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Sample records for nanomaterials inhibit phorbol

  1. Phorbol diesters inhibit enzymatic hydrolysis of diacylglycerols in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Chabbott, H; Cabot, M C

    1986-01-01

    The effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on diacylglycerol lipase activity was examined in rat serum, tissue, and cellular preparations by using di[14C]oleoylglycerol, [3H]palmitoylacetylglycerol, and membrane-resident phospholipase C-generated diacylglycerols as substrates. These experiments were conducted to address whether phorbol esters can mimic diacylglycerols in interacting with enzymes other than protein kinase C. Serum hydrolysis of palmitoylacetylglycerol, assayed by the formation of [3H]palmitic acid, was inhibited by PMA, 4-O-methyl-PMA, or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (in order of decreasing potency). The hydrolysis of palmitoylacetylglycerol was inhibited more than 40% by the addition of PMA at a 1:1 molar ratio with substrate. The inhibition resembled the competitive type, with a Ki of approximately 2.7 microM. PMA in the 10-60 microM range also inhibited hydrolysis of palmitoylacetylglycerol by lipases from rat brain microsomes and by homogenates of C3H/10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts. PMA was likewise inhibitory when assayed in an intramembrane enzyme-substrate milieu in which diacylglycerols were generated, in situ, by treatment of [3H]palmitate-labeled cell homogenates with phospholipase C. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PMA, which is now thought to act by mimicry of diacylglycerols, can inhibit the action of diacylglycerol lipase. It is possible that such a mechanism is linked to the multiplicity of responses elicited by phorbol diesters and that other agents may function by means of enzyme interactions (post-phospholipase C) to influence the levels of the cellular diacylglycerol mediators. PMID:3458169

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, A.; Cauhan, V.P.S.; Deshmukh, D.S.; Brokerhoff, H. )

    1989-06-13

    Calcium phospholipid dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diacylglycerol (DG) and by phorbol esters and is recognized to be the phorbol ester receptor of cells; DG displaces phorbol ester competitively from PKC. A phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), can also activate PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca{sup 2+} with a K{sub PIP{sub 2}} of 0.04 mol %. Preliminary experiments have suggested a common binding site for PIP{sub 2} and DG on PKC. Here, the authors investigate the effect of PIP{sub 2} on phorbol ester binding to PKC in a mixed micellar assay. In the presence of 20 mol % PS, PIP{sub 2} inhibited specific binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) in a dose-dependent fashion up to 85% at 1 mol %. Inhibition of binding was more pronounced with PIP{sub 2} than with DG. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding of PDBu in the presence of PIP{sub 2} is the result of an altered affinity for the phorbol ester rather than of a change in maximal binding. The plot of apparent dissociation constants (K{sub d{prime}}) against PIP{sub 2} concentration was linear over a range of 0.01-1 mol % with a K{sub i} of 0.043 mol % and confirmed the competitive nature of inhibition between PDBu and PIP{sub 2}. Competition between PIP{sub 2} and phorbol ester could be determined in a liposomal assay system also. These results indicate that PIP{sub 2}, DG, and phorbol ester all compete for the same activator-receiving region on the regulatory moiety of protein kinase C, and they lend support to the suggestion that PIP{sub 2} is a primary activator of the enzyme.

  3. Phorbol ester stimulates secretory activity while inhibiting receptor-activated aminopyrine uptake by gastric glands

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.; Chew, C.S.

    1986-03-05

    Both cyclic AMP-dependent and -independent secretagogues stimulate pepsinogen release, respiration and H/sup +/ secretory activity (AP uptake) in rabbit gastric glands. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (T), a diacyglycerol analog, activates protein kinase C (PKC) and stimulates secretion in many systems. T stimulated respiration and pepsinogen release by glands and increased AP uptake by both glands and purified parietal cells. However, T reduced AP uptake by glands stimulated with carbachol (C) or histamine (H) with an apparent IC/sub 50/ of 1 nM. Preincubation with T for 30 min produced maximum inhibition which was not reversed by removal of T. T accelerated the decline of the transient C peak while the late steady state response to H was most inhibited. H-stimulated AP uptake was also inhibited by 50 ..mu..g/ml 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol, a reported PKC activator, but not by the inactive phorbol, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate. In contrast, T potentiated AP uptake by glands stimulated with submaximal doses of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. These results suggest inhibition by T is a specific effect of PKC activators. The differing effects of T on secretion indicators may result from a dual action of T on receptor and post-receptor intracellular events.

  4. Phorbol esters inhibit alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and contraction in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The mechanisms of pharmacomechanical coupling in vascular tissue are at the present time unclear. The authors and others have proposed that receptor-induced activation of phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis may be involved. To investigate this possibility they studied the actions of two biologically active phorbol esters: phorbol dibutyrate (PDB) and phorbol myristate diacetate (PMA) on receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis in rat aortic rings. They found both PDB (IC/sub 5//sup 0/ approx. 5nM) and PMA (IC/sub 50/ approx. 30 nM) but not 4-..cap alpha..-phorbol (IC32%/sub 0/ > 10,000 nM) inhibited norepinephrine-stimulated PI hydrolysis. In the presence of the calcium channel antagonist nitrendipine, PDB potently inhibited both the phasic and tonic components of norepinephrine-induced vascular contraction. In the presence of 10/sup -7/M nitrendipine, PDB had an IC/sub 50/ for contraction of approximately 10nM. The results thus suggest a functional coupling between ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis and vascular contraction. The findings further imply a mode of feed-back regulation in vascular tissue involving phorbol ester and receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis.

  5. Inhibition of bone collagen synthesis by the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Feyen, J H; Petersen, D N; Kream, B E

    1988-04-01

    We characterized the effect of the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on osteoblast function and DNA synthesis in 21-day-old fetal rat calvaria maintained in organ culture. Protein synthesis was determined by measuring the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenase-digestible (CDP) and noncollagen protein (NCP), respectively. Alkaline phosphatase activity was assessed as the release of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenol phosphate. DNA synthesis was determined by the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into acid-insoluble bone and total DNA content. PMA at 3-100 ng/ml (4-133 nM) caused a dose-related inhibition of collagen synthesis that was observed 6 hours after adding PMA to calvaria. PMA inhibited collagen synthesis in the osteoblast-rich central bone of calvaria but did not alter collagen synthesis in the periosteum. There was little effect of PMA on noncollagen protein synthesis in the central bone or periosteum. Phorbol esters that do not promote tumor formation in vivo did not alter collagen synthesis in calvaria. PMA stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in calvaria, but indomethacin did not alter the inhibitory effect of PMA on bone collagen synthesis. PMA decreased alkaline phosphatase activity measured after 48 hr of culture and increased the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into bone and DNA content after 96 hr of culture. These data indicate that PMA inhibits collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase activity, while stimulating DNA synthesis, suggesting that activation of protein kinase C might regulate osteoblast function and bone cell replication.

  6. A pseudosubstrate of PKC inhibits the phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) effect on permeabilized smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.S.; Wells, J.N. )

    1991-03-11

    Phorbol esters can induce contraction of vascular smooth muscle and potentiate calcium-induced contractions of permeabilized smooth muscle strips. The authors have used a synthetic peptide inhibitor based on residues 19-31 of PKC (PKC-I) to determine the importance of PKC in the PDBu potentiation of calcium-induced contractions in permeabilized coronary artery smooth muscle. Although peptides similar to PKC-I have been shown to also inhibit MLCK in vitro, MLCK was presumably not inhibited in our system since 30 {mu}M PKC-I alone did not alter the calcium-induced contractions. However, the potentiation of these contractions by 1 {mu}M PDBu was reduced by about 50% in the presence of 10 {mu}M PKC-I, and the potentiation was completely abolished by 30 {mu}M PKC-I. These data indicate that, in this system, PKC is not involved in calcium-induced contractions but that activation of PKC may be the mechanism by which PDBu potentiates calcium-induced contractions in permeabilized coronary artery smooth muscle.

  7. Inhibition of Nef- and phorbol ester-induced CD4 degradation by macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, T; Anderson, S J; Garcia, J V

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the causative agent of AIDS. The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) causes a similar syndrome in macaques. The product of the nef gene of SIV has been shown to be important for virus replication and disease progression in vivo. In vitro, both SIV and HIV Nef downregulate surface expression of CD4 and accelerate total CD4 turnover. The mechanism by which Nef downregulates CD4 has not been established. A current model suggests that Nef enhances cell surface CD4 endocytosis and degradation in lysosomes. However, this was recently challenged when CD4 was found to accumulate in early endosomes of cells expressing Nef. Because inhibition of Nef function might halt virus replication and disease progression, we tested two macrolide antibiotics for their ability to inhibit Nef function. Concanamycin B (ConB) and bafilomycin A1 (BFLA1) are specific inhibitors of acidification of cell endosomes and lysosomes and, unlike other inhibitors, do not affect transport. Although ConB (25 nM) and BFLA1 (100 nM) blocked phorbol myristate acetate- and Nef-induced CD4 degradation in human monocyte U937 cells, CD4 surface expression was not recovered. Instead, CD4 accumulated in lysosomes. To determine if Nef is directly responsible for CD4 degradation or if they bind to each other in a manner similar to Vpu, transcripts of human CD4 and HIV-1 nef were cotranslated in vitro. Our results indicate that under our experimental conditions, Nef does not affect CD4 stability and does not associate with CD4 in this in vitro system. Our data suggest that (i) CD4 downregulation by Nef results in degradation of CD4 in lysosomes, (ii) inhibition of CD4 degradation by macrolide antibiotics does not restore surface expression, and (iii) the inhibition of CD4 expression by Nef appears to be indirect and is likely to involve cellular factors. PMID:8627671

  8. Inhibition of alpha interferon but not gamma interferon signal transduction by phorbol esters is mediated by a tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Petricoin, E; David, M; Igarashi, K; Benjamin, C; Ling, L; Goelz, S; Finbloom, D S; Larner, A C

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the expression of viral oncoproteins, cell transformation, or phorbol ester treatment of cells can inhibit alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta)-induced gene expression. The mechanisms by which these promoters of cell growth exert their inhibitory effects vary, but in most instances they involve a disruption of the IFN-alpha/beta-induced transcription complex ISGF3 such that the DNA-binding component of this complex (the 48-kDa ISGF3gamma protein) does not bind to the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE). In this report, we demonstrated that phorbol ester treatment of human peripheral blood monocytes dramatically inhibits activation of IFN-alpha/B-stimulated early response genes but by a mechanism which does not involve abrogation of the ISRE binding of ISGF3gamma. Phorbol ester treatment of monocytes inhibited IFN alpha-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the transcription factors Stat1alpha, Stat2, and Stat3 and of the tyrosine kinase Tyk2 but had no effect on IFN-gamma activation of Stat1alpha. IFNalpha-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak1 and the alpha subunit of the IFN-alpha receptor were unaffected by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Moreover, PMA caused the dephosphorylation of Tyk2 but not of Jak1, which was activated by IFN. Pretreatment of cells with vanadate prevented the effects of PMA with regard to PMA-induced Tyk2 dephosphorylation. These observations suggest that PMA exerts its inhibitory effects by activation of a tyrosine phosphatase which selectively regulates Tyk2 but not Jak1 activity. PMID:8657115

  9. Fullerene nanomaterials inhibit the allergic response.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John J; Bateman, Henry R; Stover, Alex; Gomez, Greg; Norton, Sarah K; Zhao, Wei; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Lenk, Robert; Kepley, Christopher L

    2007-07-01

    Fullerenes are a class of novel carbon allotropes that may have practical applications in biotechnology and medicine. Human mast cells (MC) and peripheral blood basophils are critical cells involved in the initiation and propagation of several inflammatory conditions, mainly type I hypersensitivity. We report an unanticipated role of fullerenes as a negative regulator of allergic mediator release that suppresses Ag-driven type I hypersensitivity. Human MC and peripheral blood basophils exhibited a significant inhibition of IgE dependent mediator release when preincubated with C(60) fullerenes. Protein microarray demonstrated that inhibition of mediator release involves profound reductions in the activation of signaling molecules involved in mediator release and oxidative stress. Follow-up studies demonstrated that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk was dramatically inhibited in Ag-challenged cells first incubated with fullerenes. In addition, fullerene preincubation significantly inhibited IgE-induced elevation in cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, fullerenes prevented the in vivo release of histamine and drop in core body temperature in vivo using a MC-dependent model of anaphylaxis. These findings identify a new biological function for fullerenes and may represent a novel way to control MC-dependent diseases including asthma, inflammatory arthritis, heart disease, and multiple sclerosis.

  10. 4-Methylumbelliferone inhibits the phosphorylation of hyaluronan synthase 2 induced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Kasai, Kosuke; Nanashima, Naoki; Nozaka, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Manabu; Chiba, Mitsuru; Yoneda, Masahiko; Nakamura, Toshiya

    2013-04-01

    The effect of 4-methylumbelliferone (MU), a hyaluronan synthase-suppressor, on O-linked β-Nacetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) was investigated in cultured human skin fibroblasts, and we found that MU stimulated O-GlcNAcylation of the cellular proteins. Since O-GlcNAcylation affects protein phosphorylation via Ser/Thr kinases, we examined the effect of MU on both the phosphorylation of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) and hyaluronan production. The cells were cultured in the presence or absence of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and MU independently or in combination. The protein fraction of each cell culture was extracted and divided into 2 parts-phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated fractions-by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography. The hyaluronan level in the medium was determined by an ELISA-like assay. Addition of MU decreased the level of hyaluronan in the medium and that of HAS2 in the phosphorylated protein fraction. On the contrary, the addition of TPA increased the levels of both of them. Interestingly, the combination of TPA and MU lowered the levels of them in treated cells as compared to those in untreated control cells. These results suggest that TPA activated protein kinase C (PKC), which stimulates the phosphorylation of HAS2, and increased hyaluronan production. Further, MU may inhibit the phosphorylation of HAS2 by PKC through the stimulation of O-GlcNAcylation.

  11. Analyzing phorbol ester effects on gap junctional communication: a dramatic inhibition of assembly

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The effect of 12-O-tetradeconylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on gap junction assembly between Novikoff hepatoma cells was examined. Cells were dissociated with EDTA to single cells and then reaggregated to form new junctions. When TPA (25 nM) was added to the cells at the onset of the 60-min reaggregation, dye transfer was detected at only 0.6% of the cell-cell interfaces compared to 72% for the untreated control and 74% for 4-alpha TPA, an inactive isomer of TPA. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy of reaggregated control cells showed interfaces containing an average of more than 600 aggregated intramembranous gap junction particles, while TPA-treated cells had no gap junctions. However, Lucifer yellow dye transfer between nondissociated cells via gap junctions was unaffected by 60 min of TPA treatment. Therefore, TPA dramatically inhibited gap junction assembly but did not alter channel gating nor enhance disassembly of preexisting gap junction structures. Short term TPA treatment (< 30 min) increased phosphorylation of the gap junction protein molecular weight of 43,000 (Cx43), but did not change the cellular level of Cx43. Cell surface biotinylation experiments suggested that TPA did not substantially reduce the plasma membrane concentration of Cx43. Therefore, the simple presence of Cx43 in the plasma membrane is not sufficient for gap junction assembly, and protein kinase C probably exerts an effect on assembly of gap junctions at the plasma membrane level. PMID:7806568

  12. Specific binding of phorbol ester tumor promoters

    PubMed Central

    Driedger, Paul E.; Blumberg, Peter M.

    1980-01-01

    [20-3H]Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate bound to particulate preparations from chicken embryo fibroblasts in a specific, saturable, reversible fashion. Equilibrium binding occurred with a Kd of 25 nM; this value is very close to the 50% effective dose (ED50), 50 nM, previously determined for the biological response (induction of fibronectin loss) in growing chicken embryo fibroblasts. At saturation, 1.4 pmol of [20-3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate was bound per mg of protein (approximately 7 × 104 molecules per cell). Binding was inhibited by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (Ki = 2 nM), mezerein (Ki = 180 nM), phorbol 12,13-dibenzoate (Ki = 180 nM), phorbol 12,13-diacetate (Ki = 1.7 μM), phorbol 12,13,20-triacetate (Ki = 39 μM), and phorbol 13-acetate (Ki = 120 μM). The measured Ki values are all within a factor of 3.5 of the ED50 values of these derivatives for inducing loss of fibronectin in intact cells. Binding was not inhibited by the inactive compounds phorbol (10 μg/ml) and 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (10 μg/ml) or by the inflammatory but nonpromoting phorbol-related diterpene esters resiniferatoxin (100 ng/ml) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-isobutyrate 20-acetate (100 ng/ml). These data suggest that biological responses to the phorbol esters in chicken embryo fibroblasts are mediated by this binding activity and that the binding activity corresponds to the phorbol ester target in mouse skin involved in tumor promotion. Binding was not inhibited by the nonphorbol promoters anthralin (1 μM), phenol (1 mM), iodoacetic acid (1.7 μM), and cantharidin (75 μM), or by epidermal growth factor (100 ng/ml), dexamethasone acetate (2 μM), retinoic acid (10 μM), or prostaglandin E2 (1 μM). These agents thus appear to act at a target distinct from that of the phorbol esters. PMID:6965793

  13. Nanomaterials-based enzyme electrochemical biosensors operating through inhibition for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-03-15

    In recent years great progress has been made in applying nanomaterials to design novel biosensors. Use of nanomaterials offers to biosensing platforms exceptional optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Nanomaterials can increase the surface of the transducing area of the sensors that in turn bring an increase in catalytic behaviors. They have large surface-to-volume ratio, controlled morphology and structure that also favor miniaturization, an interesting advantage when the sample volume is a critical issue. Biosensors have great potential for achieving detect-to-protect devices: devices that can be used in detections of pollutants and other treating compounds/analytes (drugs) protecting citizens' life. After a long term focused scientific and financial efforts/supports biosensors are expected now to fulfill their promise such as being able to perform sampling and analysis of complex samples with interest for clinical or environment fields. Among all types of biosensors, enzymatic biosensors, the most explored biosensing devices, have an interesting property, the inherent inhibition phenomena given the enzyme-substrate complex formation. The exploration of such phenomena is making remarkably important their application as research and applied tools in diagnostics. Different inhibition biosensor systems based on nanomaterials modification has been proposed and applied. The role of nanomaterials in inhibition-based biosensors for the analyses of different groups of drugs as well as contaminants such as pesticides, phenolic compounds and others, are discussed in this review. This deep analysis of inhibition-based biosensors that employ nanomaterials will serve researchers as a guideline for further improvements and approaching of these devices to real sample applications so as to reach society needs and such biosensor market demands.

  14. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  15. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, M.; Frohlich, E.D.; Cole, F.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.

  16. Phorbol ester stimulates membrane association of protein kinase C and inhibits spontaneous Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/ release in rat cardiac cells

    SciTech Connect

    Capogrossi, M.C.; Kaku, T.; Filburn, C.H.; Pelto, D.J.; Hansford, R.G.; Lakatta, E.G.

    1986-03-01

    Spontaneous oscillatory Ca/sup 2 +/ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) occurs in rat cardiac myocytes at hyperpolarized membrane potentials and is manifested as contractile waves (W). W frequency varies with SR functional status and cell Ca/sup 2 +/ loading. In myocyte suspensions (Hepes buffer, 37/sup 0/C (Ca/sup 2 +/) = 1.0mM) phorbol myristate acetate, PMA, (10/sup -7/ M) increased protein kinase C activity in membranes as a fraction of total (PKCAM) fivefold with a t 1/2 of < 30 sec (n = 3) and decreased W frequency in individual myocytes (n = 8). This effect varied directly and linearly with baseline W frequency, r = .94, p < .001). Dioctanoyl glycerol (10 ..mu.. M) had a similar effect on W. The PMA effect to decrease W frequency could be a direct one on SR or result from a reduction in cell Ca/sup 2 +/. The time course of PKCAM change is sufficiently rapid for it to mediate the effect on W. Thus, enhanced PKCAM may exert negative feedback control on Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization during ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation.

  17. Phorbol ester attenuates the KCl-induced increase in (Ca/sup 2 +/) and inhibits spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/ release, in rat cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.G.; Capogrossi, M.C.; Kaku, T.; Pelto, D.J.; Filburn, C.H.; Lakatta, E.G.

    1986-03-01

    Partial membrane depolarization induced by increasing the KCl concentration of the medium bathing cardiac myocytes leads to an increase in cell (Ca/sup 2 +/), and accelerates the frequency of spontaneous contractile waves (W) caused by periodic sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca/sup 2 +/ release. In suspensions of myocytes bathed in 1.0mM Ca/sup 2 +/ at 37 (pH 7.4) and loaded with the fluorescent Ca/sup 2 +/ - indicator Fura-2, by incubation with 2 ..mu..M acetoxymethyl ester for 30 min, the addition of KCl to raise (K/sup +/) from 5 to 30 mM is associated with a rapid (< 10 sec) increase in fluorescence, corresponding to an increased cell (Ca/sup 2 +/). Prior exposure (3 min) to 10/sup -7/ M phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) diminishes this response to 44 +/- 10% of that in control suspensions (n = 9). Under the same conditions W frequency (min/sup -1/) in individual cells in 30 mM KCl averaged 8.3 +/- 0.6. Addition of PMA abolished W within 1 min. Diacylglycerol (10 ..mu..M L..cap alpha..-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, di C8) had a similar effect on W frequency. The thesis is that PMA attenuates cell Ca/sup 2 +/ overload and its associated potentiation of spontaneous SR Ca/sup 2 +/ oscillations. In view of the efficacy of PMA and di C8, it is suggested that the effect is mediated by protein kinase c, and it may involve an alteration in the intracellular distribution of this enzyme.

  18. Biological responsiveness to the phorbol esters and specific binding of (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a manipulable genetic system

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, K.K.; Chritton, S.; Blumberg, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of its suitability for genetic studies, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was examined for its responsiveness to the phorbol esters. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate had three effects. It inhibited the increase in animal size during growth; it decreased the yield of progeny; and it caused uncoordinated movement of the adult. The effects on nematode size, progeny yield, and movement were quantitated. Concentrations of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate yielding half-maximal responses were 440, 460, and 170 nM, respectively. As was expected from the biological responsiveness of the nematodes, specific, saturable binding of phorbol ester to nematode extracts was found. (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate bound with a dissociation constant of 26.8 +/- 3.9 nM. At saturation, 5.7 +/- 1.4 pmole/mg protein was bound.

  19. Chemosensitizing effects of carbon-based nanomaterials in cancer cells: enhanced apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation as underlying mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Kati; Ringel, Jessica; Hampel, Silke; Rieger, Christiane; Huebner, Doreen; Wirth, Manfred P.; Fuessel, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can exert antitumor activities themselves and sensitize cancer cells to conventional chemotherapeutics such as carboplatin and cisplatin. In the present study, the chemosensitizing effect of CNFs and CNTs on cancer cells of urological origin was investigated regarding the underlying mechanisms. Prostate cancer (DU-145, PC-3) and bladder cancer (EJ28) cells were treated with carbon nanomaterials (CNFs, CNTs) and chemotherapeutics (carboplatin, cisplatin) alone as well as in combination for 24 h. Forty-eight (EJ28) or 72 h (DU-145, PC-3) after the end of treatment the effects on cellular proliferation, clonogenic survival, cell death rate and cell cycle distribution were evaluated. Depending on the cell line, simultaneous administration of chemotherapeutics and carbon nanomaterials produced an additional inhibition of cellular proliferation and clonogenic survival of up to 77% and 98%, respectively, compared to the inhibitory effects of the chemotherapeutics alone. These strongly enhanced antiproliferative effects were accompanied by an elevated cell death rate, which was predominantly mediated via apoptosis and not by necrosis. The antitumor effects of combinations with CNTs were less pronounced than those with CNFs. The enhanced effects of the combinatory treatments on cellular function were mostly of additive to partly synergistic nature. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis demonstrated an arrest at the G2/M phase mediated by a monotreatment with chemotherapeutics. Following combinatory treatments, mostly less than or nearly additive increases of cell fractions in the G2/M phase could be observed. In conclusion, the pronounced chemosensitizing effects of CNFs and CNTs were mediated by an enhanced apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. The combination of carbon-based nanomaterials and conventional chemotherapeutics represents a novel

  20. Inhibition of NF-IL6 activity by manassantin B, a dilignan isolated from Saururus chinensis, in phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated U937 promonocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Kyung-No; Song, In-sung; Shin, Yong-Hyun; Pai, Tong-Kun; Chung, Dae-Kyun; Baek, Nam-In; Lee, Jung Joon; Kim, Jiyoung

    2005-08-31

    Mannasantin B, a dilignan structurally related to manssantin A, is an inhibitor of NF-kappaB transactivation. In the present study, we found that it inhibited PMA-induced expression of IL-1beta, IL-1beta mRNA, and IL-1beta promoter activity in U937 cells with IC50 values of about 50 nM. It also inhibited NF-IL6- and NF-kappaB-induced activation of IL-1beta, with IC50 values of 78 nM and 1.6 microM, respectively, revealing a potent inhibitory effect on NF-IL6. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that manassantin B had an inhibitory effect on DNA binding by NF-IL6, but not by NF-kappaB. Further analysis revealed that transactivation by NF-IL6 was also inhibited. Our results indicate that manassantin B suppresses expression of IL-1beta in promonocytic cells by inhibiting not only NF-kappaB but also NF-IL6 activity. Furthermore, our observations suggest that manassantin B may be clinically useful as a potent inhibitor of NF-IL6 activity.

  1. Identification of the phorbol ester receptor in human and avian erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, C.M.; Sando, J.J.; Speizer, L.A.

    1986-05-01

    The ability of phorbol esters to inhibit the uptake of a fluorescent glucose analogue in goose but not human erythrocytes is consistent with earlier reports that the human red blood cell lacks the phorbol ester receptor. However, they have located specific phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding sites in both human and goose erythrocytes. Human and goose red blood cells contain 2 classes of phorbol ester receptors with similar affinities, however the human erythrocyte contains 1/3 as many phorbol ester receptors as does the goose red blood cell. An additional contrast in the binding of phorbol esters to human and goose red blood cells is the temperature-induced enhancement of binding to goose, but not human erythrocytes. Equilibrium phorbol ester binding to goose red blood cells at 37/sup 0/C is enhanced 3.3 +/- 0.4 times that amount bound at 4/sup 0/C. Equilibrium binding of phorbol esters to human erythrocytes is identical at both temperatures. In vivo and in vitro phosphorylation profiles of C-kinase substrates also differ between the human and goose erythrocyte.

  2. Silver nanoparticles impede phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation and autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Liming; Bai, Ru; Zhang, Tianlu; Chen, Chunying

    2015-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are important constituents of the innate immune system. Monocyte-macrophage differentiation is not only crucial for innate immune responses, but is also related to some cardiovascular diseases. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. However, the effect of AgNPs on the functions of blood monocytes is scarcely reported. Here, we report the impedance effect of AgNPs on THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and that this effect was mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal impairment. Firstly, AgNPs inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced monocyte differentiation by down-regulating both expression of surface marker CD11b and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Secondly, autophagy is activated during PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) can inhibit this process. Thirdly, AgNPs block the degradation of the autophagy substrate p62 and induce autophagosome accumulation, which demonstrates the blockade of autophagic flux. Fourthly, lysosomal impairments including alkalization and decrease of lysosomal membrane stability were observed in AgNP-treated THP-1 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the impedance of monocyte-macrophage differentiation by AgNPs is mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal dysfunction. Our results suggest that crosstalk exists in different biological effects induced by AgNPs.

  3. Purifying Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor); Hurst, Janet (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of purifying a nanomaterial and the resultant purified nanomaterial in which a salt, such as ferric chloride, at or near its liquid phase temperature, is used to penetrate and wet the internal surfaces of a nanomaterial to dissolve impurities that may be present, for example, from processes used in the manufacture of the nanomaterial.

  4. High surface adsorption properties of carbon-based nanomaterials are responsible for mortality, swimming inhibition, and biochemical responses in Artemia salina larvae.

    PubMed

    Mesarič, Tina; Gambardella, Chiara; Milivojević, Tamara; Faimali, Marco; Drobne, Damjana; Falugi, Carla; Makovec, Darko; Jemec, Anita; Sepčić, Kristina

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of three different carbon-based nanomaterials on brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae. The larvae were exposed to different concentrations of carbon black, graphene oxide, and multiwall carbon nanotubes for 48 h, and observed using phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy. Acute (mortality) and behavioural (swimming speed alteration) responses and cholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and catalase enzyme activities were evaluated. These nanomaterials were ingested and concentrated in the gut, and attached onto the body surface of the A. salina larvae. This attachment was responsible for concentration-dependent inhibition of larval swimming, and partly for alterations in the enzyme activities, that differed according to the type of tested nanomaterials. No lethal effects were observed up to 0.5mg/mL carbon black and 0.1mg/mL multiwall carbon nanotubes, while graphene oxide showed a threshold whereby it had no effects at 0.6 mg/mL, and more than 90% mortality at 0.7 mg/mL. Risk quotients calculated on the basis of predicted environmental concentrations indicate that carbon black and multiwall carbon nanotubes currently do not pose a serious risk to the marine environment, however if uncontrolled release of nanomaterials continues, this scenario can rapidly change.

  5. Extracellular biogenic nanomaterials inhibit pyoverdine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a novel insight into impacts of metal(loid)s on environmental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Anee; Liu, Yang; Yang, Liang; Cao, Bin

    2015-02-01

    Anthropogenic activities such as mining, smelting, and industrial use have caused serious problems of metal(loid) pollution in nearly every country in the world. A wide range of environmental microorganisms are capable of transforming metal(loid)s into nanomaterials, i.e., biogenic nanomaterials (bio-NMs), in the environment. Although the impacts of various metal(loid)s on the ecosystems have been extensively studied, the potential influence of the bio-NMs generated in the environment to environmental organisms is largely unexplored. Using tellurium nanomaterials transformed from tellurite by a metal-reducing bacterium as model bio-NMs, we demonstrated that the bio-NMs significantly decreased siderophore production in an environmental bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the bio-NMs inhibited the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis and transport of siderophores. Siderophores secreted by certain bacteria in microbial communities can be considered as public goods that can be exploited by local communities, playing an important role in shaping microbial communities. The inhibition of siderophore production by the bio-NMs implies that bio-NMs may have an important influence on the ecosystems through altering specific functions of environmental bacteria. Taken together, this study provides a novel insight into the environmental impacts of metal(loid)s.

  6. Nineteen-Step Total Synthesis of (+)-Phorbol

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shuhei; Chu, Hang; Felding, Jakob; Baran, Phil S.

    2016-01-01

    Phorbol, the flagship member of the tigliane diterpene family, has been known for over 80 years and has attracted attention from scores of chemists and biologists due to its intriguing chemical structure and the medicinal potential of phorbol esters.1 Access to useful quantities of phorbol and related analogs has relied upon isolation from natural sources and semisynthesis. Despite relentless efforts spanning 40 years, chemical synthesis has been unable to compete with these strategies due to its sheer complexity and unusual oxidation pattern. In fact, purely synthetic enantiopure phorbol has remained elusive and efforts on the synthetic biology side have not led to even the simplest members of this terpene family. Recently the chemical syntheses of eudesmanes,2 germacrenes,3 taxanes,4,5 and ingenanes6-8 have all benefited from a strategy inspired by the logic of two-phase terpene biosynthesis where powerful C–C bond constructions and C–H bond oxidations go hand in hand. In this manuscript, we show how a two-phase terpene synthesis strategy can be enlisted to achieve the first enantiospecific total synthesis of (+)-phorbol in only 19 steps from the abundant monoterpene (+)-3-carene. The purpose of this route is not to displace isolation/semisynthesis as a means to generate the natural product per se, but rather to enable access to analogs containing unique oxidation patterns that are otherwise inaccessible. PMID:27007853

  7. Specific binding of phorbol ester tumor promoters to intact primary epidermal cells from Sencar mice

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-04-01

    The binding of (20-/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ((/sup 3/H)PDB) to intact living epidermal cells in monolayer culture was characterized. At 37/sup 0/C, the maximum specific (/sup 3/H)PDB binding (binding displaceable by 30 ..mu..M unlabeled PDB) was attained in 15 to 20 min and was followed by a rapid decrease (down regulation) of radioactivity bound to the cells. The activity lost by the cells during this decrease was found in the incubation medium. Prior exposure of cells to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate) but not to phorbol for 2 h at 37/sup 0/C caused approx. 55% reduction in the number of measurable binding sites for (/sup 3/H)PDB. The down regulation was temperature sensitive; there was no loss of radioactivity after 1 h at 4/sup 0/C. The specific binding of (/sup 3/H)PDB at 4/sup 0/C reached equilibrium in 15 to 20 min and was saturable and freely reversible. At equilibrium, epidermal cells contained 1.2 x 10/sup 5/ binding sites per cell, and binding sites had a K/sub D/ of 10 nM. Specificity of binding was shown by the observation that the biologically active phorbol esters PMA and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-decanoate inhibited the binding, whereas the inactive parent compound phorbol and the nonphorbol tumor promoter anthralin did not have any effect. The abilities of these compounds to inhibit (/sup 3/H)PDB binding directly correlates with their tumor promoting activities. Epidermal cells exposed to retinoic acid or fluocinolone acetonide for 24 h had similar (/sup 3/H)PDB binding characteristics as untreated cells suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion induced by these compounds is not mediated through alterations in the phorbol ester binding sites.

  8. Specific binding of phorbol ester tumor promoters to intact primary epidermal cells from Sencar mice.

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, V; Slaga, T J

    1981-01-01

    The binding of [20-3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ([3H]PDB) to intact living epidermal cells in monolayer culture was characterized. At 37 degrees C, the maximum specific [3H]PDB binding (binding displaceable by 30 microM unlabeled PDB) was attained in 15--20 min and was followed by a rapid decrease (down regulation) of radioactivity bound to the cells. The activity lost by the cells during this decrease was found in the incubation medium. Prior exposure of cells to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate) but not to phorbol for 2 hr at 37 degrees C caused approximately 55% reduction in the number of measurable binding sites for [3H]PDB. The down regulation was temperature sensitive; there was no loss of radioactivity after 1 hr at 4 degrees C. The specific binding of [3H]PDB at 4 degrees C reached equilibrium in 15--20 min and was saturable and freely reversible. At equilibrium, epidermal cells contained 1.2 x 10(5) binding sites per cell, and binding sites had a KD of 10 nM. Specificity of binding was shown by the observation that the biologically active phorbol esters PMA and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-decanoate inhibited the binding, whereas the inactive parent compound phorbol and the nonphorbol tumor promoter anthralin did not have any effect. The abilities of these compounds to inhibit [3H]PDB binding directly correlates with their tumor promoting activities. Epidermal cells exposed to retinoic acid or fluocinolone acetonide for 24 hr had similar [3H]PDB binding characteristics as untreated cells suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion induced by these compounds is not mediated through alterations in the phorbol ester binding sites. PMID:6941309

  9. Effect of phorbol esters on mitochondrial actions of glucagon

    SciTech Connect

    Cardellach, F.; Moehren, G.; Hoek, J.B.

    1987-05-01

    Glucagon generates different second messenger signals in liver. It increases cAMP levels and elevates cytosolic Ca/sup 2 +/ levels by degradation of polyphosphoinositides. The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) inhibits glucagon-induced calcium mobilization, but not cAMP formation. TPA can thus be used to assess the role of Ca/sup 2 +/ and cAMP in the activation of mitochondrial processes. In isolated hepatocytes, glucagon increased the steady state NAD(P)H level, probably by activating mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent dehydrogenases. TPA inhibited the glucagon-induced NAD(P) reduction without affecting phosphorylase activation. The effects of glucagon and TPA on mitochondrial respiratory activity and calcium retention were tested after isolation of the mitochondria from perfused livers. Electron transport rates were increased by 15-25% and calcium retention time was increased four-fold after glucagon treatment. When livers were pretreated with TPA, glucagon had no effect on electron transport activity, but calcium retention was increased by the same factor. The results suggest that glucagon-induced calcium mobilization is required for the stimulation of the respiratory activity but not for the increased capacity to retain a calcium overload in the mitochondria.

  10. Five new phorbol esters with cytotoxic and selective anti-inflammatory activities from Croton tiglium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Feng; Yang, Sheng-Hui; Liu, Yan-Qun; Li, Din-Xiang; He, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Yong-Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-05-01

    Five new phorbol esters, (four phorbol diesters, 1-4, and one 4-deoxy-4α-phorbol diester, 5), as well as four known phorbol esters analogues (6-9) were isolated and identified from the branches and leaves of Croton tiglium. Their structures were elucidated mainly by extensive NMR spectroscopic, and mass spectrometric analysis. Among them, compound (1) was the first example of a naturally occurring phorbol ester with the 20-aldehyde group. Compounds 2-5, and 7-9 showed potent cytotoxicity against the K562, A549, DU145, H1975, MCF-7, U937, SGC-7901, HL60, Hela, and MOLT-4 cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 1.0 to 43 μM, while none of the compounds exhibited cytotoxic effects on normal human cell lines 293T and LX-2, respectively. In addition, compound 3 exhibited moderate COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition, with IC50 values of 0.14 and 8.5 μM, respectively.

  11. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  12. Synergy between phorbol esters, 1-oleyl-2-acetylglycerol, urushiol, and calcium ionophore in eliciting aggregation of marine sponge cells.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, G; Azaroff, L; Davidson, S; Dunham, P

    1986-05-01

    Aggregation of marine sponge cells (Microciona prolifera) resembles stimulus-response coupling of higher organisms in which activation of protein kinase C and movements of intracellular Ca provide twin signals. We now report that activators of protein kinase C (phorbol esters) and ionomycin act synergistically to aggregate sponge cells. Surprisingly--since extracellular Ca is required for integrity of the species-specific aggregation factor--synergistic aggregation proceeded in the complete absence of added extracellular Ca (2.5-20 mM EDTA). The order of activity of phorbol esters and related compounds was that of their effect on protein kinase C (phorbol myristate acetate, phorbol dibutyrate greater than phorbol diacetate much greater than phorbol, 4 alpha-phorbol). 1-Oleyl, 2-acetylglycerol a synthetic activator of protein kinase C, also showed synergy with ionomycin. Phorbol esters and 1-oleyl, 2-acetylglycerol acted in synergy with ionomycin to liberate membrane Ca as detected by decreased fluorescence of chlortetracycline in prelabeled cells. Moreover, urushiol, the toxic principle of poison ivy, but not pentadecanylcatechol, its inert analogue, showed synergy with ionomycin. Synergistic aggregation was inhibited by calmidazolium (10 microM), piroxicam (20-100 microM), and pertussis toxin (20 micrograms/ml). The data not only confirm that marine sponge cell aggregation follows the general sequence of stimulus-response coupling in the cells of higher organisms but also support, in this most ancient of multicellular creatures, the hypothesis that mobilization of intracellular Ca and activation of protein kinase C provide the twin signals for cell activation in the absence of added extracellular Ca.

  13. Prevention of neuronal apoptosis by phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C: blockade of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Behrens, M M; Strasser, U; Koh, J Y; Gwag, B J; Choi, D W

    1999-01-01

    Consistent with previous studies on cell lines and non-neuronal cells, specific inhibitors of protein kinase C induced mouse primary cultured neocortical neurons to undergo apoptosis. To examine the complementary hypothesis that activating protein kinase C would attenuate neuronal apoptosis, the cultures were exposed for 1 h to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, which activated protein kinase C as evidenced by downstream enhancement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Exposure to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, or another active phorbol ester, phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, but not to the inactive ester, 4alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, markedly attenuated neuronal apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate also attenuated neuronal apoptosis induced by exposure to beta-amyloid peptide 1-42, or oxygen-glucose deprivation in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists. The neuroprotective effects of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate were blocked by brief (non-toxic) concurrent exposure to the specific protein kinase C inhibitors, but not by a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 inhibitor. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate blocked the induction of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and specific inhibition of this kinase by SB 203580 attenuated serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 activity was high at rest and not modified by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate treatment. These data strengthen the idea that protein kinase C is a key modulator of several forms of central neuronal apoptosis, in part acting through inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase regulated pathways.

  14. Co-transfection with protein kinase D confers phorbol-ester-mediated inhibition on glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation in COS cells transfected to overexpress glucagon receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, E S; Rozengurt, E; Connell, J M; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    Glucagon elicited a profound increase in the intracellular cAMP concentration of COS-7 cells which had been transiently transfected with a cDNA encoding the rat glucagon receptor and under conditions where cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was fully inhibited. This was achieved in a dose-dependent fashion with an EC50 of 1.8+/-0.4 nM glucagon. In contrast with previous observations made using hepatocytes [Heyworth, Whetton, Kinsella and Houslay (1984) FEBS Lett. 170, 38-42], treatment of transfected COS-7 cells with PMA did not inhibit the ability of glucagon to increase intracellular cAMP levels. PMA-mediated inhibition was not conferred by treatment with okadaic acid, nor by co-transfecting cells with cDNAs encoding various protein kinase C isoforms (PKC-alpha, PKC-betaII and PKC-epsilon) or with the PMA-activated G-protein-receptor kinases GRK2 and GRK3. In contrast, PMA induced the marked inhibition of glucagon-stimulated cAMP production in COS-7 cells that had been co-transfected with a cDNA encoding protein kinase D (PKD). Such inhibition was not due to an action on the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase, as forskolin-stimulated cAMP production was unchanged by PMA treatment of COS cells that had been co-transfected with both the glucagon receptor and PKD. PKD transcripts were detected in RNA isolated from hepatocytes but not from COS-7 cells. Transcripts for GRK2 were present in hepatocytes but not in COS cells, whereas transcripts for GRK3 were not found in either cell type. It is suggested that PKD may play a role in the regulation of glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase. PMID:9291130

  15. Effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and cortisol interaction on steroid-binding capacity in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, J P; de Loecker, W

    1979-01-01

    The specificity of the cortisol-receptor protein is examined in plasma and liver cytosol of rats. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate does not inhibit the binding of cortisol to transcortin, nor does it affect the binding capacity of dexamethasone to the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor, but, by interacting with the cortisol molecule, it interferes with hormone-mediated processes in the cell. PMID:534535

  16. Luminol-dependent photoemission from single neutrophil stimulated by phorbol ester and calcium ionophore--role of degranulation and myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Suematsu, M.; Oshio, C.; Miura, S.; Suzuki, M.; Houzawa, S.; Tsuchiya, M.

    1988-08-30

    Luminol-dependent photonic burst from phorbol ester-treated single neutrophil was visually investigated by using an ultrasensitive photonic image intensifier microscope. Neutrophils stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (0.1 microgram/ml) alone produced a negligible level of photonic activities in the presence of luminol (10 micrograms/ml). The additional application of 0.1 microM Ca2+ ionophore A23187 induced explosive changes of photonic burst corresponding to the distribution of neutrophils, and these photonic activities were gradually spread to extracellular space. Sodium azide, which prevents myeloperoxidase activity, inhibited Ca2+ ionophore-induced photonic burst from phorbol ester-treated neutrophil. These findings suggest a prerequisite role of degranulation and myeloperoxidase release in luminol-dependent photoemission from stimulated neutrophils.

