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Sample records for nanocrystal nonvolatile memory

  1. Effects of Heavy Ion Exposure on Nanocrystal Nonvolatile Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Suhail, Mohammed; Kuhn, Peter; Prinz, Erwin; Kim, Hak; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    We have irradiated engineering samples of Freescale 4M nonvolatile memories with heavy ions. They use Silicon nanocrystals as the storage element, rather than the more common floating gate. The irradiations were performed using the Texas A&M University cyclotron Single Event Effects Test Facility. The chips were tested in the static mode, and in the dynamic read mode, dynamic write (program) mode, and dynamic erase mode. All the errors observed appeared to be due to single, isolated bits, even in the program and erase modes. These errors appeared to be related to the micro-dose mechanism. All the errors corresponded to the loss of electrons from a programmed cell. The underlying physical mechanisms will be discussed in more detail later. There were no errors, which could be attributed to malfunctions of the control circuits. At the highest LET used in the test (85 MeV/mg/sq cm), however, there appeared to be a failure due to gate rupture. Failure analysis is being conducted to confirm this conclusion. There was no unambiguous evidence of latchup under any test conditions. Generally, the results on the nanocrystal technology compare favorably with results on currently available commercial floating gate technology, indicating that the technology is promising for future space applications, both civilian and military.

  2. A wearable multiplexed silicon nonvolatile memory array using nanocrystal charge confinement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaemin; Son, Donghee; Lee, Mincheol; Song, Changyeong; Song, Jun-Kyul; Koo, Ja Hoon; Lee, Dong Jun; Shim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Minbaek; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for efficient charge confinement in nanocrystal floating gates to realize high-performance memory devices have been investigated intensively. However, few studies have reported nanoscale experimental validations of charge confinement in closely packed uniform nanocrystals and related device performance characterization. Furthermore, the system-level integration of the resulting devices with wearable silicon electronics has not yet been realized. We introduce a wearable, fully multiplexed silicon nonvolatile memory array with nanocrystal floating gates. The nanocrystal monolayer is assembled over a large area using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. Efficient particle-level charge confinement is verified with the modified atomic force microscopy technique. Uniform nanocrystal charge traps evidently improve the memory window margin and retention performance. Furthermore, the multiplexing of memory devices in conjunction with the amplification of sensor signals based on ultrathin silicon nanomembrane circuits in stretchable layouts enables wearable healthcare applications such as long-term data storage of monitored heart rates.

  3. A wearable multiplexed silicon nonvolatile memory array using nanocrystal charge confinement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaemin; Son, Donghee; Lee, Mincheol; Song, Changyeong; Song, Jun-Kyul; Koo, Ja Hoon; Lee, Dong Jun; Shim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Minbaek; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for efficient charge confinement in nanocrystal floating gates to realize high-performance memory devices have been investigated intensively. However, few studies have reported nanoscale experimental validations of charge confinement in closely packed uniform nanocrystals and related device performance characterization. Furthermore, the system-level integration of the resulting devices with wearable silicon electronics has not yet been realized. We introduce a wearable, fully multiplexed silicon nonvolatile memory array with nanocrystal floating gates. The nanocrystal monolayer is assembled over a large area using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. Efficient particle-level charge confinement is verified with the modified atomic force microscopy technique. Uniform nanocrystal charge traps evidently improve the memory window margin and retention performance. Furthermore, the multiplexing of memory devices in conjunction with the amplification of sensor signals based on ultrathin silicon nanomembrane circuits in stretchable layouts enables wearable healthcare applications such as long-term data storage of monitored heart rates. PMID:26763827

  4. A wearable multiplexed silicon nonvolatile memory array using nanocrystal charge confinement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaemin; Son, Donghee; Lee, Mincheol; Song, Changyeong; Song, Jun-Kyul; Koo, Ja Hoon; Lee, Dong Jun; Shim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Minbaek; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for efficient charge confinement in nanocrystal floating gates to realize high-performance memory devices have been investigated intensively. However, few studies have reported nanoscale experimental validations of charge confinement in closely packed uniform nanocrystals and related device performance characterization. Furthermore, the system-level integration of the resulting devices with wearable silicon electronics has not yet been realized. We introduce a wearable, fully multiplexed silicon nonvolatile memory array with nanocrystal floating gates. The nanocrystal monolayer is assembled over a large area using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. Efficient particle-level charge confinement is verified with the modified atomic force microscopy technique. Uniform nanocrystal charge traps evidently improve the memory window margin and retention performance. Furthermore, the multiplexing of memory devices in conjunction with the amplification of sensor signals based on ultrathin silicon nanomembrane circuits in stretchable layouts enables wearable healthcare applications such as long-term data storage of monitored heart rates. PMID:26763827

  5. Non-Volatile Flash Memory Characteristics of Tetralayer Nickel-Germanide Nanocrystals Embedded Structure.

    PubMed

    Panda, D; Panda, M

    2016-01-01

    Formation of tetralayer memory structure having nickel-germanide nanocrystals using a Ge/Ni multilayers is proposed. X-ray diffraction study shows the NiGe (002) phase formation after proper annealing. Cross sectional HRTEM clearly shows the sharpness and the size (~4-6 nm) of the stacked nanocrystals embedded in the oxide matrix. A large anti-clockwise hysteresis memory win- dow of 13.4 Volt at ± 15 Volt is observed for the optimized samples. This large memory window indicates for the MLC applications. Frequency independent C-V curve confirms about the charge storage in the nanocrystals. A good charge retention and endurance characteristics are exhibited upto 125 °C for the nonvolatile memory application. PMID:27398590

  6. Scaling dependence of memory windows and different carrier charging behaviors in Si nanocrystal nonvolatile memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Chen, Kun-ji; Ma, Zhong-yuan; Zhang, Xin-xin; Jiang, Xiao-fan; Wu, Yang-qing; Huang, Xin-fan; Oda, Shunri

    2016-09-01

    Based on the charge storage mode, it is important to investigate the scaling dependence of memory performance in silicon nanocrystal (Si-NC) nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices for its scaling down limit. In this work, we made eight kinds of test key cells with different gate widths and lengths by 0.13-μm node complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. It is found that the memory windows of eight kinds of test key cells are almost the same of about 1.64 V @ ± 7 V/1 ms, which are independent of the gate area, but mainly determined by the average size (12 nm) and areal density (1.8 × 1011/cm2) of Si-NCs. The program/erase (P/E) speed characteristics are almost independent of gate widths and lengths. However, the erase speed is faster than the program speed of test key cells, which is due to the different charging behaviors between electrons and holes during the operation processes. Furthermore, the data retention characteristic is also independent of the gate area. Our findings are useful for further scaling down of Si-NC NVM devices to improve the performance and on-chip integration. Project supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2010CB934402) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374153, 61571221, and 61071008).

  7. A Radiation-Tolerant, Low-Power Non-Volatile Memory Based on Silicon Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.; Boer, E. A.; Ostraat, M. L.; Brongersma, M. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Atwater, H. A.; deBlauwe, J.; Green, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Nanocrystal nonvolatile floating-gate memories are a good candidate for space applications - initial results suggest they are fast, more reliable and consume less power than conventional floating gate memories. In the nanocrystal based NVM device, charge is not stored on a continuous polysilicon layer (so-called floating gate), but instead on a layer of discrete nanocrystals. Charge injection and storage in dense arrays of silicon nanocrystals in SiO2 is a critical aspect of the performance of potential nanocrystal flash memory structures. The ultimate goal for this class of devices is few- or single-electron storage in a small number of nanocrystal elements. In addition, the nanocrystal layer fabrication technique should be simple, 8-inch wafer compatible and well controlled in program/erase threshold voltage swing was seen during 100,000 program and erase cycles. Additional near-term goals for this project include extensive testing for radiation hardness and the development of artificial layered tunnel barrier heterostructures which have the potential for large speed enhancements for read/write of nanocrystal memory elements, compared with conventional flash devices. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Density-controllable nonvolatile memory devices having metal nanocrystals through chemical synthesis and assembled by spin-coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangli, Wang; Yubin, Chen; Yi, Shi; Lin, Pu; Lijia, Pan; Rong, Zhang; Youdou, Zheng

    2010-12-01

    A novel two-step method is employed, for the first time, to fabricate nonvolatile memory devices that have metal nanocrystals. First, size-averaged Au nanocrystals are synthesized chemically; second, they are assembled into memory devices by a spin-coating technique at room temperature. This attractive approach makes it possible to tailor the diameter and control the density of nanocrystals individually. In addition, processes at room temperature prevent Au diffusion, which is a main concern for the application of metal nanocrystal-based memory. The experimental results, both the morphology characterization and the electrical measurements, reveal that there is an optimum density of nanocrystal monolayer to balance between long data retention and a large hysteresis memory window. At the same time, density-controllable devices could also feed the preferential emphasis on either memory window or retention time. All these facts confirm the advantages and novelty of our two-step method.

  9. Formation of Ru nanocrystals by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition for nonvolatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Moon-Sang; Kim, Ki-Su; Kim, Ki-Bum

    2006-08-28

    The formation of Ru nanocrystals is demonstrated on a SiO{sub 2} substrate by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition using diethylcyclopentadienyl ruthenium and NH{sub 3} plasma. The island growth of Ru was observed at the initial stages of the film formation up to a nominal thickness of 11.1 nm. A maximum Ru nanocrystal spatial density of 9.7x10{sup 11} /cm{sup 2} was achieved with an average size of 3.5 nm and standard deviation of the size of 20%. Electron charging/discharging effect in the Ru nanocrystals is demonstrated by measuring the flatband voltage shift in the capacitance-voltage measurement of metal-oxide-semiconductor memory capacitor structure.

  10. Oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation treatment to enhance data retention of tungsten nanocrystal nonvolatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jer-Chyi Chang, Wei-Cheng; Lai, Chao-Sung; Chang, Li-Chun; Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa

    2014-03-15

    Data retention characteristics of tungsten nanocrystal (W-NC) memory devices using an oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment are investigated. With an increase of oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time, the capacitance–voltage hysteresis memory window is increased but the data retention characteristics become degraded. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that this poor data retention is a result of plasma damage on the tunneling oxide layer, which can be prevented by lowering the bias voltage to 7 kV. In addition, by using the elevated temperature retention measurement technique, the effective charge trapping level of the WO{sub 3} film surrounding the W-NCs can be extracted. This measurement reveals that a higher oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time induces more shallow traps within the WO{sub 3} film, degrading the retention behavior of the W-NC memory.

  11. Superior endurance performance of nonvolatile memory devices based on discrete storage in surface-nitrided Si nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Chen, Kunji; Ma, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Xinxin; Jiang, Xiaofan; Huang, Xinfan; Zhang, Yongxing; Wang, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    The surface-nitrided silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) floating gate nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices were fabricated by 0.13 μm node CMOS technology. The surface-nitrided Si-NCs were formed in-situ by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition and followed by nitridation treatment in NH3 ambient. It is found that the nitridation treatment not only enhances the control effect of gate voltage on channel carriers by passivation of the Si-NCs surface defects but also suppresses releasing of the stored carriers among the neighboring Si-NCs and leakage from Si-NCs to channel through the tunneling oxide by a silicon nitride cover layer acted as potential barrier. Consequently, the storage carriers are fully discrete in the Si-NCs, which are different from that in the conventional poly-crystal Si or SONOS floating gate NVM devices. The surface-nitrided Si-NCs NVM devices show lower subthreshold swing value of 0.13 V/decade, faster P/E speed characteristics of 1 μs at ±7 V, and good retention characteristics at room temperature. Furthermore, due to the improvement of the tunneling oxide quality by nitridation treatment, the stable memory window of 1.7 V has been kept after 107 P/E cycles, showing superior endurance characteristics with the good retention characteristics. Our fabrication of surface-nitrided Si-NCs floating gate NVM is compatible with the standard CMOS technology, which may be employed in the 3-D NAND technology to further improve the device performance.

  12. Nonvolatile Memory Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Irom, Farokh; Friendlich, Mark; Nguyen, Duc; Kim, Hak; Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews several forms of nonvolatile memory for use in space applications. The intent is to: (1) Determine inherent radiation tolerance and sensitivities, (2) Identify challenges for future radiation hardening efforts, (3) Investigate new failure modes and effects, and technology modeling programs. Testing includes total dose, single event (proton, laser, heavy ion), and proton damage (where appropriate). Test vehicles are expected to be a variety of non-volatile memory devices as available including Flash (NAND and NOR), Charge Trap, Nanocrystal Flash, Magnetic Memory (MRAM), Phase Change--Chalcogenide, (CRAM), Ferroelectric (FRAM), CNT, and Resistive RAM.

  13. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO{sub 2} layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M.; Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F.; Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E.; Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A.

    2013-12-16

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO{sub 2} films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories.

  14. Nonvolatile Analog Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A nonvolatile analog memory uses pairs of ferroelectric field effect transistors (FFETs). Each pair is defined by a first FFET and a second FFET. When an analog value is to be stored in one of the pairs, the first FFET has a saturation voltage applied thereto, and the second FFET has a storage voltage applied thereto that is indicative of the analog value. The saturation and storage voltages decay over time in accordance with a known decay function that is used to recover the original analog value when the pair of FFETs is read.

  15. Nonvolatile random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A nonvolatile magnetic random access memory can be achieved by an array of magnet-Hall effect (M-H) elements. The storage function is realized with a rectangular thin-film ferromagnetic material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and inplane bipolar remanent magnetization states. The thin-film magnetic element is magnetized by a local applied field, whose direction is used to form either a 0 or 1 state. The element remains in the 0 or 1 state until a switching field is applied to change its state. The stored information is detcted by a Hall-effect sensor which senses the fringing field from the magnetic storage element. The circuit design for addressing each cell includes transistor switches for providing a current of selected polarity to store a binary digit through a separate conductor overlying the magnetic element of the cell. To read out a stored binary digit, transistor switches are employed to provide a current through a row of Hall-effect sensors connected in series and enabling a differential voltage amplifier connected to all Hall-effect sensors of a column in series. To avoid read-out voltage errors due to shunt currents through resistive loads of the Hall-effect sensors of other cells in the same column, at least one transistor switch is provided between every pair of adjacent cells in every row which are not turned on except in the row of the selected cell.

  16. CF{sub 4} plasma treatment on nanostructure band engineered Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-nanocrystal nonvolatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jer-Chyi; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2011-03-15

    The effects of CF{sub 4} plasma treatment on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystal (NC) memory were investigated. For material analysis, secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were performed to characterize the fluorine depth profile of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC film. In addition, an UV-visible spectrophotometer was used to obtain the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} bandgap and analyzed to suggest the modified structure of the energy band. Moreover, the electrical properties, including the memory window, program/erase speed, charge retention, and endurance characteristics were significantly improved depending on the CF{sub 4} plasma treatment conditions. This can be explained by the physical model based on the built-in electric field in the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructure. However, it was observed that too much CF{sub 4} plasma caused large surface roughness induced by the plasma damage, leading to characteristics degradation. It was concluded that with suitable CF{sub 4} plasma treatment, this Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC memory can be applied to future nonvolatile memory applications.

  17. Light-bias coupling erase process for non-volatile zinc tin oxide TFT memory with a nickel nanocrystals charge trap layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jeng-Ting; Liu, Li-Chih; Ke, Po-Hsien; Chen, Jen-Sue; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2016-03-01

    A nonvolatile charge trapping memory is demonstrated on a thin film transistor (TFT) using a solution processed ultra-thin (~7 nm) zinc tin oxide (ZTO) semiconductor layer with an Al2O3/Ni-nanocrystals (NCs)/SiO2 dielectric stack. A positive threshold voltage (V TH) shift of 7 V is achieved at gate programming voltage of 40 V for 1 s but the state will not be erased by applying negative gate voltage. However, the programmed V TH shift can be expediently erased by applying a gate voltage of  -10 V in conjunction with visible light illumination for 1 s. It is found that the sub-threshold swing (SS) deteriorates slightly under light illumination, indicating that photo-ionized oxygen vacancies (V\\text{o}+ and/or V\\text{o}++ ) are trapped at the interface between Al2O3 and ZTO, which assists the capture of electrons discharged from the Ni NCs charge trapping layer. The light-bias coupling action and the role of ultra-thin ZTO thickness are discussed to elucidate the efficient erasing mechanism.

  18. A multilevel nonvolatile magnetoelectric memory

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianxin; Cong, Junzhuang; Shang, Dashan; Chai, Yisheng; Shen, Shipeng; Zhai, Kun; Sun, Young

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence and coupling between magnetization and electric polarization in multiferroic materials provide extra degrees of freedom for creating next-generation memory devices. A variety of concepts of multiferroic or magnetoelectric memories have been proposed and explored in the past decade. Here we propose a new principle to realize a multilevel nonvolatile memory based on the multiple states of the magnetoelectric coefficient (α) of multiferroics. Because the states of α depends on the relative orientation between magnetization and polarization, one can reach different levels of α by controlling the ratio of up and down ferroelectric domains with external electric fields. Our experiments in a device made of the PMN-PT/Terfenol-D multiferroic heterostructure confirm that the states of α can be well controlled between positive and negative by applying selective electric fields. Consequently, two-level, four-level, and eight-level nonvolatile memory devices are demonstrated at room temperature. This kind of multilevel magnetoelectric memory retains all the advantages of ferroelectric random access memory but overcomes the drawback of destructive reading of polarization. In contrast, the reading of α is nondestructive and highly efficient in a parallel way, with an independent reading coil shared by all the memory cells. PMID:27681812

  19. Analog Nonvolatile Computer Memory Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd

    2007-01-01

    In nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) circuits of a proposed type, digital data would be stored in analog form in ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FFETs). This type of memory circuit would offer advantages over prior volatile and nonvolatile types: In a conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor static RAM, six transistors must be used to store one bit, and storage is volatile in that data are lost when power is turned off. In a conventional dynamic RAM, three transistors must be used to store one bit, and the stored bit must be refreshed every few milliseconds. In contrast, in a RAM according to the proposal, data would be retained when power was turned off, each memory cell would contain only two FFETs, and the cell could store multiple bits (the exact number of bits depending on the specific design). Conventional flash memory circuits afford nonvolatile storage, but they operate at reading and writing times of the order of thousands of conventional computer memory reading and writing times and, hence, are suitable for use only as off-line storage devices. In addition, flash memories cease to function after limited numbers of writing cycles. The proposed memory circuits would not be subject to either of these limitations. Prior developmental nonvolatile ferroelectric memories are limited to one bit per cell, whereas, as stated above, the proposed memories would not be so limited. The design of a memory circuit according to the proposal must reflect the fact that FFET storage is only partly nonvolatile, in that the signal stored in an FFET decays gradually over time. (Retention times of some advanced FFETs exceed ten years.) Instead of storing a single bit of data as either a positively or negatively saturated state in a ferroelectric device, each memory cell according to the proposal would store two values. The two FFETs in each cell would be denoted the storage FFET and the control FFET. The storage FFET would store an analog signal value

  20. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOEpatents

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  1. Charge trapping characteristics of Au nanocrystals embedded in remote plasma atomic layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film as the tunnel and blocking oxides for nonvolatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaesang; Kim, Hyungchul; Park, Taeyong; Ko, Youngbin; Ryu, Jaehun; Jeon, Heeyoung; Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2012-01-15

    Remote plasma atomic layer deposited (RPALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were investigated to apply as tunnel and blocking layers in the metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor memory utilizing Au nanocrystals (NCs) for nonvolatile memory applications. The interface stability of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film deposited by RPALD was studied to observe the effects of remote plasma on the interface. The interface formed during RPALD process has high oxidation states such as Si{sup +3} and Si{sup +4}, indicating that RPALD process can grow more stable interface which has a small amount of fixed oxide trap charge. The significant memory characteristics were also observed in this memory device through the electrical measurement. The memory device exhibited a relatively large memory window of 5.6 V under a 10/-10 V program/erase voltage and also showed the relatively fast programming/erasing speed and a competitive retention characteristic after 10{sup 4} s. These results indicate that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited via RPALD can be applied as the tunnel and blocking oxides for next-generation flash memory devices.

  2. Nonvolatile Ionic Two-Terminal Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual solid-state memory device nonvolatile and erasable and has only two terminals. Proposed device based on two effects: thermal phase transition and reversible intercalation of ions. Transfer of sodium ions between source of ions and electrical switching element increases or decreases electrical conductance of element, turning switch "on" or "off". Used in digital computers and neural-network computers. In neural networks, many small, densely packed switches function as erasable, nonvolatile synaptic elements.

  3. Non-volatile memory for checkpoint storage

    SciTech Connect

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Cipolla, Thomas M.; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Ohmacht, Martin; Takken, Todd E.

    2014-07-22

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in high performance parallel computing systems and storing of checkpoint data to a non-volatile memory storage device. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity. In one embodiment, the non-volatile memory is a pluggable flash memory card.

  4. Nonvolatile Rad-Hard Holographic Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Zhou, Han-Ying; Reyes, George; Dragoi, Danut; Hanna, Jay

    2001-01-01

    We are investigating a nonvolatile radiation-hardened (rad-hard) holographic memory technology. Recently, a compact holographic data storage (CHDS) breadboard utilizing an innovative electro-optic scanner has been built and demonstrated for high-speed holographic data storage and retrieval. The successful integration of this holographic memory breadboard has paved the way for follow-on radiation resistance test of the photorefractive (PR) crystal, Fe:LiNbO3. We have also started the investigation of using two-photon PR crystals that are doubly doped with atoms of iron group (Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu) and of rare-earth group (Nd, Tb) for nonvolatile holographic recordings.

  5. Overview of emerging nonvolatile memory technologies.

    PubMed

    Meena, Jagan Singh; Sze, Simon Min; Chand, Umesh; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory technologies in Si-based electronics date back to the 1990s. Ferroelectric field-effect transistor (FeFET) was one of the most promising devices replacing the conventional Flash memory facing physical scaling limitations at those times. A variant of charge storage memory referred to as Flash memory is widely used in consumer electronic products such as cell phones and music players while NAND Flash-based solid-state disks (SSDs) are increasingly displacing hard disk drives as the primary storage device in laptops, desktops, and even data centers. The integration limit of Flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional Flash memories have been proposed. Emerging memory technologies promise new memories to store more data at less cost than the expensive-to-build silicon chips used by popular consumer gadgets including digital cameras, cell phones and portable music players. They are being investigated and lead to the future as potential alternatives to existing memories in future computing systems. Emerging nonvolatile memory technologies such as magnetic random-access memory (MRAM), spin-transfer torque random-access memory (STT-RAM), ferroelectric random-access memory (FeRAM), phase-change memory (PCM), and resistive random-access memory (RRAM) combine the speed of static random-access memory (SRAM), the density of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), and the nonvolatility of Flash memory and so become very attractive as another possibility for future memory hierarchies. Many other new classes of emerging memory technologies such as transparent and plastic, three-dimensional (3-D), and quantum dot memory technologies have also gained tremendous popularity in recent years. Subsequently, not an exaggeration to say that computer memory could soon earn the ultimate commercial validation for commercial scale-up and production the cheap plastic knockoff. Therefore, this review is devoted to the rapidly developing new

  6. Overview of emerging nonvolatile memory technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory technologies in Si-based electronics date back to the 1990s. Ferroelectric field-effect transistor (FeFET) was one of the most promising devices replacing the conventional Flash memory facing physical scaling limitations at those times. A variant of charge storage memory referred to as Flash memory is widely used in consumer electronic products such as cell phones and music players while NAND Flash-based solid-state disks (SSDs) are increasingly displacing hard disk drives as the primary storage device in laptops, desktops, and even data centers. The integration limit of Flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional Flash memories have been proposed. Emerging memory technologies promise new memories to store more data at less cost than the expensive-to-build silicon chips used by popular consumer gadgets including digital cameras, cell phones and portable music players. They are being investigated and lead to the future as potential alternatives to existing memories in future computing systems. Emerging nonvolatile memory technologies such as magnetic random-access memory (MRAM), spin-transfer torque random-access memory (STT-RAM), ferroelectric random-access memory (FeRAM), phase-change memory (PCM), and resistive random-access memory (RRAM) combine the speed of static random-access memory (SRAM), the density of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), and the nonvolatility of Flash memory and so become very attractive as another possibility for future memory hierarchies. Many other new classes of emerging memory technologies such as transparent and plastic, three-dimensional (3-D), and quantum dot memory technologies have also gained tremendous popularity in recent years. Subsequently, not an exaggeration to say that computer memory could soon earn the ultimate commercial validation for commercial scale-up and production the cheap plastic knockoff. Therefore, this review is devoted to the rapidly developing new

  7. SONOS Nonvolatile Memory Cell Programming Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Phillips, Thomas A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile memory is gaining favor over conventional EEPROM FLASH memory technology. This paper characterizes the SONOS write operation using a nonquasi-static MOSFET model. This includes floating gate charge and voltage characteristics as well as tunneling current, voltage threshold and drain current characterization. The characterization of the SONOS memory cell predicted by the model closely agrees with experimental data obtained from actual SONOS memory cells. The tunnel current, drain current, threshold voltage and read drain current all closely agreed with empirical data.

  8. Black phosphorus nonvolatile transistor memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dain; Choi, Yongsuk; Hwang, Euyheon; Kang, Moon Sung; Lee, Seungwoo; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2016-04-28

    We demonstrated nanofloating gate transistor memory devices (NFGTMs) using mechanically-exfoliated few-layered black phosphorus (BP) channels and gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) charge trapping layers. The resulting BP-NFGTMs exhibited excellent memory performances, including the five-level data storage, large memory window (58.2 V), stable retention (10(4) s), and cyclic endurance (1000 cycles). PMID:27074903

  9. Nonvolatile Memory Based on Nonlinear Magnetoelectric Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jianxin; Cong, Junzhuang; Chai, Yisheng; Shang, Dashan; Shen, Shipeng; Zhai, Kun; Tian, Ying; Sun, Young

    2016-08-01

    The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroics have a great potential in creating next-generation memory devices. We use an alternative concept of nonvolatile memory based, on a type of nonlinear magnetoelectric effects showing a butterfly-shaped hysteresis loop. The principle is to utilize the states of the magnetoelectric coefficient, instead of magnetization, electric polarization, or resistance, to store binary information. Our experiments in a device made of the PMN-PT/Terfenol-D multiferroic heterostructure clearly demonstrate that the sign of the magnetoelectric coefficient can be repeatedly switched between positive and negative by applying electric fields, confirming the feasibility of this principle. This kind of nonvolatile memory has outstanding practical virtues such as simple structure, easy operation in writing and reading, low power, fast speed, and diverse materials available.

  10. Black phosphorus nonvolatile transistor memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dain; Choi, Yongsuk; Hwang, Euyheon; Kang, Moon Sung; Lee, Seungwoo; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrated nanofloating gate transistor memory devices (NFGTMs) using mechanically-exfoliated few-layered black phosphorus (BP) channels and gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) charge trapping layers. The resulting BP-NFGTMs exhibited excellent memory performances, including the five-level data storage, large memory window (58.2 V), stable retention (104 s), and cyclic endurance (1000 cycles).We demonstrated nanofloating gate transistor memory devices (NFGTMs) using mechanically-exfoliated few-layered black phosphorus (BP) channels and gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) charge trapping layers. The resulting BP-NFGTMs exhibited excellent memory performances, including the five-level data storage, large memory window (58.2 V), stable retention (104 s), and cyclic endurance (1000 cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02078j

  11. Non-volatile magnetic random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Improvements are made in a non-volatile magnetic random access memory. Such a memory is comprised of an array of unit cells, each having a Hall-effect sensor and a thin-film magnetic element made of material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and in-plane, bipolar remanent magnetization states. The Hall-effect sensor is made more sensitive by using a 1 m thick molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs layer on a silicon substrate by employing a GaAs/AlGaAs/InAlAs superlattice buffering layer. One improvement avoids current shunting problems of matrix architecture. Another improvement reduces the required magnetizing current for the micromagnets. Another improvement relates to the use of GaAs technology wherein high electron-mobility GaAs MESFETs provide faster switching times. Still another improvement relates to a method for configuring the invention as a three-dimensional random access memory.

  12. Nonvolatile memory behavior of nanocrystalline cellulose/graphene oxide composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, L. Cardinali, M.; Fortunati, E.; Kenny, J. M.

    2014-10-13

    With the continuous advance of modern electronics, the demand for nonvolatile memory cells rapidly grows. In order to develop post-silicon electronic devices, it is necessary to find innovative solutions to the eco-sustainability problem of materials for nonvolatile memory cells. In this work, we realized a resistive memory device based on graphene oxide (GO) and GO/cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) thin films. Aqueous solutions of GO and GO with CNC have been prepared and drop cast between two metal electrodes. Such thin-film based devices showed a transition between low and high conductivity states upon the forward and backward sweeping of an external electric field. This reversible current density transition behavior demonstrates a typical memory characteristic. The obtained results open an easy route for electronic information storage based on the integration of nanocrystalline cellulose onto graphene based devices.

  13. Cellulose Nanofiber Paper as an Ultra Flexible Nonvolatile Memory

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuki; Koga, Hirotaka; Celano, Umberto; Zhuge, Fuwei; Kanai, Masaki; Rahong, Sakon; Meng, Gang; He, Yong; De Boeck, Jo; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Kitaoka, Takuya; Nogi, Masaya; Yanagida, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    On the development of flexible electronics, a highly flexible nonvolatile memory, which is an important circuit component for the portability, is necessary. However, the flexibility of existing nonvolatile memory has been limited, e.g. the smallest radius into which can be bent has been millimeters range, due to the difficulty in maintaining memory properties while bending. Here we propose the ultra flexible resistive nonvolatile memory using Ag-decorated cellulose nanofiber paper (CNP). The Ag-decorated CNP devices showed the stable nonvolatile memory effects with 6 orders of ON/OFF resistance ratio and the small standard deviation of switching voltage distribution. The memory performance of CNP devices can be maintained without any degradation when being bent down to the radius of 350 μm, which is the smallest value compared to those of existing any flexible nonvolatile memories. Thus the present device using abundant and mechanically flexible CNP offers a highly flexible nonvolatile memory for portable flexible electronics. PMID:24985164

  14. Radiation and Reliability Concerns for Modern Nonvolatile Memory Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Friendlich, Mark R.; Kim, Hak S.; Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Buchner, S. P.; McMorrow, D.; Mavis, D. G.; Eaton, P. H.; Castillo, J.

    2011-01-01

    Commercial nonvolatile memory technology is attractive for space applications, but radiation issues are serious concerns. In addition, we discuss combined radiation/reliability concerns which are only beginning to be addressed.

  15. Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2000: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings for the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2000 that was held on November 15-16, 2000 in Arlington, Virginia. The proceedings contains a wide range of papers that cover the presentations of myriad advances in the nonvolatile memory technology during the recent past including memory cell design, simulations, radiation environment, and emerging memory technologies. The papers presented in the proceedings address the design challenges and applications and deals with newer, emerging memory technologies as well as related issues of radiation environment and die packaging.

  16. EDITORIAL: Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei; Yang, J. Joshua; Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Non-volatile memory refers to the crucial ability of computers to store information once the power source has been removed. Traditionally this has been achieved through flash, magnetic computer storage and optical discs, and in the case of very early computers paper tape and punched cards. While computers have advanced considerably from paper and punched card memory devices, there are still limits to current non-volatile memory devices that restrict them to use as secondary storage from which data must be loaded and carefully saved when power is shut off. Denser, faster, low-energy non-volatile memory is highly desired and nanostructures are the critical enabler. This special issue on non-volatile memory based on nanostructures describes some of the new physics and technology that may revolutionise future computers. Phase change random access memory, which exploits the reversible phase change between crystalline and amorphous states, also holds potential for future memory devices. The chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a promising material in this field because it combines a high activation energy for crystallization and a relatively low crystallization temperature, as well as a low melting temperature and low conductivity, which accommodates localized heating. Doping is often used to lower the current required to activate the phase change or 'reset' GST but this often aggravates other problems. Now researchers in Korea report in-depth studies of SiO2-doped GST and identify ways of optimising the material's properties for phase-change random access memory [1]. Resistance switching is an area that has attracted a particularly high level of interest for non-volatile memory technology, and a great deal of research has focused on the potential of TiO2 as a model system in this respect. Researchers at HP labs in the US have made notable progress in this field, and among the work reported in this special issue they describe means to control the switch resistance and show

  17. Method for refreshing a non-volatile memory

    DOEpatents

    Riekels, James E.; Schlesinger, Samuel

    2008-11-04

    A non-volatile memory and a method of refreshing a memory are described. The method includes allowing an external system to control refreshing operations within the memory. The memory may generate a refresh request signal and transmit the refresh request signal to the external system. When the external system finds an available time to process the refresh request, the external system acknowledges the refresh request and transmits a refresh acknowledge signal to the memory. The memory may also comprise a page register for reading and rewriting a data state back to the memory. The page register may comprise latches in lieu of supplemental non-volatile storage elements, thereby conserving real estate within the memory.

  18. SONOS technology for commercial and military nonvolatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Farrell, P.; Jacunski, M.; Williams, D.; Jakubczak, J.; Knoll, M.; Murray, J.

    Silicon Oxide Nitride Oxide Semiconductor (SONOS) technology is well suited for military and commercial nonvolatile memory applications. Excellent long term memory retention, radiation hardness, and endurance has been demonstrated with this technology. This paper summarizes our data in these areas for SONOS technology.

  19. EDITORIAL: Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei; Yang, J. Joshua; Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Non-volatile memory refers to the crucial ability of computers to store information once the power source has been removed. Traditionally this has been achieved through flash, magnetic computer storage and optical discs, and in the case of very early computers paper tape and punched cards. While computers have advanced considerably from paper and punched card memory devices, there are still limits to current non-volatile memory devices that restrict them to use as secondary storage from which data must be loaded and carefully saved when power is shut off. Denser, faster, low-energy non-volatile memory is highly desired and nanostructures are the critical enabler. This special issue on non-volatile memory based on nanostructures describes some of the new physics and technology that may revolutionise future computers. Phase change random access memory, which exploits the reversible phase change between crystalline and amorphous states, also holds potential for future memory devices. The chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a promising material in this field because it combines a high activation energy for crystallization and a relatively low crystallization temperature, as well as a low melting temperature and low conductivity, which accommodates localized heating. Doping is often used to lower the current required to activate the phase change or 'reset' GST but this often aggravates other problems. Now researchers in Korea report in-depth studies of SiO2-doped GST and identify ways of optimising the material's properties for phase-change random access memory [1]. Resistance switching is an area that has attracted a particularly high level of interest for non-volatile memory technology, and a great deal of research has focused on the potential of TiO2 as a model system in this respect. Researchers at HP labs in the US have made notable progress in this field, and among the work reported in this special issue they describe means to control the switch resistance and show

  20. Non-volatile memory based on the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; You, Lu; Zhou, Yang; Shiuh Lim, Zhi; Zou, Xi; Chen, Lang; Ramesh, R.; Wang, Junling

    2013-01-01

    The quest for a solid state universal memory with high-storage density, high read/write speed, random access and non-volatility has triggered intense research into new materials and novel device architectures. Though the non-volatile memory market is dominated by flash memory now, it has very low operation speed with ~10 μs programming and ~10 ms erasing time. Furthermore, it can only withstand ~105 rewriting cycles, which prevents it from becoming the universal memory. Here we demonstrate that the significant photovoltaic effect of a ferroelectric material, such as BiFeO3 with a band gap in the visible range, can be used to sense the polarization direction non-destructively in a ferroelectric memory. A prototype 16-cell memory based on the cross-bar architecture has been prepared and tested, demonstrating the feasibility of this technique. PMID:23756366

  1. Non-volatile memory based on the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; You, Lu; Zhou, Yang; Shiuh Lim, Zhi; Zou, Xi; Chen, Lang; Ramesh, R.; Wang, Junling

    2013-06-01

    The quest for a solid state universal memory with high-storage density, high read/write speed, random access and non-volatility has triggered intense research into new materials and novel device architectures. Though the non-volatile memory market is dominated by flash memory now, it has very low operation speed with ~10 μs programming and ~10 ms erasing time. Furthermore, it can only withstand ~105 rewriting cycles, which prevents it from becoming the universal memory. Here we demonstrate that the significant photovoltaic effect of a ferroelectric material, such as BiFeO3 with a band gap in the visible range, can be used to sense the polarization direction non-destructively in a ferroelectric memory. A prototype 16-cell memory based on the cross-bar architecture has been prepared and tested, demonstrating the feasibility of this technique.

  2. Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2001: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh; Daud, Taher; Strauss, Karl

    2001-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings for the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2001 that was held on November 7-8, 2001 in San Diego, CA. The proceedings contains a a wide range of papers that cover current and new memory technologies including Flash memories, Magnetic Random Access Memories (MRAM and GMRAM), Ferro-electric RAM (FeRAM), and Chalcogenide RAM (CRAM). The papers presented in the proceedings address the use of these technologies for space applications as well as radiation effects and packaging issues.

  3. Characterization of an Autonomous Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Memory Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Caroline S.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Evans, Joe; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the electrical characterization of an autonomous non-volatile ferroelectric memory latch using the principle that when an electric field is applied to a ferroelectriccapacitor,the positive and negative remnant polarization charge states of the capacitor are denoted as either data 0 or data 1. The properties of the ferroelectric material to store an electric polarization in the absence of an electric field make the device non-volatile. Further the memory latch is autonomous as it operates with the ground, power and output node connections, without any externally clocked control line. The unique quality of this latch circuit is that it can be written when powered off. The advantages of this latch over flash memories are: a) It offers unlimited reads/writes b) works on symmetrical read/write cycles. c) The latch is asynchronous. The circuit was initially developed by Radiant Technologies Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  4. Titanium oxide nonvolatile memory device and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    In recent years, the semiconductor memory industry has seen an ever-increasing demand for nonvolatile memory (NVM), which is fueled by portable consumer electronic applications like the mobile phone and MP3 player. FLASH memory has been the most widely used nonvolatile memories in these systems, and has successfully kept up with CMOS scaling for many generations. However, as FLASH memory faces major scaling challenges beyond 22nm, non-charge-based nonvolatile memories are widely researched as candidates to replace FLASH. Titanium oxide (TiOx) nonvolatile memory device is considered to be a promising choice due to its controllable nonvolatile memory switching, good scalability, compatibility with CMOS processing and potential for 3D stacking. However, several major issues need to be overcome before TiOx NVM device can be adopted in manufacturing. First, there exists a highly undesirable high-voltage stress initiation process (FORMING) before the device can switch between high and low resistance states repeatedly. By analyzing the conductive behaviors of the memory device before and after FORMING, we propose that FORMING involves breaking down an interfacial layer between its Pt electrode and the TiOx thin film, and that FORMING is not needed if the Pt-TiOx interface can be kept clean during fabrication. An in-situ fabrication process is developed for cross-point TiOx NVM device, which enables in-situ deposition of the critical layers of the memory device and thus achieves clean interfaces between Pt electrodes and TiOx film. Testing results show that FORMING is indeed eliminated for memory devices made with the in-situ fabrication process. It verifies the significance of in-situ deposition without vacuum break in the fabrication of TiOx NVM devices. Switching parameters statistics of TiOx NVM devices are studied and compared for unipolar and bipolar switching modes. RESET mechanisms are found to be different for the two switching modes: unipolar switching can be

  5. Nonvolatile organic transistor memory devices based on nanostructured polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mau-Shen; Lu, Chien; Li, Meng-Hsien; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2014-10-01

    We report the characteristics of ferroelectric field effect transistor (FeFET) nonvolatile flash memory devices using aligned P(VDF-TrFE) electrospun nanofibers as the dielectric layer. These FeFET devices showed reliable memory behaviors and memory window proportional to the quantity of aligned nanofibers containing the ferroelectric β-phase crystalline domain. Moreover, the FeFET devices using nanofibers exhibited the long-term stability in the data retention larger than 104 s with the ON/OFF ratio of ~103, and the multiple switching operation stability up to 100 cycles.

  6. Remarkable charge-trapping performance based in Zr0.5Hf0.5O2 with nanocrystal Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 blocking layer for nonvolatile memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. B.; Jia, X. L.; Yang, T.; Zhao, J. H.; Li, Y. C.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Two kinds of charge trapping memory device with Au/Zr0.5Hf0.5O2(ZHO)/SiO2/p-Si and Au/Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3(BST)/Zr0.5Hf0.5O2/SiO2/p-Si structure were fabricated and investigated. The double BST/ZHO films exhibit a larger memory window of 7.36 V under ±14 V sweeping voltages in its C-V curve and the device has good charge retention properties with only small charge loss of ∼ 5% after more than 104 s. The good characteristics are attributed to the inter-diffusion between BST and ZHO where more deep defect sites were created after RTA treatment, which provides high potential barriers for the trapped charges to tunnel back to the silicon substrate. Furthermore, the nanocrystal in the BST layer increases the tunneling barrier of tunneling current into the gate and effectively restrains the leakage of storage charge from blocking layer, which improves the charge retention characteristic.

  7. Integrated photonics with programmable non-volatile memory.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-Feng; Luo, Xian-Shu; Lim, Andy Eu-Jin; Li, Chao; Fang, Qing; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Jia, Lian-Xi; Tu, Xiao-Guang; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Hai-Feng; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics integrated circuits (Si-PIC) with well-established active and passive building elements are progressing towards large-scale commercialization in optical communications and high speed optical interconnects applications. However, current Si-PICs do not have memory capabilities, in particular, the non-volatile memory functionality for energy efficient data storage. Here, we propose an electrically programmable, multi-level non-volatile photonics memory cell (PMC) fabricated by standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible processes. A micro-ring resonator (MRR) was built using the PMC to optically read the memory states. Switching energy smaller than 20 pJ was achieved. Additionally, a MRR memory array was employed to demonstrate a four-bit memory read capacity. Theoretically, this can be increased up to ~400 times using a 100 nm free spectral range broadband light source. The fundamental concept of this design provides a route to eliminate the von Neumann bottleneck. The energy-efficient optical storage can complement on-chip optical interconnects for neutral networking, memory input/output interfaces and other computational intensive applications. PMID:26941113

  8. Integrated photonics with programmable non-volatile memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun-Feng; Luo, Xian-Shu; Lim, Andy Eu-Jin; Li, Chao; Fang, Qing; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Jia, Lian-Xi; Tu, Xiao-Guang; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Hai-Feng; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Silicon photonics integrated circuits (Si-PIC) with well-established active and passive building elements are progressing towards large-scale commercialization in optical communications and high speed optical interconnects applications. However, current Si-PICs do not have memory capabilities, in particular, the non-volatile memory functionality for energy efficient data storage. Here, we propose an electrically programmable, multi-level non-volatile photonics memory cell (PMC) fabricated by standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible processes. A micro-ring resonator (MRR) was built using the PMC to optically read the memory states. Switching energy smaller than 20 pJ was achieved. Additionally, a MRR memory array was employed to demonstrate a four-bit memory read capacity. Theoretically, this can be increased up to ~400 times using a 100 nm free spectral range broadband light source. The fundamental concept of this design provides a route to eliminate the von Neumann bottleneck. The energy-efficient optical storage can complement on-chip optical interconnects for neutral networking, memory input/output interfaces and other computational intensive applications.

  9. Integrated photonics with programmable non-volatile memory

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun-Feng; Luo, Xian-Shu; Lim, Andy Eu-Jin; Li, Chao; Fang, Qing; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Jia, Lian-Xi; Tu, Xiao-Guang; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Hai-Feng; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics integrated circuits (Si-PIC) with well-established active and passive building elements are progressing towards large-scale commercialization in optical communications and high speed optical interconnects applications. However, current Si-PICs do not have memory capabilities, in particular, the non-volatile memory functionality for energy efficient data storage. Here, we propose an electrically programmable, multi-level non-volatile photonics memory cell (PMC) fabricated by standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible processes. A micro-ring resonator (MRR) was built using the PMC to optically read the memory states. Switching energy smaller than 20 pJ was achieved. Additionally, a MRR memory array was employed to demonstrate a four-bit memory read capacity. Theoretically, this can be increased up to ~400 times using a 100 nm free spectral range broadband light source. The fundamental concept of this design provides a route to eliminate the von Neumann bottleneck. The energy-efficient optical storage can complement on-chip optical interconnects for neutral networking, memory input/output interfaces and other computational intensive applications. PMID:26941113

  10. Nonvolatile semiconductor memory having three dimension charge confinement

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L. Ralph; Osbourn, Gordon C.; Peercy, Paul S.; Weaver, Harry T.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A layered semiconductor device with a nonvolatile three dimensional memory comprises a storage channel which stores charge carriers. Charge carriers flow laterally through the storage channel from a source to a drain. Isolation material, either a Schottky barrier or a heterojunction, located in a trench of an upper layer controllably retains the charge within the a storage portion determined by the confining means. The charge is retained for a time determined by the isolation materials' nonvolatile characteristics or until a change of voltage on the isolation material and the source and drain permit a read operation. Flow of charge through an underlying sense channel is affected by the presence of charge within the storage channel, thus the presences of charge in the memory can be easily detected.

  11. Nonvolatile GaAs Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Stadler, Henry L.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan

    1994-01-01

    Proposed random-access integrated-circuit electronic memory offers nonvolatile magnetic storage. Bits stored magnetically and read out with Hall-effect sensors. Advantages include short reading and writing times and high degree of immunity to both single-event upsets and permanent damage by ionizing radiation. Use of same basic material for both transistors and sensors simplifies fabrication process, with consequent benefits in increased yield and reduced cost.

  12. Integrated, nonvolatile, high-speed analog random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention provides an integrated, non-volatile, high-speed random access memory. A magnetically switchable ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic layer is sandwiched between an electrical conductor which provides the ability to magnetize the magnetically switchable layer and a magneto resistive or Hall effect material which allows sensing the magnetic field which emanates from the magnetization of the magnetically switchable layer. By using this integrated three-layer form, the writing process, which is controlled by the conductor, is separated from the storage medium in the magnetic layer and from the readback process which is controlled by the magnetoresistive layer. A circuit for implementing the memory in CMOS or the like is disclosed.

  13. Droplet evaporation-induced ferritin self-assembled monolayer as a template for nanocrystal flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Moonjae; Choi, Hyejung; Chang, Man; Jo, Minseok; Jung, Seung-Jae; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2007-05-01

    A nonvolatile nanocrystal (NC) memory containing a ferritin core was fabricated. A ferritin monolayer was formed through a droplet evaporation technique. High-pressure hydrogen (HP-H2) annealing effectively reduced iron oxide (Fe2O3) to form conductive iron NC. In addition, HP-H2 annealing also improved memory characteristics by passivation of the interface states at Si /HfO2. The authors observed good memory characteristics, including fast program/erase (P/E) operation, a memory window of 1.75V under ±6V, and a stable memory window up to 104s at 85°C.

  14. Development of non-volatile semiconductor memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    A 256 word by 8-bit random access memory chip was developed utilizing p channel, metal gate metal-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) technology; with operational characteristics of a 2.5 microsecond read cycle, a 6.0 microsecond write cycle, 800 milliwatts of power dissipation; and retention characteristics of 10 to the 8th power read cycles before data refresh and 5000 hours of no power retention. Design changes were implemented to reduce switching currents that caused parasitic bipolar transistors inherent in the MNOS structure to turn on. Final wafer runs exhibited acceptable yields for a die 250 mils on a side. Evaluation testing was performed on the device in order to determine the maturity of the device. A fixed gate breakdown mechanism was found when operated continuously at high temperature.

  15. Highly Stretchable Non-volatile Nylon Thread Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ting-Kuo

    2016-04-01

    Integration of electronic elements into textiles, to afford e-textiles, can provide an ideal platform for the development of lightweight, thin, flexible, and stretchable e-textiles. This approach will enable us to meet the demands of the rapidly growing market of wearable-electronics on arbitrary non-conventional substrates. However the actual integration of the e-textiles that undergo mechanical deformations during both assembly and daily wear or satisfy the requirements of the low-end applications, remains a challenge. Resistive memory elements can also be fabricated onto a nylon thread (NT) for e-textile applications. In this study, a simple dip-and-dry process using graphene-PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate) ink is proposed for the fabrication of a highly stretchable non-volatile NT memory. The NT memory appears to have typical write-once-read-many-times characteristics. The results show that an ON/OFF ratio of approximately 103 is maintained for a retention time of 106 s. Furthermore, a highly stretchable strain and a long-term digital-storage capability of the ON-OFF-ON states are demonstrated in the NT memory. The actual integration of the knitted NT memories into textiles will enable new design possibilities for low-cost and large-area e-textile memory applications.

  16. Highly Stretchable Non-volatile Nylon Thread Memory

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ting-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Integration of electronic elements into textiles, to afford e-textiles, can provide an ideal platform for the development of lightweight, thin, flexible, and stretchable e-textiles. This approach will enable us to meet the demands of the rapidly growing market of wearable-electronics on arbitrary non-conventional substrates. However the actual integration of the e-textiles that undergo mechanical deformations during both assembly and daily wear or satisfy the requirements of the low-end applications, remains a challenge. Resistive memory elements can also be fabricated onto a nylon thread (NT) for e-textile applications. In this study, a simple dip-and-dry process using graphene-PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate) ink is proposed for the fabrication of a highly stretchable non-volatile NT memory. The NT memory appears to have typical write-once-read-many-times characteristics. The results show that an ON/OFF ratio of approximately 103 is maintained for a retention time of 106 s. Furthermore, a highly stretchable strain and a long-term digital-storage capability of the ON-OFF-ON states are demonstrated in the NT memory. The actual integration of the knitted NT memories into textiles will enable new design possibilities for low-cost and large-area e-textile memory applications. PMID:27072786

  17. Bioorganic nanodots for non-volatile memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Amdursky, Nadav; Shalev, Gil; Handelman, Amir; Natan, Amir; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Litsyn, Simon; Szwarcman, Daniel; Rosenman, Gil; Roizin, Yakov

    2013-12-01

    In recent years we are witnessing an intensive integration of bio-organic nanomaterials in electronic devices. Here we show that the diphenylalanine bio-molecule can self-assemble into tiny peptide nanodots (PNDs) of ∼2 nm size, and can be embedded into metal-oxide-semiconductor devices as charge storage nanounits in non-volatile memory. For that purpose, we first directly observe the crystallinity of a single PND by electron microscopy. We use these nanocrystalline PNDs units for the formation of a dense monolayer on SiO{sub 2} surface, and study the electron/hole trapping mechanisms and charge retention ability of the monolayer, followed by fabrication of PND-based memory cell device.

  18. PREFACE: Emerging non-volatile memories: magnetic and resistive technologies Emerging non-volatile memories: magnetic and resistive technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-02-01

    In 2010, the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) published an assessment of the potential and maturity of selected emerging research on memory technologies. Eight different technologies of non-volatile memories were compared (ferroelectric gate field-effect transistor, nano-electro-mechanical switch, spin-transfer torque random access memories (STTRAM), various types of resistive RAM, in particular redox RAM, nanothermal phase change RAM, electronic effects RAM, macromolecular memories and molecular RAM). In this report, spin-transfer torque MRAM and redox RRAM were identified as two emerging memory technologies recommended for accelerated research and development leading to scaling and commercialization of non-volatile RAM to and beyond the 16nm generation. Nowadays, there is an intense research and development effort in microelectronics on these two technologies, one based on spintronic phenomena (tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque), the other based on migration of vacancies or ions in an insulating matrix driven by oxydo-reduction potentials. Both technologies could be used for standalone or embedded applications. In this context, it appeared timely to publish a cluster of review articles related to these two technologies. In this cluster, the first two articles introduce the general principles of spin-transfer torque RAM and of thermally assisted RAM. The third presents a broader range of applications for this integrated CMOS/magnetic tunnel junction technology for low-power electronics. The fourth paper presents more advanced research on voltage control of magnetization switching with the aim of dramatically reducing the write energy in MRAM. The last two papers deal with two categories of resistive RAM, one based on the migration of cations, the other one based on nanowires. We thank all the authors and reviewers for their contribution to this cluster issue. Our special thanks are due to Dr Olivia Roche, Publisher, and Dr

  19. Graphene-quantum-dot nonvolatile charge-trap flash memories.

    PubMed

    Sin Joo, Soong; Kim, Jungkil; Kang, Soo Seok; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Sung Won

    2014-06-27

    Nonvolatile flash-memory capacitors containing graphene quantum dots (GQDs) of 6, 12, and 27 nm average sizes (d) between SiO2 layers for use as charge traps have been prepared by sequential processes: ion-beam sputtering deposition (IBSD) of 10 nm SiO2 on a p-type wafer, spin-coating of GQDs on the SiO2 layer, and IBSD of 20 nm SiO2 on the GQD layer. The presence of almost a single array of GQDs at a distance of ∼13 nm from the SiO2/Si wafer interface is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. The memory window estimated by capacitance-voltage curves is proportional to d for sweep voltages wider than  ± 3 V, and for d = 27 nm the GQD memories show a maximum memory window of 8 V at a sweep voltage of  ± 10 V. The program and erase speeds are largest at d = 12 and 27 nm, respectively, and the endurance and data-retention properties are the best at d = 27 nm. These memory behaviors can be attributed to combined effects of edge state and quantum confinement. PMID:24896068

  20. Covalent assembly of gold nanoparticles for nonvolatile memory applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Raju Kumar; Kusuma, Damar Yoga; Lee, P S; Srinivasan, M P

    2011-12-01

    This work reports a versatile approach for enhancing the stability of nonvolatile memory devices through covalent assembly of functionalized gold nanoparticles. 11-mercapto-1-undecanol functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a narrow size distribution and particle size of about 5 nm were synthesized. Then, the AuNPs were immobilized on a SiO(2) substrate using a functionalized polymer as a surface modifier. Microscopic and spectroscopic techniques were used to characterize the AuNPs and their morphology before and after immobilization. Finally, a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) type memory device with such covalently anchored AuNPs as a charge trapping layer was fabricated. The MIS structure showed well-defined counterclockwise C-V hysteresis curves indicating a good memory effect. The flat band voltage shift was 1.64 V at a swapping voltage between ±7 V. Furthermore, the MIS structure showed a good retention characteristic up to 20,000 s. The present synthetic route to covalently immobilize gold nanoparticles system will be a step towards realization for the nanoparticle-based electronic devices and related applications.

  1. Nanopatterned ferroelectrics for ultrahigh density rad-hard nonvolatile memories.

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Stevens, Jeffrey; Scrymgeour, David; Gin, Aaron V.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew

    2010-09-01

    Radiation hard nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) is a crucial component for DOE and DOD surveillance and defense applications. NVRAMs based upon ferroelectric materials (also known as FERAMs) are proven to work in radiation-rich environments and inherently require less power than many other NVRAM technologies. However, fabrication and integration challenges have led to state-of-the-art FERAMs still being fabricated using a 130nm process while competing phase-change memory (PRAM) has been demonstrated with a 20nm process. Use of block copolymer lithography is a promising approach to patterning at the sub-32nm scale, but is currently limited to self-assembly directly on Si or SiO{sub 2} layers. Successful integration of ferroelectrics with discrete and addressable features of {approx}15-20nm would represent a 100-fold improvement in areal memory density and would enable more highly integrated electronic devices required for systems advances. Towards this end, we have developed a technique that allows us to carry out block copolymer self-assembly directly on a huge variety of different materials and have investigated the fabrication, integration, and characterization of electroceramic materials - primarily focused on solution-derived ferroelectrics - with discrete features of {approx}20nm and below. Significant challenges remain before such techniques will be capable of fabricating fully integrated NVRAM devices, but the tools developed for this effort are already finding broader use. This report introduces the nanopatterned NVRAM device concept as a mechanism for motivating the subsequent studies, but the bulk of the document will focus on the platform and technology development.

  2. Nonvolatile polymer memory with nanoconfinement of ferroelectric crystals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Ju; Bae, Insung; Shin, Yu Jin; Park, Youn Jung; Huh, June; Park, Sang-Min; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Park, Cheolmin

    2011-01-12

    We demonstrate significantly improved performance of a nonvolatile polymeric ferroelectric field effect transistor (FeFET) memory using nanoscopic confinement of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) within self-assembled organosilicate (OS) lamellae. Periodic OS lamellae with 30 nm in width and 50 nm in periodicity were templated using block copolymer self-assembly. Confined crystallization of PVDF-TrFE not only significantly reduces gate leakage current but also facilitates ferroelectric polarization switching. These benefits are due to the elimination of structural defects and the development of an effective PVDF-TrFE crystal orientation through nanoconfinement. A bottom gate FeFET fabricated using a single-crystalline triisopropylsilylethynyl pentacene channel and PVDF-TrFE/OS hybrid gate insulator shows characteristic source-drain current hysteresis that is fully saturated at a programming voltage of ±8 V with an ON/OFF current ratio and a data retention time of approximately 10(2) and 2 h, respectively.

  3. Electrostatic Switching in Vertically Oriented Nanotubes for Nonvolatile Memory Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Khan, Paul; Jennings, Andrew T.; Greer, Julia R.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Allmen, Paul von

    2009-01-01

    We have demonstrated electrostatic switching in vertically oriented nanotubes or nanofibers, where a nanoprobe was used as the actuating electrode inside an SEM. When the nanoprobe was manipulated to be in close proximity to a single tube, switching voltages between 10 V - 40 V were observed, depending on the geometrical parameters. The turn-on transitions appeared to be much sharper than the turn-off transitions which were limited by the tube-to-probe contact resistances. In many cases, stiction forces at these dimensions were dominant, since the tube appeared stuck to the probe even after the voltage returned to 0 V, suggesting that such structures are promising for nonvolatile memory applications. The stiction effects, to some extent, can be adjusted by engineering the switch geometry appropriately. Nanoscale mechanical measurements were also conducted on the tubes using a custom-built anoindentor inside an SEM, from which preliminary material parameters, such as the elastic modulus, were extracted. The mechanical measurements also revealed that the tubes appear to be well adhered to the substrate. The material parameters gathered from the mechanical measurements were then used in developing an electrostatic model of the switch using a commercially available finite-element simulator. The calculated pull-in voltages appeared to be in agreement to the experimentally obtained switching voltages to first order.

  4. A graphene-based non-volatile memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Loïc.; Maurice, Ange; Lebental, Bérengère; Vezzoli, Stefano; Cojocaru, Costel-Sorin; Tay, Beng Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of a simple two-terminal non-volatile graphene switch. After an initial electroforming step during which Joule heating leads to the formation of a nano-gap impeding the current flow, the devices can be switched reversibly between two well-separated resistance states. To do so, either voltage sweeps or pulses can be used, with the condition that VSET < VRESET , where SET is the process decreasing the resistance and RESET the process increasing the resistance. We achieve reversible switching on more than 100 cycles with resistance ratio values of 104. This approach of graphene memory is competitive as compared to other graphene approaches such as redox of graphene oxide, or electro-mechanical switches with suspended graphene. We suggest a switching model based on a planar electro-mechanical switch, whereby electrostatic, elastic and friction forces are competing to switch devices ON and OFF, and the stability in the ON state is achieved by the formation of covalent bonds between the two stretched sides of the graphene, hence bridging the nano-gap. Developing a planar electro-mechanical switch enables to obtain the advantages of electro-mechanical switches while avoiding most of their drawbacks.

  5. Nonvolatile Memory Solution for Near-Term NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, J. U.; Blaes, B. R.; Mojarradi, M. M.

    2001-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) system that could reliably function in extreme environments is one of the most critical components for many spacecrafts being developed for NASA missions to be launched in next four to seven years. NVM supports the computer system in saving and updating critical state data required for a warm restart after power cycling or in case of a power bus failure. It also provides a power independent mass storage capacity for the scientific data gathered by the instruments. In some cases the window for gathering such data is very small and occurs only once in a given mission. Commercially popular and fully developed Flash NVM technology is inappropriate for many reasons such as the limited read write cycles with slower access speeds, radiation intolerance, higher Single Event Upsets (SEU) rates, etc. It is desirable to have an NVM system based upon a robust cell technology making it immune to the SEUs and with sufficient radiation hardness. Availability of such NVM system seems to be still 5 to 10 years in the future. Meanwhile, it is possible to provide an interim hybrid solution by combining the existing rad-hard technologies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Ultra-flexible nonvolatile memory based on donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer blends

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Flexible memory cell array based on high mobility donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer has been demonstrated. The memory cell exhibits low read voltage, high cell-to-cell uniformity and good mechanical flexibility, and has reliable retention and endurance memory performance. The electrical properties of the memory devices are systematically investigated and modeled. Our results suggest that the polymer blends provide an important step towards high-density flexible nonvolatile memory devices. PMID:26029856

  7. Ultra-flexible nonvolatile memory based on donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V A L

    2015-01-01

    Flexible memory cell array based on high mobility donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer has been demonstrated. The memory cell exhibits low read voltage, high cell-to-cell uniformity and good mechanical flexibility, and has reliable retention and endurance memory performance. The electrical properties of the memory devices are systematically investigated and modeled. Our results suggest that the polymer blends provide an important step towards high-density flexible nonvolatile memory devices.

  8. Determining the state of non-volatile memory cells with floating gate using scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzii, D.; Kelm, E.; Luapunov, N.; Milovanov, R.; Molodcova, G.; Yanul, M.; Zubov, D.

    2013-01-01

    During a failure analysis of integrated circuits, containing non-volatile memory, it is often necessary to determine its contents while Standard memory reading procedures are not applicable. This article considers how the state of NVM cells with floating gate can be determined using scanning probe microscopy. Samples preparation and measuring procedure are described with the example of Microchip microcontrollers with the EPROM memory (PIC12C508) and flash-EEPROM memory (PIC16F876A).

  9. Organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories utilizing sputtered C nanoparticles as nano-floating-gate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Chang-Hai; She, Xiao-Jian; Sun, Qi-Jun; Gao, Xu; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2014-10-20

    High-performance organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories have been achieved using sputtered C nanoparticles as the nano-floating-gate. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate is prepared with low-cost material and simple process, forming uniform and discrete charge trapping sites covered by a smooth and complete polystyrene layer. The devices show large memory window, excellent retention capability, and programming/reading/erasing/reading endurance. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate can effectively trap both holes and electrons, and it is demonstrated to be suitable for not only p-type but also n-type organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories.

  10. Organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories utilizing sputtered C nanoparticles as nano-floating-gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Chang-Hai; She, Xiao-Jian; Sun, Qi-Jun; Gao, Xu; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2014-10-01

    High-performance organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories have been achieved using sputtered C nanoparticles as the nano-floating-gate. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate is prepared with low-cost material and simple process, forming uniform and discrete charge trapping sites covered by a smooth and complete polystyrene layer. The devices show large memory window, excellent retention capability, and programming/reading/erasing/reading endurance. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate can effectively trap both holes and electrons, and it is demonstrated to be suitable for not only p-type but also n-type organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories.

  11. Printed dose-recording tag based on organic complementary circuits and ferroelectric nonvolatile memories

    PubMed Central

    Nga Ng, Tse; Schwartz, David E.; Mei, Ping; Krusor, Brent; Kor, Sivkheng; Veres, Janos; Bröms, Per; Eriksson, Torbjörn; Wang, Yong; Hagel, Olle; Karlsson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated a printed electronic tag that monitors time-integrated sensor signals and writes to nonvolatile memories for later readout. The tag is additively fabricated on flexible plastic foil and comprises a thermistor divider, complementary organic circuits, and two nonvolatile memory cells. With a supply voltage below 30 V, the threshold temperatures can be tuned between 0 °C and 80 °C. The time-temperature dose measurement is calibrated for minute-scale integration. The two memory bits are sequentially written in a thermometer code to provide an accumulated dose record. PMID:26307438

  12. Radiation Tests of Highly scaled, High-Density, Commercial, Nonvolatile NAND Flash Memories--Update 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.

    2011-01-01

    High-density, commercial, nonvolatile flash memories with NAND architecture are now available from several manufacturers. This report examines SEE effects and TID response in single-level cell (SLC) 32Gb and multi-level cell (MLC) 64Gb NAND flash memories manufactured by Micron Technology.

  13. Radiation Tests of Highly Scaled, High-Density, Commercial, Nonvolatile NAND Flash Memories - Update 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.

    2010-01-01

    High-density, commercial, nonvolatile flash memories with NAND architecture are now available from several manufacturers. This report examines SEE effects and TID response in single-level cell (SLC) and multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memories manufactured by Micron Technology.

  14. An FPGA-Based Test-Bed for Reliability and Endurance Characterization of Non-Volatile Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Vikram; Patel, Jagdish; Patel, Janak; Namkung, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Memory technologies are divided into two categories. The first category, nonvolatile memories, are traditionally used in read-only or read-mostly applications because of limited write endurance and slow write speed. These memories are derivatives of read only memory (ROM) technology, which includes erasable programmable ROM (EPROM), electrically-erasable programmable ROM (EEPROM), Flash, and more recent ferroelectric non-volatile memory technology. Nonvolatile memories are able to retain data in the absence of power. The second category, volatile memories, are random access memory (RAM) devices including SRAM and DRAM. Writing to these memories is fast and write endurance is unlimited, so they are most often used to store data that change frequently, but they cannot store data in the absence of power. Nonvolatile memory technologies with better future potential are FRAM, Chalcogenide, GMRAM, Tunneling MRAM, and Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) EEPROM.

  15. Multilevel resistive switching nonvolatile memory based on MoS2 nanosheet-embedded graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Gwang Hyuk; Kim, Choong-Ki; Bang, Gyeong Sook; Kim, Jong Yun; Jang, Byung Chul; Koo, Beom Jun; Woo, Myung Hun; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2016-09-01

    An increasing demand for nonvolatile memory has driven extensive research on resistive switching memory because it uses simple structures with high density, fast switching speed, and low power consumption. To improve the storage density, the application of multilevel cells is among the most promising solutions, including three-dimensional cross-point array architectures. Two-dimensional nanomaterials have several advantages as resistive switching media, including flexibility, low cost, and simple fabrication processes. However, few reports exist on multilevel nonvolatile memory and its switching mechanism. We herein present a multilevel resistive switching memory based on graphene oxide (GO) and MoS2 fabricated by a simple spin-coating process. Metallic 1T-MoS2 nanosheets, chemically exfoliated by Li intercalation, were successfully embedded between two GO layers as charge-trapping sites. The resulting stacks of GO/MoS2/GO exhibited excellent nonvolatile memory performance with at least four resistance states, >102 endurance cycles, and >104 s retention time. Furthermore, the charge transport mechanism was systematically investigated through the analysis of low-frequency 1/f noise in various resistance states, which could be modulated by the input voltage bias in the negative differential resistance region. Accordingly, we propose a strategy to achieve multilevel nonvolatile memory in which the stacked layers of two-dimensional nanosheets are utilized as resistive and charge-storage materials.

  16. The role of non-volatile memory from an application perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kettering, Brett M; Nunez, James A

    2010-09-16

    Current, emerging, and future NVM (non-volatile memory) technologies give us hope that we will be able to architect HPC (high performance computing) systems that initially use them in a memory and storage hierarchy, and eventually use them as the memory and storage for the system, complete with ownership and protections as a HDD-based (hard-disk-drive-based) file system provides today.

  17. Nonvolatile Memory Effect in Organic Thin-Film Transistor Based on Aluminum Nanoparticle Floating Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Dong-Ge

    2010-01-01

    A nonvolatile memory effect was observed in an organic thin-film transistor by introducing a Boating gate structure. The Boating gate was composed of an Al film in a thickness of nanometers, which was thermally deposited on a SiO2 insulator and exposed to air to spontaneously oxidize. It can be seen that the transistors exhibit significant hysteresis behaviors and storage circles in current-voltage characteristics in the dark and under illumination, indicating that the transistors may act as a nonvolatile memory element. The operational mechanism is discussed in the cases of dark and illumination via charge trapping by the Al floating gate.

  18. Improving Memory Characteristics of Hydrogenated Nanocrystalline Silicon Germanium Nonvolatile Memory Devices by Controlling Germanium Contents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiwoong; Jang, Kyungsoo; Phu, Nguyen Thi Cam; Trinh, Thanh Thuy; Raja, Jayapal; Kim, Taeyong; Cho, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangho; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) with silicon dioxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxynitride (ONO(n)) charge trap structure is a promising flash memory technology duo that will fulfill process compatibility for system-on-panel displays, down-scaling cell size and low operation voltage. In this research, charge trap flash devices were fabricated with ONO(n) stack gate insulators and an active layer using hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon germanium (nc-SiGe:H) films at a low temperature. In this study, the effect of the interface trap density on the performance of devices, including memory window and retention, was investigated. The electrical characteristics of NVM devices were studied controlling Ge content from 0% to 28% in the nc-SiGe:H channel layer. The optimal Ge content in the channel layer was found to be around 16%. For nc-SiGe:H NVM with 16% Ge content, the memory window was 3.13 V and the retention data exceeded 77% after 10 years under the programming condition of 15 V for 1 msec. This showed that the memory window increased by 42% and the retention increased by 12% compared to the nc-Si:H NVM that does not contain Ge. However, when the Ge content was more than 16%, the memory window and retention property decreased. Finally, this research showed that the Ge content has an effect on the interface trap density and this enabled us to determine the optimal Ge content. PMID:27483856

  19. Physical principles and current status of emerging non-volatile solid state memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Yang, C.-H.; Wen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Today the influence of non-volatile solid-state memories on persons' lives has become more prominent because of their non-volatility, low data latency, and high robustness. As a pioneering technology that is representative of non-volatile solidstate memories, flash memory has recently seen widespread application in many areas ranging from electronic appliances, such as cell phones and digital cameras, to external storage devices such as universal serial bus (USB) memory. Moreover, owing to its large storage capacity, it is expected that in the near future, flash memory will replace hard-disk drives as a dominant technology in the mass storage market, especially because of recently emerging solid-state drives. However, the rapid growth of the global digital data has led to the need for flash memories to have larger storage capacity, thus requiring a further downscaling of the cell size. Such a miniaturization is expected to be extremely difficult because of the well-known scaling limit of flash memories. It is therefore necessary to either explore innovative technologies that can extend the areal density of flash memories beyond the scaling limits, or to vigorously develop alternative non-volatile solid-state memories including ferroelectric random-access memory, magnetoresistive random-access memory, phase-change random-access memory, and resistive random-access memory. In this paper, we review the physical principles of flash memories and their technical challenges that affect our ability to enhance the storage capacity. We then present a detailed discussion of novel technologies that can extend the storage density of flash memories beyond the commonly accepted limits. In each case, we subsequently discuss the physical principles of these new types of non-volatile solid-state memories as well as their respective merits and weakness when utilized for data storage applications. Finally, we predict the future prospects for the aforementioned solid-state memories for

  20. Highly stable, extremely high-temperature, nonvolatile memory based on resistance switching in polycrystalline Pt nanogaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroya; Shinomura, Yuma; Kashiwabara, Shota; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2016-10-01

    Highly stable, nonvolatile, high-temperature memory based on resistance switching was realized using a polycrystalline platinum (Pt) nanogap. The operating temperature of the memory can be drastically increased by the presence of a sharp-edged Pt crystal facet in the nanogap. A short distance between the facet edges maintains the nanogap shape at high temperature, and the sharp shape of the nanogap densifies the electric field to maintain a stable current flow due to field migration. Even at 873 K, which is a significantly higher temperature than feasible for conventional semiconductor memory, the nonvolatility of the proposed memory allows stable ON and OFF currents, with fluctuations of less than or equal to 10%, to be maintained for longer than eight hours. An advantage of this nanogap scheme for high-temperature memory is its secure operation achieved through the assembly and disassembly of a Pt needle in a high electric field.

  1. Highly stable, extremely high-temperature, nonvolatile memory based on resistance switching in polycrystalline Pt nanogaps

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroya; Shinomura, Yuma; Kashiwabara, Shota; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Highly stable, nonvolatile, high-temperature memory based on resistance switching was realized using a polycrystalline platinum (Pt) nanogap. The operating temperature of the memory can be drastically increased by the presence of a sharp-edged Pt crystal facet in the nanogap. A short distance between the facet edges maintains the nanogap shape at high temperature, and the sharp shape of the nanogap densifies the electric field to maintain a stable current flow due to field migration. Even at 873 K, which is a significantly higher temperature than feasible for conventional semiconductor memory, the nonvolatility of the proposed memory allows stable ON and OFF currents, with fluctuations of less than or equal to 10%, to be maintained for longer than eight hours. An advantage of this nanogap scheme for high-temperature memory is its secure operation achieved through the assembly and disassembly of a Pt needle in a high electric field. PMID:27725705

  2. Low-power non-volatile spintronic memory: STT-RAM and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. L.; Alzate, J. G.; Khalili Amiri, P.

    2013-02-01

    The quest for novel low-dissipation devices is one of the most critical for the future of semiconductor technology and nano-systems. The development of a low-power, universal memory will enable a new paradigm of non-volatile computation. Here we consider STT-RAM as one of the emerging candidates for low-power non-volatile memory. We show different configurations for STT memory and demonstrate strategies to optimize key performance parameters such as switching current and energy. The energy and scaling limits of STT-RAM are discussed, leading us to argue that alternative writing mechanisms may be required to achieve ultralow power dissipation, a necessary condition for direct integration with CMOS at the gate level for non-volatile logic purposes. As an example, we discuss the use of the giant spin Hall effect as a possible alternative to induce magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions using pure spin currents. Further, we concentrate on magnetoelectric effects, where electric fields are used instead of spin-polarized currents to manipulate the nanomagnets, as another candidate solution to address the challenges of energy efficiency and density. The possibility of an electric-field-controlled magnetoelectric RAM as a promising candidate for ultralow-power non-volatile memory is discussed in the light of experimental data demonstrating voltage-induced switching of the magnetization and reorientation of the magnetic easy axis by electric fields in nanomagnets.

  3. A Nonvolatile MOSFET Memory Device Based on Mobile Protons in SiO(2) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Vanheusden, K.; Warren, W.L.; Devine, R.A.B.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Draper, B.L.; Schwank, J.R.

    1999-03-02

    It is shown how mobile H{sup +} ions can be generated thermally inside the oxide layer of Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si structures. The technique involves only standard silicon processing steps: the nonvolatile field effect transistor (NVFET) is based on a standard MOSFET with thermally grown SiO{sub 2} capped with a poly-silicon layer. The capped thermal oxide receives an anneal at {approximately}1100 C that enables the incorporation of the mobile protons into the gate oxide. The introduction of the protons is achieved by a subsequent 500-800 C anneal in a hydrogen-containing ambient, such as forming gas (N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} 95:5). The mobile protons are stable and entrapped inside the oxide layer, and unlike alkali ions, their space-charge distribution can be controlled and rapidly rearranged at room temperature by an applied electric field. Using this principle, a standard MOS transistor can be converted into a nonvolatile memory transistor that can be switched between normally on and normally off. Switching speed, retention, endurance, and radiation tolerance data are presented showing that this non-volatile memory technology can be competitive with existing Si-based non-volatile memory technologies such as the floating gate technologies (e.g. Flash memory).

  4. Review of Emerging New Solid-State Non-Volatile Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Yoshihisa

    2013-04-01

    The integration limit of flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional flash memories have been proposed. Unlike flash memories, new nonvolatile memories do not require storage of electric charges. The possibility of phase-change random-access memories (PCRAMs) or resistive-change RAMs (ReRAMs) replacing ultrahigh-density NAND flash memories has been investigated; however, many issues remain to be overcome, making the replacement difficult. Nonetheless, ferroelectric RAMs (FeRAMs) and magnetoresistive RAMs (MRAMs) are gradually penetrating into fields where the shortcomings of flash memories, such as high operating voltage, slow rewriting speed, and limited number of rewrites, make their use inconvenient. For instance, FeRAMs are widely used in ICs that require low power consumption such as smart cards and wireless tags. MRAMs are used in many kinds of controllers in industrial equipment that require high speed and unlimited rewrite operations. For successful application of new non-volatile semiconductor memories, such memories must be practically utilized in new fields in which flash memories are not applicable, and their technologies must be further developed.

  5. A review of emerging non-volatile memory (NVM) technologies and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, An

    2016-11-01

    This paper will review emerging non-volatile memory (NVM) technologies, with the focus on phase change memory (PCM), spin-transfer-torque random-access-memory (STTRAM), resistive random-access-memory (RRAM), and ferroelectric field-effect-transistor (FeFET) memory. These promising NVM devices are evaluated in terms of their advantages, challenges, and applications. Their performance is compared based on reported parameters of major industrial test chips. Memory selector devices and cell structures are discussed. Changing market trends toward low power (e.g., mobile, IoT) and data-centric applications create opportunities for emerging NVMs. High-performance and low-cost emerging NVMs may simplify memory hierarchy, introduce non-volatility in logic gates and circuits, reduce system power, and enable novel architectures. Storage-class memory (SCM) based on high-density NVMs could fill the performance and density gap between memory and storage. Some unique characteristics of emerging NVMs can be utilized for novel applications beyond the memory space, e.g., neuromorphic computing, hardware security, etc. In the beyond-CMOS era, emerging NVMs have the potential to fulfill more important functions and enable more efficient, intelligent, and secure computing systems.

  6. Electrostatically transparent graphene quantum-dot trap layers for efficient nonvolatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Rae; Jo, Yong Eun; Sung, Yeo Hyun; Won, Ui Yeon; Shin, Yong Seon; Kang, Won Tae; Yu, Woo Jong E-mail: micco21@skku.edu; Lee, Young Hee E-mail: micco21@skku.edu

    2015-03-09

    In this study, we have demonstrated nonvolatile memory devices using graphene quantum-dots (GQDs) trap layers with indium zinc oxide (IZO) semiconductor channel. The Fermi-level of GQD was effectively modulated by tunneling electrons near the Dirac point because of limited density of states and weak electrostatic screening in monolayer graphene. As a result, large gate modulation was driven in IZO channel to achieve a subthreshold swing of 5.21 V/dec (300 nm SiO{sub 2} gate insulator), while Au quantum-dots memory shows 15.52 V/dec because of strong electrostatic screening in metal quantum-dots. Together, discrete charge traps of GQDs enable stable performance in the endurance test beyond 800 cycles of programming and erasing. Our study suggests the exciting potential of GQD trap layers to be used for a highly promising material in non-volatile memory devices.

  7. Low-field Switching Four-state Nonvolatile Memory Based on Multiferroic Tunnel Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yau, H. M.; Yan, Z. B.; Chan, N. Y.; Au, K.; Wong, C. M.; Leung, C. W.; Zhang, F.Y.; Gao, X. S.; Dai, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Multiferroic tunneling junction based four-state non-volatile memories are very promising for future memory industry since this kind of memories hold the advantages of not only the higher density by scaling down memory cell but also the function of magnetically written and electrically reading. In this work, we demonstrate a success of this four-state memory in a material system of NiFe/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 with improved memory characteristics such as lower switching field and larger tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Ferroelectric switching induced resistive change memory with OFF/ON ratio of 16 and 0.3% TMR effect have been achieved in this multiferroic tunneling structure. PMID:26239505

  8. Ambipolar organic thin-film transistor-based nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jinhua; Wang, Wei Ying, Jun; Xie, Wenfa

    2014-01-06

    An ambipolar organic thin-film transistor-based nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memory was demonstrated, with discrete distributed gold nanoparticles, tetratetracontane (TTC), pentacene as the floating-gate layer, tunneling layer, and active layer, respectively. The electron traps at the TTC/pentacene interface were significantly suppressed, which resulted in an ambipolar operation in present memory. As both electrons and holes were supplied in the channel and trapped in the floating-gate by programming/erasing operations, respectively, i.e., one type of charge carriers was used to overwrite the other, trapped, one, a large memory window, extending on both sides of the initial threshold voltage, was realized.

  9. Integration of Flexible and Microscale Organic Nonvolatile Resistive Memory Devices Using Orthogonal Photolithography.

    PubMed

    Song, Younggul; Jang, Jingon; Yoo, Daekyoung; Jung, Seok-Heon; Jeong, Hyunhak; Hong, Seunghun; Lee, Jin-Kyun; Lee, Takhee

    2016-06-01

    We present the integration of flexible and microscale organic nonvolatile resistive memory devices fabricated in a cross-bar array structure on plastic substrates. This microscale integration was made via orthogonal photolithography method using fluorinated photoresist and solvents and was achieved without causing damage to the underlying organic memory materials. Our flexible microscale organic devices exhibited high ON/OFF ratio (I(ON/I(OFF) > 10(4)) under bending conditions. In addition, the ON and OFF states of our flexible and microscale memory devices were maintained for 10,000 seconds without any serious degradation.

  10. Scalable printed electronics: an organic decoder addressing ferroelectric non-volatile memory.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tse Nga; Schwartz, David E; Lavery, Leah L; Whiting, Gregory L; Russo, Beverly; Krusor, Brent; Veres, Janos; Bröms, Per; Herlogsson, Lars; Alam, Naveed; Hagel, Olle; Nilsson, Jakob; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Scalable circuits of organic logic and memory are realized using all-additive printing processes. A 3-bit organic complementary decoder is fabricated and used to read and write non-volatile, rewritable ferroelectric memory. The decoder-memory array is patterned by inkjet and gravure printing on flexible plastics. Simulation models for the organic transistors are developed, enabling circuit designs tolerant of the variations in printed devices. We explain the key design rules in fabrication of complex printed circuits and elucidate the performance requirements of materials and devices for reliable organic digital logic.

  11. Numerical simulation study of organic nonvolatile memory with polysilicon floating gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao-wen, Yan; Jiao, Wang; Jian-li, Qiao; Wen-jie, Chen; Pan, Yang; Tong, Xiao; Jian-hong, Yang

    2016-06-01

    A polysilicon-based organic nonvolatile floating-gate memory device with a bottom-gate top-contact configuration is investigated, in which polysilicon is sandwiched between oxide layers as a floating gate. Simulations for the electrical characteristics of the polysilicon floating gate-based memory device are performed. The shifted transfer characteristics and corresponding charge trapping mechanisms during programing and erasing (P/E) operations at various P/E voltages are discussed. The simulated results show that present memory exhibits a large memory window of 57.5 V, and a high read current on/off ratio of ≈ 103. Compared with the reported experimental results, these simulated results indicate that the polysilicon floating gate based memory device demonstrates remarkable memory effects, which shows great promise in device designing and practical application.

  12. Metal-organic molecular device for non-volatile memory storage

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, B. E-mail: kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kulkarni, G. U. E-mail: kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in

    2014-08-25

    Non-volatile memory devices have been of immense research interest for their use in active memory storage in powered off-state of electronic chips. In literature, various molecules and metal compounds have been investigated in this regard. Molecular memory devices are particularly attractive as they offer the ease of storing multiple memory states in a unique way and also represent ubiquitous choice for miniaturized devices. However, molecules are fragile and thus the device breakdown at nominal voltages during repeated cycles hinders their practical applicability. Here, in this report, a synergetic combination of an organic molecule and an inorganic metal, i.e., a metal-organic complex, namely, palladium hexadecylthiolate is investigated for memory device characteristics. Palladium hexadecylthiolate following partial thermolysis is converted to a molecular nanocomposite of Pd(II), Pd(0), and long chain hydrocarbons, which is shown to exhibit non-volatile memory characteristics with exceptional stability and retention. The devices are all solution-processed and the memory action stems from filament formation across the pre-formed cracks in the nanocomposite film.

  13. Flexible Nonvolatile Polymer Memory Array on Plastic Substrate via Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Jang, Byung Chul; Seong, Hyejeong; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Jong Yun; Koo, Beom Jun; Choi, Junhwan; Yang, Sang Yoon; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2016-05-25

    Resistive random access memory based on polymer thin films has been developed as a promising flexible nonvolatile memory for flexible electronic systems. Memory plays an important role in all modern electronic systems for data storage, processing, and communication; thus, the development of flexible memory is essential for the realization of flexible electronics. However, the existing solution-processed, polymer-based RRAMs have exhibited serious drawbacks in terms of the uniformity, electrical stability, and long-term stability of the polymer thin films. Here, we present poly(1,3,5-trimethyl-1,3,5-trivinyl cyclotrisiloxane) (pV3D3)-based RRAM arrays fabricated via the solvent-free technique called initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process for flexible memory application. Because of the outstanding chemical stability of pV3D3 films, the pV3D3-RRAM arrays can be fabricated by a conventional photolithography process. The pV3D3-RRAM on flexible substrates showed unipolar resistive switching memory with an on/off ratio of over 10(7), stable retention time for 10(5) s, excellent cycling endurance over 10(5) cycles, and robust immunity to mechanical stress. In addition, pV3D3-RRAMs showed good uniformity in terms of device-to-device distribution. The pV3D3-RRAM will pave the way for development of next-generation flexible nonvolatile memory devices. PMID:27142537

  14. Improved memory characteristics of charge trap memory by employing double layered ZrO2 nanocrystals and inserted Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. J.; Li, R.; Zhang, X. W.; Hu, D.; Zhao, Y. G.

    2016-07-01

    The charge trap memory capacitors incorporating a stacked charge trapping layer consisting of double layered ZrO2 nanocrystals (NCs) and inserted Al2O3 have been fabricated and investigated. It is observed that the memory capacitor with stacked trapping layer exhibits a hysteresis window as large as 14.3 V for ±10 V sweeping gate voltage range, faster program/erase speed, improved endurance performance, and good data retention characteristics with smaller extrapolated ten years charge loss at room temperature and 125 °C compared to single layered NCs. The special energy band alignment and the introduced additional traps of double layered ZrO2 NCs and inserted Al2O3 change the trapping and loss behavior of charges, and jointly contribute to the remarkable memory characteristics. Therefore, the memory capacitor with a stacked charge trapping layer is a promising candidate in future nonvolatile charge trap memory device design and application.

  15. Lateral electric-field-driven non-volatile four-state memory in multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cai; Zhang, Chao; Yao, Jinli; Jiang, Changjun

    2016-09-01

    A non-volatile four-state memory is formed using an in-plane side-polarization configuration in a Co/(011) Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (Co/PMN-PT) heterostructure. The resistivity vs. electric field behavior shows a change from volatile butterfly to looplike to non-volatile butterfly characteristics when the temperature decreases from 290 K to 83 K under an electric field of 10 kV/cm and then increases back to 290 K; this behavior is attributed to the strain-mediated magnetoelectric effect. In addition, the in-plane resistivity of Co film, which was measured using the four-probe technique, can be controlled both electrically and magnetically. Specifically, a non-volatile resistivity is gained by the application of electric field pulses. Additionally, a four-state memory is obtained by co-mediation of the magnetic field and electric field pulses, compared with the two different states achieved under the application of the electric field only, which indicates that our results are highly important for multi-state memory and spintronic devices applications.

  16. A fast and low-power microelectromechanical system-based non-volatile memory device

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Wook; Park, Seung Joo; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.; Park, Yung Woo

    2011-01-01

    Several new generation memory devices have been developed to overcome the low performance of conventional silicon-based flash memory. In this study, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile memory design based on the electromechanical motion of a cantilever to provide fast charging and discharging of a floating-gate electrode. The operation is demonstrated by using an electromechanical metal cantilever to charge a floating gate that controls the charge transport through a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. The set and reset currents are unchanged after more than 11 h constant operation. Over 500 repeated programming and erasing cycles were demonstrated under atmospheric conditions at room temperature without degradation. Multinary bit programming can be achieved by varying the voltage on the cantilever. The operation speed of the device is faster than a conventional flash memory and the power consumption is lower than other memory devices. PMID:21364559

  17. A junctionless SONOS nonvolatile memory device constructed with in situ-doped polycrystalline silicon nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a silicon-oxide-nitride-silicon nonvolatile memory constructed on an n+-poly-Si nanowire [NW] structure featuring a junctionless [JL] configuration is presented. The JL structure is fulfilled by employing only one in situ heavily phosphorous-doped poly-Si layer to simultaneously serve as source/drain regions and NW channels, thus greatly simplifying the manufacturing process and alleviating the requirement of precise control of the doping profile. Owing to the higher carrier concentration in the channel, the developed JL NW device exhibits significantly enhanced programming speed and larger memory window than its counterpart with conventional undoped-NW-channel. Moreover, it also displays acceptable erase and data retention properties. Hence, the desirable memory characteristics along with the much simplified fabrication process make the JL NW memory structure a promising candidate for future system-on-panel and three-dimensional ultrahigh density memory applications. PMID:22373446

  18. Low-cost fabrication of ternary CuInSe{sub 2} nanocrystals by colloidal route using a novel combination of volatile and non-volatile capping agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Parul; Narain Sharma, Shailesh Singh, Son

    2014-11-15

    Wet-route synthesis of CuInSe{sub 2} (CISe) nanocrystals has been envisaged with the utilization of the unique combination of coordinating ligand and non coordinating solvent. Our work demonstrates the formation of a single-phase, nearly stoichiometric and monodispersive, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals (band gap (E{sub g})∼1.16 eV) using a novel combination of ligands; viz. volatile arylamine aniline and non-volatile solvent 1-octadecene. The synthesis and growth conditions have been manoeuvred using the colligative properties of the mixture and thus higher growth temperature (∼250 °C) could be attained that promoted larger grain growth. The beneficial influence of the capping agents (aniline and 1-octadecene) on the properties of chalcopyrite nanocrystals has enabled us to pictorally model the structural, morphological and optoelectronic aspects of CISe nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Without resorting to any post-selenization process and using the colligative properties of the mixture comprising of volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene to manoeuvre the growth conditions to promote Ostwald ripening, a single phase, monodispersive and nearly stoichiometric ternary CISe nanocrystals are formed by wet-synthesis route. - Highlights: • Wet-route synthesis of CISe nanocrystals reported without post-selenization process. • Single-phase, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals formed. • Novel combination of capping agents: volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene. • Higher growth temperature attained using the colligative properties of the mixture. • Metallic salts presence explains exp. and theoretical boiling point difference.

  19. Nonvolatile memory effect of a functional polyimide containing ferrocene as the electroactive moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Guofeng; Qi, Shengli; Chen, Fei; Shi, Lei; Hu, Wenping; Wu, Dezhen

    2011-05-01

    A functional polyimide, hexafluoroisopropyl bis(phthalic dianhydride)/4-(bis(4-aminophenyl) methyl)phenol grafted with ferrocene, was synthesized. Electrical characterization results indicate that the sandwiched devices using our synthesized polyimide as the active layer possess electrical bistability and exhibit nonvolatile memory behavior with an ON/OFF current ratio of about 103. Molecular orbitals and electronic properties are investigated by molecular simulation and cyclic voltammetry characterization. The charge transfer mechanisms in the OFF and ON states of the memory device were reasonably interpreted by using the thermionic emission and space-charge-limited-current model, respectively.

  20. A FPGA-based Measurement System for Nonvolatile Semiconductor Memory Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Jiankang; White, Marvin

    2002-03-01

    Low voltage, long retention, high density SONOS nonvolatile semiconductor memory (NVSM) devices are ideally suited for PCMCIA, FLASH and 'smart' cards. The SONOS memory transistor requires characterization with an accurate, rapid measurement system with minimum disturbance to the device. The FPGA-based measurement system includes three parts: 1) a pattern generator implemented with XILINX FPGAs and corresponding software, 2) a high-speed, constant-current, threshold voltage detection circuit, 3) and a data evaluation program, implemented with a LABVIEW program. Fig. 1 shows the general block diagram of the FPGA-based measurement system. The function generator is designed and simulated with XILINX Foundation Software. Under the control of the specific erase/write/read pulses, the analog detect circuit applies operational modes to the SONOS device under test (DUT) and determines the change of the memory-state of the SONOS nonvolatile memory transistor. The TEK460 digitizes the analog threshold voltage output and sends to the PC computer. The data is filtered and averaged with a LABVIEWTM program running on the PC computer and displayed on the monitor in real time. We have implemented the pattern generator with XILINX FPGAs. Fig. 2 shows the block diagram of the pattern generator. We realized the logic control by a method of state machine design. Fig. 3 shows a small part of the state machine. The flexibility of the FPGAs enhances the capabilities of this system and allows measurement variations without hardware changes. The characterization of the nonvolatile memory transistor device under test (DUT), as function of programming voltage and time, is achieved by a high-speed, constant-current threshold voltage detection circuit. The analog detection circuit incorporating fast analog switches controlled digitally with the FPGAs. The schematic circuit diagram is shown in Fig. 4. The various operational modes for the DUT are realized with control signals applied to the

  1. A novel 2 T P-channel nano-crystal memory for low power/high speed embedded NVM applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junyu, Zhang; Yong, Wang; Jing, Liu; Manhong, Zhang; Zhongguang, Xu; Zongliang, Huo; Ming, Liu

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a novel 2 T P-channel nano-crystal memory structure for low power and high speed embedded non-volatile memory (NVM) applications. By using the band-to-band tunneling-induced hot-electron (BTBTIHE) injection scheme, both high-speed and low power programming can be achieved at the same time. Due to the use of a select transistor, the “erased states" can be set to below 0 V, so that the periphery HV circuit (high-voltage generating and management) and read-out circuit can be simplified. Good memory cell performance has also been achieved, including a fast program/erase (P/E) speed (a 1.15 V memory window under 10 μs program pulse), an excellent data retention (only 20% charge loss for 10 years). The data shows that the device has strong potential for future embedded NVM applications.

  2. Progress on a New Non-Volatile Memory for Space Based on Chalcogenide Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Maimon, J.; Hunt, K.; Rodgers, J.; Burcin, L.; Knowles, K.

    2004-02-04

    We report on the progress of a recent addition to non-volatile solid state memory technologies suited for space and other ionizing radiation environments. We summarize the material and processing science behind the current generation of chalcogenide phase-change memories fabricated on CMOS structures. The chalcogenide material used for phase-change applications in rewritable optical storage (Ge2Sb2Te5) has been integrated with a radiation hardened CMOS process to produce 64kbit memory arrays. On selected arrays electrical testing demonstrated up to 100% memory cell yield, 100ns programming and read speeds, and write currents as low as 1mA/bit. Devices functioned normally from - 55 deg. C to 125 deg. C. Write/read endurance has been demonstrated to 1 x 108 before first bit failure. Radiation results show no degradation to the hardened CMOS or effects that can be attributed to the phase-change material. Future applications of the technology are discussed.

  3. Photoluminescence of Si nanocrystal memory devices obtained by ion beam synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Carrada, Marzia; Wellner, Anja; Paillard, Vincent; Bonafos, Caroline; Coffin, Hubert; Claverie, Alain

    2005-12-19

    In this letter, we propose an original method to investigate Si nanocrystal-based nonvolatile memory devices, taking benefit of the photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and the specific optoelectronic properties of Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs). Ordered two-dimensional-arrays of Si-NCs were synthesized by ultralow-energy ion implantation in 7-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} and subsequent annealing. The Si-NCs population characteristics (size and density) were adjusted by different oxidizing annealing. This allowed, at the same time, the progressive healing of the oxide matrix. The analysis of the spectra revealed the presence of two PL bands, one due to quantum confinement effects in Si-NCs, and the other one attributed to silicon-rich oxide. Therefore, the evolution in energy and intensity of the PL bands was correlated to the oxidizing conditions, thus to the change of the Si-NCs size and density, and to the formation of stoichiometric SiO{sub 2}. These results are of great interest as being the first step in using PL spectroscopy as a nondestructive method to assess or monitor the electrical performances of the future memory devices, before any step of contact fabrication.

  4. High-performance nonvolatile organic transistor memory devices using the electrets of semiconducting blends.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Chen, Yougen; Satoh, Toshifumi; Kakuchi, Toyoji; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2014-08-13

    Organic nonvolatile transistor memory devices of the n-type semiconductor N,N'-bis(2-phenylethyl)-perylene-3,4:9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (BPE-PTCDI) were prepared using various electrets (i.e., three-armed star-shaped poly[4-(diphenylamino)benzyl methacrylate] (N(PTPMA)3) and its blends with 6,6-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pen) or ferrocene). In the device using the PCBM:N(PTPMA)3 blend electret, it changed its memory feature from a write-once-read-many (WORM) type to a flash type as the PCBM content increased and could be operated repeatedly based on a tunneling process. The large shifts on the reversible transfer curves and the hysteresis after implementing a gate bias indicated the considerable charge storage in the electret layer. On the other hand, the memory characteristics showed a flash type and a WORM characteristic, respectively, using the donor/donor electrets TIPS-pen:N(PTPMA)3 and ferrocene:N(PTPMA)3. The variation on the memory characteristics was attributed to the difference of energy barrier at the interface when different types of electret materials were employed. All the studied memory devices exhibited a long retention over 10(4) s with a highly stable read-out current. In addition, the afore-discussed memory devices by inserting another electret layer of poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) between the BPE-PTCDI layer and the semiconducting blend layer enhanced the write-read-erase-read (WRER) operation cycle as high as 200 times. This study suggested that the energy level and charge transfer in the blend electret had a significant effect on tuning the characteristics of nonvolatile transistor memory devices.

  5. Radiation Tests of Highly Scaled, High-Density, Commercial, Nonvolatile NAND Flash Memories - Update 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Allen, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    The space radiation environment poses a certain risk to all electronic components on Earth-orbiting and planetary mission spacecraft. In recent years, there has been increased interest in the use of high-density, commercial, nonvolatile flash memories in space because of ever-increasing data volumes and strict power requirements. They are used in a wide variety of spacecraft subsystems. At one end of the spectrum, flash memories are used to store small amounts of mission-critical data such as boot code or configuration files and, at the other end, they are used to construct multi-gigabyte data recorders that record mission science data. This report examines single-event effect (SEE) and total ionizing dose (TID) response in single-level cell (SLC) 32-Gb, multi-level cell (MLC) 64-Gb, and Triple-level (TLC) 64-Gb NAND flash memories manufactured by Micron Technology with feature size of 25 nm.

  6. Nonvolatile memory cells based on MoS2/graphene heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Bertolazzi, Simone; Krasnozhon, Daria; Kis, Andras

    2013-04-23

    Memory cells are an important building block of digital electronics. We combine here the unique electronic properties of semiconducting monolayer MoS2 with the high conductivity of graphene to build a 2D heterostructure capable of information storage. MoS2 acts as a channel in an intimate contact with graphene electrodes in a field-effect transistor geometry. Our prototypical all-2D transistor is further integrated with a multilayer graphene charge trapping layer into a device that can be operated as a nonvolatile memory cell. Because of its band gap and 2D nature, monolayer MoS2 is highly sensitive to the presence of charges in the charge trapping layer, resulting in a factor of 10(4) difference between memory program and erase states. The two-dimensional nature of both the contact and the channel can be harnessed for the fabrication of flexible nanoelectronic devices with large-scale integration.

  7. Zinc Cadmium Selenide Cladded Quantum Dot Based Electroluminescent and Nonvolatile Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amody, Fuad H.

    This dissertation presents electroluminescent (EL) and nonvolatile memory devices fabricated using pseudomorphic ZnCdSe-based cladded quantum dots (QDs). These dots were grown using our own in-school built novel reactor. The EL device was fabricated on a substrate of ITO (indium tin oxide) coated glass with the quantum dots sandwiched between anode and cathode contacts with a small barrier layer on top of the QDs. The importance of these cladded dots is to increase the quantum yield of device. This device is unique as they utilize quantum dots that are pseudomorphic (nearly lattice-matched core and the shell of the dot). In the case of floating quantum dot gate nonvolatile memory, cladded ZnCdSe quantum dots are deposited on single crystalline gate insulator (ZnMgS/ZnMgSe), which is grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The control gate dielectric layer of the nonvolatile memory is Si3N4 or SiO2 and is grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The cladded dots are grown using an improved methodology of photo-assisted microwave plasma metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PMP-MOCVD) enhanced reactor. The cladding composition of the core and shell of the dots was engineered by the help of ultraviolet light which changed the incorporation of zinc (and hence composition of ZnCdSe). This makes ZnxCd1--xSe-ZnyCd1--y Se QDs to have a low composition of zinc in the core than the cladding (x

  8. Low-cost fabrication of ternary CuInSe2 nanocrystals by colloidal route using a novel combination of volatile and non-volatile capping agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Parul; Narain Sharma, Shailesh; Singh, Son

    2014-11-01

    Wet-route synthesis of CuInSe2 (CISe) nanocrystals has been envisaged with the utilization of the unique combination of coordinating ligand and non coordinating solvent. Our work demonstrates the formation of a single-phase, nearly stoichiometric and monodispersive, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals (band gap (Eg)~1.16 eV) using a novel combination of ligands; viz. volatile arylamine aniline and non-volatile solvent 1-octadecene. The synthesis and growth conditions have been manoeuvred using the colligative properties of the mixture and thus higher growth temperature (~250 °C) could be attained that promoted larger grain growth. The beneficial influence of the capping agents (aniline and 1-octadecene) on the properties of chalcopyrite nanocrystals has enabled us to pictorally model the structural, morphological and optoelectronic aspects of CISe nanoparticles.

  9. Characteristics of a Nonvolatile SRAM Memory Cell Utilizing a Ferroelectric Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Cody; Laws, Crystal; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    The SRAM cell circuit is a standard for volatile data storage. When utilizing one or more ferroelectric transistors, the hysteresis characteristics give unique properties to the SRAM circuit, providing for investigation into the development of a nonvolatile memory cell. This paper discusses various formations of the SRAM circuit, using ferroelectric transistors, n-channel and p-channel MOSFETs, and resistive loads. With varied source and supply voltages, the effects on the timing and retention characteristics are investigated, including retention times of up to 24 hours.

  10. Hybrid Flexible Resistive Random Access Memory-Gated Transistor for Novel Nonvolatile Data Storage.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Chen, Bo; Wang, Chundong; Zhou, Li; Yan, Yan; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sun, Qijun; Zhang, Hua; Roy, V A L

    2016-01-20

    Here, a single-device demonstration of novel hybrid architecture is reported to achieve programmable transistor nodes which have analogies to flash memory by incorporating a resistive switching random access memory (RRAM) device as a resistive switch gate for field effect transistor (FET) on a flexible substrate. A high performance flexible RRAM with a three-layered structure is fabricated by utilizing solution-processed MoS2 nanosheets sandwiched between poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer layers. Gate coupling with the pentacene-based transistor can be controlled by the RRAM memory state to produce a nonprogrammed state (inactive) and a programmed state (active) with a well-defined memory window. Compared to the reference flash memory device based on the MoS2 floating gate, the hybrid device presents robust access speed and retention ability. Furthermore, the hybrid RRAM-gated FET is used to build an integrated logic circuit and a wide logic window in inverter logic is achieved. The controllable, well-defined memory window, long retention time, and fast access speed of this novel hybrid device may open up new possibilities of realizing fully functional nonvolatile memory for high-performance flexible electronics.

  11. Hybrid Flexible Resistive Random Access Memory-Gated Transistor for Novel Nonvolatile Data Storage.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Chen, Bo; Wang, Chundong; Zhou, Li; Yan, Yan; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sun, Qijun; Zhang, Hua; Roy, V A L

    2016-01-20

    Here, a single-device demonstration of novel hybrid architecture is reported to achieve programmable transistor nodes which have analogies to flash memory by incorporating a resistive switching random access memory (RRAM) device as a resistive switch gate for field effect transistor (FET) on a flexible substrate. A high performance flexible RRAM with a three-layered structure is fabricated by utilizing solution-processed MoS2 nanosheets sandwiched between poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer layers. Gate coupling with the pentacene-based transistor can be controlled by the RRAM memory state to produce a nonprogrammed state (inactive) and a programmed state (active) with a well-defined memory window. Compared to the reference flash memory device based on the MoS2 floating gate, the hybrid device presents robust access speed and retention ability. Furthermore, the hybrid RRAM-gated FET is used to build an integrated logic circuit and a wide logic window in inverter logic is achieved. The controllable, well-defined memory window, long retention time, and fast access speed of this novel hybrid device may open up new possibilities of realizing fully functional nonvolatile memory for high-performance flexible electronics. PMID:26578160

  12. Design of hybrid spintronic devices at scaled technologies for non-volatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumder, Niladri Narayan

    The ever-increasing demand for embedding more on- and off-chip memories to increase the bandwidth of high performance systems has led to a significant amount of research directed towards several potential high density memory technologies. With aggressive technology scaling, the researchers are incessantly confronted with various overwhelming challenges associated with the design of low power, ultra-high density and robust memory blocks. An alternative to all currently available memory technologies, spin-transfer torque (STT) Magnetic Random Access Memories (MRAM) offer many desirable memory-attributes. Data non-volatility, unlimited endurance, low power, high performance and high integration capabilities have stimulated an overwhelming interest for STT-MRAM among memory researchers. In an attempt to address the issues associated with parametric process variations and high switching energy consumptions, different genres of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) structures, memory bit-cells, and architecture are proposed. Unlike state-of-the-art tri-layer MTJ devices, the multi-port/multi-pillar structures provide the option to eliminate the self-conflicting design requirements for memory read, write and hold. Techniques to reduce thermal fluctuation induced delay spreads is discussed for reliable and deterministic magnetic switching characteristics in both in-plane and perpendicular anisotropy devices. The effect of thermal spin-transfer torque on high speed magnetic switching is discussed in the context of designing low power, robust, and reliable MRAM devices. Based on thermally initiated magnonic spin-transfer torque, we propose three new genres of multi-port MRAMs for low energy, high speed, and reliable magnetic switching. The proposition of several new genres of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) based on both electric and thermal spin-transfer torque, the corresponding bit-cells, and memory architectures make STT-MRAM a promising choice as future universal memories.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Charge Injection and Discharging of Si Nanocrystals and Arrays by Electrostatic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.; Boer, E.; Ostraat, M.; Brongersma, M. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Atwater, H. A.

    2000-01-01

    NASA requirements for computing and memory for microspacecraft emphasize high density, low power, small size, and radiation hardness. The distributed nature of storage elements in nanocrystal floating-gate memories leads to intrinsic fault tolerance and radiation hardness. Conventional floating-gate non-volatile memories are more susceptible to radiation damage. Nanocrystal-based memories also offer the possibility of faster, lower power operation. In the pursuit of filling these requirements, the following tasks have been accomplished: (1) Si nanocrystal charging has been accomplished with conducting-tip AFM; (2) Both individual nanocrystals on an oxide surface and nanocrystals formed by implantation have been charged; (3) Discharging is consistent with tunneling through a field-lowered oxide barrier; (4) Modeling of the response of the AFM to trapped charge has allowed estimation of the quantity of trapped charge; and (5) Initial attempts to fabricate competitive nanocrystal non-volatile memories have been extremely successful.

  14. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound.

    PubMed

    Pookpanratana, S; Zhu, H; Bittle, E G; Natoli, S N; Ren, T; Richter, C A; Li, Q; Hacker, C A

    2016-03-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a 'click' reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The 'click' reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices.

  15. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pookpanratana, S.; Zhu, H.; Bittle, E. G.; Natoli, S. N.; Ren, T.; Richter, C. A.; Li, Q.; Hacker, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices.

  16. Blackcomb: Hardware-Software Co-design for Non-Volatile Memory in Exascale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Robert

    2014-11-26

    Summary of technical results of Blackcomb Memory Devices We explored various different memory technologies (STTRAM, PCRAM, FeRAM, and ReRAM). The progress can be classified into three categories, below. Modeling and Tool Releases Various modeling tools have been developed over the last decade to help in the design of SRAM or DRAM-based memory hierarchies. To explore new design opportunities that NVM technologies can bring to the designers, we have developed similar high-level models for NVM, including PCRAMsim [Dong 2009], NVSim [Dong 2012], and NVMain [Poremba 2012]. NVSim is a circuit-level model for NVM performance, energy, and area estimation, which supports various NVM technologies, including STT-RAM, PCRAM, ReRAM, and legacy NAND Flash. NVSim is successfully validated against industrial NVM prototypes, and it is expected to help boost architecture-level NVM-related studies. On the other side, NVMain is a cycle accurate main memory simulator designed to simulate emerging nonvolatile memories at the architectural level. We have released these models as open source tools and provided contiguous support to them. We also proposed PS3-RAM, which is a fast, portable and scalable statistical STT-RAM reliability analysis model [Wen 2012]. Design Space Exploration and Optimization With the support of these models, we explore different device/circuit optimization techniques. For example, in [Niu 2012a] we studied the power reduction technique for the application of ECC scheme in ReRAM designs and proposed to use ECC code to relax the BER (Bit Error Rate) requirement of a single memory to improve the write energy consumption and latency for both 1T1R and cross-point ReRAM designs. In [Xu 2011], we proposed a methodology to design STT-RAM for different optimization goals such as read performance, write performance and write energy by leveraging the trade-off between write current and write time of MTJ. We also studied the tradeoffs in building a reliable crosspoint Re

  17. Physical implication of transition voltage in organic nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shun; Gao, Xu; Zhong, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Zhong-Da; Xu, Jian-Long; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2016-07-01

    High-performance pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories, using polystyrene as a tunneling dielectric and Au nanoparticles as a nano-floating-gate, show parallelogram-like transfer characteristics with a featured transition point. The transition voltage at the transition point corresponds to a threshold electric field in the tunneling dielectric, over which stored electrons in the nano-floating-gate will start to leak out. The transition voltage can be modulated depending on the bias configuration and device structure. For p-type active layers, optimized transition voltage should be on the negative side of but close to the reading voltage, which can simultaneously achieve a high ON/OFF ratio and good memory retention.