  17. Structural modifications induced by TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate) in sea urchin eggs.

    PubMed

    Ciapa, B; Crossley, I; De Renzis, G

    1988-07-01

    We investigated the effect of the phorbol ester TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate) on the egg morphology of the sea urchin Arbacia lixula. Our study indicates that TPA alters the cortical region of the egg: the pigment granules migrate toward the surface, while cortical granules detach from the plasma membrane. Cortical granule exocytosis did not occur but the endocytosis process was turned on. Prolonged treatment of the eggs by TPA partially inhibits the cortical granule exocytosis normally triggered by fertilization. We discuss the effects of TPA in terms of its interaction with the Ca2+ pool and cytoskeletal structures. In order to discern the respective roles of pHi and protein kinase C activity in endocytosis process activation, we compared the ultrastructural effects of TPA and ammonia. Finally, the role of pigment vesicles in egg metabolism activation is discussed.

  18. Interactions between Carbon Nanomaterials and Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Li, Shanghao; Peng, Zhili; Al-Yuobi, Abdulrahman Obaid; Omar Bashammakh, Abdulaziz Saleh; El-Shahawi, M S; Leblanc, Roger M

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between carbon nanomaterials, including carbon dots, fullerene, carbon nanotube, graphene, and graphene oxide, and biomolecules play an important role in the field of nanobiotechnology. Due to the unique properties of carbon nanomaterials and the magnificent features of their colloids, it shows high potential in fibrillation inhibition, high sensitivity sensor fabrication, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other areas. Hereby, we will go over different families of carbon nanomaterials regarding to the interaction between carbon nanomaterials and biomolecules at the interface, and their applications will be reviewed as well.

  19. Tumor promoting phorbol diesters: substrates for diacylglycerol lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, M.C.

    1984-08-30

    Enzyme activity in rat serum was examined utilizing the potent tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and various glycerolipids as substrates. The serum activity was specific for hydrolysis of the long chain tetradecanoate moiety of TPA, hydrolyzed mono- and diacylglycerols, but was not effective against triacylglycerols, cholesterylesters, or phospholipids. Heating the enzyme preparation at 56/sup 0/C for 1 min was dually effective in reducing the hydrolysis of both TPA and dioleoylglycerol by 83-86% of control levels. The potent diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, RHC 80267, inhibited the hydrolysis of TPA in the 0.2-1.0 ..mu..M range and was also a potent blocker of monoacyl- and diacylglycerol hydrolysis. In substrate competition studies, exogenous unlabeled TPA was added to the (/sup 14/C)dioleoylglycerol-containing reaction mixture, however, this produced an approximate 3-fold stimulation of (/sup 14/)dioleoylglycerol hydrolysis. Although we have not established whether the hydrolysis of TPA and diacylglycerol is the work of one enzyme, the effectiveness of the specific lipase inhibitor, RHC 80267, demonstrates that diacylglycerol lipase can utilize TPA as substrate, a finding never before documented. This point is of interest in light of the theory that phorbol esters act by mimicry of the natural lipid mediator, diacylglycerols. 44 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  20. Mechanisms for cardiac depression induced by phorbol myristate acetate in working rat hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Karmazyn, M.; Watson, J. E.; Moffat, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of the phorbol ester, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) were examined on function and energy metabolism in the isolated working heart of the rat. 2. At a concentration of 10(-9) M PMA produced a rapid loss in cardiac function in terms of aortic flow rate (AFR) and coronary flow rates (CFR) whereas a similar concentration of 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate was ineffective. At a concentration of 10(-10) M, the PMA-induced depression was more gradual but nevertheless very pronounced with an almost total loss in AFR after 30 min perfusion. The reduction in CFR was more moderate than that observed with respect to AFR. 3. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (+/-)-1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-acylglycerol significantly attenuated the loss in AFR and CFR following addition of PMA. 4. Two inhibitors of Na+/H+ exchange, amiloride and quinacrine, totally prevented the reduction in AFR. Although the PMA-induced depression in CFR was also attenuated by both amiloride and quinacrine, these effects were not significant, probably reflecting the less pronounced effect of PMA on this parameter. 5. Nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker reduced PMA toxicity to a similar degree as Na+/N+ exchange inhibition whereas the calcium channel agonist Bay K 8644 was without effect. 6. Tissue content of energy metabolites including high energy phosphates, total adenine nucleotides or lactate were not significantly affected by PMA perfusion. 7. We conclude that PKC activation is necessary for phorbol ester-induced cardiac dysfunction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2207502

  1. Characterization of a phorbol ester-stimulated S6 kinase from MDCK renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.E.; Krebs, E.G.

    1987-05-01

    Increased phosphorylation of S6, a 40S ribosomal subunit protein, is observed in mammalian cells in response to growth factors and phorbol esters. The goal of this study was to identify the S6 kinase that is stimulated by phorbol ester treatment of MDCK cells. MDCK clone D1 cells express high levels of protein kinase C(PKC). PKC and S6 kinase activities were measured following DEAE-Sephacel fractionation of cytosol; this procedure separated the two kinase activities. When confluent MDCK-D1 cells were exposed to 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), 95% of the total cellular PKC activity became associated with the particulate fraction within 1 hour. Cytosolic S6 kinase activity was maximal by 1 hour and then declined thereafter, preceding any detectable loss of total cellular PKC. The PMA-responsive S6 kinase was partially purified from MDCK-D1 cytosol by consecutive steps of DEAE-Sephacel, ammonium sulfate precipitation, Ultrogel AcA 34, heparin-agarose, and Ultrogel AcA 34. The partially-purified enzyme had an apparent molecular size of approximately 80 kDa. In addition to S6, the enzyme phosphorylated synthetic peptides based on the carboxyl terminal sequence of S6. S6 kinase activity utilized ATP but not GTP, and was inhibited by heparin, NaCl, and ..beta..-glycerophosphate. In conclusion, a phorbol ester-stimulated S6 kinase has been partially purified from an epithelial cell line. This kinase is distinct from PKC.

  2. Phorbol ester-stimulated phosphorylation of keratinocyte transglutaminase in the membrane anchorage region.

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, R; Rong, X H; Rice, R H

    1990-01-01

    The membrane-bound transglutaminase of cultured keratinocytes became radioactively labelled upon addition of [32P]Pi to the medium. Transglutaminase phosphorylation was also demonstrable using particulate material isolated from cell homogenates. Compatible with mediation of the labelling by protein kinase C, the degree of phosphorylation in intact cells was stimulated approx. 5-fold in 4 h on treatment with the tumour-promoting phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but not by phorbol. The extent of labelling was virtually unaffected by cycloheximide inhibition of protein synthesis, indicating that it arose primarily through turnover of phosphate in the membrane-bound enzyme. Phosphoamino acid analysis detected labelling only of serine residues. Most of the label was removed by trypsin release of the enzyme from the particulate fraction of cell homogenates, which deletes a membrane anchorage region of approximately 10 kDa. Upon trypsin treatment of the enzyme after immunoprecipitation, the phosphate label was recovered in soluble peptide material with a size of several thousand Da or less. Indicative of fragmentation of the membrane anchorage region, this material was separable by h.p.l.c. into two equally labelled peptides. Moreover, when the enzyme was labelled with [3H]palmitate or [3H]myristate, the fatty-acid-labelled peptide material required non-ionic detergent for solubilization and was separable from the phosphate-labelled material by gel filtration. Phorbol ester treatment of cultured keratinocytes in high- or low- Ca2(+)-containing medium was not accompanied by an appreciable protein-synthesis-independent change in transglutaminase activity. Independent of possible alteration of the intrinsic catalytic activity of the enzyme, phosphorylation may well modulate its interaction with substrate proteins, a potential site for physiological regulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:1977383

  3. Tephrosia purpurea alleviates phorbol ester-induced tumor promotion response in murine skin.

    PubMed

    Saleem, M; Ahmed Su; Alam, A; Sultana, S

    2001-02-01

    In recent years, considerable emphasis has been placed on identifying new cancer chemopreventive agents, which could be useful for the human population. Tephrosia purpurea has been shown to possess significant activity against hepatotoxicity, pharmacological and physiological disorders. Earlier we showed that Tephrosia purpurea inhibits benzoyl peroxide-mediated cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present study, we therefore assessed the effect of Tephrosia purpurea on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbal-13-acetate (TPA; a well-known phorbol ester) induced cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity in murine skin. The pre-treatment of Swiss albino mice with Tephrosia purpurea prior to application of croton oil (phorbol ester) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cutaneous carcinogenesis. Skin tumor initiation was achieved by a single topical application of 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA) (25 microg per animal per 0.2 ml acetone) to mice. Ten days later tumor promotion was started by twice weekly topical application of croton oil (0.5% per animal per 0.2 ml acetone, v /v). Topical application of Tephrosia purpurea 1 h prior to each application of croton oil (phorbol ester) resulted in a significant protection against cutaneous carcinogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The animals pre-treated with Tephrosia purpurea showed a decrease in both tumor incidence and tumor yield as compared to the croton oil (phorbol ester)-treated control group. In addition, a significant reduction in TPA-mediated induction in cutaneous ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and [3H]thymidine incorporation was also observed in animals pre-treated with a topical application of Tephrosia purpurea. The effect of topical application of Tephrosia purpurea on TPA-mediated depletion in the level of enzymatic and non-enzymatic molecules in skin was also evaluated and it was observed that topical application of Tephrosia purpurea prior to TPA resulted in the significant recovery of

  4. Light induced degradation of phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Yunping, Bu; Ha, Bui Thi Ngoc; Eunice, Yeo; Chueng, Lo Loong; Yan, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Jatropha curcas (Jatropha) is a tropical shrub that is gaining popularity as a biofuel feedstock plant. Phorbol esters (PEs) are tetracyclic tiglian diterpenoids that are present in Jatropha seeds and other parts of plant. Epidermal cell irritating and cancer promoting PEs not only reduce commercial values of Jatropha seed cake but also cause some safety and environment concerns on PE leaching to soil. A simple bioassay of PE toxicity was conducted by incubating 48 h old brine shrimp (Artemia salina) nauplii with Jatropha oil for 24 h. 1-4% of Jatropha oil (corresponding to PE concentration of 25-100 mg L(-1)) had mortality rate of 5-95%, with LC50 estimated to be 2.7% of oil or 67 mg L(-1) of PE. Jatropha oil was incubated with clay or black soil (autoclaved or non-autoclaved) in the darkness or under sunlight for different periods of time before oil was re-extracted and tested for PE content by HPLC and for remaining toxicity with the brine shrimp bioassay. Under sunlight, PE decreased to non-detectable level within six days. Toxicity reduced to less than 5% mortality rate that is comparable to rapeseed oil control within the same period. In contrast, PE level and toxicity remained little changed when Jatropha oil was incubated in the darkness. Such PE degradation/detoxification was also found independent of the presence of soil or soil microorganisms. We conclude that sunlight directly degrades and detoxifies PEs and this finding should alleviate the concern on long term environmental impact of PE leaching.

  5. Phorbol diesters and transferrin modulate lymphoblastoid cell transferrin receptor expression by two different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Alcantara, O.; Phillips, J.L.; Boldt, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of transferrin receptors (TfR) by activated lymphocytes is necessary for lymphocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Regulation of TfR expression, therefore, is a mechanism by which the lymphocyte's proliferative potential may be directed and controlled. The authors studied mechanisms by which lymphoblastoid cells modulate TfR expression during treatment with phorbol diesters or iron transferrin (FeTf), agents which cause downregulation of cell surface TfR. Phorbol diester-induced TfR downregulation occurred rapidly, being detectable at 2 min and reaching maximal decreases of 50% by 15 min. It was inhibited by cold but not by agents that destabilize cytoskeletal elements. Furthermore, this downregulation was reversed rapidly by washing or by treatment with the membrane interactive agent, chlorpromazine. In contrast, FeTf-induced TfR downregulation occurred slowly. Decreased expression of TfR was detectable only after 15 min and maximal downregulation was achieved after 60 min. Although FeTf-induced downregulation also was inhibited by cold, it was inhibited in addition by a group of microtubule destabilizing agents (colchicine, vinblastine, podophyllotoxin) or cytochalasin B, a microfilament inhibitor. Furthermore, FeTf-induced downregulation was not reversed readily by washing or by treatment with chlorpromazine. Phorbol diesters cause TfR downregulation by a cytoskeleton-independent mechanism. These data indicate that TfR expression is regulated by two independent mechanisms in lymphoblastoid cells, and they provide the possibility that downregulation of TfR by different mechanisms may result in different effects in these cells.

  6. Phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate promotes anchorage-independent growth and survival of melanomas through MEK-independent activation of ERK1/2

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Kjersti; Skrede, Martina; Cruciani, Veronique; Mikalsen, Svein-Ole; Slipicevic, Ana; Florenes, Vivi Ann . E-mail: v.a.florenes@labmed.uio.no

    2005-04-01

    The phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKCs, is known to stimulate the in vitro growth of monolayer cultures of normal human melanocytes whereas it inhibits the growth of most malignant melanoma cell lines. We examined the effect of PMA on proliferation and survival of melanoma cells grown as multicellular aggregates in suspension (spheroids), and aimed to elucidate downstream targets of PKC signaling. In contrast to monolayer cultures, PMA increased cell proliferation as well as protected melanoma cells from suspension-mediated apoptosis (anoikis). Supporting the importance of PKC in anchorage-independent growth, treatment of anoikis-resistant melanoma cell lines with antisense oligonucleotides against PKC-{alpha}, or the PKC inhibitor Goe6976, strongly induced anoikis. PMA induced activation of ERK1/2, but this effect was not prevented by the MEK inhibitors PD98059 or by U0126. Whereas PD98059 treatment alone led to marked activation of the pro-apoptotic Bim and Bad proteins and significantly increased anoikis, these effects were clearly reversed by PMA. In conclusion, our results indicate that the protective effect of PMA on anchorage-independent survival of melanoma cells at least partly is mediated by MEK-independent activation of ERK1/2 and inactivation of downstream pro-apoptotic effector proteins.

  7. ECOTOXICOLOGY OF NANOMATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of issues associated with potential ecological toxicity of nanomaterials with research needs outlined, current literature reviewed and discussion of nanomaterial toxicity relative to concerns that EPA and state risk assessors might have.

  8. Decrease of epidermal histidase activity by tumor-promoting phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Colburn, N H; Lau, S; Head, R

    1975-11-01

    The potent skin tumor promoter (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulates epidermal macromolecular synthesis as well as proliferation, but little is known of specific functional aberrations produced by TPA. This report presents results of a study on the effects of TPA on epidermal histidase (L-histidine ammonia lyase), an enzyme found in normal epidermis but not in dermis or in mouse squamous cell carcinomas. Histidase activity was assayed on postmitochondrial supernatants obtained from hairless mouse epidermis after removal by keratotome. Topical TPA treatment at doses active in tumor promotion (1.7 to 17.0 nmoles/application) produced dose-dependent decreases in epidermal histidase specific activity at 19 hr posttreatment. The onset of the decrease occurred at 12 hr with recovery to control level specific activity by 5 days, showing kinetics similar to those obtained for stimulation of DNA synthesis. This decrease in histidase could not be attributed to a general inhibition of soluble protein synthesis or to the appearance of an inhibitor of histidase activity. The strong promoter TPA produced a greater histidase decrease than did the moderate promoter and mitogen 12,13-didecanoyl phorbol at equimolar dose, while phorbol, a nonpromoter and nonmitogen, produced no effects on histidase. The relationship of this histidase depression to tumor promotion and not initiation is further indicated by the finding that (a) Tween 60, a structurally unrelated tumor promotor, also produced a decrease in histidase; and (b) the tumor initiator urethan and an initiating dose of 9,10-dimethybenz(a)anthracene showed no effects on histadase activity.

  9. Epidermal cell proliferation and promoting ability of phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Slaga, T J; Scribner, J D; Viaje, A

    1976-11-01

    Dose-response relationships on the abilities of several phorbol ester tumor promoters to promote skin tumors after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene initiation and to bring about edema, inflammation, and epidermal hyperplasia were determined in female Charles River CD-1 mice. The promoting ability of the potent synthetic promoter, phorbol-12,13-dioctanoate (PdiC8), was determined over a dose range of 0.1-10 mug/application. Administration of PdiC8 two times weekly at dosages of 4, 6, 8, and 10 mug gave little variation in tumor response. A dose-dependent tumor response occurred at doses of 1-4 mug PdiC8. Only 1 papilloma was observed when PdiC8 was given twice weekly at a dose of 0.1 or 0.5 mug. A similar dose-response relation was observed for the ability of PdiC8 to stimulate epidermal hyperplasia. Investigations of other phorbol esters revealed an excellent correlation between their promoting ability and their ability to induce epidermal hyperplasia; however, that was not the case for compounds outside the phorbol ester series (i.e., acetic acid, cantharidin, and ethylphenylpropiolate).

  10. Stimulation of progesterone production by phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in cultured Leydig tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, L.R.; Raju, V.S.; Stocco, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    It has been shown that addition of hCG or c-AMP to cultured Leydig tumor cells (MA-10) increases synthesis of progesterone as the major steroid. To investigate the possible involvement of protein kinase C (PK-C) in the regulation of steroid synthesis, the authors have studied the effect of PMA, an activator of PK-C, on progesterone production in MA-10 cells. The addition of PMA (100 ng/ml) stimulated steroid production whereas 4 -phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, an inactive phorbol ester, did not have any effects. Like hCG and c-AMP, PMA-stimulated progesterone production was inhibited by cycloheximide. hCG-stimulated steroid synthesis was inhibited by PMA. The addition of PMA to MA-10 Leydig cells further increased the c-AMP-stimulated progesterone production. To determine whether c-AMP has a obligatory role in the regulation of steroid production, the effect of adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 9-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)adenine (TFA), was studied on progesterone production in the presence of hCG. At lower dose (17 ng/ml) hCG-stimulated intracellular c-AMP levels and steroid production were inhibited by TFA (300 M). At higher dose of hCG (34 ng/ml) TFA did not inhibit the hCG-stimulated intracellular c-AMP levels, however, progesterone production was inhibited. Results suggest that the action of hCG, c-AMP and PMA in controlling steroidogenesis might be regulated by similar but different mechanisms.

  11. Lymphocyte activation by OKT3: cyclosporine sensitivity and synergism with phorbol ester.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J E; Benzie, C R

    1986-01-01

    Lymphocyte activation by the mitogenic monoclonal antibody OKT3 is less effective than activation by mitogenic lectins such as phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A). Activation by OKT3 is also very sensitive to inhibition by cyclosporine (CSA), which selectively inhibits Ca2+-activated steps in the activation process. In addition, the magnitude of the OKT3 response can be raised to that seen with mitogenic lectins by coincubation with phorbol esters (which activate protein kinase C). These observations suggest that OKT3 may deliver efficiently the Ca2+ signal involved in the initiation of lymphocyte activation, and that the comparatively weak overall response is due to a failure to generate a second signal, probably the activation of protein kinase C, as efficiently as the mitogenic lectins. PMID:3485075

  12. Beta/sub 1/-adrenoceptors in rat hepatoma, desensitization by isoproterenol and phorbol-myristate-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Sainz, J.A.; Alcantara, R.; Hernandez-Sotomayor, S.M.T.; Mas-Oliva, J.

    1989-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic responsiveness of hepatocytes obtained from hypothyroid rats and of a transplantable hepatoma cell line (AS-30D) were studied by measuring the accumulation of cyclic AMP. The potency order for agonists in hepatocytes was: isoproterenol > epinephrine >> norepinephrine whereas in the hepatoma cells the potency order was: isoproterenol > norepinephrine /equivalent to/ epinephrine. The effect of isoproterenol was antagonized in hepatocytes by low concentrations of ICI 118551 and only partially by concentrations of atenolol as high as 100 ..mu..M. In hepatome cells the effect of isoproterenol was inhibited by both antagonists with the potency order atenolol > ICI 118551. These data indicate that in hepatocytes the effect is mediated by beta/sub 2/-adrenoceptors whereas in hepatoma cells it is through beta/sub 1/-adrenoceptors. Preincubation of hepatoma cells with isoproterenol or phorbol-myristate-acetate diminished the subsequent beta-adrenergic responsiveness of the cells. Interestingly, when both isoproterenol and phorbol-myristate-acetate were present during the preincubation the beta-adrenergic desensitization observed was bigger than that induced by any of these agents alone.

  13. EDITORIAL: Whither nanomaterials? Whither nanomaterials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-10-01

    As the journal Nanotechnology enters its third decade it is interesting to look back on the field and to think about where it may be headed in the future. The growth of the journal over the past twenty years mirrors that of the field, with exponentially rising numbers of citations and a widening diversity of topics that we identify as nanotechnology. In the early 1990s, Nanotechnology was focused primarily on nanoscale electronics and on scanning probe tools for fabricating and characterizing nanostructures. The synthesis and assembly of nanomaterials was already an active area in chemical research; however, it did not yet intersect strongly with the activities of the physics community, which was interested primarily in new phenomena that emerged on the nanoscale and on the devices that derived from them. In the 1990s there were several key advances that began to bridge this gap. Techniques were developed for making nanocrystals of compound semiconductors, oxides, and metals with very fine control over shape and superstructure. Carbon nanotubes were discovered and their unique electronic properties were demonstrated. Research on the self-assembly of organic molecules on surfaces led to the development of soft lithography and layer-by- layer assembly of materials. The potential to use DNA and then proteins as building blocks of precise assemblies of nanoparticles was explored. These bottom-up structures could not be made by top-down techniques, and their unique properties as components of sensors, electronic devices, biological imaging agents, and drug delivery vehicles began to change the definition of the field. Ten years ago, Inelke Malsch published a study on the scientific trends and organizational dynamics of nanotechology in Europe (1999 Nanotechnology 10 1-7). Scientists from a variety of disciplines were asked which areas of research they would include in the definition of nanotechnology. Although the article concluded with forward-looking thoughts in the

  14. Risk management of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Maureen R; Tran, Lang

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has become the focus of a large amount of scientific, political, and financial interest. Limited information on the exposure to nanomaterials is available, with only a few occupational exposure studies having been performed. While laboratory animal studies on the biological effects of some nanomaterials have been published, no epidemiological studies have been reported to date. This lack of data on exposure and human health effects hinders risk assessment of these materials. As the use of nanomaterials increases rapidly, it is of vital importance that the risk assessment community understands the complexities of the issues surrounding the manufacture, use and disposal of nanomaterials, the potential of environmental and occupational exposure to human populations, as well as adverse health outcomes. For this to happen, it is in many ways necessary for the scientific community to also understand what questions risk assessors need to ask, and what research will best answer them. Risk management of nanomaterials requires more information as to the human and ecological effects of exposure to various nanomaterials. At this time, there are no specific regulations for nanomaterials, but a few efforts to include nanomaterials under existing environmental regulations have begun. The purpose of this article is to describe the potential regulations for nanomaterials, and the current issues related to the risk assessment of nanomaterials.

  15. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration.

    PubMed

    Holder, Amara L; Vejerano, Eric P; Zhou, Xinzhe; Marr, Linsey C

    2013-09-01

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which nanomaterials may enter incinerator waste streams and the fate of these nanomaterials during the incineration process. Although the literature on incineration of nanomaterials is scarce, results from studies of their behavior at high temperature or in combustion environments for other applications can help predict their fate within an incinerator. Preliminary evidence suggests nanomaterials may catalyze the formation or destruction of combustion by-products. Depending on their composition, nanomaterials may undergo physical and chemical transformations within the incinerator, impacting their partitioning within the incineration system (e.g., bottom ash, fly ash) and the effectiveness of control technology for removing them. These transformations may also drastically affect nanomaterial transport and impacts in the environment. Current regulations on incinerator emissions do not specifically address nanomaterials, but limits on particle and metal emissions may prove somewhat effective at reducing the release of nanomaterials in incinerator effluent. Control technology used to meet these regulations, such as fabric filters, electrostatic precipitators, and wet electrostatic scrubbers, are expected to be at least partially effective at removing nanomaterials from incinerator flue gas.

  16. Platelet-derived growth factor mimics phorbol diester action on epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation at threonine-654

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.J.; Czech, M.P.

    1985-06-01

    Addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to quiescent WI-38 human fetal lung fibroblasts mimics the effect of tumor-promoting phorbol diesters to inhibit the high-affinity binding of SVI-labeled epidermal growth factor ( SVI-EGF). PDGF, like phorbol diesters, was found to increase the phosphorylation state of EGF receptors immunoprecipitated from intact fibroblasts that were labeled to equilibrium with (TSP)phosphate. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the EGF receptors indicated that both PDGF and phorbol diesters increased the level of (TSP)phosphoserine and (TSP)phosphothreonine. Phosphopeptide mapping of the EGF receptor demonstrated that PDGF increased the phosphorylation of several sites and induced the phosphorylation of a site that was not observed to be phosphorylated on EGF receptors isolated from control cells. This latter phosphorylation site on the EGF receptor was identified as threonine-654. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that increases in diacylglycerol and CaS levels caused by addition of PDGF to fibroblasts activate protein kinase C and that this kinase, at least in part, mediates the effect of PDGF on the phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The data further suggest that protein kinase C may play an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolism and proliferation by PDGF.

  17. Effect of phorbol esters on iron uptake in human hematopoietic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, U.; Titeux, M.; Louache, F.; Thomopoulos, P.; Rochant, H.

    1984-11-01

    We have investigated the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on iron uptake into human hematopoietic cell lines K562, U937, and HL-60. TPA inhibited both cell growth and iron uptake by these cell lines. This effect was rapid, which is typical of phorbol esters which are biologically active, and it occurred at very low concentrations of TPA. This effect of TPA was dependent upon an inhibition of the transferrin-binding capacity as estimated on intact cells. However, experiments with transferrin binding on cell samples dissolved in 1% Triton X-100 showed that TPA-treated cells exhibited a transferrin-binding capacity similar to that of control cells. On the basis of this result, it is suggested that TPA modified a part of transferrin receptors present in the cells; as a result of this modification, these receptors became unavailable for binding transferrin, but they remained physically present in the cell. Other compounds capable of inducing the differentiation of leukemic cells, such as dimethyl sulfoxide, butyrate, retinoic acid, and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3, did not acutely inhibit iron uptake. We also investigated the effect of TPA on transferrin receptors in a cellular system in which phorbol esters stimulate cell proliferation. At 16 X 10(-9) M, TPA markedly stimulated the proliferation of T-lymphocytes. However, in spite of this marked stimulation of cell proliferation, TPA-stimulated lymphocytes exhibited a transferrin-binding capacity much inferior to cells stimulated by other mitogens, such as phytohemagglutinin.

  18. Effects of phorbol ester on cholecystokinin octapeptide-evoked exocrine pancreatic secretion in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, L P; Camello, P J; Singh, J; Salido, G M; Madrid, J A

    1990-01-01

    1. A comparative study was made of the effect of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on cholecystokinin octapeptide-evoked exocrine pancreatic secretion in the anaesthetized rat and isolated permeabilized pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK8; 0.10-6.40 nmol (kg body weight)-1) induced dose-dependent increases in pancreatic juice flow, total protein output and amylase release in the anaesthetized rat. 3. Administration of TPA (10(-8) mol (kg body weight)-1) in combination with CCK8 resulted in marked attenuation of the CCK8-evoked secretory response. 4. Simultaneous injection of polymyxin B (10(-8) mol (kg body weight)-1), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, with TPA and CCK8 reversed the inhibitory effect of the phorbol ester on CCK8-induced pancreatic juice flow, total protein output and amylase release. 5. In permeabilized rat pancreatic acini CCK8 (10(-13)-10(-9) M) elicited dose-dependent increases in [3H]leucine-labelled protein secretion (3H-labelled protein release). Combining TPA (10(-8) M) with CCK8 resulted in an inhibition of the CCK8-induced 3H-labelled protein release especially at lower concentrations of CCK8. At higher concentrations of CCK8, TPA was unable to inhibit the CCK8-evoked 3H-labelled protein release. Again, polymyxin B reversed the TPA-induced inhibition of CCK8-evoked 3H-labelled protein output. 6. The results indicate that protein kinase C activation may play an important physiological role in modulating the CCK8-evoked secretory response in rat pancreas in vivo and in vitro. PMID:1712842

  19. Effects of phorbol esters and secretagogues on nitrobenzylthioinosine binding to nucleoside transporters and nucleoside uptake in cultured chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Delicado, E G; Sen, R P; Miras-Portugal, M T

    1991-01-01

    Secretagogues inhibited adenosine uptake in chromaffin cells without causing apparent changes in the uptake affinity. The inhibition caused by carbachol, nicotine and acetylcholine reached 50%. This inhibition was reproduced by the action of protein kinase C activators such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 100 nM), phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu; 100 nM), dicaproin (10 micrograms/ml) and tricaprylin (10 micrograms/ml), with inhibitions of Vmax. of 18, 20, 37 and 47% respectively. No changes in the affinity of uptake were observed with these effectors. Down-regulation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters decreased the inhibitory effects of carbachol on adenosine uptake. Binding studies with nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) showed a similar decrease in the number of transporters when chromaffin cells were treated with the same effectors used for the uptake studies. The high-affinity dissociation constants showed minor changes with respect to the control. The ratio between maximal uptake capacity and the transporter number per cell was not significantly modified by the action of secretagogues or direct effectors of protein kinase C. The number of high-affinity binding sites for NBTI was decreased in cellular homogenates by the direct action of protein kinase C activators, with staurosporine able to reverse this action. Protein kinase C from bovine brain in the presence of ATP and effectors, decreased the number of high-affinity NBTI-binding sites in purified chromaffin cell plasma membranes. These data suggest the possibility of a molecular modification at the transporter level. PMID:1953658

  20. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  1. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  2. Genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Oesch, Franz; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This review is based on the lecture presented at the April 2010 nanomaterials safety assessment Postsatellite to the 2009 EUROTOX Meeting and summarizes genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials published in the open scientific literature (up to 2008). Special attention is paid to the relationship between particle size and positive versus negative outcome, as well as the dependence of the outcome on the test used. Salient conclusions and outstanding recommendations emerging from the information summarized in this review are as follows: recognize that nanomaterials are not all the same; therefore know and document what nanomaterial has been tested and in what form; take nanomaterials specific properties into account; in order to make your results comparable with those of others and on other nanomaterials: use or at least include in your studies standardized methods; use in vivo studies to put in vitro results into perspective; take uptake and distribution of the nanomaterial into account; and in order to become able to make extrapolations to risk for human: learn about the mechanism of nanomaterials genotoxic effects. Past experience with standard non-nanosubstances already had shown that mechanisms of genotoxic effects can be complex and their elucidation can be demanding, while there often is an immediate need to assess the genotoxic hazard. Thus, a practical and pragmatic approach to genotoxicity investigations of novel nanomaterials is the use of a battery of standard genotoxicity testing methods covering a wide range of mechanisms. Application of these standard methods to nanomaterials demands, however, adaptations, and the interpretation of results from the genotoxicity testing of nanomaterials needs additional considerations exceeding those used for standard size materials.

  3. Protein Kinase C Regulates Ionic Conductance in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons: Electrophysiological Effects of Phorbol Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Jay M.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Alger, Bradley E.

    1985-04-01

    The vertebrate central nervous system contains very high concentrations of protein kinase C, a calcium-and phospholipid-stimulated phosphorylating enzyme. Phorbol esters, compounds with inflammatory and tumor-promoting properties, bind to and activate this enzyme. To clarify the role of protein kinase C in neuronal function, we have localized phorbol ester receptors in the rat hippocampus by autoradiography and examined the electrophysiological effects of phorbol esters on hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vitro. Phorbol esters blocked a calcium-dependent potassium conductance. In addition, phorbol esters blocked the late hyperpolarization elicited by synaptic stimulation even though other synaptic potentials were not affected. The potencies of several phorbol esters in exerting these actions paralleled their affinities for protein kinase C, suggesting that protein kinase C regulates membrane ionic conductance.

  4. Phototoxicity of Selected Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantification of exposure to nanomaterials is critical for assessing their environmental hazard and risk. This is an immediate issue for nano-TiO2 because it is one of more common nanomaterials now in commerce, and is difficult to analyze using common acid-digestion techniques. ...

  5. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  6. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  7. Phorbol Ester Effects on Neurotransmission: Interaction with Neurotransmitters and Calcium in Smooth Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Jay M.; Gould, Robert J.; Peroutka, Stephen J.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Stimulation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle by neurotransmitters generates diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, which may regulate some forms of neurotransmission. Phorbol esters, potent inflammatory and tumorpromoting compounds, also activate protein kinase C. We demonstrate potent and selective effects of phorbol esters on smooth muscle, indicating a role for protein kinase C in neurotransmission. In rat vas deferens and dog basilar artery, phorbol esters synergize with calcium to mimic the contractile effects of neurotransmitters that act through the phosphatidylinositol cycle. In guinea pig ileum and rat uterus, phorbol esters block contractions produced by these neurotransmitters.

  8. Nanomaterials in Biosolids Inhibit Nodulation, Shift Microbial Community Composition, and Result in Increased Metal Uptake Relative to Bulk/Dissolved Metals.

    PubMed

    Judy, Jonathan D; McNear, David H; Chen, Chun; Lewis, Ricky W; Tsyusko, Olga V; Bertsch, Paul M; Rao, William; Stegemeier, John; Lowry, Gregory V; McGrath, Steve P; Durenkamp, Mark; Unrine, Jason M

    2015-07-21

    We examined the effects of amending soil with biosolids produced from a pilot-scale wastewater treatment plant containing a mixture of metal-based engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) on the growth of Medicago truncatula, its symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti, and on soil microbial community structure. Treatments consisted of soils amended with biosolids generated with (1) Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 ENMs introduced into the influent wastewater (ENM biosolids), (2) AgNO3, Zn(SO4)2, and micron-sized TiO2 (dissolved/bulk metal biosolids) introduced into the influent wastewater stream, or (3) no metal added to influent wastewater (control). Soils were amended with biosolids to simulate 20 years of metal loading, which resulted in nominal metal concentrations of 1450, 100, and 2400 mg kg(-1) of Zn, Ag, and Ti, respectively, in the dissolved/bulk and ENM treatments. Tissue Zn concentrations were significantly higher in the plants grown in the ENM treatment (182 mg kg(-1)) compared to those from the bulk treatment (103 mg kg(-1)). Large reductions in nodulation frequency, plant growth, and significant shifts in soil microbial community composition were found for the ENM treatment compared to the bulk/dissolved metal treatment. These results suggest differences in metal bioavailability and toxicity between ENMs and bulk/dissolved metals at concentrations relevant to regulatory limits.

  9. Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Mattigod, Shas V.

    2006-01-30

    Over the last 10-15 years, there has been an explosion of activity in the design and synthesis of nanomaterials built around a wide variety of basic architectures. In more recent years, a portion of this effort has focused on the environmental impacts and environmental applications of these nanomaterials. Why all this interest in nanomaterials? What advantages might these tiny structures provide to environmental remediation efforts? This chapter is intended to provide an overview of research in this area, as well as outline some of the advantages that these materials provide to environmental clean-up efforts.

  10. Antiallergic Phorbol Ester from the Seeds of Aquilaria malaccensis

    PubMed Central

    Korinek, Michal; Wagh, Vitthal D.; Lo, I-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Ming; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wu, Yang-Chang; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The Aquilaria malaccensis (Thymelaeaceae) tree is a source of precious fragrant resin, called agarwood, which is widely used in traditional medicines in East Asia against diseases such as asthma. In our continuous search for active natural products, A. malaccensis seeds ethanolic extract demonstrated antiallergic effect with an IC50 value less than 1 µg/mL. Therefore, the present research aimed to purify and identify the antiallergic principle of A. malaccensis through a bioactivity-guided fractionation approach. We found that phorbol ester-rich fraction was responsible for the antiallergic activity of A. malaccensis seeds. One new active phorbol ester, 12-O-(2Z,4E,6E)-tetradeca-2,4,6-trienoylphorbol-13-acetate, aquimavitalin (1) was isolated. The structure of 1 was assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR data and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Aquimavitalin (1) showed strong inhibitory activity in A23187- and antigen-induced degranulation assay with IC50 values of 1.7 and 11 nM, respectively, with a therapeutic index up to 71,000. The antiallergic activities of A. malaccensis seeds and aquimavitalin (1) have never been revealed before. The results indicated that A. malaccensis seeds and the pure compound have the potential for use in the treatment of allergy. PMID:27007372

  11. Antiallergic Phorbol Ester from the Seeds of Aquilaria malaccensis.

    PubMed

    Korinek, Michal; Wagh, Vitthal D; Lo, I-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Ming; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wu, Yang-Chang; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2016-03-21

    The Aquilaria malaccensis (Thymelaeaceae) tree is a source of precious fragrant resin, called agarwood, which is widely used in traditional medicines in East Asia against diseases such as asthma. In our continuous search for active natural products, A. malaccensis seeds ethanolic extract demonstrated antiallergic effect with an IC50 value less than 1 µg/mL. Therefore, the present research aimed to purify and identify the antiallergic principle of A. malaccensis through a bioactivity-guided fractionation approach. We found that phorbol ester-rich fraction was responsible for the antiallergic activity of A. malaccensis seeds. One new active phorbol ester, 12-O-(2Z,4E,6E)-tetradeca-2,4,6-trienoylphorbol-13-acetate, aquimavitalin (1) was isolated. The structure of 1 was assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR data and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Aquimavitalin (1) showed strong inhibitory activity in A23187- and antigen-induced degranulation assay with IC50 values of 1.7 and 11 nM, respectively, with a therapeutic index up to 71,000. The antiallergic activities of A. malaccensis seeds and aquimavitalin (1) have never been revealed before. The results indicated that A. malaccensis seeds and the pure compound have the potential for use in the treatment of allergy.

  12. Reactive oxygen species mediate phorbol ester-stimulated cAMP response in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Ezeamuzie, Charles I; Taslim, Najla

    2006-08-14

    Recently, we showed that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) can cause a direct, PKC-dependent, stimulation of intracellular cAMP in human eosinophils. Since PMA also stimulates the release of reactive oxygen species in these cells, we have investigated whether reactive oxygen species are involved in the cAMP response. Provided eosinophils were incubated for <20 min at 37 degrees C before stimulation, PMA potently stimulated cAMP generation that surpassed that of histamine. Pre-treatment of the cells with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and apocynin, strongly inhibited the cAMP production induced by PMA, but not that induced by histamine. This treatment also strongly inhibited the release of superoxide anions (O(2)(-)). The cAMP response was also inhibited by pre-treatment with the specific peroxide scavenger, ebselen, but not superoxide dismutase, or NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), thus, suggesting the possible involvement of a peroxide rather than O(2)(-) or nitric oxide (NO). These results reveal a novel involvement of intracellular reactive oxygen species in protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent stimulation of cAMP production in human eosinophils.

  13. Potential risks of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakalova, Totka; Louda, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the design and manipulation of materials at the nanometer scale such that novel or enhanced properties emerge. It is a new area of knowledge that promises a dazzling array of opportunities in areas as diverse as manufacturing, energy, health care, and waste treatment. But while the ability to develop nanomaterials and incorporate them into products is advancing rapidly, our understanding of the potential environmental, health, and safety effects of nanomaterials — and of the most effective ways to manage such effects — has proceeded at a much slower pace. Because of the novel properties that emerge at the nano scale, nanomaterials may require more and different information than called for under traditional risk management systems. And given the enormous commercial and societal benefits that may potentially come from this technology, it is likely that nanomaterials, and the products and other applications containing them, will be widely produced and used. Therefore it is especially important to understand and minimize the potential risks.

  14. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  15. Comparison of the hypertrophic effect of phorbol ester, norepinephrine, angiotensin II and contraction on cultured cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Allo, S.N.; Carl, L.L.; Morgan, H.E. )

    1991-03-15

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), norepinephrine (NE), angiotensin II (AII) and contraction stimulate cardiomyocyte growth. Differences exist in the time course and extent of protein and RNA accumulation. Cells plated at 4 {times} 10{sup 6} cells/60mm dish and arrested with 50 mM KCl demonstrated no significant growth. Treatment with PMA stimulated growth to a maximum of 17% at 48 h. In contrast, maximal stimulation of growth was 36% at 48 h and 31% at 72 h for contracting and NE treated cells, respectively. Maximal stimulation of the capacity for protein synthesis was 32% for PMA treated cells at 24 h as compared to 59% and 77% for NE treated and contracting cells respectively at 72 h. In support of a primary role for altered capacity in the regulation of protein synthesis, there was a significant correlation between RNA and protein content independent of the stimulus used. AII increased RNA content by 28% at 48h, but had no effect on growth up to 72h. Treatment with staurosporine blocked the stimulation of growth, suggestive of a role for protein kinase C (PKC). However, the inhibition of contraction-induced growth was due in part to a reduction in the rate of contraction. It was concluded that: significant differences existed in the time course of growth stimulation and RNA accumulation, depending on the stimulus; and growth inhibition by staurosporine is suggestive of an important role of PKC in hypertrophic growth induced by these stimuli.

  16. Phorbol ester-mediated desensitization of histamine Hl receptors on a cultured smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhashi, M.; Payan, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to examine the effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on histamine Hl receptors, (HlR) present on the smooth muscle cell line, DDT/sub 1/MF-2. (/sup 3/H)-pyrilamine binding revealed that specific (/sup 3/H)-pyrilamine binding sites were reduced be pretreatment with 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an activator of PKC, but not the Kd. The TPA analogue, 4..cap alpha.. phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, which does not activate PKC, failed to induce down-regulation of HlR. TPA-induced down regulation of HlR was inhibited by pretreatment with 1-(5-Isoquinilinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H-7), a PKC inhibitor, in a dose dependent manner. The H-7 analogue, H-8, which is a less potent inhibitor of PKC, but a potent inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide dependent protein kinase, had no effect on HlR. Moreover, treatment with TPA inhibited histamine-induced increases in (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in cells loaded with the fluorescent indicator, indo-1. These data suggest that HlR in DDT/sub 1/MF-2 cells were functionally regulated by PKC.

  17. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  18. Functional DNA Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao

    The discovery of DNA helical structure opened the door of modern molecular biology. Ned Seeman utilized DNA as building block to construct different nanoscale materials, and introduced a new field, know as DNA nanotechnology. After several decades of development, different DNA structures had been created, with different dimension, different morphology and even with complex curvatures. In addition, after construction of enough amounts DNA structure candidates, DNA structure template, with excellent spatial addressability, had been used to direct the assembly of different nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and proteins, to produce different functional nanomaterials. However there are still many challenges to fabricate functional DNA nanostructures. The first difficulty is that the present finite sized template dimension is still very small, usually smaller than 100nm, which will limit the application for large amount of nanomaterials assembly or large sized nanomaterials assembly. Here we tried to solve this problem through developing a new method, superorigami, to construct finite sized DNA structure with much larger dimension, which can be as large as 500nm. The second problem will be explored the ability of DNA structure to assemble inorganic nanomaterials for novel photonic or electronic properties. Here we tried to utilize DNA Origami method to assemble AuNPs with controlled 3D spacial position for possible chiral photonic complex. We also tried to assemble SWNT with discrete length for possible field effect transistor device. In addition, we tried to mimic in vivo compartment with DNA structure to study internalized enzyme behavior. From our results, constructed DNA cage origami can protect encapsulated enzyme from degradation, and internalized enzyme activity can be boosted for up to 10 folds. In summary, DNA structure can serve as an ideal template for construction of functional nanomaterials with lots of possibilities to be explored.

  19. Tumor-promoting phorbol diesters cause the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptors in normal human fibroblasts at threonine-654.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R J; Czech, M P

    1985-01-01

    The effect of tumor-promoting phorbol diesters to potentiate the action of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on cell proliferation is associated with phosphorylation of EGF receptors, acute depression of EGF binding, and inhibition of EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. In the present studies, normal human fibroblasts and A431 carcinoma cells were labeled with [32P]phosphate and treated with and without 10 nM 4 beta-phorbol 12 beta-myristate 13 alpha-acetate (PMA). The EGF receptors then were isolated by immunoprecipitation and digested with trypsin. Analysis of the labeled receptor phosphopeptides by reversed-phase HPLC revealed that PMA induces the phosphorylation of a unique phosphopeptide containing [32P]phosphothreonine. Comparison of several chemical and physical properties of the 32P-labeled phosphopeptide with the primary structure of the EGF receptor suggested the identify Lys-Arg-Thr(P)-Leu-Arg. This was confirmed by direct demonstration that a synthetic peptide of this structure comigrates during HPLC and electrophoresis with the 32P-labeled phosphopeptide isolated from the EGF receptors of normal human fibroblasts. The phosphorylated site on the peptide corresponds to threonine-654 of the EGF receptor, which is located on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane nine residues distant from the transmembrane domain. These data indicate that phosphorylation of the EGF receptor in human fibroblasts and A431 cells at threonine-654 may regulate the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity and the binding of EGF. Images PMID:2984676

  20. Intracellular Signal Modulation by Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive Oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can crucially affect the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways can be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future. PMID:24683030

  1. Intracellular signal modulation by nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can be of crucial importance for the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways have also been shown to be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials, effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future.

  2. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration

    EPA Science Inventory

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which ...

  3. Toxicological properties of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyi; Jin, Junjiang; Chang, Ya-Nan; Chang, Xueling; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-01-01

    The development of engineered nanomaterials opens tremendous opportunities for their application as therapeutic and diagnostic tools, as well as in the fields of consumer products. As the newly developed material subtype, they exhibit great activities for the high ratio of surface to total atoms. In the bio-system, the activity can render nanomaterials some negative outcomes for their unexpected deposition in organs and cells, the cellular response to the exogenous substance and the interfacial reaction with biomolecules. In this review, we have discussed the evolution of nanotoxicology studies in the past ten years mainly emerging from our laboratory. The early in vivo studies mainly focused on the biokinetic of inhaled nanoparticles and their impacts on mammal tissues, such as the central nervous system, respiratory system, cardiovascular system and so on. Then the scope extended to engineered nanomaterials used as food additives and medicines, as well as their influence on alimentary and reproductive systems. In vitro experiments to study the nanoparticle-cell interaction and nanoparticle-biomolecule interplay are indispensable to reveal the mechanisms behind the macroscopic phenomenon. In addition, novel tools such as new model organisms and synchrotron radiation-based techniques are used to facilitate our understanding of the toxicology profile of nanomaterials.

  4. Toxicity of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M. Laird; Stroeve, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There are few studies of the long-term consequences of nanoparticles on human health, but governmental agencies, including the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Japan’s Ministry of Health, have recently raised the question of whether seemingly innocuous materials such as carbon-based nanotubes should be treated with the same caution afforded known carcinogens such as asbestos. Since nanomaterials are increasing a part of everyday consumer products, manufacturing processes, and medical products, it is imperative that both workers and end-users be protected from inhalation of potentially toxic NPs. It also suggests that NPs may need to be sequestered into products so that the NPs are not released into the atmosphere during the product’s life or during recycling. Further, non-inhalation routes of NP absorption, including dermal and medical injectables, must be studied in order to understand possible toxic effects. Fewer studies to date have addressed whether the body can eventually eliminate nanomaterials to prevent particle build-up in tissues or organs. This critical review discusses the biophysicochemical properties of various nanomaterials with emphasis on currently available toxicology data and methodologies for evaluating nanoparticle toxicity. PMID:22170510

  5. Effects of phorbol ester on contraction, intracellular pH and intracellular Ca2+ in isolated mammalian ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, K T; Harding, S E

    1991-01-01

    1. We have investigated the actions of certain phorbol esters on the intracellular pH, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility of isolated rat and guinea-pig cardiac myocytes. Intracellular pH was measured using 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and intracellular Ca2+ was measured using Fura-2. 2. Application of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (also called phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) (TPA) (which activates protein kinase C) to rat cardiac myocytes significantly increased cell shortening by 116 +/- 34% (n = 8) (p less than 0.02). The rate of change of cell length during contraction (i.e. +dL/dt) increased from 67.2 +/- 8.7 microns/s to 127.7 +/- 14.1 microns/s (n = 7). The rate of change of cell length during relaxation (-dL/dt) increased from 55.8 +/- 7.4 microns/s to 118.9 +/- 12.1 microns/s (n = 7). Time to peak shortening was unchanged. 3. Application of 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, which does not activate protein kinase C, did not affect rat myocyte contractility. An insignificant decrease in contractility (by 7.5 +/- 7.5%) was observed (n = 5). The positive inotropic effect of TPA may therefore be evoked through an activation of protein kinase C. 4. In rat myocytes we have measured the changes of pHi and contractility (cell shortening) during an alkalosis and acidosis induced by exposure to and subsequent removal of NH4Cl both in the presence and absence of TPA. Recovery times from an acid load were significantly (p less than 0.05) enhanced by 15.1 +/- 6.9% (n = 13) in the presence of TPA. Recovery times of cell shortening were also more rapid (p less than 0.05) by an average of 59.1 +/- 10.6% (n = 5) in the presence of TPA. Recovery times were unchanged in the presence of 4-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (which does not activate protein kinase C). 5. Since pHi recovery of an isolated myocyte from an acid load is partially inhibited by the presence of 1 mM-amiloride and inhibited by removing extracellular Na

  6. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  7. Neutrophil beta-adrenergic receptor responses are potentiated by acute exposure to phorbol ester without changes in receptor distribution or coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kilfeather, S.A.; Stein, M.; O'Malley, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate for 10 minutes enhanced cyclic AMP accumulation in human neutrophils under basal conditions and in response to the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO, 1{mu}M) and the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (FSK, 10mM). Potentiation of responses to ISO by PMA was dose-dependent between 0.1 and 100nM PMA. The diacylglycerol analogue, 1-oleoyl-2-actylgylcerol (OAG) (50 {mu}M) also elevated beta-receptor responses, but 4beta-phorbol (100nM), lacking the capacity to activate PMA, was ineffective. Short-term exposure to the peptide n-formylmethionine leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP, 1 {mu}M) also elevated neutrophil cyclic AMP accumulation. All potentiating effects of PMA on cyclic AMP production were inhibited by the protein kinase inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H{sub 7}). PMA had no apparent effect on beta-receptor agonist-affinity, distribution between cell-surface and internalized compartments, or the capacity of ISO to induce beta-receptor internalization. Responses to FSK or ISO in terms of fold-stimulation of basal cyclic AMP accumulation int he presence of PMA were not elevated by PMA.

  8. Protection against apoptosis in chicken bursa and thymus cells by phorbol ester in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, J.; Thorbecke, G.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Programmed suicide or apoptosis, due to activation of endogenous nucleases, occurs in immature CD4{sup {minus}}85{sup {minus}} mammalian thymus cells. Like the thymus, the bursa of Fabricius is a site of massive lymphopoiesis accompanied by cell death in vivo. In the present study the authors have, therefore, examined whether chicken bursa and thymus cells exhibit apoptosis. Bursa and thymus cells from SC chickens, 4-10 weeks of age, were incubated for 8-24 hrs with various reagents. Genomic DNA was isolated, electrophoresed in 3% Nusieve agarose gels, and examined for patterns of DNA fragmentation. A laddering of DNA in multiples of 200 base pairs, indicative of apoptosis, was observed with both bursa and thymus cells. These patterns of DNA fragmentation from bursa cells could be prevented by adding phorbol myristic acetate during culture and, more effectively, by PMA plus ionomycin, but not by ionomycin alone or by anti-{mu}. PMA did not affect the patterns of DNA fragmentation seen with spleen cells. Addition of the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporin inhibited the preventive effect of PMA on apoptosis. PMA also greatly promoted the survival of bursa cells in culture, as assayed by percentage cell death and by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation. It is concluded that bursa and thymus cells from the chicken exhibit apoptosis. The data further suggest that protein kinase C activation protects apoptosis in cultured bursa cells.

  9. Colloidal nanomaterial-based immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Teste, Bruno; Descroix, Stephanie

    2012-06-01

    Nanomaterials have been widely developed for their use in nanomedicine, especially for immunoassay-based diagnosis. In this review we focus on the use of nanomaterials as a nanoplatform for colloidal immunoassays. While conventional heterogeneous immunoassays suffer from mass transfer limitations and consequently long assay time, colloidal immunosupports allow target capture in the entire volume, thus speeding up reaction kinetics and shortening assay time. Owing to their wide range of chemical and physical properties, nanomaterials are an interesting candidate for immunoassay development. The most popular colloidal nanomaterials for colloidal immunoassays will be discussed, as well as their influence on immune reactions. Recent advances in nanomaterial applications for different formats of immunoassays will be reported, such as nanomaterial-based indirect immunoassays, optical-based agglutination immunoassays, resonance energy transfer-based immunoassays and magnetic relaxation-based immunoassays. Finally, the future of using nanomaterials for homogeneous immunoassays dedicated to clinical diagnosis will be discussed.

  10. Phorbol esters modulate cyclic AMP accumulation in porcine thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Emoto, T.; Kasai, K.; Hiraiwa, M.; Shimoda, S.

    1988-01-01

    In cultured porcine thyroid cells, during 60 min incubation phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) had no effect on basal cyclic AMP accumulation and slightly stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) or forskolin. Cholera toxin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation was significantly stimulated by PMA. On the other hand, cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by prostaglandin E/sub 1/ or E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 1/ and PGE/sub 2/) was markedly depressed by simultaneous addition of PMA. These opposing effects of PMA on cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by PGE and cholera toxin were observed in a dose-related fashion, with half-maximal effect of around 10/sup -9/ M in either case. The almost same effects of PMA on cyclic AMP accumulation in basal and stimulated conditions were also observed in freshly prepared thyroid cells. The present study was performed in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-iso-butyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), indicating that PMA affected adenylate cyclase activity. Therefore, it is suggested that PMA may modulate the production of cyclic AMP in response to different stimuli, possibly by affecting several sites in the adenylate cyclase complex in thyroid cells.

  11. Phorbol ester and spontaneous activity in SHR aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Moisey, D.M.; Cox, R.H.

    1986-03-01

    Thoracic aortas (TA) were excised from 6-week old SHR and WKY. 2mm rings were mounted isometrically at optimum preload. Spontaneous rhythmical activity developed in TA from SHR and had a frequency of 3-4/min with varying periods of quiescence between bursts of activity. The spontaneous activity often produced an increase in tension development which was associated with increased frequency of oscillations. Verapamil (10/sup -7/ M) or Ca/sup + +/-free solution added during the contractile phase resulted in an immediate loss of tension and spontaneous activity. Addition of ouabain (10/sup -4/ M) during the contractile phase of spontaneous activity, increased the frequency of oscillations which appeared to fuse into a tetanus. Spontaneous rhythmical activity was infrequently observed in TA from WKY. However, addition of phorbol 12-myristate-13 acetate (TPA), frequently induced spontaneous rhythmic oscillations associated with tension development in TA from WKY. TPA contracted the SHR TA and increased the frequency of oscillations. SHR TA were more sensitive to TPA than WKY. This study demonstrates (1) spontaneous rhythmical activity, independent of agonist stimulation in TA from 6-week old SHR and (2) TPA induced spontaneous oscillatory activity. The mechanism underlying the spontaneous oscillatory activity may involve membrane coupling events and Na-pump difference between SHR and WKY.

  12. Effects of phorbol esters on fluid transport and blood flow in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoeqvist, A.; Henderson, L.S.; Fondacaro, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Studies were designed to examine the effects of phorbol esters on intestinal fluid transport and blood flow in the anesthetized cat and enteropooling in the conscious rat. Intraluminal administration of phorbol ester into a segment of isolated small bowel produced a copious intestinal secretion and a concomitant mesenteric hyperemia in the cat. Net fluid movement in the intestine was converted from absorption in the control state to secretion following phorbol ester administration. Intravenous atropine reduced the phorbol ester-induced secretion by 56%; clonidine abolished the remaining secretory response. In the rat, intragastric administration of phorbol ester produced enteropooling comparable to that of other potent intestinal secretagogues. Since phorbol esters are known to activate protein kinase C, these suggest that activation of protein kinase C in the small intestine may lead to a full secretory response. The evidence suggests that this secretion is accompanied by a metabolic hyperemia. These results suggest that protein kinase C plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal fluid transport.

  13. Phorbol esters potentiate the induction of class I HLA expression by interferon alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Erusalimsky, J D; Kefford, R F; Gilmore, D J; Milstein, C

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the effect of phorbol esters on the induction of class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA) expression by interferons (IFNs) in the T-cell line MOLT-4 and in the MOLT-4 mutant YHHH. Addition of IFN-alpha to phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate-pretreated MOLT-4 cells causes a greater than 20-fold increase in the expression of class I HLA, as compared to a 4- to 7-fold IFN-alpha-induced increase in control cells. Pretreatment with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate does not alter the class I HLA response to IFN-gamma or the responses of other IFN-induced genes. This effect of phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate reproduces in MOLT-4 cells the phenotype of the mutant YHHH, which also displays a selective enhanced class I HLA response to IFN-alpha. Pretreatment of YHHH with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate does not affect any of the responses induced by IFN. These findings suggest the existence of a phorbol ester-sensitive factor, inducible in MOLT-4 and constitutively expressed or modified in YHHH, which operates in the pathway of induction of class I HLA by IFN-alpha but not in the pathway used by IFN-gamma. Images PMID:2494657

  14. Phorbol esters potentiate the induction of class I HLA expression by interferon. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Erusalimsky, J.D.; Kefford, R.F.; Gilmore, D.J.; Milstein, C. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors have studied the effect of phorbol esters on the induction of class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA) expression by interferons (IFNs) in the T-cell line MOLT-4 and in the MOLT-4 mutant YHHH. Addition of IFN-{alpha} to phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate-pretreated MOLT-4 cells causes a >20-fold increase in the expression of class I HLA, as compared to a 4- to 7-fold IFN-{alpha}-induced increase in control cells. Pretreatment with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate does not alter the class I HLA response to IFN-{gamma} or the responses of other IFN-induced genes. This effect of phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate reproduces in MOLT-4 cells the phenotype of the mutant YHHH, which also displays a selective enhanced class I HLA response to IFN-{alpha}. Pretreatment of YHHH with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate does not affect any of the responses induced by IFN. These findings suggest the existence of a phorbol ester-sensitive factor, inducible in MOLT-4 and constitutively expressed or modified in YHHH, which operates in the pathway of induction of class I HLA by IFN-{alpha} but not in the pathway used by IFN-{gamma}.

  15. Protein kinase C activators inhibit capillary endothelial cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binds specifically to bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cells (K/sub d/ = 8nM) and inhibits the proliferation (K/sub 50/ = 6 +/- 4 nM). Under similar conditions, PDBu does not inhibit the growth of bovine aortic endothelial or smooth muscle cells. PDBu markedly attenuates the response of BCE cells to purified human hepatoma-derived growth factor which, in the absence of PDBu, stimulates BCE cell growth by about 3-fold. Several observations suggest that the inhibition of BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated by protein kinase C: (1) different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to the relative potencies as protein kinase C activators (12-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate > PDBu >> phorbol 12,13-diacetate >>>..beta..-phorbol; ..cap alpha..-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). (2) Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/), a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2-dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. (3) A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a Ca/sup 2 +//phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase that is activated by diC/sub 8/ and PDBu, but not by ..beta..-phorbol. These results support a role for protein kinase C in suppressing capillary endothelial cell growth and may therefore have implications in the intracellular regulation of angiogenesis.

  16. Inhibitory action of sphingosine, sphinganine and dexamethasone on glucose uptake: Studies with hydrogen peroxide and phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.K.; Hill, M.E.; Nelson, D.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of the inhibitory action of glucocorticoids on glucose uptake is incompletely understood. Treatment with corticosteriods of cells in which glucose uptake is stimulated at insulin postbinding and postreceptor sites may clarify the site of the steroid inhibitory action. Hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to stimulate the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) which stimulates protein kinase C were, therefore, used as stimulators of glucose transport in this study. These studies demonstrate that dexamethasone and the sphingoid bases, sphinganine and sphingosine, inhibit glucose uptake that has been stimulated at either the receptor kinase or protein kinase C level in both 3T3-L1 and 3T3-C2 cells. These data confirm glucocorticoid inhibitory action at a post binding level and support the suggestion that some corticosteriod inhibitory effects may be mediated by an action on sphingolipid metabolism.

  17. Soft bioelectronics using nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjae; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-09-01

    Recently, soft bioelectronics has attracted significant attention because of its potential applications in biointegrated healthcare devices and minimally invasive surgical tools. Mechanical mismatch between conventional electronic/optoelectronic devices and soft human tissues/organs, however, causes many challenges in materials and device designs of bio-integrated devices. Intrinsically soft hybrid materials comprising twodimensional nanomaterials are utilized to solve these issues. In this paper, we describe soft bioelectronic devices based on graphene synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition process. These devices have unique advantages over rigid electronics, particularly in biomedical applications. The functionalized graphene is hybridized with other nanomaterials and fabricated into high-performance sensors and actuators toward wearable and minimally invasive healthcare devices. Integrated bioelectronic systems constructed using these devices solve pending issues in clinical medicine while providing new opportunities in personalized healthcare.

  18. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  19. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  20. Nanomaterials for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Francisco; Boulais, Kevin; Rayms-Kelleran, Alfredo; Gehman, Victor H., Jr.; Long, Karen J.; Szu, Harold

    2009-04-01

    There is a lot of interest by society at large for reliable and affordable sensor and detection systems. Recent threats regarding public exposure to both biological and chemical agents have helped focus attention to the development of new sensor and detector technologies. Unfortunately, there is not even consensus in the scientific community on a uniform terminology of the subject. A large body of knowledge in sensor materials is available but most existing sensor materials are very limited in their ability to sense and discriminate small amounts of harmful agents embedded in large amounts of chemically inert but complex background. New materials are needed to meet the challenges ahead. Nanomaterials may be a solution to this problem. In this work we review the current state of the sensor lexicon. This is followed by a proposition of a consistent definition of terms used in the sensor and detection technology. Finally, we review a promising IR sensor system being developed using nanomaterials and several detector systems also developed using nanomaterials for nano solar cells and nano smart materials.

  1. Effects of inorganic iodide, epidermal growth factor and phorbol ester on hormone synthesis by porcine thyroid follicles cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Kikuo; Ichimura, Kenichi; Banba, Nobuyuki; Emoto, Tatsushi; Hiraiwa, Masaki; Hishinuma, Akira; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shimoda, Shinichi ); Yamaguchi, Fumihiko; Hosoya, Toichiro )

    1992-01-01

    Porcine thyroid follicles cultured in suspension for 96 h synthesized and secreted thyroid hormones in the presence of thyrotropin (TSH). The secretion of newly synthesized hormones was assessed by determining in the contents of thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) in the media and by paperchromatographic analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled hormones in the media where the follicles were cultured in the presence and absence of inhibitors of hormone synthesis. The hormone synthesis and secretion was modified by exogenously added NaI. The maximal response was obtained at 1 {mu}M. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity in the cultured follicles with TSH for 96 h was dose-dependently inhibited by NaI. One hundred {mu}M and NaI completely inhibited TSH-induced TPO activity. Moreover, both epidermal growth factor and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate inhibited de novo hormone synthesis. An induction of TPO activity by TSH was also inhibited by either agent. These data provide direct evidences that thyroid hormone synthesis is regulated by NaI as well as TSH at least in part via regulation of TPO activity and also that both EGF and PMA are inhibitory on thyroid hormone formation.

  2. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in hepatocytes is abolished by phorbol esters, pertussis toxin and partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    EGF has been demonstrated to increase free intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ levels in isolated hepatocytes putatively by generation of the second messenger inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/). Pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) inhibited the EGF (66 nM) stimulated Ca/sup 2 +/ response as measured by quin2. Inhibition by PMA was maximal within 3 min and was concentration dependent (IC/sub 50/ = 13.5 nM). Four other active phorbol ester analogues blocked the Ca/sup 2 +/ response while inactive analogues did not. EGF was unable to increase intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ levels in hepatocytes isolated from rats treated with pertussis toxin for 72 hrs. Neither PMA nor toxin pretreatment was able to inhibit the Ca/sup 2 +/ response to angiotensin II (Ang II). In hepatocytes isolated 24 hrs after partial hepatectomy, the Ca/sup 2 +/ response to EGF (as measured by phosphorylase activity, EC/sub 50/ = 5 nM) was completely abolished and remained attenuated for 7 days post-hepatectomy. The Ca/sup 2 +/ response to Ang II in this model system was also blunted but required 3 days for development of the full effect and within 7 days full activity is nearly restored. The results suggest that fundamental differences exist in the transduction mechanisms used by these two Ca/sup 2 +/-linked hormones to mobilize intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ (and putatively increase IP/sub 3/ formation).

  3. Electrocatalysis at metal nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin

    Direct liquid fuel cells, such as direct methanol fuel cells and direct formic acid fuel cells, have attracted much attention in the past decades due to the need of clean and efficient power sources. One of the most critical issues in the development of highly efficient fuel cells is to increase the rates of fuel-cell reactions as a commercial product. As a result, the topic of electrocatalysis plays a significant role in the investigations of fuel cell reactions. For methanol oxidation, platinum based nanomaterials are the most important catalysts. For formic acid oxidation, both platinum and palladium based nanomaterials are widely employed as the catalysts. Recently, shape-control of the nanoparticles has become an imperative task due to the fact that most of the reactions in fuel cells are sensitive to the surface structure of the catalysts. Though numerous studies have been conducted in past to elucidate the catalytic activity on the nanomaterials with different shapes, the results are inconclusive. Herein, systematic comparison of catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation on shape-controlled cubic platinum-based alloy nanoparticles with different alloy element are reported in this dissertation. Methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions on spherical and cubic Pt-Cu nanoparticles are also studied. Cu-Pd nanoparticles are synthesized through galvanic redox reactions to provide significantly higher and much more stable formic acid oxidation activities. Interparticle distance effect is investigated on two dimensional nanoparticle array electrodes with controlled particle size, which is ideal model system for exploring the interparticle distance effects on the voltammetric behavior and reaction mechanisms.

  4. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  5. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors and Bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Mao, Xun; Gurung, Anant; Baloda, Meenu; Lin, Yuehe; He, Yuqing

    2010-08-31

    This book chapter summarizes the recent advance in nanomaterials for electrochemical biosensors and bioassays. Biofunctionalization of nanomaterials for biosensors fabrication and their biomedical applications are discussed.

  6. Detoxification of toxic phorbol esters from Malaysian Jatropha curcas Linn. kernel by Trichoderma spp. and endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Azhar; Abdullah, Norhani; Saad, Wan Zuhainis; Ahmad, Syahida; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abas, Faridah; Gherbawy, Youssuf

    2014-02-05

    The presence of phorbol esters (PEs) with toxic properties limits the use of Jatropha curcas kernel in the animal feed industry. Therefore, suitable methods to detoxify PEs have to be developed to render the material safe as a feed ingredient. In the present study, the biological treatment of the extracted PEs-rich fraction with non-pathogenic fungi (Trichoderma harzianum JQ350879.1, T. harzianum JQ517493.1, Paecilomyces sinensis JQ350881.1, Cladosporium cladosporioides JQ517491.1, Fusarium chlamydosporum JQ350882.1, F. chlamydosporum JQ517492.1 and F. chlamydosporum JQ350880.1) was conducted by fermentation in broth cultures. The PEs were detected by liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-ESIMS) and quantitatively monitored by HPLC using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate as the standard. At day 30 of incubation, two T. harzianum spp., P. sinensis and C. cladosporioides significantly (p < 0.05) removed PEs with percentage losses of 96.9%-99.7%, while F. chlamydosporum strains showed percentage losses of 88.9%-92.2%. All fungal strains could utilize the PEs-rich fraction for growth. In the cytotoxicity assay, cell viabilities of Chang liver and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines were less than 1% with the untreated PEs-rich fraction, but 84.3%-96.5% with the fungal treated PEs-rich fraction. There was no inhibition on cell viability for normal fungal growth supernatants. To conclude, Trichoderma spp., Paecilomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp. are potential microbes for the detoxification of PEs.

  7. Detoxification of Toxic Phorbol Esters from Malaysian Jatropha curcas Linn. Kernel by Trichoderma spp. and Endophytic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Azhar; Abdullah, Norhani; Saad, Wan Zuhainis; Ahmad, Syahida; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abas, Faridah; Gherbawy, Youssuf

    2014-01-01

    The presence of phorbol esters (PEs) with toxic properties limits the use of Jatropha curcas kernel in the animal feed industry. Therefore, suitable methods to detoxify PEs have to be developed to render the material safe as a feed ingredient. In the present study, the biological treatment of the extracted PEs-rich fraction with non-pathogenic fungi (Trichoderma harzianum JQ350879.1, T. harzianum JQ517493.1, Paecilomyces sinensis JQ350881.1, Cladosporium cladosporioides JQ517491.1, Fusarium chlamydosporum JQ350882.1, F. chlamydosporum JQ517492.1 and F. chlamydosporum JQ350880.1) was conducted by fermentation in broth cultures. The PEs were detected by liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-ESIMS) and quantitatively monitored by HPLC using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate as the standard. At day 30 of incubation, two T. harzianum spp., P. sinensis and C. cladosporioides significantly (p < 0.05) removed PEs with percentage losses of 96.9%–99.7%, while F. chlamydosporum strains showed percentage losses of 88.9%–92.2%. All fungal strains could utilize the PEs-rich fraction for growth. In the cytotoxicity assay, cell viabilities of Chang liver and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines were less than 1% with the untreated PEs-rich fraction, but 84.3%–96.5% with the fungal treated PEs-rich fraction. There was no inhibition on cell viability for normal fungal growth supernatants. To conclude, Trichoderma spp., Paecilomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp. are potential microbes for the detoxification of PEs. PMID:24504029

  8. Insulin reverses the growth retardation effect of phorbol ester in chicken embryos during organogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Girbau, M.; Bassas, L.; Roth, J.; de Pablo, F. )

    1989-01-01

    The tumor promoting phorbol esters can affect early embryonic development by causing interference with the normal pathways of cellular growth and differentiation. The present study was designed to: (a) define a time in organogenesis when a vertebrate embryo model, the chicken, was sensitive to the phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoil-13-acetate (TPA), and (b) attempt a rescue of the embryos disturbed by TPA with simultaneous addition of insulin. In embryos treated at days 2 and 3 of development, TPA caused dose-dependent mortality. Survivors were biochemically retarded as indicated by their decreased weight, protein, DNA, RNA, total creatine kinase, triglycerides, phospholipids and cholesterol contents. When intermediated doses of TPA were applied together with insulin the embryonic growth disturbance was largely antagonized. These data, generated with an in vivo whole embryo, support the strong link between the mode of action of insulin and signal transduction mechanisms typical of phorbol esters.

  9. Phorbol esters broaden the action potential in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Storm, J F

    1987-03-20

    Intracellular recordings were made from CA1 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slices. Single action potentials were elicited by injection of brief current pulses. Bath application of phorbol esters (4 beta-phorbol-12,13-diacetate, 0.3-5 microM; or 4 beta-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate, 5-10 microM) broadened the action potential in each of the cells tested (n = 9). The broadening reflected slowing of the repolarization, whereas the upstroke of the spike was unchanged. This effect may enhance transmitter release from synaptic terminals, and contribute to enhancement of synaptic transmission through activation of protein kinase C, a mechanism which has been associated with long term potentiation.

  10. Stimulation of dopamine synthesis and activation of tyrosine hydroxylase by phorbol diesters in rat striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Onali, P.; Olianas, M.C.

    1987-03-23

    In rat striatal synaptosomes, 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 4 ..beta..-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), two activators of Ca/sup 2 +/-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) increased dopamine (DA) synthesis measured by following the release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C) tyrosine. Maximal stimulation (21-28% increase of basal rate) was produced by 0.5 ..mu..M PMA and 1 ..mu..M PDBu. 4 ..beta..-Phorbol and 4 ..beta..-phorbol 13-acetate, which are not activators of protein kinase C, were ineffective at 1 ..mu..M. PMA did not change the release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C)DOPA. Addition of 1 mM EGTA to a Ca/sup 2 +/-free incubation medium failed to affect PMA stimulation. KCl (60 mM) enhanced DA synthesis by 25%. Exposure of synaptosomes to either PMA or PDBu prior to KCl addition resulted in a more than additive increase (80-100%) of DA synthesis. A similar synergistic effect was observed when the phorbol diesters were combined with either veratridine or d-amphetamine but not with forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Pretreatment of striatal synaptosomes with phorbol diesters produced an activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) associated with a 60% increase of the Vmax and a decrease of the Km for the pterine cofactor 6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin. These results indicate that protein kinase C participates in the regulation of striatal TH in situ and that its activation may act synergistically with DA releasing agents in stimulating DA synthesis. 37 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Nanomaterials, Inflammation and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials exhibit unique properties that are absent in the bulk material because decreasing material size leads to an exponential increase in surface area, surface area to volume ratio, and effective stiffness, resulting in altered physiochemical properties. Diverse categories of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanoporous scaffolds, nanopatterned surfaces, nanofibers and carbon nanotubes can be generated using advanced fabrication and processing techniques. These materials are being increasingly incorporated in tissue engineering scaffolds to facilitate the development of biomimetic substitutes to replace damaged tissues and organs. Long term success of nanomaterials in tissue engineering is contingent upon the inflammatory responses they elicit in vivo. This review seeks to summarize the recent developments in our understanding of biochemical and biophysical attributes of nanomaterials and the inflammatory responses they elicit, with a focus on strategies for nanomaterial design in tissue engineering applications. PMID:25421333

  12. Health effects of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tetley, T D

    2007-06-01

    With the rapid growth of nanotechnology and future bulk manufacture of nanomaterials comes the need to determine, understand and counteract any adverse health effects of these materials that may occur during manufacture, during use, or accidentally. Nanotechnology is expanding rapidly and will affect many aspects of everyday life; there are already hundreds of products that utilize nanoparticles. Paradoxically, the unique properties that are being exploited (e.g. high surface reactivity and ability to cross cell membranes) might have negative health impacts. The rapid progress in development and use of nanomaterials is not yet matched by toxicological investigations. Epidemiological studies implicate the ultrafine (nano-sized) fraction of particulate air pollution in the exacerbation of cardiorespiratory disease and increased morbidity. Experimental animal studies suggest that the increased concentration of nanoparticles and higher reactive surface area per unit mass, alongside unique chemistry and functionality, is important in the acute inflammatory and chronic response. Some animal models have shown that nanoparticles which are deposited in one organ (e.g. lung and gut) may access the vasculature and target other organs (e.g. brain and liver). The exact relationship between the physicochemistry of a nanoparticle, its cellular reactivity, and its biological and systemic consequences cannot be predicted. It is important to understand such relationships to enjoy the benefits of nanotechnology without being exposed to the hazards.

  13. Modulation of survival and proliferation of BSC-1 cells through changes in spreading behavior caused by the tumor-promoting phorbol ester TPA.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Y; Kanno, Y

    1989-12-01

    The effect of a tumor-promoting phorbol ester on spreading behavior was investigated to clarify the involvement of the interactions between cells and substratum in the maintenance of cell viability and the control of cell proliferation. BSC-1 cells did not spread and lost cell viability after a 24-h incubation in the absence of calf serum. Addition of calf serum initially induced radial spreading and then polarized spreading, with the formation on stress fibers and focal contact-like structure, and enhanced survival. Vitronectin also induced both radial spreading and polarized spreading, and enhanced cell survival. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced radial spreading with actin ribbons in the absence of serum. It improved the survival of cells attached to the substratum, but not in suspension. TPA suppressed polarized spreading, formation of stress fibers and of focal contact-like structure, and cell proliferation, in the presence of serum. Phorbol did not have any effect. These results suggest that enhancement of radial spreading and inhibition of polarized spreading of BSC-1 cells by TPA are closely related to the enhancement of cell survival and inhibition of cell growth.

  14. Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Márquez, Francisco; Morant, Carmen

    2015-01-15

    A large part of the advances in nanotechnology have been directed towards the development of highspeed electronics, more efficient catalysts, and sensors. This latter group of applications has great relevance and unprecedented development potential for the coming years. Some of the main objectives for the development of sensors have focused on making more sensitive, effective and specific sensing devices. The improvement of these systems and the increase of specificity are clearly associated with a decrease in size of the components, which can lead to obtaining more rapid action, almost in real time. Nanomaterials currently used in sensor development include a long list of nanostructured systems, as for example: Metal nanotubes, nanowires, nanofibers, nanocomposites, nanorods, nanoparticles, nanostructured polymers, and different allotropes of carbon as carbon nanotubes, graphene or fullerenes, among others [1]. These nanomaterials are characterized by having unique physicochemical properties, including high electrical and thermal conductivity, extremely high surface area/volume ratio, high mechanical strength and even excellent catalytic properties [1] [2]. These materials, may exhibit relevant physicochemical behavior, such as quantization or electronic confinement effects, which can be used in the development of all kinds of sensors [2]. So far, sensors have been developed for determination and quantification of gases, radiation, biomolecules, microorganisms, etc. [2] [3]. The sensors developed so far usually use the system lock and key, wherein the selective receptor (lock) is selectively anchored to the analyte of interest (or key). This system has great limitations when analyzing the analyte in the presence of other analytes, which can alter the sensitivity or specificity of the measure, as occurs in sensors used in biomedical applications [3] [4]. One possible solution is based on the development of sensor arrays, consisting of a combination of different and

  15. Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Márquez, Francisco; Morant, Carmen

    2015-01-15

    A large part of the advances in nanotechnology have been directed towards the development of highspeed electronics, more efficient catalysts, and sensors. This latter group of applications has great relevance and unprecedented development potential for the coming years. Some of the main objectives for the development of sensors have focused on making more sensitive, effective and specific sensing devices. The improvement of these systems and the increase of specificity are clearly associated with a decrease in size of the components, which can lead to obtaining more rapid action, almost in real time. Nanomaterials currently used in sensor development include amore » long list of nanostructured systems, as for example: Metal nanotubes, nanowires, nanofibers, nanocomposites, nanorods, nanoparticles, nanostructured polymers, and different allotropes of carbon as carbon nanotubes, graphene or fullerenes, among others [1]. These nanomaterials are characterized by having unique physicochemical properties, including high electrical and thermal conductivity, extremely high surface area/volume ratio, high mechanical strength and even excellent catalytic properties [1] [2]. These materials, may exhibit relevant physicochemical behavior, such as quantization or electronic confinement effects, which can be used in the development of all kinds of sensors [2]. So far, sensors have been developed for determination and quantification of gases, radiation, biomolecules, microorganisms, etc. [2] [3]. The sensors developed so far usually use the system lock and key, wherein the selective receptor (lock) is selectively anchored to the analyte of interest (or key). This system has great limitations when analyzing the analyte in the presence of other analytes, which can alter the sensitivity or specificity of the measure, as occurs in sensors used in biomedical applications [3] [4]. One possible solution is based on the development of sensor arrays, consisting of a combination of

  16. Nanomaterials for renewable energy

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Shimou; Li, Liang; Sun, Hanwen; ...

    2015-05-19

    With demand for sustainable energy, resource, and environment protection, new material technologies are constantly expanding during the last few couple of decades. An intensive attention has been given by the scientific communities. In particular, nanomaterials are increasingly playing an active role either by increasing the efficiency of the energy storage and conversion processes or by improving the device design and performance. This special issue presents recent research advances in various aspects of energy storage technologies, advanced batteries, fuel cells, solar cell, biofuels, and so on. Design and synthesis of novel materials have demonstrated great impact on the utilization of themore » sustainable energy, which need to solve the increasing shortage of resource and the issues of environmental pollution.« less

  17. Nanomaterials for renewable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shimou; Li, Liang; Sun, Hanwen; Sun, Jian; Lu, Baowang

    2015-05-19

    With demand for sustainable energy, resource, and environment protection, new material technologies are constantly expanding during the last few couple of decades. An intensive attention has been given by the scientific communities. In particular, nanomaterials are increasingly playing an active role either by increasing the efficiency of the energy storage and conversion processes or by improving the device design and performance. This special issue presents recent research advances in various aspects of energy storage technologies, advanced batteries, fuel cells, solar cell, biofuels, and so on. Design and synthesis of novel materials have demonstrated great impact on the utilization of the sustainable energy, which need to solve the increasing shortage of resource and the issues of environmental pollution.

  18. Nanomaterials for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moloney, Padraig G.

    2006-01-01

    Nano-engineered materials are multi-functional materials with superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Nanomaterials may be used for a variety of space exploration applications, including ultracapacitors, active/passive thermal management materials, and nanofiltration for water recovery. Additional applications include electrical power/energy storage systems, hybrid systems power generation, advanced proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and air revitalization. The need for nanomaterials and their growth, characterization, processing and space exploration applications is discussed. Data is presented for developing solid-supported amine adsorbents based on carbon nanotube materials and functionalization of nanomaterials is examined.

  19. ROCK mediates phorbol ester-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via p21Cip1 up-regulation and JNK.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liqing; Eto, Masumi; Kazanietz, Marcelo G

    2009-10-23

    It is established that androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells undergo apoptosis upon treatment with phorbol esters and related analogs, an effect primarily mediated by PKCdelta. Treatment of LNCaP prostate cancer cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) causes a strong and sustained activation of RhoA and its downstream effector ROCK (Rho kinase) as well as the formation of stress fibers. These effects are impaired in cells subjected to PKCdelta RNA interference depletion. Functional studies revealed that expression of a dominant negative RhoA mutant or treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 inhibits the apoptotic effect of PMA in LNCaP cells. Remarkably, the cytoskeleton inhibitors cytochalasin B and blebbistatin blocked not only PMA-induced apoptosis but also the activation of JNK, a mediator of the cell death effect by the phorbol ester. In addition, we found that up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1) is required for PMA-induced apoptosis and that inhibitors of ROCK or the cytoskeleton organization prevent p21(Cip1) induction. Real time PCR analysis and reporter gene assay revealed that PMA induces p21(Cip1) transcriptionally in a ROCK- and cytoskeleton-dependent manner. p21(Cip1) promoter analysis revealed that PMA induction is dependent on Sp1 elements in the p21(Cip1) promoter but independent of p53. Taken together, our studies implicate ROCK-mediated up-regulation of p21(Cip1) and the cytoskeleton in PKCdelta-dependent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

  20. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol ester increases red blood cell scramblase activity and external phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Barber, Latorya A; Palascak, Mary B; Qi, Xiaoyang; Joiner, Clinton H; Franco, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) is thought to contribute to sickle cell disease (SCD) pathophysiology. The red blood cell (RBC) aminophospholipid translocase (APLT) mediates the transport of PS from the outer to the inner RBC membrane leaflet to maintain an asymmetric distribution of PL, while phospholipid scramblase (PLSCR) equilibrates PL across the RBC membrane, promoting PS externalization. We previously identified an association between PS externalization level and PLSCR activity in sickle RBC under basal conditions. Other studies showed that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by PMA (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate) causes increased external PS on RBC. Therefore, we hypothesized that PMA-activated PKC stimulates PLSCR activity in RBC and thereby contributes to increased PS externalization. In the current studies, we show that PMA treatment causes immediate and variable PLSCR activation and subsequent PS externalization in control and sickle RBC. While TfR+ sickle reticulocytes display some endogenous PLSCR activity, we observed a robust activation of PLSCR in sickle reticulocytes treated with PMA. The PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine (Chel), significantly inhibited PMA-dependent PLSCR activation and PS externalization. Chel also inhibited endogenous PLSCR activity in sickle reticulocytes. These data provide evidence that PKC mediates PS externalization in RBC through activation of PLSCR.

  1. Neurotoxicity of manganese oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, Diana M.; Khoshnan, Ali; Patterson, Paul H.; Hering, Janet G.

    2009-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity in humans has been observed as manganism, a disease that resembles Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of Mn toxicity and the chemical forms that may be responsible for its neurotoxicity are not well understood. We examined the toxicity of Mn oxide nanomaterials in a neuronal precursor cell model, using the MTS assay to evaluate mitochondrial function in living cells and the LDH assay to quantify the release of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase as a result of damage to the cell membrane. Both assays show that the toxicity of Mn is dependent on the type of Mn oxide nanomaterial and its concentration as well as on the state of cell differentiation. Following exposure to Mn oxide nanomaterials, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated, and flow cytometry experiments suggest that cell death occurred through apoptosis. During exposure to Mn oxide nanomaterials, increased levels of the transcription factor NF-κB (which mediates the cellular inflammatory response) were observed.