  18. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27240537

  19. Quasi-unipolar pentacene films embedded with fullerene for non-volatile organic transistor memories

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Juhee; Lee, Sungpyo; Lee, Moo Hyung; Kang, Moon Sung

    2015-02-09

    Quasi-unipolar non-volatile organic transistor memory (NOTM) can combine the best characteristics of conventional unipolar and ambipolar NOTMs and, as a result, exhibit improved device performance. Unipolar NOTMs typically exhibit a large signal ratio between the programmed and erased current signals but also require a large voltage to program and erase the memory cells. Meanwhile, an ambipolar NOTM can be programmed and erased at lower voltages, but the resulting signal ratio is small. By embedding a discontinuous n-type fullerene layer within a p-type pentacene film, quasi-unipolar NOTMs are fabricated, of which the signal storage utilizes both electrons and holes while the electrical signal relies on only hole conduction. These devices exhibit superior memory performance relative to both pristine unipolar pentacene devices and ambipolar fullerene/pentacene bilayer devices. The quasi-unipolar NOTM exhibited a larger signal ratio between the programmed and erased states while also reducing the voltage required to program and erase a memory cell. This simple approach should be readily applicable for various combinations of advanced organic semiconductors that have been recently developed and thereby should make a significant impact on organic memory research.

  20. Vertically Stackable Novel One-Time Programmable Nonvolatile Memory Devices Based on Dielectric Breakdown Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seongjae; Lee, Jung Hoon; Ryoo, Kyung-Chang; Jung, Sunghun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a novel one-time programmable (OTP) nonvolatile memory (NVM) device and its array structures based on silicon technology are proposed. There have been many features of OTP NVM devices utilizing various combinations of channel, breakdown region, barrier, and contact materials. However, this invention can be realized by simple materials and fabrication methods: it is silicon-based materials and fully compatible with the conventional CMOS process. An individual memory cell is a silicon diode vertically integrated. Historically, OTP memories were widely used for read-only-memory (ROM) in the central processing unit (CPU) of the computer systems. By implanting the nanoscale fabrication technology into the concept of OTP memory, innovative high-density NVM appliances for massive storage media becomes very promising. The program operation is performed by breaking down the thin oxide layer between pn doped structure and wordline (WL) and its state can be sensed by the leakage current through the broken oxide. Since this invention is based on neither transistor structure nor charge-based mechanism, it is highly reliable and functional for the ultra-large scale integration. The feasibility of its stacked array will be also checked.

  1. Graphene-ferroelectric metadevices for nonvolatile memory and reconfigurable logic-gate operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo Young; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Teun-Teun; Park, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Kanghee; Choi, Hyun Joo; Lee, Seung Hoon; Son, Jaehyeon; Park, Namkyoo; Min, Bumki

    2016-01-01

    Memory metamaterials are artificial media that sustain transformed electromagnetic properties without persistent external stimuli. Previous memory metamaterials were realized with phase-change materials, such as vanadium dioxide or chalcogenide glasses, which exhibit memory behaviour with respect to electrically/optically induced thermal stimuli. However, they require a thermally isolated environment for longer retention or strong optical pump for phase-change. Here we demonstrate electrically programmable nonvolatile memory metadevices realised by the hybridization of graphene, a ferroelectric and meta-atoms/meta-molecules, and extend the concept further to establish reconfigurable logic-gate metadevices. For a memory metadevice having a single electrical input, amplitude, phase and even the polarization multi-states were clearly distinguishable with a retention time of over 10 years at room temperature. Furthermore, logic-gate functionalities were demonstrated with reconfigurable logic-gate metadevices having two electrical inputs, with each connected to separate ferroelectric layers that act as the multi-level controller for the doping level of the sandwiched graphene layer.

  2. Graphene–ferroelectric metadevices for nonvolatile memory and reconfigurable logic-gate operations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Young; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Teun-Teun; Park, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Kanghee; Choi, Hyun Joo; Lee, Seung Hoon; Son, Jaehyeon; Park, Namkyoo; Min, Bumki

    2016-01-01

    Memory metamaterials are artificial media that sustain transformed electromagnetic properties without persistent external stimuli. Previous memory metamaterials were realized with phase-change materials, such as vanadium dioxide or chalcogenide glasses, which exhibit memory behaviour with respect to electrically/optically induced thermal stimuli. However, they require a thermally isolated environment for longer retention or strong optical pump for phase-change. Here we demonstrate electrically programmable nonvolatile memory metadevices realised by the hybridization of graphene, a ferroelectric and meta-atoms/meta-molecules, and extend the concept further to establish reconfigurable logic-gate metadevices. For a memory metadevice having a single electrical input, amplitude, phase and even the polarization multi-states were clearly distinguishable with a retention time of over 10 years at room temperature. Furthermore, logic-gate functionalities were demonstrated with reconfigurable logic-gate metadevices having two electrical inputs, with each connected to separate ferroelectric layers that act as the multi-level controller for the doping level of the sandwiched graphene layer. PMID:26813710

  3. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices.

  4. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sangram K; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K

    2016-01-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27240537

  5. Normally-off type nonvolatile static random access memory with perpendicular spin torque transfer-magnetic random access memory cells and smallest number of transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Chika; Abe, Keiko; Noguchi, Hiroki; Nomura, Kumiko; Ikegami, Kazutaka; Fujita, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel nonvolatile-random access memory (RAM) cell design based on a “normally-off memory architecture” using a perpendicular spin torque transfer-magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) based on a four-transistors static random access memory (SRAM) in order to reduce the operating power of mobile processors. After the cell design concept and basic operation are proposed, a stable and reliable operation for read/write is confirmed by circuit simulation.

  6. Organic one-transistor-type nonvolatile memory gated with thin ionic liquid-polymer film for low voltage operation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun Kak; Park, Tae Joon; Kim, Kang Lib; Cho, Suk Man; Jeong, Beom Jin; Park, Cheolmin

    2014-11-26

    As one of the most emerging next-generation nonvolatile memories, one-transistor (1T)-type nonvolatile memories are of great attention due to their excellent memory performance and simple device architecture suitable for high density memory arrays. In particular, organic 1T-type memories containing both organic semiconductors and insulators are further beneficial because of their mechanical flexibility with low cost fabrication. Here, we demonstrate a new flexible organic 1T-type memory operating at low voltage. The low voltage operation of a memory less than 10 V was obtained by employing a polymer gate insulator solution blended with ionic liquid as a charge storage layer. Ionic liquid homogeneously dissolved in a thin poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) film gave rise to low voltage operation of a device due to its high capacitance. Simultaneously, stable charge trapping of either anions or cations efficiently occurred in the polymer matrix, dependent upon gate bias. Optimization of ionic liquid in PVDF-TrFE thus led to an air-stable and mechanically flexible organic 1T-type nonvolatile memory operating at programming voltage of ±7 V with large ON/OFF current margin of approximately 10(3), reliable time-dependent data retention of more than 10(4) seconds, and write/read endurance cycles of 80.

  7. Organic one-transistor-type nonvolatile memory gated with thin ionic liquid-polymer film for low voltage operation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun Kak; Park, Tae Joon; Kim, Kang Lib; Cho, Suk Man; Jeong, Beom Jin; Park, Cheolmin

    2014-11-26

    As one of the most emerging next-generation nonvolatile memories, one-transistor (1T)-type nonvolatile memories are of great attention due to their excellent memory performance and simple device architecture suitable for high density memory arrays. In particular, organic 1T-type memories containing both organic semiconductors and insulators are further beneficial because of their mechanical flexibility with low cost fabrication. Here, we demonstrate a new flexible organic 1T-type memory operating at low voltage. The low voltage operation of a memory less than 10 V was obtained by employing a polymer gate insulator solution blended with ionic liquid as a charge storage layer. Ionic liquid homogeneously dissolved in a thin poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) film gave rise to low voltage operation of a device due to its high capacitance. Simultaneously, stable charge trapping of either anions or cations efficiently occurred in the polymer matrix, dependent upon gate bias. Optimization of ionic liquid in PVDF-TrFE thus led to an air-stable and mechanically flexible organic 1T-type nonvolatile memory operating at programming voltage of ±7 V with large ON/OFF current margin of approximately 10(3), reliable time-dependent data retention of more than 10(4) seconds, and write/read endurance cycles of 80. PMID:25341965

  8. Investigation of High-k Dielectrics and Metal Gate Electrodes for Non-volatile Memory Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanti, Srikant

    Due to the increasing demand of non-volatile flash memories in the portable electronics, the device structures need to be scaled down drastically. However, the scalability of traditional floating gate structures beyond 20 nm NAND flash technology node is uncertain. In this regard, the use of metal gates and high-k dielectrics as the gate and interpoly dielectrics respectively, seem to be promising substitutes in order to continue the flash scaling beyond 20nm. Furthermore, research of novel memory structures to overcome the scaling challenges need to be explored. Through this work, the use of high-k dielectrics as IPDs in a memory structure has been studied. For this purpose, IPD process optimization and barrier engineering were explored to determine and improve the memory performance. Specifically, the concept of high-k / low-k barrier engineering was studied in corroboration with simulations. In addition, a novel memory structure comprising a continuous metal floating gate was investigated in combination with high-k blocking oxides. Integration of thin metal FGs and high-k dielectrics into a dual floating gate memory structure to result in both volatile and non-volatile modes of operation has been demonstrated, for plausible application in future unified memory architectures. The electrical characterization was performed on simple MIS/MIM and memory capacitors, fabricated through CMOS compatible processes. Various analytical characterization techniques were done to gain more insight into the material behavior of the layers in the device structure. In the first part of this study, interfacial engineering was investigated by exploring La2O3 as SiO2 scavenging layer. Through the silicate formation, the consumption of low-k SiO2 was controlled and resulted in a significant improvement in dielectric leakage. The performance improvement was also gauged through memory capacitors. In the second part of the study, a novel memory structure consisting of continuous metal FG

  9. The floating-gate non-volatile semiconductor memory--from invention to the digital age.

    PubMed

    Sze, S M

    2012-10-01

    In the past 45 years (from 1967 to 2012), the non-volatile semiconductor memory (NVSM) has emerged from a floating-gate concept to the prime technology driver of the largest industry in the world-the electronics industry. In this paper, we briefly review the historical development of NVSM and project its future trends to the year 2020. In addition, we consider NVSM's wide-range of applications from the digital cellular phone to tablet computer to digital television. As the device dimension is scaled down to the deca-nanometer regime, we expect that many innovations will be made to meet the scaling challenges, and NVSM-inspired technology will continue to enrich and improve our lives for decades to come. PMID:23421120

  10. Nonvolatile Memories Using Quantum Dot (QD) Floating Gates Assembled on II-VI Tunnel Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, E.; Gogna, M.; Al-Amoody, F.; Karmakar, S.; Ayers, J.; Heller, E.; Jain, F.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents preliminary data on quantum dot gate nonvolatile memories using nearly lattice-matched ZnS/Zn0.95Mg0.05S/ZnS tunnel insulators. The GeO x -cladded Ge and SiO x -cladded Si quantum dots (QDs) are self-assembled site-specifically on the II-VI insulator grown epitaxially over the Si channel (formed between the source and drain region). The pseudomorphic II-VI stack serves both as a tunnel insulator and a high- κ dielectric. The effect of Mg incorporation in ZnMgS is also investigated. For the control gate insulator, we have used Si3N4 and SiO2 layers grown by plasma- enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  11. A Compute Capable SSD Architecture for Next-Generation Non-volatile Memories

    SciTech Connect

    De, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Existing storage technologies (e.g., disks and ash) are failing to cope with the processor and main memory speed and are limiting the overall perfor- mance of many large scale I/O or data-intensive applications. Emerging fast byte-addressable non-volatile memory (NVM) technologies, such as phase-change memory (PCM), spin-transfer torque memory (STTM) and memristor are very promising and are approaching DRAM-like performance with lower power con- sumption and higher density as process technology scales. These new memories are narrowing down the performance gap between the storage and the main mem- ory and are putting forward challenging problems on existing SSD architecture, I/O interface (e.g, SATA, PCIe) and software. This dissertation addresses those challenges and presents a novel SSD architecture called XSSD. XSSD o oads com- putation in storage to exploit fast NVMs and reduce the redundant data tra c across the I/O bus. XSSD o ers a exible RPC-based programming framework that developers can use for application development on SSD without dealing with the complication of the underlying architecture and communication management. We have built a prototype of XSSD on the BEE3 FPGA prototyping system. We implement various data-intensive applications and achieve speedup and energy ef- ciency of 1.5-8.9 and 1.7-10.27 respectively. This dissertation also compares XSSD with previous work on intelligent storage and intelligent memory. The existing ecosystem and these new enabling technologies make this system more viable than earlier ones.

  12. Biomolecule nanoparticle-induced nanocomposites with resistive switching nonvolatile memory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yongmin; Ryu, Sook Won; Cho, Jinhan

    2016-04-01

    Resistive switching behavior-based memory devices are considered promising candidates for next-generation data storage because of their simple structure configuration, low power consumption, and rapid operating speed. Here, the resistive switching nonvolatile memory properties of Fe2O3 nanocomposite (NC) films prepared from the thermal calcination of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled ferritin multilayers were successfully investigated. For this study, negatively charged ferritin nanoparticles were alternately deposited onto the Pt-coated Si substrate with positively charged poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) by solution-based electrostatic LbL assembly, and the formed multilayers were thermally calcinated to obtain a homogeneous transition metal oxide NC film through the elimination of organic components, including the protein shell of ferritin. The formed memory device exhibits a stable ON/OFF current ratio of approximately 103, with nanosecond switching times under an applied external bias. In addition, these reversible switching properties were kept stable during the repeated cycling tests of above 200 cycles and a test period of approximately 105 s under atmosphere. These solution-based approaches can provide a basis for large-area inorganic nanoparticle-based electric devices through the design of bio-nanomaterials at the molecular level.

  13. Floating gate memory-based monolayer MoS2 transistor with metal nanocrystals embedded in the gate dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingli; Zou, Xuming; Xiao, Xiangheng; Xu, Lei; Wang, Chunlan; Jiang, Changzhong; Ho, Johnny C; Wang, Ti; Li, Jinchai; Liao, Lei

    2015-01-14

    Charge trapping layers are formed from different metallic nanocrystals in MoS2 -based nanocrystal floating gate memory cells in a process compatible with existing fabrication technologies. The memory cells with Au nanocrystals exhibit impressive performance with a large memory window of 10 V, a high program/erase ratio of approximately 10(5) and a long retention time of 10 years.

  14. Nonvolatile memory effects in an orthoconic smectic liquid crystal mixture doped with polymer-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Marino, L; Marino, S; Wang, D; Bruno, E; Scaramuzza, N

    2014-06-01

    Promising applications of liquid crystal nanocomposites have driven extensive efforts to achieve non-volatile memory effects for the realization of electronic storage devices. In this context, non-volatile memory effects in an orthoconic smectic liquid crystal mixture, with and without polymer capped gold nanoparticles, were investigated. The dielectric spectroscopy technique was performed by applying a d.c. bias during the measurement or a d.c. potential before the start of the measurement in order to obtain pre-conditioning of the sample. Both techniques showed the presence of non-volatile memory effects in the pure orthoconic smectic liquid crystal mixture similar to the doped one. The results demonstrate that the addition of gold nanoparticles enhances the memory effect making it permanent. Our experimental evidence underlines the importance of the structure of the host liquid crystal and clearly suggests that the prolonged time memory effect, observed in the doped liquid crystal, is due to the electric field inducing charge transfer from the liquid crystal molecules to the gold nanoparticles, thanks to the polymer-capping which acts as an ionic charge trapper. Such an ionic trap effect is also responsible for strong reduction of total conductivity of the doped system.

  15. Low-Dimensional Polyoxometalate Molecules/Tantalum Oxide Hybrids for Non-Volatile Capacitive Memories.

    PubMed

    Balliou, Angelika; Papadimitropoulos, Giorgos; Skoulatakis, George; Kennou, Stella; Davazoglou, Dimitrios; Gardelis, Spiros; Glezos, Nikos

    2016-03-23

    Transition-metal-oxide hybrids composed of high surface-to-volume ratio Ta2O5 matrices and a molecular analogue of transition metal oxides, tungsten polyoxometalates ([PW12O40](3-)), are introduced herein as a charge storage medium in molecular nonvolatile capacitive memory cells. The polyoxometalate molecules are electrostatically self-assembled on a low-dimensional Ta2O5 matrix, functionalized with an aminosilane molecule with primary amines as the anchoring moiety. The charge trapping sites are located onto the metal framework of the electron-accepting molecular entities as well as on the molecule/oxide interfaces which can immobilize negatively charged mobile oxygen vacancies. The memory characteristics of this novel nanocomposite were tested using no blocking oxide for extraction of structure-specific characteristics. The film was formed on top of the 3.1 nm-thick SiO2/n-Si(001) substrates and has been found to serve as both SiO2/Si interface states' reducer (i.e., quality enhancer) and electron storage medium. The device with the polyoxometalates sandwiched between two Ta2O5 films results in enhanced internal scattering of carriers. Thanks to this, it exhibits a significantly larger memory window than the one containing the plain hybrid and comparable retention time, resulting in a memory window of 4.0 V for the write state and a retention time around 10(4) s without blocking medium. Differential distance of molecular trapping centers from the cell's gate and electronic coupling to the space charge region of the underlying Si substrate were identified as critical parameters for enhanced electron trapping for the first time in such devices. Implementing a numerical electrostatic model incorporating structural and electronic characteristics of the molecular nodes derived from scanning probe and spectroscopic characterization, we are able to interpret the hybrid's electrical response and gain some insight into the electrostatics of the trapping medium. PMID

  16. All-solution-processed nonvolatile flexible nano-floating gate memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chaewon; Song, Ji-Min; Lee, Jang-Sik; Lee, Mi Jung

    2014-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have great potential for future electronic applications owing to their inherent flexibility, low cost, light weight and ability to easily cover large areas. However, all of these advantageous material properties can only be harnessed if simple, cheap and low-temperature fabrication processes, which exclude the need for vacuum deposition and are compatible with flexible plastic substrates, are employed. There are a few solution-based techniques such as spin-coating and inkjet printing that meet the above criteria. In this paper, we describe a novel all-solution-processed nonvolatile memory device fabricated on a flexible plastic substrate. The source, drain and gate electrodes were printed using an inkjet printer with a conducting organic solution, while the semiconducting layer was spin-coated with an n-type polymer. The charge-trapping layer was composed of spin-coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO), which was prepared in the form of a solution using Hummer’s method. The fabricated device was characterized in order to confirm the memory characteristics. Device parameters such as threshold voltage shift, retention/endurance characteristics, mechanical robustness and reliability upon bending were also analyzed.

  17. Reconfigurable magnetic logic combined with non-volatile memory in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhaochu; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    Silicon-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors have achieved great success and become the mainstream of integrated logic circuits. However, the traditional pathway to enhance computational performance and decrease cost by continuous miniaturization is approaching its fundamental limits. The recent emergence of magnetic logic devices, especially magnetic-field-based semiconductor logic devices, shows promise for surpassing the development limits of CMOS logic and arouses profound attentions. Based on our Si based magnetoresistance (MR) device, we proposed a Si based reconfigurable magnetic logic device by coupling nonlinear transport effect and Hall effect in Si, which could do all four basic Boolean logic operations including AND, OR, NOR and NAND combined with non-volatile memory. Further, we developed a Si based current-mode magnetic logic device, which allowed direct communication between different logic devices by current-induced magnetization switch effect without external intermediate magnetic-electric converters. This may result in a memory-logic integrated system leading to a non von Neumann computer.

  18. Subthreshold-swing-adjustable tunneling-field-effect-transistor-based random-access memory for nonvolatile operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, In; Cheon, Woo Young; Choi, Woo Young

    2016-04-01

    A subthreshold-swing-adjustable tunneling-field-effect-transistor-based random-access memory (SAT RAM) has been proposed and fabricated for low-power nonvolatile memory applications. The proposed SAT RAM cell demonstrates adjustable subthreshold swing (SS) depending on stored information: small SS in the erase state ("1" state) and large SS in the program state ("0" state). Thus, SAT RAM cells can achieve low read voltage (Vread) with a large memory window in addition to the effective suppression of ambipolar behavior. These unique features of the SAT RAM are originated from the locally stored charge, which modulates the tunneling barrier width (Wtun) of the source-to-channel tunneling junction.

  19. Metal-oxide-semiconductor diodes containing C60 fullerenes for non-volatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmeier, Daniel; Baumgärtner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    For non-volatile memories, silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon or floating gate structures are used to store information by charging and discharging electronic states reversibly. In this article, we propose to replace the floating gate by C60 molecules. This would allow more defined programming voltages because of the discrete molecular energy levels and a higher resistance to tunneling oxide defects because of the weak electrical connection between the single molecules. Such C60 MOS diode structures are produced and their electrical properties are analyzed regarding current transport and charging mechanism of the molecules. To create the MOS structures, C60 molecules (5% of a monolayer) are evaporated onto a part of a clean silicon wafer and covered by amorphous silicon in situ in an ultra high vacuum system. Then the wafer is oxidized in wet atmosphere at just 710 °C through the C60 layer. The goal is to produce a clean oxide above and under the molecules without destroying them. Aluminum gate contacts are defined on top of these layers to perform complementary capacitance voltage (CV) and current voltage (IV) measurements. First, the gate voltage is swept to analyze the injection current, then CV measurements are performed after each sweep to analyze the charge state of the C60 layer and the oxide quality. Reference diodes without C60 on the same wafer show an identical Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling behavior for currents injected from silicon or from aluminum, respectively. In the CV curves, no pronounced flatband voltage shift is observable. In diodes with C60, for negative gate voltages, a classical FN tunneling is observed and compared to theory. The electron injection from silicon shows a different tunneling current behavior. It starts at a lower electric field and has a smaller slope then a FN current would have. It is identified as a trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) current caused by oxidation-induced traps under the C60 layer. It is modeled by an

  20. Unipolar resistive switching in metal oxide/organic semiconductor non-volatile memories as a critical phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Rocha, Paulo R. F.; Gomes, Henrique L.; Leeuw, Dago M. de

    2015-11-28

    Diodes incorporating a bilayer of an organic semiconductor and a wide bandgap metal oxide can show unipolar, non-volatile memory behavior after electroforming. The prolonged bias voltage stress induces defects in the metal oxide with an areal density exceeding 10{sup 17 }m{sup −2}. We explain the electrical bistability by the coexistence of two thermodynamically stable phases at the interface between an organic semiconductor and metal oxide. One phase contains mainly ionized defects and has a low work function, while the other phase has mainly neutral defects and a high work function. In the diodes, domains of the phase with a low work function constitute current filaments. The phase composition and critical temperature are derived from a 2D Ising model as a function of chemical potential. The model predicts filamentary conduction exhibiting a negative differential resistance and nonvolatile memory behavior. The model is expected to be generally applicable to any bilayer system that shows unipolar resistive switching.

  1. Voltage-controlled nonvolatile molecular memory of an azobenzene monolayer through solution-processed reduced graphene oxide contacts.

    PubMed

    Min, Misook; Seo, Sohyeon; Lee, Sae Mi; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2013-12-23

    The solution-processed fabrication of an azobenzene (ABC10) monolayer-based nonvolatile memory device on a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) electrode is successfully accomplished. Trans--cis isomerizations of ABC10 between two rGO electrodes in a crossbar device are controlled by applied voltage. An rGO soft-contact top electrode plays an important role in the conformational-change-dependent conductance switching process of an ABC10 monolayer.

  2. Electric field mediated non-volatile tuning magnetism in CoPt/PMN-PT heterostructure for magnetoelectric memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. T.; Li, J.; Peng, X. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, D. H.; Cao, Q. Q.; Du, Y. W.

    2016-02-01

    We report a power efficient non-volatile magnetoelectric memory in the CoPt/(011)PMN-PT heterostructure. Two reversible and stable electric field induced coercivity states (i.e., high-HC or low-HC) are obtained due to the strain mediated converse magnetoelectric effect. The reading process of the different coercive field information written by electric fields is demonstrated by using a magnetoresistance read head. This result shows good prospects in the application of novel multiferroic devices.

  3. Resistance switching of Au-implanted-ZrO2 film for nonvolatile memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Guan, Weihua; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Qin; Chen, Junning

    2008-12-01

    The resistive switching characteristics and switching mechanisms of the Au-implanted-ZrO2 film are extensively investigated for nonvolatile memory applications. Reversible resistance-switching behavior from a high resistance to low resistance state can be traced by dc voltage and pulse voltage. After more than 200 dc switching cycles, the resistance ratio between the high and low resistance states is more than 180 times under 0.7 V readout bias. In the voltage pulse test, the "write" and "erase" speeds can be as fast as 50 and 100 ns, respectively. No data loss is observed for more than 106 s. The formation and rupture of conducting filamentary paths related to the implanted Au ions are suggested to be responsible for the resistive switching phenomenon. The dependence of resistance on temperature indicates that the variable-range hopping conduction mechanism is dominated in the low-resistance state, while the current characteristics are governed by the trap-controlled space limited conduction mechanism in the high-resistance state.

  4. Non-volatile, high density, high speed, Micromagnet-Hall effect Random Access Memory (MHRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin C.; Katti, Romney R.; Stadler, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    The micromagnetic Hall effect random access memory (MHRAM) has the potential of replacing ROMs, EPROMs, EEPROMs, and SRAMs because of its ability to achieve non-volatility, radiation hardness, high density, and fast access times, simultaneously. Information is stored magnetically in small magnetic elements (micromagnets), allowing unlimited data retention time, unlimited numbers of rewrite cycles, and inherent radiation hardness and SEU immunity, making the MHRAM suitable for ground based as well as spaceflight applications. The MHRAM device design is not affected by areal property fluctuations in the micromagnet, so high operating margins and high yield can be achieved in large scale integrated circuit (IC) fabrication. The MHRAM has short access times (less than 100 nsec). Write access time is short because on-chip transistors are used to gate current quickly, and magnetization reversal in the micromagnet can occur in a matter of a few nanoseconds. Read access time is short because the high electron mobility sensor (InAs or InSb) produces a large signal voltage in response to the fringing magnetic field from the micromagnet. High storage density is achieved since a unit cell consists only of two transistors and one micromagnet Hall effect element. By comparison, a DRAM unit cell has one transistor and one capacitor, and a SRAM unit cell has six transistors.

  5. Resistive Switching in Al/Al2O3/TiO2/Al/PES Flexible Device for Nonvolatile Memory Application.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Chieh; Lee, Wang-Ying; Lee, Han-Tang

    2016-05-01

    Resistive switching memory devices with superior properties are possibly used in next-generation nonvolatile memory to replace the flash memory. In addition, flexible electronics has also attracted much attention because of its light-weight and flexibility. Therefore, an Al/Al2O3/TiO2/Al/PES flexible resistive switching memory is employed in this study. The resistive switching characteristics and stability of the flexible device are improved by inserting the Al2O3 film. The resistive switching of the flexible device can be repeated over hundreds of times after the bending test. A possible resistive switching model of the flexible device is also proposed. In addition, the non-volatility of the flexible device is demonstrated. Based on our research results, the proposed Al2O3/TiO2-based resistive switching memory is possibly used in next-generation flexible electronics and nonvolatile memory applications. PMID:27483828

  6. Improving reliability of non-volatile memory technologies through circuit level techniques and error control coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chengen; Emre, Yunus; Cao, Yu; Chakrabarti, Chaitali

    2012-12-01

    Non-volatile resistive memories, such as phase-change RAM (PRAM) and spin transfer torque RAM (STT-RAM), have emerged as promising candidates because of their fast read access, high storage density, and very low standby power. Unfortunately, in scaled technologies, high storage density comes at a price of lower reliability. In this article, we first study in detail the causes of errors for PRAM and STT-RAM. We see that while for multi-level cell (MLC) PRAM, the errors are due to resistance drift, in STT-RAM they are due to process variations and variations in the device geometry. We develop error models to capture these effects and propose techniques based on tuning of circuit level parameters to mitigate some of these errors. Unfortunately for reliable memory operation, only circuit-level techniques are not sufficient and so we propose error control coding (ECC) techniques that can be used on top of circuit-level techniques. We show that for STT-RAM, a combination of voltage boosting and write pulse width adjustment at the circuit-level followed by a BCH-based ECC scheme can reduce the block failure rate (BFR) to 10-8. For MLC-PRAM, a combination of threshold resistance tuning and BCH-based product code ECC scheme can achieve the same target BFR of 10-8. The product code scheme is flexible; it allows migration to a stronger code to guarantee the same target BFR when the raw bit error rate increases with increase in the number of programming cycles.

  7. Nonvolatile “AND,” “OR,” and “NOT” Boolean logic gates based on phase-change memory

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Zhong, Y. P.; Deng, Y. F.; Zhou, Y. X.; Xu, L.; Miao, X. S.

    2013-12-21

    Electronic devices or circuits that can implement both logic and memory functions are regarded as the building blocks for future massive parallel computing beyond von Neumann architecture. Here we proposed phase-change memory (PCM)-based nonvolatile logic gates capable of AND, OR, and NOT Boolean logic operations verified in SPICE simulations and circuit experiments. The logic operations are parallel computing and results can be stored directly in the states of the logic gates, facilitating the combination of computing and memory in the same circuit. These results are encouraging for ultralow-power and high-speed nonvolatile logic circuit design based on novel memory devices.

  8. A Novel Non-Destructive Silicon-on-Insulator Nonvolatile Memory - LDRD 99-0750 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    DRAPER,BRUCE L.; FLEETWOOD,D. M.; MEISENHEIMER,TIMOTHY L.; MURRAY,JAMES R.; SCHWANK,JAMES R.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.; SMITH,PAUL M.; VANHEUSDEN,KAREL J.; WARREN,WILLIAM L.

    1999-11-01

    Defects in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) buried oxides are normally considered deleterious to device operation. Similarly, exposing devices to hydrogen at elevated temperatures often can lead to radiation-induced charge buildup. However, in this work, we take advantage of as-processed defects in SOI buried oxides and moderate temperature hydrogen anneals to generate mobile protons in the buried oxide to form the basis of a ''protonic'' nonvolatile memory. Capacitors and fully-processed transistors were fabricated. SOI buried oxides are exposed to hydrogen at moderate temperatures using a variety of anneal conditions to optimize the density of mobile protons. A fast ramp cool down anneal was found to yield the maximum number of mobile protons. Unfortunately, we were unable to obtain uniform mobile proton concentrations across a wafer. Capacitors were irradiated to investigate the potential use of protonic memories for space and weapon applications. Irradiating under a negative top-gate bias or with no applied bias was observed to cause little degradation in the number of mobile protons. However, irradiating to a total dose of 100 krad(SiO{sub 2}) under a positive top-gate bias caused approximately a 100% reduction in the number of mobile protons. Cycling capacitors up to 10{sup 4} cycles had little effect on the switching characteristics. No change in the retention characteristics were observed for times up to 3 x 10{sup 4} s for capacitors stored unbiased at 200 C. These results show the proof-of-concept for a protonic nonvolatile memory. Two memory architectures are proposed for a protonic non-destructive, nonvolatile memory.

  9. MIEC (mixed-ionic-electronic-conduction)-based access devices for non-volatile crossbar memory arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Rohit S.; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Virwani, Kumar; Jackson, Bryan; Padilla, Alvaro; Narayanan, Pritish; Rettner, Charles T.; Shelby, Robert M.; Bethune, Donald S.; Raman, Karthik V.; BrightSky, Matthew; Joseph, Eric; Rice, Philip M.; Topuria, Teya; Kellock, Andrew J.; Kurdi, Bülent; Gopalakrishnan, Kailash

    2014-10-01

    Several attractive applications call for the organization of memristive devices (or other resistive non-volatile memory (NVM)) into large, densely-packed crossbar arrays. While resistive-NVM devices frequently possess some degree of inherent nonlinearity (typically 3-30× contrast), the operation of large (\\gt 1000×1000 device) arrays at low power tends to require quite large (\\gt 1e7) ON-to-OFF ratios (between the currents passed at high and at low voltages). One path to such large nonlinearities is the inclusion of a distinct access device (AD) together with each of the state-bearing resistive-NVM elements. While such an AD need not store data, its list of requirements is almost as challenging as the specifications demanded of the memory device. Several candidate ADs have been proposed, but obtaining high performance without requiring single-crystal silicon and/or the high processing temperatures of the front-end-of-the-line—which would eliminate any opportunity for 3D stacking—has been difficult. We review our work at IBM Research—Almaden on high-performance ADs based on Cu-containing mixed-ionic-electronic conduction (MIEC) materials [1-7]. These devices require only the low processing temperatures of the back-end-of-the-line, making them highly suitable for implementing multi-layer cross-bar arrays. MIEC-based ADs offer large ON/OFF ratios (\\gt 1e7), a significant voltage margin {{V}m} (over which current \\lt 10 nA), and ultra-low leakage (\\lt 10 pA), while also offering the high current densities needed for phase-change memory and the fully bipolar operation needed for high-performance RRAM. Scalability to critical lateral dimensions \\lt 30 nm and thicknesses \\lt 15 nm, tight distributions and 100% yield in large (512 kBit) arrays, long-term stability of the ultra-low leakage states, and sub-50 ns turn-ON times have all been demonstrated. Numerical modeling of these MIEC-based ADs shows that their operation depends on C{{u}+} mediated hole

  10. Multi-floor cascading ferroelectric nanostructures: multiple data writing-based multi-level non-volatile memory devices.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seung; Kwon, Owoong; Lee, Bom-Yi; Seol, Daehee; Park, Beomjin; Lee, Jae Yong; Lee, Ju Hyun; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Jin Kon

    2016-01-21

    Multiple data writing-based multi-level non-volatile memory has gained strong attention for next-generation memory devices to quickly accommodate an extremely large number of data bits because it is capable of storing multiple data bits in a single memory cell at once. However, all previously reported devices have failed to store a large number of data bits due to the macroscale cell size and have not allowed fast access to the stored data due to slow single data writing. Here, we introduce a novel three-dimensional multi-floor cascading polymeric ferroelectric nanostructure, successfully operating as an individual cell. In one cell, each floor has its own piezoresponse and the piezoresponse of one floor can be modulated by the bias voltage applied to the other floor, which means simultaneously written data bits in both floors can be identified. This could achieve multi-level memory through a multiple data writing process. PMID:26695561

  11. Technology breakthroughs in high performance metal-oxide-semiconductor devices for ultra-high density, low power non-volatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Augustin Jinwoo

    Non-volatile memory devices have attracted much attention because data can be retained without power consumption more than a decade. Therefore, non-volatile memory devices are essential to mobile electronic applications. Among state of the art non-volatile memory devices, NAND flash memory has earned the highest attention because of its ultra-high scalability and therefore its ultra-high storage capacity. However, human desire as well as market competition requires not only larger storage capacity but also lower power consumption for longer battery life time. One way to meet this human desire and extend the benefits of NAND flash memory is finding out new materials for storage layer inside the flash memory, which is called floating gate in the state of the art flash memory device. In this dissertation, we study new materials for the floating gate that can lower down the power consumption and increase the storage capacity at the same time. To this end, we employ various materials such as metal nanodot, metal thin film and graphene incorporating complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible processes. Experimental results show excellent memory effects at relatively low operating voltages. Detailed physics and analysis on experimental results are discussed. These new materials for data storage can be promising candidates for future non-volatile memory application beyond the state of the art flash technologies.

  12. Epitaxial Growth of Thin Ferroelectric Polymer Films on Graphene Layer for Fully Transparent and Flexible Nonvolatile Memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Lib; Lee, Wonho; Hwang, Sun Kak; Joo, Se Hun; Cho, Suk Man; Song, Giyoung; Cho, Sung Hwan; Jeong, Beomjin; Hwang, Ihn; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Yu, Young-Jun; Shin, Tae Joo; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Kang, Seok Ju; Park, Cheolmin

    2016-01-13

    Enhancing the device performance of organic memory devices while providing high optical transparency and mechanical flexibility requires an optimized combination of functional materials and smart device architecture design. However, it remains a great challenge to realize fully functional transparent and mechanically durable nonvolatile memory because of the limitations of conventional rigid, opaque metal electrodes. Here, we demonstrate ferroelectric nonvolatile memory devices that use graphene electrodes as the epitaxial growth substrate for crystalline poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) polymer. The strong crystallographic interaction between PVDF-TrFE and graphene results in the orientation of the crystals with distinct symmetry, which is favorable for polarization switching upon the electric field. The epitaxial growth of PVDF-TrFE on a graphene layer thus provides excellent ferroelectric performance with high remnant polarization in metal/ferroelectric polymer/metal devices. Furthermore, a fully transparent and flexible array of ferroelectric field effect transistors was successfully realized by adopting transparent poly[bis(4-phenyl)(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)amine] semiconducting polymer.

  13. A hybrid magnetic/complementary metal oxide semiconductor three-context memory bit cell for non-volatile circuit design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, B.; Brum, R. M.; Torres, L.

    2014-04-01

    After decades of continued scaling to the beat of Moore's law, it now appears that conventional silicon based devices are approaching their physical limits. In today's deep-submicron nodes, a number of short-channel and quantum effects are emerging that affect the manufacturing process, as well as, the functionality of the microelectronic systems-on-chip. Spintronics devices that exploit both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment, in addition to its fundamental electronic charge, are promising solutions to circumvent these scaling threats. Being compatible with the CMOS technology, such devices offer a promising synergy of radiation immunity, infinite endurance, non-volatility, increased density, etc. In this paper, we present a hybrid (magnetic/CMOS) cell that is able to store and process data both electrically and magnetically. The cell is based on perpendicular spin-transfer torque magnetic tunnel junctions (STT-MTJs) and is suitable for use in magnetic random access memories and reprogrammable computing (non-volatile registers, processor cache memories, magnetic field-programmable gate arrays, etc). To demonstrate the potential our hybrid cell, we physically implemented a small hybrid memory block using 45 nm × 45 nm round MTJs for the magnetic part and 28 nm fully depleted silicon on insulator (FD-SOI) technology for the CMOS part. We also report the cells measured performances in terms of area, robustness, read/write speed and energy consumption.

  14. A hybrid magnetic/complementary metal oxide semiconductor three-context memory bit cell for non-volatile circuit design

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanović, B. E-mail: lionel.torres@lirmm.fr; Brum, R. M.; Torres, L.

    2014-04-07

    After decades of continued scaling to the beat of Moore's law, it now appears that conventional silicon based devices are approaching their physical limits. In today's deep-submicron nodes, a number of short-channel and quantum effects are emerging that affect the manufacturing process, as well as, the functionality of the microelectronic systems-on-chip. Spintronics devices that exploit both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment, in addition to its fundamental electronic charge, are promising solutions to circumvent these scaling threats. Being compatible with the CMOS technology, such devices offer a promising synergy of radiation immunity, infinite endurance, non-volatility, increased density, etc. In this paper, we present a hybrid (magnetic/CMOS) cell that is able to store and process data both electrically and magnetically. The cell is based on perpendicular spin-transfer torque magnetic tunnel junctions (STT-MTJs) and is suitable for use in magnetic random access memories and reprogrammable computing (non-volatile registers, processor cache memories, magnetic field-programmable gate arrays, etc). To demonstrate the potential our hybrid cell, we physically implemented a small hybrid memory block using 45 nm × 45 nm round MTJs for the magnetic part and 28 nm fully depleted silicon on insulator (FD-SOI) technology for the CMOS part. We also report the cells measured performances in terms of area, robustness, read/write speed and energy consumption.

  15. Functionalized Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Metal-free, Flexible and Rewritable Nonvolatile Memory Device via Direct Laser-Writing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Cheng, Huhu; Hu, Yue; Song, Long; Zhang, Zhipan; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet (g-C3N4-NS) has layered structure similar with graphene nanosheet and presents unusual physicochemical properties due to the s-triazine fragments. But their electronic and electrochemical applications are limited by the relatively poor conductivity. The current work provides the first example that atomically thick g-C3N4-NSs are the ideal candidate as the active insulator layer with tunable conductivity for achieving the high performance memory devices with electrical bistability. Unlike in conventional memory diodes, the g-C3N4-NSs based devices combined with graphene layer electrodes are flexible, metal-free and low cost. The functionalized g-C3N4-NSs exhibit desirable dispersibility and dielectricity which support the all-solution fabrication and high performance of the memory diodes. Moreover, the flexible memory diodes are conveniently fabricated through the fast laser writing process on graphene oxide/g-C3N4-NSs/graphene oxide thin film. The obtained devices not only have the nonvolatile electrical bistability with great retention and endurance, but also show the rewritable memory effect with a reliable ON/OFF ratio of up to 105, which is the highest among all the metal-free flexible memory diodes reported so far, and even higher than those of metal-containing devices. PMID:25073687

  16. Functionalized graphitic carbon nitride for metal-free, flexible and rewritable nonvolatile memory device via direct laser-writing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Cheng, Huhu; Hu, Yue; Song, Long; Zhang, Zhipan; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti

    2014-07-30

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet (g-C3N4-NS) has layered structure similar with graphene nanosheet and presents unusual physicochemical properties due to the s-triazine fragments. But their electronic and electrochemical applications are limited by the relatively poor conductivity. The current work provides the first example that atomically thick g-C3N4-NSs are the ideal candidate as the active insulator layer with tunable conductivity for achieving the high performance memory devices with electrical bistability. Unlike in conventional memory diodes, the g-C3N4-NSs based devices combined with graphene layer electrodes are flexible, metal-free and low cost. The functionalized g-C3N4-NSs exhibit desirable dispersibility and dielectricity which support the all-solution fabrication and high performance of the memory diodes. Moreover, the flexible memory diodes are conveniently fabricated through the fast laser writing process on graphene oxide/g-C3N4-NSs/graphene oxide thin film. The obtained devices not only have the nonvolatile electrical bistability with great retention and endurance, but also show the rewritable memory effect with a reliable ON/OFF ratio of up to 10(5), which is the highest among all the metal-free flexible memory diodes reported so far, and even higher than those of metal-containing devices.

  17. Investigating the bistability characteristics of GaN/AlN resonant tunneling diodes for ultrafast nonvolatile memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Masanori; Takahashi, Tokio; Shimizu, Mitsuaki

    2015-03-01

    The bistability characteristics of GaN/AlN resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) grown on a sapphire substrate by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were investigated to better understand their physical origin and explore their use in nonvolatile memories. The bistability current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of GaN/AlN RTDs, which were due to intersubband transitions and electron accumulation in the quantum well, were clearly observed over a wide temperature range between 50 and 300 K. However, the I-V characteristics sometimes degraded at temperatures above 250 K. Complex staircase structures were observed in the voltage region showing a negative differential resistance in the I-V curve, and the forward current increased or decreased rapidly as the forward-bias voltage increased. Repeated measurements of the I-V characteristics over the wide temperature range between 50 and 300 K revealed that the bistability characteristics of GaN/AlN RTDs degraded owing to the leakage of electrons accumulating in the quantum well through a deep level in the AlN barrier associated with crystal defects such as dislocations and impurities. Therefore, reduction in crystal defect and impurity densities in the AlN barrier, and a careful design that considers deep levels are important for realizing realize ultrafast nonvolatile memories based on the bistability characteristics of GaN/AlN RTDs.

  18. Multifunctional organic phototransistor-based nonvolatile memory achieved by UV/ozone treatment of the Ta₂O₅ gate dielectric.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohui; Zhao, Haoyan; Dong, Guifang; Duan, Lian; Li, Dong; Wang, Liduo; Qiu, Yong

    2014-06-11

    An organic phototransistor (OPT) shows nonvolatile memory effect due to its novel optical writing and electrical erasing processes. In this work, we utilize an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) as the light source to investigate OPT-based memory (OPTM) performance. It is found that the OPTM can be used as either flash memory or write-once read-many-times memory by adjusting the properties of the Ta2O5 gate dielectric layer. UV/ozone treatment is applied to effectively change dielectric properties of the Ta2O5 film. The mechanisms for this are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and capacitance-voltage measurement. It turns out that the densities of oxygen vacancies and defects in the first 1.8 nm Ta2O5 films near the Ta2O5/semiconductor interface are reduced. Furthermore, for the first time, we use this multifunctional OPTM, which unites the photosensitive and memory properties in one single device, as an optical feedback system to tune the brightness of the OLED. Our study suggests that these OPTMs have potential applications in tuning the brightness uniformity, improving the display quality and prolonging the lifetime of flat panel displays.

  19. A New Concept for Non-Volatile Memory: The Electric-Pulse Induced Resistive Change Effect in Colossal Magnetoresistive Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. Q.; Wu, N. J.; Ignatiev, A.

    2001-01-01

    A novel electric pulse-induced resistive change (EPIR) effect has been found in thin film colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials, and has shown promise for the development of resistive, nonvolatile memory. The EPIR effect is induced by the application of low voltage (< 4 V) and short duration (< 20 ns) electrical pulses across a thin film sample of a CMR material at room temperature and under no applied magnetic field. The pulse can directly either increase or decrease the resistance of the thin film sample depending on pulse polarity. The sample resistance change has been shown to be over two orders of magnitude, and is nonvolatile after pulsing. The sample resistance can also be changed through multiple levels - as many as 50 have been shown. Such a device can provide a way for the development of a new kind of nonvolatile multiple-valued memory with high density, fast write/read speed, low power-consumption, and potential high radiation-hardness.

  20. NVL-C: Static Analysis Techniques for Efficient, Correct Programming of Non-Volatile Main Memory Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Computer architecture experts expect that non-volatile memory (NVM) hierarchies will play a more significant role in future systems including mobile, enterprise, and HPC architectures. With this expectation in mind, we present NVL-C: a novel programming system that facilitates the efficient and correct programming of NVM main memory systems. The NVL-C programming abstraction extends C with a small set of intuitive language features that target NVM main memory, and can be combined directly with traditional C memory model features for DRAM. We have designed these new features to enable compiler analyses and run-time checks that can improve performance and guard against a number of subtle programming errors, which, when left uncorrected, can corrupt NVM-stored data. Moreover, to enable recovery of data across application or system failures, these NVL-C features include a flexible directive for specifying NVM transactions. So that our implementation might be extended to other compiler front ends and languages, the majority of our compiler analyses are implemented in an extended version of LLVM's intermediate representation (LLVM IR). We evaluate NVL-C on a number of applications to show its flexibility, performance, and correctness.

  1. Effect of electrode material on characteristics of non-volatile resistive memory consisting of Ag2S nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-07-01

    In this study, Ag2S nanoparticles are synthesized and used as the active material for two-terminal resistance switching memory devices. Sintered Ag2S films are successfully crystallized on plastic substrates with synthesized Ag2S nanoparticles, after a relatively low-temperature sintering process (200 °C). After the sintering process, the crystallite size is increased from 6.8 nm to 80.3 nm. The high ratio of surface atoms to inner atoms of nanoparticles reduces the melting point temperature, deciding the sintering process temperature. In order to investigate the resistance switching characteristics, metal/Ag2S/metal structures are fabricated and tested. The effect of the electrode material on the non-volatile resistive memory characteristics is studied. The bottom electrochemically inert materials, such as Au and Pt, were critical for maintaining stable memory characteristics. By using Au and Pt inert bottom electrodes, we are able to significantly improve the memory endurance and retention to more than 103 cycles and 104 sec, respectively.

  2. Direct probing of electron and hole trapping into nano-floating-gate in organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Ze-Qun; Wang, Shun; Chen, Jian-Mei; Gao, Xu; Dong, Bin E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn Chi, Li-Feng E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn Wang, Sui-Dong E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn

    2015-03-23

    Electron and hole trapping into the nano-floating-gate of a pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory is directly probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The probing is straightforward and non-destructive. The measured surface potential change can quantitatively profile the charge trapping, and the surface characterization results are in good accord with the corresponding device behavior. Both electrons and holes can be trapped into the nano-floating-gate, with a preference of electron trapping than hole trapping. The trapped charge quantity has an approximately linear relation with the programming/erasing gate bias, indicating that the charge trapping in the device is a field-controlled process.

  3. Transparent photostable ZnO nonvolatile memory transistor with ferroelectric polymer and sputter-deposited oxide gate

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C. H.; Im, Seongil; Yun, Jungheum; Lee, Gun Hwan; Lee, Byoung H.; Sung, Myung M.

    2009-11-30

    We report on the fabrication of transparent top-gate ZnO nonvolatile memory thin-film transistors (NVM-TFTs) with 200 nm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride/trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric layer; semitransparent 10 nm thin AgO{sub x} and transparent 130 nm thick indium-zinc oxide (IZO) were deposited on the ferroelectric polymer as gate electrode by rf sputtering. Our semitransparent NVM-TFT with AgO{sub x} gate operates under low voltage write-erase (WR-ER) pulse of {+-}20 V, but shows some degradation in retention property. In contrast, our transparent IZO-gated device displays very good retention properties but requires anomalously higher pulse of {+-}70 V for WR and ER states. Both devices stably operated under visible illuminations.

  4. Multi-Bit Nano-Electromechanical Nonvolatile Memory Cells (Zigzag T Cells) for the Suppression of Bit-to-Bit Interference.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Young; Han, Jae Hwan; Cha, Tae Min

    2016-05-01

    Multi-bit nano-electromechanical (NEM) nonvolatile memory cells such as T cells were proposed for higher memory density. However, they suffered from bit-to-bit interference (BI). In order to suppress BI without sacrificing cell size, this paper proposes zigzag T cell structures. The BI suppression of the proposed zigzag T cell is verified by finite-element modeling (FEM). Based on the FEM results, the design of zigzag T cells is optimized.

  5. Effect of tunneling layers on the performances of floating-gate based organic thin-film transistor nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei Han, Jinhua; Ying, Jun; Xiang, Lanyi; Xie, Wenfa

    2014-09-22

    Two types of floating-gate based organic thin-film transistor nonvolatile memories (FG-OTFT-NVMs) were demonstrated, with poly(methyl methacrylate co glycidyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-GMA)) and tetratetracontane (TTC) as the tunneling layer, respectively. Their device performances were measured and compared. In the memory with a P(MMA-GMA) tunneling layer, typical unipolar hole transport was obtained with a relatively small mobility of 0.16 cm{sup 2}/V s. The unidirectional shift of turn-on voltage (V{sub on}) due to only holes trapped/detrapped in/from the floating gate resulted in a small memory window of 12.5 V at programming/erasing voltages (V{sub P}/V{sub E}) of ±100 V and a nonzero reading voltage. Benefited from the well-ordered molecule orientation and the trap-free surface of TTC layer, a considerably high hole mobility of 1.7 cm{sup 2}/V s and a visible feature of electrons accumulated in channel and trapped in floating-gate were achieved in the memory with a TTC tunneling layer. High hole mobility resulted in a high on current and a large memory on/off ratio of 600 at the V{sub P}/V{sub E} of ±100 V. Both holes and electrons were injected into floating-gate and overwritten each other, which resulted in a bidirectional V{sub on} shift. As a result, an enlarged memory window of 28.6 V at the V{sub P}/V{sub E} of ±100 V and a zero reading voltage were achieved. Based on our results, a strategy is proposed to optimize FG-OTFT-NVMs by choosing a right tunneling layer to improve the majority carrier mobility and realize ambipolar carriers injecting and trapping in the floating-gate.

  6. In2O3 nanocrystal memory with the barrier engineered tunnel layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Uk; Kim, Seon Pil; Han, Dong Seok; Kim, Eun Kyu; Park, Goon-Ho; Cho, Won-Ju; Kim, Young-Ho

    2011-01-01

    In2O3 nanocrystal memories with barrier-engineered tunnel layers were fabricated on a p-type Si substrate. The structure and thickness of the barrier-engineered tunnel layers were SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 (ONO) and 2/2/3 nm, respectively. The equivalent oxide thickness of the ONO tunnel layers was 5.64 nm. The average size and density of the In2O3 nanocrystals after the reaction between BPDA-PDA polyimide and the In thin film were about 8 nm and 4 x 10(11) cm(-2), respectively. The electrons were charged from the channel of the memory device to the quantum well of the In2O3 nanocrystal through the ONO tunnel layer via Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The memory window was about 1.4 V when the program and erase conditions of the In2O3 nanocrystal memory device were 12 V for 1 s and -15 V for 200 ms.

  7. Effects of thickness and geometric variations in the oxide gate stack on the nonvolatile memory behaviors of charge-trap memory thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Jun Yong; Kim, So-Jung; Byun, Chun-Won; Pi, Jae-Eun; Ryu, Min-Ki; Hwang, Chi Sun; Yoon, Sung-Min

    2015-09-01

    Device designs of charge-trap oxide memory thin-film transistors (CTM-TFTs) were investigated to enhance their nonvolatile memory performances. The first strategy was to optimize the film thicknesses of the tunneling and charge-trap (CT) layers in order to meet requirements of both higher operation speed and longer retention time. While the program speed and memory window were improved for the device with a thinner tunneling layer, a long retention time was obtained only for the device with a tunneling layer thicker than 5 nm. The carrier concentration and charge-trap densities were optimized in the 30-nm-thick CT layer. It was observed that 10-nm-thick tunneling, 30-nm-thick CT, and 50-nm-thick blocking layers were the best configuration for our proposed CTM-TFTs, where a memory on/off margin higher than 107 was obtained, and a memory margin of 6.6 × 103 was retained even after the lapse of 105 s. The second strategy was to examine the effects of the geometrical relations between the CT and active layers for the applications of memory elements embedded in circuitries. The CTM-TFTs fabricated without an overlap between the CT layer and the drain electrode showed an enhanced program speed by the reduced parasitic capacitance. The drain-bias disturbance for the memory off-state was effectively suppressed even when a higher read-out drain voltage was applied. Appropriate device design parameters, such as the film thicknesses of each component layer and the geometrical relations between them, can improve the memory performances and expand the application fields of the proposed CTM-TFTs.