  2. Radioactive Nanomaterials for Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A.; Yang, Dongzhi; Wu, Hongwei; Hong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques, including primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), can provide quantitative information for a biological event in vivo with ultra-high sensitivity, however, the comparatively low spatial resolution is their major limitation in clinical application. By convergence of nuclear imaging with other imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging, the hybrid imaging platforms can overcome the limitations from each individual imaging technique. Possessing versatile chemical linking ability and good cargo-loading capacity, radioactive nanomaterials can serve as ideal imaging contrast agents. In this review, we provide a brief overview about current state-of-the-art applications of radioactive nanomaterials in the circumstances of multimodality imaging. We present strategies for incorporation of radioisotope(s) into nanomaterials along with applications of radioactive nanomaterials in multimodal imaging. Advantages and limitations of radioactive nanomaterials for multimodal imaging applications are discussed. Finally, a future perspective of possible radioactive nanomaterial utilization is presented for improving diagnosis and patient management in a variety of diseases. PMID:27227167

  3. Degradation of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters derived from Jatropha oil cake and their tumor-promoting activity.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Motoyuki; Hasegawa, Go; Yasuhara, Tadashi; Ishihara, Yoko

    2015-04-01

    Large amount of oil cake is generated during biodiesel production from Jatropha seeds. Although Jatropha oil cake is rich in plant nutrients, presence of toxic phorbol esters restricts the usage of oil cake as a fertilizer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the components and tumor promoting activity of phorbol esters in Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil and plants grown in the treated soil. Contents and their biological activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in soil and plants were sequentially analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in vitro cell transformation assay, respectively. Disappearance of Jatropha phorbol-ester-specific peaks were followed with HPLC during incubation of Jatropha oil cake with soil for five weeks. Along with the degradation of Jatropha phorbol ester in soil, tumor-promoting activity in the sample was also attenuated and ultimately disappeared. Jatropha phorbol esters and tumor promoting activity were not detected from mustard spinach grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil. In addition, the esterase KM109 degrades DHPB (see definition below; Jatropha phorbol ester) and reduced its tumor-promoting activity. From these data, we conclude: (1) components and tumor promoting activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in the oil cake disappeared completely by incubation with soil for five-week, (2) Jatropha phorbol esters did not transfer into plants grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil, and (3) DHPB can be degraded by esterase from soil bacterium. These observations are useful for utilization of Jatropha oil cake as a fertilizer.

  4. Energetics of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandra Navrotsky; Brian Woodfield; Juliana Boerio-Goates; Frances Hellman

    2005-01-28

    This project, "Energetics of Nanomaterials," represents a three-year collaboration among Alexandra Navrotsky (UC Davis), Brian Woodfield and Juliana Boerio-Goates (BYU), and Frances Hellman (UC Berkeley). It's purpose has been to explore the differences between bulk materials, nanoparticles, and thin films in term of their thermodynamic properties, with an emphasis on heat capaacities and entropies, as well as enthalpies. the three groups have brought very different expertise and capabilities to the project. Navrotsky is a solid-state chemist and geochemist, with a unique Thermochemistry Facility emphasizing enthalpy of formation measurements by high temperature oxide melt and room temperatue acid solution calorimetry. Boerio-Goates and Woodfield are calorimetry. Hellman is a physicist with expertise in magnetism and heat capacity measurements using microscale "detector on a chip" calorimetric technology that she pioneered. The overarching question of our work is "How does the free energy play out in nanoparticles?", or "How do differences in free energy affect overall nanoparticle behavior?" Because the free energy represents the temperature-dependent balance between the enthalpy of a system and its entropy, there are two separate, but related, components to the experimental investigations: Solution calorimetric measurements provide the energetics and two types of heat capacity measurements the entropy. We use materials that are well characterized in other ways (structurally, magnetically, and chemically), and samples are shared across the collaboration.

  5. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  6. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase regulates basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated but not phorbol ester-stimulated transcription of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Tinti, C; Song, B; Cubells, J F; Joh, T H

    1994-09-01

    To define the precise role of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, we performed transient cotransfection analyses of a reporter construct containing the upstream 2,400 bp sequence of the rat TH gene with expression plasmids encoding a heat-stable specific inhibitor of PKA (PKI), a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA, or the catalytic subunit of PKA. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of either PKI or mutant regulatory subunit blocked cAMP-stimulated induction and reduced basal transcription of the TH-reporter construct. Expression of the catalytic subunit of PKA induced the expression of the TH-reporter construct up to 50-fold in a dose-dependent manner. Primer extension analysis confirmed that PKA-mediated induction of TH-reporter expression occurred at the correct transcription initiation site. Expression of PKI did not affect induction following phorbol ester treatment, suggesting that PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) induce TH transcription by independent mechanisms. Finally, a double mutation within the cAMP response element (CRE) of TH2400-CAT diminished its basal and forskolin-stimulated transcription to the level of the promoterless plasmid, pBLCAT3, but did not alter the induction following treatment with phorbol ester, indicating that the CRE is not required for PKC-mediated transcriptional induction. Our results indicate that PKA, via the CRE, plays a crucial role for basal and cAMP-inducible transcription of the TH gene.

  7. Sphingosine and phorbol ester preferentially stimulate phosphatidylethanolamine hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Z.; Chattopadhyay, J. )

    1991-03-11

    It is generally accepted that agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C and phosphatidyl-choline (PrdCho)-specific phospholipase D are the major systems to produce the lipid messengers phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG). Here the authors show that simultaneous treatment of ({sup 14}C)palmitate-prelabeled NIH 3T3 fibroblasts with two synergistically acting mitogens, sphingosine and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), resulted in about a two-fold increase in the cellular level of PtdOH, and that both sphingosine, and to a lesser extent, TPA preferentially stimulated phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (PtdEtn) hydrolysis. This latter point was demonstrated by using NIG 3T3 cells prelabeled with {sup 14}C-labeled bases, {sup 32}P-labeled phospholipids or ({sup 14}C)palmitate. Treatment of ({sup 14}C)palmitate-prelabeled cells with TPA alone did not result in significant accumulation of PtdOH, due to rapid metabolism of this phospholipid. On the other hand, sphingosine inhibited the rapid metabolism of the PtdOH pool, formed through the action of phospholipase D, by inhibiting PtdCho synthesis. Since PtdOH is a potent mitogen in these cells, it is possible that these effects of sphingosine on PtdOH metabolism are related to its recently reported co-mitogenic effects.

  8. Nanomaterials in Biomedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A.; Márquez, Francisco

    2015-06-11

    Nowadays, nanomaterials have become an emerging field that has shown great promise in the development of novel diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including cancer, due to their nanoscale size effects and increased surface area. In comparison to their larger counterparts, nanomaterials have unique physicochemical and biological properties including size, shape, chemical composition, surface structure and charge, aggregation and agglomeration, and solubility which can affect their interactions with biomolecules and cells. In addition, nanoparticles (NPs) with size-tunable light emission have demonstrated an impressive potential as high-efficiency delivery transporters for biomolecules into cells, being used to produce exceptional images of tumor sites. Moreover, NPs delivery system has been widely applied in pharmaceutical field to enhance absorption of bioactive compounds since they can interact with several phytochemicals by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to encapsulate these phytochemicals in NPs and thus enhance aqueous solubility of the chemicals. Moreover, NPs also can prevent against oxidation/degradation of the phytochemicals encapsulated in the gastrointestinal tract and can be taken directly up by epithelial cells in the small intestine resulting in the increase of absorption and bioavailability of phytochemicals. In general, there are two specific fields of utilization of intrinsically active NPs as pharmacologic agents including oxidative-related pathologies and cancer. On the other hand, Redox active NPs have been shown to ameliorate many clinically relevant pathological disorders that implicate oxidative stress, reducing the oxidative burden and alleviating many important symptoms. In additionuch NPs act either in a catalytic way resembling the action of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and superoxide dismutase, or as activating surfaces to facilitate reactions between the aqueous environment and the

  9. Nanomaterials in Biomedicine

    DOE PAGES

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A.; Márquez, Francisco

    2015-06-11

    Nowadays, nanomaterials have become an emerging field that has shown great promise in the development of novel diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including cancer, due to their nanoscale size effects and increased surface area. In comparison to their larger counterparts, nanomaterials have unique physicochemical and biological properties including size, shape, chemical composition, surface structure and charge, aggregation and agglomeration, and solubility which can affect their interactions with biomolecules and cells. In addition, nanoparticles (NPs) with size-tunable light emission have demonstrated an impressive potential as high-efficiency delivery transporters for biomolecules into cells, being used to producemore » exceptional images of tumor sites. Moreover, NPs delivery system has been widely applied in pharmaceutical field to enhance absorption of bioactive compounds since they can interact with several phytochemicals by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to encapsulate these phytochemicals in NPs and thus enhance aqueous solubility of the chemicals. Moreover, NPs also can prevent against oxidation/degradation of the phytochemicals encapsulated in the gastrointestinal tract and can be taken directly up by epithelial cells in the small intestine resulting in the increase of absorption and bioavailability of phytochemicals. In general, there are two specific fields of utilization of intrinsically active NPs as pharmacologic agents including oxidative-related pathologies and cancer. On the other hand, Redox active NPs have been shown to ameliorate many clinically relevant pathological disorders that implicate oxidative stress, reducing the oxidative burden and alleviating many important symptoms. In additionuch NPs act either in a catalytic way resembling the action of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and superoxide dismutase, or as activating surfaces to facilitate reactions between the aqueous environment

  10. Health hazards associated with nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Pattan, Gurulingappa; Kaul, Gautam

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology is a major scientific and economic growth area and presents a variety of hazards for human health and environment. It is widely believed that engineered nanomaterials will be increasingly used in biomedical applications (as therapeutics and as diagnostic tools). However, before these novel materials can be safely applied in a clinical setting, their toxicity needs to be carefully assessed. Nanoscale materials often behave different from the materials with a larger structure, even when the basic material is same. Many mammals get exposed to these nanomaterials, which can reach almost every cell of the mammalian body, causing the cells to respond against nanoparticles (NPs) resulting in cytotoxicity and/or genotoxicity. The important key to understand the toxicity of nanomaterials is that their minute size, smaller than cellular organelles, allows them to penetrate the basic biological structures, disrupting their normal function. There is a wealth of evidence for the noxious and harmful effects of engineered NPs as well as other nanomaterials. The rapid commercialization of nanotechnology field requires thoughtful, attentive environmental, animal and human health safety research and should be an open discussion for broader societal impacts and urgent toxicological oversight action. While 'nanotoxicity' is a relatively new concept to science, this comprehensive review focuses on the nanomaterials exposure through the skin, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract and their mechanism of toxicity and effect on various organs of the body.

  11. Photoinduced toxicity of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip Scott

    Engineered nanomaterials including metal, metal oxide and carbon based nanomaterials are extensively used in a wide variety of applications to the extent that their presence in the environment is expected to increase dramatically over the next century. These nanomaterials may be photodegraded by solar radiation and thereby release metal ions into the environment that can produce cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. Photoinduced toxicity experiments are performed exposing human lung epithelial carcinoma cells [H1650] to engineered semiconductor nanoparticles such as CdSe quantum dots and ZnO nanoparticles after exposure to 3, 6, and 9 hours of solar simulated radiation. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the metal ions are evaluated using ZnSO4 and CdCl2 solutions for the MTT assay and Comet assay respectively. The objective of the dissertation is to obtain quantitative information about the environmental transformation of engineered nanomaterials and their mechanism of toxicity. This information is critical for addressing the environmental health and safety risks of engineered nanomaterials to workers, consumers and the environment.

  12. Multiple effects of phorbol esters on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1987-06-01

    In S49 lymphoma cells, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances adenylate cyclase activity and doubles cAMP accumulation in response to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation at 37/sup 0/C, putatively via the action of protein kinase C. at 27/sup 0/C, TPA has the opposite effect, inhibiting cAMP production in response to isoproterenol by approx. 25%. TPA also inhibits the response to prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/), another stimulant of hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in these cells, by 30% at 37/sup 0/C and almost 50% at 27/sup 0/C. In contrast, TPA enhances responses to forskolin and cholera toxin at both 27 and 37/sup 0/C. In membranes from cells treated with TPA, PGE/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is inhibited by 50%, whereas the catalytic activity stimulated by NaF or forskolin is enhanced. TPA reduces the potency of both PGE/sub 1/ and isoproterenol for cAMP generation by 50%. TPA causes a similar decrease in ..beta..-adrenergic agonist affinity with no reduction in the density of either antagonist of agonist binding sites in wild type cells and in cells lacking the ..cap alpha..-subunit of the stimulatory transducer protein (G/sub s/) (cyc/sup -/) or lacking functional receptor G/sub s/ coupling (UNC). Therefore, TPA has at least three functionally distinct effects on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in S49 cells. The authors conclude that multiple and opposing effects of TPA on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase occur simultaneously within the same cell, affecting the responses to several agonists differently. In addition, the data offer a mechanism by which a cell can achieve heterogeneous efficacies to hormones that activate adenylate cyclase.

  13. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate prevents isoproterenol-induced morphological change in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nabika, Toru; Chaldakov, G.N.; Nara, Yasuo; Endo, Jiro; Yamori, Yukio )

    1988-10-01

    The effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on isoproterenol (ISO)- and dibutyryl cAMP (dBcAMP)-induced morphological change and cytoskeletal reorganization was studied in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) using the fluorescence staining of actin and microtubules. The treatment of VSMC with 1.0 {mu}M of ISO or with 1.0 mM of dBcAMP for 90 min induced the disruption of actin-containing stress fibers followed by cytoplasmic arborization. The addition of 100 nM of PMA prevented both the destruction of actin fibers and cell arborization induced either by ISO or by dBcAMP. These results indicated that the inhibition of arborization by PMA was mediated through the activation of protein kinase C. Colchicine at 5.0 {mu}M also had an inhibitory effect on ISO- and dBcAMP-induced cell arborization. However, immunofluorescence studies revealed that colchicine but not PMA elicited the reorganization of microtubules, suggesting that the effect of PMA was mediated through a mechanism different from that of colchicine. The observations indicated that the morphology of VSMC was regulated through the alteration of cytoskeletal organization induced by cAMP-mediated and by protein kinase C-dependent systems.

  14. Regulation of thyroid peroxidase activity by thyrotropin, epidermal growth factor and phorbol ester in porcine thyroid follicles cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Kikuo; Hiraiwa, Masaki; Emoto, Tatsushi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shimoda, Shin-Ichi ); Ohmori, Takeshi; Koizumi, Narumi; Hosoya, Toichiro )

    1989-01-01

    The activity of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in porcine follicles cultured for 96 h in suspension with five hormones (5H) still attained over 50% of that in the freshly isolated follicles. On the other hand, the activity in those cultured with 5H + TSH (6H) was several times higher than that cultured with 5H after 96 h, although an initial decrease of TPO activity during the first 24 h of culture was observed in both conditions. The ability of follicles to metabolize iodide when cultured with 6H for 96 h was also several times higher than that of those cultured with 5H. The half-maximal dose of TSH for stimulation of TPO activity and iodide metabolism was 0.03 - 0.04 mU/ml and the effect was mediated by cAMP. These results indicate that in porcine thyroid follicles in primary suspension culture, TPO activity as well as the ability of iodide metabolism is induced by chronic TSH stimulation. In addition, epidermal growth factor and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate completely inhibited TSH stimulation on both activities and also basal (5H) activity of iodide metabolism.

  15. ERK2-Pyruvate Kinase Axis Permits Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Megakaryocyte Differentiation in K562 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Chaman, Noor; Iqbal, Mohammad Askandar; Siddiqui, Farid Ahmad; Gopinath, Prakasam; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic changes that contribute to differentiation are not well understood. Overwhelming evidence shows the critical role of glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK) in directing metabolism of proliferating cells. However, its role in metabolism of differentiating cells is unclear. Here we studied the role of PK in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in human leukemia K562 cells. We observed that PMA treatment decreased cancer-type anabolic metabolism but increased ATP production, along with up-regulated expression of two PK isoforms (PKM2 and PKR) in an ERK2-dependent manner. Interestingly, silencing of PK (PKM2 and PKR) inhibited PMA-induced megakaryocytic differentiation, as revealed by decreased expression of megakaryocytic differentiation marker CD61 and cell cycle behavior. Further, PMA-induced ATP production reduced greatly upon PK silencing, suggesting that PK is required for ATP synthesis. In addition to metabolic effects, PMA treatment also translocated PKM2, but not PKR, into nucleus. ERK1/2 knockdowns independently and together suggested the role of ERK2 in the up-regulation of both the isoforms of PK, proposing a role of ERK2-PK isoform axis in differentiation. Collectively, our findings unravel ERK2 guided PK-dependent metabolic changes during PMA induction, which are important in megakaryocytic differentiation. PMID:26269597

  16. ERK2-Pyruvate Kinase Axis Permits Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Megakaryocyte Differentiation in K562 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chaman, Noor; Iqbal, Mohammad Askandar; Siddiqui, Farid Ahmad; Gopinath, Prakasam; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2015-09-25

    Metabolic changes that contribute to differentiation are not well understood. Overwhelming evidence shows the critical role of glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK) in directing metabolism of proliferating cells. However, its role in metabolism of differentiating cells is unclear. Here we studied the role of PK in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in human leukemia K562 cells. We observed that PMA treatment decreased cancer-type anabolic metabolism but increased ATP production, along with up-regulated expression of two PK isoforms (PKM2 and PKR) in an ERK2-dependent manner. Interestingly, silencing of PK (PKM2 and PKR) inhibited PMA-induced megakaryocytic differentiation, as revealed by decreased expression of megakaryocytic differentiation marker CD61 and cell cycle behavior. Further, PMA-induced ATP production reduced greatly upon PK silencing, suggesting that PK is required for ATP synthesis. In addition to metabolic effects, PMA treatment also translocated PKM2, but not PKR, into nucleus. ERK1/2 knockdowns independently and together suggested the role of ERK2 in the up-regulation of both the isoforms of PK, proposing a role of ERK2-PK isoform axis in differentiation. Collectively, our findings unravel ERK2 guided PK-dependent metabolic changes during PMA induction, which are important in megakaryocytic differentiation.

  17. Dmrt1 Expression Is Regulated by Follicle-Stimulating Hormone and Phorbol Esters in Postnatal Sertoli Cells*

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JIANG KAI; HECKERT, LESLIE L.

    2006-01-01

    Dmrt1 is a recently described gene that is expressed exclusively in the testis and is required for postnatal testis differentiation. Here we describe the expression of Dmrt1 in postnatal rat testis and Sertoli cells. RNase protection analysis was used to examine Dmrt1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in intact testis during postnatal development and in primary cultures of Sertoli cells under various culture conditions. We show that Dmrt1 mRNA levels rise significantly beginning approximately 10 days after birth and remain elevated until after the third postnatal week. Thereafter, mRNA levels drop coincident with the proliferation of germ cells in the testis. In freshly isolated Sertoli cells, Dmrt1 mRNA levels were robust but decreased significantly when the cells were placed in culture for 24 h. Treatment of Sertoli cells with either FSH or 8-bromo-cAMP resulted in a significant rise in Dmrt1 mRNA levels. This cAMP response was sensitive to treatment with the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D but not to the translational inhibitor cycloheximide. The cAMP-dependent rise in Dmrt1 mRNA also required activation of protein kinase A, as mRNA induction was sensitive to the inhibitor H89. Studies also show that Dmrt1 expression was inhibited by phorbol esters (PMA) but only modestly effected by serum. PMID:11181532

  18. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated inositol phosphate formation in hepatocytes is abolished by pertussis toxin and phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The EGF-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protein phosphorylation events in isolated hepatocytes are blocked by pertussis toxin and phorbol ester pretreatment. The present study characterized the EGF-stimulated formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/) and inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4)P/sub 3/) in hepatocytes using HPLC methodology to separate the InsP/sub 3/ isomers. Both 66 nM EGF and 10 nM angiotensin II (ANG II) caused a rapid increase in the Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ isomer although EGF-stimulated formation was smaller. At a concentration of ANG II (0.1 nM) which gave an equivalent rise in (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ as 66 nM EGF, the kinetics and magnitude of Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ formation were similar. EGF or ANG II-stimulated formation of the Ins(1,3,4)P/sub 3/ isomer was more gradual and increased beyond the level of Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ after 60 sec. The initial EGF and ANG II-stimulated increase in both InsP/sub 3/ isomers was not affected by removing external Ca/sup 2 +/ with a 10-fold excess of EGTA. Pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin for 72 hrs blocked the ability of EGF to increase Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ but did not affect the increase due to ANG II. Three main pretreatment of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) also inhibited the EGF-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ formation. PMA slightly attenuated Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ formation stimulated by 0.1 nM ANG II but not enough to affect the Ca/sup 2 +/ signal. These data suggest that the signal transduction system used by EGF receptors to increase Ins (1,4,5)P/sub 3/ in hepatocytes is somehow different from that used by ANG II receptors.

  19. Phorbol ester induces elevated oxidative activity and alkalization in a subset of lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chii-Shiarng )

    2002-01-01

    Background: Lysosomes are acidic organelles that play multiple roles in various cellular oxidative activities such as the oxidative burst during cytotoxic killing. It remains to be determined how lysosomal lumen oxidative activity and pH interact and are regulated. Here, I report the use of fluorescent probes to measure oxidative activity and pH of lysosomes in live macrophages upon treatment with the tumor promotor phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and provide novel insight regarding the regulation of lysosomal oxidative activity and pH. Results: The substrate used to measure oxidative activity was bovine serum albumin covalently coupled to dihydro-2?, 4,5,6,7,7?-hexafluorofluorescein (OxyBURST Green H2HFF BSA). During pulse-chase procedures with live macrophages, this reduced dye was internalized through an endocytic pathway and accumulated in the lysosomes. Oxidation of this compound results in a dramatic increase of fluorescence intensity. By using low-light level fluorescence microscopy, I determined that phorbol ester treatment results in increased oxidative activity and pH elevation in different subsets of lysosomes. Furthermore, lysosomes with stronger oxidative activity tended to exclude the acidotropic lysosomal indicator, and thus exhibit higher alkalinity. Conclusions: Results indicate that there is a regulatory mechanism between lysosomal oxidative activity and pH. Activation of lysosomal Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NADPH) oxidase by phorbol ester may result in increase of intralysosomal O2?- and H2O2, concurrent with pH elevation due to consumption of H+ and generation of OH-. Furthermore, effect of phorbol ester on elevated oxidative activity and pH is heterogeneous among total lysosomal population. Higher oxidative activity and/or pH are only observed in subsets of lysosomes.

  20. Nanomaterials for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Zhang, Qiming; Lamon, Simone

    2016-12-01

    The growing amount of data that is generated every year creates an urgent need for new and improved data storage methods. Nanomaterials, which have unique mechanical, electronic and optical properties owing to the strong confinement of electrons, photons and phonons at the nanoscale, are enabling the development of disruptive methods for optical data storage with ultra-high capacity, ultra-long lifetime and ultra-low energy consumption. In this Review, we survey recent advancements in nanomaterials technology towards the next generation of optical data storage systems, focusing on metallic nanoparticles, graphene and graphene oxide, semiconductor quantum dots and rare-earth-doped nanocrystals. We conclude by discussing the use of nanomaterials in data storage systems that do not rely on optical mechanisms and by surveying the future prospects for the field.

  1. The nanomaterial toolkit for neuroengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shreyas

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing interest in developing effective tools to better probe the central nervous system (CNS), to understand how it works and to treat neural diseases, injuries and cancer. The intrinsic complexity of the CNS has made this a challenging task for decades. Yet, with the extraordinary recent advances in nanotechnology and nanoscience, there is a general consensus on the immense value and potential of nanoscale tools for engineering neural systems. In this review, an overview of specialized nanomaterials which have proven to be the most effective tools in neuroscience is provided. After a brief background on the prominent challenges in the field, a variety of organic and inorganic-based nanomaterials are described, with particular emphasis on the distinctive properties that make them versatile and highly suitable in the context of the CNS. Building on this robust nano-inspired foundation, the rational design and application of nanomaterials can enable the generation of new methodologies to greatly advance the neuroscience frontier.

  2. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  3. Cellular Stress Responses Elicited by Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials are being incorporated continuously into consumer products, resulting in increased human exposures. The study of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on oxidative stress and inflammation endpoints without further investigation of underlying pathwa...

  4. Engineered Nanomaterials Elicit Cellular Stress Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials are being developed continuously and incorporated into consumer products, resulting in increased human exposures. The study of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on toxicity endpoints without further investigating potential mechanisms or pathway...

  5. NANOMATERIALS, NANOTECHNOLOGY: APPLICATIONS, CONSUMER PRODUCTS, AND BENEFITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanotechnology is a platform technology that is finding more and more applications daily. Today over 600 consumer products are available globally that utilize nanomaterials. This chapter explores the use of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in three areas, namely Medicine, Environ...

  6. Effect of phorbol esters on contractile state and calcium flux in cultured chick heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leatherman, G.F.; Kim, D.; Smith, T.W.

    1987-07-01

    Phorbol esters are potent tumor promoters that have been widely used in studies of transmembrane signaling because of their ability to activate protein kinase C. To study the effect of phorbol esters (and indirectly, the role of protein kinase C) on the cardiac muscle contractility, the authors examined the effects of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) on contractile state, transmembrane /sup 45/Ca fluxes, and cytosolic free Ca concentration ((Ca)/sub i/) using spontaneously contracting cultured chick ventricular cells. PMA produced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in the amplitude of cell motion (half maximum inhibitory concentration) with maximal effect observed at 1 ..mu..M. PMA (1 ..mu..M) reduced /sup 45/Ca uptake rate by 16 /plus minus/ 4% and the size of the rapidly exchangeable Ca pool by 11 /plus minus/ 2%, but did not alter the /sup 45/Ca efflux rate. In fura-2-loaded cells. PMA produced a decrease in (Ca)/sub i/ from 96 /plus minus/ 7 to 72 /plus minus/ 5 nM with a time course similar to that of alteration in contractile amplitude. These results indicate that PMA influences transsarcolemmal Ca uptake, and thus the excitation-contraction process, and suggest that protein kinase C may modulate myocardial Ca homeostassis and contractile state.

  7. Phorbol ester induced phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor in intact MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knabbe, C.; Lippman, M.E.; Greene, G.L.; Dickson, R.B.

    1986-05-01

    Recent studies with a variety of cellular receptors have shown that phorbol ester induced phosphorylation modulates ligand binding and function. In this study the authors present direct evidence that the estrogen receptor in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells is a phosphoprotein whose phosphorylation state can be enhanced specifically by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Cells were cultured to 6h in the presence of (/sup 32/P)-orthophosphate. Whole cell extracts were immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody (D58) against the estrogen receptor and subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis. Autoradiography showed a specific band in the region of 60-62 kDa which was significantly increased in preparations from PMA treated cells. Phospho-amino acid analysis demonstrated specific phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues. Cholera toxin or forskolin did not change the phosphorylation state of this protein. In a parallel binding analysis PMA led to a rapid decrease of estrogen binding sites. The estrogen induction of both progesterone receptors and growth in semisolid medium was blocked by PMA, whereas the estrogen induction of the 8kDa protein corresponding to the ps2 gene product and of the 52 kDa protein was not affected. In conclusion, phorbol esters can induce phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor. This process may be associated with the inactivation of certain receptor functions.

  8. Differential role of protein kinase C in desensitization of muscarinic receptor induced by phorbol esters and receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Wi Sheung.

    1989-01-01

    PKC, a phorbol ester receptor, copurified with specific binding sites of ({sup 3}H)phorbol-12,13,-dibutyrate (({sup 3}H)PDBu). The specific binding of ({sup 3}H)PDBu to intact cells was saturable to a single class of binding sites. The PKC and phorbol ester receptors in N1E-115 cells can be down regulated by prolonged phorbol ester incubation. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) suppressed muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP response in a time-dependent and a concentration-dependent fashion and the suppressive effect of PMA could be attenuated by a protein kinase inhibitor, H-7, as well as by down-regulation of the PKC through long-term incubation with PDBu. Exposure of the cells to the muscarinic agonist carbamylcholine also desensitized subsequent CBC-mediated cyclic GMP response. However, pretreatment with carbamylcholine did not desensitize histamine-induced cyclic GMP formation while treatment with PMA suppressed this histamine-mediated response. Preincubation of the cells with CBC, but not with phorbol ester, resulted in down-regulation of muscarinic receptors. The loss of muscarinic receptors induced by agonist even occurred when the phosphoinositide hydrolysis response was suppressed.

  9. Nanomaterials under high-pressure.

    PubMed

    San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2006-10-01

    The use of high-pressure for the study and elaboration of homogeneous nanostructures is critically reviewed. Size effects, the interaction between nanostructures and guest species or the interaction of the nanosystem with the pressure transmitting medium are emphasized. Phase diagrams and the possibilities opened by the combination of pressure and temperature for the elaboration of new nanomaterials is underlined through the examination of three different systems: nanocrystals, nano-cage materials which include fullerites and group-14 clathrates, and single wall nanotubes. This tutorial review is addressed to scientist seeking an introduction or a panoramic view of the study of nanomaterials under high-pressure.

  10. Nanomaterials for biosensing with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection.

    PubMed

    Bertoncello, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Analytical applications of nanomaterials used in electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-based detection methods are reviewed. Among nanomaterials, carbon-based nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, graphene), metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, inorganic metal complexes and conducting polymers are considered. The most common mechanisms of ECL detections are also described in this review. Finally, challenges and perspectives of the use of such materials in chemical analysis are discussed.

  11. Effects of antiinflammatory agents on mouse skin tumor promotion, epidermal DNA synthesis, phorbol ester-induced cellular proliferation, and production of plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Viaje, A; Slaga, T J; Wigler, M; Weinstein, I B

    1977-05-01

    The antinflammatory ateroids fluocinoine acetonide, fluocinonide, and fluclorolone acetonide were found to be very effectiveinhibitory agents of mouse skin tumor promotion. These steroids also drastically inhibited epidermal DNA synthesis and epidermal cellular proliferation induced by a phorbal ester tumor promoter. In addition, these compounds were potent inhibitors, of plasminogen activator production in tumor cell cultures. The clinically used non-steroidal antiinflammatory agents oxyphenbutazone, indomethacin, and Seclazone also inhibite tumor promotion but were much less effective. Although these agents are useful against inflammatory disorders in general when given p.o., in our studies they had little effect on inflammation and epidermal cellular proliferation induced by a phorbol ester tumor promoter when given topically. The afore mentioned nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents also had little effect on epidermal DNA synthesis. Oxyphenbutazone and indomethacin were less potent inhibitors of plasminogen activator production in tumor cells than were the antiinflammatory steroids, and Seclazone produced a negligible inhibition. There is, therefore, a general correlation in the potencies of a series of steroidal antiinflammatory agents for inhibition of tumor promotion and their ability to inhibit plasminogen activator production by tumor cell cultures and epidermal DNA synthesis.

  12. Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.; Mosimann, W.F.; Yanagihara, N.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin are independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.

  13. Energetics of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, Frances

    2004-12-13

    This project, ''Energetics of Nanomaterials'', represents a three-year collaboration among Alexandra Navrotsky (University of California at Davis), Brian Woodfield and Juliana Boerio-Goates (Brigham Young University) and Frances Hellman (University of California at San Diego). Its purpose has been to explore the differences between bulk materials, nanoparticles, and thin films in terms of their thermodynamic properties, with an emphasis on heat capacities and entropies, as well as enthalpies. We used our combined experimental techniques to address the following questions: How does energy and entropy depend on particle size and crystal structure? Do entropic differences have their origins in changes in vibrational densities of states or configurational (including surface configuration) effects? Do material preparation and sample geometry, i.e., nanoparticles versus thin films, change these quantities? How do the thermodynamics of magnetic and structural transitions change in nanoparticles and thin films? Are different crystal structures stabilized for a given composition at the nanoscale, and are the responsible factors energetic, entropic, or both? How do adsorption energies (for water and other gases) depend on particle size and crystal structure in the nanoregime? What are the energetics of formation and strain energies in artificially layered thin films? Do the differing structures of grain boundaries in films and nanocomposites alter the energetics of nanoscale materials? Of the several directions we first proposed, we initially concentrated on a few systems: TiO(sub 2), CoO, and CoO-MgO. In these systems, we were able to clearly identify particle size-dependent effects on energy and vibrational entropy, and to separate out the effect of particle size and water content on the enthalpy of formation of the various TiO(sub 2) polymorphs. With CoO, we were able to directly compare nanoparticle films and bulk materials; this comparison is important because films can

  14. Acute effects of Fe₂O₃, TiO₂, ZnO and CuO nanomaterials on Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Nations, Shawna; Wages, Mike; Cañas, Jaclyn E; Maul, Jonathan; Theodorakis, Chris; Cobb, George P

    2011-05-01

    Metal oxide nanomaterials have exhibited toxicity to a variety of aquatic organisms, especially microbes and invertebrates. To date, few studies have evaluated the toxicity of metal oxide nanomaterials on aquatic vertebrates. Therefore, this study examined effects of ZnO, TiO(2), Fe(2)O(3), and CuO nanomaterials (20-100 nm) on amphibians utilizing the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay Xenopus (FETAX) protocol, a 96 h exposure with daily solution exchanges. Nanomaterials were dispersed in reconstituted moderately hard test medium. These exposures did not increase mortality in static renewal exposures containing up to 1,000 mg L(-1) for TiO(2), Fe(2)O(3), CuO, and ZnO, but did induce developmental abnormalities. Gastrointestinal, spinal, and other abnormalities were observed in CuO and ZnO nanomaterial exposures at concentrations as low as 3.16 mg L(-1) (ZnO). An EC(50) of 10.3 mg L(-1) ZnO was observed for total malformations. The minimum concentration to inhibit growth of tadpoles exposed to CuO or ZnO nanomaterials was 10 mg L(-1). The results indicate that select nanomaterials can negatively affect amphibians during development. Evaluation of nanomaterial exposure on vertebrate organisms are imperative to responsible production and introduction of nanomaterials in everyday products to ensure human and environmental safety.

  15. Engineering nanomaterial surfaces for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Li-Hong; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2009-10-01

    Nanomaterials, possessing unique physical and chemical properties, have attracted much interest and generated wide varieties of applications. Recent investigations of functionalized nanomaterials have expanded into the biological area, providing a versatile platform in biomedical applications such as biomolecular sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and disease therapy. Bio-functions and bio-compatibility of nanomaterials are realized by introducing synthetic ligands or natural biomolecules onto nanomaterials, and combining ligand-receptor biological interactions with intrinsic nanomaterial properties. Common strategies of engineering nanomaterial surfaces involve physisorption or chemisorption of desired ligands. We developed a photochemically initiated surface coupling chemistry, bringing versatility and simplicity to nanomaterial functionalization. The method was applied to attach underivatized carbohydrates efficiently on gold and iron oxide nanoparticles, and the resulting glyconanoparticles were successfully used as a sensitive biosensing system probing specific interactions between carbohydrates and proteins as well as bacteria.

  16. Engineering Nanomaterial Surfaces for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Li-Hong; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials, possessing unique physical and chemical properties, have attracted much interest and generated wide varieties of applications. Recent investigations of functionalized nanomaterials have expanded into the biological area, providing a versatile platform in biomedical applications such as biomolecular sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and disease therapy. Bio-functions and bio-compatibility of nanomaterials are realized by introducing synthetic ligands or natural biomolecules onto nanomaterials, and combining ligand-receptor biological interactions with intrinsic nanomaterial properties. Common strategies of engineering nanomaterial surfaces involve physisorption or chemisorption of desired ligands. We developed a photochemically initiated surface coupling chemistry, bringing versatility and simplicity to nanomaterial functionalization. The method was applied to attach underivatized carbohydrates efficiently on gold and iron oxide nanoparticles, and the resulting glyconanoparticles were successfully used as a sensitive biosensing system probing specific interactions between carbohydrates and proteins as well as bacteria. PMID:19596820

  17. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-05

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization.

  18. Enzyme-catalyzed degradation of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene, the nanoscale sp 2 allotropes of carbon, have garnered widespread attention as a result of their remarkable electrical, mechanical, and optical properties and the promise of new technologies that harness these properties. Consequently, these carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been employed for diverse applications such as electronics, sensors, composite materials, energy conversion devices, and nanomedicine. The manufacture and eventual disposal of these products may result in the release of CNMs into the environment and subsequent exposure to humans, animals, and vegetation. Given the possible pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of CNMs, much attention has been focused on the distribution, toxicity, and persistence of CNMs both in living systems and the environment. This dissertation will guide the reader though recent studies aimed at elucidating fundamental insight into the persistence of CNMs such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide). In particular, in-testtube oxidation/degradation of CNMs catalyzed by peroxidase enzymes will be examined, and the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying these processes will be discussed. Finally, an outlook of the current field including in vitro and in vivo biodegradation experiments, which have benefits in terms of human health and environmental safety, and future directions that could have implications for nanomedical applications such as imaging and drug delivery will be presented. Armed with an understanding of how and why CNMs undergo enzyme-catalyzed oxidation/biodegradation, researchers can tailor the structure of CNMs to either promote or inhibit these processes. For example, in nanomedical applications such as drug delivery, the incorporation of carboxylate functional groups could facilitate biodegradation of the nanomaterial after delivery of the cargo. Also, the incorporation of CNMs with defect sites in consumer

  19. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2016-05-15

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell-cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future.

  20. Nanomaterials-Based Optical Techniques for the Detection of Acetylcholinesterase and Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ning; Wang, Qinglong; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The large amount of pesticide residues in the environment is a threat to global health by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Biosensors for inhibition of AChE have been thus developed for the detection of pesticides. In line with the rapid development of nanotechnology, nanomaterials have attracted great attention and have been intensively studied in biological analysis due to their unique chemical, physical and size properties. The aim of this review is to provide insight into nanomaterial-based optical techniques for the determination of AChE and pesticides, including colorimetric and fluorescent assays and surface plasmon resonance. PMID:25558991

  1. Current applications and future prospects of nanomaterials in tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Fan, Chao-Qiang; Dong, Hui; Wang, Su-Min; Yang, Xiao-Chao; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Tumors are one of the most serious human diseases and cause numerous global deaths per year. In spite of many strategies applied in tumor therapy, such as radiation therapy, chemotherapy, surgery, and a combination of these treatments, tumors are still the foremost killer worldwide among human diseases, due to their specific limitations, such as multidrug resistance and side effects. Therefore, it is urgent and necessary to develop new strategies for tumor therapy. Recently, the fast development of nanoscience has paved the way for designing new strategies to treat tumors. Nanomaterials have shown great potential in tumor therapy, due to their unique properties, including passive targeting, hyperthermia effects, and tumor-specific inhibition. This review summarizes the recent progress using the innate antitumor properties of metallic and nonmetallic nanomaterials to treat tumors, and related challenges and prospects are discussed. PMID:28331307

  2. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  3. Final Report: "Energetics of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Navrotsky, Alexandra; Ross, Nancy; Woodfield, Brian

    2015-02-14

    Nanomaterials, solids with very small particle size, form the basis of new technologies that are revolutionizing fields such as energy, lighting, electronics, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. These nanoparticles are different from conventional bulk materials in many ways we do not yet fully understand. This project focused on their structure and thermodynamics and emphasized the role of water in nanoparticle surfaces. Using a unique and synergistic combination of high-tech techniques—namely oxide melt solution calorimetry, cryogenic heat capacity measurements, and inelastic neutron scattering—this work has identified differences in structure, thermodynamic stability, and water behavior on nanoparticles as a function of composition and particle size. The systematics obtained increase the fundamental understanding needed to synthesize, retain, and apply these technologically important nanomaterials and to predict and tailor new materials for enhanced functionality, eventually leading to a more sustainable way of life. Highlights are reported on the following topics: surface energies, thermochemistry of nanoparticles, and changes in stability at the nanoscale; heat capacity models and the gapped phonon spectrum; control of pore structure, acid sites, and thermal stability in synthetic γ-aluminas; the lattice contribution is the same for bulk and nanomaterials; and inelastic neutron scattering studies of water on nanoparticle surfaces.

  4. Novel Nanomaterials for Clinical Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Jamie L.; Yi, Xiang; Quan, Lingdong; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke are rapidly increasing as population ages. The field of nanomedicine is rapidly expanding and promises revolutionary advances to the diagnosis and treatment of devastating human diseases. This paper provides an overview of novel nanomaterials that have potential to improve diagnosis and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, block ionomer complexes, nanogels, and dendrimers that have been tested clinically or in experimental models for delivery of drugs, genes, and imaging agents. More recently discovered nanotubes and nanofibers are evaluated as promising scaffolds for neuroregeneration. Novel experimental neuroprotective strategies also include nanomaterials, such as fullerenes, which have antioxidant properties to eliminate reactive oxygen species in the brain to mitigate oxidative stress. Novel technologies to enable these materials to cross the blood brain barrier will allow efficient systemic delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents to the brain. Furthermore, by combining such nanomaterials with cell-based delivery strategies, the outcomes of neurodegenerative disorders can be greatly improved. PMID:18210200

  5. Enhancement of adenylate cyclase activity by phorbol ester: effects on the inhibitory pathway in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1986-05-01

    12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances the apparent V/sub max/ of adenylate cyclase (AC) in S49 lymphoma cells. This effect does not result from an increased rate of activation of the catalytic subunit by the stimulatory GTP binding transducer protein (G/sub s/). In wild type (WT) membranes this enhancement seems to involve a GTP binding protein since TPA enhances forskolin-stimulated AC activity by 30% in the presence of GTP (10 ..mu..M) or Gpp(NH)p (1 ..mu..M) but not in the absence of guanine nucleotide. The authors obtain comparable results in the cyc- variant that lacks the GTP binding subunit of G/sub s/ responsible for stimulating AC, suggesting the importance of a different GTP binding protein. Blockade of the activity of the inhibitory GTP binding protein (G/sub i/) by high concentrations of Mg/sup + +/ (approx.100 mM) or Mn/sup + +/ (approx.1 mM) abolishes the effect of TPA to enhance AC activity in WT membranes. The time course of Gpp(NH)p-mediated inhibition of AC reveals a characteristic lag prior to steady state, indicative of the rate of G/sub i/ activation; TPA increases this lag 3-4 fold. The authors conclude that reduction in the rate of activation of G/sub i/ by guanine nucleotide is one mechanism by which phorbol esters enhance guanine nucleotide-dependent activity of AC, hypothetically via the phosphorylation of G/sub i/ by protein kinase C.

  6. Phorbol esters alter adenylate cyclase responses to vasoactive intestinal peptide and forskolin in the GH cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, S.; Florio, T.; Cronin, M.

    1986-05-01

    Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol ester modifies cyclic AMP production in several anterior pituitary cell systems. In the GH cell line from a rat pituitary tumor, exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA: 100 nM) for 30 minutes significantly reduces vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP: 100 nM) stimulated adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in subsequent membrane preparations to 62 + 4% of control (n = 6 independent studies). In contrast, these same membrane preparations respond to forskolin (1 ..mu..M) with significantly more activity, 130 +/- 6% of controls (n = 6 independent studies). Finally, phorbol ester does not block an inhibitory hormone input into the AC system; somatostatin (100 nM) reduction of VIP-stimulated AC activity is not significantly different in membrane preparations from PMA treated and control cells (n = 3 independent studies). These other findings lead the authors to propose that protein kinase C can modify several sites in the AC complex in anterior pituitary cells.

  7. Toxicity of nanomaterials; an undermined issue.

    PubMed

    Mogharabi, Mehdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-08-15

    Nanomaterials are employed in extensive variety of commercial products such as electronic components, cosmetics, food, sports equipment, biomedical applications, and medicine. With the increasing utilization of engineered nanomaterials, the potential exposure of human to nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Nowadays when new nanomaterials with new applications are introduced, mostly good and positive effects are mentioned whereas possible hazards arising from nanosize of the compounds are undermined. Toxicology studies of nanomaterials demonstrate some adverse effects in some human organs such as central nerve system, immune system, and lung. There is lack of complete information about human toxicity and environmental waste of nanomaterials. We aimed to highlight current toxicological concerns of potentially useful nanomaterials which are now used in pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences.

  8. Studies on glycogen autophagy: effects of phorbol myristate acetate, ionophore A23187, or phentolamine.

    PubMed

    Kalamidas, S A; Kotoulas, O B; Hann, A C

    2002-06-15

    The effects of agents that could manipulate the lysosomal calcium such as phorbol myristate acetate, ionophore A23187, and phentolamine on the lysosomal glycogen degradation were studied by electron microscopy, morphometric analysis, and biochemical assays in newborn rat hepatocytes. Phorbol myristate acetate, which promotes the input of calcium to lysosomes, increased the total volume of autophagic vacuoles and the activity of lysosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid alpha 1,4 glucosidase and decreased the fractional volume of undigested glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles and also decreased the activity of acid mannose 6-phosphatase. Ionophore A23187, which releases lysosomal calcium, produced opposite results in these enzyme activities. Phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent which interferes with the generation of phosphoinositides and may activate the lysosomal calcium uptake pump, increased the total volume of autophagic vacuoles and the activity of lysosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid glucosidase and decreased the fractional volume of undigested glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles. The results of this study constitute evidence that changes in lysosomal calcium may influence certain aspects of autophagy, including the degradation of glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles. They also support our previous postulate [Kalamidas and Kotoulas (2000a,b) Histol Histopathol 15:29-35, 1011-1018] that stimulation of autophagic mechanisms in newborn rat hepatocytes may be associated with acid mannose 6-phosphatase activity-deficient lysosomes.

  9. Down-modulation of receptors for phorbol ester tumor promoter in primary epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Slaga, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    The specific (20-/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ((/sup 3/H)PDBu) binding to intact epidermal cells displayed the phenomenon of down-modulation, i.e., the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)PDBu to its receptors on primary epidermal cells reached a maximum within 1 h and steadily declined thereafter. The apparent down-modulation of radiolabel resulted from a partial loss in the total number of receptors; the affinity of receptors for the ligand was essentially unchanged. A number of agents such as chloroquine, methylamine, or arginine which are known to prevent clustering, down-modulation, and/or internalization of several hormone receptors did not affect the down-modulation of phorbol ester receptors. Furthermore, cycloheximide had no effect either on down-modulation or on the binding capacity of cells. The surface binding capacity of down-modulated cells following a 90-min incubation with unlabeled ligand was almost returned to normal within 1 h. The effect of the antidepressant drug chlorpromazine, which is known to interact with calmodulin, on (/sup 3/H)PDBu binding was also investigated. Our data indicate that the effect of chlorpromazine on (/sup 3/H)PDBu binding is probably unrelated to its calmodulin-binding activity.

  10. A phorbol ester response element within the human T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, H M; Wotton, D; Gegonne, A; Ghysdael, J; Wang, S; Speck, N A; Owen, M J

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the T-cell receptor beta-chain gene enhancer is increased by activators of the protein kinase C pathway during T-cell activation. Analysis of mutant enhancer constructs identified two elements, beta E2 and beta E3, conferring phorbol ester inducibility. Multimerized beta E2 acted in isolation as a phorbol ester-responsive element. Both beta E2 and beta E3, which contain a consensus Ets-binding site, were shown to bind directly to the product of the c-ets-1 protooncogene. Both regions also bound a second factor, core-binding factor. Mutation of the beta E2 Ets site abolished the inducibility of the beta E2 multimer. beta E2 and beta E3 Ets site mutations also profoundly affected activity and inducibility of the enhancer. In contrast, enhancer activity but not its inducibility was affected by mutation of the beta E2 core-binding factor site. Cotransfection studies showed that Ets-1 specifically repressed activity of the multimerized beta E2 element and the complete T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer. These data show that the T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer responds to protein kinase C-mediated activation signals via a functional domain, composed of two elements, which contains binding sites for Ets transcription factors and which is negatively regulated by Ets-1. Images PMID:1409722

  11. Enhanced cAMP accumulation by a phorbol ester in cerebral cortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, J.F.; Davis, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) was found to be selective in its ability to alter cAMP accumulations in cultured rat cerebral cortical cells. Basal levels of cAMP in cultured neuronal and nonneuronal cells preincubated in the absence or presence of PMA were 14 pmol/mg protein and 16 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Adenosine increased cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. cAMP accumulation in response to low concentrations of adenosine was not significantly altered by pretreatment with PMA but marked potentiation of adenosine elicited accumulations was observed at 10 and 100 ..mu..M adenosine. Longer preincubation with PMA resulted in a decreased ability of PMA to enhance adenosine elicited accumulations of cAMP. PMA did not significantly alter cAMP accumulation by forskolin (FOR) and enhanced norepinephrine stimulated cAMP by only 2-fold. For similarly potentiated adenosine/sub 2/ (A/sub 2/)- receptor elicited accumulation of cAMP which could be further enhanced by PMA. These results suggest that the effects of the phorbol ester are more specific for potentiating adenosine stimulated cAMP accumulation and may occur as a result of a more efficient coupling between the A/sub 2/-receptor, N-protein and adenylate cyclase.

  12. ACE expression in monocytes is induced by cytokines, phorbol ester and steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, D.; Lanzillo, J.; Fanburg, B. )

    1991-03-15

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels are elevated in the serum and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) of patients with granulomatous diseases. However, the role of ACE in (Mo) physiology and the regulation of the inflammatory response is not well understood. Since Mo can be stimulated to form giant cells using phorbol esters, glucocorticoids or certain inflammatory cytokines, the authors examined production of ACE protein by normal PBM, a Mo-like cell line, THP-1, and a macrophage-like cell line, U937 following stimulation with these agents. Using a sensitive ELISA assay, they found that in U937 cells, expression of ACE protein increased by 3.4 fold with dexamethasone, 3.7. fold with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA), and 5.8 fold with the two agents combined. The cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF substantially increased ACE expression, by 7.6 and 7.7 fold respectively, with maximal effect at 0.01 U/ml, while IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} had little effect. Similar results were found with PBM and THP-1 cells. The combination of dexamethasone and PMA also induced homotypic cluster formation in PBM, suggesting a correlation between cell adhesion and ACE production. The authors conclude that ACE expression in monocytes and macrophages is stimulated by low concentration of glucocorticoids and certain inflammatory cytokines. ACE may participate in the initiation and propagation of granulomatous inflammatory processes.

  13. Nano-material and method of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Menchhofer, Paul A; Seals, Roland D; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-03

    A fluffy nano-material and method of manufacture are described. At 2000.times. magnification the fluffy nanomaterial has the appearance of raw, uncarded wool, with individual fiber lengths ranging from approximately four microns to twenty microns. Powder-based nanocatalysts are dispersed in the fluffy nanomaterial. The production of fluffy nanomaterial typically involves flowing about 125 cc/min of organic vapor at a pressure of about 400 torr over powder-based nano-catalysts for a period of time that may range from approximately thirty minutes to twenty-four hours.

  14. Nanometallomics: an emerging field studying the biological effects of metal-related nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Yuxi; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2014-02-01

    Metallomics, focusing on the global and systematic understanding of the metal uptake, trafficking, role and excretion in biological systems, has attracted more and more attention. Metal-related nanomaterials, including metallic and metal-containing nanomaterials, have unique properties compared to their micro-scaled counterparts and therefore require special attention. The small size effect, surface effect, and quantum size effect directly influence the physicochemical properties of nanostructured materials and their fate and behavior in biota. However, to our knowledge, the metallomics itself did not touch this special category of materials yet. Therefore, the term "nanometallomics" is proposed and the systematic study on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME) behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in biological systems and their interactions with genes, proteins and other biomolecules will be reviewed. The ADME behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in the biological systems is influenced by their physicochemical properties, the exposure route, and the microenvironment of the deposition site. Nanomaterials may not only interact directly or indirectly with genes, proteins and other molecules to cause DNA damage, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and cytotoxicity, but also stimulate the immune responses, circumvent tumor resistance and inhibit tumor metastasis. Nanometallomics needs to be integrated with other omics sciences, such as genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, to explore the biomedical data and obtain the overall knowledge of underlying mechanisms, and therefore to improve the application performance and to reduce the potential risk of metal-related nanomaterials.

  15. Nanomaterials--A Membrane-Based Synthetic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    template method for preparing nanomaterials is very general; we, and others, have used it to prepare nanopolymers, nanometals, nanosemiconductors and other nano materials. Nanomaterials, Nanometals, Nanoelectrodes, Nanochemistry .

  16. Phorbol ester activation of chloride current in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Shuba, L. M.; Asai, T.; McDonald, T. F.

    1996-01-01

    1. Although earlier studies with phorbol esters indicate that protein kinase C (PKC) may be an important regulator of Cl- current (Icl) in cardiac cells, there is a need for additional quantitative data and investigation of conflicting findings. Our objectives were to measure the magnitude, time course, and concentration-dependence of Icl activated in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), evaluate its PKC dependence, and examine its modification by external and internal ions. 2. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to apply short depolarizing and hyperpolarizing pulses to myocytes superfused with Na(+)-, K(+)-, Ca(2+)-free solution (36 degrees C) and dialysed with Cs+ solution. Stimulation of membrane currents by PMA (threshold < or = 1nM, EC50 approximately equal to 14 nM, maximal 40% increase with > or = 100 nM) plateaued within 6-10 min. 3. PMA-activated current was time-independent, and suppressed by l mM 9-anthracenecarboxylic acid (9-AC). Its reversal potential (Erev) was sensitive to changes in the Cl- gradient, and outward rectification of the current-voltage (I-V) relationship was more pronounced with 30 mM than 140 mM Cl- dialysate. 4. The relative permeability of PMA-activated channels estimated from Erev measurements was I- > Cl- > > aspartate. Channel activation was independent of external Na+. 5. PMA failed to activate Icl in myocytes pretreated with 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7) or dialysed with pCa 10.5 solution. Lack of response to 4 alpha-phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (alpha PDD) was a further indication of mediation by PKC. 6. Icl induced by 2 microM forskolin was far larger than that induced by PMA, suggesting that endogenous protein kinase A is a much stronger Cl- channel activator than endogenous PKC in these myocytes. 7. The macroscopic properties of PMA-induced Icl appear to be indistinguishable from those of PKA-activated Icl. We discount stimulation of PKA by PMA as an

  17. Nanomaterial Toxicity Screening in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess nanomaterial vertebrate toxicity, a high-content screening assay was created using developing zebrafish, Danio rerio. This included a diverse group of nanomaterials (n=42 total) ranging from metallic (Ag, Au) and metal oxide (CeO2, CuO, TiO2, ZnO) nanoparticles, to non...

  18. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  19. Nanomaterials Toxicity and Cell Death Modalities

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Daniela; Carnuccio, Rosa; Maiuri, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the nanotechnology advancement has developed a plethora of novel and intriguing nanomaterial application in many sectors, including research and medicine. However, many risks have been highlighted in their use, particularly related to their unexpected toxicity in vitro and in vivo experimental models. This paper proposes an overview concerning the cell death modalities induced by the major nanomaterials. PMID:23304518

  20. Multi-metal oxide ceramic nanomaterial

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Stephen; Liu, Shuangyi; Huang, Limin

    2016-06-07

    A convenient and versatile method for preparing complex metal oxides is disclosed. The method uses a low temperature, environmentally friendly gel-collection method to form a single phase nanomaterial. In one embodiment, the nanomaterial consists of Ba.sub.AMn.sub.BTi.sub.CO.sub.D in a controlled stoichiometry.

  1. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-07

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  2. Antimicrobial and biocompatible properties of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Ul-Islam, M; Shehzad, A; Khan, S; Khattak, W A; Ullah, M W; Park, J K

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of drug-resistant characteristics in pathogenic viral, bacterial, and fungal species and the consequent spread of infectious diseases are currently receiving serious attention. Indeed, there is a pressing demand to explore novel materials and develop new strategies that can address these issues of serious concern. Nanomaterials are currently proving to be the most capable therapeutic agents to cope with such hazards. The exceptional physiochemical properties and impressive antimicrobial capabilities of nanoparticles have provoked their utilization in biomedical fields. Nanomaterials of both organic and inorganic nature have shown the capabilities of disrupting microbial cells through different mechanisms. Along with the direct influence on the microbial cell membrane, DNA and proteins, these nanomaterials produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage cell components and viruses. Currently, a serious hazard associated with these antimicrobial nanomaterials is their toxicity to human and animal cells. Extensive studies have reported the dose, time, and cell-dependent toxicology of various nanomaterials, and some have shown excellent biocompatible properties. Nevertheless, there is still debate regarding the use of nanomaterials for medical applications. Therefore, in this review, the antimicrobial activities of various nanomaterials with details of their acting mechanisms were compiled. The relative toxic and biocompatible behavior of nanomaterials emphasized in this study provides information pertaining to their practical applicability in medical fields.

  3. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Amezcua, Rodolfo; Shirolkar, Ajay; Fraze, Carolyn; Stout, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possibly resulting in the development of arrhythmia, ventricular remodeling, and eventual heart failure. Scarred cardiac muscle results in heart failure for millions of heart attack survivors worldwide. Modern cardiac tissue engineering research has developed nanomaterial applications to combat heart failure, preserve normal heart tissue, and grow healthy myocardium around the infarcted area. This review will discuss the recent progress of nanomaterials for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications through three main nanomaterial approaches: scaffold designs, patches, and injectable materials. PMID:28335261

  4. Cellulose Nanomaterials in Water Treatment Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles François; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials’ potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials’ beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization. PMID:25837659

  5. Microwave chemistry for inorganic nanomaterials synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bilecka, Idalia; Niederberger, Markus

    2010-08-01

    This Feature Article gives an overview of microwave-assisted liquid phase routes to inorganic nanomaterials. Whereas microwave chemistry is a well-established technique in organic synthesis, its use in inorganic nanomaterials' synthesis is still at the beginning and far away from having reached its full potential. However, the rapidly growing number of publications in this field suggests that microwave chemistry will play an outstanding role in the broad field of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. This article is not meant to give an exhaustive overview of all nanomaterials synthesized by the microwave technique, but to discuss the new opportunities that arise as a result of the unique features of microwave chemistry. Principles, advantages and limitations of microwave chemistry are introduced, its application in the synthesis of different classes of functional nanomaterials is discussed, and finally expected benefits for nanomaterials' synthesis are elaborated.

  6. Auxetic nanomaterials: Recent progress and future development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Harold S.

    2016-12-01

    Auxetic materials (materials with negative Poisson's ratio) and nanomaterials have independently been, for many years, two of the most active research fields in material science. Recently, these formerly independent fields have begun to intersect in new and interesting ways due to the recent discovery of auxeticity in nanomaterials like graphene, metal nanoplates, black phosphorus, and others. Here, we review the research emerging at the intersection of auxeticity and nanomaterials. We first survey the atomistic mechanisms, both intrinsic and extrinsic, that have been found, primarily through atomistic simulations, to cause auxeticity in nanomaterials. We then outline the available experimental evidence for auxetic nanomaterials. In order to lay the groundwork for future work in this exciting area, we close by discussing several future prospects as well as the current challenges in this field.

  7. Nanomaterial Based Sensors for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), graphene and metal nanowires have shown interesting electronic properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of space applications requiring ultrasensitive and light-weight sensor and electronic devices. We have been pursuing development of chemical and biosensors using carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers for the last several years and this talk will present the benefits of nanomaterials these applications. More recently, printing approaches to manufacturing these devices have been explored as a strategy that is compatible to a microgravity environment. Nanomaterials are either grown in house or purchased and processed as electrical inks. Chemical modification or coatings are added to the nanomaterials to tailor the nanomaterial to the exact application. The development of printed chemical sensors and biosensors will be discussed for applications ranging from crew life support to exploration missions.

  8. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods.

  9. A receptor model for tumor promoters: rational superposition of teleocidins and phorbol esters.

    PubMed Central

    Itai, A; Kato, Y; Tomioka, N; Iitaka, Y; Endo, Y; Hasegawa, M; Shudo, K; Fujiki, H; Sakai, S

    1988-01-01

    Four 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-O-acetylphorbol-type tumor promoters--teleocidin, phorbol ester, aplysiatoxin, and ingenol ester--are superposed in an attempt to understand their common biological activity on the assumption that they may bind to the same receptor site. A method using three-dimensional computer graphics was applied for superposing molecules and receptor mapping. The main feature of the method is that molecules are superposed in terms of spatial arrangement of physical and chemical properties but not in terms of the atomic positions as in conventional methods. This led to successful extraction of common structural features required for potent tumor-promoting activity: two hydrogen donors, a hydrogen acceptor, and a large lipophilic group. Their mutual spatial arrangements are most important for biological activity. Images PMID:3131760

  10. Nanochemistry and nanomaterials for photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Seo, Jangwon; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-11-07

    Nanochemistry and nanomaterials provide numerous opportunities for a new generation of photovoltaics with high solar energy conversion efficiencies at low fabrication cost. Quantum-confined nanomaterials and polymer-inorganic nanocomposites can be tailored to harvest sun light over a broad range of the spectrum, while plasmonic structures offer effective ways to reduce the thickness of light-absorbing layers. Multiple exciton generation, singlet exciton fission, photon down-conversion, and photon up-conversion realized in nanostructures, create significant interest for harvesting underutilized ultraviolet and currently unutilized infrared photons. Nanochemical interface engineering of nanoparticle surfaces and junction-interfaces enable enhanced charge separation and collection. In this review, we survey these recent advances employed to introduce new concepts for improving the solar energy conversion efficiency, and reduce the device fabrication cost in photovoltaic technologies. The review concludes with a summary of contributions already made by nanochemistry. It then describes the challenges and opportunities in photovoltaics where the chemical community can play a vital role.

  11. Stopping of Ions in Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The stopping of ions in solids is due to the energy loss as a result of the resistance to ion passage of the electronic and ionic nuclei in the material. When an ion penetrates a solid, it experiences a number of collisions. Energetic charged particles interact with both electrons and atoms in materials. Kinetic energy transfers to atoms can result in displacement of atoms from their original sites; thereby forming atomic-scale defects in the structure. Energy transfers to the target electrons (either bound or free) produces electron-hole pairs that can result in charging of pre-existing defects, localized electronic excitations, rupture of covalent and ionic bonds, enhanced defect and atomic diffusion, increased free energy, changes in phase transformation dynamics, as well as formation of atomic-scale defects. Such atomic collisions and ionization processes can modify the physical and chemical behavior of nanomaterials. This box will discuss irradiation-induced defect, address nanostructure engineering and radiation effects in nanomaterials, as well as the scientific challenges of ion-solid interactions.

  12. Sp1 involvement in the 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA)-mediated increase in resistance to methotrexate in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Noé, V; Alemany, C; Nicolás, M; Ciudad, C J

    2001-06-01

    4beta-Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA) increases the number of colonies resistant to methotrexate (MTX), mainly by amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) locus. We showed previously that inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) prevents this resistance. Here, we studied the molecular changes involved in the development of TPA-mediated MTX resistance in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. TPA incubation increased the expression and activity of DHFR. Because Sp1 controls the dhfr promoter, we determined the effect of TPA on the expression of Sp1 and its binding to DNA. TPA incubation increased Sp1 binding and the levels of Sp1 protein. The latter effect was due to an increase in Sp1 mRNA. Dephosphorylation of nuclear extracts from control or TPA-treated cells reduced the binding of Sp1. Stable transfectants of PKCalpha showed increased Sp1 binding, and when treated with MTX, developed a greater number of resistant colonies than control cells. Seventy-five percent of the isolated colonies showed increased copy number for the dhfr gene. Transient expression of PKCalpha increased DHFR activity. Over-expression of Sp1 increased resistance to MTX, and inhibition of Sp1 binding by mithramycin decreased this resistance. We conclude that one mechanism by which TPA enhances MTX resistance, mainly by gene amplification, is through an increase in Sp1 expression which leads to DHFR activation.

  13. Effect of phorbol ester on the release of atrial natriuretic peptide from the hypertrophied rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, P.; Taskinen, T.; Järvinen, M.; Ruskoaho, H.

    1991-01-01

    1. To determine the cellular mechanisms of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release from ventricular cardiomyocytes, the secretory and the cardiac effects of a phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), known to stimulate protein kinase C activity in heart cells, were studied in isolated, perfused heart preparations from 2- and 21-month-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. TPA was added to the perfusion fluid for 30 min at a concentration of 46 nM after removal of atrial tissue. Additionally, atrial and ventricular levels of immunoreactive ANP (IR-ANP) and ANP mRNA, the distribution of ANP within ventricles as well as the relative contribution of atria and ventricles in the release of ANP were studied. 2. Ventricular hypertrophy that gradually developed in hypertensive rats resulted in remarkable augmentation of ANP gene expression, as reflected by elevated levels of immunoreactive ANP and ANP mRNA. The total amount of IR-ANP in the ventricles of the SHR rats increased 41 fold and ANP mRNA levels 12.9 fold from the age of 2 to 21 months. At the age of 21 months, levels of IR-ANP and ANP mRNA in the ventricles of SHR rats were 5.4 fold and 3.7 fold higher, respectively, than in the normotensive WKY rats. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated ANP granules within the hypertrophic ventricles of the old SHR rats, but not within normal ventricular tissue. 3. In isolated perfused heart preparations, the severely hypertrophied ventricular tissue of SHR rats after atrialectomy secreted more ANP into the perfusate than did the control hearts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:1826618

  14. Regulation of osteosarcoma EGF receptor affinity by phorbol ester and cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, S.E.; Catherwood, B.D. )

    1989-04-01

    We studied the binding and degradation of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) by UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells and the regulation of EGF receptor affinity for EGF by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and by treatments that raise intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Cell surface binding of (125I)EGF to A431 cells reached a plateau after a 30 minute incubation at 37 degrees C but was undetectable in UMR-106 cells. Degradation of (125I)EGF proceeded at a 50-fold higher rate in A431 cells on a per cell basis, but receptor-bound (125I)EGF was internalized and degraded at a 3.5-fold higher rate by UMR-106 cells on a per receptor basis. At 4 degrees C, (125I)EGF labeled a single class of surface binding sites in the UMR-106 cell. Treatment with TPA at 37 degrees C reduced subsequent cell surface binding of (125I)EGF at 4 degrees C a maximum of 80% with an IC50 of 1.25 ng/ml. Maximal TPA reduction of (125I)EGF binding was observed within 5-15 minutes and was due to a reduction in the affinity of cell surface receptors of (125I)EGF without a change in receptor density. Pretreatment of the cells for 4 h with 30 microM forskolin, 1 mM isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) plus 30 microM forskolin, or 1 mM IBMX plus 100 ng/ml parathyroid hormone (PTH) attenuated the loss in (125I)EGF binding caused by a subsequent dose of 10 ng/ml of TPA by 17% (p less than 0.0005), 39% (p less than 0.0002), and 35% (p less than 0.002), respectively.

  15. Bovine somatotropin attenuates phorbol ester-induced prostaglandin F2alpha production in bovine endometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Badinga, L; Guzeloglu, A; Thatcher, W W

    2002-03-01

    The recent observation that bovine somatotropin (bST) treatment at a timed insemination improves pregnancy rates in lactating dairy cows raises the possibility that growth hormone (GH) may modulate the endocrine and biochemical cross talk between the conceptus and maternal uterus at the time of pregnancy establishment in cattle. The objective of this study was to characterize the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which exogenous GH affects phorbol ester-induced prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) production in cultured bovine endometrial (BEND) cells. Serum-deprived BEND cells were incubated with or without recombinant bovine GH (rbGH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, recombinant bovine interferon (rbIFN)-tau or a combination of rbGH + rbIFN-tau for 3 h and then treated with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) for an additional 6 h. Exogenous PDBu increased PGF2alpha secretion and steady-state levels of COX-2 mRNA within 3 h. Priming of BEND cells with rbGH reduced PGF2alpha response to PDBu, whereas cotreatment with IGF-I amplified PDBu induction of PGF2alpha. Preincubation of cell monolayers with rbIFN-tau suppressed PGF2alpha and COX-2 mRNA responses to PDBu. Inhibitory effects of rbGH and rbIFN-tau on PDBu-induced PGF2alpha production were additive. Results provide the first direct evidence that supplemental bST may interact with conceptus-secreted IFN-tau to modulate PGF2alpha secretion at the critical time of maternal recognition of pregnancy.

  16. Phorbol ester and A23187 have additive but mechanistically separate effects on vasopressin action in rabbit collecting tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Y; Jacobson, H R; Breyer, M D

    1988-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and elevation of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca++]i) result from phosphatidylinositol biphosphate (PIP2) breakdown. We previously demonstrated that PKC activation inhibits arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced osmotic water flow in rabbit cortical collecting tubule (CCT) perfused in vitro at 37 degrees C. To estimate the potential significance of PIP2 turnover as a modulator of water transport in this nephron segment, we examined the effect of Ca on AVP action and explored the mechanisms of action of PKC and increased [Ca++]i. In rabbit CCTs perfused at 37 degrees C, pretreatment with bath A23187 (2 x 10(-8) M, 2 x 10(-6) M), a Ca ionophore, almost totally suppressed AVP (10 microU/ml)-induced peak hydraulic conductivity (Lp). The suppression by 2 x 10(-8) M A23187 was as potent as that by 2 x 10(-6) M A23187, and significant even when it was administered 10 min after AVP. When phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 10(-9) M), a PKC activator, and A23187 (2 x 10(-8) M) were placed in the bath simultaneously, the combined suppressive effect on peak Lp was greater than that of either inhibitor alone. However, the mechanisms of inhibition by PMA and A23187 were different. While both 10(-7) and 10(-9) M PMA suppression are primarily post-cAMP, A23187 predominantly suppressed a pre-cAMP step: 10(-4) M chlorophenylthio-cAMP-induced peak Lp was not affected by 2 x 10(-8) M A23187, and only partially inhibited by 2 x 10(-6) M A23187. The PMA (10(-7) M) suppression of AVP-induced peak Lp was totally reversed by bath staurosporine (10(-7) M), a PKC inhibitor, but not attenuated by either bath indomethacin (5 x 10(-6) M) or low Ca (1-2 x 10(-6) M) bath medium. In contrast, the A23187 (2 x 10(-8) M) suppression of the peak Lp was not affected by staurosporine, but was significantly reversed by indomethacin or low Ca bath medium. We conclude: (a) Elevation of [Ca++]i, as well as activation of PKC, suppresses the hydroosmotic effect of

  17. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  18. The Role of Nanomaterials in Translational Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lavik, Erin; von Recum, Horst

    2011-01-01

    There are a range of definitions for nanomaterials and a range of length scales that are considered nano, but one thing is consistent among fields: nanomaterials are small and special. Nanomaterials have the potential to have tremendous impact on medical treatments. In one example, nanomaterials are permitting the tracking of cells via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in clinical trials to assess the efficacy and safety of cellular therapies. In a second example, nanomaterials are acting as drug-delivery vehicles for the targeted delivery of therapies to increase efficacy and to reduce side effects. However, there are distinct challenges that must be considered in the development and application of these materials, including careful analysis of the distribution and clearance of nanomaterials and their potential off-target effects. By carefully assessing materials early in their development at the bench, one may be able to move successful approaches through to the clinic more rapidly, which is indeed the goal of the field. For far too many conditions and diseases, the tools we have are less than adequate, and nanomaterials have the potential to fill that void. To realize this potential, investigators must be willing to invest time and resources to develop and to translate these technologies to the point where the risk is low enough that they have real, commercial possibilities. Working collaboratively and leveraging resources and experience play important roles in moving technologies through preclinical and clinical testing. It requires incredible dedication of teams of researchers, but the result is new treatments and therapies. PMID:21604811

  19. Involvement of the antioxidative property of morusin in blocking phorbol ester-induced malignant transformation of JB6 P(+) mouse epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pai-Shan; Hu, Chao-Chin; Wang, Chau-Jong; Lee, Yean-Jang; Chung, Wei-Chia; Tseng, Tsui-Hwa

    2017-02-25

    Chemoprevention has been acknowledged as an important and practical strategy for managing cancer. We have previously synthesized morusin, a prenylated flavonoid that exhibits anti-cancer progression activity. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-cancer promotion potential of morusin by using the mouse epidermal JB6 P(+) cell model. Extensive evidence shows that tumor promotion by phorbol esters is due to the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, the effect of morusin on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced ROS production was assessed. Noncytotoxic concentrations of morusin were found to dose-dependently reduce TPA-induced ROS production. Moreover, morusin inhibited TPA-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation, which can mediate cell proliferation and malignant transformation. Furthermore, morusin inhibited the TPA upregulation of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which may be regulated by AP-1 and NF-κB. In addition, noncytotoxic concentrations of morusin reduced the TPA-promoted cell growth of JB6 P(+) cells and inhibited TPA-induced malignant properties, such as cytoskeletal rearrangement and cell migration of JB6 P(+) cells. Similar to the effects of glutathione (GSH) pretreatment, morusin inhibited TPA-induced expression of N-cadeherin and vimentin, which are malignant cell surface proteins. Finally, morusin treatment dose-dependently suppressed the TPA-induced anchorage-independent cell transformation of JB6 P(+) cells. In conclusion, our results evidence that morusin possesses anti-cancer promotion potential because of its antioxidant property, which mediates multiple transformation-associated gene expression.

  20. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2010-05-11

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  1. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2012-10-02

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  2. Endotoxin contamination of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Esch, R Keith; Han, Li; Foarde, Karin K; Ensor, David S

    2010-03-01

    Endotoxin has established health impacts and may be a potential confounding factor in toxicity studies of engineered nanomaterials (ENM). We aimed to characterize endotoxin contamination for a representative set of carbon-based ENM. The established method for quantifying endotoxin relies on its activity in a complex biochemical assay system. Because of their physical and chemical properties, measurement of endotoxin associated with many ENM presents non-trivial technical challenges. We have made progress in identifying and implementing methods for ENM analysis with respect to endotoxin content, revealing varying levels of endotoxin contamination in the ENM examined here. The physical association of ENM and endotoxin and their shared physiological effects suggest the possibility that contaminating endotoxin may contribute to the toxicity that is ascribed to ENM. We found in this small number of samples that endotoxin levels were not related to type of ENM or surface area but may be introduced randomly during manufacture.

  3. Nanomaterials for Electronics and Optoelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes(CNTs), graphene, and inorganic nanowires(INWs) have shown interesting electronic, mechanical, optical, thermal, and other properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of applications by the nanotechnology community ranging from electronics to nanocomposites. While the first two are carbon-based materials, the INWs in the literature include silicon, germanium, III-V, II-VI, a variety of oxides, nitrides, antimonides and others. In this talk, first an overview of growth of these three classes of materials by CVD and PECVD will be presented along with results from characterization. Then applications in development of chemical sensors, biosensors, energy storage devices and novel memory architectures will be discussed.

  4. Green chemistry of carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Basiuk, Elena V; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of looking for more ecologically friendly, "green" techniques manifested itself in the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials. The main principles of green chemistry emphasize how important it is to avoid the use, or at least to reduce the consumption, of organic solvents for a chemical process. And it is precisely this aspect that was systematically addressed and emphasized by our research group since the very beginning of our work on the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials in early 2000s. The present review focuses on the results obtained to date on solvent-free techniques for (mainly covalent) functionalization of fullerene C60, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs, respectively), as well as nanodiamonds (NDs). We designed a series of simple and fast functionalization protocols based on thermally activated reactions with chemical compounds stable and volatile at 150-200 degrees C under reduced pressure, when not only the reactions take place at a high rate, but also excess reagents are spontaneously removed from the functionalized material, thus making its purification unnecessary. The main two classes of reagents are organic amines and thiols, including bifunctional ones, which can be used in conjunction with different forms of nanocarbons. The resulting chemical processes comprise nucleophilic addition of amines and thiols to fullerene C60 and to defect sites of pristine MWNTs, as well as direct amidation of carboxylic groups of oxidized nanotubes (mainly SWNTs) and ND. In the case of bifunctional amines and thiols, reactions of the second functional group can give rise to cross-linking effects, or be employed for further derivatization steps.

  5. Accelerating the Translation of Nanomaterials in Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Mitragotri, Samir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Chow, Edward K.; Ho, Dean; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mirkin, Chad A.; Petrosko, Sarah Hurst; Shi, Jinjun; Stevens, Molly M.; Sun, Shouheng; Teoh, Sweehin; Venkatraman, Subbu S.; Xia, Younan; Wang, Shutao; Gu, Zhen; Xu, Chenjie

    2017-01-01

    Due to their size and tailorable physicochemical properties, nanomaterials are an emerging class of structures utilized in biomedical applications. There are now many prominent examples of nanomaterials being used to improve human health, in areas ranging from imaging and diagnostics to therapeutics and regenerative medicine. An overview of these examples reveals several common areas of synergy and future challenges. This Nano Focus discusses the current status and future potential of promising nanomaterials and their translation from the laboratory to the clinic, by highlighting a handful of successful examples. PMID:26115196

  6. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  7. Nanomaterial Labels in Electrochemical Immunosensors and Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-12-15

    This article reviews recent advances in nanomaterial labels in electrochemical immunosensors and immunoassays. Various nanomaterial labels are discussed, including colloidal gold/silver, semiconductor nanoparticles, and markers loaded nanocarriers (carbon nanotubes, apoferritin, silica nanoparticles, and liposome beads). The enormous signal enhancement associated with the use of nanomaterial labels and with the formation of nanomaterial–antibody-antigen assemblies provides the basis for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of disease-related protein biomarkers, biothreat agents, or infectious agents. In general, all endeavors cited here are geared to achieve one or more of the following goals: signal amplification by several orders of magnitude, lower detection limits, and detecting multiple targets.

  8. Graphene-based nanomaterials and their electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pumera, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials are in the forefront of chemical research. This tutorial review provides an introduction to their electrochemistry, its fundamentals and applications. Selected examples of applications in energy storage and sensing are presented. The synthetic methods for preparing graphenes as well as their materials chemistry are thoroughly discussed, as they have a profound influence on the electronic and electrochemical behavior of graphene-related nanomaterials. Inherent electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of graphene nanomaterials is discussed thoroughly. Important application in sensing and energy storage areas are highlighted.

  9. Reproductive toxicity of carbon nanomaterials: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukova, I.; Gusev, A.; Tkachev, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the current review, we assembled the experimental evidences of an association between carbon nanomaterials including carbon black, graphite nanoplatelets, graphene, single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and fullerene exposure and adverse reproductive and developmental effects, in vitro and in vivo studies. It is shown that carbon nanomaterials reveal toxic effect on reproductive system and offspring development of the animals of various system groups to a certain degree depending on carbon crystal structure. Although this paper provides initial information about the potential male and female reproductive toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, further studies, using characterized nanoparticles, relevant routes of administration, and doses closely reflecting all the expected levels of exposure are needed.

  10. Nanomaterial Labels in Electrochemical Immunosensors and Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in nanomaterial labels in electrochemical immunosensors and immunoassays. Various nanomaterial labels are discussed, including colloidal gold/silver, semiconductor nanoparticles, and markers loaded nanocarriers (carbon nanotubes, apoferritin, silica nanoparticles, and liposome beads). The enormous signal enhancement associated with the use of nanomaterial labels and with the formation of nanomaterial–antibody-antigen assemblies provides the basis for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of disease-related protein biomarkers, biothreat agents, or infectious agents. In general, all endeavors cited here are geared to achieve one or more of the following goals: signal amplification by several orders of magnitude, lower detection limits, and detecting multiple targets. PMID:18371644

  11. Biophysical influence of airborne carbon nanomaterials on natural pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Valle, Russell P; Wu, Tony; Zuo, Yi Y

    2015-05-26

    Inhalation of nanoparticles (NP), including lightweight airborne carbonaceous nanomaterials (CNM), poses a direct and systemic health threat to those who handle them. Inhaled NP penetrate deep pulmonary structures in which they first interact with the pulmonary surfactant (PS) lining at the alveolar air-water interface. In spite of many research efforts, there is a gap of knowledge between in vitro biophysical study and in vivo inhalation toxicology since all existing biophysical models handle NP-PS interactions in the liquid phase. This technical limitation, inherent in current in vitro methodologies, makes it impossible to simulate how airborne NP deposit at the PS film and interact with it. Existing in vitro NP-PS studies using liquid-suspended particles have been shown to artificially inflate the no-observed adverse effect level of NP exposure when compared to in vivo inhalation studies and international occupational exposure limits (OELs). Here, we developed an in vitro methodology called the constrained drop surfactometer (CDS) to quantitatively study PS inhibition by airborne CNM. We show that airborne multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets induce a concentration-dependent PS inhibition under physiologically relevant conditions. The CNM aerosol concentrations controlled in the CDS are comparable to those defined in international OELs. Development of the CDS has the potential to advance our understanding of how submicron airborne nanomaterials affect the PS lining of the lung.

  12. Nanomaterials - Acetylcholinesterase Enzyme Matrices for Organophosphorus Pesticides Electrochemical Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Arun Prakash; Umasankar, Yogeswaran; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important cholinesterase enzyme present in the synaptic clefts of living organisms. It maintains the levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by catalyzing the hydrolysis reaction of acetylcholine to thiocholine. This catalytic activity of AChE is drastically inhibited by trace amounts of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides present in the environment. As a result, effective monitoring of OP pesticides in the environment is very desirable and has been done successfully in recent years with the use of nanomaterial-based AChE sensors. In such sensors, the enzyme AChE has been immobilized onto nanomaterials like multiwalled carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, zirconia nanoparticles, cadmium sulphide nano particles or quantum dots. These nanomaterial matrices promote significant enhancements of OP pesticide determinations, with the thiocholine oxidation occurring at much lower oxidation potentials. Moreover, nanomaterial-based AChE sensors with rapid response, increased operational and long storage stability are extremely well suited for OP pesticide determination over a wide concentration range. In this review, the unique advantages of using nanomaterials as AChE immobilization matrices are discussed. Further, detection limits, sensitivities and correlation coefficients obtained using various electroanalytical techniques have also been compared with chromatographic techniques. PMID:22408512

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Carbon nanomaterials in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Pu Chun; Qiao, Rui

    2007-09-01

    This paper intends to reflect, from the biophysical viewpoint, our current understanding on interfacing nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and fullerenes, with biological systems. Strategies for improving the solubility, and therefore, the bioavailability of nanomaterials in aqueous solutions are summarized. In particular, the underlining mechanisms of attaching biomacromolecules (DNA, RNA, proteins) and lysophospholipids onto carbon nanotubes and gallic acids onto fullerenes are analyzed. The diffusion and the cellular delivery of RNA-coated carbon nanotubes are characterized using fluorescence microscopy. The translocation of fullerenes across cell membranes is simulated using molecular dynamics to offer new insight into the complex issue of nanotoxicity. To assess the fate of nanomaterials in the environment, the biomodification of lipid-coated carbon nanotubes by the aquatic organism Daphnia magna is discussed. The aim of this paper is to illuminate the need for adopting multidisciplinary approaches in the field study of nanomaterials in biological systems and in the environment.

  14. Carbon-based nanomaterials for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sook Hee; Lee, Minah; Park, Chan Beum

    2013-02-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes possess unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties that present new opportunities for tissue engineering, a key field for the development of biological alternatives that repair or replace whole or a portion of tissue. Carbon nanomaterials can also provide a similar microenvironment as like a biological extracellular matrix in terms of chemical composition and physical structure, making them a potential candidate for the development of artificial scaffolds. In this review, we summarize recent research advances in the effects of carbon nanomaterial-based substrates on cellular behaviors, including cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteo- or neural- lineages. The development of 3D scaffolds based on carbon nanomaterials (or their composites with polymers and inorganic components) is introduced, and the potential of these constructs in tissue engineering, including toxicity issues, is discussed. Future perspectives and emerging challenges are also highlighted.

  15. Engineered nanomaterials: Exposures, hazards and risk prevention.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanotechnology presents the possibility of revolutionizing many aspects of our lives. People in many settings (academic, small and large industrial, and the general public) are either developing or using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). However, understanding of the health and sa...

  16. Assessing the Environmental Safety of Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanotechnology research in the United States is coordinated under the National Nano-technology Initiative with the goal of fostering development and implementation of nanomaterials and products that incorporate them and assuring that they are environmentally safe. The environmen...

  17. Techniques for physicochemical characterization of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping-Chang; Lin, Stephen; Wang, Paul C.; Sridhar, Rajagopalan

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have opened up a new era of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases and traumatic injuries. Nanomaterials, including those with potential for clinical applications, possess novel physicochemical properties that have an impact on their physiological interactions, from the molecular level to the systemic level. There is a lack of standardized methodologies or regulatory protocols for detection or characterization of nanomaterials. This review summarizes the techniques that are commonly used to study the size, shape, surface properties, composition, purity and stability of nanomaterials, along with their advantages and disadvantages. At present there are no FDA guidelines that have been developed specifically for nanomaterial based formulations for diagnostic or therapeutic use. There is an urgent need for standardized protocols and procedures for the characterization of nanoparticles, especially those that are intended for use as theranostics. PMID:24252561

  18. Review of ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following is a letter report from the Executive Committee of the BOSC concerning the review of the ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop: Developing a Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Research Strategy for Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide.

  19. The Neurotoxic Potential of Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    The expanding development and production of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have diverse and far-reaching potential benefits in consumer products, food, drugs, medical devices and for enhancing environmental cleanup and remediation. The knowledge of potential implications of ENMs...

  20. Method to synthesize metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-13

    Metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials can be synthesized from metal alkoxide precursors by solution precipitation or solvothermal processing. The synthesis routes are more scalable, less complex and easier to implement than other synthesis routes.

  1. Conversion of protein kinase C from a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent to an independent form of phorbol ester-binding protein by digestion with trypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.P.; Huang, F.L.

    1986-08-29

    Tryptic fragments of protein kinase C containing the kinase (45 KDa) and phorbol ester-binding activity (38 KDa) were separated by Mono O column chromatography. The purified phorbol ester-binding fragment exhibits a higher affinity for phosphatidylserine than the native enzyme but comparable Kd for (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate as the native enzyme. This proteolytic fragment binds phorbol ester equally efficient either in the presence or absence of Ca/sup 2 +/ and the addition of the kinase fragment did not restore the Ca/sup 2 +/-requirement for the binding. These results indicate that protein kinase C is composed of two functionally distinct units which can be expressed independently after limited proteolysis with trypsin.