  8. Ambipolar nonvolatile memory based on a quantum-dot transistor with a nanoscale floating gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yongli; Zhang, Yating; Cao, Xiaolong; Song, Xiaoxian; Cao, Mingxuan; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Zhang, Guizhong; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-07-01

    Using only solution processing methods, we developed ambipolar quantum-dot (QD) transistor floating-gate memory (FGM) that uses Au nanoparticles as a floating gate. Because of the bipolarity of the active channel of PbSe QDs, the memory could easily trap holes or electrons in the floating gate by programming/erasing (P/E) operations, which could shift the threshold voltage both up and down. As a result, the memory exhibited good programmable memory characteristics: a large memory window (ΔVth ˜ 15 V) and a long retention time (>105 s). The magnitude of ΔVth depended on both P/E voltages and the bias voltage (VDS): ΔVth was a cubic function to VP/E and linearly depended on VDS. Therefore, this FGM based on a QD transistor is a promising alternative to its inorganic counterparts owing to its advantages of bipolarity, high mobility, low cost, and large-area production.

  9. Nonvolatile modulation of electronic structure and correlative magnetism of L10-FePt films using significant strain induced by shape memory substrates.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun; Zhao, Jiancheng; Yang, Feng; Gong, Kui; Hao, Shijie; Cao, Yi; Hu, Chen; Zhang, Jingyan; Wang, Zhongqiang; Chen, Lei; Li, Sirui; Sun, Li; Cui, Lishan; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-02-01

    Tuning the lattice strain (εL) is a novel approach to manipulate the magnetic, electronic, and transport properties of spintronic materials. Achievable εL in thin film samples induced by traditional ferroelectric or flexible substrates is usually volatile and well below 1%. Such limits in the tuning capability cannot meet the requirements for nonvolatile applications of spintronic materials. This study answers to the challenge of introducing significant amount of elastic strain in deposited thin films so that noticeable tuning of the spintronic characteristics can be realized. Based on subtle elastic strain engineering of depositing L10-FePt films on pre-stretched NiTi(Nb) shape memory alloy substrates, steerable and nonvolatile lattice strain up to 2.18% has been achieved in the L10-FePt films by thermally controlling the shape memory effect of the substrates. Introduced strains at this level significantly modify the electronic density of state, orbital overlap, and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) strength in the FePt film, leading to nonvolatile modulation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal characteristics. This finding not only opens an efficient avenue for the nonvolatile tuning of SOC based magnetism and spintronic effects, but also helps to clarify the physical nature of pure strain effect.

  10. Nonvolatile modulation of electronic structure and correlative magnetism of L10-FePt films using significant strain induced by shape memory substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chun; Zhao, Jiancheng; Yang, Feng; Gong, Kui; Hao, Shijie; Cao, Yi; Hu, Chen; Zhang, Jingyan; Wang, Zhongqiang; Chen, Lei; Li, Sirui; Sun, Li; Cui, Lishan; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-02-01

    Tuning the lattice strain (εL) is a novel approach to manipulate the magnetic, electronic, and transport properties of spintronic materials. Achievable εL in thin film samples induced by traditional ferroelectric or flexible substrates is usually volatile and well below 1%. Such limits in the tuning capability cannot meet the requirements for nonvolatile applications of spintronic materials. This study answers to the challenge of introducing significant amount of elastic strain in deposited thin films so that noticeable tuning of the spintronic characteristics can be realized. Based on subtle elastic strain engineering of depositing L10-FePt films on pre-stretched NiTi(Nb) shape memory alloy substrates, steerable and nonvolatile lattice strain up to 2.18% has been achieved in the L10-FePt films by thermally controlling the shape memory effect of the substrates. Introduced strains at this level significantly modify the electronic density of state, orbital overlap, and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) strength in the FePt film, leading to nonvolatile modulation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal characteristics. This finding not only opens an efficient avenue for the nonvolatile tuning of SOC based magnetism and spintronic effects, but also helps to clarify the physical nature of pure strain effect.

  11. Nonvolatile modulation of electronic structure and correlative magnetism of L10-FePt films using significant strain induced by shape memory substrates.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun; Zhao, Jiancheng; Yang, Feng; Gong, Kui; Hao, Shijie; Cao, Yi; Hu, Chen; Zhang, Jingyan; Wang, Zhongqiang; Chen, Lei; Li, Sirui; Sun, Li; Cui, Lishan; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    Tuning the lattice strain (εL) is a novel approach to manipulate the magnetic, electronic, and transport properties of spintronic materials. Achievable εL in thin film samples induced by traditional ferroelectric or flexible substrates is usually volatile and well below 1%. Such limits in the tuning capability cannot meet the requirements for nonvolatile applications of spintronic materials. This study answers to the challenge of introducing significant amount of elastic strain in deposited thin films so that noticeable tuning of the spintronic characteristics can be realized. Based on subtle elastic strain engineering of depositing L10-FePt films on pre-stretched NiTi(Nb) shape memory alloy substrates, steerable and nonvolatile lattice strain up to 2.18% has been achieved in the L10-FePt films by thermally controlling the shape memory effect of the substrates. Introduced strains at this level significantly modify the electronic density of state, orbital overlap, and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) strength in the FePt film, leading to nonvolatile modulation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal characteristics. This finding not only opens an efficient avenue for the nonvolatile tuning of SOC based magnetism and spintronic effects, but also helps to clarify the physical nature of pure strain effect. PMID:26830325

  12. Nonvolatile modulation of electronic structure and correlative magnetism of L10-FePt films using significant strain induced by shape memory substrates

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chun; Zhao, Jiancheng; Yang, Feng; Gong, Kui; Hao, Shijie; Cao, Yi; Hu, Chen; Zhang, Jingyan; Wang, Zhongqiang; Chen, Lei; Li, Sirui; Sun, Li; Cui, Lishan; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    Tuning the lattice strain (εL) is a novel approach to manipulate the magnetic, electronic, and transport properties of spintronic materials. Achievable εL in thin film samples induced by traditional ferroelectric or flexible substrates is usually volatile and well below 1%. Such limits in the tuning capability cannot meet the requirements for nonvolatile applications of spintronic materials. This study answers to the challenge of introducing significant amount of elastic strain in deposited thin films so that noticeable tuning of the spintronic characteristics can be realized. Based on subtle elastic strain engineering of depositing L10-FePt films on pre-stretched NiTi(Nb) shape memory alloy substrates, steerable and nonvolatile lattice strain up to 2.18% has been achieved in the L10-FePt films by thermally controlling the shape memory effect of the substrates. Introduced strains at this level significantly modify the electronic density of state, orbital overlap, and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) strength in the FePt film, leading to nonvolatile modulation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal characteristics. This finding not only opens an efficient avenue for the nonvolatile tuning of SOC based magnetism and spintronic effects, but also helps to clarify the physical nature of pure strain effect. PMID:26830325

  13. Nonvolatile multilevel data storage memory device from controlled ambipolar charge trapping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V A L

    2013-01-01

    The capability of storing multi-bit information is one of the most important challenges in memory technologies. An ambipolar polymer which intrinsically has the ability to transport electrons and holes as a semiconducting layer provides an opportunity for the charge trapping layer to trap both electrons and holes efficiently. Here, we achieved large memory window and distinct multilevel data storage by utilizing the phenomena of ambipolar charge trapping mechanism. As fabricated flexible memory devices display five well-defined data levels with good endurance and retention properties showing potential application in printed electronics.

  14. Solution-processed Al-chelated gelatin for highly transparent non-volatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Wang, Yeong-Her

    2015-03-23

    Using the biomaterial of Al-chelated gelatin (ACG) prepared by sol-gel method in the ITO/ACG/ITO structure, a highly transparent resistive random access memory (RRAM) was obtained. The transmittance of the fabricated device is approximately 83% at 550 nm while that of Al/gelatin/ITO is opaque. As to the ITO/gelatin/ITO RRAM, no resistive switching behavior can be seen. The ITO/ACG/ITO RRAM shows high ON/OFF current ratio (>10{sup 5}), low operation voltage, good uniformity, and retention characteristics at room temperature and 85 °C. The mechanism of the ACG-based memory devices is presented. The enhancement of these electrical properties can be attributed to the chelate effect of Al ions with gelatin. Results show that transparent ACG-based memory devices possess the potential for next-generation resistive memories and bio-electronic applications.

  15. Logic gates realized by nonvolatile GeTe/Sb2Te3 super lattice phase-change memory with a magnetic field input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bin; Cheng, Xiaomin; Feng, Jinlong; Guan, Xiawei; Miao, Xiangshui

    2016-07-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices or circuits that can implement both storage and calculation are a crucial requirement for the efficiency improvement of modern computer. In this work, we realize logic functions by using [GeTe/Sb2Te3]n super lattice phase change memory (PCM) cell in which higher threshold voltage is needed for phase change with a magnetic field applied. First, the [GeTe/Sb2Te3]n super lattice cells were fabricated and the R-V curve was measured. Then we designed the logic circuits with the super lattice PCM cell verified by HSPICE simulation and experiments. Seven basic logic functions are first demonstrated in this letter; then several multi-input logic gates are presented. The proposed logic devices offer the advantages of simple structures and low power consumption, indicating that the super lattice PCM has the potential in the future nonvolatile central processing unit design, facilitating the development of massive parallel computing architecture.

  16. Silicon photonic integrated circuits with electrically programmable non-volatile memory functions.

    PubMed

    Song, J-F; Lim, A E-J; Luo, X-S; Fang, Q; Li, C; Jia, L X; Tu, X-G; Huang, Y; Zhou, H-F; Liow, T-Y; Lo, G-Q

    2016-09-19

    Conventional silicon photonic integrated circuits do not normally possess memory functions, which require on-chip power in order to maintain circuit states in tuned or field-configured switching routes. In this context, we present an electrically programmable add/drop microring resonator with a wavelength shift of 426 pm between the ON/OFF states. Electrical pulses are used to control the choice of the state. Our experimental results show a wavelength shift of 2.8 pm/ms and a light intensity variation of ~0.12 dB/ms for a fixed wavelength in the OFF state. Theoretically, our device can accommodate up to 65 states of multi-level memory functions. Such memory functions can be integrated into wavelength division mutiplexing (WDM) filters and applied to optical routers and computing architectures fulfilling large data downloading demands. PMID:27661912

  17. Multilevel characteristics and memory mechanisms for nonvolatile memory devices based on CuInS{sub 2} quantum dot-polymethylmethacrylate nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yang; Yun, Dong Yeol; Kim, Tae Whan; Kim, Sang Wook

    2014-12-08

    Nonvolatile memory devices based on CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layer were fabricated using spin-coating method. The memory window widths of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves for the Al/CIS QDs embedded in PMMA layer/p-Si devices were 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0 V for sweep voltages of ±3, ±5, and ±7 V, respectively. Capacitance-cycle data demonstrated that the charge-trapping capability of the devices with an ON/OFF ratio value of 2.81 × 10{sup −10} was maintained for 8 × 10{sup 3} cycles without significant degradation and that the extrapolation of the ON/OFF ratio value to 1 × 10{sup 6} cycles converged to 2.40 × 10{sup −10}, indicative of the good stability of the devices. The memory mechanisms for the devices are described on the basis of the C-V curves and the energy-band diagrams.

  18. Modeling and simulation of floating gate nanocrystal FET devices and circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasaneen, El-Sayed A. M.

    The nonvolatile memory market has been growing very fast during the last decade, especially for mobile communication systems. The Semiconductor Industry Association International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors states that the difficult challenge for nonvolatile semiconductor memories is to achieve reliable, low power, low voltage performance and high-speed write/erase. This can be achieved by aggressive scaling of the nonvolatile memory cells. Unfortunately, scaling down of conventional nonvolatile memory will further degrade the retention time due to the charge loss between the floating gate and drain/source contacts and substrate which makes conventional nonvolatile memory unattractive. Using nanocrystals as charge storage sites reduces dramatically the charge leakage through oxide defects and drain/source contacts. Floating gate nanocrystal nonvolatile memory, FG-NCNVM, is a candidate for future memory because it is advantageous in terms of high-speed write/erase, small size, good scalability, low-voltage, low-power applications, and the capability to store multiple bits per cell. Many studies regarding FG-NCNVMs have been published. Most of them have dealt with fabrication improvements of the devices and device characterizations. Due to the promising FG-NCNVM applications in integrated circuits, there is a need for circuit a simulation model to simulate the electrical characteristics of the floating gate devices. In this thesis, a FG-NCNVM circuit simulation model has been proposed. It is based on the SPICE BSIM simulation model. This model simulates the cell behavior during normal operation. Model validation results have been presented. The SPICE model shows good agreement with experimental results. Current-voltage characteristics, transconductance and unity gain frequency (fT) have been studied showing the effect of the threshold voltage shift (DeltaVth) due to nanocrystal charge on the device characteristics. The threshold voltage shift due to

  19. High Performance Nonvolatile Transistor Memories Utilizing Functional Polyimide-Based Supramolecular Electrets.

    PubMed

    Tung, Wei-Yao; Li, Meng-Hsien; Wu, Hung-Chin; Liu, Hsin-Yu; Hsieh, Yun-Ting; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2016-05-20

    We report pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor memory devices utilizing supramolecular electrets, consisting of a polyimide, PI(6FOH-ODPA), containing hydroxyl groups for hydrogen bonding with amine functionalized aromatic rings (AM) of 1-aniline (AM1), 2-naphthylamine (AM2), 2-aminoanthracene (AM3), and 1-aminopyrene (AM4). The effect of the phenyl ring size and composition of AM1-AM4 on the hole-trapping capability of the fabricated devices was investigated systematically. Under an operating voltage under ±40 V, the prepared devices using the electrets of 100 % AM1-AM4/PI ratios exhibited a memory window of 0, 8.59, 25.97, and 29.95 V, respectively, suggesting that the hole-trapping capability increased with enhancing phenyl ring size. The memory window was enhanced as the amount of AM in PI increased. Furthermore, the devices showed a long charge-retention time of 10(4)  s with an ON/OFF current ratio of around 10(3) -10(4) and multiple switching stability over 100 cycles. This study demonstrated that the electrical characteristics of the OFET memory devices could be manipulated through the chemical compositions of the supramolecular electrets.

  20. Characterization of a high-quality and UV-transparent PECVD silicon nitride film for nonvolatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chin K.; Ying, T. L.; Wei, C. S.; Liu, L. M.; Cheng, Huang-Chung; Lin, M. S.

    1994-09-01

    A high quality and UV-transparent plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride film is well developed to form a passivation layer for non-volatile memory devices. The dependence of the film properties on process parameters has been studied by factorial designed experiments. The deposition rate, uniformity, stress, refractive index, wet etching rate, density, step coverage, and UV-transmittance are the items used to evaluate the film properties. Rutherfold backside scattering (RBS) and hydrogen forward scattering (HFS) are used to measure the film composition and total hydrogen composition, respectively. Compared to the traditional PECVD nitride (PE-SiN) film known to have tensile stress and opacity to ultra-violet light (UV light), the developed PE-SiN film with very low compressive stress (< 1E9 dynes/cm*2) and excellent UV-transmittance (> 70% for 1.6 micrometers - thick film) can be achieved. The developed film has higher density, lower hydrogen content, and high N/Si inside film. Based on RBS/HFS, UV-transmittance and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR) results, the material and optical properties of the developed PE-SiN film are well investigated. This developed PE-SiN film is successfully applied to EPROM devices, and very good electrical and reliability performances have been demonstrated.

  1. High-G testing of MEMS mechanical non-volatile memory and silicon re-entry switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael Sean; Pohl, Kenneth Roy

    2005-10-01

    Two different Sandia MEMS devices have been tested in a high-g environment to determine their performance and survivability. The first test was performed using a drop-table to produce a peak acceleration load of 1792 g's over a period of 1.5 ms. For the second test the MEMS devices were assembled in a gun-fired penetrator and shot into a cement target at the Army Waterways Experiment Station in Vicksburg Mississippi. This test resulted in a peak acceleration of 7191 g's for a duration of 5.5 ms. The MEMS devices were instrumented using the MEMS Diagnostic Extraction System (MDES), which is capable of driving the devices and recording the device output data during the high-g event, providing in-flight data to assess the device performance. A total of six devices were monitored during the experiments, four mechanical non-volatile memory devices (MNVM) and two Silicon Reentry Switches (SiRES). All six devices functioned properly before, during, and after each high-g test without a single failure. This is the first known test under flight conditions of an active, powered MEMS device at Sandia.

  2. A high performance triboelectric nanogenerator for self-powered non-volatile ferroelectric transistor memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Huajing; Li, Qiang; He, Wenhui; Li, Jing; Xue, Qingtang; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Lijing; Ren, Tianling; Dong, Guifang; Chan, H. L. W.; Dai, Jiyan; Yan, Qingfeng

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an integrated module of self-powered ferroelectric transistor memory based on the combination of a ferroelectric FET and a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG). The novel TENG was made of a self-assembled polystyrene nanosphere array and a poly(vinylidene fluoride) porous film. Owing to this unique structure, it exhibits an outstanding performance with an output voltage as high as 220 V per cycle. Meanwhile, the arch-shaped TENG is shown to be able to pole a bulk ferroelectric 0.65Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.35PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) single crystal directly. Based on this effect, a bottom gate ferroelectric FET was fabricated using pentacene as the channel material and a PMN-PT single crystal as the gate insulator. Systematic tests illustrate that the ON/OFF current ratio of this transistor memory element is approximately 103. More importantly, we demonstrate the feasibility to switch the polarization state of this FET gate insulator, namely the stored information, by finger tapping the TENG with a designed circuit. These results may open up a novel application of TENGs in the field of self-powered memory systems.We demonstrate an integrated module of self-powered ferroelectric transistor memory based on the combination of a ferroelectric FET and a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG). The novel TENG was made of a self-assembled polystyrene nanosphere array and a poly(vinylidene fluoride) porous film. Owing to this unique structure, it exhibits an outstanding performance with an output voltage as high as 220 V per cycle. Meanwhile, the arch-shaped TENG is shown to be able to pole a bulk ferroelectric 0.65Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.35PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) single crystal directly. Based on this effect, a bottom gate ferroelectric FET was fabricated using pentacene as the channel material and a PMN-PT single crystal as the gate insulator. Systematic tests illustrate that the ON/OFF current ratio of this transistor memory element is approximately 103. More importantly, we demonstrate the

  3. A high performance triboelectric nanogenerator for self-powered non-volatile ferroelectric transistor memory.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huajing; Li, Qiang; He, Wenhui; Li, Jing; Xue, Qingtang; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Lijing; Ren, Tianling; Dong, Guifang; Chan, H L W; Dai, Jiyan; Yan, Qingfeng

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an integrated module of self-powered ferroelectric transistor memory based on the combination of a ferroelectric FET and a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG). The novel TENG was made of a self-assembled polystyrene nanosphere array and a poly(vinylidene fluoride) porous film. Owing to this unique structure, it exhibits an outstanding performance with an output voltage as high as 220 V per cycle. Meanwhile, the arch-shaped TENG is shown to be able to pole a bulk ferroelectric 0.65Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.35PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) single crystal directly. Based on this effect, a bottom gate ferroelectric FET was fabricated using pentacene as the channel material and a PMN-PT single crystal as the gate insulator. Systematic tests illustrate that the ON/OFF current ratio of this transistor memory element is approximately 10(3). More importantly, we demonstrate the feasibility to switch the polarization state of this FET gate insulator, namely the stored information, by finger tapping the TENG with a designed circuit. These results may open up a novel application of TENGs in the field of self-powered memory systems. PMID:26350823

  4. Iii-V Compound Semiconductor Integrated Charge Storage Structures for Dynamic and Non-Volatile Memory Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, Dale Laird

    This thesis presents an investigation into a novel group of GaAs charge storage devices. These devices, which are an integration of bipolar and junction field effect transistor structures were conceived, designed, fabricated, and tested within this study. The purpose was to analyse new types of charge storage devices, which are suitable for fabrication and lead to the development of dynamic and nonvolatile memories in III-V compound semiconductors. Currently, III-V semiconductor storage devices consist only of capacitors, where data is destroyed during reading and electrical erasure is difficult. In this work, four devices types were demonstrated that exhibit nondestructive reading, and three of the prototypes can be electrically erased. All types use the junction field effect transistor (JFET) for charge sensing, with each having different bipolar or epitaxial layer structure controlling the junction gate. The bottom epitaxial layer in each case served as the JFET channel. Two of the device types have three alternately doped layers, while the remaining two have four alternately doped layers. In all cases, removal of majority carriers from the middle layers constitutes stored charge. The missing carriers deplete the current carrying a region of the JFET channel. Drain current of the JFET becomes an indicator of stored charge. The basic function of each JFET memory element type is independent of interchanging n- and p- type doping within the structure type. Some performance advantage can be realized, however, by sensing with an n-type channel as compared to p- type due to increased carrier mobility. All device types exhibit storage time characteristics of order ten seconds. Devices are constructed in epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) reactors. The design of the epitaxial layers is an intrinsic part, together with the electrical design, of the storage device concept. These concepts are implemented first with photolithography masks which are used

  5. Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2009-12-07

    Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

  6. High mechanical endurance RRAM based on amorphous gadolinium oxide for flexible nonvolatile memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Tu, Hailing; Wei, Feng; Shi, Zhitian; Xiong, Yuhua; Zhang, Yan; Du, Jun

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we use amorphous Gd2O3 as the switching layer for fabricated RRAM devices with novel high performance, excellent flexibility, and mechanical endurance properties as potential candidate memory for flexible electronics applications. The obtained Cu/Gd2O3/Pt devices on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates show bipolar switching characteristics, low voltage operation (<2 V) and long retention time (>106 s). No performance degradation occurs, and the stored information is not lost after the device has been bent to different angles and up to 104 times in the bending tests. Based on temperature-dependent switching characteristics, the formation of Cu conducting filaments stemming from electrochemical reactions is believed to be the reason for the resistance switching from a high resistance state to a low resistance state. The studies of the integrated experiment and mechanism lay the foundation for the development of high-performance flexible RRAM.

  7. High reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory with a poly(4-vinyl phenol) charge trapping layer based on a pn-heterojunction active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Lanyi; Ying, Jun; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Letian; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate a high reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a polymer poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) as the charge trapping layer. In the unipolar OFETs, the inreversible shifts of the turn-on voltage (Von) and severe degradation of the memory window (ΔVon) at programming (P) and erasing (E) voltages, respectively, block their application in NVMs. The obstacle is overcome by using a pn-heterojunction as the active layer in the OFET memory, which supplied a holes and electrons accumulating channel at the supplied P and E voltages, respectively. Both holes and electrons transferring from the channels to PVP layer and overwriting the trapped charges with an opposite polarity result in the reliable bidirectional shifts of Von at P and E voltages, respectively. The heterojunction OFET exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory characteristics, with a large ΔVon of 8.5 V, desired reading (R) voltage at 0 V, reliable P/R/E/R dynamic endurance over 100 cycles and a long retention time over 10 years.

  8. Nb-doped Gd2O3 as charge-trapping layer for nonvolatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, R. P.; Huang, X. D.; Sin, Johnny K. O.; Lai, P. T.

    2015-10-01

    The charge-trapping properties of Gd2O3 with different Nb doping levels are investigated using an Al/Al2O3/Gd2O3/SiO2/Si structure. Compared with the memory device with pure Gd2O3, the one with lightly Nb-doped Gd2O3 shows better charge-trapping characteristics, including higher programming speed (6.5 V at +12 V programming voltage for 10 ms) and better retention property (92% retained charge at 85 °C after 104 s), due to its higher trapping efficiency that resulted from higher trap density and suppressed formation of a silicate interlayer at the Gd2O3/SiO2 interface induced by the Nb doping. Moreover, the one with heavily Nb-doped Gd2O3 shows improvement in erasing behavior but worse retention and lower programming speed than the one with lightly Nb-doped Gd2O3. Further analysis reveals that the Nb-doping level determines the type of dominant trap in the Nb-doped Gd2O3, thus leading to different charge-loss mechanisms and charge-trapping characteristics.

  9. In-chip optical CD measurements for non-volatile memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconi, Mauro; Kremer, Stephanie; Polli, M.; Severgnini, Ermes; Trovati, Silvia S.

    2006-03-01

    A potential limitation to a wider usage of the scatterometry technique for CD evaluation comes from its requirement of dedicated regular measurement gratings, located in wafer scribe lanes. In fact, the simplification of the original chip layout that is often requested to design these gratings may impact on their printed dimension and shape. Etched gratings might also suffer from micro-loading effects other than in the circuit. For all these reasons, measurements collected therein may not represent the real behavior of the device. On the other hand, memory devices come with large sectors that usually possess the characteristics required for a proper scatterometry evaluation. In particular, for a leading edge flash process this approach is in principle feasible for the most critical process steps. The impact of potential drawbacks, mainly lack of pattern regularity within the tool probe area, is investigated. More, a very large sampling plan on features with equal nominal CD and density spread over the same exposure shot becomes feasible, thus yielding a deeper insight of the overall lithographic process window and a quantitative method to evaluate process equipment performance along time by comparison to acceptance data and/or last preventive maintenance. All the results gathered in the device main array are compared to those collected in standard scatterometry targets, tailored to the characteristics of the considered layers in terms of designed CD, pitch, stack and orientation.

  10. Control over variability in nonvolatile hafnium-oxide resistive-switching memory based on modeling of the switching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Brian Jerad

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM) technology presents an attractive option for embedded non-volatile (NV) memory systems if its variability (cycle-to-cycle and device-to-device) can be controlled. This dissertation has focused on investigations to identify key mechanisms and parameters which dominate ReRAM variability, and the development of subsequent experimental and simulation-based tools to address this variability. The first component of these efforts entailed identification of the modern-day non-volatile memory technological gaps that have driven the operational requirements and challenges for resistive memory as an emerging NV memory. Initial research confirmed the critical requirement of a sub-stoichiometric (HfO2-x) dielectric regarding the enablement of stable switching and suggested a defect-driven mechanism, which is discussed in detail. Preliminary experimental work was focused on the fabrication of a durable current-limiting (1T1R) testing structure; which was utilized to enable ReRAM device characterization, reduce unwanted parasitic capacitances, and overshoot-current. Initial electrical and physical characterization confirmed a filamentary based (defect-driven) mechanism based on ReRAM scalability-trends (in device sizes ranging from 50x50nm2 to 7x7microm2). Physical analysis (AFM, TEM and EELS) verified a `dominant-filament mechanism' in transmission-metal-oxide (specifically HfO2-x) based ReRAM. A novel characterization and analysis protocol for key electrical parameters affecting filament formation for HfO2-x-based ReRAMs was developed, focusing on the roles of current, voltage, and temperature. This protocol included characterization of the high-resistive-state (HRS) dependence on the maximum FORMING current (seen during 1st RESET Imax) and the characterization of low-power endurance. This characterization protocol was employed to investigate and develop an approach for ReRAM filament formation at elevated temperatures (hot FORMING) to

  11. Electron Transport in Silicon Nanocrystal Devices: From Memory Applications to Silicon Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gerald M.

    The push to integrate the realms of microelectronics and photonics on the silicon platform is currently lacking an efficient, electrically pumped silicon light source. One promising material system for photonics on the silicon platform is erbium-doped silicon nanoclusters (Er:Si-nc), which uses silicon nanoclusters to sensitize erbium ions in a SiO2 matrix. This medium can be pumped electrically, and this thesis focuses primarily on the electrical properties of Er:Si-nc films and their possible development as a silicon light source in the erbium emission band around 1.5 micrometers. Silicon nanocrystals can also be used as the floating gate in a flash memory device, and work is also presented examining charge transport in novel systems for flash memory applications. To explore silicon nanocrystals as a potential replacement for metallic floating gates in flash memory, the charging dynamics in silicon nanocrystal films are first studied using UHV-AFM. This approach uses a non-contact AFM tip to locally charge a layer of nanocrystals. Subsequent imaging allows the injected charge to be observed in real time as it moves through the layer. Simulation of this interaction allows the quantication of the charge in the layer, where we find that each nanocrystal is only singly charged after injection, while holes are retained in the film for hours. Work towards developing a dielectric stack with a voltage-tunable barrier is presented, with applications for flash memory and hyperspectral imaging. For hyperspectral imaging applications, film stacks containing various dielectrics are studied using I-V, TEM, and internal photoemission, with barrier tunability demonstrated in the Sc2O3/SiO2 system. To study Er:Si-nc as a potential lasing medium for silicon photonics, a theoretical approach is presented where Er:Si-nc is the gain medium in a silicon slot waveguide. By accounting for the local density of optical states effect on the emitters, and carrier absorption due to

  12. Nonvolatile Ferroelectric Memory Circuit Using Black Phosphorus Nanosheet-Based Field-Effect Transistors with P(VDF-TrFE) Polymer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Tack; Kwon, Hyeokjae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Yun Jae; Lim, Jung Ah; Song, Yong-Won; Yi, Yeonjin; Choi, Won-Kook; Hwang, Do Kyung; Im, Seongil

    2015-10-27

    Two-dimensional van der Waals (2D vdWs) materials are a class of new materials that can provide important resources for future electronics and materials sciences due to their unique physical properties. Among 2D vdWs materials, black phosphorus (BP) has exhibited significant potential for use in electronic and optoelectronic applications because of its allotropic properties, high mobility, and direct and narrow band gap. Here, we demonstrate a few-layered BP-based nonvolatile memory transistor with a poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) ferroelectric top gate insulator. Experiments showed that our BP-based ferroelectric transistors operate satisfactorily at room temperature in ambient air and exhibit a clear memory window. Unlike conventional ambipolar BP transistors, our ferroelectric transistors showed only p-type characteristics due to the carbon-fluorine (C-F) dipole effect of the P(VDF-TrFE) layer, as well as the highest linear mobility value of 1159 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with a 10(3) on/off current ratio. For more advanced memory applications beyond unit memory devices, we implemented two memory inverter circuits, a resistive-load inverter circuit and a complementary inverter circuit, combined with an n-type molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheet. Our memory inverter circuits displayed a clear memory window of 15 V and memory output voltage efficiency of 95%.

  13. 5 V driving organic non-volatile memory transistors with poly(vinyl alcohol) gate insulator and poly(3-hexylthiophene) channel layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Sungho; Seo, Jooyeok; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2015-10-01

    Organic non-volatile memory devices were fabricated by employing organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) as a gate insulating layer and a channel layer, respectively. The 10-nm-thick nickel layers were inserted for better charge injection between the channel layer and the top source/drain electrodes. The fabricated PVA-OFET memory devices could be operated at low voltages (≤5 V) and showed pronounced hysteresis characteristics in the transfer curves, even though very small hysteresis was measured from the output curves. The degree of hysteresis was considerably dependent on the ratio of channel width (W) to channel length (L). The PVA-OFET memory device with the smaller W/L ratio (25) exhibited better retention characteristics upon 700 cycles of writing-reading-erasing-reading operations, which was assigned to the stability of charged states in devices.

  14. High performance non-volatile ferroelectric copolymer memory based on a ZnO nanowire transistor fabricated on a transparent substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Nedic, Stanko; Welland, Mark E-mail: mew10@cam.ac.uk; Tea Chun, Young; Chu, Daping E-mail: mew10@cam.ac.uk; Hong, Woong-Ki

    2014-01-20

    A high performance ferroelectric non-volatile memory device based on a top-gate ZnO nanowire (NW) transistor fabricated on a glass substrate is demonstrated. The ZnO NW channel was spin-coated with a poly (vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) layer acting as a top-gate dielectric without buffer layer. Electrical conductance modulation and memory hysteresis are achieved by a gate electric field induced reversible electrical polarization switching of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin film. Furthermore, the fabricated device exhibits a memory window of ∼16.5 V, a high drain current on/off ratio of ∼10{sup 5}, a gate leakage current below ∼300 pA, and excellent retention characteristics for over 10{sup 4} s.

  15. Flexible non-volatile optical memory thin-film transistor device with over 256 distinct levels based on an organic bicomponent blend.

    PubMed

    Leydecker, Tim; Herder, Martin; Pavlica, Egon; Bratina, Gvido; Hecht, Stefan; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Organic nanomaterials are attracting a great deal of interest for use in flexible electronic applications such as logic circuits, displays and solar cells. These technologies have already demonstrated good performances, but flexible organic memories are yet to deliver on all their promise in terms of volatility, operational voltage, write/erase speed, as well as the number of distinct attainable levels. Here, we report a multilevel non-volatile flexible optical memory thin-film transistor based on a blend of a reference polymer semiconductor, namely poly(3-hexylthiophene), and a photochromic diarylethene, switched with ultraviolet and green light irradiation. A three-terminal device featuring over 256 (8 bit storage) distinct current levels was fabricated, the memory states of which could be switched with 3 ns laser pulses. We also report robustness over 70 write-erase cycles and non-volatility exceeding 500 days. The device was implemented on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate, validating the concept for integration into wearable electronics and smart nanodevices.

  16. Flexible non-volatile optical memory thin-film transistor device with over 256 distinct levels based on an organic bicomponent blend.

    PubMed

    Leydecker, Tim; Herder, Martin; Pavlica, Egon; Bratina, Gvido; Hecht, Stefan; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Organic nanomaterials are attracting a great deal of interest for use in flexible electronic applications such as logic circuits, displays and solar cells. These technologies have already demonstrated good performances, but flexible organic memories are yet to deliver on all their promise in terms of volatility, operational voltage, write/erase speed, as well as the number of distinct attainable levels. Here, we report a multilevel non-volatile flexible optical memory thin-film transistor based on a blend of a reference polymer semiconductor, namely poly(3-hexylthiophene), and a photochromic diarylethene, switched with ultraviolet and green light irradiation. A three-terminal device featuring over 256 (8 bit storage) distinct current levels was fabricated, the memory states of which could be switched with 3 ns laser pulses. We also report robustness over 70 write-erase cycles and non-volatility exceeding 500 days. The device was implemented on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate, validating the concept for integration into wearable electronics and smart nanodevices. PMID:27323302

  17. Flexible non-volatile optical memory thin-film transistor device with over 256 distinct levels based on an organic bicomponent blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leydecker, Tim; Herder, Martin; Pavlica, Egon; Bratina, Gvido; Hecht, Stefan; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Organic nanomaterials are attracting a great deal of interest for use in flexible electronic applications such as logic circuits, displays and solar cells. These technologies have already demonstrated good performances, but flexible organic memories are yet to deliver on all their promise in terms of volatility, operational voltage, write/erase speed, as well as the number of distinct attainable levels. Here, we report a multilevel non-volatile flexible optical memory thin-film transistor based on a blend of a reference polymer semiconductor, namely poly(3-hexylthiophene), and a photochromic diarylethene, switched with ultraviolet and green light irradiation. A three-terminal device featuring over 256 (8 bit storage) distinct current levels was fabricated, the memory states of which could be switched with 3 ns laser pulses. We also report robustness over 70 write-erase cycles and non-volatility exceeding 500 days. The device was implemented on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate, validating the concept for integration into wearable electronics and smart nanodevices.

  18. Flexible non-volatile optical memory thin-film transistor device with over 256 distinct levels based on an organic bicomponent blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leydecker, Tim; Herder, Martin; Pavlica, Egon; Bratina, Gvido; Hecht, Stefan; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Organic nanomaterials are attracting a great deal of interest for use in flexible electronic applications such as logic circuits, displays and solar cells. These technologies have already demonstrated good performances, but flexible organic memories are yet to deliver on all their promise in terms of volatility, operational voltage, write/erase speed, as well as the number of distinct attainable levels. Here, we report a multilevel non-volatile flexible optical memory thin-film transistor based on a blend of a reference polymer semiconductor, namely poly(3-hexylthiophene), and a photochromic diarylethene, switched with ultraviolet and green light irradiation. A three-terminal device featuring over 256 (8 bit storage) distinct current levels was fabricated, the memory states of which could be switched with 3 ns laser pulses. We also report robustness over 70 write–erase cycles and non-volatility exceeding 500 days. The device was implemented on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate, validating the concept for integration into wearable electronics and smart nanodevices.

  19. Reversible strain-induced magnetization switching in FeGa nanomagnets: Pathway to a rewritable, non-volatile, non-toggle, extremely low energy straintronic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Hasnain; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-12-01

    We report reversible strain-induced magnetization switching between two stable/metastable states in ~300 nm sized FeGa nanomagnets delineated on a piezoelectric PMN-PT substrate. Voltage of one polarity applied across the substrate generates compressive strain in a nanomagnet and switches its magnetization to one state, while voltage of the opposite polarity generates tensile strain and switches the magnetization back to the original state. The two states can encode the two binary bits, and, using the right voltage polarity, one can write either bit deterministically. This portends an ultra-energy-efficient non-volatile “non-toggle” memory.

  20. Reversible strain-induced magnetization switching in FeGa nanomagnets: Pathway to a rewritable, non-volatile, non-toggle, extremely low energy straintronic memory

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hasnain; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    We report reversible strain-induced magnetization switching between two stable/metastable states in ~300 nm sized FeGa nanomagnets delineated on a piezoelectric PMN-PT substrate. Voltage of one polarity applied across the substrate generates compressive strain in a nanomagnet and switches its magnetization to one state, while voltage of the opposite polarity generates tensile strain and switches the magnetization back to the original state. The two states can encode the two binary bits, and, using the right voltage polarity, one can write either bit deterministically. This portends an ultra-energy-efficient non-volatile “non-toggle” memory. PMID:26657829

  1. Reversible strain-induced magnetization switching in FeGa nanomagnets: Pathway to a rewritable, non-volatile, non-toggle, extremely low energy straintronic memory.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Hasnain; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    We report reversible strain-induced magnetization switching between two stable/metastable states in ~300 nm sized FeGa nanomagnets delineated on a piezoelectric PMN-PT substrate. Voltage of one polarity applied across the substrate generates compressive strain in a nanomagnet and switches its magnetization to one state, while voltage of the opposite polarity generates tensile strain and switches the magnetization back to the original state. The two states can encode the two binary bits, and, using the right voltage polarity, one can write either bit deterministically. This portends an ultra-energy-efficient non-volatile "non-toggle" memory. PMID:26657829

  2. Optical and electrical properties of undoped and doped Ge nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Size-dependent photoluminescence characteristics from Ge nanocrystals embedded in different oxide matrices have been studied to demonstrate the light emission in the visible wavelength from quantum-confined charge carriers. On the other hand, the energy transfer mechanism between Er ions and Ge nanocrystals has been exploited to exhibit the emission in the optical fiber communication wavelength range. A broad visible electroluminescence, attributed to electron hole recombination of injected carriers in Ge nanocrystals, has been achieved. Nonvolatile flash-memory devices using Ge nanocrystal floating gates with different tunneling oxides including SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, and variable oxide thickness [VARIOT] tunnel barrier have been fabricated. An improved charge storage characteristic with enhanced retention time has been achieved for the devices using VARIOT oxide floating gate. PMID:22348653

  3. Quantum Dot Gate Three-State and Nonvolatile Memory Field-Effect Transistors Using a ZnS/ZnMgS/ZnS Heteroepitaxial Stack as a Tunnel Insulator on Silicon-on-Insulator Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Ernesto; Chan, Pik-Yiu; Lingalugari, Murali; Ayers, John E.; Heller, Evan; Jain, Faquir

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the use of II-VI lattice-matched gate insulators in quantum dot gate three-state and flash nonvolatile memory structures. Using silicon-on-insulator wafers we have fabricated GeO x -cladded Ge quantum dot (QD) floating gate nonvolatile memory field-effect transistor devices using ZnS-Zn0.95Mg0.05S-ZnS tunneling layers. The II-VI heteroepitaxial stack is nearly lattice-matched and is grown using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a silicon channel. This stack reduces the interface state density, improving threshold voltage variation, particularly in sub-22-nm devices. Simulations using self-consistent solutions of the Poisson and Schrödinger equations show the transfer of charge to the QD layers in three-state as well as nonvolatile memory cells.

  4. Impact of metal nano layer thickness on tunneling oxide and memory performance of core-shell iridium-oxide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, W.; Maikap, S.; Tien, T.-C.; Li, W.-C.; Yang, J.-R.

    2011-10-01

    The impact of iridium-oxide (IrO{sub x}) nano layer thickness on the tunneling oxide and memory performance of IrO{sub x} metal nanocrystals in an n-Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/IrO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/IrO{sub x} structure has been investigated. A thinner (1.5 nm) IrO{sub x} nano layer has shown better memory performance than that of a thicker one (2.5 nm). Core-shell IrO{sub x} nanocrystals with a small average diameter of 2.4 nm and a high density of {approx}2 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} have been observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. The IrO{sub x} nanocrystals are confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A large memory window of 3.0 V at a sweeping gate voltage of {+-}5 V and 7.2 V at a sweeping gate voltage of {+-} 8 V has been observed for the 1.5 nm-thick IrO{sub x} nano layer memory capacitors with a small equivalent oxide thickness of 8 nm. The electrons and holes are trapped in the core and annular regions of the IrO{sub x} nanocrystals, respectively, which is explained by Gibbs free energy. High electron and hole-trapping densities are found to be 1.5 x 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} and 2 x 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}, respectively, due to the small size and high-density of IrO{sub x} nanocrystals. Excellent program/erase endurance of >10{sup 6} cycles and good retention of 10{sup 4} s with a good memory window of >1.2 V under a small operation voltage of {+-} 5 V are obtained. A large memory size of >10 Tbit/sq. in. can be designed by using the IrO{sub x} nanocrystals. This study is not only important for the IrO{sub x} nanocrystal charge-trapping memory investigation but it will also help to design future metal nanocrystal flash memory.

  5. Resistive Switching of Individual Dislocations in Insulating Perovskites -- A Potential Route Towards Nanoscale Non-Volatile Memories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szot, Krzystof; Speier, Wolfgang; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Waser, Rainer

    2006-03-01

    Electrically controlled resistive switching effects have been reported for a broad variety of binary and multinary oxides in recent years. In particular, titanates, zirconates, and manganites have been in the focus of the studies. In many cases, the mechanism of the switching and the geometrical extension of the phenomenon (filaments vs. bulk) are still under discussion. In this work, we present evidence for a redox-based switching mechanism and we indicate a potential route towards highly scalable non-volatile memories based on this switching effect. The challenge our work is to utilize resistive switching mechanism with the aim to construct active electronic elements on a real nanoscale level, here by reversibly switching the electrical properties of individual dislocations by electrical stimuli. We demonstrate that standard undoped SrTiO3 single crystals, utilized as a model system, exhibit a switching behavior along filaments based on dislocations, mediated by oxygen transport. For this, we employed a three-step procedure: the crystals were, at first, annealed at elevated temperatures under reducing conditions, then exposed to 200mbar O2 pressure at room temperature, and finally subjected to an electric field under ultrahigh vacuum (electroformation). This treatment induced in a metal-insulator (SrTiO3)-metal (MIM) system a transition to metallic state. A hysteretic behavior appears after dynamical polarization of the MIM structure at the maximum electroforming currents. The shape of the I/V curve has the typical signature for bi-stable switching known for these types of perovskites. The positive temperature dependence of the resistance of the low- (LRS) and the high-resistance (HRS) state clearly identifies both states to be metallic in character. The inhomogeneity of the electrical transport becomes directly evident from a simple optical inspection and the conductivity maps as measured by LC-AFM of a planar structure. One can trace the formation of the

  6. Nonvolatile memory thin-film transistors using biodegradable chicken albumen gate insulator and oxide semiconductor channel on eco-friendly paper substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Jung; Jeon, Da-Bin; Park, Jung-Ho; Ryu, Min-Ki; Yang, Jong-Heon; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Kim, Gi-Heon; Yoon, Sung-Min

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory thin-film transistors (TFTs) fabricated on paper substrates were proposed as one of the eco-friendly electronic devices. The gate stack was composed of chicken albumen gate insulator and In-Ga-Zn-O semiconducting channel layers. All the fabrication processes were performed below 120 °C. To improve the process compatibility of the synthethic paper substrate, an Al2O3 thin film was introduced as adhesion and barrier layers by atomic layer deposition. The dielectric properties of biomaterial albumen gate insulator were also enhanced by the preparation of Al2O3 capping layer. The nonvolatile bistabilities were realized by the switching phenomena of residual polarization within the albumen thin film. The fabricated device exhibited a counterclockwise hysteresis with a memory window of 11.8 V, high on/off ratio of approximately 1.1 × 10(6), and high saturation mobility (μsat) of 11.5 cm(2)/(V s). Furthermore, these device characteristics were not markedly degraded even after the delamination and under the bending situration. When the curvature radius was set as 5.3 cm, the ION/IOFF ratio and μsat were obtained to be 5.9 × 10(6) and 7.9 cm(2)/(V s), respectively.

  7. Core-Shell Zn x Cd1- x Se/Zn y Cd1- y Se Quantum Dots for Nonvolatile Memory and Electroluminescent Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amoody, Fuad; Suarez, Ernesto; Rodriguez, Angel; Heller, E.; Huang, Wenli; Jain, F.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a floating quantum dot (QD) gate nonvolatile memory device using high-energy-gap Zn y Cd1- y Se-cladded Zn x Cd1- x Se quantum dots ( y > x) with tunneling layers comprising nearly lattice-matched semiconductors (e.g., ZnS/ZnMgS) on Si channels. Also presented is the fabrication of an electroluminescent (EL) device with embedded cladded ZnCdSe quantum dots. These ZnCdSe quantum dots were embedded between indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass and a top Schottky metal electrode deposited on a thin CsF barrier. These QDs, which were nucleated in a photo-assisted microwave plasma (PMP) metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, were grown between the source and drain regions on a p-type silicon substrate of the nonvolatile memory device. The composition of QD cladding, which relates to the value of y in Zn y Cd1- y Se, was engineered by the intensity of ultraviolet light, which controlled the incorporation of zinc in ZnCdSe. The QD quality is comparable to those deposited by other methods. Characteristics and modeling of the II-VI quantum dots as well as two diverse types of devices are presented in this paper.

  8. Electrical Bistabilities and Conduction Mechanisms of Nonvolatile Memories Based on a Polymethylsilsesquioxane Insulating Layer Containing CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zehao; Ooi, Poh Choon; Li, Fushan; Yun, Dong Yeol; Kim, Tae Whan

    2015-10-01

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices based on a metal-insulator-metal structure consisting of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots embedded in polymethylsilsesquioxane dielectric layers were fabricated. The current-voltage ( I- V) curves showed a bistable current behavior and the presence of hysteresis. The current-time ( I- t) curves showed that the fabricated NVM memory devices were stable up to 1 × 104 s with a distinct ON/OFF ratio of 104 and were reprogrammable when the endurance test was performed. The extrapolation of the I- t curve to 105 s with corresponding current ON/OFF ratio 1 × 105 indicated a long performance stability of the NVM devices. Schottky emission, Poole-Frenkel emission, trapped-charge limited-current and Child-Langmuir law were proposed as the dominant conduction mechanisms for the fabricated NVM devices based on the obtained I- V characteristics.

  9. Characterization of single-sided gate-to-drain non-overlapped implantation nMOSFETs for multi-functional non-volatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, E. S.; Chen, Y. F.; Chang, C. C.; Peng, K. M.; Chou, S. W.; Ho, C. W.; Huang, C. F.; Gong, J.

    2012-02-01

    Novel single-sided non-overlapped implantation (SNOI) nMOSFETs are characterized for their capability of multiple programmable memory functions. These devices can be operated as mask ROMs, EEPROMs or anti-fuses by using a pure logic processing. To function as mask ROMs, they can be mask-coded with the source drain extension (SDE) implantation. They can also be used as EEPROM devices by trapping charges in the side-wall nitride spacers. Furthermore, SNOI devices can be used as antifuses by introducing the punch-through stress at the drain side. The SNOI devices were successfully demonstrated for antifuse operations with an extremely high program/initial readout current ratio exceeding 10 9 and a program speed as high as 1 μs. These novel SNOI devices not only provide non-volatile memory solutions in standard CMOS processing but also give a flexible choice among mask ROM, antifuse and EEPROM functions.

  10. Device and Circuit Modeling and Development of a Non-Volatile Random Access Memory Cell, Utilizing AN Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Floating-Gate Transistor Based Technology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggio, Salvatore Richard, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    High density storage mechanisms are generally created using either magnetic or optical implementation techniques. Both of these techniques require mechanical transport of the medium and, therefore, have low reliability factors. These devices also generate unwanted low level ambient noise, which is of particular concern when considering modern quiet office standards. Additionally, optical techniques tend to be read-only in nature. Both mechanisms exhibit random access times that are measured in milli-seconds, rather than in micro-seconds. Therefore, the creation of a non-volatile random access memory as a replacement for the above mentioned storage techniques would be of great advantage in terms of access time, reliability, and ambient noise level. Described within are the device and circuit modeling and fabrication techniques used to develop a non-volatile random access memory cell from an amorphous silicon thin -film transistor based technology. Amorphous silicon thin-film transistors are fabricated by depositing the metal, the insulator and the semiconductor materials with a sputtering mechanism in a vacuum at 220 degrees centigrade, rather than by diffusion at 2000 degrees centigrade, as is done with crystalline silicon. By depositing a metal in the insulator, which is located between the gate and the channel, and by using an insulator material with extremely high resistivity, one can store charge in the gate region for a long period of time without external power. For example, this period of time can be as little as one week or as long as over one year. With a periodic refresh, one can extend the memory time of this storage mechanism indefinitely. Thin-film transistors can be deposited on a variety of materials such as glass, quartz or plastic by means of a stationary or continuous motion fabrication system. This material can be either rigid or flexible, and can be comparatively large in size. This allows for much greater circuit density than a standard

  11. Non-exponential resistive switching in Ag2S memristors: a key to nanometer-scale non-volatile memory devices.

    PubMed

    Gubicza, Agnes; Csontos, Miklós; Halbritter, András; Mihály, György

    2015-03-14

    The dynamics of resistive switchings in nanometer-scale metallic junctions formed between an inert metallic tip and an Ag film covered by a thin Ag2S layer are investigated. Our thorough experimental analysis and numerical simulations revealed that the resistance change upon a switching bias voltage pulse exhibits a strongly non-exponential behaviour yielding markedly different response times at different bias levels. Our results demonstrate the merits of Ag2S nanojunctions as nanometer-scale non-volatile memory cells with stable switching ratios, high endurance as well as fast response to write/erase, and an outstanding stability against read operations at technologically optimal bias and current levels. PMID:25684683

  12. Investigation of resistive switching in Cu-doped HfO2 thin film for multilevel non-volatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Manhong; Zhang, Sen; Li, Yingtao; Zuo, Qingyun; Yang, Jianhong; Liu, Ming

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the resistive switching characteristics in a Cu/HfO2:Cu/Pt sandwiched structure is investigated for multilevel non-volatile memory applications. The device shows excellent resistive switching performance, including good endurance, long retention time, fast operation speed and a large storage window (ROFF/RON>107). Based on the temperature-dependent test results, the formation of Cu conducting filaments is believed to be the reason for the resistance switching from the OFF state to the ON state. By integrating the resistive switching mechanism study and the device fabrication, different resistance values are achieved using different compliance currents in the program process. These resistance values can be easily distinguished in a large temperature range, and can be maintained over 10 years by extrapolating retention data at room temperature. The integrated experiment and mechanism studies set up the foundation for the development of high-performance multilevel RRAM.

  13. Sub-band transport mechanism and switching properties for resistive switching nonvolatile memories with structure of silver/aluminum oxide/p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanhong; Li, La; Wang, Song; Gao, Ping; Pan, Lujun; Zhang, Jialiang; Zhou, Peng; Li, Jinhua; Weng, Zhankun

    2015-02-09

    In this paper, we discuss a model of sub-band in resistive switching nonvolatile memories with a structure of silver/aluminum oxide/p-type silicon (Ag/Al{sub x}O{sub y}/p-Si), in which the sub-band is formed by overlapping of wave functions of electron-occupied oxygen vacancies in Al{sub x}O{sub y} layer deposited by atomic layer deposition technology. The switching processes exhibit the characteristics of the bipolarity, discreteness, and no need of forming process, all of which are discussed deeply based on the model of sub-band. The relationships between the SET voltages and distribution of trap levels are analyzed qualitatively. The semiconductor-like behaviors of ON-state resistance affirm the sub-band transport mechanism instead of the metal filament mechanism.

  14. Four-state memory based on a giant and non-volatile converse magnetoelectric effect in FeAl/PIN-PMN-PT structure

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanping; Gao, Cunxu; Chen, Zhendong; Xi, Shibo; Shao, Weixia; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Guilin; Li, Jiangong

    2016-01-01

    We report a stable, tunable and non-volatile converse magnetoelectric effect (ME) in a new type of FeAl/PIN-PMN-PT heterostructure at room temperature, with a giant electrical modulation of magnetization for which the maximum relative magnetization change (ΔM/M) is up to 66%. The 109° ferroelastic domain switching in the PIN-PMN-PT and coupling with the ferromagnetic (FM) film via uniaxial anisotropy originating from the PIN-PMN-PT (011) surface are the key roles in converse ME effect. We also propose here a new, four-state memory through which it is possible to modify the remanent magnetism state by adjusting the electric field. This work represents a helpful approach to securing electric-writing magnetic-reading with low energy consumption for future high-density information storage applications. PMID:27417902

  15. Four-state memory based on a giant and non-volatile converse magnetoelectric effect in FeAl/PIN-PMN-PT structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yanping; Gao, Cunxu; Chen, Zhendong; Xi, Shibo; Shao, Weixia; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Guilin; Li, Jiangong

    2016-07-01

    We report a stable, tunable and non-volatile converse magnetoelectric effect (ME) in a new type of FeAl/PIN-PMN-PT heterostructure at room temperature, with a giant electrical modulation of magnetization for which the maximum relative magnetization change (ΔM/M) is up to 66%. The 109° ferroelastic domain switching in the PIN-PMN-PT and coupling with the ferromagnetic (FM) film via uniaxial anisotropy originating from the PIN-PMN-PT (011) surface are the key roles in converse ME effect. We also propose here a new, four-state memory through which it is possible to modify the remanent magnetism state by adjusting the electric field. This work represents a helpful approach to securing electric-writing magnetic-reading with low energy consumption for future high-density information storage applications.