  2. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Estefania P.; Rochael, Natalia C.; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B.; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S.; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M.; Palhano, Fernando L.; Foguel, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation. PMID:26198639

  3. Exposure assessment approaches for engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Linda C; Maynard, Andrew D

    2010-11-01

    Products based on nanotechnology are rapidly emerging in the marketplace, sometimes with little notice to consumers of their nanotechnology pedigree. This wide variety of nanotechnology products will result (in some cases) in unintentional human exposure to purposely engineered nanoscale materials via the dermal, inhalation, ingestion, and ocular pathways. Occupational, consumer, and environmental exposure to the nanomaterials should be characterized during the entire product lifecycle-manufacture, use, and disposal. Monitoring the fate and transport of engineered nanomaterials is complicated by the lack of detection techniques and the lack of a defined set of standardized metrics to be consistently measured. New exposure metrics may be required for engineered nanomaterials, but progress is possible by building on existing tools. An exposure metric matrix could organize existing data by relating likely exposure pathways (dermal, inhalation, ocular, ingestion) with existing measurements of important characteristics of nanoscale materials (particle number, mass, size distribution, charge). Nanomaterial characteristics not commonly measured, but shown to initiate a biological response during toxicity testing, signal a need for further research, such as the pressing need to develop monitoring devices capable of measuring those aspects of engineered nanomaterials that result in biological responses in humans. Modeling the behavior of nanoparticles may require new types of exposure models that individually track particles through the environment while keeping track of the particle shape, surface area, and other surface characteristics as the nanoparticles are transformed or become reactive. Lifecycle analysis could also be used to develop conceptual models of exposure from engineered nanomaterials.

  4. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature and then crossing the blood-retinal barrier; and through the choroidal blood supply, crossing the Bruch's membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The blood-retinal barrier is functionally similar to the blood-brain barrier, normally restricting transport of larger sized materials, but particles in the lower nanomaterial size range can be expected to transit. The blood flow to the retinal choroid is, on a tissue mass basis, one of the highest in the body raising the potential for rapid delivery of nanomaterials to the RPE. In vitro, RPE cells rapidly uptake nano particles, transport and agglomerate them in the perinuclear cytoplasm. In vivo studies have shown that the eye can uptake nanomaterials and retain them longer than many other tissues after cessation of exposure. Toxicity from nanomaterials to the neural retina or the RPE would be expected to follow common mechanisms identified for other tissues including generation of reactive oxygen species, alteration of cellular redox status, altered intracellular signaling, and release of toxic metal ions from soluble metallic particles. The retina and other ocular tissues, however, have potential for additional phototoxic mechanism

  5. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renyuan; Zhang, Lianbin; Wang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits. It is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will hinge upon further developments in nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes on `design-for-purpose' and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress in rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil-water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid to the chemical concepts related to nanomaterial design throughout the review.

  6. Nanomaterial-mediated Biosensors for Monitoring Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Masashige; Ptitsyn, Andre; McLamore, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of physiological glucose transport is crucial for gaining new understanding of diabetes. Many techniques and equipment currently exist for measuring glucose, but these techniques are limited by complexity of the measurement, requirement of bulky equipment, and low temporal/spatial resolution. The development of various types of biosensors (eg, electrochemical, optical sensors) for laboratory and/or clinical applications will provide new insights into the cause(s) and possible treatments of diabetes. State-of-the-art biosensors are improved by incorporating catalytic nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, electrospun nanofibers, and quantum dots. These nanomaterials greatly enhance biosensor performance, namely sensitivity, response time, and limit of detection. A wide range of new biosensors that incorporate nanomaterials such as lab-on-chip and nanosensor devices are currently being developed for in vivo and in vitro glucose sensing. These real-time monitoring tools represent a powerful diagnostic and monitoring tool for measuring glucose in diabetes research and point of care diagnostics. However, concerns over the possible toxicity of some nanomaterials limit the application of these devices for in vivo sensing. This review provides a general overview of the state of the art in nanomaterial-mediated biosensors for in vivo and in vitro glucose sensing, and discusses some of the challenges associated with nanomaterial toxicity. PMID:24876594

  7. Ric-8A gene deletion or phorbol ester suppresses tumorigenesis in a mouse model of GNAQQ209L-driven melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, B R; Tall, G G

    2016-01-01

    Ric-8A alleles. Our work defines two new rational targets that may be developed as potential uveal melanoma therapies through reduction of Gαq/11-Q209L oncoprotein abundance: (1) Ric-8A inhibition and (2) phorbol ester treatment. PMID:27348266

  8. Alterations in polyamine levels induced by phorbol diesters and other agents that promote differentiation in human promyelocytic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.; Weeks, C.; Herrmann, A.; Callaham, M.; Slaga, T.

    1981-02-01

    Polyamine levels were evaluated in human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells after treatment with inducers of terminal differentiation. Differentiation in these cells was determined by increases in the percentage of morphologically mature cells and in lysozyme activity. Treatment of the HL-60 cells with phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate or other inducers of terminal differentiation such as dimethylsulfoxide and retinoic acid resulted in increased levels of putrescine. However, no increase in putrescine could be detected after PMA treatment of a HL-60 cell variant that exhibited a decreased susceptibility to PMA-induced terminal differentiation. Similarly, no increase in putrescine was observed with two nontumor-promoters (phorbol 12,13-diacetate and 4-O-methyl-PMA) or with anthralin, a non-phorbol tumor promoter. In addition to enhancing putrescine levels, PMA also increased the amount of spermidine and decreased the amount of spermine. The increase in putrescine and spermidine preceded the expression of the various differentiation markers. Unlike the changes observed in the polyamine levels after PMA treatment, the activities of ornithine and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases, which are polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, did not significantly change. ..cap alpha..-Methylornithine and ..cap alpha..-difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), which are inhibitors of the polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, did not affect differentiation in control or PMA-treated cells. Because of these observations, we suggest that the change in polyamine levels involve biochemical pathways other than the known biosynthetic ones. By-products of these pathways may perhaps be the controlling factors involved in the induction of terminal differentiation in the HL-60 and other cell types as well.

  9. Distinct PKC isoforms mediate the activation of cPLA2 and adenylyl cyclase by phorbol ester in RAW264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-W; Chen, Bin C

    1998-01-01

    The modulatory effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and adenylyl cyclase (AC) have recently been described. Since the signalling cascades associated with these events play critical roles in various functions of macrophages, we set out to investigate the crosstalk between PKC and the cPLA2 and AC pathways in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages and to determine the involvement of individual PKC isoforms. The cPLA2 and AC pathways were studied by measuring the potentiation by the phorbol ester PMA of ionomycin-induced arachidonic acid (AA) release and prostagladin E1 (PGE1)-stimulated cyclic AMP production, respectively.PMA at 1 μM caused a significant increase in AA release both in the presence (371%) and absence (67%) of ionomycin induction, while exposure of RAW 264.7 cells to PMA increased PGE1 stimulation of cyclic AMP levels by 208%.Treatment of cells with staurosporine and Ro 31-8220 inhibited the PMA-induced potentiation of both AA release and cyclic AMP accumulation, while Go 6976 (an inhibitor of classical PKC isoforms) and LY 379196 (a specific inhibitor of PKCβ) inhibited the AA response but failed to affect the enhancement of the cyclic AMP response by PMA.Long term pretreatment of cells with PMA abolished the subsequent effect of PMA in potentiating AA release, but only inhibited the cyclic AMP response by 42%.Neither PD 98059, an inhibitor of MEK, nor genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, had any effect on the ability of PMA to potentiate AA or cyclic AMP production.The potentiation of AA release, but not of cyclic AMP formation, by PMA was sensitive to inhibition by wortmannin. This effect was unrelated to the inhibition of PKC activation as deduced from the translocation of PKC activity to the cell membrane.Western blot analysis revealed the presence of eight PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, δ, ε, μ λ and ξ) in RAW 264.7 cells and PMA was shown to induce the translocation of the α, βI, βII,

  10. Enhanced histamine production through the induction of histidine decarboxylase expression by phorbol ester in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yusuke; Kako, Koichiro; Kim, Jun-Dal; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2012-11-01

    Histamine (HA), a mediator of inflammation, type I allergic responses and neurotransmission, is synthesized from L-histidine, the reaction of which is catalyzed by histidine decarboxylase (HDC). HDC has been reported to be induced by various stimuli, not only in mast cells and basophils, but also in T lymphocytes and macrophages. Although its mRNA has been shown to be increased in Jurkat cells when treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), little is known concerning the induced production of HA by HDC. The present study quantified the trace amounts of intracellular HA using ultra-high liquid chromatography in combination with the 6-aminoquinoline carbamate-derivatization technique. To test whether the cellular level of HA is elevated by the induction of HDC in Jurkat cells treated with TPA, the peak corresponding to authentic HA in the cell lysate was fractioned and its molecular weight determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results of this study show that the HA level is increased by the induction of HDC expression by TPA in Jurkat cells. Therefore, this method is useful in elucidating the physiological significance of HA production.

  11. Increased phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) receptor function associated with sickle red cell membrane ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, M.; Nair, C.N.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    The biological receptor for tumor-promoting phorbol esters has been identified as the CaS /phospholipid dependent enzyme, protein kinase C. In the red cell, this enzyme is mainly cytosolic but becomes translocated to the membrane if the cellular CaS is allowed to rise. Since cellular CaS in sickle red cells is high, it was reasoned that this enzyme may become more membrane-bound. In fact, the authors noticed a four-fold increase in the binding of TH-PDBu by membrane ghosts isolated from sickle red cells compared to normal red cells (pmoles PDBu bound/mg protein; normal = 0.3 vs sickle cell = 1.4). Attempts to assay the enzyme directly as phospholipid-activated TSP incorporation into the acid-precipitable membrane proteins also indicated a two-fold increase in the radiolabelling of sickle cell membrane ghosts. Autophosphorylation of membrane proteins and analysis of the phosphorylation profile by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography revealed phosphorylation predominantly of bands 3, 4.1 and 4.9 which are known protein kinase C substrates for the red cell enzyme. The increased membrane-associated protein kinase C in sickle red cells may have a bearing on the altered membrane properties reported in this condition.

  12. Contraction of rat thoracic aorta strips induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, H.; Lederis, K.

    1987-02-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced a slow and progressive increase in tension of rat thoracic aorta strips in the presence of extracellular CaS . Complete relaxation could not be obtained in CaS -free buffer containing 1 mM ethyleneglycol-bis(US -aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 10 X M PMA. In the absence of extracellular CaS , PMA (10 X M) induced a small but sustained contraction which was not altered by the addition of another 2 mM EGTA and 3 x 10 V M verapamil. Papaverine (10 U M) relaxed the PMA-induced contraction to the base line, but phentolamine (10 V M), cyproheptadine (10 V M), atropine (10 V M) and tetrodotoxine (10 W M) did not change the contraction. CaS -depleted muscle strips, prepared by four repeated applications of 10 X M norepinephrine in CaS -free buffer, were contracted by 10 X M PMA, but at a lower maximum tension than nontreated strips. The action of PMA on rat aorta strips in CaS -free buffer did not require the presence of the adventitial layer or endothelial cells. These results suggest that PMA may induce activation of protein kinase C and smooth muscle contraction in the absence of extracellular CaS , without an increase in myoplasmic CaS .

  13. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell–protein or cell–cell contact was also demonstrated. PMID:27994457

  14. Insulin and phorbol ester stimulate conductive Na/sup +/ transport through a common pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Civan, M.M.; Peterson-Yantorno, K.; O'Brien, T.G.

    1988-02-01

    Insulin stimulates Na/sup +/ transport across frog skin, toad urinary bladder, and the distal renal nephron. This stimulation reflects an increase in apical membrane Na/sup +/ permeability and a stimulation of the basolateral membrane Na,K-exchange pump. Considerable indirect evidence has suggested that the apical natriferic effect of insulin is mediated by activation of protein kinase C. However, no direct information has been available documenting that insulin and protein kinase C indeed share a common pathway in stimulating Na/sup +/ transport across frog skin. In the present work, the authors have studied the interaction of insulin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a documented activator of protein kinase C. Preincubation of skins with 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, another activator of protein kinase C, increases baseline Na/sup +/ transport and reduces the subsequent natriferic response to PMA. Preincubation with PMA markedly reduces the subsequent natriferic action of insulin. This effect does not appear to primarily reflect PMA-induced internalization of insulin receptors. The insulin receptors are localized on the basolateral surface of frog skin, but the application of PMA to this surface is much less effective than mucosal treatment in reducing the response to insulin. The current results provide documentation that insulin and protein kinase C share a common pathway in stimulating Na/sup +/ transport across frog skin. The data are consistent with the concept that the natriferic effect of insulin on frog skin is, at least in part, mediated by activation of protein kinase C.

  15. Potentiation of phorbol ester-induced coronary vasoconstriction in dogs following endothelium disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.B.; Ku, D.D.

    1986-03-05

    In the present study, the effect of phorbol ester, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), activation of protein kinase C on coronary vascular reactivity was studied in isolated dog coronary arteries. Addition of TPA (10-100 nM) produced a slow, time- and dose-dependent contraction reaching a maximum at approx 2-3 hrs and was essentially irreversible upon washing. Disruption of the endothelium(EC) greatly accelerated the development as well as increase the magnitude of TPA contraction (50-100%). Prior treatment of vessels with phentolamine (1..mu..M), cyproheptadine (1..mu..H) and ibuprofen (1..mu..g/ml) did not alter the TPA contraction. Furthermore, in contrast to previously reported calcium-dependence of TPA contraction in other vessels, complete removal of extracellular calcium (Ca/sub 0/) or addition of 1..mu..M nimodipine after TPA(30nM) resulted in only 32 +/- 4% and 25 +/- 3% reversal of TPA contraction, respectively. Addition of amiloride (10..mu..M to 1mM), however, resulted in a dose-dependent reversal of TPA contraction. The results of the present study indicate that a similar activation of protein kinase C by TPA leads to potent coronary vasoconstriction, which is not completely dependent on Ca/sub 0/. More importantly, these results further support their hypothesis that EC also functions as an inhibitory barrier to prevent circulating vasoconstrictors from exerting their deleterious constrictory effects.

  16. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell-protein or cell-cell contact was also demonstrated.

  17. Rapid isolation and purification of phorbol esters from Jatropha curcas by high-speed countercurrent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wan; Hu, Huiling; Chen, Fang; Tang, Lin; Peng, Tong; Wang, Zhanguo

    2015-03-18

    In this work, a high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) method was established for the preparation of phorbol esters (PEs) from Jatropha curcas. n-Hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1.5:1.5:1.2:0.5, v/v) was selected as the optimum two-phase solvent system to separate and purify jatropha factor C1 (JC1) with a purity of 85.2%, as determined by HPLC, and to obtain a mixture containing four or five PEs. Subsequently, continuous semipreparative HPLC was applied to further purify JC1 (99.8% as determined by HPLC). In addition, UPLC-PDA and UPLC-MS were established and successfully used to evaluate the isolated JC1 and PE-rich crude extract. The purity of JC1 was only 87.8% by UPLC-UV. A peak (a compound highly similar to JC1) was indentified as the isomer of JC1 by comparing the characteristic UV absorption and MS spectra. Meanwhile, this strategy was also applied to analyze the PE-rich crude extract from J. curcas. It is interesting that there may be more than 15 PEs according to the same quasi-molecular ion peaks, highly similar sequence-specific fragment ions, and similar UV absorption spectrum.

  18. Hybrid upconversion nanomaterials for optogenetic neuronal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shreyas; Liu, Jing-Jing; Pasquale, Nicholas; Lai, Jinping; McGowan, Heather; Pang, Zhiping P.; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by embedding upconversion nanomaterials, which can convert NIR light to blue luminescence, into polymeric scaffolds. These hybrid nanomaterial scaffolds allowed for NIR-mediated neuronal stimulation, with comparable efficiency as that of 470 nm blue light. Our platform was optimized for NIR-mediated optogenetic control by balancing multiple physicochemical properties of the nanomaterial (e.g. size, morphology, structure, emission spectra, concentration), thus providing an early demonstration of rationally-designing nanomaterial-based strategies for advanced neural applications.Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by

  19. Signal Amplification of Bioassay Using Zinc Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Chad L.

    An emerging trend in the analytical detection sciences is the employment of nanomaterials for bioassay signal transduction to identify analytes critical to public health. These nanomaterials have been specifically investigated for applications which require identification of trace levels of cells, proteins, or other molecules that can have broad ranging impacts to human health in fields such as clinical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, food and drink control, and the prevention of bioterrorism. Oftentimes these nanoparticle-based signal transduction or amplification approaches offer distinct advantages over conventional methods such as increased sensitivity, rapidity, or stability. The biological application of nanoparticles however, does suffer from drawbacks that have limited more widespread adoption of these techniques. Some of these drawbacks are, high cost and toxicity, arduous synthesis methods, functionalization and bioconjugation challenges, and laboratory disposal and environmental hazard issues, all of which have impeded the progression of this technology in some way or another. This work aims at developing novel techniques that offer solutions to a number of these hurdles through the development of new nanoparticle-based signal transduction approaches and the description of a previously undescribed nanomaterial. Zinc-based nanomaterials offer the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations that are encountered when other nanomaterials are employed for bioassay signal transduction. On the other hand, the biological application of zinc nanomaterials has been difficult because in general their fluorescence is in the blue range and the reported quantum yields are usually too low for highly sensitive applications. The advantages of using zinc nanomaterials for biological applications, such as reduced toxicity, simple synthesis, low cost, and straightforward functionalization strategies contribute to the research interest in their application as

  20. Antibacterial activities of tellurium nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zong-Hong; Lee, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-05-01

    We prepared four differently shaped Te nanomaterials (NMs) as antibacterial reagents against Escherichia coli. By controlling the concentrations of hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) as reducing agent, NaCl, and temperature, we prepared Te nanowires, nanopencils, nanorices, and nanocubes. These four Te NMs resulted in a live/dead ratio of E. coli cells of less than 0.1, which is smaller than that of Ag nanoparticles. The order of antibacterial activity against E. coli is nanocubes ≈ nanorices > nanopencils ≈ nanowires. This is in good agreement with the concentration order of tellurite (TeO(3)(2-)) ions released from Te NMs in E. coli cells, revealing that TeO(3)(2-) ions account for the antibacterial activity of the four Te NMs. We found that spherical Te nanoparticles (32 nm in diameter) with TeO(3)(2-) ions were formed in the E. coli cells. Compared to Ag nanoparticles that are commonly used as antibacterial reagents, Te NMs have higher antibacterial activity and lower toxicity. Thus, Te NMs hold great practical potential as a new and efficient antibacterial agent.

  1. Health implications of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroiusti, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, a growing number of people are expected to be exposed to its products, the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Some physico-chemical properties of ENMs, linked to their size in the nanoscale (1-100 nm), make them potentially more reactive, and therefore raise concern about possible adverse effects in humans. In this article, I discuss human diseases which may be predicted after exposure to ENMs, and how their pathogenetic mechanisms may be linked to exposure; in this regard, special emphasis has been given to the triad of oxidative stress/inflammation/genotoxicity and to the interaction of ENMs/proteins in different biological compartments. The analysis of possible adverse effects has been made on an organ-by-organ basis, starting from the skin, respiratory system and gastrointestinal tract. These sites are in fact not only those exposed to the highest amounts of ENMs, but are also the portals of entry to internal organs for possible systemic effects. Although the list and the relevance of possible human disorders linked to ENM exposure are at least as impressive as that of their direct or indirect beneficial effects for human health, we must be clear that ENM-linked diseases belong to the realm of possible risk (i.e. cannot be excluded, but are unlikely), whereas ENMs with proven beneficial effects are on the market. Therefore, the mandatory awareness about possible adverse effects of ENMs should in no way be interpreted as a motivation to disregard the great opportunity represented by nanotechnology.

  2. [Modern toxicology of magnetic nanomaterials].

    PubMed

    Cywińska, Monika A; Grudziński, Ireneusz P

    2012-01-01

    Current advances in nanobiotechnology have led to the development of new field of nanomedicine, which includes many applications of nano(bio)materials for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes (theranostics). Major expectations and challenges are on bioengineered magnetic nanoparticles when their come to delivering drug compounds, especially to targeting anticancer drugs to specific molecular endpoints in cancer therapy. The unique physicochemical properties of these nanoparticles offer great promise in modern cancer nanomedicine to provide new technological breakthroughs, such as guided drug and gene delivery, magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, tissue engineering, cancer cell tracking and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. Along with the expanding interest in bio-engineered magnetic nanoproducts their potential toxicity has become one of the major concerns. To date, a number of recent scientific evidences suggest that certain properties of magnetic nanoparticles (e.g., enhanced reactive area, ability to cross cell membranes, resistance to biodegradation) may amplify their cytotoxic potential relative to bulk non-nanoscale counterparts. In other words, safety assessment developed for ordinary magnetic materials may be of limited use in determining the health and environmental risks of the novel bio-engineered magnetic nanoproducts. In the present paper we discuss the main directions of research conducted to assess the toxicity of magnetic nanocompounds in experimental in vitro and in vivo models, pointing to the key issues concerning the toxicological analysis of magnetic nanomaterials. In addition new research directions of nanotoxicological studies elucidating the importance of developing alternative methods for testing magnetic nano(bio)products are also presented.

  3. Envelopment-Internalization Synergistic Effects and Metabolic Mechanisms of Graphene Oxide on Single-Cell Chlorella vulgaris Are Dependent on the Nanomaterial Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Shaohu; Hu, Xiangang; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-08-19

    The interactions between nanomaterials and cells are fundamental in biological responses to nanomaterials. However, the size-dependent synergistic effects of envelopment and internalization as well as the metabolic mechanisms of nanomaterials have remained unknown. The nanomaterials tested here were larger graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS) and small graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQD). GONS intensively entrapped single-celled Chlorella vulgaris, and envelopment by GONS reduced the cell permeability. In contrast, GOQD-induced remarkable shrinkage of the plasma membrane and then enhanced cell permeability through strong internalization effects such as plasmolysis, uptake of nanomaterials, an oxidative stress increase, and inhibition of cell division and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Metabolomics analysis showed that amino acid metabolism was sensitive to nanomaterial exposure. Shrinkage of the plasma membrane is proposed to be linked to increases in the isoleucine levels. The inhibition of cell division and chlorophyll a biosynthesis was associated with decreases in aspartic acid and serine, the precursors of chlorophyll a. The increases in mitochondrial membrane potential loss and oxidative stress were correlated with an increase in linolenic acid. The above metabolites can be used as indicators of the corresponding biological responses. These results enhance our systemic understanding of the size-dependent biological effects of nanomaterials.

  4. Biological and ecological responses to carbon-based nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnikova, Tatsiana A.

    This dissertation examines the biological and ecological responses to carbon nanoparticles, a major class of nanomaterials which have been mass produced and extensively studied for their rich physical properties and commercial values. Chapter I of this dissertation offers a comprehensive review on the structures, properties, applications, and implications of carbon nanomaterials, especially related to the perspectives of biological and ecosystems. Given that there are many types of carbon nanomaterials available, this chapter is focused on three major types of carbon-based nanomaterials only, namely, fullerenes, single walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. On the whole organism level, specifically, Chapter II presents a first study on the fate of fullerenes and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in rice plants, which was facilitated by the self assembly of these nanomaterials with NOM. The aspects of fullerene uptake, translocation, biodistribution, and generational transfer in the plants were examined and quantified using bright field and electron microscopy, FT-Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy. The uptake and transport of fullerene in the plant vascular system were attributed to water transpiration, convection, capillary force, and the fullerene concentration gradient from the roots to the leaves of the plants. On the cellular level, Chapter III documents the differential uptake of hydrophilic C60(OH)20 vs. amphiphilic C70-NOM complex in Allium cepa plant cells and HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. This study was conducted using a plant cell viability assay, and complemented by bright field, fluorescence and electron microscopy imaging. In particular, C60(OH)20 and C70-NOM showed contrasting uptake in both the plant and mammalian cells, due to their significant differences in physicochemistry and the presence of an extra hydrophobic plant cell wall in the plant cells. Consequently, C60(OH)20 was found to induce toxicity in Allium cepa cells but not in HT-29 cells, while C70

  5. Antioxidant and Antiradical Activities of Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae) Leaves and Other Selected Tropical Green Vegetables Investigated on Lipoperoxidation and Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) Activated Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tsumbu, Cesar N.; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Tits, Monique; Angenot, Luc; Franck, Thierry; Serteyn, Didier; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange

    2011-01-01

    Abelmoschus esculentus (Malvaceae), Hibiscus acetosella (Malvaceae), Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae) and Pteridium aquilinum (Dennstaedtiaceae) leaves are currently consumed as vegetables by migrants from sub-Saharan Africa living in Western Europe and by the people in the origin countries, where these plants are also used in the folk medicine. Manihot leaves are also eaten in Latin America and some Asian countries. This work investigated the capacity of aqueous extracts prepared from those vegetables to inhibit the peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion. Short chain, volatile C-compounds as markers of advanced lipid peroxidation were measured by gas chromatography by following the ethylene production. The generation of lipid hydroperoxides, was monitored by spectroscopy using N-N′-dimethyl-p-phenylene-diamine (DMPD). The formation of intermediate peroxyl, and other free radicals, at the initiation of the lipid peroxidation was investigated by electron spin resonance, using α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone as spin trap agent. The ability of the extracts to decrease the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in “inflammation like” conditions was studied by fluorescence technique using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescine-diacetate as fluorogenic probe, in a cell model of human monocytes (HL-60 cells) activated with phorbol ester. Overall the extracts displayed efficient concentration-dependent inhibitory effects. Their total polyphenol and flavonoid content was determined by classic colorimetric methods. An HPLC-UV/DAD analysis has clearly identified the presence of some polyphenolic compounds, which explains at least partially the inhibitions observed in our models. The role of these plants in the folk medicine by sub-Saharan peoples as well as in the prevention of oxidative stress and ROS related diseases requires further consideration. PMID:22254126

  6. PP2B-mediated Dephosphorylation of c-Jun C Terminus Regulates Phorbol Ester-induced c-Jun/Sp1 Interaction in A431 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ben-Kuen; Huang, Chi-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chen, Yun-Ju; Kikkawa, Ushio; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2007-01-01

    The c-Jun/Sp1 interaction is essential for growth factor- and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced genes expression, including human 12(S)-lipoxygenase, keratin 16, cytosolic phospholipase A2, p21WAF1/CIP1, and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β4. Here, we examined the mechanism underlying the PMA-induced regulation on the interaction between c-Jun and Sp1. We found that treatment of cells with PMA induced a dephosphorylation at the C terminus of c-Jun at Ser-243 and a concomitant inhibition of PP2B by using PP2B small interfering RNA, resulting in reduction of PMA-induced gene expression as well as the c-Jun/Sp1 interaction. The c-Jun mutant TAM-67-3A, which contains three substitute alanines at Thr-231, Ser-243, and Ser-249 compared with TAM-67, binds more efficaciously with Sp1 and is about twice as efficacious as TAM-67 in inhibiting the PMA-induced activation of the 12(S)-lipoxygenase promoter. Importantly, PP2B not only dephosphorylates the c-Jun at Ser-243 but also interacts with c-Jun in PMA-treated cells. PMA stimulates the association of the PP2B/c-Jun/Sp1 complex with the promoter. These findings indicate the dephosphorylation of c-Jun C terminus is required for the c-Jun/Sp1 interaction and reveal that PP2B plays an important role in regulating c-Jun/Sp1 interaction in PMA-induced gene expression. PMID:17215518

  7. Phorbol ester-treated human acute myeloid leukemia cells secrete G-CSF, GM-CSF and erythroid differentiation factor into serum-free media in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Scher, W; Eto, Y; Ejima, D; Den, T; Svet-Moldavsky, I A

    1990-12-10

    Upon treatment with the phorbol ester, tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (PMA), peripheral mononuclear blood cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia secrete into serum-free cell-conditioned media (PMA-CCM) at least three distinct nondialysable 'hematopoietic' factors: granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and erythroid differentiation factor (EDF, activin A). G-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a G-CSF-responsive cell line, NSF-60, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a G-CSF-specific monoclonal antibody (MAB). GM-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a GM-CSF-responsive line, TALL-101, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a GM-CSF-specific MAB. EDF was identified by its ability to stimulate erythroid differentiation in mouse erythroleukemia cell lines, its identical retention times to those of authentic EDF on three successive reverse-phase HPLC columns and characterization of its penultimate N-terminal residue as leucine which is the same as that of authentic EDF. Both authentic EDF and the erythroid-stimulating activity in PMA-CCM were found to act synergistically with a suboptimal inducing concentration of a well-studied inducing agent, dimethyl sulfoxide, in inducing erythroid differentiation. In addition, a fourth activity was observed in PMA-CCM: normal human fetal bone marrow cell-proliferation stimulating activity (FBMC-PSA). FBMC-PSA was identified by its ability to stimulate the growth of granulocytes and macrophages in FBMC suspension cultures, which neither recombinant G-CSF or GM-CSF were found to do.

  8. Nanomaterials based electrochemical sensors for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aicheng; Chatterjee, Sanghamitra

    2013-06-21

    A growing variety of sensors have increasingly significant impacts on everyday life. Key issues to take into consideration toward the integration of biosensing platforms include the demand for minimal costs and the potential for real time monitoring, particularly for point-of-care applications where simplicity must also be considered. In light of these developmental factors, electrochemical approaches are the most promising candidate technologies due to their simplicity, high sensitivity and specificity. The primary focus of this review is to highlight the utility of nanomaterials, which are currently being studied for in vivo and in vitro medical applications as robust and tunable diagnostic and therapeutic platforms. Highly sensitive and precise nanomaterials based biosensors have opened up the possibility of creating novel technologies for the early-stage detection and diagnosis of disease related biomarkers. The attractive properties of nanomaterials have paved the way for the fabrication of a wide range of electrochemical sensors that exhibit improved analytical capacities. This review aims to provide insights into nanomaterials based electrochemical sensors and to illustrate their benefits in various key biomedical applications. This emerging discipline, at the interface of chemistry and the life sciences, offers a broad palette of opportunities for researchers with interests that encompass nanomaterials synthesis, supramolecular chemistry, controllable drug delivery and targeted theranostics in biology and medicine.

  9. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, D. H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  10. Biopharmaceutics and Therapeutic Potential of Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Chen, Chunying; Zhao, Yuliang; Jia, Lee; Wang, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials are at the leading edge of the rapidly developing nanosciences and are founding an important class of new materials with specific physicochemical properties different from bulk materials with the same compositions. The potential for nanomaterials is rapidly expanding with novel applications constantly being explored in different areas. The unique size-dependent properties of nanomaterials make them very attractive for pharmaceutical applications. Investigations of physical, chemical and biological properties of engineered nanomaterials have yielded valuable information. Cytotoxic effects of certain engineered nanomaterials towards malignant cells form the basis for one aspect of nanomedicine. It is inferred that size, three dimensional shape, hydrophobicity and electronic configurations make them an appealing subject in medicinal chemistry. Their unique structure coupled with immense scope for derivatization forms a base for exciting developments in therapeutics. This review article addresses the fate of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of engineered nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. It updates the distinctive methodology used for studying the biopharmaceutics of nanoparticles. This review addresses the future potential and safety concerns and genotoxicity of nanoparticle formulations in general. It particularly emphasizes the effects of nanoparticles on metabolic enzymes as well as the parenteral or inhalation administration routes of nanoparticle formulations. This paper illustrates the potential of nanomedicine by discussing biopharmaceutics of fullerene derivatives and their suitability for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Future direction is discussed as well. PMID:18855608

  11. Describing Nanomaterials: A Uniform Description System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, John; Freiman, Steve; Teague, Clayton

    2014-03-01

    Products involving nanomaterials are growing rapidly and nanoparticles also occur naturally. Materials, scientists, engineers, health officials, and regulators have realized they need a common description system. Led by CODATA and VAMAS, a Uniform Description System (UDS) for nanomaterials is being developed to meet the requirements of a broad range of scientific and technical disciplines and different user communities. The goal of the CODATA/VAMAS effort is the creation of a complete set of descriptors that can be used by all communities, e.g., materials, physics, chemistry, agricultural, medical, etc., interested in nanomaterials. The description system must be relevant to researchers, manufacturers of nanomaterials, materials selectors, and regulators. The purpose of the UDS for materials on the nanoscale is twofold: Uniqueness and Equivalency. The first step in the development of the UDS has been the creation of a Framework that will be used by the different communities to guide in the selection of descriptors relevant to their needs. This talk is a brief description of the draft of such a Framework, and how the framework will be translated into a robust description system with input from many scientific communities including physics. A contribution from the CODATA/VAMAS Working Group on the Description of Nanomaterials.

  12. Applications of Nanomaterials in Food Packaging.

    PubMed

    Bumbudsanpharoke, Nattinee; Choi, Jungwook; Ko, Seonghyuk

    2015-09-01

    Nanomaterials have drawn great interest in recent years due to their extraordinary properties that make them advantageous in food packaging applications. Specifically, nanoparticles can impart significant barrier properties, as well as mechanical, optical, catalytic, and antimicrobial properties into packaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and nanoclay account for the majority of the nano-enabled food packaging on the market, while others, such as nano-zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium, share less of the current market. In current food packaging, these nanomaterials are primarily used to impart antimicrobial function and to improve barrier properties, thereby extending the shelf life and freshness of packaged food. On the other hand, there is growing concern about the migration of nanomaterials from food contact materials to foodstuffs and its associated potential risks. Indeed, insufficient data about environmental and human safety assessments of migration and exposure of nanomaterials are hindering their market growth. To overcome this barrier, the public believes that legislation from government agencies is critical. This review provides an overview of the characteristics and functions of major nanomaterials that are commonly applied to food packaging, including available and near- future products. Migration research, safety issues, and public concerns are also discussed.

  13. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials' physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants.

  14. Nanomaterials and future aerospace technologies: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaia, Richard A.

    2012-06-01

    Two decades of extensive investment in nanomaterials, nanofabrication and nanometrology have provided the global engineering community a vast array of new technologies. These technologies not only promise radical change to traditional industries, such as transportation, information and aerospace, but may create whole new industries, such as personalized medicine and personalized energy harvesting and storage. The challenge today for the defense aerospace community is determining how to accelerate the conversion of these technical opportunities into concrete benefits with quantifiable impact, in conjunction with identifying the most important outstanding scientific questions that are limiting their utilization. For example, nanomaterial fabrication delivers substantial tailorablity beyond a traditional material data sheet. How can we integrate this tailorability into agile manufacturing and design methods to further optimize the performance, cost and durability of future resilient aerospace systems? The intersection of nano-based metamaterials and nanostructured devices with biotechnology epitomizes the technological promise of autonomous systems and enhanced human-machine interfaces. What then are the key materials and processes challenges that are inhibiting current lab-scale innovation from being integrated into functioning systems to increase effectiveness and productivity of our human resources? Where innovation is global, accelerating the use of breakthroughs, both for commercial and defense, is essential. Exploitation of these opportunities and finding solutions to the associated challenges for defense aerospace will rely on highly effective partnerships between commercial development, scientific innovation, systems engineering, design and manufacturing.

  15. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, T.M.; Bear, H.D. )

    1991-03-15

    Stimulation of lymphocytes with viable tumor cells can induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against autologous tumor. However, sufficient numbers of tumor cells are not always available for such stimulation, and high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) is often required for growth. Using the weakly immunogenic methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma MCA105, the authors demonstrate here that CTLs can be expected by pharmacologic manipulation of protein kinase C (PKC) and intracellular calcium with phorbol dibutyrate (PD-Bu) and ionomycin (Io), respectively. Lymphocytes were obtained from the spleens and ipsilateral popliteal draining lymph nodes (DLN) 10 days after the footpad injection of viable MCA105 tumor cells. The cells were stimulated with autologous tumor and 20U/ml IL-2 for 7 days and then treated with PDBu and Io and expanded in culture with 20U/ml IL-2 for an additional 14 days. The lymphocytes from the spleens and DLNs demonstrated significant expansion and marked cytotoxicity against MCA105. In another regimen, lymphocytes from the DLNs of tumor-bearing mice were stimulated directly with PDBu and Io without prior in vitro exposure to autologous tumor and expanded in culture with 20U/ml IL-2. The expansion of these lymphocytes was 500 fold and the cytotoxicity against MCA 105 remained high. Lymphocytes expanded with PDBu and Io also killed MCA102, but normal spleen cells expanded in the same way had no cytotoxic activity. The authors conclude that PKC activators coupled with calcium ionophores and low-dose IL-2 can generate CTL when little or no antigen is available.

  16. Phorbol myristate acetate and catechol as skin cocarcinogens in SENCAR mice

    SciTech Connect

    Van Duuren, B.L.; Melchionne, S.; Seidman, I.

    1986-09-01

    The enhancement of the carcinogenicity of benzo(a) pyrene (B(a)P) and ..beta..-propiolactone (BPL) by the mouse skin cocarcinogens phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and catechol were examined in female SENCAR mice, 30 per group. The carcinogen and cocarcinogen were applied simultaneously, three times weekly for 490-560 days. B(a)P and BPL were used at constant doses of 5 and 50 ..mu..g, respectively, in all experiments. PMA was used at three doses, 2.5, 1.0, and 0.5 ..mu..g per application, and catechol was used at one dose, 2 mg per application. Control groups included animals that received carcinogen only, cocarcinogen only, acetone only, and no treatment. The carcinogenicity of B(a)P and BPL were enhanced by the cocarcinogens, particularly in terms of tumor multiplicity. For both carcinogens, the most marked cocarcinogenic effects were observed at the lowest dose of PMA used (0.5 ..mu..g per application). This observation applied for days to first tumor, animals with tumors, tumor multiplicity, and incidence of malignant skin tumors. Catechol applied alone did not induce any tumors; with PMA alone there were significant incidences of benign and malignant tumors, e.g., at a dose of only 0.5 ..mu..g per application, 15 of 30 animals had 28 tumors, 5 of which were squamous carcinomas. In two-stage carcinogenesis experiments with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as initiator and PMA as promoter, SENCAR mice showed a greater susceptibility to tumor induction when compared to ICR/Ha mice used in earlier work. This susceptibility was most notable in terms of rate of tumor appearance and tumor multiplicity.

  17. Specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Sandhya; Kumar, Raghuvesh; Kumar, Munish

    2017-01-01

    A model is proposed to study the size and shape effects on specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanomaterials. The formulation developed for specific heat is based on the basic concept of cohesive energy and melting temperature. The specific heat of Ag and Au nanoparticles is reported and the effect of size and shape has been studied. We observed that specific heat increases with the reduction of particle size having maximum shape effect for spherical nanoparticle. To provide a more critical test, we extended our model to study the thermal conductivity and used it for the study of Si, diamond, Cu, Ni, Ar, ZrO2, BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 nanomaterials. A significant reduction is found in the thermal conductivity for nanomaterials by decreasing the size. The model predictions are consistent with the available experimental and simulation results. This demonstrates the suitability of the model proposed in this paper.

  18. Graphene-based nanomaterials for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials, due to their unique physicochemical properties, versatile surface functionalization, ultra-high surface area, and good biocompatibility, have attracted considerable interest in biomedical applications such as biosensors, drug delivery, bioimaging, theranostics, and so on. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in bioimaging of graphene-based nanomaterials, including graphene, graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), graphene quantum dots (GQDs), and their derivatives. There are two methods to synthesize graphene-based nanomaterials: in situ synthesis and binding method. We will highlight the molecular imaging modalities including optical imaging (fluorescence (FL), two-photon FL, and Raman imaging), PET/SPECT (positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), PAI (photoacoustic imaging), CT (computed tomography), and multimodal imaging. In the end, we will elaborate on the prospects and challenges of their future bioimaging applications.

  19. Synthesis of camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhimin; Liu, Zhiguo; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Zhao, Chunjian; Zhao, Xiuhua; Meng, Ronghua; Tan, Shengnan

    2010-04-01

    Camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials have been synthesized by the sodium borohydride reduction method under a strong basic condition. The obtained gold nanomaterials have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The camptothecin-loaded gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored for more than two months at room temperature without obvious changes. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to purple and blue during the acidifying process. It was revealed that the release of camptothecin and the aggregation of gold nanoparticles can be controlled by tuning the solution pH. The present study implied that the gold nanomaterials can be used as the potential carrier for CPT delivery.

  20. Toxicity of inorganic nanomaterials in biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxia; Chang, Xueling; Chen, Xiaoxia; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Feng; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have shown promising potentials as novel biomedical imaging agents with high sensitivity, high spatial and temporal resolution. To translate the laboratory innovations into clinical applications, their potential toxicities are highly concerned and have to be evaluated comprehensively both in vitro and in vivo before their clinical applications. In this review, we first summarized the in vivo and in vitro toxicities of the representative inorganic nanoparticles used in biomedical imagings. Then we further discuss the origin of nanotoxicity of inorganic nanomaterials, including ROS generation and oxidative stress, chemical instability, chemical composition, the surface modification, dissolution of nanoparticles to release excess free ions of metals, metal redox state, and left-over chemicals from synthesis, etc. We intend to provide the readers a better understanding of the toxicology aspects of inorganic nanomaterials and knowledge for achieving optimized designs of safer inorganic nanomaterials for clinical applications.

  1. Nanomaterials in Environmental Contamination, Their Nanotoxicological Peculiarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, G.; Kirillova, N.

    Eco-nanothreat arises from a lack of knowledge about new states of matter (spheroidal molecules of carbon, nanostructures, nanoparticles and nanophases). Newly discovered nanomaterials are likely to have different behavior and properties than their predecessors. New approaches for creating nanotechnologies are developed by using nanomaterials. Nanotechnology is considered as a panacea for resolving global problems that may affect the duration and quality of life. However, progress in technology historically leads to positive and negative consequences, thus the same can be expected from nanotechnology. Several un-researched threats may arise from uncontrolled development of nanotechnology. Some scientists foresee nanotechnological and nanodemocratic threats connected to possible undesirable self-replication of different nanosystems, and uncontrolled application of cheap ubiquitous personal nanosensors for permanent surveillance of individuals. In addition, little research is aimed to study how nanomaterials may attribute to environmental contamination. Finally, the influence of nanoparticles and nanostructures on the human organism may also be threatening in certain circumstances.

  2. Ice Nucleation Properties of Oxidized Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Whale, Thomas F; Rosillo-Lopez, Martin; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G

    2015-08-06

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in many fields, particularly atmospheric science, but is still poorly understood. All known inorganic ice nucleating particles are relatively large in size and tend to be hydrophilic. Hence it is not obvious that carbon nanomaterials should nucleate ice. However, in this paper we show that four different readily water-dispersible carbon nanomaterials are capable of nucleating ice. The tested materials were carboxylated graphene nanoflakes, graphene oxide, oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The carboxylated graphene nanoflakes have a diameter of ∼30 nm and are among the smallest entities observed so far to nucleate ice. Overall, carbon nanotubes were found to nucleate ice more efficiently than flat graphene species, and less oxidized materials nucleated ice more efficiently than more oxidized species. These well-defined carbon nanomaterials may pave the way to bridging the gap between experimental and computational studies of ice nucleation.