  16. Colossal Electroresistive Properties Of CSD Grown Pr{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} Films For Nonvolatile Memory Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, K. H.; Joshi, U. S.

    2010-12-01

    Colossal electroresistance effects upon application of electric field in perovskite oxide Pr{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}(PCMO) thin films, which is a promising candidate for resistance random access memory (RRAM) device have been investigated. Nanocrystalline PCMO films were grown on SiO{sub 2} substrates by chemical solution deposition and crystallized at 700 deg. C under different gas atmospheres. Four terminal current voltage characteristics of Ag/PCMO/Ag planar geometry exhibited a sharp transition from a low resistance state (LRS) to a high resistance state (HRS) with a resistance switching ratio of as high as 1100% at room temperature. Nonvolatility and high retention was confirmed by electric pulse induced resistive switching measurements. The resistance switching ratios were found to depend on the annealing conditions, suggesting an interaction between the nonlattice oxygen and oxygen vacancies and/or the cationic vacancy.

  17. Four-state memory based on a giant and non-volatile converse magnetoelectric effect in FeAl/PIN-PMN-PT structure.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanping; Gao, Cunxu; Chen, Zhendong; Xi, Shibo; Shao, Weixia; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Guilin; Li, Jiangong

    2016-01-01

    We report a stable, tunable and non-volatile converse magnetoelectric effect (ME) in a new type of FeAl/PIN-PMN-PT heterostructure at room temperature, with a giant electrical modulation of magnetization for which the maximum relative magnetization change (ΔM/M) is up to 66%. The 109° ferroelastic domain switching in the PIN-PMN-PT and coupling with the ferromagnetic (FM) film via uniaxial anisotropy originating from the PIN-PMN-PT (011) surface are the key roles in converse ME effect. We also propose here a new, four-state memory through which it is possible to modify the remanent magnetism state by adjusting the electric field. This work represents a helpful approach to securing electric-writing magnetic-reading with low energy consumption for future high-density information storage applications. PMID:27417902

  18. Resistive Switching of Individual Dislocations in Insulating Perovskites -- A Potential Route Towards Nanoscale Non-Volatile Memories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szot, Krzystof; Speier, Wolfgang; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Waser, Rainer

    2006-03-01

    Electrically controlled resistive switching effects have been reported for a broad variety of binary and multinary oxides in recent years. In particular, titanates, zirconates, and manganites have been in the focus of the studies. In many cases, the mechanism of the switching and the geometrical extension of the phenomenon (filaments vs. bulk) are still under discussion. In this work, we present evidence for a redox-based switching mechanism and we indicate a potential route towards highly scalable non-volatile memories based on this switching effect. The challenge our work is to utilize resistive switching mechanism with the aim to construct active electronic elements on a real nanoscale level, here by reversibly switching the electrical properties of individual dislocations by electrical stimuli. We demonstrate that standard undoped SrTiO3 single crystals, utilized as a model system, exhibit a switching behavior along filaments based on dislocations, mediated by oxygen transport. For this, we employed a three-step procedure: the crystals were, at first, annealed at elevated temperatures under reducing conditions, then exposed to 200mbar O2 pressure at room temperature, and finally subjected to an electric field under ultrahigh vacuum (electroformation). This treatment induced in a metal-insulator (SrTiO3)-metal (MIM) system a transition to metallic state. A hysteretic behavior appears after dynamical polarization of the MIM structure at the maximum electroforming currents. The shape of the I/V curve has the typical signature for bi-stable switching known for these types of perovskites. The positive temperature dependence of the resistance of the low- (LRS) and the high-resistance (HRS) state clearly identifies both states to be metallic in character. The inhomogeneity of the electrical transport becomes directly evident from a simple optical inspection and the conductivity maps as measured by LC-AFM of a planar structure. One can trace the formation of the

  19. GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices with InAs quantum dots as charge storage nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Sk Masiul Chowdhury, Sisir; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Nagabhushan, B.; Banerji, P.; Chakraborty, S.

    2015-06-24

    Ultra-thin InP passivated GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices were fabricated using InAs quantum dots (QDs) as charge storing elements by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique to study the efficacy of the QDs as charge storage elements. The grown QDs were embedded between two high-k dielectric such as HfO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, which were used for tunneling and control oxide layers, respectively. The size and density of the QDs were found to be 5 nm and 1.8×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}, respectively. The device with a structure Metal/ZrO{sub 2}/InAs QDs/HfO{sub 2}/GaAs/Metal shows maximum memory window equivalent to 6.87 V. The device also exhibits low leakage current density of the order of 10{sup −6} A/cm{sup 2} and reasonably good charge retention characteristics. The low value of leakage current in the fabricated memory device is attributed to the Coulomb blockade effect influenced by quantum confinement as well as reduction of interface trap states by ultra-thin InP passivation on GaAs prior to HfO{sub 2} deposition.

  20. Integration of lead-free ferroelectric on HfO2/Si (100) for high performance non-volatile memory applications

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Souvik; Maurya, Deepam; Clavel, Michael; Zhou, Yuan; Halder, Nripendra N.; Hudait, Mantu K.; Banerji, Pallab; Priya, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel lead-free ferroelectric thin film (1-x)BaTiO3-xBa(Cu1/3Nb2/3)O3 (x = 0.025) (BT-BCN) integrated on to HfO2 buffered Si for non-volatile memory (NVM) applications. Piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM), x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were employed to establish the ferroelectricity in BT-BCN thin films. PFM study reveals that the domains reversal occurs with 180° phase change by applying external voltage, demonstrating its effectiveness for NVM device applications. X-ray photoelectron microscopy was used to investigate the band alignments between atomic layer deposited HfO2 and pulsed laser deposited BT-BCN films. Programming and erasing operations were explained on the basis of band-alignments. The structure offers large memory window, low leakage current, and high and low capacitance values that were easily distinguishable even after ~106 s, indicating strong charge storage potential. This study explains a new approach towards the realization of ferroelectric based memory devices integrated on Si platform and also opens up a new possibility to embed the system within current complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processing technology. PMID:25683062

  1. Shape-memory bionanocomposites based on chitin nanocrystals and thermoplastic polyurethane with a highly crystalline soft segment.

    PubMed

    Saralegi, Ainara; Fernandes, Susana C M; Alonso-Varona, Ana; Palomares, Teodoro; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph; Eceiza, Arantxa; Corcuera, Maria Angeles

    2013-12-01

    Shape-memory bionanocomposites based on a naturally sourced segmented thermoplastic polyurethane and chitin nanocrystals were synthesized, and their mechanical properties and thermally activated shape-memory behavior were studied. The chitin nanocrystals were incorporated during the synthesis of the prepolymer made from a castor oil-based difunctional polyol and hexamethylene diisocyanate. The polymerization was completed by addition of propanediol, as a corn-sugar based chain extender, bringing the weight content of components from renewable resources to >60%. Thermal analysis of the bionanocomposites revealed a phase-separated morphology, which is composed of soft and hard domains, which bestow the material with two melting transitions at 60 and 125 °C, that are exploitable for a shape memory effect. The soft segment is responsible for temporary shape fixing, while the hard segment crystallites are responsible for the permanent shape. The introduction of small amounts (0.25-2 wt %) of chitin nanocrystals was found to increase the crystallinity of the hard segment by way of nucleation, which in turn improves the shape recovery considerably. The thermally activated shape-memory behavior of the synthesized bionancomposites is exploitable with a programming and release temperature of 60 °C. The materials display good in vitro cell response, as shown by short-term cytotoxicity assays, and therefore, the bionanocomposites appear to be potentially useful for biomedical applications.

  2. Investigation of a High Quality and Ultraviolet-Light Transparent Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Nitride Film for Non-Volatile Memory Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chin-Kun; Ying, Tser-Liang; Wei, Chih-Shih; Liu, Lu-Min; Cheng, Huang-Chung; Lin, Mou-Shiung

    1995-09-01

    A high quality and ultraviolet-light transparent (UV-transparent) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride ( SiN x) film is developed to form passivation layer for non-volatile memory devices. Comparing to the conventional PECVD SiN x film known to have tensile stress and opacity to ultraviolet-light (UV-light), the proposed SiN x film with very low compressive stress ( <1×109 dyn/cm2) and excellent UV-transmittance (>70% for 1.6 µ m-thick film) can be achieved. The film stress is strongly related to RF input power during deposition process. The UV-transmittance is influenced by pressure and SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It is also shown that the UV-transmittance is closely correlated to refractive index (RI), film density as well as N/Si ratio inside the film. This SiN x film has been successfully applied to erasable programming read-only memory (EPROM's) devices, and very good UV-erasability and reliability performances are demonstrated.

  3. Fabrication of InGaZnO Nonvolatile Memory Devices at Low Temperature of 150 degrees C for Applications in Flexible Memory Displays and Transparency Coating on Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Hanh, Nguyen Hong; Jang, Kyungsoo; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    We directly deposited amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices with oxynitride-oxide-dioxide (OOO) stack structures on plastic substrate by a DC pulsed magnetron sputtering and inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICPCVD) system, using a low-temperature of 150 degrees C. The fabricated bottom gate a-IGZO NVM devices have a wide memory window with a low operating voltage during programming and erasing, due to an effective control of the gate dielectrics. In addition, after ten years, the memory device retains a memory window of over 73%, with a programming duration of only 1 ms. Moreover, the a-IGZO films show high optical transmittance of over 85%, and good uniformity with a root mean square (RMS) roughness of 0.26 nm. This film is a promising candidate to achieve flexible displays and transparency on plastic substrates because of the possibility of low-temperature deposition, and the high transparent properties of a-IGZO films. These results demonstrate that the a-IGZO NVM devices obtained at low-temperature have a suitable programming and erasing efficiency for data storage under low-voltage conditions, in combination with excellent charge retention characteristics, and thus show great potential application in flexible memory displays. PMID:27483835

  4. Magnetic Random Access Memory based non-volatile asynchronous Muller cell for ultra-low power autonomous applications

    SciTech Connect

    Di Pendina, G. E-mail: eldar.zianbetov@cea.fr Zianbetov, E. E-mail: eldar.zianbetov@cea.fr; Beigne, E. E-mail: eldar.zianbetov@cea.fr

    2015-05-07

    Micro and nano electronic integrated circuit domain is today mainly driven by the advent of the Internet of Things for which the constraints are strong, especially in terms of power consumption and autonomy, not only during the computing phases but also during the standby or idle phases. In such ultra-low power applications, the circuit has to meet new constraints mainly linked to its changing energetic environment: long idle phases, automatic wake up, data back-up when the circuit is sporadically turned off, and ultra-low voltage power supply operation. Such circuits have to be completely autonomous regarding their unstable environment, while remaining in an optimum energetic configuration. Therefore, we propose in this paper the first MRAM-based non-volatile asynchronous Muller cell. This cell has been simulated and characterized in a very advanced 28 nm CMOS fully depleted silicon-on-insulator technology, presenting good power performance results due to an extremely efficient body biasing control together with ultra-wide supply voltage range from 160 mV up to 920 mV. The leakage current can be reduced to 154 pA thanks to reverse body biasing. We also propose an efficient standard CMOS bulk version of this cell in order to be compatible with different fabrication processes.

  5. A light incident angle switchable ZnO nanorod memristor: reversible switching behavior between two non-volatile memory devices.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinjoo; Lee, Seunghyup; Lee, Junghan; Yong, Kijung

    2013-11-26

    A light incident angle selectivity of a memory device is demonstrated. As a model system, the ZnO resistive switching device has been selected. Electrical signal is reversibly switched between memristor and resistor behaviors by modulating the light incident angle on the device. Moreover, a liquid passivation layer is introduced to achieve stable and reversible exchange between the memristor and WORM behaviors.

  6. Laser-induced nondestructive patterning of a thin ferroelectric polymer film with controlled crystals using Ge8Sb2Te11 alloy layer for nonvolatile memory.

    PubMed

    Bae, Insung; Kim, Richard Hahnkee; Hwang, Sun Kak; Kang, Seok Ju; Park, Cheolmin

    2014-09-10

    We present a simple but robust nondestructive process for fabricating micropatterns of thin ferroelectric polymer films with controlled crystals. Our method is based on utilization of localized heat arising from thin Ge(8)Sb(2)Te(11) (GST) alloy layer upon exposure of 650 nm laser. The heat was generated on GST layer within a few hundred of nanosecond exposure and subsequently transferred to a thin poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) film deposited on GST layer. By controlling exposure time and power of the scanned laser, ferroelectric patterns of one or two microns in size are fabricated with various shape. In the micropatterned regions, ferroelectric polymer crystals were efficiently controlled in both degree of the crystallinity and the molecular orientations. Nonvolatile memory devices with laser scanned ferroelectric polymer layers exhibited excellent device performance of large remnant polarization, ON/OFF current ratio and data retention. The results are comparable with devices containing ferroelectric films thermally annealed at least for 2 h, making our process extremely efficient for saving time. Furthermore, our approach can be conveniently combined with a number of other functional organic materials for the future electronic applications.

  7. Determination of the optimal cation composition of ferroelectric (ZnxCd1-x)S thin films for applications to silicon-based nonvolatile memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Y.; Rokuta, E.; Jhoi, J.-H.; Tabata, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Kawai, T.

    2002-04-01

    Thin films of ferroelectric binary mixed II-VI compounds such as (ZnxCd1-x)S, as well as (ZnyCd1-y)Te and (ZnzCd1-z)Se (0⩽x,y,z⩽1), were examined from the standpoint of the application to Si-based nonvolatile memories. Electronic-band discontinuities at the ferroelectric-Si interface decreased significantly with increase in the atomic number of the constituent chalcogenide atoms, which favored (ZnxCd1-x)S as the most potential gate ferroelectrics among the three compounds. Polarization-field (P-E) characteristics of the (ZnxCd1-x)S films were found to largely depend on the cation composition. No hysteretic behaviors in the P-E curves were observed for high-Zn concentrations above x=0.5, while the P-E curves traced hysteretic loops due to the ferroelectricity for x<0.5. The remnant polarization was greatly dependent on the Zn concentration, and yielded a maximum of 0.03 μC/cm2 for x=0.3. On the other hand, the coercive field was not composition dependent, and was approximately 12 kV/cm.

  8. Surface modification of a ferroelectric polymer insulator for low-voltage readable nonvolatile memory in an organic field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Ho; Bae, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Min-Hoi; Keum, Chang-Min; Park, Jaehoon; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the sequential surface modification of a ferroelectric polymer insulator plays an essential role in both the enhancement of the carrier mobility and the shift in the turn-on voltage (Von) in an organic ferroelectric field-effect transistor (FeFET) for nonvolatile memory. The surface of a ferroelectric polymer insulator, poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene), is physicochemically modified by the successive treatments of ultraviolet-ozone (UVO) and CF4 plasma to understand how the surface morphology and the hydrophobicity affect the grain size, the mobility, and Von in the FeFET. In a pentacene-based FeFET, the CF4 plasma irradiation leads to the mobility enhancement by a factor of about 5 as well as the shift in Von toward a positive voltage direction while the UVO treatment results in only the shift in Von toward a negative voltage direction. It is found that the sequence of the two successive treatments is critical for tailoring interfacial interactions between the ferroelectric polymer insulator and the pentacene layer. The underlying mechanism for the mobility enhancement and the shift in Von is described in terms of the surface morphology and the nature of the built-in electric field.

  9. Laser-induced nondestructive patterning of a thin ferroelectric polymer film with controlled crystals using Ge8Sb2Te11 alloy layer for nonvolatile memory.

    PubMed

    Bae, Insung; Kim, Richard Hahnkee; Hwang, Sun Kak; Kang, Seok Ju; Park, Cheolmin

    2014-09-10

    We present a simple but robust nondestructive process for fabricating micropatterns of thin ferroelectric polymer films with controlled crystals. Our method is based on utilization of localized heat arising from thin Ge(8)Sb(2)Te(11) (GST) alloy layer upon exposure of 650 nm laser. The heat was generated on GST layer within a few hundred of nanosecond exposure and subsequently transferred to a thin poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) film deposited on GST layer. By controlling exposure time and power of the scanned laser, ferroelectric patterns of one or two microns in size are fabricated with various shape. In the micropatterned regions, ferroelectric polymer crystals were efficiently controlled in both degree of the crystallinity and the molecular orientations. Nonvolatile memory devices with laser scanned ferroelectric polymer layers exhibited excellent device performance of large remnant polarization, ON/OFF current ratio and data retention. The results are comparable with devices containing ferroelectric films thermally annealed at least for 2 h, making our process extremely efficient for saving time. Furthermore, our approach can be conveniently combined with a number of other functional organic materials for the future electronic applications. PMID:25127181

  10. Simulation of Nanoscale Two-Bit Not-And-type Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Nonvolatile Memory Devices with a Separated Double-Gate Fin Field Effect Transistor Structure Containing Different Tunneling Oxide Thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Se Woong; Park, Sang Su; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, Tae Whan

    2009-06-01

    Not-and (NAND)-type silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices with a separated double-gate (SDG) Fin field effect transistor structure were proposed to reduce the unit cell size of such memory devices and increase their memory density in comparison with that of conventional NVM devices. The proposed memory device consisted of a pair of control gates separated along the length of the Fin channel direction. Each SDG had a different thickness of the tunneling oxide to operate the proposed memory device as a two-bit/cell device. A technology computer-aided design simulation was performed to investigate the program/erase and two-bit characteristics. The simulation results show that the proposed devices can be used to increase the scaling down capability and charge storage density of NAND-type SONOS NVM devices.

  11. Defect states and charge trapping characteristics of HfO{sub 2} films for high performance nonvolatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Shao, Y. Y.; Lu, X. B. Zeng, M.; Zhang, Z.; Gao, X. S.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, J.-M.; Dai, J. Y.

    2014-10-27

    In this work, we present significant charge trapping memory effects of the metal-hafnium oxide-SiO{sub 2}-Si (MHOS) structure. The devices based on 800 °C annealed HfO{sub 2} film exhibit a large memory window of ∼5.1 V under ±10 V sweeping voltages and excellent charge retention properties with only small charge loss of ∼2.6% after more than 10{sup 4 }s retention. The outstanding memory characteristics are attributed to the high density of deep defect states in HfO{sub 2} films. We investigated the defect states in the HfO{sub 2} films by photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation measurements and found that the defect states distributed in deep energy levels ranging from 1.1 eV to 2.9 eV below the conduction band. Our work provides further insights for the charge trapping mechanisms of the HfO{sub 2} based MHOS devices.

  12. Charge-trapping characteristics of fluorinated thin ZrO{sub 2} film for nonvolatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. D. E-mail: laip@eee.hku.hk; Shi, R. P.; Lai, P. T. E-mail: laip@eee.hku.hk

    2014-04-21

    The effects of fluorine treatment on the charge-trapping characteristics of thin ZrO{sub 2} film are investigated by physical and electrical characterization techniques. The formation of silicate interlayer at the ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interface is effectively suppressed by fluorine passivation. However, excessive fluorine diffusion into the Si substrate deteriorates the quality of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface. Compared with the ZrO{sub 2}-based memory devices with no or excessive fluorine treatment, the one with suitable fluorine-treatment time shows higher operating speed and better retention due to less resistance of built-in electric field (formed by trapped electrons) against electron injection from the substrate and smaller trap-assisted tunneling leakage, resulting from improved ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces.

  13. Power reduction by power gating in differential pair type spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memories for low-power nonvolatile cache memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Takashi; Ikeda, Shoji; Hanyu, Takahiro; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Array operation currents in spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memories (STT-MRAMs) that use four differential pair type magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)-based memory cells (4T2MTJ, two 6T2MTJs and 8T2MTJ) are simulated and compared with that in SRAM. With L3 cache applications in mind, it is assumed that the memories are composed of 32 Mbyte capacity to be accessed in 64 byte in parallel. All the STT-MRAMs except for the 8T2MTJ one are designed with 32 bit fine-grained power gating scheme applied to eliminate static currents in the memory cells that are not accessed. The 8T2MTJ STT-MRAM, the cell’s design concept being not suitable for the fine-grained power gating, loads and saves 32 Mbyte data in 64 Mbyte unit per 1 Mbit sub-array in 2 × 103 cycles. It is shown that the array operation current of the 4T2MTJ STT-MRAM is 70 mA averaged in 15 ns write cycles at Vdd = 0.9 V. This is the smallest among the STT-MRAMs, about the half of the low standby power (LSTP) SRAM whose array operation current is totally dominated by the cells’ subthreshold leakage.

  14. Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boboila, Simona; Kim, Youngjae; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Desnoyers, Peter; Shipman, Galen M

    2012-01-01

    In this abstract, we study the performance and energy tradeoffs involved in migrating data analysis into the flash device, a process we refer to as Active Flash. The Active Flash paradigm is similar to 'active disks', which has received considerable attention. Active Flash allows us to move processing closer to data, thereby minimizing data movement costs and reducing power consumption. It enables true out-of-core computation. The conventional definition of out-of-core solvers refers to an approach to process data that is too large to fit in the main memory and, consequently, requires access to disk. However, in Active Flash, processing outside the host CPU literally frees the core and achieves real 'out-of-core' analysis. Moving analysis to data has long been desirable, not just at this level, but at all levels of the system hierarchy. However, this requires a detailed study on the tradeoffs involved in achieving analysis turnaround under an acceptable energy envelope. To this end, we first need to evaluate if there is enough computing power on the flash device to warrant such an exploration. Flash processors require decent computing power to run the internal logic pertaining to the Flash Translation Layer (FTL), which is responsible for operations such as address translation, garbage collection (GC) and wear-leveling. Modern SSDs are composed of multiple packages and several flash chips within a package. The packages are connected using multiple I/O channels to offer high I/O bandwidth. SSD computing power is also expected to be high enough to exploit such inherent internal parallelism within the drive to increase the bandwidth and to handle fast I/O requests. More recently, SSD devices are being equipped with powerful processing units and are even embedded with multicore CPUs (e.g. ARM Cortex-A9 embedded processor is advertised to reach 2GHz frequency and deliver 5000 DMIPS; OCZ RevoDrive X2 SSD has 4 SandForce controllers, each with 780MHz max frequency

  15. Effect of embedded metal nanocrystals on the resistive switching characteristics in NiN-based resistive random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Hee-Dong; Man Hong, Seok; Hyun Park, Ju; Su Jeon, Dong; Geun Kim, Tae

    2014-03-07

    The metal nanocrystals (NCs) embedded-NiN-based resistive random access memory cells are demonstrated using several metal NCs (i.e., Pt, Ni, and Ti) with different physical parameters in order to investigate the metal NC's dependence on resistive switching (RS) characteristics. First, depending on the electronegativity of metal, the size of metal NCs is determined and this affects the operating current of memory cells. If metal NCs with high electronegativity are incorporated, the size of the NCs is reduced; hence, the operating current is reduced owing to the reduced density of the electric field around the metal NCs. Second, the potential wells are formed by the difference of work function between the metal NCs and active layer, and the barrier height of the potential wells affects the level of operating voltage as well as the conduction mechanism of metal NCs embedded memory cells. Therefore, by understanding these correlations between the active layer and embedded metal NCs, we can optimize the RS properties of metal NCs embedded memory cells as well as predict their conduction mechanisms.

  16. A 600-µW ultra-low-power associative processor for image pattern recognition employing magnetic tunnel junction-based nonvolatile memories with autonomic intelligent power-gating scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yitao; Miura, Sadahiko; Honjo, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Shoji; Hanyu, Takahiro; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    A novel associative processor using magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)-based nonvolatile memories has been proposed and fabricated under a 90 nm CMOS/70 nm perpendicular-MTJ (p-MTJ) hybrid process for achieving the exceptionally low-power performance of image pattern recognition. A four-transistor 2-MTJ (4T-2MTJ) spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory was adopted to completely eliminate the standby power. A self-directed intelligent power-gating (IPG) scheme specialized for this associative processor is employed to optimize the operation power by only autonomously activating currently accessed memory cells. The operations of a prototype chip at 20 MHz are demonstrated by measurement. The proposed processor can successfully carry out single texture pattern matching within 6.5 µs using 128-dimension bag-of-feature patterns, and the measured average operation power of the entire processor core is only 600 µW. Compared with the twin chip designed with 6T static random access memory, 91.2% power reductions are achieved. More than 88.0% power reductions are obtained compared with the latest associative memories. The further power performance analysis is discussed in detail, which verifies the special superiority of the proposed processor in power consumption for large-capacity memory-based VLSI systems.

  17. Bistable Magnetoresistance Switching in Exchange-Coupled CoFe2O4-Fe3O4 Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices by Self-Assembly and Thermal Annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J; Ye, XC; Oh, SJ; Kikkawa, JM; Kagan, CR; Murray, CB

    2013-02-01

    Self-assembly of multicomponent nanocrystal superlattices provides a modular approach to the design of metamaterials by choosing constituent nanocrystal building blocks with desired physical properties and engineering the interparticle coupling. In this work, we report the self-assembly of binary nanocrystal superlattices composed of magnetically hard CoFe2O4 nanocrystals and magnetically soft Fe3O4 nanocrystals. Both NaZn13- and MgZn2-type CoFe2O4-Fe3O4 binary nanocrystal superlattices have been formed by the liquid-air interfacial assembly approach. Exchange coupling is achieved in both types of binary superlattices after thermal annealing under vacuum at 400 degrees C. The exchange-coupled CoFe2O4-Fe3O4 binary nanocrystal superlattices show single-phase magnetization switching behavior and magnetoresistance switching behavior below 200 K. The NaZn13-type CoFe2O4-Fe3O4 binary nanocrystal superlattices annealed at 500 degrees C even exhibit bistable magnetoresistance switching behavior at room temperature constituting a simple nonvolatile memory function.

  18. Effect of hydrogenation on the memory properties of Si nanocrystals obtained by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Young-Kwan; Park, Sangjin; Park, Youngsoo; Yoo, In-Kyeong; Cha, Daigil; Shin, Jung H.; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2006-11-01

    Effect of hydrogenation on memory properties has been studied for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures with Si nanocrystals fabricated using inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition and subsequent annealing. Hydrogenation induces a drastic increase of a dip in the quasistatic capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve of the MOS capacitor, caused by the reduction of the interface states due to hydrogen passivation. This is consistent with high-frequency C-V measurements showing more well-defined curves with less distortion in hydrogenated samples. After hydrogenation, the MOS device shows a significantly larger decrease of flatband voltage shift in electron charging than in hole charging, indicating more effective passivation of the defect states related to the electron charging. A longer retention time is found for electron charging after hydrogenation, but almost no change of charge loss rate for hole charging. These results suggest that an asymmetry exists in the effect of hydrogenation between electron and hole storage.

  19. An ultra-low-power area-efficient non-volatile memory in a 0.18 μm single-poly CMOS process for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyun, Jia; Peng, Feng; Shengguang, Zhang; Nanjian, Wu; Baiqin, Zhao; Su, Liu

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an ultra-low-power area-efficient non-volatile memory (NVM) in a 0.18 μm single-poly standard CMOS process for passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. In the memory cell, a novel low-power operation method is proposed to realize bi-directional Fowler—Nordheim tunneling during write operation. Furthermore, the cell is designed with PMOS transistors and coupling capacitors to minimize its area. In order to improve its reliability, the cell consists of double floating gates to store the data, and the 1 kbit NVM was implemented in a 0.18 μm single-poly standard CMOS process. The area of the memory cell and 1 kbit memory array is 96 μm2 and 0.12 mm2, respectively. The measured results indicate that the program/erase voltage ranges from 5 to 6 V The power consumption of the read/write operation is 0.19 μW/0.69 μW at a read/write rate of (268 kb/s)/(3.0 kb/s).

  20. Single-crystal C60 needle/CuPc nanoparticle double floating-gate for low-voltage organic transistors based non-volatile memory devices.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsuan-Chun; Lu, Chien; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Low-voltage organic field-effect transistor memory devices exhibiting a wide memory window, low power consumption, acceptable retention, endurance properties, and tunable memory performance are fabricated. The performance is achieved by employing single-crystal C60 needles and copper phthalocyanine nanoparticles to produce an ambipolar (hole/electron) trapping effect in a double floating-gate architecture. PMID:25358891

  1. Bipolar resistive switching performance of the nonvolatile memory cells based on (AgI){sub 0.2}(Ag{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}){sub 0.8} solid electrolyte films

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. B.; Guo, H. X.; Su, Y.; Xu, B.; Li, H. T.; Xia, Y. D.; Liu, Z. G.; Yin, J.; Yan, D. W.

    2009-09-01

    Resistive switching memory cells with polycrystalline (AgI){sub 0.2}(Ag{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}){sub 0.8} (AIMO) solid electrolyte films as storage medium were fabricated on SiO{sub 2}/Pt/Ti/Si substrates by using pulse laser deposition technique and focused ion beam lithography. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis have been employed to investigate the structure, the surface morphology, and the composition of AIMO thin films. The Ag/AIMO/Pt memory cells with sandwich structure exhibit stable, reproducible, and reliable resistive switching characteristics. The ratio of resistance between high resistance states and low resistance states can reach approx10{sup 5}. Moreover, the low resistance is approx500 OMEGA at a compliance current of 0.5 mA, which is favorable to reduce the power dissipation of the entire circuit. The switching-on mechanism has been discussed and the metallic conduction characteristic has also been verified. The fast response speed and the good retention properties further indicate that polycrystalline AIMO thin film is a potential candidate for the next generation nonvolatile memory.

  2. Nonvolatile Array Of Synapses For Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1993-01-01

    Elements of array programmed with help of ultraviolet light. A 32 x 32 very-large-scale integrated-circuit array of electronic synapses serves as building-block chip for analog neural-network computer. Synaptic weights stored in nonvolatile manner. Makes information content of array invulnerable to loss of power, and, by eliminating need for circuitry to refresh volatile synaptic memory, makes architecture simpler and more compact.

  3. Charge storage and tunneling mechanism of Ni nanocrystals embedded HfOx film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. X.; Zhang, T.; Wang, R. X.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Li, L. T.; Qiu, X. Y.

    2016-05-01

    A nano-floating gate memory structure based on Ni nanocrystals (NCs) embedded HfOx film is deposited by means of radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. Microstructure investigations reveal that self-organized Ni-NCs with diameters of 4-8 nm are well dispersed in amorphous HfOx matrix. Pt/Ni-NCs embedded HfOx/Si/Ag capacitor structures exhibit voltage-dependent capacitance-voltage hysteresis, and a maximum flat-band voltage shift of 1.5 V, corresponding to a charge storage density of 6.0 × 1012 electrons/cm2, is achieved. These capacitor memory cells exhibit good endurance characteristic up to 4 × 104 cycles and excellent retention performance of 105 s, fulfilling the requirements of next generation non-volatile memory devices. Schottky tunneling is proven to be responsible for electrons tunneling in these capacitors.

  4. Formation of SiGe nanocrystals embedded in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the application of write-once-read-many-times memory

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Min-Lin; Wu, Yung-Hsien; Lin, Chia-Chun; Chen, Lun-Lun

    2012-10-15

    The structure of SiGe nanocrystals embedded in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed by sequential deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si/Ge/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a subsequent annealing was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and its application for write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory devices was explored in this study. By applying a -10 V pulse for 1 s, a large amount of holes injected from Si substrate are stored in the nanocrystals and consequently, the current at +1.5 V increases by a factor of 10{sup 4} as compared to that of the initial state. Even with a smaller -5 V pulse for 1 {mu}s, a sufficiently large current ratio of 36 can still be obtained, verifying the low power operation. Since holes are stored in nanocrystals which are isolated from Si substrate by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with good integrity and correspond to a large valence band offset with respect to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, desirable read endurance up to 10{sup 5} cycles and excellent retention over 100 yr are achieved. Combining these promising characteristics, WORM memory devices are appropriate for high-performance archival storage applications.

  5. Formation of SiGe nanocrystals embedded in Al2O3 for the application of write-once-read-many-times memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min-Lin; Wu, Yung-Hsien; Lin, Chia-Chun; Chen, Lun-Lun

    2012-10-01

    The structure of SiGe nanocrystals embedded in Al2O3 formed by sequential deposition of Al2O3/Si/Ge/Al2O3 and a subsequent annealing was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and its application for write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory devices was explored in this study. By applying a -10 V pulse for 1 s, a large amount of holes injected from Si substrate are stored in the nanocrystals and consequently, the current at +1.5 V increases by a factor of 104 as compared to that of the initial state. Even with a smaller -5 V pulse for 1 μs, a sufficiently large current ratio of 36 can still be obtained, verifying the low power operation. Since holes are stored in nanocrystals which are isolated from Si substrate by Al2O3 with good integrity and correspond to a large valence band offset with respect to Al2O3, desirable read endurance up to 105 cycles and excellent retention over 100 yr are achieved. Combining these promising characteristics, WORM memory devices are appropriate for high-performance archival storage applications.

  6. Nonvolatile write-once-read-many times memory devices based on the composites of poly(4-vinylphenol)/Vulcan XC-72.

    PubMed

    Song, Sunghoon; Kim, Tae-Wook; Cho, Byungjin; Ji, Yongsung; Lee, Takhee

    2011-05-01

    We fabricated write-once-read-many times (WORM) type organic memory devices in 8 x 8 cross-bar structure. The active material for organic based WORM memory devices is mixture of both poly(4-vinyphenol) (PVP) and Vulcan XC-72s. From the electrical characteristics of the WORM memory devices, we observed two different resistance states, low resistance state and high resistance state, with six orders of ON/OFF ratio (I(ON)/I(OFF) - 10(6)). In addition, the WORM memory devices were maintained for longer than 50000 seconds without any serious degradation.

  7. In-situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy observation of silicon nanocrystal nucleation in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T. C.-J. Wu, L.; Lin, Z.; Jia, X.; Puthen-Veettil, B.; Zhang, T.; Conibeer, G.; Perez-Wurfl, I.; Kauffmann, Y.; Rothschild, A.

    2014-08-04

    Solid-state nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix was observed at temperatures as low as 450 °C. This was achieved by aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with real-time in-situ heating up to 600 °C. This technique is a valuable characterization tool especially with the recent interest in Si nanostructures for light emitting devices, non-volatile memories, and third-generation photovoltaics which all typically require a heating step in their fabrication. The control of size, shape, and distribution of the Si nanocrystals are critical for these applications. This experimental study involves in-situ observation of the nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix fabricated through radio frequency co-sputtering. The results show that the shapes of Si nanocrystals in amorphous SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrices are irregular and not spherical, in contrast to many claims in the literature. Furthermore, the Si nanocrystals are well confined within their layers by the amorphous SiO{sub 2}. This study demonstrates the potential of in-situ HRTEM as a tool to observe the real time nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix. Furthermore, ideas for improvements on this in-situ heating HRTEM technique are discussed.

  8. Overview of Non-Volatile Testing and Screening Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh

    2001-01-01

    Testing methods for memories and non-volatile memories have become increasingly sophisticated as they become denser and more complex. High frequency and faster rewrite times as well as smaller feature sizes have led to many testing challenges. This paper outlines several testing issues posed by novel memories and approaches to testing for radiation and reliability effects. We discuss methods for measurements of Total Ionizing Dose (TID).

  9. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-08-15

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  10. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-05-16

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  11. Performance Improvements of Metal-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Nonvolatile Memory with ZrO2 Charge-Trapping Layer by Using Nitrogen Incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Xiong; Xu, Jing-Ping; Liu, Lu; Lai, Pui-To

    2013-08-01

    The properties of ZrO2 and ZrON as the charge-trapping layer (CTL) of metal-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon memory are investigated. The microstructure and chemical bonding are examined by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that nitrogen incorporation in ZrO2 can induce more charge-trapping sites, effectively suppress the formation of zirconium silicate (leading to better interface quality between the CTL and the SiO2 tunneling layer), and increase the dielectric constant of ZrO2, thus improving the memory performances (large memory window, high program/erase speed, good endurance characteristics, and small charge loss).

  12. Nanocrystal structures

    DOEpatents

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2006-12-19

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II–VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  13. Nanocrystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2008-12-30

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  14. Lead-free epitaxial ferroelectric material integration on semiconducting (100) Nb-doped SrTiO3 for low-power non-volatile memory and efficient ultraviolet ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Souvik; Clavel, Michael; Biswas, Pranab; Chen, Bo; Song, Hyun-Cheol; Kumar, Prashant; Halder, Nripendra N.; Hudait, Mantu K.; Banerji, Pallab; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Priya, Shashank

    2015-07-01

    We report lead-free ferroelectric based resistive switching non-volatile memory (NVM) devices with epitaxial (1-x)BaTiO3-xBiFeO3 (x = 0.725) (BT-BFO) film integrated on semiconducting (100) Nb (0.7%) doped SrTiO3 (Nb:STO) substrates. The piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM) measurement at room temperature demonstrated ferroelectricity in the BT-BFO thin film. PFM results also reveal the repeatable polarization inversion by poling, manifesting its potential for read-write operation in NVM devices. The electroforming-free and ferroelectric polarization coupled electrical behaviour demonstrated excellent resistive switching with high retention time, cyclic endurance, and low set/reset voltages. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to determine the band alignment at the BT-BFO and Nb:STO heterojunction, and it exhibited staggered band alignment. This heterojunction is found to behave as an efficient ultraviolet photo-detector with low rise and fall time. The architecture also demonstrates half-wave rectification under low and high input signal frequencies, where the output distortion is minimal. The results provide avenue for an electrical switch that can regulate the pixels in low or high frequency images. Combined this work paves the pathway towards designing future generation low-power ferroelectric based microelectronic devices by merging both electrical and photovoltaic properties of BT-BFO materials.

  15. Lead-free epitaxial ferroelectric material integration on semiconducting (100) Nb-doped SrTiO3 for low-power non-volatile memory and efficient ultraviolet ray detection.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Souvik; Clavel, Michael; Biswas, Pranab; Chen, Bo; Song, Hyun-Cheol; Kumar, Prashant; Halder, Nripendra N; Hudait, Mantu K; Banerji, Pallab; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Priya, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    We report lead-free ferroelectric based resistive switching non-volatile memory (NVM) devices with epitaxial (1-x)BaTiO3-xBiFeO3 (x = 0.725) (BT-BFO) film integrated on semiconducting (100) Nb (0.7%) doped SrTiO3 (Nb:STO) substrates. The piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM) measurement at room temperature demonstrated ferroelectricity in the BT-BFO thin film. PFM results also reveal the repeatable polarization inversion by poling, manifesting its potential for read-write operation in NVM devices. The electroforming-free and ferroelectric polarization coupled electrical behaviour demonstrated excellent resistive switching with high retention time, cyclic endurance, and low set/reset voltages. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to determine the band alignment at the BT-BFO and Nb:STO heterojunction, and it exhibited staggered band alignment. This heterojunction is found to behave as an efficient ultraviolet photo-detector with low rise and fall time. The architecture also demonstrates half-wave rectification under low and high input signal frequencies, where the output distortion is minimal. The results provide avenue for an electrical switch that can regulate the pixels in low or high frequency images. Combined this work paves the pathway towards designing future generation low-power ferroelectric based microelectronic devices by merging both electrical and photovoltaic properties of BT-BFO materials.

  16. La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3} electrode technology for Pb(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} thin film nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.A.; Al-Shareef, H.N.; Warren, W.L.; Raymond, M.V.; Headley, T.J.; Voigt, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Oxide electrode technology is investigated for optimization of Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) thin film capacitor properties for high density nonvolatile memory applications. PZT thin film capacitors with RF sputter deposited La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3} (LSCO) electrodes have been characterized with respect to the following parameters: initial dielectric hysteresis loop characteristics, fatigue performance, microstructure and imprint behavior. Our studies have determined that the fatigue of PZT capacitors with LSCO electrodes is less sensitive to B site cation ratio and underlying electrode stack technology than with RuO{sub 2} electrodes. Doping PZT thin films with Nb (PNZT) improves imprint behavior of LSCO//PZT//LSCO capacitors considerably. We have demonstrated that PNZT 4/30/70 // LSCO capacitors thermally processed at either 550{degrees}C or 675{degrees}C have almost identical initial hysteresis properties and exhibit essentially no fatigue out to approximately 10{sup 10} cycles.

  17. A two-terminal write-once-read-many-times-memory device based on an aluminum nitride thin film containing Al nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, T P; Ding, L; Li, Y B; Zhang, S; Fung, S

    2010-09-01

    A switching from a high-conduction state to a low-conduction state occurs in an AIN thin film containing Al nanocrystals (nc-Al) when the nc-Al is charged with electrons. The switching is explained in terms of breaking of the conductive percolation paths of the nc-AI as a result of the charging of the nc-Al. A write-once-read many times-memory (WORM) device is demonstrated based on this phenomenon. The device can be switched by charging the nc-Al with a voltage of +10 V for 100 ms, yielding a current ratio of the two memory states of more than 300 at the reading voltage of 1 V. The charged state (i.e., the low-conduction state) remains unchanged after more than 1 x 106 read cycles, and its retention time is predicted to be more than 10 years.

  18. Effect of Mechanical Loads on Stability of Nanodomains in Ferroelectric Ultrathin Films: Towards Flexible Erasing of the Non-Volatile Memories

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue; Xiong, W. M.; Feng, Xue; Wang, Biao; Wang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Intensive investigations have been drawn on nanoscale ferroelectrics for their prospective applications such as developing memory devices. In contrast with the commonly used electrical means to process (i.e., read, write or erase) the information carried by ferroelectric domains, at present, mechanisms of non-electrical processing ferroelectric domains are relatively lacking. Here we make a systematical investigation on the stability of 180° cylindrical domains in ferroelectric nanofilms subjected to macroscopic mechanical loads, and explore the possibility of mechanical erasing. Effects of domain size, film thickness, temperature and different mechanical loads, including uniform strain, cylindrical bending and wavy bending, have been revealed. It is found that the stability of a cylindrical domain depends on its radius, temperature and film thickness. More importantly, mechanical loads have great controllability on the stability of cylindrical domains, with the critical radius nonlinearly sensitive to both strain and strain gradient. This indicates that erasing cylindrical domain can be achieved by changing the strain state of nanofilm. Based on the calculated phase diagrams, we successfully simulate several mechanical erasing processes on 4 × 4 bits memory devices. Our study sheds light on prospective device applications of ferroelectrics involving mechanical loads, such as flexible memory devices and other micro-electromechanical systems. PMID:24938187

  19. Impacts of annealing temperature on charge trapping performance in Zr0.5Hf0.5O2 for nonvolatile memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. H.; Yan, X. B.; Li, Y. C.; Yang, T.; Jia, X. L.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. Y.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, Zr0.5Hf0.5O2 films were fabricated on Si substrate and were annealed at different temperatures by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process. The charge trapping memory devices based on Zr0.5Hf0.5O2/SiO2/Si simple structure were investigated in detail. The memory device annealing at 690 °C shows the best property with a memory window of 5.6 V under ±12 V sweeping voltages in its capacitance-voltage curve and a better retention property. The high resolved transmission electron microscopy shows the generated SiO2 working as tunneling layer after RTA process, whose thickness increases with the rise of temperature. Combined with the TEM results, the photoluminescence spectrum and in situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy results further verify that oxygen vacancies and inter-diffusion layer also play a crucial role in charge trapping performance. This work provides direct insights for the charge trapping mechanisms based on high-k Zr0.5Hf0.5O2 films devices.

  20. Effect of Mechanical Loads on Stability of Nanodomains in Ferroelectric Ultrathin Films: Towards Flexible Erasing of the Non-Volatile Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue; Xiong, W. M.; Feng, Xue; Wang, Biao; Wang, Ying

    2014-06-01

    Intensive investigations have been drawn on nanoscale ferroelectrics for their prospective applications such as developing memory devices. In contrast with the commonly used electrical means to process (i.e., read, write or erase) the information carried by ferroelectric domains, at present, mechanisms of non-electrical processing ferroelectric domains are relatively lacking. Here we make a systematical investigation on the stability of 180° cylindrical domains in ferroelectric nanofilms subjected to macroscopic mechanical loads, and explore the possibility of mechanical erasing. Effects of domain size, film thickness, temperature and different mechanical loads, including uniform strain, cylindrical bending and wavy bending, have been revealed. It is found that the stability of a cylindrical domain depends on its radius, temperature and film thickness. More importantly, mechanical loads have great controllability on the stability of cylindrical domains, with the critical radius nonlinearly sensitive to both strain and strain gradient. This indicates that erasing cylindrical domain can be achieved by changing the strain state of nanofilm. Based on the calculated phase diagrams, we successfully simulate several mechanical erasing processes on 4 × 4 bits memory devices. Our study sheds light on prospective device applications of ferroelectrics involving mechanical loads, such as flexible memory devices and other micro-electromechanical systems.

  1. Acoustically assisted spin-transfer-torque switching of nanomagnets: An energy-efficient hybrid writing scheme for non-volatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ayan K.; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2013-12-02

    We show that the energy dissipated to write bits in spin-transfer-torque random access memory can be reduced by an order of magnitude if a surface acoustic wave (SAW) is launched underneath the magneto-tunneling junctions (MTJs) storing the bits. The SAW-generated strain rotates the magnetization of every MTJs' soft magnet from the easy towards the hard axis, whereupon passage of a small spin-polarized current through a target MTJ selectively switches it to the desired state with > 99.99% probability at room temperature, thereby writing the bit. The other MTJs return to their original states at the completion of the SAW cycle.

  2. Physical and electrical properties of band-engineered SiO2/(TiO2) x (SiO2)1- x stacks for nonvolatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jinho; Na, Heedo; Mok, In-Su; Kim, Jonggi; Lee, Kyumin; Sohn, Hyunchul

    2012-09-01

    In our study, the physical properties of (TiO2) x (SiO2)1- x , including band-gap, band-offset, and thermal stability and the electrical properties of band-engineered SiO2/(TiO2) x (SiO2)1- x tunnel barrier stacks, including the tunneling current and charge-trapping characteristics for applications to nonvolatile memory devices were investigated. It was observed that the band-gap and band-offset of (TiO2) x (SiO2)1- x can be controlled by adjustment in the composition of the (TiO2) x (SiO2)1- x films. Ti-silicate film with TiO2:SiO2 cycle ratio of 1:5 was maintained in an amorphous phase, even after annealing at 950 °C. The tunneling current of the band-engineered SiO2/(TiO2) x (SiO2)1- x stacked tunnel barrier was larger than that of a single SiO2 barrier under a higher external bias, while the tunneling current of a SiO2/(TiO2) x (SiO2)1- x stacked tunnel barrier under a lower external bias was smaller. Charge-trapping tests showed that the voltage shift for SiO2/(TiO2) x (SiO2)1- x is slightly larger than that for single SiO2.

  3. Pluto's Nonvolatile Chemical Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, Richard; Cook, Jason C.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Earle, Alissa M.; Ennico, Kimberly; Jennings, Donald; Howett, Carly; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo; Linscott, Ivan; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Parker, Alex Harrison; Parker, Joel Wm.; Philippe, Sylvain; Protopapa, Silvia; Quirico, Eric; Reuter, D. C.; Schmitt, Bernard; Singer, Kelsi N.; Spencer, John R.; Stansberry, John A.; Stern, S. Alan; Tsang, Constantine; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Weaver, Harold A.; Weigle, G. E.; Young, Leslie

    2016-10-01

    Despite the migration of Pluto's volatile ices (N2, CO, and CH4) around the surface on seasonal timescales, the planet's non-volatile materials are not completely hidden from view. They occur in a variety of provinces formed over a wide range of timescales, including rugged mountains and chasms, the floors of mid-latitude craters, and an equatorial belt of especially dark and reddish material typified by the informally named Cthulhu Regio. NASA's New Horizons probe observed several of these regions at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 km/pixel with its LEISA imaging spectrometer, covering wavelengths from 1.25 to 2.5 microns. Various compounds that are much lighter than the tholin-like macromolecules responsible for the reddish coloration, but that are not volatile at Pluto surface temperatures such as methanol (CH3OH) and ethane (C2H6) have characteristic absorption bands within LEISA's wavelength range. This presentation will describe their geographic distributions and attempt to constrain their origins. Possibilities include an inheritance from Pluto's primordial composition (the likely source of H2O ice seen on Pluto's surface) or ongoing production from volatile precursors through photochemistry in Pluto's atmosphere or through radiolysis on Pluto's surface. New laboratory data inform the analysis.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  4. Modular nonvolatile solid state recorder (MONSSTR) update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klang, Mark R.; Small, Martin B.; Beams, Tom

    2001-12-01

    Solid state recorders have begun replacing traditional tape recorders in fulfilling the requirement to record images on airborne platforms. With the advances in electro-optical, IR, SAR, Multi and Hyper-spectral sensors and video recording requirements, solid state recorders have become the recorder of choice. Solid state recorders provide the additional storage, higher sustained bandwidth, less power, less weight and smaller footprint to meet the current and future recording requirements. CALCULEX, Inc., manufactures a non-volatile flash memory solid state recorder called the MONSSTR (Modular Non-volatile Solid State Recorder). MONSSTR is being used to record images from many different digital sensors on high performance aircraft such as the RF- 4, F-16 and the Royal Air Force Tornado. MONSSTR, with its internal multiplexer, is also used to record instrumentation data. This includes multiple streams of PCM and multiple channels of 1553 data. Instrumentation data is being recorded by MONSSTR systems in a range of platforms including F-22, F-15, F-16, Comanche Helicopter and US Navy torpedos. MONSSTR can also be used as a cockpit video recorder. This paper will provide an update of the MONSSTR.

  5. Evaluation of Radiation Effects in Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyahira, T.; Swift, G.

    1998-01-01

    Features of flash memories: Flash memories are non-volatile; that is they do not require power to retain the information in its memory. They can be erased and written to while the device is still in the circuit.

  6. Electrically Variable or Programmable Nonvolatile Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shangqing, Liu; NaiJuan, Wu; Ignatieu, Alex; Jianren, Li

    2009-01-01

    Electrically variable or programmable capacitors based on the unique properties of thin perovskite films are undergoing development. These capacitors show promise of overcoming two important deficiencies of prior electrically programmable capacitors: Unlike in the case of varactors, it is not necessary to supply power continuously to make these capacitors retain their capacitance values. Hence, these capacitors may prove useful as components of nonvolatile analog and digital electronic memories. Unlike in the case of ferroelectric capacitors, it is possible to measure the capacitance values of these capacitors without changing the values. In other words, whereas readout of ferroelectric capacitors is destructive, readout of these capacitors can be nondestructive. A capacitor of this type is a simple two terminal device. It includes a thin film of a suitable perovskite as the dielectric layer, sandwiched between two metal or metal oxide electrodes (for example, see Figure 1). The utility of this device as a variable capacitor is based on a phenomenon, known as electrical-pulse-induced capacitance (EPIC), that is observed in thin perovskite films and especially in those thin perovskite films that exhibit the colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) effect. In EPIC, the application of one or more electrical pulses that exceed a threshold magnitude (typically somewhat less than 1 V) gives rise to a nonvolatile change in capacitance. The change in capacitance depends on the magnitude duration, polarity, and number of pulses. It is not necessary to apply a magnetic field or to cool the device below (or heat it above) room temperature to obtain EPIC. Examples of suitable CMR perovskites include Pr(1-x)Ca(x)MnO3, La(1-x)S-r(x)MnO3,and Nb(1-x)Ca(x)MnO3. Figure 2 is a block diagram showing an EPIC capacitor connected to a circuit that can vary the capacitance, measure the capacitance, and/or measure the resistance of the capacitor.

  7. Electrically programmable-erasable In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistor memory with atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3/Pt nanocrystals/Al2O3 gate stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shi-Bing; Zhang, Wen-Peng; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ding, Shi-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) memory is very promising for transparent and flexible system-on-panel displays; however, electrical erasability has always been a severe challenge for this memory. In this article, we demonstrated successfully an electrically programmable-erasable memory with atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3/Pt nanocrystals/Al2O3 gate stack under a maximal processing temperature of 300 oC. As the programming voltage was enhanced from 14 to 19 V for a constant pulse of 0.2 ms, the threshold voltage shift increased significantly from 0.89 to 4.67 V. When the programmed device was subjected to an appropriate pulse under negative gate bias, it could return to the original state with a superior erasing efficiency. The above phenomena could be attributed to Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling of electrons from the IGZO channel to the Pt nanocrystals during programming, and inverse tunnelling of the trapped electrons during erasing. In terms of 0.2-ms programming at 16 V and 350-ms erasing at -17 V, a large memory window of 3.03 V was achieved successfully. Furthermore, the memory exhibited stable repeated programming/erasing (P/E) characteristics and good data retention, i.e., for 2-ms programming at 14 V and 250-ms erasing at -14 V, a memory window of 2.08 V was still maintained after 103 P/E cycles, and a memory window of 1.1 V was retained after 105 s retention time.

  8. Electrically programmable-erasable In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistor memory with atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Pt nanocrystals/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate stack

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shi-Bing; Zhang, Wen-Peng; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ding, Shi-Jin

    2015-12-15

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) memory is very promising for transparent and flexible system-on-panel displays; however, electrical erasability has always been a severe challenge for this memory. In this article, we demonstrated successfully an electrically programmable-erasable memory with atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Pt nanocrystals/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate stack under a maximal processing temperature of 300 {sup o}C. As the programming voltage was enhanced from 14 to 19 V for a constant pulse of 0.2 ms, the threshold voltage shift increased significantly from 0.89 to 4.67 V. When the programmed device was subjected to an appropriate pulse under negative gate bias, it could return to the original state with a superior erasing efficiency. The above phenomena could be attributed to Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling of electrons from the IGZO channel to the Pt nanocrystals during programming, and inverse tunnelling of the trapped electrons during erasing. In terms of 0.2-ms programming at 16 V and 350-ms erasing at −17 V, a large memory window of 3.03 V was achieved successfully. Furthermore, the memory exhibited stable repeated programming/erasing (P/E) characteristics and good data retention, i.e., for 2-ms programming at 14 V and 250-ms erasing at −14 V, a memory window of 2.08 V was still maintained after 10{sup 3} P/E cycles, and a memory window of 1.1 V was retained after 10{sup 5} s retention time.

  9. Memory functions of nanocrystalline cadmium selenide embedded ZrHfO high-k dielectric stack

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chi-Chou; Kuo, Yue

    2014-02-28

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors made of the nanocrystalline cadmium selenide nc-CdSe embedded Zr-doped HfO{sub 2} high-k stack on the p-type silicon wafer have been fabricated and studied for their charge trapping, detrapping, and retention characteristics. Both holes and electrons can be trapped to the nanocrystal-embedded dielectric stack depending on the polarity of the applied gate voltage. With the same magnitude of applied gate voltage, the sample can trap more holes than electrons. A small amount of holes are loosely trapped at the nc-CdSe/high-k interface and the remaining holes are strongly trapped to the bulk nanocrystalline CdSe site. Charges trapped to the nanocrystals caused the Coulomb blockade effect in the leakage current vs. voltage curve, which is not observed in the control sample. The addition of the nanocrystals to the dielectric film changed the defect density and the physical thickness, which are reflected on the leakage current and the breakdown voltage. More than half of the originally trapped holes can be retained in the embedded nanocrystals for more than 10 yr. The nanocrystalline CdSe embedded high-k stack is a useful gate dielectric for this nonvolatile memory device.

  10. Transparent nanoscale floating gate memory using self-assembled bismuth nanocrystals in Bi(2) Mg(2/3) Nb(4/3) O(7) (BMN) pyrochlore thin films grown at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-June; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Hong, Soon-Ku; Lee, Jeong-Yong

    2012-07-01

    Bismuth nanocrystals for a nanoscale floating gate memory device are self-assembled in Bi(2) Mg(2/3) Nb(4/3) O(7) (BMN) dielectric films grown at room temperature by radio-frequency sputtering. The TEM cross-sectional image shows the "real" structure grown on a Si (001) substrate. The image magnified from the dotted box (red color) in the the cross-sectional image clearly shows bismuth nanoparticles at the interface between the Al(2) O(3) and HfO(2) layer (right image). Nanoparticles approximately 3 nm in size are regularly distributed at the interface.

  11. Flash drive memory apparatus and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A memory apparatus includes a non-volatile computer memory, a USB mass storage controller connected to the non-volatile computer memory, the USB mass storage controller including a daisy chain component, a male USB interface connected to the USB mass storage controller, and at least one other interface for a memory device, other than a USB interface, the at least one other interface being connected to the USB mass storage controller.

  12. Nonvolatile optically-erased colloidal memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Christopher F.; Tsyalkovsky, Volodymyr; Bandera, Yuriy; Burdette, Mary K.; Shetzline, Jamie A.; Tonkin, Charles; Creager, Stephen E.; Foulger, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    A nonconjugated methacrylate terpolymer containing carbazole moieties (electron donors), 1,3,4-oxadiazole moieties (electron acceptors), and Coumarin-6 in the pendant groups was synthesized via free radical copolymerization of methacrylate monomers containing the respective functional groups. The terpolymer was formed into 57 nm particles through a mini-emulsion route. For a thin 100 nm film of the fused particles sandwiched between an indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode and an Al electrode, the structure behaved as a nonvolatile flash (rewritable) memory with accessible electronic states that could be written, read, and optically erased. The device exhibited a turn-on voltage of ca. -4.5 VDC and a 106 current ratio. A device in the ON high conductance state could be reverted to the OFF state with a short exposure to a 360 nm light source. The development of semiconducting colloidal inks that can be converted into electroactive devices through a continuous processing method is a critical step in the widespread adoption of these 2D manufacturing technologies for printed electronics.

  13. Thin dielectric technology and memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ya-Chin

    DRAM. In addition, it can be easily embedded into a CMOS process for low-power dynamic or quasi-nonvolatile memory applications. Another method of embedding charge storage nodes into the gate dielectric employs germanium nano-crystals formed by oxidation of Si1-xGex . The device consists of a MOSFET with Ge nano-crystals embedded within the gate dielectric. This trap-formation method provides for precise control of the thicknesses of the oxide layers which sandwich the charge-traps, via thermal oxidation. Memory devices with write/erase speed/voltage and retention time superior to previously reported nano-crystal memory devices are demonstrated. A novel method of growing multiple gate oxide thicknesses below 5nm using oxygen implantation is presented. Experimental results show that multiple thicknesses of gate oxide with differences of up to 20A can be achieved on the same wafer without de gradation of the oxide interface and bulk properties. Unlike oxides grown with nitrogen implantation, oxides fabricated by the proposed method exhibit comparable reliability to that of thermally grown oxides.

  14. Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  15. Charge injection and discharging of Si nanocrystals and arrays by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boer, E.; Ostraat, M.; Brongersma, M. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Atwater, H. A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge injection and storage in dense arrays of silicon nanocrystals in SiO(sub 2) is a critical aspect of the performance of potential nanocrystal flash memory structures. The ultimate goal for this class of devices is few-or single- electron storage in a small number of nanocrystal elements.

  16. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  17. Design of Logic Module Based on Magnetic-Tunnel-Junction Elements for Nonvolatile Field-Programmable Gate Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjoo; Kim, Sojeong; Lee, Seungyeon; Lee, Seungjun; Shin, Hyungsoon

    2009-04-01

    Magnetologic using a magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ) element is a very hopeful candidate for universal logic technology because it can be used to build both logic circuits and nonvolatile memories. A structure of single-layer (SL) MTJ with a novel current driver previously presented by the authors improved both functional flexibility and uniformity of magnetologic. In this paper, the design of a nonvolatile logic module using SL MTJ is presented, which can be used as a basic logic cell for nonvolatile field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The S-module is a basic logic cell for Act3 family of FPGAs by Actel, which can implement arbitrary five-input logic functions. We designed an S-module using SL MTJ elements such that it can work as a programmable logic module with nonvolatility. The functional verification has been carried out by HSPICE simulator on the basis of a macro-model of SL MTJ.

  18. Coexistence of nonvolatility and volatility in Pt/Nb-doped SrTiO3/In memristive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Bao, D. H.; Li, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Memristive devices are triggering innovations in the fields of nonvolatile memory, digital logic, analogue circuits, neuromorphic engineering, and so on. Creating new memristive devices with unique characteristics would be significant for these emergent applications. Here we report the coexistence of nonvolatility and volatility in Pt/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (NSTO)/In memristive devices. The Pt/NSTO interface contributes a nonvolatile resistive switching behaviour, whereas the NSTO/In interface displays a volatile hysteresis loop. Combining the two interfaces in the Pt/NSTO/In devices leads to the unique coexistence of nonvolatility and volatility. The results imply more opportunities to invent new memristive devices by engineering both interfaces in metal/insulator/metal structures.

  19. Nonvolatile programmable neural network synaptic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A floating-gate metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) transistor is implemented for use as a nonvolatile analog storage element of a synaptic cell used to implement an array of processing synaptic cells. These cells are based on a four-quadrant analog multiplier requiring both X and Y differential inputs, where one Y input is UV programmable. These nonvolatile synaptic cells are disclosed fully connected in a 32 x 32 synaptic cell array using standard very large scale integration (VLSI) complementary MOS (CMOS) technology.

  20. Growth of platinum nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Movie showing the growth of platinum nanocrystals in a liquid cell observed in situ using the JEOL 3010 TEM at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. This is the first ever-real time movie showing nucleation and growth by monomer attachment or by smaller nanocrystals coalescing to form larger nanocrystals. All the nanocrystals end up being roughly the same shape and size. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/08/04/growth-spurts/

  1. Electric field tuning of non-volatile three-state magnetoelectric memory in FeCo-NiFe2O4/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Changjun; Zhang, Chao; Dong, Chunhui; Guo, Dangwei; Xue, Desheng

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate electric field impulse-induced reversible tristable magnetization switching in FeCo-NiFe2O4/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 (PMN-PT) heterostructures at room temperature. The magnetic properties of the FeCo-NiFe2O4 film can be changed reversibly by the strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling effect. Three piezostrain-mediated reversible and stable electric resistance states were obtained in the FeCo-NiFe2O4 film when different electric field impulses were applied, including large positive and negative fields and an impulse that was smaller than the electric coercive field. Consequently, reversible electric field impulse tuning of the tristable resistance state, which is related to the different magnetization switching properties of the materials, was realized. These results provide a promising approach for low loss multistate magnetoelectric memory devices for information storage applications.

  2. Implementation of Ferroelectric Memories for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpy, Stephen C.; Derbenwick, Gary F.; Kamp, David A.; Isaacson, Alan F.

    2000-01-01

    Ferroelectric random access semiconductor memories (FeRAMs) are an ideal nonvolatile solution for space applications. These memories have low power performance, high endurance and fast write times. By combining commercial ferroelectric memory technology with radiation hardened CMOS technology, nonvolatile semiconductor memories for space applications can be attained. Of the few radiation hardened semiconductor manufacturers, none have embraced the development of radiation hardened FeRAMs, due a limited commercial space market and funding limitations. Government funding may be necessary to assure the development of radiation hardened ferroelectric memories for space applications.

  3. Pulsed supersonic expansion of nonvolatile solids

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Wolfgang; Geggier, Stephanie; Grigorenko, Svitlana; Rademann, Klaus

    2004-11-01

    A compact apparatus for transferring nonvolatile particles into the gas phase and depositing them on a solid surface has been built and tested successfully. As initial experiment, solid caffeine with a vanishingly low vapor pressure has been dissolved in supercritical carbon dioxide, expanded into vacuum using a pulsed, supersonic molecular beam, and detected using a simple residual gas analyzer.

  4. Silicon and germanium nanocrystals: properties and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alexandra; Coutinho, José

    2014-01-01

    Summary Group-IV nanocrystals have emerged as a promising group of materials that extends the realm of application of bulk diamond, silicon, germanium and related materials beyond their traditional boundaries. Over the last two decades of research, their potential for application in areas such as optoelectronic applications and memory devices has been progressively unraveled. Nevertheless, new challenges with no parallel in the respective bulk material counterparts have arisen. In this review, we consider what has been achieved and what are the current limitations with regard to growth, characterization and modeling of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and related materials. PMID:25383290

  5. Two-bit memory and quantized storage phenomenon in conventional MOS structures with double-stacked Pt-NCs in an HfAlO matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangdong; Wu, Bo; Liu, Xiaoqin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Shuangju; Sun, Bai; Zhou, Ankun

    2016-03-01

    A two-bit memory and quantized storage phenomenon are observed at room temperature for a device based on the traditional MOS structure with double-stacked Pt-nanocrystals (Pt-NCs). A 2.68 and 1.72 V flat band voltage shift (memory window) has been obtained when applying a ±7 V programming/erasing voltage to the structures with double-stacked Pt-NCs. The memory windows of 2.40 and 1.44 V can be retained after stress for 10(5) seconds, which correspond to 89.55% and 83.72% stored charges reserved. The quantized charge storage phenomenon characterized by current-voltage (J-V) hysteresis curves was detected at room temperature. The shrinkage of the memory window results from the decreasing tunneling probability, which strongly depends on the number of stacks. The traps, de-traps and quantum confinement effects of Pt-NCs may contribute to the improvement of dielectric characteristics and the two-bit memory behavior. The multi-bit memory and quantized storage behavior observed in the Pt-NCs stacks structure at room temperature might provide a feasible method for realizing the multi-bit storage in non-volatile flash memory devices.

  6. Garnet Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1995-01-01

    Random-access memory (RAM) devices of proposed type exploit magneto-optical properties of magnetic garnets exhibiting perpendicular anisotropy. Magnetic writing and optical readout used. Provides nonvolatile storage and resists damage by ionizing radiation. Because of basic architecture and pinout requirements, most likely useful as small-capacity memory devices.

  7. Multilevel non-volatile data storage utilizing common current hysteresis of networked single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ihn; Wang, Wei; Hwang, Sun Kak; Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Kang Lib; Jeong, Beomjin; Huh, June; Park, Cheolmin

    2016-05-01

    The characteristic source-drain current hysteresis frequently observed in field-effect transistors with networked single walled carbon-nanotube (NSWNT) channels is problematic for the reliable switching and sensing performance of devices. But the two distinct current states of the hysteresis curve at a zero gate voltage can be useful for memory applications. In this work, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile transistor memory with solution-processed NSWNTs which are suitable for multilevel data programming and reading. A polymer passivation layer with a small amount of water employed on the top of the NSWNT channel serves as an efficient gate voltage dependent charge trapping and de-trapping site. A systematic investigation evidences that the water mixed in a polymer passivation solution is critical for reliable non-volatile memory operation. The optimized device is air-stable and temperature-resistive up to 80 °C and exhibits excellent non-volatile memory performance with an on/off current ratio greater than 104, a switching time less than 100 ms, data retention longer than 4000 s, and write/read endurance over 100 cycles. Furthermore, the gate voltage dependent charge injection mediated by water in the passivation layer allowed for multilevel operation of our memory in which 4 distinct current states were programmed repetitively and preserved over a long time period.The characteristic source-drain current hysteresis frequently observed in field-effect transistors with networked single walled carbon-nanotube (NSWNT) channels is problematic for the reliable switching and sensing performance of devices. But the two distinct current states of the hysteresis curve at a zero gate voltage can be useful for memory applications. In this work, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile transistor memory with solution-processed NSWNTs which are suitable for multilevel data programming and reading. A polymer passivation layer with a small amount of water employed on the top of the

  8. Nonvolatile Bio-Memristor Fabricated with Egg Albumen Film

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chih; Yu, Hsin-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Chung, Wen-Lin; Wu, San-Lein; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the fabrication and characterization of chicken egg albumen-based bio-memristors. By introducing egg albumen as an insulator to fabricate memristor devices comprising a metal/insulator/metal sandwich structure, significant bipolar resistive switching behavior can be observed. The 1/f noise characteristics of the albumen devices were measured, and results suggested that their memory behavior results from the formation and rupture of conductive filaments. Oxygen diffusion and electrochemical redox reaction of metal ions under a sufficiently large electric field are the principal physical mechanisms of the formation and rupture of conductive filaments; these mechanisms were observed by analysis of the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and resistance–temperature (R–T) measurement results. The switching property of the devices remarkably improved by heat-denaturation of proteins; reliable switching endurance of over 500 cycles accompanied by an on/off current ratio (Ion/off) of higher than 103 were also observed. Both resistance states could be maintained for a suitably long time (>104 s). Taking the results together, the present study reveals for the first time that chicken egg albumen is a promising material for nonvolatile memory applications. PMID:25950812

  9. Architectural Techniques For Managing Non-volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2013-01-01

    As chip power dissipation becomes a critical challenge in scaling processor performance, computer architects are forced to fundamentally rethink the design of modern processors and hence, the chip-design industry is now at a major inflection point in its hardware roadmap. The high leakage power and low density of SRAM poses serious obstacles in its use for designing large on-chip caches and for this reason, researchers are exploring non-volatile memory (NVM) devices, such as spin torque transfer RAM, phase change RAM and resistive RAM. However, since NVMs are not strictly superior to SRAM, effective architectural techniques are required for making them a universal memory solution. This book discusses techniques for designing processor caches using NVM devices. It presents algorithms and architectures for improving their energy efficiency, performance and lifetime. It also provides both qualitative and quantitative evaluation to help the reader gain insights and motivate them to explore further. This book will be highly useful for beginners as well as veterans in computer architecture, chip designers, product managers and technical marketing professionals.

  10. Nonvolatile bio-memristor fabricated with egg albumen film.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chih; Yu, Hsin-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Chung, Wen-Lin; Wu, San-Lein; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2015-05-07

    This study demonstrates the fabrication and characterization of chicken egg albumen-based bio-memristors. By introducing egg albumen as an insulator to fabricate memristor devices comprising a metal/insulator/metal sandwich structure, significant bipolar resistive switching behavior can be observed. The 1/f noise characteristics of the albumen devices were measured, and results suggested that their memory behavior results from the formation and rupture of conductive filaments. Oxygen diffusion and electrochemical redox reaction of metal ions under a sufficiently large electric field are the principal physical mechanisms of the formation and rupture of conductive filaments; these mechanisms were observed by analysis of the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and resistance-temperature (R-T) measurement results. The switching property of the devices remarkably improved by heat-denaturation of proteins; reliable switching endurance of over 500 cycles accompanied by an on/off current ratio (Ion/off) of higher than 10(3) were also observed. Both resistance states could be maintained for a suitably long time (>10(4) s). Taking the results together, the present study reveals for the first time that chicken egg albumen is a promising material for nonvolatile memory applications.

  11. Nonvolatile Bio-Memristor Fabricated with Egg Albumen Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Chih; Yu, Hsin-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Chung, Wen-Lin; Wu, San-Lein; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2015-05-01

    This study demonstrates the fabrication and characterization of chicken egg albumen-based bio-memristors. By introducing egg albumen as an insulator to fabricate memristor devices comprising a metal/insulator/metal sandwich structure, significant bipolar resistive switching behavior can be observed. The 1/f noise characteristics of the albumen devices were measured, and results suggested that their memory behavior results from the formation and rupture of conductive filaments. Oxygen diffusion and electrochemical redox reaction of metal ions under a sufficiently large electric field are the principal physical mechanisms of the formation and rupture of conductive filaments; these mechanisms were observed by analysis of the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and resistance-temperature (R-T) measurement results. The switching property of the devices remarkably improved by heat-denaturation of proteins; reliable switching endurance of over 500 cycles accompanied by an on/off current ratio (Ion/off) of higher than 103 were also observed. Both resistance states could be maintained for a suitably long time (>104 s). Taking the results together, the present study reveals for the first time that chicken egg albumen is a promising material for nonvolatile memory applications.

  12. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  13. Integrated semiconductor-magnetic random access memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a non-volatile magnetic random access memory (RAM) system having a semiconductor control circuit and a magnetic array element. The integrated magnetic RAM system uses CMOS control circuit to read and write data magnetoresistively. The system provides a fast access, non-volatile, radiation hard, high density RAM for high speed computing.

  14. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    SciTech Connect

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  15. Tunable ultrathin membranes with nonvolatile pore shape memory.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Hidenori; Islam, Crescent; Tokarev, Igor; Hu, Heng; Liu, Guojun; Minko, Sergiy

    2015-05-20

    The concept of a responsive nanoporous thin-film gel membranes whose pores could be tuned to a desired size by a specific "molecular signal" and whose pore geometry becomes "memorized" by the gel is reported. The ∼100 nm thick membranes were prepared by dip-coating from a solution mixture of a random copolymer comprising responsive and photo-cross-linkable units and monodisperse latex nanoparticles used as a sacrificial colloidal template. After stabilization of the films by photo-cross-linking the latex template was removed, yielding nanoporous structures with a narrow pore size distribution and a high porosity. The thin-film membranes could be transferred onto porous supports to serve as tunable size-selective barriers in various colloids separation applications. The pore dimensions and hence the membrane's colloidal-particle-size cutoff were reversibly regulated by swelling-shrinking of the polymer network with a specially selected low-molar-mass compound. The attained pore shape was "memorized" in aqueous media and "erased" by treatment in special solvents reverting the membrane to the original state.

  16. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  17. Biomineralization: Nanocrystals by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Li; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Nanocrystals with precisely defined structures offer promise as components of advanced materials yet they are challenging to create. Now, a nanocrystal made up of seven cadmium and twelve chloride ions has been synthesized via a biotemplating approach that uses a de novo designed protein.

  18. Interactions between volatile and nonvolatile coffee components. 1. Screening of nonvolatile components.

    PubMed

    Charles-Bernard, Marielle; Kraehenbuehl, Karin; Rytz, Andreas; Roberts, Deborah D

    2005-06-01

    This study is the first of two publications that investigate the phenomena of coffee nonvolatiles interacting with coffee volatile compounds. The purpose was to identify which coffee nonvolatile(s) are responsible for the interactions observed between nonvolatile coffee brew constituents and thiols, sulfides, pyrroles, and diketones. The overall interaction of these compounds with coffee brews prepared with green coffee beans roasted at three different roasting levels (light, medium, and dark), purified nonvolatiles, and medium roasted coffee brew fractions (1% solids after 1 or 24 h) was measured using a headspace solid-phase microextraction technique. The dark roasted coffee brew was slightly more reactive toward the selected compounds than the light roasted coffee brew. Selected pure coffee constituents, such as caffeine, trigonelline, arabinogalactans, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid, showed few interactions with the coffee volatiles. Upon fractionation of medium roasted coffee brew by solid-phase extraction, dialysis, size exclusion chromatography, or anion exchange chromatography, characterization of each fraction, evaluation of the interactions with the aromas, and correlation between the chemical composition of the fractions and the magnitude of the interactions, the following general conclusions were drawn. (1) Low molecular weight and positively charged melanoidins present significant interactions. (2) Strong correlations were shown between the melanoidin and protein/peptide content, on one hand, and the extent of interactions, on the other hand (R = 0.83-0.98, depending on the volatile compound). (3) Chlorogenic acids and carbohydrates play a secondary role, because only weak correlations with the interactions were found in complex matrixes. PMID:15913304

  19. Resistive switching memory based on bioinspired natural solid polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Raeis Hosseini, Niloufar; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2015-01-27

    A solution-processed, chitosan-based resistive-switching memory device is demonstrated with Pt/Ag-doped chitosan/Ag structure. The memory device shows reproducible and reliable bipolar resistive switching characteristics. A memory device based on natural organic material is a promising device toward the next generation of nonvolatile nanoelectronics. The memory device based on chitosan as a natural solid polymer electrolyte can be switched reproducibly between high and low resistance states. In addition, the data retention measurement confirmed the reliability of the chitosan-based nonvolatile memory device. The transparent Ag-embedded chitosan film showed an acceptable and comparable resistive switching behavior on the flexible plastic substrate as well. A cost-effective, environmentally benign memory device using chitosan satisfies the functional requirements of nonvolatile memory operations.

  20. Ferroelectric memory based on nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the past decades, ferroelectric materials have attracted wide attention due to their applications in nonvolatile memory devices (NVMDs) rendered by the electrically switchable spontaneous polarizations. Furthermore, the combination of ferroelectric and nanomaterials opens a new route to fabricating a nanoscale memory device with ultrahigh memory integration, which greatly eases the ever increasing scaling and economic challenges encountered in the traditional semiconductor industry. In this review, we summarize the recent development of the nonvolatile ferroelectric field effect transistor (FeFET) memory devices based on nanostructures. The operating principles of FeFET are introduced first, followed by the discussion of the real FeFET memory nanodevices based on oxide nanowires, nanoparticles, semiconductor nanotetrapods, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Finally, we present the opportunities and challenges in nanomemory devices and our views on the future prospects of NVMDs. PMID:22655750

  1. Nonvolatile data storage using mechanical force-induced polarization switching in ferroelectric polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin; Tang, Xin; Chen, Xiang-Zhong; Chen, Yu-Lei; Shen, Qun-Dong; Guo, Xu; Ge, Hai-Xiong

    2015-01-26

    Ferroelectric polymers offer the promise of low-cost and flexible electronic products. They are attractive for information storage due to their spontaneous polarization which is usually switched by electric field. Here, we demonstrate that electrical signals can be readily written on ultra-thin ferroelectric polymer films by strain gradient-induced polarization switching (flexoelectric effect). A force with magnitude as small as 64nN is enough to induce highly localized (40 nm feature size) change in the polarization states. The methodology is capable of realizing nonvolatile memory devices with miniaturized cell size and storage density of tens to hundreds Gbit per square inch.

  2. On Ultrasmall Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    McBride, James R.; Dukes, Albert D.; Schreuder, Michael A.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasmall nanocrystals are a growing sub-class of traditional nanocrystals that exhibit new properties at diameters typically below 2 nm. In this review, we define what constitutes an ultrasmall nanoparticle while distinguishing between ultrasmall and magic-size nanoparticles. After a brief overview of ultrasmall nanoparticles, including ultrasmall gold clusters, our recent work is presented covering the optical properties, structure, and application of ultrasmall CdSe nanocrystals. This unique material has potential application in solid state lighting due to its balanced white emission. This section is followed by a discussion on the blurring boundary between what can be considered a nanoparticle and a molecule. PMID:21132106

  3. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the individual data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme which envisages a classical abacus with the beads operated by electron spins. It is inspired by the idea of second quantization, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantized' Hall voltage, representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This concept of `second quantization of memory' realizes the 3D memory architecture with superior reading and operation efficiency, thus is a promising approach for future nonvolatile magnetic random access memory.

  4. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  5. Nanocrystal-Powered Nanomotor

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, B.C.; Aloni, S.; Jensen, K.; Ritchie, R.O.; Zettl, A.

    2005-07-05

    We have constructed and operated a nanoscale linear motorpowered by a single metal nanocrystal ram sandwiched between mechanicallever arms. Low-level electrical voltages applied to the carbon nanotubelever arms cause the nanocrystal to grow or shrink in a controlledmanner. The length of the ram is adjustable from 0 to more than 150 nm,with extension speeds exceeding 1900 nm/s. The thermodynamic principlesgoverning motor operation resemble those driving frost heave, a naturalsolid-state linear motor.

  6. Coexistence of diode-like volatile and multilevel nonvolatile resistive switching in a ZrO2/TiO2 stack structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingtao; Yuan, Peng; Fu, Liping; Li, Rongrong; Gao, Xiaoping; Tao, Chunlan

    2015-10-01

    Diode-like volatile resistive switching as well as nonvolatile resistive switching behaviors in a Cu/ZrO2/TiO2/Ti stack are investigated. Depending on the current compliance during the electroforming process, either volatile resistive switching or nonvolatile resistive switching is observed. With a lower current compliance (<10 μA), the Cu/ZrO2/TiO2/Ti device exhibits diode-like volatile resistive switching with a rectifying ratio over 106. The permanent transition from volatile to nonvolatile resistive switching can be obtained by applying a higher current compliance of 100 μA. Furthermore, by using different reset voltages, the Cu/ZrO2/TiO2/Ti device exhibits multilevel memory characteristics with high uniformity. The coexistence of nonvolatile multilevel memory and diode-like volatile resistive switching behaviors in the same Cu/ZrO2/TiO2/Ti device opens areas of applications in high-density storage, logic circuits, neural networks, and passive crossbar memory selectors.

  7. Coexistence of diode-like volatile and multilevel nonvolatile resistive switching in a ZrO2/TiO2 stack structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingtao; Yuan, Peng; Fu, Liping; Li, Rongrong; Gao, Xiaoping; Tao, Chunlan

    2015-10-01

    Diode-like volatile resistive switching as well as nonvolatile resistive switching behaviors in a Cu/ZrO₂/TiO₂/Ti stack are investigated. Depending on the current compliance during the electroforming process, either volatile resistive switching or nonvolatile resistive switching is observed. With a lower current compliance (<10 μA), the Cu/ZrO₂/TiO₂/Ti device exhibits diode-like volatile resistive switching with a rectifying ratio over 10(6). The permanent transition from volatile to nonvolatile resistive switching can be obtained by applying a higher current compliance of 100 μA. Furthermore, by using different reset voltages, the Cu/ZrO₂/TiO₂/Ti device exhibits multilevel memory characteristics with high uniformity. The coexistence of nonvolatile multilevel memory and diode-like volatile resistive switching behaviors in the same Cu/ZrO₂/TiO₂/Ti device opens areas of applications in high-density storage, logic circuits, neural networks, and passive crossbar memory selectors.

  8. Skin-Inspired Haptic Memory Arrays with an Electrically Reconfigurable Architecture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bowen; Wang, Hong; Liu, Yaqing; Qi, Dianpeng; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hua; Yu, Jiancan; Sherburne, Matthew; Wang, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-02-24

    Skin-inspired haptic-memory devices, which can retain pressure information after the removel of external pressure by virtue of the nonvolatile nature of the memory devices, are achieved. The rise of haptic-memory devices will allow for mimicry of human sensory memory, opening new avenues for the design of next-generation high-performance sensing devices and systems.

  9. In situ fabrication of ultrathin porous alumina and its application for nanopatterning Au nanocrystals on the surface of ion-sensitive field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Kisner, A; Heggen, M; Fischer, W; Tillmann, K; Offenhäusser, A; Kubota, L T; Mourzina, Y

    2012-12-01

    In situ fabrication in a single step of thin films of alumina exhibiting a thickness of less than 100 nm and nanopores with a highly regular diameter distribution in order to pattern nanostructures over field-effect devices is a critical issue and has not previously been demonstrated. Here we report the fabrication in situ of 50 nm thick ultrathin nanoporous alumina membranes with a regular pore size directly over metal-free gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistors. Depositing thin films of aluminum by an electron beam at a relatively low rate of deposition on top of chips containing the transistors and using a conventional single-step anodization process permits the production of a well-adhering nanoporous ultrathin layer of alumina on the surface of the devices. The anodization process does not substantially affect the electrical properties of the transistors. The small thickness and pore size of ultrathin alumina membranes allow them to be sequentially employed as masks for patterning Au nanocrystals grown by an electroless approach directly on the top of the transistors. The patterning process using a wet chemical approach enables the size of the patterned crystals to be controlled not only by the dimensions of the pores of alumina, but also by the concentration of the reactants employed. Surface modification of these nanocrystals with alkanethiol molecules demonstrates that the electrostatic charge of the functional groups of the molecules can modulate the electrical characteristics of the transistors. These results represent substantial progress towards the development of novel nanostructured arrays on top of field-effect devices that can be applied for chemical sensing or non-volatile memories. PMID:23124114

  10. In situ fabrication of ultrathin porous alumina and its application for nanopatterning Au nanocrystals on the surface of ion-sensitive field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Kisner, A; Heggen, M; Fischer, W; Tillmann, K; Offenhäusser, A; Kubota, L T; Mourzina, Y

    2012-12-01

    In situ fabrication in a single step of thin films of alumina exhibiting a thickness of less than 100 nm and nanopores with a highly regular diameter distribution in order to pattern nanostructures over field-effect devices is a critical issue and has not previously been demonstrated. Here we report the fabrication in situ of 50 nm thick ultrathin nanoporous alumina membranes with a regular pore size directly over metal-free gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistors. Depositing thin films of aluminum by an electron beam at a relatively low rate of deposition on top of chips containing the transistors and using a conventional single-step anodization process permits the production of a well-adhering nanoporous ultrathin layer of alumina on the surface of the devices. The anodization process does not substantially affect the electrical properties of the transistors. The small thickness and pore size of ultrathin alumina membranes allow them to be sequentially employed as masks for patterning Au nanocrystals grown by an electroless approach directly on the top of the transistors. The patterning process using a wet chemical approach enables the size of the patterned crystals to be controlled not only by the dimensions of the pores of alumina, but also by the concentration of the reactants employed. Surface modification of these nanocrystals with alkanethiol molecules demonstrates that the electrostatic charge of the functional groups of the molecules can modulate the electrical characteristics of the transistors. These results represent substantial progress towards the development of novel nanostructured arrays on top of field-effect devices that can be applied for chemical sensing or non-volatile memories.

  11. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander A.; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  12. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-22

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered 'quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  13. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  14. From Secure Memories to Smart Card Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handschuh, Helena; Trichina, Elena

    Non-volatile memory is essential in most embedded security applications. It will store the key and other sensitive materials for cryptographic and security applications. In this chapter, first an overview is given of current flash memory architectures. Next the standard security features which form the basis of so-called secure memories are described in more detail. Smart cards are a typical embedded application that is very vulnerable to attacks and that at the same time has a high need for secure non-volatile memory. In the next part of this chapter, the secure memories of so-called flash-based high-density smart cards are described. It is followed by a detailed analysis of what the new security challenges for such objects are.

  15. Reversible and Nonvolatile Modulations of Magnetization Switching Characteristic and Domain Configuration in L10-FePt Films via Nonelectrically Controlled Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun; Zhao, Jiancheng; Yang, Feng; Hao, Shijie; Gong, Kui; Hu, Di; Cao, Yi; Jiang, Xumin; Wang, Zhongqiang; Chen, Lei; Li, Sirui; Sun, Li; Cui, Lishan; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-03-23

    Reversible and nonvolatile modulation of magnetization switching characteristic in ferromagnetic materials is crucial in developing spintronic devices with low power consumption. It is recently discovered that strain engineering can be an active and effective approach in tuning the magnetic/transport properties of thin films. The primary method in strain modulation is via the converse piezoelectric effect of ferroelectrics, which is usually volatile due to the reliance of the required electric field. Also the maximum amount of deformation in ferroelectrics is usually limited to be less than 1%, and the corresponding magnetoelastic strain energy introduced to ferromagnetic films is on the order of 10(4) J/m(3), not enough to overcome magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (Ku) in many materials. Different from using conventional strain inducing substrates, this paper reports on the significantly large, reversible, and nonvolatile lattice strain in the L10-FePt films (up to 2.18%) using nonelectrically controlled shape memory alloy substrates. Introduced lattice strain can be large enough to effectively affect domain structure and magnetic reversal in FePt. A noticeable decrease of coercivity field by 80% is observed. Moreover, the coercivity field tunability using such substrates is nonvolatile at room temperature and is also reversible due to the characteristics of the shape memory effect. This finding provides an efficient avenue for developing strain assisted spintronic devices such as logic memory device, magnetoresistive random-access memory, and memristor.

  16. Non-volatile Clocked Spin Wave Interconnect for Beyond-CMOS Nanomagnet Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sourav; Chang, Sou-Chi; Kani, Nickvash; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.; Naeemi, Azad

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of using spin waves for information transmission and processing has been an area of active research due to the unique ability to manipulate the amplitude and phase of the spin waves for building complex logic circuits with less physical resources and low power consumption. Previous proposals on spin wave logic circuits have suggested the idea of utilizing the magneto-electric effect for spin wave amplification and amplitude- or phase-dependent switching of magneto-electric cells. Here, we propose a comprehensive scheme for building a clocked non-volatile spin wave device by introducing a charge-to-spin converter that translates information from electrical domain to spin domain, magneto-electric spin wave repeaters that operate in three different regimes - spin wave transmitter, non-volatile memory and spin wave detector, and a novel clocking scheme that ensures sequential transmission of information and non-reciprocity. The proposed device satisfies the five essential requirements for logic application: nonlinearity, amplification, concatenability, feedback prevention, and complete set of Boolean operations. PMID:25955353

  17. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    Model catalysts with uniform and well-defined surface structures have been extensively employed to explore structure-property relationships of powder catalysts. Traditional oxide model catalysts are based on oxide single crystals and single crystal thin films, and the surface chemistry and catalysis are studied under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. However, the acquired fundamental understandings often suffer from the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" when they are extended to the real world of powder catalysts working at atmospheric or higher pressures. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis have realized controlled synthesis of catalytic oxide nanocrystals with uniform and well-defined morphologies. These oxide nanocrystals consist of a novel type of oxide model catalyst whose surface chemistry and catalysis can be studied under the same conditions as working oxide catalysts. In this Account, the emerging concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts is demonstrated using our investigations of surface chemistry and catalysis of uniform and well-defined cuprous oxide nanocrystals and ceria nanocrystals. Cu2O cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, Cu2O octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes, and Cu2O rhombic dodecahedra enclosed with the {110} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent surface reactivities and catalytic properties that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Among these types of Cu2O nanocrystals, the octahedra are most reactive and catalytically active due to the presence of coordination-unsaturated (1-fold-coordinated) Cu on the exposed {111} crystal planes. The crystal-plane-controlled surface restructuring and catalytic activity of Cu2O nanocrystals were observed in CO oxidation with excess oxygen. In the propylene oxidation reaction with O2, 1-fold-coordinated Cu on Cu2O(111), 3-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(110), and 2-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(100) were identified

  18. Programmable Analog Memory Resistors For Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Thakoor, Sarita; Daud, Taher; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1990-01-01

    Electrical resistance of new solid-state device altered repeatedly by suitable control signals, yet remains at steady value when control signal removed. Resistance set at low value ("on" state), high value ("off" state), or at any convenient intermediate value and left there until new value desired. Circuits of this type particularly useful in nonvolatile, associative electronic memories based on models of neural networks. Such programmable analog memory resistors ideally suited as synaptic interconnects in "self-learning" neural nets. Operation of device depends on electrochromic property of WO3, which when pure is insulator. Potential uses include nonvolatile, erasable, electronically programmable read-only memories.

  19. In situ and nonvolatile photoluminescence tuning and nanodomain writing demonstrated by all-solid-state devices based on graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Takashi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Terabe, Kazuya; Aono, Masakazu

    2015-02-24

    In situ and nonvolatile tuning of photoluminescence (PL) has been achieved based on graphene oxide (GO), the PL of which is receiving much attention because of various potential applications of the oxide (e.g., display, lighting, and nano-biosensor). The technique is based on in situ and nonvolatile tuning of the sp(2) domain fraction to the sp(3) domain fraction (sp(2)/sp(3) fraction) in GO through an electrochemical redox reaction achieved by solid electrolyte thin films. The all-solid-state variable PL device was fabricated by GO and proton-conducting mesoporous SiO2 thin films, which showed an extremely low PL background. The device successfully tuned the PL peak wavelength in a very wide range from 393 to 712 nm, covering that for chemically tuned GO, by adjusting the applied DC voltage within several hundred seconds. We also demonstrate the sp(2)/sp(3) fraction tuning using a conductive atomic force microscope. The device achieved not only writing, but also erasing of the sp(2)/sp(3)-fraction-tuned nanodomain (both directions operation). The combination of these techniques is applicable to a wide range of nano-optoelectronic devices including nonvolatile PL memory devices and on-demand rewritable biosensors that can be integrated into nano- and microtips which are transparent, ultrathin, flexible, and inexpensive.

  20. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  1. The future of memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinella, M.

    In the not too distant future, the traditional memory and storage hierarchy of may be replaced by a single Storage Class Memory (SCM) device integrated on or near the logic processor. Traditional magnetic hard drives, NAND flash, DRAM, and higher level caches (L2 and up) will be replaced with a single high performance memory device. The Storage Class Memory paradigm will require high speed (< 100 ns read/write), excellent endurance (> 1012), nonvolatility (retention > 10 years), and low switching energies (< 10 pJ per switch). The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) has recently evaluated several potential candidates SCM technologies, including Resistive (or Redox) RAM, Spin Torque Transfer RAM (STT-MRAM), and phase change memory (PCM). All of these devices show potential well beyond that of current flash technologies and research efforts are underway to improve the endurance, write speeds, and scalabilities to be on-par with DRAM. This progress has interesting implications for space electronics: each of these emerging device technologies show excellent resistance to the types of radiation typically found in space applications. Commercially developed, high density storage class memory-based systems may include a memory that is physically radiation hard, and suitable for space applications without major shielding efforts. This paper reviews the Storage Class Memory concept, emerging memory devices, and possible applicability to radiation hardened electronics for space.

  2. Ultra-dense billion year memory chip

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This video shows an iron nanoparticle shuttle moving through a carbon nanotube in the presence of a low voltage electrical current. The shuttles position inside the tube can function as a high-density nonvolatile memory element. (Courtesy of /Zettl Research Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California at Berkeley.)

  3. Ferroelectric/Optoelectronic Memory/Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed hybrid optoelectronic nonvolatile analog memory and data processor comprises planar array of microscopic photosensitive ferroelectric capacitors performing massively parallel analog computations. Processors overcome electronic crosstalk and limitations on number of input/output contacts inherent in electronic implementations of large interconnection arrays. Used in general optical computing, recognition of patterns, and artificial neural networks.

  4. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  5. Photodoping of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Alicia W.

    This dissertation addresses various aspects of photodoping colloidal nanocrystals. Photodoped ZnO nanocrystals were found to be versatile tuneable reducers using both quantum confinement and band-gap engineering with Mg2+ doping to change the conduction band potential. Using photoluminescence of the visible trap and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy of Mg2+ and Mn2+ co-doped ZnO, Mg2+ was shown to change the potential of both the conduction and valence band in a ratio of 0.68:0.32. The hole scavenging reaction using ethanol as the hole scavenger was investigated using continuous-wave and time resolved photoluminescence of the visible trap state of ZnO. The reaction was found to occur between the valence band hole and with a rate of > 15 ps-1. Quenching of the ZnO visible trap luminescence upon photodoping was shown to be due to trap/electron Auger process while the concomitant enhancement of the UV band-gap emission was hypothesized to be due to a reduction in non-radiative processes due to extra electrons in the conduction-band. The trap/electron Auger process in ZnO nanocrystals was further characterized by a size-dependence and shown to scale with R2. Another previously unknown Auger size dependence was measured in CdSe/ZnS trions and shown to scale with R4.3.

  6. Natural Attenuation of Nonvolatile Contaminants in the Capillary Fringe.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Zohre; Mack, E Erin; Spain, Jim C

    2016-09-20

    When anoxic polluted groundwater encounters the overlying vadose zone an oxic/anoxic interface is created, often near the capillary fringe. Biodegradation of volatile contaminants in the capillary fringe can prevent vapor migration. In contrast, the biodegradation of nonvolatile contaminants in the vadose zone has received comparatively little attention. Nonvolatile compounds do not cause vapor intrusion, but they still move with the groundwater and are major contaminants. Aniline (AN) and diphenylamine (DPA) are examples of toxic nonvolatile contaminants found often at dye and munitions manufacturing sites. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that bacteria can aerobically biodegrade AN and DPA in the capillary fringe and decrease the contaminant concentrations in the anoxic plume beneath the vadose zone. Laboratory multiport columns that represented the unsaturated zone were used to evaluate degradation of AN or DPA in contaminated water. The biodegradation fluxes of the contaminants were estimated to be 113 ± 26 mg AN·m(-2)·h(-1) and 76 ± 18 mg DPA·m(-2)·h(-1) in the presence of bacteria known to degrade AN and DPA. Oxygen and contaminant profiles along with enumeration of bacterial populations indicated that most of the biodegradation took place within the lower part of the capillary fringe. The results indicate that bacteria capable of contaminant biodegradation in the capillary fringe can create a sink for nonvolatile contaminants. PMID:27523982

  7. Natural Attenuation of Nonvolatile Contaminants in the Capillary Fringe.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Zohre; Mack, E Erin; Spain, Jim C

    2016-09-20

    When anoxic polluted groundwater encounters the overlying vadose zone an oxic/anoxic interface is created, often near the capillary fringe. Biodegradation of volatile contaminants in the capillary fringe can prevent vapor migration. In contrast, the biodegradation of nonvolatile contaminants in the vadose zone has received comparatively little attention. Nonvolatile compounds do not cause vapor intrusion, but they still move with the groundwater and are major contaminants. Aniline (AN) and diphenylamine (DPA) are examples of toxic nonvolatile contaminants found often at dye and munitions manufacturing sites. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that bacteria can aerobically biodegrade AN and DPA in the capillary fringe and decrease the contaminant concentrations in the anoxic plume beneath the vadose zone. Laboratory multiport columns that represented the unsaturated zone were used to evaluate degradation of AN or DPA in contaminated water. The biodegradation fluxes of the contaminants were estimated to be 113 ± 26 mg AN·m(-2)·h(-1) and 76 ± 18 mg DPA·m(-2)·h(-1) in the presence of bacteria known to degrade AN and DPA. Oxygen and contaminant profiles along with enumeration of bacterial populations indicated that most of the biodegradation took place within the lower part of the capillary fringe. The results indicate that bacteria capable of contaminant biodegradation in the capillary fringe can create a sink for nonvolatile contaminants.

  8. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices to a length greater than

  9. Magnetic Analog Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed integrated, solid-state, analog random-access memory base on principle of magnetic writing and magnetoresistive reading. Current in writing conductor magnetizes storage layer. Remanent magnetization in storage layer penetrates readout layer and detected by magnetoresistive effect or Hall effect. Memory cells are part of integrated circuit including associated reading and writing transistors. Intended to provide high storage density and rapid access, nonvolatile, consumes little power, and relatively invulnerable to ionizing radiation.

  10. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites

  11. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  12. Method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wadia, Cyrus; Wu, Yue

    2013-04-23

    A method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals is disclosed which in one embodiment includes forming a solution of iron (III) diethyl dithiophosphate and tetra-alkyl-ammonium halide in water. The solution is heated under pressure. Pyrite nanocrystal particles are then recovered from the solution.

  13. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyley, Samuel; Thielemans, Wim

    2014-06-01

    Chemical modification of cellulose nanocrystals is an increasingly popular topic in the literature. This review analyses the type of cellulose nanocrystal modification reactions that have been published in the literature thus far and looks at the steps that have been taken towards analysing the products of the nanocrystal modifications. The main categories of reactions carried out on cellulose nanocrystals are oxidations, esterifications, amidations, carbamations and etherifications. More recently nucleophilic substitutions have been used to introduce more complex functionality to cellulose nanocrystals. Multi-step modifications are also considered. This review emphasizes quantification of modification at the nanocrystal surface in terms of degree of substitution and the validity of conclusions drawn from different analysis techniques in this area. The mechanisms of the modification reactions are presented and considered with respect to the effect on the outcome of the reactions. While great strides have been made in the quality of analytical data published in the field of cellulose nanocrystal modification, there is still vast scope for improvement, both in data quality and the quality of analysis of data. Given the difficulty of surface analysis, cross-checking of results from different analysis techniques is fundamental for the development of reliable cellulose nanocrystal modification techniques.

  14. Electronic spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the bulk exciton show substantial quantum confinement effects. Recent experiments including Stark effect, resonance Raman, valence band photoemission, and near edge X-ray adsorption will be used to put together a picture of the nanocrystal electronic states.

  15. Photoemission studies of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, K. S.; Roth, R.; Alivisatos, A. P.

    1997-04-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have been the focus of much attention in the last ten years due predominantly to their size dependent optical properties. Namely, the band gap of nanocrystals exhibits a shift to higher energy with decreasing size due to quantum confinement effects. Research in this field has employed primarily optical techniques to study nanocrystals, and in this respect this system has been investigated extensively. In addition, one is able to synthesize monodisperse, crystalline particles of CdS, CdSe, Si, InP, InAs, as well as CdS/HgS/CdS and CdSe/CdS composites. However, optical spectroscopies have proven ambiguous in determining the degree to which electronic excitations are interior or surface admixtures or giving a complete picture of the density of states. Photoemission is a useful technique for understanding the electronic structure of nanocrystals and the effects of quantum confinement, chemical environments of the nanocrystals, and surface coverages. Of particular interest to the authors is the surface composition and structure of these particles, for they have found that much of the behavior of nanocrystals is governed by their surface. Previously, the authors had performed x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on CdSe nanocrystals. XPS has proven to be a powerful tool in that it allows one to determine the composition of the nanocrystal surface.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Enrico; Podsiadlo, Paul; Shevchenko, Elena; Ogletree, D. Frank; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Ashby, Paul D.

    2009-12-30

    Colloidal nanocrystals attract significant interest due to their potential applications in electronic, magnetic, and optical devices. Nanocrystal supercrystals (NCSCs) are particularly appealing for their well ordered structure and homogeneity. The interactions between organic ligands that passivate the inorganic nanocrystal cores critically influence their self-organization into supercrystals, By investigating the mechanical properties of supercrystals, we can directly characterize the particle-particle interactions in a well-defined geometry, and gain insight into both the self-assembly process and the potential applications of nanocrystal supercrystals. Here we report nanoindentation studies of well ordered lead-sulfide (Pbs) nanocrystal supercrystals. Their modulus and hardness were found to be similar to soft polymers at 1.7 GPa and 70 MPa respectively and the fractures toughness was 39 KPa/m1/2, revealing the extremely brittle nature of these materials.

  17. Germanium Nanocrystals Embedded in Sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Sharp, I.D.; Liao, C.Y.; Yi, D.O.; Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-04-15

    {sup 74}Ge nanocrystals are formed in a sapphire matrix by ion implantation followed by damage. Embedded nanocrystals experience large compressive stress relative to bulk, as embedded in sapphire melt very close to the bulk melting point (Tm = 936 C) whereas experience considerably lower stresses. Also, in situ TEM reveals that nanocrystals ion-beam-synthesized nanocrystals embedded in silica are observed to be spherical and measured by Raman spectroscopy of the zone center optical phonon. In contrast, reveals that the nanocrystals are faceted and have a bi-modal size distribution. Notably, the matrix remains crystalline despite the large implantation dose and corresponding thermal annealing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of as-grown samples those embedded in silica exhibit a significant melting point hysteresis around T{sub m}.

  18. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Klimov, Victor L.; Petruska, Melissa A.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention is directed to a process for preparing a solid composite having colloidal nanocrystals dispersed within a sol-gel matrix, the process including admixing colloidal nanocrystals with an amphiphilic polymer including hydrophilic groups selected from the group consisting of --COOH, --OH, --SO.sub.3H, --NH.sub.2, and --PO.sub.3H.sub.2 within a solvent to form an alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex, admixing the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex and a sol-gel precursor material, and, forming the solid composite from the admixture. The present invention is also directed to the resultant solid composites and to the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complexes.

  19. Non Volatile Flash Memory Radiation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.; Allen, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Commercial flash memory industry has experienced a fast growth in the recent years, because of their wide spread usage in cell phones, mp3 players and digital cameras. On the other hand, there has been increased interest in the use of high density commercial nonvolatile flash memories in space because of ever increasing data requirements and strict power requirements. Because of flash memories complex structure; they cannot be treated as just simple memories in regards to testing and analysis. It becomes quite challenging to determine how they will respond in radiation environments.

  20. Modeling of Sonos Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories (NVSMS) have many advantages. These memories are electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs). They utilize low programming voltages, endure extended erase/write cycles, are inherently resistant to radiation, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. The SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. The SONOS floating gate charge and voltage, tunneling current, threshold voltage, and drain current were characterized during an erase cycle. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental device data.

  1. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  2. Variable-Resistivity Material For Memory Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Distefano, Salvador; Moacanin, Jovan

    1989-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory elements packed densely. Electrically-erasable, programmable, read-only memory matrices made with newly-synthesized organic material of variable electrical resistivity. Material, polypyrrole doped with tetracyanoquinhydrone (TCNQ), changes reversibly between insulating or higher-resistivity state and conducting or low-resistivity state. Thin film of conductive polymer separates layer of row conductors from layer of column conductors. Resistivity of film at each intersection and, therefore, resistance of memory element defined by row and column, increased or decreased by application of suitable switching voltage. Matrix circuits made with this material useful for experiments in associative electronic memories based on models of neural networks.

  3. Ferroelectric Memory Capacitors For Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Moopenn, Alexander W.; Stadler, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film ferroelectric capacitors proposed as nonvolatile analog memory devices. Intended primarily for use as synaptic connections in electronic neural networks. Connection strengths (synaptic weights) stored as nonlinear remanent polarizations of ferroelectric films. Ferroelectric memory and interrogation capacitors combined into memory devices in vertical or lateral configurations. Photoconductive layer modulated by light provides variable resistance to alter bias signal applied to memory capacitor. Features include nondestructive readout, simplicity, and resistance to ionizing radiation. Interrogated without destroying stored analog data. Also amenable to very-large-scale integration. Allows use of ac coupling, eliminating errors caused by dc offsets in amplifier circuits of neural networks.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Memory Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are among the most cited prototypical materials for nanoelectronics and information storage devices, a dominant position that originates from their intrinsic structural and electronic properties. In this chapter we review the developments in memory elements that directly exploit the unique properties of carbon nanotubes. Fundamental operational principles and characteristics are examined for the different types of carbon nanotube-based memory devices along with the current status of experimental fabrication and scalability. These include memory elements based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFET), nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), and electromigration. Many of these devices show tremendous promise for providing enhanced densities, lower power requirements, more efficient read/write processes, and non-volatility of data.

  5. NAND FLASH Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Charles; Wang, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The NAND Flash Radiation Tolerant and Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH) is a User's Friendly, Plug-and- Play and Radiation Protected high density NAND Flash Memory. It provides a very high density, radiation hardened by design and non-volatile memory module suitable for all space applications such as commercial or scientific geo-stationary missions, earth observation, navigation, manned space vehicles and deep space scientific exploration. The Intelligent Memory Module embeds a very high density of non-volatile NAND Flash memory and one Intelligent Flash Memory Controller (FMC). The FMC provides the module with a full protection against the radiation effects such as SEL, SEFI and SEU. It's also granting the module with bad block immunity as well as high level service functions that will benefit to the user's applications.

  6. Silicon nanocrystal inks, films, and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Lance Michael; Kortshagen, Uwe Richard

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystal inks and films, and methods of making and using silicon nanocrystal inks and films, are disclosed herein. In certain embodiments the nanocrystal inks and films include halide-terminated (e.g., chloride-terminated) and/or halide and hydrogen-terminated nanocrystals of silicon or alloys thereof. Silicon nanocrystal inks and films can be used, for example, to prepare semiconductor devices.

  7. Langmuir-Blodgettry of nanocrystals and nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tao, Andrea R; Huang, Jiaxing; Yang, Peidong

    2008-12-01

    Although nanocrystals and nanowires have proliferated new scientific avenues in the study of their physics and chemistries, the bottom-up assembly of these small-scale building blocks remains a formidable challenge for device fabrication and processing. An attractive nanoscale assembly strategy should be cheap, fast, defect tolerant, compatible with a variety of materials, and parallel in nature, ideally utilizing the self-assembly to generate the core of a device, such as a memory chip or optical display. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) assembly is a good candidate for arranging vast numbers of nanostructures on solid surfaces. In the LB technique, uniaxial compression of a nanocrystal or nanowire monolayer floating on an aqueous subphase causes the nanostructures to assemble and pack over a large area. The ordered monolayer can then be transferred to a solid surface en masse and with fidelity. In this Account, we present the Langmuir-Blodgett technique as a low-cost method for the massively parallel, controlled organization of nanostructures. The isothermal compression of fluid-supported nanoparticles or nanowires is unique in its ability to achieve control over nanoscale assembly by tuning a macroscopic property such as surface pressure. Under optimized conditions (e.g., surface pressure, substrate hydrophobicity, and pulling speed), it allows continuous variation of particle density, spacing, and even arrangement. For practical application and device fabrication, LB compression is ideal for forming highly dense assemblies of nanowires and nanocrystals over unprecedented surface areas. In addition, the dewetting properties of LB monolayers can be used to further achieve patterning within the range of micrometers to tens of nanometers without a predefined template. The LB method should allow for easy integration of nanomaterials into current manufacturing schemes, in addition to fast device prototyping and multiplexing capability. PMID:18683954

  8. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Micheel, Christine Marya

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  9. Desorption Mass Spectrometry for Nonvolatile Compounds Using an Ultrasonic Cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Ahsan; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Usmanov, Dilshadbek T.; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    In this work, desorption of nonvolatile analytes induced by friction was studied. The nonvolatile compounds deposited on the perfluoroalkoxy substrate were gently touched by an ultrasonic cutter oscillating with a frequency of 40 kHz. The desorbed molecules were ionized by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ion source. Efficient desorption of samples such as drugs, pharmaceuticals, amino acids, and explosives was observed. The limits of detection for these compounds were about 1 ng. Many compounds were detected in their protonated forms without undergoing significant fragmentation. When the DBD was off, no ions for the neutral samples could be detected, meaning that only desorption along with little ionization took place by the present technique.