  3. Nanomaterials as Analytical Tools for Genosensors

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Salah, Khalid M.; Alrokyan, Salman A.; Khan, Muhammad Naziruddin; Ansari, Anees Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials are being increasingly used for the development of electrochemical DNA biosensors, due to the unique electrocatalytic properties found in nanoscale materials. They offer excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events with electronic signal transduction and for designing a new generation of bioelectronic devices exhibiting novel functions. In particular, nanomaterials such as noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Pt), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots and metal oxide nanoparticles have been actively investigated for their applications in DNA biosensors, which have become a new interdisciplinary frontier between biological detection and material science. In this article, we address some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, discussing the issues and challenges with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing nanomaterial-based biosensors and improving their applications in disease diagnosis and food safety examination. PMID:22315580

  4. Development and In Vitro Toxicity Evaluation of Alternative Sustainable Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel nanomaterial types are rapidly being developed for the value they may add to consumer products without sufficient evaluation of implications for human health, toxicity, environmental impact and long-term sustainability. Nanomaterials made of metals, semiconductors and vario...

  5. Assessing the Implications of Modified Nanomaterials in Bioassay Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    As nanotechnology advances to product development, filling environmental health and safety knowledge gaps is critical. Nanotoxicology is over-generalized, provided the permutations of nanomaterial variants created by the classes of nanomaterials (carbonaceous, metals, quantum dot...

  6. Development and In Vitro Bioactivity Profiling of Alternative Sustainable Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable, environmentally benign nanomaterials (NMs) are being designed as alternatives based on functionality to conventional metal-based nanomaterials (NMs) in order to minimize potential risk to human health and the environment. Development of rapid methods to evaluate the ...

  7. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Silver Nanomaterials in Murine Macrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silver nanomaterials are increasingly used as antimicrobial agents in a variety of products. Although there is considerable potential for human exposure to these nanomaterials, little is known about the health risks associated with their use. Macrophages are prominent immune cell...

  8. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community.

    PubMed

    Ostraat, Michele L; Mills, Karmann C; Guzan, Kimberly A; Murry, Damaris

    2013-01-01

    The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the Registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN) has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (http://www.nanomaterialregistry.org) currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

  9. Overview of Risk Management for Engineered Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, P. A.; Geraci, C. L.; Hodson, L. L.; Zumwalde, R. D.; Kuempel, E. D.; Murashov, V.; Martinez, K. F.; Heidel, D. S.

    2013-04-01

    Occupational exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is considered a new and challenging occurrence. Preliminary information from laboratory studies indicates that workers exposed to some kinds of ENMs could be at risk of adverse health effects. To protect the nanomaterial workforce, a precautionary risk management approach is warranted and given the newness of ENMs and emergence of nanotechnology, a naturalistic view of risk management is useful. Employers have the primary responsibility for providing a safe and healthy workplace. This is achieved by identifying and managing risks which include recognition of hazards, assessing exposures, characterizing actual risk, and implementing measures to control those risks. Following traditional risk management models for nanomaterials is challenging because of uncertainties about the nature of hazards, issues in exposure assessment, questions about appropriate control methods, and lack of occupational exposure limits (OELs) or nano-specific regulations. In the absence of OELs specific for nanomaterials, a precautionary approach has been recommended in many countries. The precautionary approach entails minimizing exposures by using engineering controls and personal protective equipment (PPE). Generally, risk management utilizes the hierarchy of controls. Ideally, risk management for nanomaterials should be part of an enterprise-wide risk management program or system and this should include both risk control and a medical surveillance program that assesses the frequency of adverse effects among groups of workers exposed to nanomaterials. In some cases, the medical surveillance could include medical screening of individual workers to detect early signs of work-related illnesses. All medical surveillance should be used to assess the effectiveness of risk management; however, medical surveillance should be considered as a second line of defense to ensure that implemented risk management practices are effective.

  10. Overview of Risk Management for Engineered Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Schulte, P A; Geraci, C L; Hodson, L L; Zumwalde, R D; Kuempel, E D; Murashov, V; Martinez, K F; Heidel, D S

    Occupational exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is considered a new and challenging occurrence. Preliminary information from laboratory studies indicates that workers exposed to some kinds of ENMs could be at risk of adverse health effects. To protect the nanomaterial workforce, a precautionary risk management approach is warranted and given the newness of ENMs and emergence of nanotechnology, a naturalistic view of risk management is useful. Employers have the primary responsibility for providing a safe and healthy workplace. This is achieved by identifying and managing risks which include recognition of hazards, assessing exposures, characterizing actual risk, and implementing measures to control those risks. Following traditional risk management models for nanomaterials is challenging because of uncertainties about the nature of hazards, issues in exposure assessment, questions about appropriate control methods, and lack of occupational exposure limits (OELs) or nano-specific regulations. In the absence of OELs specific for nanomaterials, a precautionary approach has been recommended in many countries. The precautionary approach entails minimizing exposures by using engineering controls and personal protective equipment (PPE). Generally, risk management utilizes the hierarchy of controls. Ideally, risk management for nanomaterials should be part of an enterprise-wide risk management program or system and this should include both risk control and a medical surveillance program that assesses the frequency of adverse effects among groups of workers exposed to nanomaterials. In some cases, the medical surveillance could include medical screening of individual workers to detect early signs of work-related illnesses. All medical surveillance should be used to assess the effectiveness of risk management; however, medical surveillance should be considered as a second line of defense to ensure that implemented risk management practices are effective.

  11. Overview of Risk Management for Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, PA; Geraci, CL; Hodson, LL; Zumwalde, RD; Kuempel, ED; Murashov, V; Martinez, KF; Heidel, DS

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is considered a new and challenging occurrence. Preliminary information from laboratory studies indicates that workers exposed to some kinds of ENMs could be at risk of adverse health effects. To protect the nanomaterial workforce, a precautionary risk management approach is warranted and given the newness of ENMs and emergence of nanotechnology, a naturalistic view of risk management is useful. Employers have the primary responsibility for providing a safe and healthy workplace. This is achieved by identifying and managing risks which include recognition of hazards, assessing exposures, characterizing actual risk, and implementing measures to control those risks. Following traditional risk management models for nanomaterials is challenging because of uncertainties about the nature of hazards, issues in exposure assessment, questions about appropriate control methods, and lack of occupational exposure limits (OELs) or nano-specific regulations. In the absence of OELs specific for nanomaterials, a precautionary approach has been recommended in many countries. The precautionary approach entails minimizing exposures by using engineering controls and personal protective equipment (PPE). Generally, risk management utilizes the hierarchy of controls. Ideally, risk management for nanomaterials should be part of an enterprise-wide risk management program or system and this should include both risk control and a medical surveillance program that assesses the frequency of adverse effects among groups of workers exposed to nanomaterials. In some cases, the medical surveillance could include medical screening of individual workers to detect early signs of work-related illnesses. All medical surveillance should be used to assess the effectiveness of risk management; however, medical surveillance should be considered as a second line of defense to ensure that implemented risk management practices are effective. PMID

  12. Functional nanomaterials can optimize the efficacy of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Xu, Yingying; Tian, Yue; Chen, Chunying; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-11-01

    Nanoscale materials can improve the efficacy of vaccines. Herein we review latest developments that use nanomaterials for vaccines. By highlighting the relationships between the nanoscale physicochemical characteristics and working mechanisms of nanomaterials, this paper shows the current status of the developments where researchers employ functional nanomaterials as vector and/or immunoregulators for vaccines. It also provides us some clues for improving the design and application of nanomaterials to optimize the efficacy of vaccines.

  13. Transformations of nanomaterials in the environment.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Gregory V; Gregory, Kelvin B; Apte, Simon C; Lead, Jamie R

    2012-07-03

    Increasing use of engineered nanomaterials with novel properties relative to their bulk counterparts has generated a need to define their behaviors and impacts in the environment. The high surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles results in highly reactive and physiochemically dynamic materials in environmental media. Many transformations, e.g. reactions with biomacromolecules, redox reactions, aggregation, and dissolution, may occur in both environmental and biological systems. These transformations and others will alter the fate, transport, and toxicity of nanomaterials. The nature and extent of these transformations must be understood before significant progress can be made toward understanding the environmental risks posed by these materials.

  14. Nanomaterials and Optical Diagnosis of HIV.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    The investigators had previously shown that the risk of AIDS/HIV-related illness and transmission reduced (by 96%) with early antiretroviral treatment. Nanomaterials could be applied in early diagnosis of HIV by improving the ability to detect serum biomarkers of the blood-borne infectious diseases, with low sample volume, rapidity, and more sensitivity than currently available FDA-approved methods such as ELISA, particle agglutination assay, and Western Blotting assay. We have demonstrated several experimental studies for optical HIV diagnosis based on nanomaterials in three categories (e.g., the fluorescence-, the SPR-, and the SERS- based biosensors), and have explained each assay.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of WO3 nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Pandey, N K; Tiwari, Karunesh; Roy, Akash

    2011-02-01

    This work reports a simple, quick and economical method to prepare WO3 nanomaterials. Prepared tungsten trioxide materials have been sintered at 700 degrees C for three hours. The material has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Crystallite size of the WO3 nanostructures obtained by Shearer's formula are between 12 and 72 nm and their grain size by SEM are from 20 to 105 nm. The humidity-sensitive electrical properties of the WO3 nanomaterial have been studied using d.c. measurements.

  16. Terahertz Dynamics in Carbon Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2012-02-01

    This NSF Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) project supports a unique interdisciplinary and international partnership investigating terahertz (THz) dynamics in nanostructures. The 0.1 to 10 THz frequency range of the electromagnetic spectrum is where electrical transport and optical transitions merge, offering exciting opportunities to study a variety of novel physical phenomena in condensed matter. By combining THz technology and nanotechnology, we can advance our understanding of THz physics while improving and developing THz devices. Specifically, this PIRE research explores THz dynamics of electrons in carbon nanomaterials, namely, nanotubes and graphene --- low-dimensional, sp^2-bonded carbon systems with unique finite-frequency properties. Japan and the U.S. are global leaders in both THz research and carbon research, and stimulating cooperation is critical to further advance THz science and to commercialize products developed in the lab. However, obstacles exist for international collaboration --- primarily linguistic and cultural barriers --- and this PIRE project aims to address these barriers through the integration of our research and education programs. Our strong educational portfolio endeavours to cultivate interest in nanotechnology amongst young U.S. undergraduate students and encourage them to pursue graduate study and academic research in the physical sciences, especially those from underrepresented groups. Our award-winning International Research Experience for Undergraduates Program, NanoJapan, provides structured research internships in Japanese university laboratories with Japanese mentors --- recognized as a model international education program for science and engineering students. The project builds the skill sets of nanoscience researchers and students by cultivating international and inter-cultural awareness, research expertise, and specific academic interests in nanotechnology. U.S. project partners include Rice

  17. Simulating the fate and transport of nanomaterials in surface waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have resulted in their increased production. However, it is unclear how nanomaterials will move and react once released to the environment One approach for addressing possible exposure of nanomaterials in surface waters is by using numerical...

  18. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-05-15

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, we discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined.

  19. Identification, activity, and structural studies of peptides incorporating the phorbol ester-binding domain of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Wender, P A; Irie, K; Miller, B L

    1995-01-01

    The family of homologous enzymes known as protein kinase C (PKC) has been the object of intense interest because of its crucial role in cellular signal transduction. Although considerable information about the activation of PKC has been gained through structure-activity, molecular modeling, and synthetic studies of both natural and designed activators, information about the structure of PKC itself has been limited by its large size and requirement for phospholipid cofactors. Additionally, difficulties in the purification of truncated mutants of PKC have thus far prevented their analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or x-ray crystallographic methods. We describe the identification, synthesis, ligand-binding analysis, cofactor requirements, and preliminary NMR evaluation of two subdomains (peptides B and C) of the regulatory domain of PKC-gamma. Peptides B and C bind [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate with good affinity (Kd = 6.4 microM and 414 nM, respectively) in the presence of phosphatidylserine. In comparison, the binding affinity of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate for PKC was found to be 2.6 nM. Like PKC itself, these peptides also recognize other PKC activators, including dioctanoylglycerol and teleocidin B-4, and exhibit an ability to differentiate phorbol ester from its C-4 epimer. NMR studies of PKC subdomains are also described, indicating that both peptides B and C are well behaved in solution and do not exhibit any concentration-dependent changes. Finally, these studies reveal that peptide B becomes conformationally ordered only in the presence of phospholipid, suggesting that the regulatory domain of PKC itself might be organized for activation only when associated with the lipid bilayer, where its activator (diacylglycerol) is encountered. PMID:7816824

  20. Cloning and characterization of the major promoter of the human protein kinase C beta gene. Regulation by phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Obeid, L M; Blobe, G C; Karolak, L A; Hannun, Y A

    1992-10-15

    The expression of the beta isoenzyme for protein kinase C is regulated developmentally and in response to inducers of cell differentiation (such as phorbol esters and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3). The 5' segment of the gene for protein kinase C beta was cloned from a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL3 bacteriophage. This segment of the gene (greater than 54 kilobases in length) encompassed the coding sequence for the amino-terminal regulatory domain of the enzyme, the 5'-untranslated region, and the 5'-flanking region. Initiation of transcription was identified by S1 nuclease analysis and confirmed by RNase protection analysis at 197 base pairs 5' of the initiator ATG. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region revealed it to be extremely G+C-rich (> 80%) with many features of a CpG island. Comparison of sequence with known cis-regulatory motifs disclosed a number of potential regulatory elements including an octamer binding motif at -76, Sp1-binding sites at -94 and -63, E boxes at -110, -26, and +18, an AP-1 site at -442, and an AP-2 site at -330. To demonstrate promoter activity, a 630-base pair fragment extending from -587 to +43 was subcloned in front of a promoterless luciferase gene. This fragment was able to drive the expression of luciferase in transient transfections of human hematopoietic cells. Deletion analysis demonstrated that a fragment -111 to +43 was necessary and sufficient for promoter activity; this fragment did not contain TATA or CAAT motifs. The promoter was stimulated 8-20-fold by phorbol esters accounting for the previously observed transcriptional activation of protein kinase C beta. This phorbol ester responsiveness was conferred by the basal promoter (-111 to +43) and was independent of the AP-1 site. These results define a novel mechanism of protein kinase C autoregulation at a transcriptional level.

  1. The Phorbol Ester Fraction from Jatropha curcas Seed Oil: Potential and Limits for Crop Protection against Insect Pests

    PubMed Central

    Ratnadass, Alain; Wink, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The physic nut shrub, Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae), has been considered as a “miracle tree”, particularly as a source of alternate fuel. Various extracts of the plant have been reported to have insecticidal/acaricidal or molluscicidal/anthelminthic activities on vectors of medical or veterinary interest or on agricultural or non-agricultural pests. Among those extracts, the phorbol ester fraction from seed oil has been reported as a promising candidate for use as a plant-derived protectant of a variety of crops, from a range of pre-harvest and post-harvest insect pests. However, such extracts have not been widely used, despite the “boom” in the development of the crop in the tropics during recent years, and societal concerns about overuse of systemic chemical pesticides. There are many potential explanations to such a lack of use of Jatropha insecticidal extracts. On the one hand, the application of extracts potentially harmful to human health on stored food grain, might not be relevant. The problem of decomposition of phorbol esters and other compounds toxic to crop pests in the field needing further evaluation before such extracts can be widely used, may also be a partial explanation. High variability of phorbol ester content and hence of insecticidal activity among physic nut cultivars/ecotypes may be another. Phytotoxicity to crops may be further limitation. Apparent obstacles to a wider application of such extracts are the costs and problems involved with registration and legal approval. On the other hand, more studies should be conducted on molluscicidal activity on slugs and land snails which are major pests of crops, particularly in conservation agriculture systems. Further evaluation of toxicity to natural enemies of insect pests and studies on other beneficial insects such as pollinators are also needed. PMID:23203190

  2. The insurability of nanomaterial production risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Martin; Murphy, Finbarr; Baublyte, Lijana; McAlea, Eamonn M.; Tofail, Syed A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Without insurance the long-term sustainability of nanotechnology is questionable, but insurance companies are encumbered by their institutional memory of losses from the asbestos crisis and the absence of suitable actuarial models to measure the potential risks of nanotechnology. Here we propose a framework that supports the transfer of nanomaterial production risk to the insurance sector.

  3. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    PubMed Central

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R.; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S.; Samal, Akshaya K.; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications. PMID:22110867

  4. Chemical Dynamics at Surfaces of Metal Nanomaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0168 Chemical Dynamics at Surfaces of Metal Nanomaterials Junrong Zheng WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIV HOUSTON TX Final Report 07/23...Junrong Zheng Department of Chemistry, Rice University 1. Proposed summary The project was designed to develop novel spectroscopic tools for

  5. Sustainable Synthesis of Nanomaterials Using Microwave irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation summarizes our recent activity in MW-assisted synthesis of nanomaterials under benign conditions. Shape-controlled aqueous synthesis of noble nanostructures via MW-assisted spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts using -D-glucose, sucrose, and maltose will be...

  6. CLP application to nanomaterials: a specific aspect.

    PubMed

    Alessandrelli, Maria; Polci, Maria Letizia

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at describing some relevant aspects related to the classification, labelling and packaging of nanomaterials. Concerns have been raised about potential adverse effects to humans or the environment as result of impacts of nanomaterials. The new Regulation (EC) no. 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures (CLP) does not contain any specific definition or provision related to nanomaterials nevertheless they are covered by the definition of substance set in the Regulation. It is recognized that different particle sizes or forms of the same substance can have different classification. Thus, if substances are placed on the market both at nanoscale and as bulk, a separate classification and labelling may be required if the available data on the intrinsic properties indicate a difference in hazard class between the two forms. CLP Regulation requires the manufacturer or importer to ensure that the information used to classify relates to the forms or physical states in which the substance is placed on the market and in which it can reasonably be expected to be used. Moreover, CLP demands testing relating to physical hazards to be performed if such information is missing or not adequate to conclude on classification. Further developments of the CLP guidance documents and implementation tools are needed in order to cover nanomaterials more specifically.

  7. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions.

    PubMed

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S; Samal, Akshaya K; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  8. Tools for Assessing Ecological Nanomaterial Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) are commonly defined as being commercial products with at least one dimension in the size range of 1 nm to 100 nm that also possess unique properties as the result of their size. Anecdotal evidence suggests that at least 600 MN products a...

  9. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Chia-Wen Wu, Kevin

    2013-08-01

    Traditional boundaries between materials science and engineering and life sciences are rapidly disintegrating as interdisciplinary research teams develop new materials-science-based tools for exploring fundamental issues in both medicine and biology. With recent technological advances in multiple research fields such as materials science, cell and molecular biology and micro-/nano-technology, much attention is shifting toward evaluating the functional advantages of nanomaterials and nanofabrication, at the cellular and molecular levels, for specific, biomedically relevant applications. The pursuit of this direction enhances the understanding of the mechanisms of, and therapeutic potentials for, some of the most lethal diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, organ fibrosis and cancers. This interdisciplinary approach has generated great interest among researchers working in a wide variety of communities including industry, universities and research laboratories. The purpose of this focus issue in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials is to bridge nanotechnology and biology with medicine, focusing more on the applications of nanomaterials and nanofabrication in biomedically relevant issues. This focus issue, we believe, will provide a more comprehensive understanding of (i) the preparation of nanomaterials and the underlying mechanisms of nanofabrication, and (ii) the linkage of nanomaterials and nanofabrication with biomedical applications. The multidisciplinary focus issue that we have attempted to organize is of interest to various research fields including biomaterials and tissue engineering, bioengineering, nanotechnology and nanomaterials, i.e. chemistry, physics and engineering. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication topics addressed in this focus issue include sensing and diagnosis (e.g. immunosensing and diagnostic devices for diseases), cellular and molecular biology (e.g. probing cellular behaviors and stem cell differentiation) and drug delivery

  10. Biological Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: Needs for the Next Decade.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Catherine J; Vartanian, Ariane M; Geiger, Franz M; Hamers, Robert J; Pedersen, Joel; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L; Carlson, Erin E; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D; Orr, Galya; Rosenzweig, Ze'ev

    2015-06-24

    The interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterial effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.

  11. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; Orr, Galya; Rosenzweig, Ze'ev

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterial effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.

  12. Adsorbed Proteins Influence the Biological Activity and Molecular Targeting of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Debamitra; Sundaram, S. K.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Riley, Brian J.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Kaysen, George A.; Moudgil, Brij M.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2007-11-01

    The possible combination of unique physicochemical properties operating at unique sites of action within cells and tissues has led to considerable uncertainty surrounding nanomaterial toxic potential. Here we have investigated the relative importance of proteins adsorbed onto nanomaterial surfaces in guiding uptake and toxicity to determine whether a priori identification of adsorbed proteins will contribute to nanomaterial toxicity assessment. Albumin was identified as the major protein adsorbed onto single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) following incubation with fetal bovine or human serum/plasma, but not when plasma from the Nagase Analbuminemic Rat (NAR) was used, and precoating SWCNTs with a non-ionic surfactant (Pluronic F127) inhibited albumin adsorption. Damaged or structurally altered albumin is rapidly cleared by scavenger receptors. In the RAW 264.7 macrophage-like model, we observed that SWCNTs inhibited the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 ng/ml, 6 hr) and this anti-inflammatory response was inhibited by fucoidan (scavenger receptor antagonist) and by precoating SWCNTs with Pluronic F127. Fucoidan also reduced the uptake of fluorescent SWCNTs (Alexa647) in RAW 264.7 cells. Albumin-coated SWCNTs reduced LPS-mediated Cox-2 induction. SWCNTs did not appear to reduce binding of a fluorescent LPS (Alexa488) to RAW 264.7 cells. The profile of proteins adsorbed onto amorphous silica (50 – 1000 nm) was qualitatively different, relative to SWCNTs, and coating amorphous silica with Pluronic F127 dramatically reduced protein binding and toxicity. Collectively, these observations are consistent with an important role for adsorbed proteins in guiding nanomaterial disposition and toxicity.

  13. Metalloproteinase inhibitors for the disintegrin-like metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 that differentially block constitutive and phorbol ester-inducible shedding of cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Andreas; Hundhausen, Christian; Lambert, Millard H; Broadway, Neil; Andrews, Robert C; Bickett, D Mark; Leesnitzer, M Anthony; Becherer, J David

    2005-03-01

    The transmembrane metzinkin-proteases of the ADAM (a disintegrin and a metalloproteinase)-family ADAM10 and ADAM 17 are both implicated in the ectodomain shedding of various cell surface molecules including the IL6-receptor and the transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1 and CXCL16. These molecules are constitutively released from cultured cells, a process that can be rapidly enhanced by cell stimulation with phorbol esters such as PMA. Recent research supports the view that the constitutive cleavage predominantly involves ADAM10 while the inducible one is mediated to a large extent by ADAM17. We here describe the discovery of hydroxamate compounds with different potency against ADAM10 and ADAM17 and different ability to block constitutive and inducible cleavage of IL6R, CX3CL1 and CXCL16 by the two proteases. By screening a number of hydroxamate inhibitors for the inhibition of recombinant metalloproteinases, a compound was found inhibiting ADAM10 with more than 100-fold higher potency than ADAM17, which may be explained by an improved fit of the compound to the S1' specificity pocket of ADAM10 as compared to that of ADAM17. In cell-based cleavage experiments this compound (GI254023X) potently blocked the constitutive release of IL6R, CX3CL1 and CXCL16, which was in line with the reported involvement of ADAM10 but not ADAM17 in this process. By contrast, the compound did not affect the PMA-induced shedding, which was only blocked by GW280264X, a potent inhibitor of ADAM17. As expected, GI254023X did not further decrease the residual release of CX3CL1 and CXCL16 in ADAM10-deficient cells verifying that the compound's effect on the constitutive shedding of these molecules was exclusively due to the inhibition of ADAM10. Thus, GI254023X may by of use as a preferential inhibitor of constitutive shedding events without effecting the inducible shedding in response to agonists acting similar to PMA.

  14. Stimulation of prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production by phorbol esters and epidermal growth factor in porcine thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, K.; Hiraiwa, M.; Emoto, T.; Akimoto, K.; Takaoka, T.; Shimoda, S.I.

    1987-07-13

    Effects of phorbol esters and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production by cultured porcine thyroid cells were examined. Both phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and EGF stimulated prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production by the cells in dose related fashion. PMA stimulated prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production over fifty-fold with the dose of 10/sup -7/ M compared with control. EGF (10/sup -7/ M) also stimulated it about ten-fold. The ED/sub 50/ values of PMA and EGF were respectively around 1 x 10/sup -9/ M and 5 x 10/sup -10/ M. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), however, did not stimulate prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production from 1 to 24-h incubation. The release of radioactivity from (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid prelabeled cells was also stimulated by PMA and EGF, but not by TSH. These results indicate that both PMA and EGF are potent stimulators of prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production, associated with the activity to stimulate arachidonic acid release in porcine thyroid cells. 36 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  15. Molecular Basis for Failure of “Atypical” C1 Domain of Vav1 to Bind Diacylglycerol/Phorbol Ester*

    PubMed Central

    Geczy, Tamas; Peach, Megan L.; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Sigano, Dina M.; Kang, Ji-Hye; Valle, Christopher J.; Selezneva, Julia; Woo, Wonhee; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E.; Garfield, Susan H.; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Marquez, Victor E.; Blumberg, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    C1 domains, the recognition motif of the second messenger diacylglycerol and of the phorbol esters, are classified as typical (ligand-responsive) or atypical (not ligand-responsive). The C1 domain of Vav1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, plays a critical role in regulation of Vav activity through stabilization of the Dbl homology domain, which is responsible for exchange activity of Vav. Although the C1 domain of Vav1 is classified as atypical, it retains a binding pocket geometry homologous to that of the typical C1 domains of PKCs. This study clarifies the basis for its failure to bind ligands. Substituting Vav1-specific residues into the C1b domain of PKCδ, we identified five crucial residues (Glu9, Glu10, Thr11, Thr24, and Tyr26) along the rim of the binding cleft that weaken binding potency in a cumulative fashion. Reciprocally, replacing these incompatible residues in the Vav1 C1 domain with the corresponding residues from PKCδ C1b (δC1b) conferred high potency for phorbol ester binding. Computer modeling predicts that these unique residues in Vav1 increase the hydrophilicity of the rim of the binding pocket, impairing membrane association and thereby preventing formation of the ternary C1-ligand-membrane binding complex. The initial design of diacylglycerol-lactones to exploit these Vav1 unique residues showed enhanced selectivity for C1 domains incorporating these residues, suggesting a strategy for the development of ligands targeting Vav1. PMID:22351766

  16. Cardiomyocytes from phorbol myristate acetate-activated mesenchymal stem cells restore electromechanical function in infarcted rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Heesang; Hwang, Hye Jin; Chang, Woochul; Song, Byeong-Wook; Cha, Min-Ji; Lim, Soyeon; Choi, Eun Ju; Ham, Onju; Lee, Chang Youn; Park, Jun-Hee; Lee, Se-Yeon; Choi, Eunmi; Lee, Chungkeun; Lee, Myoungho; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Kim, Sung-Hou; Jang, Yangsoo; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Despite the safety and feasibility of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy, an optimal cell type has not yet emerged in terms of electromechanical integration in infarcted myocardium. We found that poor to moderate survival benefits of MSC-implanted rats were caused by incomplete electromechanical integration induced by tissue heterogeneity between myocytes and engrafted MSCs in the infarcted myocardium. Here, we report the development of cardiogenic cells from rat MSCs activated by phorbol myristate acetate, a PKC activator, that exhibited high expressions of cardiac-specific markers and Ca2+ homeostasis-related proteins and showed adrenergic receptor signaling by norepinephrine. Histological analysis showed high connexin 43 coupling, few inflammatory cells, and low fibrotic markers in myocardium implanted with these phorbol myristate acetate-activated MSCs. Infarct hearts implanted with these cells exhibited restoration of conduction velocity through decreased tissue heterogeneity and improved myocardial contractility. These findings have major implications for the development of better cell types for electromechanical integration of cell-based treatment for infarcted myocardium. PMID:21173226

  17. Carbon Nanomaterials and DNA: from Molecular Recognition to Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanjun; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-15

    highly sensitive detection of ppm levels of SWNTs in cells, and the other monitored i-motif DNA formation. Further studies indicated that SWNTs could inhibit telomerase activity in living cells and cause telomere dysfunction, providing new insight into the biological effects of SWNTs. Then, some applications that are based on the interactions between graphene and DNA are also summarized. Combined with other nanomaterials, such as metal and upconversion nanoparticles, several hybrid nanomaterials were successfully constructed, and a series of DNA logic gates were successfully developed. Afterwards, the newcomer of the carbon nanomaterials family, carbon quantum dots (CQDs), were found to be capable of modulating right-handed B-form DNA to left-handed Z-form DNA. These were further used to design FRET logic gates that were based on the CQD-derived DNA conformational transition. Taking into account the remaining challenges and promising aspects, CNM-based DNA nanotechnology and its biomedical applications will attract more attention and produce new breakthroughs in the near future.

  18. Control of macrophage cell differentiation in human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Murao, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Callaham, M.F.; Anderson, N.L.; Huberman, E.

    1983-10-01

    Human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) were induced to differentiate into macrophage-like cells in a dose (3 x 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -7/ M) and time (1 to 6 days)-dependent manner by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ and the tumor promoter, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Differentiation was determined by an increase in the percentage of morphologically mature cells, in lysozyme and nonspecific esterase activities, and in reactivity with the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody. Two HL-60 cell variants, designated as R-80 and B-II, were also examined. R-80 cells, which are resistant to induction of cell differentiation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, also exhibited resistance, although to a lesser degree, to induction of cell differentiation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/. Te resistance to the action of the two compounds is presumably not due to similar binding sites for the two inducers, since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ was unable to compete for the phorbol diester binding sites as measured by (/sup 3/H)phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate binding. B-II cells were resistant to induction of cell differentiation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, retinoic acid, and dimethyl sulfoxide. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of HL-60 cell protein patterns indicated that treatment of the HL-60 cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, retinoic acid, and dimethyl sulfoxide caused the cells to express various monocyte-macrophage and granulocyte marker proteins. These results indicate that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ induces in the HL-60 cells a phenotype that resembles, but is not identical to, that of peripheral monocytes-macrophages. 40 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  19. National Survey of Workplaces Handling and Manufacturing Nanomaterials, Exposure to and Health Effects of Nanomaterials, and Evaluation of Nanomaterial Safety Data Sheets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A national survey on workplace environment nanomaterial handling and manufacturing was conducted in 2014. Workplaces relevant to nanomaterials were in the order of TiO2 (91), SiO2 (88), carbon black (84), Ag (35), Al2O3 (35), ZnO (34), Pb (33), and CeO2 (31). The survey results indicated that the number of workplaces handling or manufacturing nanomaterials was 340 (0.27% of total 126,846) workplaces. The number of nanomaterials used and products was 546 (1.60 per company) and 583 (1.71 per company), respectively. For most workplaces, the results on exposure to hazardous particulate materials, including nanomaterials, were below current OELs, yet a few workplaces were above the action level. As regards the health status of workers, 9 workers were diagnosed with a suspected respiratory occupational disease, where 7 were recommended for regular follow-up health monitoring. 125 safety data sheets (SDSs) were collected from the nanomaterial-relevant workplaces and evaluated for their completeness and reliability. Only 4 CNT SDSs (3.2%) included the term nanomaterial, while most nanomaterial SDSs were not regularly updated and lacked hazard information. When taken together, the current analysis provides valuable national-level information on the exposure and health status of workers that can guide the next policy steps for nanomaterial management in the workplace. PMID:27556041

  20. National Survey of Workplaces Handling and Manufacturing Nanomaterials, Exposure to and Health Effects of Nanomaterials, and Evaluation of Nanomaterial Safety Data Sheets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Yu, Il Je

    2016-01-01

    A national survey on workplace environment nanomaterial handling and manufacturing was conducted in 2014. Workplaces relevant to nanomaterials were in the order of TiO2 (91), SiO2 (88), carbon black (84), Ag (35), Al2O3 (35), ZnO (34), Pb (33), and CeO2 (31). The survey results indicated that the number of workplaces handling or manufacturing nanomaterials was 340 (0.27% of total 126,846) workplaces. The number of nanomaterials used and products was 546 (1.60 per company) and 583 (1.71 per company), respectively. For most workplaces, the results on exposure to hazardous particulate materials, including nanomaterials, were below current OELs, yet a few workplaces were above the action level. As regards the health status of workers, 9 workers were diagnosed with a suspected respiratory occupational disease, where 7 were recommended for regular follow-up health monitoring. 125 safety data sheets (SDSs) were collected from the nanomaterial-relevant workplaces and evaluated for their completeness and reliability. Only 4 CNT SDSs (3.2%) included the term nanomaterial, while most nanomaterial SDSs were not regularly updated and lacked hazard information. When taken together, the current analysis provides valuable national-level information on the exposure and health status of workers that can guide the next policy steps for nanomaterial management in the workplace.

  1. Heparin inhibits the induction of three matrix metalloproteinases (stromelysin, 92-kD gelatinase, and collagenase) in primate arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kenagy, R D; Nikkari, S T; Welgus, H G; Clowes, A W

    1994-01-01

    Heparin inhibits the migration and proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells and modifies the extracellular matrix. These effects may be the result of heparin's effects on proteinases that degrade the matrix. We have previously reported that heparin inhibits the induction of tissue-type plasminogen activator and interstitial collagenase mRNA. We have investigated the possibility that heparin affects other members of the matrix metalloproteinase family. Phorbol ester increased the levels of mRNA of collagenase, 92-kD gelatinase and stromelysin as well as the synthesis of these proteins. These effects were inhibited by heparin, but not by other glycosaminoglycans, in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of these matrix metalloproteinases was also inhibited by staurosporine and pretreatment with phorbol ester indicating the involvement of the protein kinase C pathway. In contrast, the 72-kD gelatinase was expressed constitutively and was not affected by phorbol ester or heparin. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 was expressed constitutively and was slightly increased by phorbol ester. It was not affected by heparin. Thus, heparin inhibits the production of four proteinases (tissue plasminogen activator, collagenase, stromelysin and 92-kD gelatinase) that form an interdependent system capable of degrading all the major components of the extracellular matrix. Images PMID:8182130

  2. Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoyang Haven

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), which may be released to the environment due to human-related activities, can move across environmental phase boundaries and be found in most media. Given the rapid development and growing applications of nanotechnology, there is concern and thus the need to assess the potential environmental impact associated with ENMs. Accordingly, a modeling platform was developed to enable evaluation of the dynamic multimedia environmental distribution of ENMs (MendNano) and the range of potential exposure concentrations of ENMs. The MendNano was based on a dynamic multimedia compartmental modeling approach that was guided by detailed analysis of the agglomeration of ENMs, life-cycle analysis based estimates of their potential release to the environment, and incorporation of mechanistic sub-models of various intermedia transport processes. Model simulations for various environmental scenarios indicated that ENM accumulation in the sediment increased significantly with increased ENMs attachment to suspended solids in water. Atmospheric dry and wet depositions can be important pathways for ENMs input to the terrestrial environment in the absence of direct and distributed ENM release to soil. Increased ENM concentration in water due to atmospheric deposition (wet and dry) is expected as direct ENM release to water diminishes. However, for soluble ENMs dissolution can be the dominant pathway for suspended ENM removal from water even compared to advective transport. For example, simulations for Los Angeles showed that dry deposition, rain scavenging, and wind dilution can remove 90% of ENMs from the atmospheric airshed in ~100-230 days, ~2-6 hrs, and ~0.5-2 days, respectively. For the evaluated ENMs (metal, metal oxides, carbon nanotubes (CNT), nanoclays), mass accumulation in the multimedia environment was mostly in the soil and sediment. Additionally, simulation results for TiO2 in Los Angeles demonstrates that the ENM concentrations in air and

  3. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  4. Nanomaterials: a challenge for toxicological risk assessment?

    PubMed

    Haase, Andrea; Tentschert, Jutta; Luch, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged as one of the central technologies in the twenty-first century. This judgment becomes apparent by considering the increasing numbers of people employed in this area; the numbers of patents, of scientific publications, of products on the market; and the amounts of money invested in R&D. Prospects originating from different fields of nanoapplication seem unlimited. However, nanotechnology certainly will not be able to meet all of the ambitious expectations communicated, yet has high potential to heavily affect our daily life in the years to come. This might occur in particular in the field of consumer products, for example, by introducing nanomaterials in cosmetics, textiles, or food contact materials. Another promising area is the application of nanotechnology in medicine fueling hopes to significantly improve diagnosis and treatment of all kinds of diseases. In addition, novel technologies applying nanomaterials are expected to be instrumental in waste remediation and in the production of efficient energy storage devices and thus may help to overcome world's energy problems or to revolutionize computer and data storage technologies. In this chapter, we will focus on nanomaterials. After a brief historic and general overview, current proposals of how to define nanomaterials will be summarized. Due to general limitations, there is still no single, internationally accepted definition of the term "nanomaterial." After elaborating on the status quo and the scope of nanoanalytics and its shortcomings, the current thinking about possible hazards resulting from nanoparticulate exposures, there will be an emphasis on the requirements to be fulfilled for appropriate health risk assessment and regulation of nanomaterials. With regard to reliable risk assessments, until now there is still the remaining issue to be resolved of whether or not specific challenges and unique features exist on the nanoscale that have to be tackled and distinctively

  5. Active Oxygen Metabolites and Thromboxane in Phorbol Myristate Acetate Toxicity to the Isolated, Perfused Rat Lung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Laurie Jean

    When administered intravenously or intratracheally to rats, rabbits and sheep, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) produces changes in lung morphology and function are similar to those seen in humans with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Therefore, it is thought that information about the mechanism of ARDS development can be gained from experiments using PMA-treated animals. Currently, the mechanisms by which PMA causes pneumotoxicity are unknown. Results from other studies in rabbits and in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs suggest that PMA-induced lung injury is mediated by active oxygen species from neutrophils (PMN), whereas studies in sheep and rats suggest that PMN are not required for the toxic response. The role of PMN, active oxygen metabolites and thromboxane (TxA_2) in PMA-induced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs (IPLs) was examined in this thesis. To determine whether PMN were required for PMA to produce toxicity to the IPL, lungs were perfused for 30 min with buffer containing various concentrations of PMA (in the presence or absence of PMN). When concentrations >=q57 ng/ml were added to medium devoid of added PMN, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. When a concentration of PMA (14-28 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to the perfusion medium containing PMN (1 x 10 ^8), perfusion pressure increased, and lungs accumulated fluid. These results indicate that high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of PMN, whereas injury induced by lower concentrations is PMN-dependent. To examine whether active oxygen species were involved in mediating lung injury induced by PMA and PMN, lungs were coperfused with the oxygen radical scavengers SOD and/or catalase. Coperfusion with either or both of these enzymes totally protected lungs against injury caused by PMN and PMA. These results suggest that active oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical in particular), mediate lung injury in

  6. New Insights on the Influence of Organic Co-Contaminants on the Aquatic Toxicology of Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Sanchís, Josep; Olmos, Mar; Vincent, Phil; Farré, Marinella; Barceló, Damià

    2016-01-19

    At present, there is a lack of understanding of the combined ecotoxicity of carbon-based nanomaterials and co-contaminants. In this paper, we report on the toxicity of three carbon nanomaterials (fullerene-soot, multiwall carbon nanotubes, and graphene). Two standardized toxicity bioassays, the immobilization of the invertebrate Daphnia magna and the bioluminescence inhibition of the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri, have been used. Synergistic and antagonistic effects of binary mixtures composed of fullerene soot and organic co-contaminants as malathion, glyphosate, diuron, triclosan, and nonylphenol were assessed. The isobologram method was used to evaluate the concentrations producing an effect, in comparison to those effects expected by a simple additive approach. In this study, antagonism was the predominant effect. However, synergism was also observed as in the case of D. magna exposed to mixtures of malathion and fullerene soot. D. magna was shown to be the most sensitive assay when carbon nanomaterials were present. Toxicity to D. magna was as follows: fullerene soot > multiwall carbon nanotubes > graphene. These results were proportional to the size of aggregates, smaller aggregates being the most toxic. The vector function of nanomaterials aggregates and the unexpected release inside living organisms was proven for malathion. These results highlight new insights on the risks associated with the release of carbon nanomaterials into the environment.

  7. Controllable synthesis and biomedical applications of silver nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhihai; Jiang, Xiaoli; Guo, Dawei; Gu, Ning

    2011-11-01

    Silver nanomaterials have lots of peculiar and exciting physical and chemical properties that are different from massive silver, so the synthesis and applications of silver nanomaterials have attracted a great deal of attention in the last decade. Currently, all kinds of silver nanomaterials having different shapes and sizes have been synthesized by many ingenious methods, and silver nanomaterials have exhibited extensive application prospects in many fields especially in biomedical aspect. In this article, the controllable synthesis of silver nanomaterials including nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoprisms, nanoplates, nanodisks, nanospheres, and nanopolyhedrons, etc. are reviewed. Silver nanomaterials are most utilized in the form of nanoparticles, so the main biomedical applications of silver nanoparticles, such as antibacterial and antiviral applications, antitumor applications, biosensors and biological labels, optical imaging and imaging intensifier, are discussed. Although antibacterial applications are still the most important aspects of silver nanomaterials at present, antitumor, optical sensors and imaging applications of silver nanomaterials have also shown good potential perspectives. More biomedical applications of silver nanomaterials still need to be exploited for the future, and the biological safety of silver nanomaterials also should be paid enough attention before their practical applications.

  8. Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Muhammad; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Sharif, Ahsan; Ahmad, Ejaz; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors. PMID:28348356

  9. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, MaryJoe K.; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  10. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  11. [Employer's obligation of safety and nanomaterials].

    PubMed

    Doucet, Maud

    2011-01-01

    Health and Safety law at work is influenced by the intervention of the European Union. The model of prevention of occupational risks is set by the 1989 framework directive. The question of its applicability to nanomaterials divides the Commission and the European Parliament. This model was welcomed differently by member states. Employers are generally under an obligation to adopt best means to assure workers' safety, while French law imposes an obligation to get results. This obligation concerns each aspect of the employment contract's execution and is analysed as an effective way to esure the prevention of occupational risks. If risks associated with nanomaterials seem to be taken into consideration by our system of worker protection, it seems however that prevention will be difficult to implement.

  12. Phage-based nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Farr, Rebecca; Choi, Dong Shin; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology enable us to manipulate and produce materials with molecular level control. In the newly emerging field of bionanomedicine, it is essential to precisely control the physical, chemical and biological properties of materials. Among other biological building blocks, viruses are a promising nanomaterial that can be functionalized with great precision. Since the production of viral particles is directed by the genetic information encapsulated in their protein shells, the viral particles create precisely defined sizes and shapes. In addition, the composition and surface properties of the particles can be controlled through genetic engineering and chemical modification. In this manuscript, we review the advances of virus-based nanomaterials for biomedical applications in three different areas: phage therapy, drug delivery and tissue engineering. By exploiting and manipulating the original functions of viruses, viral particles hold great possibilities in these biomedical applications to improve human health.