  10. Si nanocrystals and nanocrystal interfaces studied by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujala, J.; Slotte, J.; Tuomisto, F.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2016-10-01

    Si nanocrystals embedded in a SiO 2 matrix were studied with positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Analysis of the S- and W-parameters for the sample annealed at 800 °C reveals a positron trap at the interface between the amorphous nanodots and the surrounding matrix. Another trap state is observed in the 1150 °C heat treated samples where nanodots are in a crystalline form. Positrons are most likely trapped to defects related to dangling bonds at the surface of the nanocrystals. Passivation of the samples results on one hand in the decrease of the S-parameter implying a decrease in the open volume of the interface state and, on the other hand, in the strengthening of the positron annihilation signal from the interface. The intensity of the photoluminescence signal increases with the formation of the nanocrystals. Passivation of samples strengthens the photoluminescence signal, further indicating a successful deactivation of luminescence quenching at the nanocrystal surface. Strengthening of the positron annihilation signal and an increase in the photoluminescence intensity in passivated silicon nanocrystals suggests that the positron trap at the interface does not contribute to a significant extent to the exciton recombination in the nanocrystals.

  11. Synthesis and Doping of Silicon Nanocrystals for Versatile Nanocrystal Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Nicolaas Johannes

    The impact of nanotechnology on our society is getting larger every year. Electronics are becoming smaller and more powerful, the "Internet of Things" is all around us, and data generation is increasing exponentially. None of this would have been possible without the developments in nanotechnology. Crystalline semiconductor nanoparticles (nanocrystals) are one of the latest developments in the field of nanotechnology. This thesis addresses three important challenges for the transition of silicon nanocrystals from the lab bench to the marketplace: A better understanding of the nanocrystal synthesis was obtained, the electronic properties of the nanocrystals were characterized and tuned, and novel silicon nanocrystal inks were formed and applied using simple coating technologies. Plasma synthesis of nanocrystals has numerous advantages over traditional solution-based synthesis methods. While the formation of nanoparticles in low pressure nonthermal plasmas is well known, the heating mechanism leading to their crystallization is poorly understood. A combination of comprehensive plasma characterization with a nanoparticle heating model presented here reveals the underlying plasma physics leading to crystallization. The model predicts that the nanoparticles reach temperatures as high as 900 K in the plasma as a result of heating reactions on the nanoparticle surface. These temperatures are well above the gas temperature and sufficient for complete nanoparticle crystallization. Moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for industrial applications. The heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles was adapted in Chapter 3 to study plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 -- 105 Pa). The model considers three collisionality regimes and determines the dominant contribution of each regime under various plasma conditions. Strong nanoparticle cooling at

  12. Electronic states of lead salt nanocrystal and nanocrystal assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    With the development of new synthetic methods, semiconductor nanocrystals of various morphologies and dimensions have been created. This changes their electro-optical properties, and brings new questions in understanding. At the same time, more and more research is now focused on nanocrystal assemblies, in particular nanocrystal superlattices with atomically coherent lattices, with the potential for various optoelectronic device applications. This thesis examines, in both theory and experiment, a number of nanocrystal systems, with the stress on dimensionality and morphology. In particular, in 1D and 2D systems, due to the anisotropic quantum connenment, the electrons and holes will form a tightly bond excitons, even at room temperature, in contrast to 0D and 3D systems, where either quantum connenment or coulomb interaction completely dominates. We'll also look into nanocrystal assemblies, both amorphous and atomically coherent, and study the effect of the inherent disorder in the structure on their electronic properties, with the goal of charge transportation through delocalized states. Last, we'll examine the ne structure in these nanocrystals.

  13. Design and fabrication of a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction based nonvolatile programmable switch achieving 40% less area using shared-control transistor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, D.; Natsui, M.; Mochizuki, A.; Miura, S.; Honjo, H.; Kinoshita, K.; Fukami, S.; Sato, H.; Ikeda, S.; Endoh, T.; Ohno, H.; Hanyu, T.

    2014-05-01

    A compact nonvolatile programmable switch (NVPS) using 90 nm CMOS technology together with perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (p-MTJ) devices is fabricated for zero-standby-power field-programmable gate array. Because routing information does not change once it is programmed into an NVPS, high-speed read and write accesses are not required and a write-control transistor can be shared among all the NVPSs, which greatly simplifies structure of the NVPS. In fact, the effective area of the proposed NVPS is reduced by 40% compared to that of a conventional MTJ-based NVPS. The instant on/off behavior without external nonvolatile memory access is also demonstrated using the fabricated test chip.

  14. Early stage of nanocrystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have elucidated important mechanisms behind oriented attachment, the phenomenon that drives biomineralization and the growth of nanocrystals. This electron microscopy movie shows the early stage of nanocrystal growth. Nanoparticles make transient contact at many points and orientations until their lattices are perfectly matched. The particles then make a sudden jump-to-contact to form attached aggregates. (Movie courtesy of Jim DeYoreo)

  15. Mixed semiconductor nanocrystal compositions

    DOEpatents

    Maskaly, Garry R.; Schaller, Richard D.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-02-15

    Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors, wherein energy is transferred from the energy donor to the energy acceptor and wherein: the energy acceptor is a colloidal nanocrystal having a lower band gap energy than the energy donor; the energy donor and the energy acceptor are separated by a distance of 40 nm or less; wherein the average peak absorption energy of the acceptor is at least 20 meV greater than the average peak emission energy of the energy donor; and wherein the ratio of the number of energy donors to the number of energy acceptors is from about 2:1 to about 1000:1.

  16. Assemblies of Cellulose Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumacheva, Eugenia

    The entropically driven coassembly of nanorods (cellulose nanocrystals, CNCs) and different types of nanoparticles (NPs), including dye-labeled latex NPs, carbon dots and plasmonic NPs was experimentally studied in aqueous suspensions and in solid films. In mixed CNC-NP suspensions, phase separation into an isotropic NP-rich and a chiral nematic CNC-rich phase took place; the latter contained a significant amount of NPs. Drying the mixed suspension resulted in CNC-NP films with planar disordered layers of NPs, which alternated with chiral nematic CNC-rich regions. In addition, NPs were embedded in the chiral nematic domains. The stratified morphology of the films, together with a random distribution of NPs in the anisotropic phase, led to the films having close-to-uniform fluorescence, birefringence, and circular dichroism properties.

  17. Luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Charina L.; Koski, Kristie J.; Olson, Andrew C. K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe-CdS core-shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution. PMID:21098301

  18. Diffraction by nanocrystals II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joe P J; Millane, Rick P

    2014-08-01

    Nanocrystals with more than one molecule in the unit cell will generally crystallize with incomplete unit cells on the crystal surface. Previous results show that the ensemble-averaged diffraction by such crystals consists of a usual Bragg component and two other Bragg-like components due to the incomplete unit cells. Using an intrinsic flexibility in the definition of the incomplete-unit-cell part of a crystal, the problem is formulated such that the magnitude of the Bragg-like components is minimized, which leads to a simpler and more useful interpretation of the diffraction. Simulations show the nature of the relative magnitudes of the diffraction components in different regions of reciprocal space and the effect of crystal faceting. PMID:25121528

  19. Standard test method for nonvolatile residue of volatile cleaning solvents using the solvent purity meter

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covers the determination of nonvolatile residue of volatile cleaning solvents using a solvent purity meter. The residue is concentrated in aerosol form by evaporation of the more volatile solvents. The volume of the concentrated aerosol is passed by a forward light scattering photometer. Experimentally devised curves relating photometer output to nonvolatile residue concentration are used to obtain parts per million of nonvolatile residue content of the cleaning solvents.

  20. Flash Memory Reliability: Read, Program, and Erase Latency Versus Endurance Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidecker, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and results of the fiscal year (FY) 2010 NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program (NEPP) task for nonvolatile memory (NVM) reliability. This year's focus was to measure latency (read, program, and erase) of NAND Flash memories and determine how these parameters drift with erase/program/read endurance cycling.

  1. Memory Switches Based On MnO2-x Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.; Lambe, John

    1989-01-01

    Thin films of Mn02-x at intersections between metallic row and column conductors serve as switching elements for nonvolatile electronic memories. "On"-state resistance adjustable, and on-to-off transition irreversible. Elements electrically programmable and especially suitable for use in associative electronic memories based on neural-network concepts.

  2. Radiation Test Challenges for Scaled Commerical Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Ray L.; Cohn, Lewis M.; Oldham, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    As sub-100nm CMOS technologies gather interest, the radiation effects performance of these technologies provide a significant challenge. In this talk, we shall discuss the radiation testing challenges as related to commercial memory devices. The focus will be on complex test and failure modes emerging in state-of-the-art Flash non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs), which are volatile. Due to their very high bit density, these device types are highly desirable for use in the natural space environment. In this presentation, we shall discuss these devices with emphasis on considerations for test and qualification methods required.

  3. Photoluminescence spectral study of single cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide colloidal nanocrystals in poly(methyl methacrylate) and quantum dots molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yaoming

    Quantum dots (QDs)and Nano-crystals (NCs) have been studies for decades. Because of the nanoscale quantum confinement, delta shape like energy density states and narrowband emitters properties, they hold great promise for numerous optoelectronics and photonics applications. They could be used for tunable lasers, white LED, Nano-OLED, non-volatile memory and solar cells. They are also the most promising candidates for the quantum computing. The benefits for NCs over QDs is that NCs can be incorporated into a variety of polymers as well as thin films of bulk semiconductors. These exceptional flexibility and structural control distinguish NCs from the more traditional QD structures fabricated using epitaxial growth techniques. In my research of work, I studied the photoluminescence (PL) and absorption character of ensemble NCs incorporated in Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). To understand the behavior of the NCs in PMMA, it is important to measure a singe NC to avoid the inhomogenous broading of many NCs. So I particularly studied the behavior of a single NC in PMMA matrix. A microphotoluminescence setup to optically isolate a single nanocrystal is used. Random spectral shift and blinking behavior (on and off) are found. Addition to that, two color spectral shifting, is a major phenomena found in the system. Other interesting results such as PL intensity changes (decreasing or increasing with time) and quenching effect are observed and explained too. From the correlation function, we can distinguish the phonon replicas. The energy of these phonons can be calculated very accurately from the experiment result. The Huang-Rhys factors can be estimated too. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), from highly strained-layer heteroepitaxy in the Stranski-Krastanow (S-K) growth mode, have been intensively studied because of the delta-function-like density of states, which is significant for optoelectronic applications. Spontaneous formation of semiconductor quantum

  4. Semiconductor nanocrystal-based phagokinetic tracking

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A; Parak, Wolfgang J; Le Gros, Mark; Boudreau, Rosanne

    2014-11-18

    Methods for determining metabolic properties of living cells through the uptake of semiconductor nanocrystals by cells. Generally the methods require a layer of neutral or hydrophilic semiconductor nanocrystals and a layer of cells seeded onto a culture surface and changes in the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals are detected. The observed changes made to the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals can be correlated to such metabolic properties as metastatic potential, cell motility or migration.

  5. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type

  6. Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Switching of Ferromagnetic Resonance in NiFe/PLZT Multiferroic Thin Film Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongqiang; Wang, Xinjun; Nan, Tianxiang; Zhou, Ziyao; Ma, Beihai; Chen, Xiaoqin; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Wang, Zhiguang; Guo, Rongdi; Chen, Shuiyuan; Shi, Xiaoling; Shi, Wei; Sun, Hongzhi; Budil, David; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoelectric effect, arising from the interfacial coupling between magnetic and electrical order parameters, has recently emerged as a robust means to electrically manipulate the magnetic properties in multiferroic heterostructures. Challenge remains as finding an energy efficient way to modify the distinct magnetic states in a reliable, reversible, and non-volatile manner. Here we report ferroelectric switching of ferromagnetic resonance in multiferroic bilayers consisting of ultrathin ferromagnetic NiFe and ferroelectric Pb0.92La0.08Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PLZT) films, where the magnetic anisotropy of NiFe can be electrically modified by low voltages. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements confirm that the interfacial charge-mediated magnetoelectric effect is dominant in NiFe/PLZT heterostructures. Non-volatile modification of ferromagnetic resonance field is demonstrated by applying voltage pulses. The ferroelectric switching of magnetic anisotropy exhibits extensive applications in energy-efficient electronic devices such as magnetoelectric random access memories, magnetic field sensors, and tunable radio frequency (RF)/microwave devices. PMID:27581071

  7. Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Switching of Ferromagnetic Resonance in NiFe/PLZT Multiferroic Thin Film Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongqiang; Wang, Xinjun; Nan, Tianxiang; Zhou, Ziyao; Ma, Beihai; Chen, Xiaoqin; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Wang, Zhiguang; Guo, Rongdi; Chen, Shuiyuan; Shi, Xiaoling; Shi, Wei; Sun, Hongzhi; Budil, David; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetoelectric effect, arising from the interfacial coupling between magnetic and electrical order parameters, has recently emerged as a robust means to electrically manipulate the magnetic properties in multiferroic heterostructures. Challenge remains as finding an energy efficient way to modify the distinct magnetic states in a reliable, reversible, and non-volatile manner. Here we report ferroelectric switching of ferromagnetic resonance in multiferroic bilayers consisting of ultrathin ferromagnetic NiFe and ferroelectric Pb0.92La0.08Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PLZT) films, where the magnetic anisotropy of NiFe can be electrically modified by low voltages. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements confirm that the interfacial charge-mediated magnetoelectric effect is dominant in NiFe/PLZT heterostructures. Non-volatile modification of ferromagnetic resonance field is demonstrated by applying voltage pulses. The ferroelectric switching of magnetic anisotropy exhibits extensive applications in energy-efficient electronic devices such as magnetoelectric random access memories, magnetic field sensors, and tunable radio frequency (RF)/microwave devices.

  8. An error-resilient non-volatile magneto-elastic universal logic gate with ultralow energy-delay product

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Ayan K.; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing goal of computer technology is to process and store digital information with the same device in order to implement new architectures. One way to accomplish this is to use nanomagnetic logic gates that can perform Boolean operations and then store the output data in the magnetization states of nanomagnets, thereby doubling as both logic and memory. Unfortunately, many of these nanomagnetic devices do not possess the seven essential characteristics of a Boolean logic gate : concatenability, non-linearity, isolation between input and output, gain, universal logic implementation, scalability and error resilience. More importantly, their energy-delay products and error rates tend to vastly exceed that of conventional transistor-based logic gates, which is unacceptable. Here, we propose a non-volatile voltage-controlled nanomagnetic logic gate that possesses all the necessary characteristics of a logic gate and whose energy-delay product is two orders of magnitude less than that of other nanomagnetic (non-volatile) logic gates. The error rate is also superior. PMID:25532757

  9. Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Switching of Ferromagnetic Resonance in NiFe/PLZT Multiferroic Thin Film Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongqiang; Wang, Xinjun; Nan, Tianxiang; Zhou, Ziyao; Ma, Beihai; Chen, Xiaoqin; Jones, John G; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Wang, Zhiguang; Guo, Rongdi; Chen, Shuiyuan; Shi, Xiaoling; Shi, Wei; Sun, Hongzhi; Budil, David; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoelectric effect, arising from the interfacial coupling between magnetic and electrical order parameters, has recently emerged as a robust means to electrically manipulate the magnetic properties in multiferroic heterostructures. Challenge remains as finding an energy efficient way to modify the distinct magnetic states in a reliable, reversible, and non-volatile manner. Here we report ferroelectric switching of ferromagnetic resonance in multiferroic bilayers consisting of ultrathin ferromagnetic NiFe and ferroelectric Pb0.92La0.08Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PLZT) films, where the magnetic anisotropy of NiFe can be electrically modified by low voltages. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements confirm that the interfacial charge-mediated magnetoelectric effect is dominant in NiFe/PLZT heterostructures. Non-volatile modification of ferromagnetic resonance field is demonstrated by applying voltage pulses. The ferroelectric switching of magnetic anisotropy exhibits extensive applications in energy-efficient electronic devices such as magnetoelectric random access memories, magnetic field sensors, and tunable radio frequency (RF)/microwave devices. PMID:27581071

  10. Analysis of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) from Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Organic contamination on critical spacecraft surfaces can cause electronic problems, serious attenuation of various optical signals, thermal control changes, and adhesion problems. Such contaminants can be detected early by the controlled use of witness mirrors, witness plates, wipe sampling, or direct solvent extraction. Each method requires careful control of variables of technique and materials to attain the ultimate sensitivities inherent to that procedure. Subsequent chemical analysis of the contaminant sample by infrared and mass spectrometry identifies the components, gives semiquantitative estimates of contaminant thickness, indicates possible sources of the nonvolatile residue (NVR), and provides guidance for effective cleanup procedures.

  11. Linearly arranged polytypic CZTSSe nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Feng-Jia; Wu, Liang; Gong, Ming; Chen, Shi You; Liu, Guang Yao; Yao, Hong-Bin; Liang, Hai-Wei; Wang, Yi-Xiu; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Even colloidal polytypic nanostructures show promising future in band-gap tuning and alignment, researches on them have been much less reported than the standard nano-heterostructures because of the difficulties involved in synthesis. Up to now, controlled synthesis of colloidal polytypic nanocrsytals has been only realized in II-VI tetrapod and octopod nanocrystals with branched configurations. Herein, we report a colloidal approach for synthesizing non-branched but linearly arranged polytypic I2-II-IV-VI4 nanocrystals, with a focus on polytypic non-stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnSxSe4−x nanocrystals. Each synthesized polytypic non-stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnSxSe4−x nanocrystal is consisted of two zinc blende-derived ends and one wurtzite-derived center part. The formation mechanism has been studied and the phase composition can be tuned through adjusting the reaction temperature, which brings a new band-gap tuning approach to Cu2ZnSnSxSe4-x nanocrystals. PMID:23233871

  12. Flexible memristive memory array on plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjun; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Keon Jae

    2011-12-14

    The demand for flexible electronic systems such as wearable computers, E-paper, and flexible displays has recently increased due to their advantages over present rigid electronic systems. Flexible memory is an essential part of electronic systems for data processing, storage, and communication and thus a key element to realize such flexible electronic systems. Although several emerging memory technologies, including resistive switching memory, have been proposed, the cell-to-cell interference issue has to be overcome for flexible and high performance nonvolatile memory applications. This paper describes the development of NOR type flexible resistive random access memory (RRAM) with a one transistor-one memristor structure (1T-1M). By integration of a high-performance single crystal silicon transistor with a titanium oxide based memristor, random access to memory cells on flexible substrates was achieved without any electrical interference from adjacent cells. The work presented here can provide a new approach to high-performance nonvolatile memory for flexible electronic applications. PMID:22026616

  13. Organic nano-floating-gate transistor memory with metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tho, Luu; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Noh, Yong-Young

    2016-04-01

    Organic non-volatile memory is advanced topics for various soft electronics applications as lightweight, low-cost, flexible, and printable solid-state data storage media. As a key building block, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with a nano-floating gate are widely used and promising structures to store digital information stably in a memory cell. Different types of nano-floating-gates and their various synthesis methods have been developed and applied to fabricate nanoparticle-based non-volatile memory devices. In this review, recent advances in the classes of nano-floating-gate OFET memory devices using metal nanoparticles as charge-trapping sites are briefly reviewed. Details of device fabrication, characterization, and operation mechanisms are reported based on recent research activities reported in the literature.

  14. Aqueous Based Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lihong; Kershaw, Stephen V; Li, Yilin; Huang, Xiaodan; Li, Yingying; Rogach, Andrey L; Gao, Mingyuan

    2016-09-28

    This review summarizes traditional and recent nonconventional, bioinspired, methods for the aqueous synthesis of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The basic chemistry concepts are critically emphasized at the very beginning as these are strongly correlated with the selection of ligands and the optimal formation of aqueous QDs and their more sophisticated structures. The synergies of biomimetic and biosynthetic methods that can combine biospecific reactivity with the robust and strong optical responses of QDs have also resulted in new approaches to the synthesis of the nanoparticles themselves. A related new avenue is the recent extension of QD synthesis to form nanoparticles endowed with chiral optical properties. The optical characteristics of QD materials and their advanced forms such as core/shell heterostructures, alloys, and doped QDs are discussed: from the design considerations of optical band gap tuning, the control and reduction of the impact of surface traps, the consideration of charge carrier processes that affect emission and energy and charge transfer, to the impact and influence of lattice strain. We also describe the considerable progress in some selected QD applications such as in bioimaging and theranostics. The review concludes with future strategies and identification of key challenges that still need to be resolved in reaching very attractive, scalable, yet versatile aqueous syntheses that may widen the scope of commercial applications for semiconductor nanocrystals. PMID:27586892

  15. Nanocrystal powered nanomotor

    DOEpatents

    Regan, Brian C.; Zettl, Alexander K.; Aloni, Shaul

    2011-01-04

    A nanoscale nanocrystal which may be used as a reciprocating motor is provided, comprising a substrate having an energy differential across it, e.g. an electrical connection to a voltage source at a proximal end; an atom reservoir on the substrate distal to the electrical connection; a nanoparticle ram on the substrate distal to the atom reservoir; a nanolever contacting the nanoparticle ram and having an electrical connection to a voltage source, whereby a voltage applied between the electrical connections on the substrate and the nanolever causes movement of atoms between the reservoir and the ram. Movement of the ram causes movement of the nanolever relative to the substrate. The substrate and nanolever preferably comprise multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and the atom reservoir and nanoparticle ram are preferably metal (e.g. indium) deposited as small particles on the MWNTs. The substrate may comprise a silicon chip that has been fabricated to provide the necessary electrodes and other electromechanical structures, and further supports an atomic track, which may comprise an MWNT.

  16. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  17. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    SciTech Connect

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K.

    2013-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard–Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  18. Nonvolatile, reversible electric-field controlled switching of remanent magnetization in multifunctional ferromagnetic/ferroelectric hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandlmaier, A.; Geprägs, S.; Woltersdorf, G.; Gross, R.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.

    2011-08-01

    In spin-mechanics, the magnetoelastic coupling in ferromagnetic/ferroelectric hybrid devices is exploited in order to realize an electric-voltage control of magnetization orientation. To this end, different voltage-induced elastic strain states are used to generate different magnetization orientations. In our approach, we take advantage of the hysteretic expansion and contraction of a commercial piezoelectric actuator as a function of electrical voltage to deterministically select one of two electro-remanent elastic strain states. We investigate the resulting magnetic response in a nickel thin film/piezoelectric actuator hybrid device at room temperature, using simultaneous magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetotransport measurements. The magnetic properties of the hybrid can be consistently described in a macrospin model, i.e., in terms of a single magnetic domain. At zero external magnetic field, the magnetization orientation in the two electro-remanent strain states differs by 15°, which corresponds to a magnetoresistance change of 0.5%. These results demonstrate that the spin-mechanics scheme indeed enables a nonvolatile electrically read- and writable memory bit where the information is encoded in a magnetic property.

  19. LastingNVCache: A Technique for Improving the Lifetime of Non-volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Li, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Use of NVM (Non-volatile memory) devices such as ReRAM (resistive RAM) and STT-RAM (spin transfer torque RAM) for designing on-chip caches holds the promise of providing a high-density, low-leakage alternative to SRAM. However, low write endurance of NVMs, along with the write-variation introduced by existing cache management schemes may significantly limit the lifetime of NVM caches. We present LastingNVCache, a technique for improving lifetime of NVM caches by mitigating the intra-set write variation. LastingNVCache works on the key idea that by periodically flushing a frequently-written data-item, the next time the block can be made to load into a cold block in the set. Through this, the future writes to that data-item can be redirected from a hot block to a cold block, which leads to improvement in the cache lifetime. Microarchitectural simulations have shown that LastingNVCache provides 6.36X, 9.79X, and 10.94X improvement in lifetime for single, dual and quad-core systems. Also, its implementation overhead is small and it outperforms a recently proposed technique for improving lifetime of NVM caches.

  20. Non-volatile resistive photo-switches for flexible image detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, Sebastian; Wolf, Christoph; Sax, Stefan; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    The increasing quest to find lightweight, conformable or flexible image detectors for machine vision or medical imaging brings organic electronics into the spotlight for these fields of application. Here were we introduce a unique imaging device concept and its utilization in an organic, flexible detector array with simple passive matrix wiring. We present a flexible organic image detector array built up from non-volatile resistive multi-bit photo-switchable elements. This unique realization is based on an organic photodiode combined with an organic resistive memory device wired in a simple crossbar configuration. The presented concept exhibits significant advantages compared to present organic and inorganic detector array technologies, facilitating the detection and simultaneous storage of the image information in one detector pixel, yet also allowing for simple read-out of the information from a simple passive-matrix crossbar wiring. This concept is demonstrated for single photo-switchable pixels as well as for arrays with sizes up to 32 by 32 pixels (1024 bit). The presented results pave the way for a versatile flexible and easy-to-fabricate sensor array technology. In a final step, the concept was expanded to detection of x-rays.

  1. Enhanced non-volatile resistive switching in suspended single-crystalline ZnO nanowire with controllable multiple states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yan; Chen, Xuejiao; Feng, Zhihong; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switching nanostructures are a promising candidate for next-generation non-volatile memories. In this report, we investigate the switching behaviors of single-crystalline ZnO nanowires suspended in air. They exhibit significantly higher current density, lower switching voltage, and more pronounced multiple conductance states compared to nanowires in direct contact with substrate. We attribute the effect to enhanced Joule heating efficiency, reduced surface scattering, and more significantly, the positive feedback established between the current density and local temperature in the suspended nanowires. The proposed mechanism has been quantitatively examined by finite element simulations. We have also demonstrated an innovative approach to initiating the current–temperature mutual enhancement through illumination by ultraviolet light, which further confirmed our hypothesis and enabled even greater enhancement. Our work provides further insight into the resistive switching mechanism of single-crystalline one-dimensional nanostructures, and suggests an effective means of performance enhancement and device optimization.

  2. Enhanced non-volatile resistive switching in suspended single-crystalline ZnO nanowire with controllable multiple states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yan; Chen, Xuejiao; Feng, Zhihong; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switching nanostructures are a promising candidate for next-generation non-volatile memories. In this report, we investigate the switching behaviors of single-crystalline ZnO nanowires suspended in air. They exhibit significantly higher current density, lower switching voltage, and more pronounced multiple conductance states compared to nanowires in direct contact with substrate. We attribute the effect to enhanced Joule heating efficiency, reduced surface scattering, and more significantly, the positive feedback established between the current density and local temperature in the suspended nanowires. The proposed mechanism has been quantitatively examined by finite element simulations. We have also demonstrated an innovative approach to initiating the current-temperature mutual enhancement through illumination by ultraviolet light, which further confirmed our hypothesis and enabled even greater enhancement. Our work provides further insight into the resistive switching mechanism of single-crystalline one-dimensional nanostructures, and suggests an effective means of performance enhancement and device optimization.

  3. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  4. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  5. Data-Intensive Memory-Map simulator and runtime

    SciTech Connect

    Essen, B. B.

    2012-05-01

    DI-MMAP is a simulator for modeling the performance of next generation non-volatile random access memory technologies (NVRAM) and a high-perfromance memory-map runtime for the Linux operating system. It is implemented as a device driver for the Linux operating system. It will be used by algorithm designers to unserstand the impact of future NVRAM on their algorithms and will be used by application developers for high-performance access to NVRAM storage.

  6. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  7. Tailoring lanthanide nanocrystals for nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Tan, Timothy T. Y.

    2013-02-01

    Lanthanide nanocrystals have demonstrated strong potentials in nanomedicine due to its up-conversion and strong magnetic properties, and low toxicity. This talk will focus on strategies in lanthanide nanostructure tailoring to achieve up-conversion color emission tuning, MRI T1 and T2 contrast tuning, and the use of up-conversion fluorescence in drug delivery and cancer cells ablation.

  8. Flexible Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskite Memory.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chungwan; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-05-24

    Active research has been done on hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite materials for application to solar cells with high power conversion efficiency. However, this material often shows hysteresis, which is undesirable, shift in the current-voltage curve. The hysteresis may come from formation of defects and their movement in perovskite materials. Here, we utilize the defects in perovskite materials to be used in memory operations. We demonstrate flexible nonvolatile memory devices based on hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite as the resistive switching layer on a plastic substrate. A uniform perovskite layer is formed on a transparent electrode-coated plastic substrate by solvent engineering. Flexible nonvolatile memory based on the perovskite layer shows reproducible and reliable memory characteristics in terms of program/erase operations, data retention, and endurance properties. The memory devices also show good mechanical flexibility. It is suggested that resistive switching is done by migration of vacancy defects and formation of conducting filaments under the electric field in the perovskite layer. It is believed that organic-inorganic perovskite materials have great potential to be used in high-performance, flexible memory devices. PMID:27093096

  9. Nanocrystals Research for Energy Efficient and Clean Energy Technologies:

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2013-12-17

    Efforts centered on: nanocrystal photovoltaic fabrication, ultrafast dynamics and aberration-corrected STEM characterization of II-VI core, core/shell and alloyed nanocrystals, and fundamental investigation and applications of ultrasmall white light-emitting CdSe nanocrystal.

  10. Apple juice composition: sugar, nonvolatile acid, and phenolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Wrolstad, R E

    1988-01-01

    Apples from Michigan, Washington, Argentina, Mexico, and New Zealand were processed into juice; the 8 samples included Golden Delicious, Jonathan, Granny Smith, and McIntosh varieties. Liquid chromatography was used for quantitation of sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose, and sorbitol), nonvolatile acids (malic, quinic, citric, shikimic, and fumaric), and phenolics (chlorogenic acid and hydroxymethylfurfural [HMF]). Other determinations included pH, 0Brix, and L-malic acid. A number of compositional indices for these authentic juices, e.g., chlorogenic acid content, total malic - L-malic difference, and the HMF:chlorogenic ratio, were at variance with recommended standards. The phenolic profile was shown to be particularly influenced by gelatin fining, with peak areas decreasing by as much as 50%. The L-malic:total malic ratio serves as a better index for presence of synthetic malic acid than does the difference between the 2 determinations. No apparent differences in chemical composition could be attributed to geographic origin.

  11. Characterization of Monomethyihydrazine (MMH) Non-Volatile Residue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Chuck; Howard, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    The Space Shuttle program has a unique propellant purity requirement for determination of nonvolatile residue (NVR) in monomethylhydrazine (MMH). TIis requirement differs from the Military Specification procurement specification by requiring a NVR analysis with a limit of less than or equal to 10 milligrams per liter. In June 2008, a routine MMH replenishment delivery was transferred into a NASA KSC owned tanker for future delivery to the Space Shuffle pad MMH storage tank. Per Shuffle standard operating procedure, the receiving tanker was sampled and analyzed for purity and surprisingly it failed the Shuttle use NVR specification limit. Detailed examination of the NVR revealed that it was fundamentally different than the typical MMH NVR. This paper will examine various aspects of NVR determination in MMH and the analytical characterization processes used to identify the NVR.

  12. Non-volatile polarization switch of magnetic domain wall velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N.; Bernand-Mantel, A.; Schott, Marine; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.

    2015-12-21

    Controlled propagation speed of individual magnetic domains in metal channels at the room temperature is obtained via the non-volatile field effect associated with the switchable polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) (polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric polymer. Polarization domains directly written using conducting atomic force microscope probe locally accelerate/decelerate the magnetic domains in the 0.6 nm thick Co film. The change of the magnetic domain wall velocity is consistent with the magnetic anisotropy energy modulation through the polarization upward/downward orientation. Excellent retention is observed. The demonstrated local non-destructive and reversible change of magnetic properties via rewritable patterning of ferroelectric domains could be attractive for exploring the ultimate limit of miniaturization in devices based on ferromagnetic/ferroelectric bilayers.

  13. Anomalous carbon-isotope ratios in nonvolatile organic material.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, I R; Nissenbaum, A

    1966-08-12

    Organic mats are associated with sulfur deposits in Upper Pleistocene sand ridges of the coastal plain of southern Israel; black, brittle, and non-volatile, they show parallel layering but no other apparent cellular structure. Two independent carbon-14 determinations yielded ages of 27,750+/-500 and 31,370+/-1400 years. Four carbon-13:carbon-12 determinations fell within the range deltaC(13) =-82.5 to -89.3 per mille relative to the PDB standard; these appear to be the lowest values yet reported for naturally occurring high-molecular-weight organic material. The origin of the carbon is probably complex; it must have passed through at least one biologic cycle before final deposition.

  14. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    George, Johnsy; Sabapathi, S N

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. PMID:26604715

  15. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    PubMed Central

    George, Johnsy; Sabapathi, SN

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. PMID:26604715

  16. Phase transitions and doping in semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Ayaskanta

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are a promising technological material because their size-dependent optical and electronic properties can be exploited for a diverse range of applications such as light-emitting diodes, bio-labels, transistors, and solar cells. For many of these applications, electrical current needs to be transported through the devices. However, while their solution processability makes these colloidal nanocrystals attractive candidates for device applications, the bulky surfactants that render these nanocrystals dispersible in common solvents block electrical current. Thus, in order to realize the full potential of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in the next-generation of solid-state devices, methods must be devised to make conductive films from these nanocrystals. One way to achieve this would be to add minute amounts of foreign impurity atoms (dopants) to increase their conductivity. Electronic doping in nanocrystals is still very much in its infancy with limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern the doping process. This thesis introduces an innovative synthesis of doped nanocrystals and aims at expanding the fundamental understanding of charge transport in these doped nanocrystal films. The list of semiconductor nanocrystals that can be doped is large, and if one combines that with available dopants, an even larger set of materials with interesting properties and applications can be generated. In addition to doping, another promising route to increase conductivity in nanocrystal films is to use nanocrystals with high ionic conductivities. This thesis also examines this possibility by studying new phases of mixed ionic and electronic conductors at the nanoscale. Such a versatile approach may open new pathways for interesting fundamental research, and also lay the foundation for the creation of novel materials with important applications. In addition to their size-dependence, the intentional incorporation of

  17. Area-efficient nonvolatile carry chain based on pass-transistor/atom-switch hybrid logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xu; Tsuji, Yukihide; Sakamoto, Toshitsugu; Morioka, Ayuka; Miyamura, Makoto; Tada, Munehiro; Banno, Naoki; Okamoto, Koichiro; Iguchi, Noriyuki; Hada, Hiromitsu

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, an area-efficient nonvolatile carry chain combining look-up tables and a pass-transistor-logic-based adder is newly developed using complementary atom switches without additional CMOS circuits. A proposed tristate switch composed of three pairs of complementary atom switches selects one of “0”, “1”, and the “carry_in” signal as the input of a common multiplexer for both a look-up table and an adder. The developed nonvolatile carry chain achieves the reductions of 20% area, 17% delay, and 17% power consumption, respectively, in comparison with a conventional nonvolatile carry chain using dedicated CMOS gates.

  18. Towards Terabit Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Memories have been the major yardstick for the continuing validity of Moore's law. In single-transistor-per-Bit dynamic random-access memories (DRAM), the number of bits per chip pretty much gives us the number of transistors. For decades, DRAM's have offered the largest storage capacity per chip. However, DRAM does not scale any longer, both in density and voltage, severely limiting its power efficiency to 10 fJ/b. A differential DRAM would gain four-times in density and eight-times in energy. Static CMOS RAM (SRAM) with its six transistors/cell is gaining in reputation because it scales well in cell size and operating voltage so that its fundamental advantage of speed, non-destructive read-out and low-power standby could lead to just 2.5 electrons/bit in standby and to a dynamic power efficiency of 2aJ/b. With a projected 2020 density of 16 Gb/cm², the SRAM would be as dense as normal DRAM and vastly better in power efficiency, which would mean a major change in the architecture and market scenario for DRAM versus SRAM. Non-volatile Flash memory have seen two quantum jumps in density well beyond the roadmap: Multi-Bit storage per transistor and high-density TSV (through-silicon via) technology. The number of electrons required per Bit on the storage gate has been reduced since their first realization in 1996 by more than an order of magnitude to 400 electrons/Bit in 2010 for a complexity of 32Gbit per chip at the 32 nm node. Chip stacking of eight chips with TSV has produced a 32GByte solid-state drive (SSD). A stack of 32 chips with 2 b/cell at the 16 nm node will reach a density of 2.5 Terabit/cm². Non-volatile memory with a density of 10 × 10 nm²/Bit is the target for widespread development. Phase-change memory (PCM) and resistive memory (RRAM) lead in cell density, and they will reach 20 Gb/cm² in 2D and higher with 3D chip stacking. This is still almost an order-of-magnitude less than Flash. However, their read-out speed is ~10-times faster, with as yet

  19. New materials for tunable plasmonic colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Comin, Alberto; Manna, Liberato

    2014-06-01

    We present a review on the emerging materials for novel plasmonic colloidal nanocrystals. We start by explaining the basic processes involved in surface plasmon resonances in nanoparticles and then discuss the classes of nanocrystals that to date are particularly promising for tunable plasmonics: non-stoichiometric copper chalcogenides, extrinsically doped metal oxides, oxygen-deficient metal oxides and conductive metal oxides. We additionally introduce other emerging types of plasmonic nanocrystals and finally we give an outlook on nanocrystals of materials that could potentially display interesting plasmonic properties.

  20. Anisotropic Gold Nanocrystals:. Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiufiuc, R.; Toderas, F.; Iosin, M.; Stiufiuc, G.

    In this letter we report on successful preparation and characterization of anisotropic gold nanocrystals bio-synthesized by reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions in pelargonium plant extract. The nanocrystals have been characterized by means of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). Using these investigation techniques, the successful formation of anisotropic single nanocrystals with the preferential growth direction along the gold (111) plane has been confirmed. The high detail phase images could give us an explanation concerning the growth mechanism of the nanocrystals.

  1. Size distributions of chemically synthesized Ag nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thøgersen, Annett; Bonsak, Jack; Fosli, Carl Huseby; Muntingh, Georg

    2011-08-01

    Silver nanocrystals made by a chemical reduction of silver salts (AgNO3) by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) were studied using transmission electron microscopy and light scattering simulations. For various AgNO3/NaBH4 molar ratios, the size distributions of the nanocrystals were found to be approximately log-normal. In addition, a linear relation was found between the mean nanocrystal size and the molar ratio. In order to relate the size distribution of Ag nanocrystals of the various molar ratios to the scattering properties of Ag nanocrystals in solar cell devices, light scattering simulations of Ag nanocrystals in Si, SiO2, SiN, and Al2O3 matrices were carried out using MiePlot. These light scattering spectra for the individual nanocrystal sizes were combined into light scattering spectra for the fitted size distributions. The evolution of these scattering spectra with respect to an increasing mean nanocrystal size was then studied. From these findings, it is possible to find the molar ratio for which the corresponding nanocrystal size distribution has maximum scattering at a particular wavelength in the desired matrix.

  2. Oxygenated amorphous carbon for resistive memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Claudia A.; Sebastian, Abu; Marchiori, Chiara; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Dellmann, Laurent; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Rossell, Marta D.; Rossel, Christophe P.; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-10-01

    Carbon-based electronics is a promising alternative to traditional silicon-based electronics as it could enable faster, smaller and cheaper transistors, interconnects and memory devices. However, the development of carbon-based memory devices has been hampered either by the complex fabrication methods of crystalline carbon allotropes or by poor performance. Here we present an oxygenated amorphous carbon (a-COx) produced by physical vapour deposition that has several properties in common with graphite oxide. Moreover, its simple fabrication method ensures excellent reproducibility and tuning of its properties. Memory devices based on a-COx exhibit outstanding non-volatile resistive memory performance, such as switching times on the order of 10 ns and cycling endurance in excess of 104 times. A detailed investigation of the pristine, SET and RESET states indicates a switching mechanism based on the electrochemical redox reaction of carbon. These results suggest that a-COx could play a key role in non-volatile memory technology and carbon-based electronics.

  3. Quantitative tunneling spectroscopy of nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    First, Phillip N; Whetten, Robert L; Schaaff, T Gregory

    2007-05-25

    The proposed goals of this collaborative work were to systematically characterize the electronic structure and dynamics of 3-dimensional metal and semiconducting nanocrystals using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). This report describes progress in the spectroscopic work and in the development of methods for creating and characterizing gold nanocrystals. During the grant period, substantial effort also was devoted to the development of epitaxial graphene (EG), a very promising materials system with outstanding potential for nanometer-scale ballistic and coherent devices ("graphene" refers to one atomic layer of graphitic, sp2 -bonded carbon atoms [or more loosely, few layers]). Funding from this DOE grant was critical for the initial development of epitaxial graphene for nanoelectronics

  4. Lead sulphide nanocrystal photodetector technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saran, Rinku; Curry, Richard J.

    2016-02-01

    Light detection is the underlying principle of many optoelectronic systems. For decades, semiconductors including silicon carbide, silicon, indium gallium arsenide and germanium have dominated the photodetector industry. They can show excellent photosensitivity but are limited by one or more aspects, such as high production cost, high-temperature processing, flexible substrate incompatibility, limited spectral range or a requirement for cryogenic cooling for efficient operation. Recently lead sulphide (PbS) nanocrystals have emerged as one of the most promising new materials for photodetector fabrication. They offer several advantages including low-cost manufacturing, solution processability, size-tunable spectral sensitivity and flexible substrate compatibility, and they have achieved figures of merit outperforming conventional photodetectors. We review the underlying concepts, breakthroughs and remaining challenges in photodetector technologies based on PbS nanocrystals.

  5. The Surface Chemistry of Metal Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nicholas Charles

    The surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals is explored through several interrelated analytical investigations. After a brief discussion of the nanocrystal history and applications, molecular orbital theory is used to describe the electronic properties of semiconductors, and how these materials behave on the nanoscale. Quantum confinement plays a major role in dictating the optical properties of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals, however surface states also have an equally significant contribution to the electronic properties of nanocrystals due to the high surface area to volume ratio of nanoscale semiconductors. Controlling surface chemistry is essential to functionalizing these materials for biological imaging and photovoltaic device applications. To better understand the surface chemistry of semiconducting nanocrystals, three competing surface chemistry models are presented: 1.) The TOPO model, 2.) the Non-stoichiometric model, and 3.) the Neutral Fragment model. Both the non-stoichiometric and neutral fragment models accurately describe the behavior of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. These models rely on the covalent bond classification system, which divides ligands into three classes: 1.) X-type, 1-electron donating ligands that balance charge with excess metal at the nanocrystal surface, 2.) L-type, 2-electron donors that bind metal sites, and 3.) Z-type, 2-electron acceptors that bind chalcogenide sites. Each of these ligand classes is explored in detail to better understand the surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. First, chloride-terminated, tri-n-butylphosphine (Bu 3P) bound CdSe nanocrystals were prepared by cleaving carboxylate ligands from CdSe nanocrystals with chlorotrimethylsilane in Bu3P solution. 1H and 31P{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the isolated nanocrystals allowed assignment of distinct signals from several free and bound species, including surface-bound Bu3P and [Bu3P-H]+[Cl]- ligands as well as a Bu

  6. Nanographene charge trapping memory with a large memory window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jianling; Yang, Rong; Zhao, Jing; He, Congli; Wang, Guole; Shi, Dongxia; Zhang, Guangyu

    2015-11-01

    Nanographene is a promising alternative to metal nanoparticles or semiconductor nanocrystals for charge trapping memory. In general, a high density of nanographene is required in order to achieve high charge trapping capacity. Here, we demonstrate a strategy of fabrication for a high density of nanographene for charge trapping memory with a large memory window. The fabrication includes two steps: (1) direct growth of continuous nanographene film; and (2) isolation of the as-grown film into high-density nanographene by plasma etching. Compared with directly grown isolated nanographene islands, abundant defects and edges are formed in nanographene under argon or oxygen plasma etching, i.e. more isolated nanographene islands are obtained, which provides more charge trapping sites. As-fabricated nanographene charge trapping memory shows outstanding memory properties with a memory window as wide as ∼9 V at a relative low sweep voltage of ±8 V, program/erase speed of ∼1 ms and robust endurance of >1000 cycles. The high-density nanographene charge trapping memory provides an outstanding alternative for downscaling technology beyond the current flash memory.

  7. Non-volatile, solid state bistable electrical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A bistable switching element is made of a material whose electrical resistance reversibly decreases in response to intercalation by positive ions. Flow of positive ions between the bistable switching element and a positive ion source is controlled by means of an electrical potential applied across a thermal switching element. The material of the thermal switching element generates heat in response to electrical current flow therethrough, which in turn causes the material to undergo a thermal phase transition from a high electrical resistance state to a low electrical resistance state as the temperature increases above a predetermined value. Application of the electrical potential in one direction renders the thermal switching element conductive to pass electron current out of the ion source. This causes positive ions to flow from the source into the bistable switching element and intercalate the same to produce a non-volatile, low resistance logic state. Application of the electrical potential in the opposite direction causes reverse current flow which de-intercalates the bistable logic switching element and produces a high resistance logic state.

  8. Atmospheric fate of non-volatile and ionizable compounds.

    PubMed

    Franco, Antonio; Hauschild, Michael; Jolliet, Olivier; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    A modified version of the Multimedia Activity Model for Ionics MAMI, including two-layered atmosphere, air-water interface partitioning, intermittent rainfall and variable cloud coverage was developed to simulate the atmospheric fate of ten low volatility or ionizable organic chemicals. Probabilistic simulations describing the uncertainty of substance and environmental input properties were run to evaluate the impact of atmospheric parameters, ionization and air-water (or air-ice) interface enrichment. The rate of degradation and the concentration of OH radicals, the duration of dry and wet periods, and the parameters describing air-water partitioning (K(AW) and temperature) and ionization (pK(a) and pH) are the key parameters determining the potential for long range transport. Wet deposition is an important removal process, but its efficiency is limited, primarily by the duration of the dry period between precipitation events. Given the underlying model assumptions, the presence of clouds contributes to the higher persistence in the troposphere because of the capacity of cloud water to accumulate and transport non-volatile (e.g. 2,4-D) and surface-active chemicals (e.g. PFOA). This limits the efficiency of wet deposition from the troposphere enhancing long-range transport.

  9. Hollow nanocrystals and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Yin, Yadong; Erdonmez, Can Kerem

    2011-07-05

    Described herein are hollow nanocrystals having various shapes that can be produced by a simple chemical process. The hollow nanocrystals described herein may have a shell as thin as 0.5 nm and outside diameters that can be controlled by the process of making.

  10. Structure Map for Embedded Binary Alloy Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.W.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Stone, P.R.; Watanabe, M.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-09-20

    The equilibrium structure of embedded nanocrystals formed from strongly segregating binary-alloys is considered within a simple thermodynamic model. The model identifies two dimensionlessinterface energies that dictate the structure, and allows prediction of the stable structure for anychoice of these parameters. The resulting structure map includes three distinct nanocrystal mor-phologies: core/shell, lobe/lobe, and completely separated spheres.

  11. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2014-02-11

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  12. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlam, Michael C; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2014-03-25

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit tight of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  13. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-04-13

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  14. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, Paul A.

    2015-11-10

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit tight of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  15. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-06-23

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  16. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  17. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-03-08

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  18. Copper selenide nanocrystals for photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Colin M; Pattani, Varun P; Rasch, Michael; Panthani, Matthew G; Koo, Bonil; Tunnell, James W; Korgel, Brian A

    2011-06-01

    Ligand-stabilized copper selenide (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, approximately 16 nm in diameter, were synthesized by a colloidal hot injection method and coated with amphiphilic polymer. The nanocrystals readily disperse in water and exhibit strong near-infrared (NIR) optical absorption with a high molar extinction coefficient of 7.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) M(-1) at 980 nm. When excited with 800 nm light, the Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals produce significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 22%, comparable to nanorods and nanoshells of gold (Au). In vitro photothermal heating of Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals in the presence of human colorectal cancer cell (HCT-116) led to cell destruction after 5 min of laser irradiation at 33 W/cm(2), demonstrating the viabilitiy of Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals for photothermal therapy applications. PMID:21553924

  19. Copper Selenide Nanocrystals for Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Colin M.; Pattani, Varun; Rasch, Michael; Panthani, Matthew G.; Koo, Bonil; Tunnell, James W.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-stabilized copper selenide (Cu2−xSe) nanocrystals, approximately 16 nm in diameter, were synthesized by a colloidal hot injection method and coated with amphiphilic polymer. The nanocrystals readily disperse in water and exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) optical absorption with a high molar extinction coefficient of 7.7 × 107 cm−1 M−1 at 980 nm. When excited with 800 nm light, the Cu2−xSe nanocrystals produce significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 22%, comparable to nanorods and nanoshells of gold (Au). In vitro photothermal heating of Cu2−xSe nanocrystals in the presence of human colorectal cancer cell (HCT-116) led to cell destruction after 5 minutes of laser irradiation at 33 W/cm2, demonstrating the viabilitiy of Cu2−xSe nanocrystals for photothermal therapy applications. PMID:21553924

  20. Nanocrystal technology, drug delivery and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Junghanns, Jens-Uwe A H; Müller, Rainer H

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology will affect our lives tremendously over the next decade in very different fields, including medicine and pharmacy. Transfer of materials into the nanodimension changes their physical properties which were used in pharmaceutics to develop a new innovative formulation principle for poorly soluble drugs: the drug nanocrystals. The drug nanocrystals do not belong to the future; the first products are already on the market. The industrially relevant production technologies, pearl milling and high pressure homogenization, are reviewed. The physics behind the drug nanocrystals and changes of their physical properties are discussed. The marketed products are presented and the special physical effects of nanocrystals explained which are utilized in each market product. Examples of products in the development pipelines (clinical phases) are presented and the benefits for in vivo administration of drug nanocrystals are summarized in an overview. PMID:18990939

  1. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high–dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second.

  2. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high-dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second.

  3. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high-dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second. PMID:27124455

  4. Laser Fabrication of Polymer Ferroelectric Nanostructures for Nonvolatile Organic Memory Devices.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Tong, Daniel E; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Álvaro; Nogales, Aurora; García-Gutiérrez, Mari-Cruz; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Llobet, Jordi; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Rebollar, Esther

    2015-09-01

    Polymer ferroelectric laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) have been prepared on ferroelectric thin films of a poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) copolymer. Although this copolymer does not absorb light at the laser wavelength, LIPSS on the copolymer can be obtained by forming a bilayer with other light-absorbing polymers. The ferroelectric nature of the structured bilayer was proven by piezoresponse force microscopy measurements. Ferroelectric hysteresis was found on both the bilayer and the laser-structured bilayer. We show that it is possible to write ferroelectric information at the nanoscale. The laser-structured ferroelectric bilayer showed an increase in the information storage density of an order of magnitude, in comparison to the original bilayer.

  5. Optimizing the performance of advanced nonvolatile memories using differentiated cell source and drain implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Martin; Pansana, P.

    1995-09-01

    In order to satisfy the twin requirements of increased performance at low cost, a novel architecture that allows the differentiation of the source and drain implants of an EPROM cell without any additional processing steps has been developed. This cell is more immune to electrical stress than a standard cell during both programming and read cycles. In addition, this cell is inherently electrically shorter and therefore can be used to reduce die size in advanced EPROM devices.

  6. Resistive switching behavior of La-doped ZnO films for nonvolatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M. H.; Zeng, Z. Q.; Li, J. C.; Wang, Z. P.; Xu, X. L.; Wang, G. Y.; Zhang, L. B.; Yang, S. B.; Xiao, Y. G.; Jiang, B.

    2011-09-01

    Rare earth element La-doped ZnO polycrystalline films are prepared on Pt/Ti/SiO 2/Si substrate and p-Si substrate by chemical solution deposition (CSD) method. High ROFF/ RON ratios, low operation voltages within 150 switching cycles of test and long retention measurement are obtained, which indicate that the two different structure devices exhibit reversible, controllable and remarkable reliability unipolar resistive switching (RS) behaviors. The RS mechanism is related to the different substrate of the samples. The filament theory and the interface effect are suggested to be responsible for the RS phenomenon for the Pt/Ti/SiO 2/Si substrate and p-Si substrate, respectively.

  7. Carbon Nanofibers Synthesized on Selective Substrates for Nonvolatile Memory and 3D Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Khan, Abdur R.

    2011-01-01

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) growth technique has been developed where the choice of starting substrate was found to influence the electrical characteristics of the resulting carbon nanofiber (CNF) tubes. It has been determined that, if the tubes are grown on refractory metallic nitride substrates, then the resulting tubes formed with dc PECVD are also electrically conducting. Individual CNFs were formed by first patterning Ni catalyst islands using ebeam evaporation and liftoff. The CNFs were then synthesized using dc PECVD with C2H2:NH3 = [1:4] at 5 Torr and 700 C, and approximately equal to 200-W plasma power. Tubes were grown directly on degenerately doped silicon <100> substrates with resistivity rho approximately equal to 1-5 meterohm-centimeter, as well as NbTiN. The approximately equal to 200-nanometer thick refractory NbTiN deposited using magnetron sputtering had rho approximately equal to 113 microohm-centimeter and was also chemically compatible with CNF synthesis. The sample was then mounted on a 45 beveled Al holder, and placed inside a SEM (scanning electron microscope). A nanomanipulator probe stage was placed inside the SEM equipped with an electrical feed-through, where tungsten probes were used to make two-terminal electrical measurements with an HP 4156C parameter analyzer. The positive terminal nanoprobe was mechanically manipulated to physically contact an individual CNF grown directly on NbTiN as shown by the SEM image in the inset of figure (a), while the negative terminal was grounded to the substrate. This revealed the tube was electrically conductive, although measureable currents could not be detected until approximately equal to 6 V, after which point current increased sharply until compliance (approximately equal to 50 nA) was reached at approximately equal to 9.5 V. A native oxide on the tungsten probe tips may contribute to a tunnel barrier, which could be the reason for the suppressed transport at low biases. Currents up to approximately 100 nA could be cycled, which are likely to propagate via the tube surface, or sidewalls, rather than the body, which is shown by the I-V in figure (a). Electrical conduction via the sidewalls is a necessity for dc NEMS (nanoelectromechanical system) applications, more so than for the field emission applications of such tubes. During the tests, high conductivity was expected, because both probes were shorted to the substrate, as shown by curve 1 in the I-V characteristic in figure (b). When a tube grown on NbTiN was probed, the response was similar to the approximately equal to 100 nA and is represented by curve 2 in figure (b), which could be cycled and propagated via the tube surface or the sidewalls. However, no measureable currents for the tube grown directly on Si were observed as shown by curve 3 in figure (b), even after testing over a range of samples. This could arise from a dielectric coating on the sidewalls for tubes on Si. As a result of the directional nature of ion bombardment during dc PECVD, Si from the substrate is likely re-sputtered and possibly coats the sidewalls.

  8. High temperature polyimide containing anthracene moiety and its structure, interface, and nonvolatile memory behavior.

    PubMed

    Park, Samdae; Kim, Kyungtae; Kim, Dong Min; Kwon, Wonsang; Choi, Junman; Ree, Moonhor

    2011-03-01

    A high temperature polyimide bearing anthracene moieties, poly(3,3'-di(9-anthracenemethoxy)-4,4'-biphenylene hexafluoroisopropylidenediphthalimide) (6F-HAB-AM PI) was synthesized. The polymer exhibits excellent thermal stability up to around 410 °C. This polymer is amorphous but orients preferentially in the plane of nanoscale thin films. In device fabrications of its nanoscale thin films with metal top and bottom electrodes, no diffusion of the metal atoms or ions between the polymer and electrodes was found; however, the aluminum bottom electrode had somewhat undergone oxide layer (about 1.2 nm thick) formation at the surface during the post polymer layer formation process, which was confirmed to have no significant influence on the device performance. The polymer thin film exhibited excellent unipolar and bipolar switching behaviors over a very small voltage range, less than ±2 V. Further, the PI films show repeatable writing, reading, and erasing ability with long reliability and high ON/OFF current ratio (up to 10(7)) in air ambient conditions as well as even at temperatures up to 200 °C. PMID:21338065

  9. Ferroelectric/electrode interfaces: Polarization switching and reliability of PZT capacitors in nonvolatile memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye (Mike)

    The objective of this work was to investigate how the interface between electrode and PZT influences the PZT capacitor reliability. In order to conduct a well controlled experiment only the top-electrode PZT film interface was modified to study its effect on switching characteristics (i.e. hysteresis loop), voltage switching endurance and polarization retention of state of the art MOCVD grown film (nominally identical). The polycrystalline PZT film (50 -- 90 nm thick) are dominantly tetragonal with small fractions of the rhombohedral phase. XPS analyses of the as-deposited PZT film found the existence of a Pb-rich carbonate surface layer on all PZT film provided by industrial collaborators. Using materials characterizations such as in-situ XPS and ARXPS in tandem with electrical measurements it was determined that the Pb-rich surface layer appears to be an engineered sacrificial layer, which is beneficial in maximizing the switchable polarization and in improving the endurance and opposite-state retention behavior of PZT based FRAM capacitors with Pt electrode. This is because the excess Pb on the PZT surface and the Pb in the surface PZT reacts readily with the Pt during the Pt top electrode deposition creating a Pb-deficient non-ferroelectric interface layer between the top electrode and the PZT film. ARXPS analyses showed that this defective layer was approximately one nanometer thick and this is consistent with the hysteresis loop measurements that indicated a similar interface layer thickness. Inferior switching endurance and polarization retention was found in PZT film with an engineered initial thicker defective interface layer (via a HNO3-clean of the PZT surface prior to the top electrode deposition). This could be due to the fact that this defective interface layer may have thickened during the voltage cycling and/or retention bake. The thickening could be caused by greater carrier trapping and/or interface reaction between the Pb and the Pt. This thickening effectively stretched out the hysteresis curve and decreased remanent polarization that can be measured. To further investigate the interface effect on the switching phenomena and ferroelectric reliability, a monolayer HfO2 interface layer (experimentally determined optimal thickness) was inserted between the Pt top electrode and the PZT film by depositing the HfO2 monolayer coat by atomic layer deposition prior to room temperature Pt electrode deposition. Materials and electrical measurements showed that most of the applied electrical field was lost over this engineered interface layer (lower dielectric material) if its thickness was greater than 5 nanometer, effectively eliminating the switching phenomena. However, PZT capacitor with the monolayer HfO2 coat showed improved switching endurance and polarization retention. This is consistent with the preceding discussion because the engineering HfO 2 interface layer may have prevented the thickening of the interface layer during cycling and retention bake. Lastly, it was determined that the superior switching characteristics and reliability found in nominally identical PZT film with IrO2 top electrode was due to the inert chemical interface between the PZT and the top electrode. In-situ XPS analyses did not find any chemical reaction between the Pb in PZT surface and the IrO2 during the simulated IrO2 deposition. This is consistent with the higher switching polarization and greater voltage switching endurance found in PZT film with IrO2 top electrode.

  10. Unipolar resistive switching behavior of amorphous YCrO{sub 3} films for nonvolatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu; Misra, Pankaj; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu

    2014-08-28

    Amorphous YCrO{sub 3} (YCO) films were prepared on Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate by pulsed laser deposition in order to investigate resistive switching (RS) phenomenon. The Pt/YCO/Pt device showed stable unipolar RS with resistance ratio of ∼10{sup 5} between low and high resistance states, excellent endurance and retention characteristics, as well as, non-overlapping switching voltages with narrow dispersions. Based on the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature dependent switching characteristics, observed RS was mainly ascribed to the oxygen vacancies. Moreover, current-voltage characteristics of the device in low and high resistance states were described by Ohmic and trap controlled space–charge limited conduction mechanisms, respectively.

  11. 2D Mica Crystal as Electret in Organic Field-Effect Transistors for Multistate Memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotao; He, Yudong; Li, Rongjin; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2016-05-01

    Organic nonvolatile multistate storage devices based on organic field-effect transistors using mica as the 2D single-crystal electrets are developed. A4-paper-sized 2D mica crystals with flat surface are prepared successfully. Devices with mica electrets exhibit a typical memory effect and show ideal output curves on both the on and the off states.

  12. Nanocrystal-based Optoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Kenneth; Herzog, Joseph; Ward, Daniel; Natelson, Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Optoelectronic devices capable of detecting and emitting light on a scale well below its wavelength could have a profound impact on basic and applied experimental research in light-based electronics, on-demand photon generation, and for studying poorly understood quantum phenomena such as blinking and spectral wandering. We present a fabrication procedure for ultrasmall, nanocrystal optoelectronic devices based on self-assembled layers of quantum dots in plasmonically-active gold nanogaps. We provide preliminary experimental results which examine the possibility for surfaced-enhanced fluorescence, subwavelength detection and emission of light as well as plasmon-based optical trapping in these systems.

  13. Neural network based feed-forward high density associative memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Moopenn, A.; Lamb, J. L.; Ramesham, R.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel thin film approach to neural-network-based high-density associative memory is described. The information is stored locally in a memory matrix of passive, nonvolatile, binary connection elements with a potential to achieve a storage density of 10 to the 9th bits/sq cm. Microswitches based on memory switching in thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon, and alternatively in manganese oxide, have been used as programmable read-only memory elements. Low-energy switching has been ascertained in both these materials. Fabrication and testing of memory matrix is described. High-speed associative recall approaching 10 to the 7th bits/sec and high storage capacity in such a connection matrix memory system is also described.

  14. Organic ferroelectric/semiconducting nanowire hybrid layer for memory storage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ronggang; Kassa, Hailu G; Haouari, Rachid; Marrani, Alessio; Geerts, Yves H; Ruzié, Christian; van Breemen, Albert J J M; Gelinck, Gerwin H; Nysten, Bernard; Hu, Zhijun; Jonas, Alain M

    2016-03-21

    Ferroelectric materials are important components of sensors, actuators and non-volatile memories. However, possible device configurations are limited due to the need to provide screening charges to ferroelectric interfaces to avoid depolarization. Here we show that, by alternating ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires over an insulating substrate, the ferroelectric dipole moment can be stabilized by injected free charge carriers accumulating laterally in the neighboring semiconducting nanowires. This lateral electrostatic coupling between ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires offers new opportunities to design new device architectures. As an example, we demonstrate the fabrication of an elementary non-volatile memory device in a transistor-like configuration, of which the source-drain current exhibits a typical hysteretic behavior with respect to the poling voltage. The potential for size reduction intrinsic to the nanostructured hybrid layer offers opportunities for the development of strongly miniaturized ferroelectric and piezoelectric devices.

  15. Conditions of steady switching in phase-transition memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. I. Salnikov, S. M.; Anufriev, Yu. V.

    2015-04-15

    Three types of non-volatile memory cells of different designs based on phase transitions are developed and implemented. The effect of the design features of the cells and their active-region sizes on the switching characteristics and normal operation of the cells is considered as a whole. The causes of failure of the cells are analyzed from the obtained series of scanning electron images upon level-by-level etching of the samples. It is shown that the cell design is the most critical factor from the viewpoint of switching to the high-resistance state. The causes of this fact are analyzed and the criterion for providing the steady operation of cells of non-volatile memory based on phase transitions is formulated.

  16. Controlling upconversion nanocrystals for emerging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Shi, Bingyang; Jin, Dayong; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanocrystals enable anti-Stokes emission with pump intensities several orders of magnitude lower than required by conventional nonlinear optical techniques. Their exceptional properties, namely large anti-Stokes shifts, sharp emission spectra and long excited-state lifetimes, have led to a diversity of applications. Here, we review upconversion nanocrystals from the perspective of fundamental concepts and examine the technical challenges in relation to emission colour tuning and luminescence enhancement. In particular, we highlight the advances in functionalization strategies that enable the broad utility of upconversion nanocrystals for multimodal imaging, cancer therapy, volumetric displays and photonics.

  17. Quantum theory of electroabsorption in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tepliakov, Nikita V; Leonov, Mikhail Yu; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Rukhlenko, Ivan D

    2016-01-25

    We develop a simple quantum-mechanical theory of interband absorption by semiconductor nanocrystals exposed to a dc electric field. The theory is based on the model of noninteracting electrons and holes in an infinitely deep quantum well and describes all the major features of electroabsorption, including the Stark effect, the Franz-Keldysh effect, and the field-induced spectral broadening. It is applicable to nanocrystals of different shapes and dimensions (quantum dots, nanorods, and nanoplatelets), and will prove useful in modeling and design of electrooptical devices based on ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals.

  18. Progress in the study of drug nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Guo, Fei; Zheng, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Jianxu

    2015-12-01

    The poor water solubility of many candidate drugs remains a major obstacle to their development and clinical use, especially for oral drug delivery. Nanocrystal technology can improve the solubility and dissolution rates of many poorly water-soluble drugs very effectively, significantly improving their oral bioavailability and decreasing the food effect. For this reason, this technology is becoming a key area of drug delivery research. This review presents much of the recent progress in nanocrystal drug pharmaceuticals, including the characteristics, composition, preparation technology, and clinical applications of these drugs. Finally, the effect of nanocrystal technology on insoluble drugs is quantified and described. PMID:26817271

  19. Organic ferroelectric/semiconducting nanowire hybrid layer for memory storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ronggang; Kassa, Hailu G.; Haouari, Rachid; Marrani, Alessio; Geerts, Yves H.; Ruzié, Christian; van Breemen, Albert J. J. M.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.; Nysten, Bernard; Hu, Zhijun; Jonas, Alain M.

    2016-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials are important components of sensors, actuators and non-volatile memories. However, possible device configurations are limited due to the need to provide screening charges to ferroelectric interfaces to avoid depolarization. Here we show that, by alternating ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires over an insulating substrate, the ferroelectric dipole moment can be stabilized by injected free charge carriers accumulating laterally in the neighboring semiconducting nanowires. This lateral electrostatic coupling between ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires offers new opportunities to design new device architectures. As an example, we demonstrate the fabrication of an elementary non-volatile memory device in a transistor-like configuration, of which the source-drain current exhibits a typical hysteretic behavior with respect to the poling voltage. The potential for size reduction intrinsic to the nanostructured hybrid layer offers opportunities for the development of strongly miniaturized ferroelectric and piezoelectric devices.Ferroelectric materials are important components of sensors, actuators and non-volatile memories. However, possible device configurations are limited due to the need to provide screening charges to ferroelectric interfaces to avoid depolarization. Here we show that, by alternating ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires over an insulating substrate, the ferroelectric dipole moment can be stabilized by injected free charge carriers accumulating laterally in the neighboring semiconducting nanowires. This lateral electrostatic coupling between ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires offers new opportunities to design new device architectures. As an example, we demonstrate the fabrication of an elementary non-volatile memory device in a transistor-like configuration, of which the source-drain current exhibits a typical hysteretic behavior with respect to the poling voltage. The potential for size reduction

  20. Voltage-impulse-induced nonvolatile tunable magnetoelectric inductor based on multiferroic bilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hua; Tang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Huaiwu; Sun, Nian X.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we developed a voltage-impulse-induced nonvolatile tunable magnetoelectric inductor, which used an amorphous magnetic ribbon/lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multiferroic bilayer structure as a magnetic core. The PZT substrate, which contained defect dipoles through acceptor doping, was used in the bilayer structure to obtain an asymmetric strain-E “butterfly” curve. Different and stable voltage-impulse-induced in-plane residual stain states could be obtained by applying specific voltage impulse excitation modes. These residual strain states induced a nonvolatile inductance variation in the inductor through strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling. This method provided a promising approach to realize nonvolatile tunable inductors for miniaturized circuits and systems.

  1. Voltage-impulse-induced nonvolatile tunable magnetoelectric inductor based on multiferroic bilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hua; Tang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Huaiwu; Sun, Nian X.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we developed a voltage-impulse-induced nonvolatile tunable magnetoelectric inductor, which used an amorphous magnetic ribbon/lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multiferroic bilayer structure as a magnetic core. The PZT substrate, which contained defect dipoles through acceptor doping, was used in the bilayer structure to obtain an asymmetric strain–E “butterfly” curve. Different and stable voltage-impulse-induced in-plane residual stain states could be obtained by applying specific voltage impulse excitation modes. These residual strain states induced a nonvolatile inductance variation in the inductor through strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling. This method provided a promising approach to realize nonvolatile tunable inductors for miniaturized circuits and systems.

  2. Semiconductor-nanocrystal/conjugated polymer thin films

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Dittmer, Janke J.; Huynh, Wendy U.; Milliron, Delia

    2010-08-17

    The invention described herein provides for thin films and methods of making comprising inorganic semiconductor-nanocrystals dispersed in semiconducting-polymers in high loading amounts. The invention also describes photovoltaic devices incorporating the thin films.

  3. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size. PMID:27102066

  4. Bonding pathways of gold nanocrystals in solution.

    PubMed

    Aabdin, Zainul; Lu, Jingyu; Zhu, Xi; Anand, Utkarsh; Loh, N Duane; Su, Haibin; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2014-11-12

    Nanocrystal bonding is an important phenomenon in crystal growth and nanoscale welding. Here, we show that for gold nanocrystals bonding in solution can follow two distinct pathways: (1) coherent, defect-free bonding occurs when two nanocrystals attach with their lattices aligned to within a critical angle; and (2) beyond this critical angle, defects form at the interfaces where the nanocrystals merge. The critical misalignment angle for ∼10 nm crystals is ∼15° in both in situ experiments and full-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Understanding the origin of this critical angle during bonding may help us predict and manage strain profiles in nanoscale assemblies and inspire techniques toward reproducible and extensible architectures using only basic crystalline blocks.

  5. Semiconductor-nanocrystal/conjugated polymer thin films

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Dittmer, Janke J.; Huynh, Wendy U.; Milliron, Delia

    2014-06-17

    The invention described herein provides for thin films and methods of making comprising inorganic semiconductor-nanocrystals dispersed in semiconducting-polymers in high loading amounts. The invention also describes photovoltaic devices incorporating the thin films.

  6. Resonant tunneling of carriers in silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenyova, N. V.; Konakov, A. A.; Burdov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    The rates of resonant and nearly resonant tunnel transitions have been calculated within the envelope function approximation for electrons and holes in silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon dioxide matrix. It is shown that, if the nanocrystals are close enough, the rates of resonant tunneling reach the values of the order of 1012-1014 s-1, which considerably exceed the rates of radiative recombination and other basic non-radiative processes, such as the Auger recombination and capture on surface defects. The transition rate is found to be very sensitive to inter-crystallite distance, crystallite size, and effective mass of the carriers in the oxide matrix. Electron tunneling turns out to be faster than the hole one, especially, at greater distances between the nanocrystals. Thus, the tunnel migration in a dense ensemble of nanocrystals is mainly electronic.

  7. Colloidal nanocrystals and method of making

    SciTech Connect

    Kahen, Keith

    2015-10-06

    A tight confinement nanocrystal comprises a homogeneous center region having a first composition and a smoothly varying region having a second composition wherein a confining potential barrier monotonically increases and then monotonically decreases as the smoothly varying region extends from the surface of the homogeneous center region to an outer surface of the nanocrystal. A method of producing the nanocrystal comprises forming a first solution by combining a solvent and at most two nanocrystal precursors; heating the first solution to a nucleation temperature; adding to the first solution, a second solution having a solvent, at least one additional and different precursor to form the homogeneous center region and at most an initial portion of the smoothly varying region; and lowering the solution temperature to a growth temperature to complete growth of the smoothly varying region.

  8. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-04-22

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size.

  9. Zirconia nanocrystals as submicron level biological label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K.; Liepins, J.; Gavare, M.; Patmalnieks, A.; Gruduls, A.; Jankovica, D.

    2012-08-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals are of increasing interest for their usage in biology and pharmacology research. Our interest was to justify ZrO2 nanocrystal usage as submicron level biological label in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia culture. For the first time (to our knowledge) images with sub micro up-conversion luminescent particles in biologic media were made. A set of undoped as well as Er and Yb doped ZrO2 samples at different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method. The up-conversion luminescence for free standing and for nanocrystals with baker's yeast cells was studied and the differences in up-conversion luminescence spectra were analyzed. In vivo toxic effects of ZrO2 nanocrystals were tested by co-cultivation with baker's yeast.

  10. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2007-07-01

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonic materials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially useful optical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct optical scattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures that couple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, which is mediated by surface plasmons, depends on the shape and arrangement of the nanocrystals. Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silver nanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticle spacing, density and packing symmetry allows for tunability of the optical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategy offers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials for application in spectroscopic sensors, subwavelength optics and integrated devices that utilize field-enhancement effects.

  11. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2007-07-01

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonic materials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially useful optical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct optical scattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures that couple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, which is mediated by surface plasmons, depends on the shape and arrangement of the nanocrystals. Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silver nanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticle spacing, density and packing symmetry allows for tunability of the optical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategy offers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials for application in spectroscopic sensors, subwavelength optics and integrated devices that utilize field-enhancement effects.

  12. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  13. Lifetime blinking in nonblinking nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Christophe; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrück, Andrea; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I.

    2012-06-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots are attractive materials for applications as nanoscale light sources. One impediment to these applications is fluctuations of single-dot emission intensity, known as blinking. Recent progress in colloidal synthesis has produced nonblinking nanocrystals; however, the physics underlying blinking suppression remains unclear. Here we find that ultra-thick-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals can exhibit pronounced fluctuations in the emission lifetimes (lifetime blinking), despite stable nonblinking emission intensity. We demonstrate that lifetime variations are due to switching between the neutral and negatively charged state of the nanocrystal. Negative charging results in faster radiative decay but does not appreciably change the overall emission intensity because of suppressed nonradiative Auger recombination for negative trions. The Auger process involving excitation of a hole (positive trion pathway) remains efficient and is responsible for charging with excess electrons, which occurs via Auger-assisted ionization of biexcitons accompanied by ejection of holes.

  14. Lifetime blinking in nonblinking nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Galland, Christophe; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrück, Andrea; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I

    2012-06-19

    Nanocrystal quantum dots are attractive materials for applications as nanoscale light sources. One impediment to these applications is fluctuations of single-dot emission intensity, known as blinking. Recent progress in colloidal synthesis has produced nonblinking nanocrystals; however, the physics underlying blinking suppression remains unclear. Here we find that ultra-thick-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals can exhibit pronounced fluctuations in the emission lifetimes (lifetime blinking), despite stable nonblinking emission intensity. We demonstrate that lifetime variations are due to switching between the neutral and negatively charged state of the nanocrystal. Negative charging results in faster radiative decay but does not appreciably change the overall emission intensity because of suppressed nonradiative Auger recombination for negative trions. The Auger process involving excitation of a hole (positive trion pathway) remains efficient and is responsible for charging with excess electrons, which occurs via Auger-assisted ionization of biexcitons accompanied by ejection of holes.

  15. Gas phase grown silicon germanium nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Kaiser, M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the gas phase synthesis of highly crystalline and homogeneously alloyed Si1-xGex nanocrystals in continuous and pulsed plasmas. Agglomerated nanocrystals have been produced with remarkable control over their composition by altering the precursor GeH4 gas flow in a continuous plasma. We specially highlight that in the pulsed plasma mode, we obtain quantum-sized free standing alloy nanocrystals with a mean size of 7.3 nm. The presence of Si1-xGex alloy particles is confirmed with multiple techniques, i.e. Raman spectroscopy, XRD (Xray diffraction) and HRTEM (high resolution transmission electron microscopy) studies, with each of these methods consistently yielding the same composition. The nanocrystals synthesized here have potential applications in band-gap engineering for multijunction solar cells.

  16. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  17. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2008-02-05

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

  18. Three-terminal resistive switching memory in a transparent vertical-configuration device

    SciTech Connect

    Ungureanu, Mariana; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2014-01-06

    The resistive switching phenomenon has attracted much attention recently for memory applications. It describes the reversible change in the resistance of a dielectric between two non-volatile states by the application of electrical pulses. Typical resistive switching memories are two-terminal devices formed by an oxide layer placed between two metal electrodes. Here, we report on the fabrication and operation of a three-terminal resistive switching memory that works as a reconfigurable logic component and offers an increased logic density on chip. The three-terminal memory device we present is transparent and could be further incorporated in transparent computing electronic technologies.

  19. Tailorable, Visible Light Emission From Silicon Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, G.A.; Wilcoxon, J.P.

    1999-07-20

    J. P. Wilcoxon and G. A. Samara Crystalline, size-selected Si nanocrystals in the size range 1.8-10 nm grown in inverse micellar cages exhibit highly structured optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) across the visible range of the spectrum. The most intense PL for the smallest nanocrystals produced This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. to induce a useful level of visible photoluminescence (PL) from silicon (Si). The approaches understood. Visible PL has been observed from Si nanocrystals, or quantum dots, produced by a variety of techniques including aerosols,2 colloids,3 and ion implantation.4 However, all of The optical absorption spectra of our nanocrystals are much richer in spectral features spectrum of bulk Si where the spectral features reflect the details of the band structure shown in nanocrystals estimated to have a Si core diameter of 1-2 nm. These measured quantum those in the spectrum of bulk Si in Fig. 1 are striking indicating that nanocrystals of this size 8-Room temperature PL results on an HPLC size-selected, purified 2 nm nanocrystals but blue shifted by -0.4 eV due to quantum confinement. Excitation at 245 nm yields

  20. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOEpatents

    Warren, William L.; Vanheusden, Karel J. R.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Devine, Roderick A. B.

    2000-01-01

    An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

  1. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOEpatents

    Warren, W.L.; Vanheusden, K.J.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Devine, R.A.B.

    1998-11-03

    An electrically written memory element is disclosed utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element. 19 figs.

  2. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOEpatents

    Warren, William L.; Vanheusden, Karel J. R.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Devine, Roderick A. B.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

  3. Optical refrigeration of Yb3+:YAG nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the laser cooling process in Yb3+:YAG nanocrystals. We have developed an approach, which permits not only estimate the cooling process in Yb3+:YAG nanocrystals but compare this process with the laser cooling of the Yb3+:YAG bulk samples. The temperature dependences of all parameters of the system are taken into account. The cooperative effects such as re-absorption, the energy migration and cooperative luminescence have been considered.

  4. On-probe pyrolysis desorption ecectrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry for the analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An on-probe pyrolyzer has been constructed and interfaced with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) for the rapid analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products. The detection and analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products of peptides, proteins and the synthetic polymer pol...

  5. VALIDATION STUDIES OF THERMAL EXTRACTION-GC/MS APPLIED TO SOURCE EMISSIONS AEROSOLS: 1. SEMIVOLATILE ANALYTE--NONVOLATILE MATRIX INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work develops a novel validation approach for studying how non-volatile aerosol matrices of considerably different chemical composition potentially affect the thermal extraction (TE)/GC/MS quantification of a wide range of trace semivolatile organic markers. The non-volatil...

  6. EqualWrites: Reducing Intra-set Write Variations for Enhancing Lifetime of Non-volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh; Vetter, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-29

    Driven by the trends of increasing core-count and bandwidth-wall problem, the size of last level caches (LLCs) has greatly increased and hence, the researchers have explored non-volatile memories (NVMs) which provide high density and consume low-leakage power. Since NVMs have low write-endurance and the existing cache management policies are write variation-unaware, effective wear-leveling techniques are required for achieving reasonable cache lifetimes using NVMs. We present EqualWrites, a technique for mitigating intra-set write variation. In this paper, our technique works by recording the number of writes on a block and changing the cache-block location of a hot data-item to redirect the future writes to a cold block to achieve wear-leveling. Simulation experiments have been performed using an x86-64 simulator and benchmarks from SPEC06 and HPC (high-performance computing) field. The results show that for single, dual and quad-core system configurations, EqualWrites improves cache lifetime by 6.31X, 8.74X and 10.54X, respectively. In addition, its implementation overhead is very small and it provides larger improvement in lifetime than three other intra-set wear-leveling techniques and a cache replacement policy.

  7. EqualChance: Addressing Intra-set Write Variation to Increase Lifetime of Non-volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    To address the limitations of SRAM such as high-leakage and low-density, researchers have explored use of non-volatile memory (NVM) devices, such as ReRAM (resistive RAM) and STT-RAM (spin transfer torque RAM) for designing on-chip caches. A crucial limitation of NVMs, however, is that their write endurance is low and the large intra-set write variation introduced by existing cache management policies may further exacerbate this problem, thereby reducing the cache lifetime significantly. We present EqualChance, a technique to increase cache lifetime by reducing intra-set write variation. EqualChance works by periodically changing the physical cache-block location of a write-intensive data item within a set to achieve wear-leveling. Simulations using workloads from SPEC CPU2006 suite and HPC (high-performance computing) field show that EqualChance improves the cache lifetime by 4.29X. Also, its implementation overhead is small, and it incurs very small performance and energy loss.

  8. EqualWrites: Reducing Intra-set Write Variations for Enhancing Lifetime of Non-volatile Caches

    DOE PAGES

    Mittal, Sparsh; Vetter, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-29

    Driven by the trends of increasing core-count and bandwidth-wall problem, the size of last level caches (LLCs) has greatly increased and hence, the researchers have explored non-volatile memories (NVMs) which provide high density and consume low-leakage power. Since NVMs have low write-endurance and the existing cache management policies are write variation-unaware, effective wear-leveling techniques are required for achieving reasonable cache lifetimes using NVMs. We present EqualWrites, a technique for mitigating intra-set write variation. In this paper, our technique works by recording the number of writes on a block and changing the cache-block location of a hot data-item to redirect themore » future writes to a cold block to achieve wear-leveling. Simulation experiments have been performed using an x86-64 simulator and benchmarks from SPEC06 and HPC (high-performance computing) field. The results show that for single, dual and quad-core system configurations, EqualWrites improves cache lifetime by 6.31X, 8.74X and 10.54X, respectively. In addition, its implementation overhead is very small and it provides larger improvement in lifetime than three other intra-set wear-leveling techniques and a cache replacement policy.« less

  9. WriteSmoothing: Improving Lifetime of Non-volatile Caches Using Intra-set Wear-leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Li, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Driven by the trends of increasing core-count and bandwidth-wall problem, the size of last level caches (LLCs) has greatly increased. Since SRAM consumes high leakage power, researchers have explored use of non-volatile memories (NVMs) for designing caches as they provide high density and consume low leakage power. However, since NVMs have low write-endurance and the existing cache management policies are write variation-unaware, effective wear-leveling techniques are required for achieving reasonable cache lifetimes using NVMs. We present WriteSmoothing, a technique for mitigating intra-set write variation in NVM caches. WriteSmoothing logically divides the cache-sets into multiple modules. For each module, WriteSmoothing collectively records number of writes in each way for any of the sets. It then periodically makes most frequently written ways in a module unavailable to shift the write-pressure to other ways in the sets of the module. Extensive simulation results have shown that on average, for single and dual-core system configurations, WriteSmoothing improves cache lifetime by 2.17X and 2.75X, respectively. Also, its implementation overhead is small and it works well for a wide range of algorithm and system parameters.

  10. Inorganic Chemistry Solutions to Semiconductor Nanocrystal Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Samuel R.; Guo, Yijun; Ruberu, T. Purnima A.; Tavasoli, Elham; Vela, Javier

    2014-03-15

    The optoelectronic and chemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals heavily depend on their composition, size, shape and internal structure, surface functionality, etc. Available strategies to alter these properties through traditional colloidal syntheses and ligand exchange methods place a premium on specific reaction conditions and surfactant combinations. In this invited review, we apply a molecular-level understanding of chemical precursor reactivity to reliably control the morphology, composition and intimate architecture (core/shell vs. alloyed) of semiconductor nanocrystals. We also describe our work aimed at achieving highly selective, low-temperature photochemical methods for the synthesis of semiconductor–metal and semiconductor–metal oxide photocatalytic nanocomposites. In addition, we describe our work on surface modification of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots using new approaches and methods that bypass ligand exchange, retaining the nanocrystal's native ligands and original optical properties, as well as on spectroscopic methods of characterization useful in determining surface ligand organization and chemistry. Using recent examples from our group and collaborators, we demonstrate how these efforts have lead to faster, wider and more systematic application of semiconductor nanocrystal-based materials to biological imaging and tracking, and to photocatalysis of unconventional substrates. We believe techniques and methods borrowed from inorganic chemistry (including coordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry) have much to offer in reaching a better understanding of the synthesis, functionalization and real-life application of such exciting materials as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, rods, tetrapods, etc.).

  11. Charge trap memory based on few-layer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qi; Yan, Faguang; Luo, Wengang; Wang, Kaiyou

    2016-02-01

    Atomically thin layered two-dimensional materials, including transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) and black phosphorus (BP), have been receiving much attention, because of their promising physical properties and potential applications in flexible and transparent electronic devices. Here, for the first time we show nonvolatile charge-trap memory devices, based on field-effect transistors with large hysteresis, consisting of a few-layer black phosphorus channel and a three dimensional (3D) Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 charge-trap gate stack. An unprecedented memory window exceeding 12 V is observed, due to the extraordinary trapping ability of the high-k HfO2. The device shows a high endurance of over 120 cycles and a stable retention of ∼30% charge loss after 10 years, even lower than the reported MoS2 flash memory. The high program/erase current ratio, large memory window, stable retention and high on/off current ratio, provide a promising route towards flexible and transparent memory devices utilising atomically thin two-dimensional materials. The combination of 2D materials with traditional high-k charge-trap gate stacks opens up an exciting field of nonvolatile memory devices.

  12. Charge trap memory based on few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qi; Yan, Faguang; Luo, Wengang; Wang, Kaiyou

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin layered two-dimensional materials, including transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) and black phosphorus (BP), have been receiving much attention, because of their promising physical properties and potential applications in flexible and transparent electronic devices. Here, for the first time we show nonvolatile charge-trap memory devices, based on field-effect transistors with large hysteresis, consisting of a few-layer black phosphorus channel and a three dimensional (3D) Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 charge-trap gate stack. An unprecedented memory window exceeding 12 V is observed, due to the extraordinary trapping ability of the high-k HfO2. The device shows a high endurance of over 120 cycles and a stable retention of ~30% charge loss after 10 years, even lower than the reported MoS2 flash memory. The high program/erase current ratio, large memory window, stable retention and high on/off current ratio, provide a promising route towards flexible and transparent memory devices utilising atomically thin two-dimensional materials. The combination of 2D materials with traditional high-k charge-trap gate stacks opens up an exciting field of nonvolatile memory devices.

  13. Carrier trapping study on a Ge nanocrystal by two-pass lift mode electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (林振, Z. Lin; Brunkov, P.; Bassani, F.; Descamps, A.; O'Dwyer, C.; Bremond, G.

    2015-03-01

    Trapped charges inside an isolated germanium nanocrystal (Ge NC) have been studied by two-pass lift mode electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) measurements at room temperature. From visualized EFM images, electrons and holes were proven to be successfully injected and trapped in the Ge NC and distributed homogenously at the edge of its truncated spherical morphology. The Ge NC is found to have iso-potential surface and behave as a conductive material after being charged. It is also shown that the dominant charge decay mechanism during discharging of Ge NCs is related to the leakage of these trapped charges. A truncated capacitor model is used to approximate the real capacitance between the tip and Ge NC surface and to quantitatively study these trapped charges. These investigations demonstrate the potential for Ge nanocrystal memory applications.

  14. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  15. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  16. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Gerung, Henry; Boyle, Timothy J.; Bunge, Scott D.

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  17. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    SciTech Connect

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  18. LDRD final report on Si nanocrystal as device prototype for spintronics applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Verley, Jason C.; Pan, Wei; Banks, James Clifford; Brewer, Luke N.; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Barton, Daniel Lee; Dunn, Roberto G.

    2006-11-01

    The silicon microelectronics industry is the technological driver of modern society. The whole industry is built upon one major invention--the solid-state transistor. It has become clear that the conventional transistor technology is approaching its limitations. Recent years have seen the advent of magnetoelectronics and spintronics with combined magnetism and solid state electronics via spin-dependent transport process. In these novel devices, both charge and spin degree freedoms can be manipulated by external means. This leads to novel electronic functionalities that will greatly enhance the speed of information processing and memory storage density. The challenge lying ahead is to understand the new device physics, and control magnetic phenomena at nanometer length scales and in reduced dimensions. To meet this goal, we proposed the silicon nanocrystal system, because: (1) It is compatible with existing silicon fabrication technologies; (2) It has shown strong quantum confinement effects, which can modify the electric and optical properties through directly modifying the band structure; and (3) the spin-orbital coupling in silicon is very small, and for isotopic pure {sup 28}Si, the nuclear spin is zero. These will help to reduce the spin-decoherence channels. In the past fiscal year, we have studied the growth mechanism of silicon-nanocrystals embedded in silicon dioxide, their photoluminescence properties, and the Si-nanocrystal's magnetic properties in the presence of Mn-ion doping. Our results may demonstrate the first evidence of possible ferromagnetic orders in Mn-ion implanted silicon nanocrystals, which can lead to ultra-fast information process and ultra-dense magnetic memory applications.

  19. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (<20 nm in diameter) in diameter. Essential to our approach is an understanding of the nanoparticle as a building block, combined with an ability to integrate them into thin films that have uniform and characteristic electrical properties. We observe the BaTiO3 nanocrystals crystallize with evidence of tetragonality. Electric field dependent polarization measurements show spontaneous polarization and hysteresis, indicating ferroelectric behavior for the BaTiO 3 nanocrystalline films with grain sizes in the range of 10--30 nm. Dielectric measurements of the films show dielectic constants in the range of 85--90 over the 1 kHz--100 kHz, with low loss. We present nanocrystals as initial building blocks for the preparation of thin films which exhibit uniform nanostructured morphologies and grain sizes. In the second part of this chapter, a nonhydrolytic alcoholysis route to study the preparation of well-crystallized size-tunable BaTiO3

  20. Germanium nanocrystals: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerung, Henry

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate a simple synthesis route of Ge nanostructures (nanoparticles and nanowires), to characterize the physical and optical properties of Ge nanocrystal, and to demonstrate their biological and optoelectronics applications. The appropriate organometallic Ge 2+ precursors for the synthesis of Ge nanocrystals were identified. These precursors were used to develop a simple route that produced high quality Ge nanocrystals in high yield under mild conditions without using potentially contaminating catalysts and forming byproducts. The particle size was varied from 1 to 10 nm, depending on the reaction parameters. The relatively low-temperature, low-pressure nanocrystal synthesis condition allowed the use of organic solvents and surfactants. We also demonstrated morphological control over Ge nanocrystals via Ge2+ precursor reactivity modification. During synthesis, the surfactants passivate the nanocrystal surface and minimize surface oxidation. This synthesis method allowed optical characterization of Ge nanocrystals decoupled from contamination and oxidation. When excited with photons, Ge nanoparticles exhibit quantum confinement effect in both infrared and ultraviolet regions, as well as optical nonlinearity by the presence of two-photon absorption. These free-standing Ge nanocrystals could be further become integral elements in various optoelectronic devices. Herein, the production of water-soluble Ge nanoparticles was demonstrated as a proof of the effectiveness of our synthesis method. Addition of secondary layer surfactants such as cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG), transforms the Ge nanoparticles to become water-soluble. The biocompatible, functionalized, water-soluble Ge nanoparticles were bound to extracellular receptors and also incorporated into the cells as a proof-of-concept demonstration for potential biomarker applications. In expectation of forming a 3-D

  1. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  2. Recent development in magnetic-bubble memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo

    1986-11-01

    The magnetic-bubble memory - the new solid-state nonvolatile memory - has taken a prominent place in today's memory market. It is widely used in industrial and information area, because it is reliable, maintenance-free, and durable. Improvements on bubble materials, processing, and chip design, especially Permalloy tracks, led magnetic-bubble memory to 4-Mbit devices which are now commercially available. Conventional Permalloy tracks are, however, not suitable for higher bit density devices because they require a large driving field. To overcome this problem, ion-implanted tracks have been developed. Physics of ion-implantation to garnets and the ion-implanted tracks have been studied and understood. The ion-implanted devices have been developed as 16-Mbit hybrid devices. The ion-implanted bubble technology is promising for 64-Mbit devices in the near future. In packaging, the innovative development has been done. The PFC (Picture Frame Core) packages reduce the device size drastically. In the future, the Bloch line memory - an ultra-high density memory will be developed, based on bubble memory technology. This paper reviews these technologies in detail.

  3. New organic bistable films for ultrafast electric memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Z. Y.; Chen, G. R.; Xu, W.; Chen, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Thin films which have electrical bistable effects are mostly metal-organic complexes and/or organic-organic (all-organic) complexes. Very recently some simple (mono-molecular) organic materials have been discovered which have bistable states at room temperature, too. The threshold voltage across these organic films with a thickness of 60 nm is 4-6 V and the transition time is 5-10 ns. Therefore, they are suitable to make ultrafast, non-volatile, organic memories (WORM or EPROM). Another possible application for an STM type ultrahigh-capacity memory is also illustrated.

  4. Stacked-Gate FET's For Analog Memory Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anilkumar P.; Moopenn, Alexander W.

    1991-01-01

    Three-terminal, double-stacked-gate field-effect transistor (FET), developed as analog memory element. Particularly suited for use as synapse with variable connection strength in electronic neural network. Provides programmable, nonvolatile resistive connection, somewhat in manner of porous-gate FET described in "Porous-Floating-Gate Field-Effect Transistor" (NPO-17532). Resembles commercial erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) device, except for thickness of layers of silicon dioxide electrically isolating gates. Either p-channel or n-channel device.

  5. Global Distribution and Sources of Volatile and Nonvolatile Aerosol In the Remote Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Avery, M.; Viezee, W.; Che, Y.; Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Pueschel, R.; Hannan, J. R.; Anderson, B.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosol (Condensation Nuclei, CN) and selected trace gases made in the areas of the North Atlantic Ocean during SONEX (October/November 1997), and the south tropical Pacific Ocean during PEM-Tropics A (September/October 1996) and PEM-Tropics B (March/April 1999) have been analyzed. Emphasis is on the interpretations of variations in the number densities of the fine (>17 nm) and ultrafine (>8 nm) CN in the upper troposphere (8-12 km). These data suggest that large number densities of highly volatile CN (10(exp 4)-10(exp 5)/cu cm) are present in the clean upper troposphere with highest values over the tropical1subtropical region. Through marine convection and long-distance horizontal transport, volatile CN originating from the tropical/subtropical regions can frequently impact the abundance of aerosol in the middle and upper troposphere at mid to high latitudes. Nonvolatile aerosol particles behave in a manner similar to tracers of combustion (CO) and photochemical pollution (PAN), implying a source from continental pollution of industrial or biomass burning origin. In the upper troposphere, we find that volatile and nonvolatile partials number densities are inversely correlated. An aerosol microphysical model is used to suggest that coagulation of fine volatile particles with fewer larger nonvolatile particles provides one possible mechanism for this relationship. It appears that nonvolatile particles, of principally anthropogenic origin,provide a highly efficient removal process for the fine volatile aerosol.

  6. WORKSHOP REPORT - CONSIDERATIONS FOR DEVELOPING LEACHING TEST METHODS FOR SEMI- AND NON-VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides a summary of the information exchange at a workshop on the potential for release of semi- or non-volatile organic constituents at contaminated sites where sub-surface treatment has been used to control migration, and from waste that is disposed or re-used. The...

  7. Normally Off ECG SoC With Non-Volatile MCU and Noise Tolerant Heartbeat Detector.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Shintaro; Yamashita, Ken; Nakano, Masanao; Yoshimoto, Shusuke; Nakagawa, Tomoki; Nakai, Yozaburo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiromitsu; Marumoto, Kyoji; Fuchikami, Takaaki; Fujimori, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shiga, Toshikazu; Yoshimoto, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes an electrocardiograph (ECG) monitoring SoC using a non-volatile MCU (NVMCU) and a noise-tolerant instantaneous heartbeat detector. The novelty of this work is the combination of the non-volatile MCU for normally off computing and a noise-tolerant-QRS (heartbeat) detector to achieve both low-power and noise tolerance. To minimize the stand-by current of MCU, a non-volatile flip-flop and a 6T-4C NVRAM are used. Proposed plate-line charge-share and bit-line non-precharge techniques also contribute to mitigate the active power overhead of 6T-4C NVRAM. The proposed accurate heartbeat detector uses coarse-fine autocorrelation and a template matching technique. Accurate heartbeat detection also contributes system-level power reduction because the active ratio of ADC and digital block can be reduced using heartbeat prediction. Measurement results show that the fully integrated ECG-SoC consumes 6.14 μ A including 1.28- μA non-volatile MCU and 0.7- μA heartbeat detector.

  8. Memory Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... different parts. Some of them are important for memory. The hippocampus (say: hih-puh-KAM-pus) is one of the more important parts of the brain that processes memories. Old information and new information, or memories, are ...

  9. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, Shelley A.

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  10. A new approach for two-terminal electronic memory devices - Storing information on silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Saranti, Konstantina; Alotaibi, Sultan; Paul, Shashi

    2016-06-09

    The work described in this paper focuses on the utilisation of silicon nanowires as the information storage element in flash-type memory devices. Silicon nanostructures have attracted attention due to interesting electrical and optical properties, and their potential integration into electronic devices. A detailed investigation of the suitability of silicon nanowires as the charge storage medium in two-terminal non-volatile memory devices are presented in this report. The deposition of the silicon nanostructures was carried out at low temperatures (less than 400 °C) using a previously developed a novel method within our research group. Two-terminal non-volatile (2TNV) memory devices and metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures containing the silicon nanowires were fabricated and an in-depth study of their characteristics was carried out using current-voltage and capacitance techniques.

  11. A new approach for two-terminal electronic memory devices - Storing information on silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranti, Konstantina; Alotaibi, Sultan; Paul, Shashi

    2016-06-01

    The work described in this paper focuses on the utilisation of silicon nanowires as the information storage element in flash-type memory devices. Silicon nanostructures have attracted attention due to interesting electrical and optical properties, and their potential integration into electronic devices. A detailed investigation of the suitability of silicon nanowires as the charge storage medium in two-terminal non-volatile memory devices are presented in this report. The deposition of the silicon nanostructures was carried out at low temperatures (less than 400 °C) using a previously developed a novel method within our research group. Two-terminal non-volatile (2TNV) memory devices and metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures containing the silicon nanowires were fabricated and an in-depth study of their characteristics was carried out using current-voltage and capacitance techniques.

  12. A new approach for two-terminal electronic memory devices - Storing information on silicon nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Saranti, Konstantina; Alotaibi, Sultan; Paul, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    The work described in this paper focuses on the utilisation of silicon nanowires as the information storage element in flash-type memory devices. Silicon nanostructures have attracted attention due to interesting electrical and optical properties, and their potential integration into electronic devices. A detailed investigation of the suitability of silicon nanowires as the charge storage medium in two-terminal non-volatile memory devices are presented in this report. The deposition of the silicon nanostructures was carried out at low temperatures (less than 400 °C) using a previously developed a novel method within our research group. Two-terminal non-volatile (2TNV) memory devices and metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures containing the silicon nanowires were fabricated and an in-depth study of their characteristics was carried out using current-voltage and capacitance techniques. PMID:27279431

  13. Single-chip computers with microelectromechanical systems-based magnetic memory (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, L. Richard; Bain, James A.; Fedder, Gary K.; Greve, David W.; Guillou, David F.; Lu, Michael S. C.; Mukherjee, Tamal; Santhanam, Suresh; Abelmann, Leon; Min, Seungook

    2000-05-01

    This article describes an approach for implementing a complete computer system (CPU, RAM, I/O, and nonvolatile mass memory) on a single integrated-circuit substrate (a chip)—hence, the name "single-chip computer." The approach presented combines advances in the field of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and micromagnetics with traditional low-cost very-large-scale integrated circuit style parallel lithographic manufacturing. The primary barrier to the creation of a computer on a chip is the incorporation of a high-capacity [many gigabytes (GB)] re-writable nonvolatile memory (in today's terminology, a disk drive) into an integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing process. This article presents the following design example: a MEMS-based magnetic memory that can store over 2 GB of data in 2 cm2 of die area and whose fabrication is compatible with a standard IC manufacturing process.

  14. Metal halide solid-state surface treatment for nanocrystal materials

    DOEpatents

    Luther, Joseph M.; Crisp, Ryan; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-04-26

    Methods of treating nanocrystal and/or quantum dot devices are described. The methods include contacting the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots with a solution including metal ions and halogen ions, such that the solution displaces native ligands present on the surface of the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots via ligand exchange.

  15. Electrically Variable Resistive Memory Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Shangqing; Wu, Nai-Juan; Ignatiev, Alex; Charlson, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Nonvolatile electronic memory devices that store data in the form of electrical- resistance values, and memory circuits based on such devices, have been invented. These devices and circuits exploit an electrically-variable-resistance phenomenon that occurs in thin films of certain oxides that exhibit the colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) effect. It is worth emphasizing that, as stated in the immediately preceding article, these devices function at room temperature and do not depend on externally applied magnetic fields. A device of this type is basically a thin film resistor: it consists of a thin film of a CMR material located between, and in contact with, two electrical conductors. The application of a short-duration, low-voltage current pulse via the terminals changes the electrical resistance of the film. The amount of the change in resistance depends on the size of the pulse. The direction of change (increase or decrease of resistance) depends on the polarity of the pulse. Hence, a datum can be written (or a prior datum overwritten) in the memory device by applying a pulse of size and polarity tailored to set the resistance at a value that represents a specific numerical value. To read the datum, one applies a smaller pulse - one that is large enough to enable accurate measurement of resistance, but small enough so as not to change the resistance. In writing, the resistance can be set to any value within the dynamic range of the CMR film. Typically, the value would be one of several discrete resistance values that represent logic levels or digits. Because the number of levels can exceed 2, a memory device of this type is not limited to binary data. Like other memory devices, devices of this type can be incorporated into a memory integrated circuit by laying them out on a substrate in rows and columns, along with row and column conductors for electrically addressing them individually or collectively.

  16. Optical properties of colloidal germanium nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    WILCOXON,JESS P.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; SAMARA,GEORGE A.

    2000-05-01

    Highly crystalline germanium (Ge) nanocrystals in the size range 2--10 nm were grown in inverse micelles and purified and size-separated by high pressure liquid chromatography with on-line optical and electrical diagnostics. The nanocrystals retain the diamond structure of bulk Ge down to at least 2.0 nm (containing about 150 Ge atoms). The background- and impurity-free extinction and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these nanocrystals revealed rich structure which was interpreted in terms of the bandstructure of Ge shifted to higher energies by quantum confinement. The shifts ranged from {minus}0.1 eV to over 1 eV for the various transitions. PL in the range 350--700 nm was observed from nanocrystals 2--5 nm in size. The 2.0 nm nanocrystals yielded the most intense PL (at 420 nm) which is believed to be intrinsic and attributed to direct recombination at {Gamma}. Excitation at high energy (250 nm) populates most of the conduction bands resulting in competing recombination channels and the observed broad PL spectra.

  17. Field-effect electroluminescence in silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Walters, Robert J; Bourianoff, George I; Atwater, Harry A

    2005-02-01

    There is currently worldwide interest in developing silicon-based active optical components in order to leverage the infrastructure of silicon microelectronics technology for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices. Light emission in bulk silicon-based devices is constrained in wavelength to infrared emission, and in efficiency by the indirect bandgap of silicon. One promising strategy for overcoming these challenges is to make use of quantum-confined excitonic emission in silicon nanocrystals. A critical challenge for silicon nanocrystal devices based on nanocrystals embedded in silicon dioxide has been the development of a method for efficient electrical carrier injection. We report here a scheme for electrically pumping dense silicon nanocrystal arrays by a field-effect electroluminescence mechanism. In this excitation process, electrons and holes are both injected from the same semiconductor channel across a tunnelling barrier in a sequential programming process, in contrast to simultaneous carrier injection in conventional pn-junction light-emitting-diode structures. Light emission is strongly correlated with the injection of a second carrier into a nanocrystal that has been previously programmed with a charge of the opposite sign.

  18. Isolated nanographene crystals for nano-floating gate in charge trapping memory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Zhu, Chenxin; Meng, Jianling; Huo, Zongliang; Cheng, Meng; Liu, Donghua; Yang, Wei; Shi, Dongxia; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Guangyu

    2013-01-01

    Graphene exhibits unique electronic properties, and its low dimensionality, structural robustness, and high work-function make it very promising as the charge storage media for memory applications. Along with the development of miniaturized and scaled up devices, nanostructured graphene emerges as an ideal material candidate. Here we proposed a novel non-volatile charge trapping memory utilizing isolate and uniformly distributed nanographene crystals as nano-floating gate with controllable capacity and excellent uniformity. Nanographene charge trapping memory shows large memory window (4.5 V) at low operation voltage (±8 V), good retention (>10 years), chemical and thermal stability (1000°C), as well as tunable memory performance employing with different tunneling layers. The fabrication of such memory structure is compatible with existing semiconductor processing thus has promise on low-cost integrated nanoscale memory applications.

  19. Prospects of nanoscience with nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Manna, Liberato; Cabot, Andreu; Hens, Zeger; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Kagan, Cherie R.; Klimov, Victor I.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Reiss, Peter; Milliron, Delia J.; Guyot-Sionnnest, Philippe; Konstantatos, Gerasimos; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Korgel, Brian A.; Murray, Christopher B.; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2015-01-22

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs, i.e., crystalline nanoparticles) have become an important class of materials with great potential for applications ranging from medicine to electronic and optoelectronic devices. Today's strong research focus on NCs has been prompted by the tremendous progress in their synthesis. Impressively narrow size distributions of just a few percent, rational shape-engineering, compositional modulation, electronic doping, and tailored surface chemistries are now feasible for a broad range of inorganic compounds. Furthermore, the performance of inorganic NC-based photovoltaic and lightemitting devices has become competitive to other state-of-the-art materials. Semiconductor NCs hold unique promise for near- and mid-infrared technologies, where very few semiconductor materials are available. On a purely fundamental side, new insights into NC growth, chemical transformations, and self-organization can be gained from rapidly progressing in situ characterization and direct imaging techniques. New phenomena are constantly being discovered in the photophysics of NCs and in the electronic properties of NC solids. In our Nano Focus, we review the state of the art in research on colloidal NCs focusing on the most recent works published in the last 2 years.

  20. Prospects of nanoscience with nanocrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Manna, Liberato; Cabot, Andreu; Hens, Zeger; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Kagan, Cherie R.; Klimov, Victor I.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Reiss, Peter; Milliron, Delia J.; et al

    2015-01-22

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs, i.e., crystalline nanoparticles) have become an important class of materials with great potential for applications ranging from medicine to electronic and optoelectronic devices. Today's strong research focus on NCs has been prompted by the tremendous progress in their synthesis. Impressively narrow size distributions of just a few percent, rational shape-engineering, compositional modulation, electronic doping, and tailored surface chemistries are now feasible for a broad range of inorganic compounds. Furthermore, the performance of inorganic NC-based photovoltaic and lightemitting devices has become competitive to other state-of-the-art materials. Semiconductor NCs hold unique promise for near- and mid-infrared technologies, where verymore » few semiconductor materials are available. On a purely fundamental side, new insights into NC growth, chemical transformations, and self-organization can be gained from rapidly progressing in situ characterization and direct imaging techniques. New phenomena are constantly being discovered in the photophysics of NCs and in the electronic properties of NC solids. In our Nano Focus, we review the state of the art in research on colloidal NCs focusing on the most recent works published in the last 2 years.« less