  13. Nanomaterials and preservation mechanisms of architecture monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Radu, Adrian; Teodorescu, Sofia; Fierǎscu, Irina; Fierǎscu, Radu-Claudiu; Ştirbescu, Raluca-Maria; Dulamǎ, Ioana Daniela; Şuicǎ-Bunghez, Ioana-Raluca; Bucuricǎ, Ioan Alin; Ion, Mihaela-Lucia

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the chemical composition of the building materials of the monuments may help us to preserve and protect them from the pollution of our cities. The aim of this work is to characterize the materials of the walls from ancient buildings, the decay products that could be appear due to the action of pollution and a new method based on nanomaterials (hydroxyapatite -HAp) for a conservative preservation of the treated walls. Some analytical techniques have been used, as follow: X-ray fluorescence energy dispersive (EDXRF) (for the relative abundance of major, minor and trace elements), FTIR and Raman spectroscopy (for stratigraphic study of cross-sections of multi-layered materials found in wall paintings), Optical microscopy (OM), (for morphology of the wall samples). The nanomaterial suspension HAp applied on the sample surface by spraying, decreased the capillary water uptake, do not modify significantly the color of the samples and induced a reduced mass loss for the treated samples.

  14. Characterisation of nanomaterial hydrophobicity using engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Cloé; Valsesia, Andrea; Oddo, Arianna; Ceccone, Giacomo; Spampinato, Valentina; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is of outmost importance for the assessment of the potential risks arising from their extensive use. NMs display indeed a large variety of physico-chemical properties that drastically affect their interaction with biological systems. Among them, hydrophobicity is an important property that is nevertheless only slightly covered by the current physico-chemical characterisation techniques. In this work, we developed a method for the direct characterisation of NM hydrophobicity. The determination of the nanomaterial hydrophobic character is carried out by the direct measurement of the affinity of the NMs for different collectors. Each collector is an engineered surface designed in order to present specific surface charge and hydrophobicity degrees. Being thus characterised by a combination of surface energy components, the collectors enable the NM immobilisation with surface coverage in relation to their hydrophobicity. The experimental results are explained by using the extended DLVO theory, which takes into account the hydrophobic forces acting between NMs and collectors.

  15. Learning from nature: binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this Review, nature-inspired binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials (BCCNMs), consisting of two components with entirely opposite physiochemical properties at the nanoscale, are presented as a novel concept for the building of promising materials. Once the distance between the two nanoscopic components is comparable to the characteristic length of some physical interactions, the cooperation between these complementary building blocks becomes dominant and endows the macroscopic materials with novel and superior properties. The first implementation of the BCCNMs is the design of bio-inspired smart materials with superwettability and their reversible switching between different wetting states in response to various kinds of external stimuli. Coincidentally, recent studies on other types of functional nanomaterials contribute more examples to support the idea of BCCNMs, which suggests a potential yet comprehensive range of future applications in both materials science and engineering.

  16. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  17. Biological Surface Adsorption Index of Nanomaterials: Modelling Surface Interactions of Nanomaterials with Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ran; Riviere, Jim E

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the interactions between nanomaterials and their surrounding environment is crucial for safety evaluation in the application of nanotechnology as well as its development and standardization. In this chapter, we demonstrate the importance of the adsorption of surrounding molecules onto the surface of nanomaterials by forming biocorona and thus impact the bio-identity and fate of those materials. We illustrate the key factors including various physical forces in determining the interaction happening at bio-nano interfaces. We further discuss the mathematical endeavors in explaining and predicting the adsorption phenomena, and propose a new statistics-based surface adsorption model, the Biological Surface Adsorption Index (BSAI), to quantitatively analyze the interaction profile of surface adsorption of a large group of small organic molecules onto nanomaterials with varying surface physicochemical properties, first employing five descriptors representing the surface energy profile of the nanomaterials, then further incorporating traditional semi-empirical adsorption models to address concentration effects of solutes. These Advancements in surface adsorption modelling showed a promising development in the application of quantitative predictive models in biological applications, nanomedicine, and environmental safety assessment of nanomaterials.

  18. Engineering the heart: evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; Mengqiu Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-16

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction.

  19. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction. PMID:24429673

  20. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction.

  1. [Health effects of nanomaterials on next generation].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ken; Shinkai, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Yanagita, Shinya; Umezawa, Masakazu; Yokota, Satoshi; Tainaka, Hitoshi; Oshio, Shigeru; Ihara, Tomomi; Sugamata, Masao

    2011-02-01

    In order to discuss the health effects of nanomaterials, we cannot disregard the research on the health effects of airborne particulates. It is said that many of the fine or ultrafine particles in airborne particulates originate from diesel vehicles in metropolitan areas. The results of not only animal experiments but many epidemiologic surveys and volunteer intervention experiments in humans are reported on the health effects of particles. Although the health effects of the particulate matter particle sizes below 10 µm (PM10) were investigated in the initial studies, recently even smaller particles have come to be regarded as questionable and research of the health effects of the minute particulate matter below 2.5 µm (PM2.5) has been done. However, our recent study about maternal exposure to diesel exhaust suggests that health effect study of PM0.1, particles below 0.1 µm (100 nm), namely nanoparticles, is necessary from now on. We are proceeding with the study of the health effects of various types of intentionally produced nanomaterials such as carbon black, carbon nanotube, fullerene and titanium dioxide, examining in particular their influence on next generation. Although there are differences in the sites affected and the seriousness of the damage, basically similar findings to DEPs mentioned above are being discovered in research on nanomaterials. Regardless of dosage and administration method, such as inhalation, endotracheal administration, nasal drip and subcutaneous administration, once nanomaterials enter the bloodstream of a pregnant mother mouse, they move to the offspring and have effects on them. The effects may appear as various symptoms in the process of growth after birth, and can sometimes lead to the onset and aggravation of serious diseases.

  2. Measurement of Transport Properties of Aerosolized Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Airborne engineered nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), functionalized MWCNT, graphene, fullerene, silver and gold nanorods were characterized using a tandem system of a differential mobility analyzer and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to obtain their airborne transport properties and understand their relationship to morphological characteristics. These nanomaterials were aerosolized using different generation methods such as electrospray, pneumatic atomization, and dry aerosolization techniques, and their airborne transport properties such as mobility and aerodynamic diameters, mass scaling exponent, dynamic shape factor, and effective density were obtained. Laboratory experiments were conducted to directly measure mobility diameter and mass of the airborne nanomaterials using tandem mobility-mass measurements. Mass scaling exponents, aerodynamic diameters, dynamic shape factors and effective densities of mobility-classified particles were obtained from particle mass and the mobility diameter. Microscopy analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was performed to obtain morphological descriptors such as envelop diameter, open area, aspect ratio, and projected area diameter. The morphological information from the TEM was compared with measured aerodynamic and mobility diameters of the particles. The results showed that aerodynamic diameter is smaller than mobility diameter below 500 nm by a factor of 2 to 4 for all nanomaterials except silver and gold nanorods. Morphologies of MWCNTs generated by liquid-based method, such as pneumatic atomization, are more compact than those of dry dispersed MWCNTs, indicating that the morphology depends on particle generation method. TEM analysis showed that projected area diameter of MWCNTs appears to be in reasonable agreement with mobility diameter in the size range from 100 – 400 nm. Principal component analysis of the obtained airborne particle

  3. Transformative Colloidal Nanomaterials for Mid- Infrared Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-11

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The grant focused on the Photoluminescence efficiency of HgTe colloidal quantum dots. The photoluminescence quantum yield...of HgTe colloidal quantum dots was measured from 1800 to 6500 cm-1 . There is a steep drop at low energy consistent with the generic gap law...Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Transformative Colloidal Nanomaterials for Mid- Infrared Devices The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this

  4. Biomedical Applications of Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Nayak, Tapas R.; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement over the last several decades. Zinc oxide (ZnO), which can exhibit a wide variety of nanostructures, possesses unique semiconducting, optical, and piezoelectric properties hence has been investigated for a wide variety of applications. One of the most important features of ZnO nanomaterials is low toxicity and biodegradability. Zn2+ is an indispensable trace element for adults (~10 mg of Zn2+ per day is recommended) and it is involved in various aspects of metabolism. Chemically, the surface of ZnO is rich in -OH groups, which can be readily functionalized by various surface decorating molecules. In this review article, we summarized the current status of the use of ZnO nanomaterials for biomedical applications, such as biomedical imaging (which includes fluorescence, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, as well as dual-modality imaging), drug delivery, gene delivery, and biosensing of a wide array of molecules of interest. Research in biomedical applications of ZnO nanomaterials will continue to flourish over the next decade, and much research effort will be needed to develop biocompatible/biodegradable ZnO nanoplatforms for potential clinical translation. PMID:24206130

  5. Nanomaterials Enabled Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Pei

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs), as the third generation of solar cells, have attracted tremendous attention for their unique properties. The semi-transparent nature, low-cost, environmental friendliness, and convenient manufacturing conditions of this generation of solar cells are promising aspects of DSCs that make them competitive in their future applications. However, much improvement in many aspects of DSCs' is required for the realization of its full potential. In this thesis, various nanomaterials, such as graphene, multi wall carbon nanotubes, vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes, hybrid structures and etc, have been used to improve the performance of DSCs. First, the application of graphene covered metal grids as transparent conductive electrodes in DSCs is explored. It is demonstrated that the mechanical properties of these flexible hybrid transparent electrodes, in both bending and stretching tests, are better than their oxide-based counter parts. Moreover, different kinds of carbon nanotubes, for instance vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes, have been used as a replacement for traditional platinum counter electrodes, in both iodine electrolyte, and sulfide-electrolyte. Further, a flexible, seamlessly connected, 3-dimensional vertically-aligned few wall carbon nanotubes graphene hybrid structures on Ni foil as DSCs' counter electrodes improve their efficiency significantly. All these nanomaterials enabled DSCs architectures achieve a comparable or better performance than standard brittle platinum/fluorine doped tin oxide combination. The large surface area of such nanomaterials in addition to the high electrical conductivity and their mechanical robustness provides a platform for significant enhancements in DSCs' performance.

  6. Octanol-water distribution of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hristovski, Kiril D; Westerhoff, Paul K; Posner, Jonathan D

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of pH and ionic strength on octanol-water distribution of five model engineered nanomaterials. Distribution experiments resulted in a spectrum of three broadly classified scenarios: distribution in the aqueous phase, distribution in the octanol, and distribution into the octanol-water interface. Two distribution coefficients were derived to describe the distribution of nanoparticles among octanol, water and their interface. The results show that particle surface charge, surface functionalization, and composition, as well as the solvent ionic strength and presence of natural organic matter, dramatically impact this distribution. Distributions of nanoparticles into the interface were significant for nanomaterials that exhibit low surface charge in natural pH ranges. Increased ionic strengths also contributed to increased distributions of nanoparticle into the interface. Similarly to the octanol-water distribution coefficients, which represent a starting point in predicting the environmental fate, bioavailability and transport of organic pollutants, distribution coefficients such as the ones described in this study could help to easily predict the fate, bioavailability, and transport of engineered nanomaterials in the environment.

  7. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-08-01

    A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens) of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction). Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than “just” an enhanced surface area.

  8. Nanomaterial-assisted aptamers for optical sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoqing; Wang, Yunqing; Chen, Lingxin; Choo, Jaebum

    2010-04-15

    Aptamers are single-strand DNA or RNA selected in vitro that bind specifically with a broad range of targets from metal ions, organic molecules, to proteins, cells and microorganisms. As an emerging class of recognition elements, aptamers offer remarkable convenience in the design and modification of their structures, which has motivated them to generate a great variety of aptamer sensors (aptasensors) that exhibit high sensitivity as well as specificity. On the other hand, the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology has generated nanomaterials with novel properties compared with their counterparts in macroscale. By integrating their strengths of both fields, recently, versatile aptamers coupling with novel nanomaterials for designing nanomaterial-assisted aptasensors (NAAs) make the combinations universal strategies for sensitive optical sensing. NAAs have been considered as an excellent sensing platform and found wide applications in analytical community. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of various optical NAAs, employing various detection techniques including colorimetry, fluorometry, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR).

  9. Macro-ions collapse leading to hybrid bio-nanomaterials.

    SciTech Connect

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2009-10-01

    I used supramolecular self-assembling cyanine and the polyamine spermine binding to Escherichia coli genomic DNA as a model for DNA collapse during high throughput screening. Polyamine binding to DNA converts the normally right handed B-DNA into left handed Z-DNA conformation. Polyamine binding to DNA was inhibited by the supramolecular self-assembling cyanine. Self-assembly of cyanine upon DNA scaffold was likewise competitively inhibited by spermine as signaled by fluorescence quench from DNA-cyanine ensemble. Sequence of DNA exposure to cyanine or spermine was critical in determining the magnitude of fluorescence quench. Methanol potentiated spermine inhibition by >10-fold. The IC{sub 50} for spermine inhibition was 0.35 {+-} 0.03 {micro}M and the association constant Ka was 2.86 x 10{sup -6}M. Reversibility of the DNA-polyamine interactions was evident from quench mitigation at higher concentrations of cyanine. System flexibility was demonstrated by similar spermine interactions with {lambda}DNA. The choices and rationale regarding the polyamine, the cyanine dye as well as the remarkable effects of methanol are discussed in detail. Cyanine might be a safer alternative to the mutagenic toxin ethidium bromide for investigating DNA-drug interactions. The combined actions of polyamines and alcohols mediate DNA collapse producing hybrid bio-nanomaterials with novel signaling properties that might be useful in biosensor applications. Finally, this work will be submitted to Analytical Sciences (Japan) for publication. This journal published our earlier, related work on cyanine supramolecular self-assembly upon a variety of nucleic acid scaffolds.

  10. Phorbol esters induce intracellular accumulation of the anti-apoptotic protein PED/PEA-15 by preventing ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Anna; Oriente, Francesco; Iovino, Salvatore; Alberobello, A Teresa; Barbagallo, Alessia P M; Esposito, Iolanda; Fiory, Francesca; Teperino, Raffaele; Ungaro, Paola; Miele, Claudia; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2007-03-23

    Phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PED/PEA)-15 is an anti-apoptotic protein whose expression is increased in several cancer cells and following experimental skin carcinogenesis. Exposure of untransfected C5N keratinocytes and transfected HEK293 cells to phorbol esters (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)) increased PED/PEA-15 cellular content and enhanced its phosphorylation at serine 116 in a time-dependent fashion. Ser-116 --> Gly (PED(S116G)) but not Ser-104 --> Gly (PED(S104G)) substitution almost completely abolished TPA regulation of PED/PEA-15 expression. TPA effect was also prevented by antisense inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC)-zeta and by the expression of a dominant-negative PKC-zeta mutant cDNA in HEK293 cells. Similar to long term TPA treatment, overexpression of wild-type PKC-zeta increased cellular content and phosphorylation of WT-PED/PEA-15 and PED(S104G) but not of PED(S116G). These events were accompanied by the activation of Ca2+-calmodulin kinase (CaMK) II and prevented by the CaMK blocker, KN-93. At variance, the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin mimicked TPA action on PED/PEA-15 intracellular accumulation and reverted the effects of PKC-zeta and CaMK inhibition. Moreover, we show that PED/PEA-15 bound ubiquitin in intact cells. PED/PEA-15 ubiquitinylation was reduced by TPA and PKC-zeta overexpression and increased by KN-93 and PKC-zeta block. Furthermore, in HEK293 cells expressing PED(S116G), TPA failed to prevent ubiquitin-dependent degradation of the protein. Accordingly, in the same cells, TPA-mediated protection from apoptosis was blunted. Taken together, our results indicate that TPA increases PED/PEA-15 expression at the post-translational level by inducing phosphorylation at serine 116 and preventing ubiquitinylation and proteosomal degradation.

  11. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    DOE PAGES

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; ...

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterialmore » effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.« less

  12. Nano-bio effects: interaction of nanomaterials with cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang-Chien; Jiang, Xiumei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Chunying; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2013-05-07

    With the advancements in nanotechnology, studies on the synthesis, modification, application, and toxicology evaluation of nanomaterials are gaining increased attention. In particular, the applications of nanomaterials in biological systems are attracting considerable interest because of their unique, tunable, and versatile physicochemical properties. Artificially engineered nanomaterials can be well controlled for appropriate usage, and the tuned physicochemical properties directly influence the interactions between nanomaterials and cells. This review summarizes recently synthesized major nanomaterials that have potential biomedical applications. Focus is given on the interactions, including cellular uptake, intracellular trafficking, and toxic response, while changing the physicochemical properties of versatile materials. The importance of physicochemical properties such as the size, shape, and surface modifications of the nanomaterials in their biological effects is also highlighted in detail. The challenges of recent studies and future prospects are presented as well. This review benefits relatively new researchers in this area and gives them a systematic overview of nano-bio interaction, hopefully for further experimental design.

  13. Biological Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: Needs for the Next Decade

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial–biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterial effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space. PMID:27162961

  14. Role of enhanced laser field in laser processing of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Kuk, Seungkuk; Kim, Eunpa; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Hwang, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Lasers have proven to be unique tools for a highly selective processing of nanomaterials system on the basis of the enhanced laser field, maintaining other sensitive portion in the system untouched. However, in many practical applications, a wide interspacing distribution among nanomaterials and nonlinear laser absorption properties of the nanomaterials in the highly excited nanomaterials states, frequently lead to rather adverse effects in terms of controlled nanomaterials processing. In this study, we will take a few laser nanomaterials processing examples mainly based on the nanowires system including the spin coated metallic nanowires for transparent electrode applications and selective semiconductor nanowires growth from the metallic nanocatalysts, and discuss on the role of the enhanced laser field via the combined theoretical and experimental investigations. Specific aims of properly utilizing the enhanced laser fields are to achieve improved electrical conductance for practical transparent electrode applications, and to facilitate directed growth of semiconductor nanowires at designated sample locations, respectively.

  15. Nano-bio effects: interaction of nanomaterials with cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Liang-Chien; Jiang, Xiumei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Chunying; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2013-04-01

    With the advancements in nanotechnology, studies on the synthesis, modification, application, and toxicology evaluation of nanomaterials are gaining increased attention. In particular, the applications of nanomaterials in biological systems are attracting considerable interest because of their unique, tunable, and versatile physicochemical properties. Artificially engineered nanomaterials can be well controlled for appropriate usage, and the tuned physicochemical properties directly influence the interactions between nanomaterials and cells. This review summarizes recently synthesized major nanomaterials that have potential biomedical applications. Focus is given on the interactions, including cellular uptake, intracellular trafficking, and toxic response, while changing the physicochemical properties of versatile materials. The importance of physicochemical properties such as the size, shape, and surface modifications of the nanomaterials in their biological effects is also highlighted in detail. The challenges of recent studies and future prospects are presented as well. This review benefits relatively new researchers in this area and gives them a systematic overview of nano-bio interaction, hopefully for further experimental design.

  16. Isolation of Phorbol Esters from Euphorbia grandicornis and Evaluation of Protein Kinase C- and Human Platelet-Activating Effects of Euphorbiaceae Diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Rédei, Dóra; Forgo, Peter; Li, Yu; Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2016-10-28

    Human platelets contain conventional (α and β) and novel isoforms of PKC (δ and θ), and PKC activation can result in platelet aggregation and secretion reaction that are important for thrombus formation. Several tumor-promoting Euphorbiaceae diterpenes are known to act as direct activators of PKC, but many types of such diterpenes have not been studied as platelet stimulators. In the present study, two new and five known phorbol esters were isolated from Euphorbia grandicornis. Two of the isolated phorbol esters together with compounds representing ingenane, jatrophane, and myrsinane structural types were studied on PKC activation and platelet stimulation. The investigated phorbol esters and ingenane esters induced blood platelet aggregation and ATP secretion. PKC activation was demonstrated by inducing membrane translocation of PKCs, phosphorylation of PKC substrates, and activation of PKC signaling pathways. The PKC-activating effect of the compounds correlated well with their efficacy to cause platelet stimulation. Moreover, by using an isoform-specific PKC inhibitor, it was found that besides conventional PKCs novel PKCs also play a positive role in platelet activation caused by phorbol/ingenane esters, especially in regulating platelet aggregation. The present results suggest that platelets afford a useful model for studying PKC activators of natural origin or their chemical derivatives.

  17. The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on whole blood oxidative response as assessed by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differences between lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on whole blood oxidative response using luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL) are currently unknown in cattle. Luminol-dependent CL measures the amount of reactive oxygen species released from leukocytes a...

  18. Effects of Phorbol Esters and Lipopolysaccharide on Endothelial Cell Microfilaments: Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy and Quantitative Morphometry of Dose Dependent Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-29

    the same ECmo (1-5 nM) for both biochemical and morphological processes. -PDB was less potent in inducing the disruption of microfilament structure...but the agent was less potent than PMA, with an ECmo of about 80 nM. The agent 4a-phorbol, which is not a tumor-promoter, had no effect on the

  19. Management of nanomaterials safety in research environment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite numerous discussions, workshops, reviews and reports about responsible development of nanotechnology, information describing health and environmental risk of engineered nanoparticles or nanomaterials is severely lacking and thus insufficient for completing rigorous risk assessment on their use. However, since preliminary scientific evaluations indicate that there are reasonable suspicions that activities involving nanomaterials might have damaging effects on human health; the precautionary principle must be applied. Public and private institutions as well as industries have the duty to adopt preventive and protective measures proportionate to the risk intensity and the desired level of protection. In this work, we present a practical, 'user-friendly' procedure for a university-wide safety and health management of nanomaterials, developed as a multi-stakeholder effort (government, accident insurance, researchers and experts for occupational safety and health). The process starts using a schematic decision tree that allows classifying the nano laboratory into three hazard classes similar to a control banding approach (from Nano 3 - highest hazard to Nano1 - lowest hazard). Classifying laboratories into risk classes would require considering actual or potential exposure to the nanomaterial as well as statistical data on health effects of exposure. Due to the fact that these data (as well as exposure limits for each individual material) are not available, risk classes could not be determined. For each hazard level we then provide a list of required risk mitigation measures (technical, organizational and personal). The target 'users' of this safety and health methodology are researchers and safety officers. They can rapidly access the precautionary hazard class of their activities and the corresponding adequate safety and health measures. We succeed in convincing scientist dealing with nano-activities that adequate safety measures and management are promoting

  20. Management of nanomaterials safety in research environment.

    PubMed

    Groso, Amela; Petri-Fink, Alke; Magrez, Arnaud; Riediker, Michael; Meyer, Thierry

    2010-12-10

    Despite numerous discussions, workshops, reviews and reports about responsible development of nanotechnology, information describing health and environmental risk of engineered nanoparticles or nanomaterials is severely lacking and thus insufficient for completing rigorous risk assessment on their use. However, since preliminary scientific evaluations indicate that there are reasonable suspicions that activities involving nanomaterials might have damaging effects on human health; the precautionary principle must be applied. Public and private institutions as well as industries have the duty to adopt preventive and protective measures proportionate to the risk intensity and the desired level of protection. In this work, we present a practical, 'user-friendly' procedure for a university-wide safety and health management of nanomaterials, developed as a multi-stakeholder effort (government, accident insurance, researchers and experts for occupational safety and health). The process starts using a schematic decision tree that allows classifying the nano laboratory into three hazard classes similar to a control banding approach (from Nano 3--highest hazard to Nano1--lowest hazard). Classifying laboratories into risk classes would require considering actual or potential exposure to the nanomaterial as well as statistical data on health effects of exposure. Due to the fact that these data (as well as exposure limits for each individual material) are not available, risk classes could not be determined. For each hazard level we then provide a list of required risk mitigation measures (technical, organizational and personal). The target 'users' of this safety and health methodology are researchers and safety officers. They can rapidly access the precautionary hazard class of their activities and the corresponding adequate safety and health measures. We succeed in convincing scientist dealing with nano-activities that adequate safety measures and management are promoting

  1. Inhibition of superoxide anion production in guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes by a seleno-organic compound, ebselen.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, S; Omura, K; Katayama, T; Okamura, N; Ohtsuka, T; Ishibashi, S; Masayasu, H

    1987-10-01

    Production of superoxide anion (O2-) induced by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) in intact guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) was markedly inhibited by a seleno-organic compound, 2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one (Ebselen), with glutathione peroxidase-like activity. The compound almost completely inhibited O2- production by a particulate fraction prepared from TPA-treated PMNL at a concentration as low as 250 nM.

  2. Environmental implications of nanomaterials: are we studying the right thing?

    PubMed

    Turco, R F; Bischoff, M; Tong, Z H; Nies, L

    2011-08-01

    A fundamental lack of data on the potential impacts of carbon based nanomaterials on natural ecosystems currently exists. The gap between what we know about environmental impacts and new products that may contain nanomaterials continues to get wider especially related to knowledge about nanocomposites. In this paper we present ideas and concerns about the current state of knowledge on nanomaterials in the environment and present a number of points about what recent work has provided us about the novel materials.

  3. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for biosensing and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rong-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2011-09-05

    Aptamers represent a class of single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that play important roles in biosensing and biomedical applications. However, aptamers can gain more flexibility as molecular recognition tools by taking advantage of the unique chemical and physical properties provided by nanomaterials. Such aptamer-nanomaterial conjugates are having an increasing impact in the fields of biosensing, bioimaging, and therapy. The recent advances and limitations of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in biosensing and biomedical applications are briefly introduced and discussed.

  4. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 {mu}g/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 {mu}g/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 {mu}g/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 {mu}g/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation.

  5. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly; Tickner, Joel; Ellenbecker, Michael; Baun, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternatives assessment approaches, because they can be considered both emerging "chemicals" of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging, and critical elements in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and to outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. The present paper focuses on the adaptability of existing hazard and exposure assessment approaches to engineered nanomaterials as well as strategies to design inherently safer nanomaterials. We argue that alternatives assessment for nanomaterials is complicated by the sheer number of nanomaterials possible. As a result, the inclusion of new data tools that can efficiently and effectively evaluate nanomaterials as substitutes is needed to strengthen the alternatives assessment process. However, we conclude that with additional tools to enhance traditional hazard and exposure assessment modules of alternatives assessment, such as the use of mechanistic toxicity screens and control banding tools, alternatives assessment can be adapted to evaluate engineered nanomaterials as potential substitutes for chemicals of concern and to ensure safer nanomaterials are incorporated in the design of new products. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:177-187. © 2016 SETAC.

  6. Increased glucose transport in response to phorbol ester growth factors, and insulin: relationship to phosphorylation of the glucose transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, W.J.; Gibbs, E.M.; Witters, L.A.; Lienhard, G.E.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the relationship between the increase in glucose transport induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), EGF, PDGF, and insulin and the phosphorylation state of the glucose transporter in human fibroblasts. To assay transport, cells were cultured in medium with 10% serum for 5 days and then for 2 days in phosphate-free medium with 5% serum. Exposure to each agonist stimulated transport, as measured by the uptake of /sup 3/H-2-deoxyglucose over a 2 min period. Values for maximal percent stimulation, time needed to reach maximal stimulation, and concentration required to achieve half-maximal stimulation were as follows: PMA, 80%, 30 min, 2 nM; EGF, 30%, 10 min, 0.2 nM; Insulin, 45%, 10 min, 17 nM. In the case of PDGF, uptake was stimulated 65% by treatment with 0.7 or 1.4 nM for 20 min. Phosphorylation of the glucose transporter was measured in cells cultured for 5-7 days in medium with 10% serum and exposed to 670 ..mu..Ci/ml /sup 32/P/sub i/ for 100 min. The agonist was then added at a saturating dose for 20 min, and the glucose transporter was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates using a monoclonal antibody. Under these conditions, no basal phosphorylation of the transporter was detected, and only phorbol ester stimulated significant incorporation of phosphate into the transport protein. Experiments are currently in progress to quantitate transporter phosphorylation under conditions identical to those used for the assay of transport. These results suggest that while the transporter is a substrate for protein kinase C in vivo, phosphorylation of the transporter is not required for increased transport in response to growth factors and insulin.

  7. Exploring the possibilities and limitations of a nanomaterials genome.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chenxi; Siler, Todd; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-07

    What are we going to do with the cornucopia of nanomaterials appearing in the open and patent literature, every day? Imagine the benefits of an intelligent and convenient means of categorizing, organizing, sifting, sorting, connecting, and utilizing this information in scientifically and technologically innovative ways by building a Nanomaterials Genome founded upon an all-purpose Periodic Table of Nanomaterials. In this Concept article, inspired by work on the Human Genome project, which began in 1989 together with motivation from the recent emergence of the Materials Genome project initiated in 2011 and the Nanoinformatics Roadmap 2020 instigated in 2010, we envision the development of a Nanomaterials Genome (NMG) database with the most advanced data-mining tools that leverage inference engines to help connect and interpret patterns of nanomaterials information. It will be equipped with state-of-the-art visualization techniques that rapidly organize and picture, categorize and interrelate the inherited behavior of complex nanomatter from the information programmed in its constituent nanomaterials building blocks. A Nanomaterials Genome Initiative (NMGI) of the type imagined herein has the potential to serve the global nanoscience community with an opportunity to speed up the development continuum of nanomaterials through the innovation process steps of discovery, structure determination and property optimization, functionality elucidation, system design and integration, certification and manufacturing to deployment in technologies that apply these versatile nanomaterials in environmentally responsible ways. The possibilities and limitations of this concept are critically evaluated in this article.

  8. Radio-nanomaterials for biomedical applications: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weifei; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2016-07-01

    The incorporation of radioactive isotope(s) into conventional nanomaterials can bring extra properties which are not possessed by original materials. The resulting radioactive nanomaterials (radio-nanomaterials), with added physical/chemical properties, can be used as important tools for different biomedical applications. In this review, our goal is to provide an up-to-date overview on these applications using radio-nanomaterials. The first section illustrates the utilization of radionanomaterials for understanding of in vivo kinetics of their parent nano-materials. In the second section, we focus on two primary applications of radio-nanomaterials: imaging and therapeutic delivery. With various methods being used to form radio-nanomaterials, they can be used for positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and multimodal imaging. Therapeutic isotopes-loading radio-nanomaterials can possess selective killing efficacy of diseased cells (e.g. tumor cells) and can provide promises for certain isotopes which are not able to be used in a conventional manner. The successful and versatile biomedical applications of radio-nanomaterials warrants further investigations of those materials and their optimizations can pave the way to future imaging guidable, personalized treatments in patients.

  9. Toxicity and Environmental Risks of Nanomaterials: Challenges and Future Needs

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Paresh Chandra; Yu, Hongtao; Fu, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has gained a great deal of public interest due to the needs and applications of nanomaterials in many areas of human endeavors including industry, agriculture, business, medicine and public health. Environmental exposure to nanomaterials is inevitable as nanomaterials become part of our daily life, and as a result, nanotoxicity research is gaining attention. This review presents a summary of recent research efforts on fate, behavior and toxicity of different classes of nanomaterials in the environment. A critical evaluation of challenges and future needs for the safe environmental nanotechnology has been discussed. PMID:19204862

  10. Therapeutic application of anti-angiogenic nanomaterials in cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature, plays a vital role in physiological and pathological processes (embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis). The overall balance of angiogenesis inside the human body is maintained by pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. The processes by which drugs inhibit angiogenesis as well as tumor growth are called the anti-angiogenesis technique, a most promising cancer treatment strategy. Over the last couple of decades, scientists have been developing angiogenesis inhibitors for the treatment of cancers. However, conventional anti-angiogenic therapy has several limitations including drug resistance that can create problems for a successful therapeutic strategy. Therefore, a new comprehensive treatment strategy using antiangiogenic agents for the treatment of cancer is urgently needed. Recently researchers have been developing and designing several nanoparticles that show anti-angiogenic properties. These nanomedicines could be useful as an alternative strategy for the treatment of various cancers using anti-angiogenic therapy. In this review article, we critically focus on the potential application of anti-angiogenic nanomaterial and nanoparticle based drug/siRNA/peptide delivery systems in cancer therapeutics. We also discuss the basic and clinical perspectives of anti-angiogenesis therapy, highlighting its importance in tumor angiogenesis, current status and future prospects and challenges.Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature, plays a vital role in physiological and pathological processes (embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis). The overall balance of angiogenesis inside the human body is maintained by pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. The processes by which drugs inhibit angiogenesis as well as tumor growth are called the anti-angiogenesis technique, a most promising cancer treatment strategy. Over the

  11. Tailoring thermal interfaces with nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Indira

    Thermal interfaces are key to ensure the reliable performance of many semiconductor, energy and electronic systems. High thermal conductivity (k), low elastic modulus (E) interface materials are required to dissipate heat and relieve thermo-mechanical stresses. The aim of this thesis is to develop compliant, high k nanocomposite materials for thermal interface applications utilizing nanostructured networks. Realizing high k nanocomposites is a challenge because of difficulties in incorporating high fractions of uniformly dispersed nanofillers and countering low filler-matrix interfacial conductance, while retaining a low elastic modulus. In this thesis, it is demonstrated that these issues are obviated by using < 5 volume % sub-10-nm cold welded gold nanowire fillers to obtain an unprecedented 30-fold increase in polydimethylsiloxane thermal conductivity that is 6-fold higher than previously reported nanocomposites at low nanofiller loadings and exceeds theoretical predictions. The nanowire diameter and aspect ratio are key to obtain cold-welded networks that enhance k at low filler fractions, while fostering low E. Along with high k, tailoring high thermal contact conductance G c is crucial for many applications. This thesis reveals a critical correlation between the rheological behavior of a high k gold-nanowire-filled polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite and its thermal contact conductance with copper. At a critical filler fraction, an abrupt increase in the nanocomposite k is accompanied by a liquid-solid transition and a multifold decrease in Gc. These concurrent changes are attributed to nanowire percolation network formation and pre-cure polymer gelation that inhibits the formation of conformal void-free interfaces. These findings will be important for designing processing sequences to realize heterointerfaces with nanowire filled high k nanocomposite materials. Another important finding of this thesis is that nanowire networks can result in mechanical

  12. Comparison of transcriptional response to phorbol ester, bryostatin 1, and bryostatin analogs in LNCaP and U937 cancer cell lines provides insight into their differential mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Kedei, N; Telek, A; Michalowski, A M; Kraft, M B; Li, W; Poudel, Y B; Rudra, A; Petersen, M E; Keck, G E; Blumberg, P M

    2013-02-01

    Bryostatin 1, like the phorbol esters, binds to and activates protein kinase C (PKC) but paradoxically antagonizes many but not all phorbol ester responses. Previously, we have compared patterns of biological response to bryostatin 1, phorbol ester, and the bryostatin 1 derivative Merle 23 in two human cancer cell lines, LNCaP and U937. Bryostatin 1 fails to induce a typical phorbol ester biological response in either cell line, whereas Merle 23 resembles phorbol ester in the U937 cells and bryostatin 1 in the LNCaP cells. Here, we have compared the pattern of their transcriptional response in both cell lines. We examined by qPCR the transcriptional response as a function of dose and time for a series of genes regulated by PKCs. In both cell lines bryostatin 1 differed primarily from phorbol ester in having a shorter duration of transcriptional modulation. This was not due to bryostatin 1 instability, since bryostatin 1 suppressed the phorbol ester response. In both cell lines Merle 23 induced a pattern of transcription largely like that of phorbol ester although with a modest reduction at later times in the LNCaP cells, suggesting that the difference in biological response of the two cell lines to Merle 23 lies downstream of this transcriptional regulation. For a series of bryostatins and analogs which ranged from bryostatin 1-like to phorbol ester-like in activity on the U937 cells, the duration of transcriptional response correlated with the pattern of biological activity, suggesting that this may provide a robust platform for structure activity analysis.

  13. Terahertz science and technology of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, R. R.; Kono, J.; Portnoi, M. E.

    2014-08-01

    The diverse applications of terahertz (THz) radiation and its importance to fundamental science makes finding ways to generate, manipulate and detect THz radiation one of the key areas of modern applied physics. One approach is to utilize carbon nanomaterials, in particular, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene. Their novel optical and electronic properties offer much promise to the field of THz science and technology. This article describes the past, current, and future of THz science and technology of carbon nanotubes and graphene. We will review fundamental studies such as THz dynamic conductivity, THz nonlinearities and ultrafast carrier dynamics as well as THz applications such as THz sources, detectors, modulators, antennas and polarizers.

  14. Polymer-mediated formation of polyoxomolybdate nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Quan

    A polymer-mediated synthetic pathway to a polyoxomolybdate nanomaterial is investigated in this work. Block copolymers or homopolymers containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) are mixed with a MoO2(OH)(OOH) aqueous solution to form a golden gel or viscous solution. As revealed by synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements, electron microscopy, and other characterization techniques, the final dark blue polyoxomolybdate product is a highly ordered simple cubic network similar to certain zeolite structure but with a much larger lattice constant of ˜5.2 nm. The average size of the cube-like single crystals is close to 1 mum. Based on its relatively low density (˜2.2 g/cm3), the nanomaterial can be highly porous if the amount of the residual polymer can be substantially reduced. The valence of molybdenum is ˜5.7 based on cerimetric titration, representing the mixed-valence nature of the polyoxomolybdate structure. The self-assembled structures (if any) of the polymer gel do not have any correlation with the final polyoxomolybdate nanostructure, excluding the possible role of polymers being a structure-directing template. On the other hand, the PEO polymer stabilizes the precursor molybdenum compound through coordination between its ether oxygen atoms and molybdenum atoms, and reduces the molybdenum (VI) precursor compound with its hydroxyl group being a reducing agent. The rare simple cubic ordering necessitates the existence of special affinities among the polyoxomolybdate nanosphere units resulted from the reduction reaction. Our mechanism study shows that the acidified condition is necessary for the synthesis of the mixed-valence polyoxomolybdate clusters, while H2O2 content modulates the rate of the reduction reaction. The polymer degradation is evidenced by the observation of a huge viscosity change, and is likely through a hydrolysis process catalyzed by molybdenum compounds. Cube-like polyoxomolybdate nanocrystals with size of ˜40 nm are obtained by means of

  15. Sonochemical growth of nanomaterials in carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Jesionek, M; Nowak, M; Mistewicz, K; Kępińska, M; Stróż, D; Bednarczyk, I; Paszkiewicz, R

    2017-03-18

    Recent achievements in investigations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with ternary chalcohalides (antimony sulfoiodide (SbSI) and antimony selenoiodide (SbSeI)) are presented. Parameters of sonochemical encapsulation of nanocrystalline semiconducting ferroelectric SbSI-type materials in CNTs are reported. This low temperature technology is convenient, fast, efficient and environmentally friendly route for producing novel type of hybrid materials useful for nanodevices. Structure as well as optical and electrical properties of SbSI@CNTs and SbSeI@CNTs are described. Advantages of ultrasonic joining of such filled CNTs with metal microelectrodes are emphasized. The possible applications of these nanomaterials as gas sensors are shown.

  16. The commercialization of nanomaterials: Today and tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Todd M.; Rardon, Daniel E.; Friedman, Lawrence B.; Vega, Luis Fanor

    2006-04-01

    Nanomaterials are receiving increasing attention in the technical community and the public at large. There are numerous activities throughout the world focusing on a wide range of developments, including privately and publicly funded work. From an industrial perspective, the measure of success of these programs will be the number of new products that are introduced to the market. The purpose of this article is to discuss issues related to the commercialization of nano-enhanced materials as well as to propose areas for future commercial developments.

  17. Reusable nanomaterial and plant biomass composites for the removal of Methylene Blue from water.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nidhi; Basniwal, Rupesh Kumar; Suman; Srivastava, Ashwani Kumar; Jain, Vinod Kumar

    2010-06-01

    A novel composite has been prepared from nanomaterials and powdered orange peel. The composite is adhered to a plastic strip and may be employed for the removal of synthetic dyes from aqueous solutions, for example from dyehouse effluents. Using Methylene Blue (CI Basic Blue 9) as the reference dye, the characteristics of the adsorbent have been studied. The effect of pH, type of nanomaterial (e.g. carbon nanotubes, activated carbon nanotubes, or titanium dioxide nanoparticles), contact time, and reusability have each been investigated. The results show that the adsorption capacity of suspended orange peel powder, an orange peel strip, and an activated carbon nanotube/orange peel strip were 46%, 67% and 78%, respectively. The uptake of dye was greatly affected by the pH of the solution, maximum absorption being obtained at pH 10, and none at all at pH 2. The improved performance was probably the result of the increased area available for adsorption compared with orange peel powder alone. The system was found to be reusable for up to six cycles without appreciable loss of adsorption and desorption efficiency. The nanomaterial in the composite enhanced performance, not only by increasing adsorption efficiency but also by inhibiting biodegradation of the orange peel powder, thereby increasing the life of the strips. The system offers an economical, user-friendly, efficient and reusable adsorption treatment for the removal of dyes from wastewater.

  18. Preparation and characterization of boron-doped titania nano-materials with antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiangxin; Wang, Yuzheng; Yang, He

    2013-01-01

    Boron-doped TiO2 (B/TiO2) nano-materials were synthesized by a sol-gel method and characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). With the test of bacterial inhibition zone, the antibacterial properties of B/TiO2 nano-materials on Escherichia coli were investigated. The results show that the structure of TiO2 could be transformed from amorphous to anatase and then to rutile by increasing calcination temperature; part of the boron atoms probably have been weaved into the interstitial TiO2 structure or incorporated into the TiO2 lattice through occupying O sites, whereas others exist as B2O3. The results of antibacterial experiment under visible light irradiation show that the B/TiO2 nano-materials exhibit enhanced antibacterial efficiency compared with non-doped TiO2. Ultimately, the action mechanism of B/TiO2 doping is discussed.

  19. Antimicrobial nanomaterials for water disinfection and microbial control: potential applications and implications.

    PubMed

    Li, Qilin; Mahendra, Shaily; Lyon, Delina Y; Brunet, Lena; Liga, Michael V; Li, Dong; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2008-11-01

    The challenge to achieve appropriate disinfection without forming harmful disinfection byproducts by conventional chemical disinfectants, as well as the growing demand for decentralized or point-of-use water treatment and recycling systems calls for new technologies for efficient disinfection and microbial control. Several natural and engineered nanomaterials have demonstrated strong antimicrobial properties through diverse mechanisms including photocatalytic production of reactive oxygen species that damage cell components and viruses (e.g. TiO2, ZnO and fullerol), compromising the bacterial cell envelope (e.g. peptides, chitosan, carboxyfullerene, carbon nanotubes, ZnO and silver nanoparticles (nAg)), interruption of energy transduction (e.g. nAg and aqueous fullerene nanoparticles (nC(60))), and inhibition of enzyme activity and DNA synthesis (e.g. chitosan). Although some nanomaterials have been used as antimicrobial agents in consumer products including home purification systems as antimicrobial agents, their potential for disinfection or microbial control in system level water treatment has not been carefully evaluated. This paper reviews the antimicrobial mechanisms of several nanoparticles, discusses their merits, limitations and applicability for water disinfection and biofouling control, and highlights research needs to utilize novel nanomaterials for water treatment applications.

  20. Phorbol ester and epidermal growth factor enhance the expression of two inducible prostaglandin H synthase genes in rat tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Y; Kitzler, J; Hardman, R; Nettesheim, P; Eling, T E

    1993-07-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory suggested that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA) stimulates prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by inducing de novo synthesis of prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) in a rat tracheal cell line. We report here an extension of this work to further elucidate the mechanisms by which TPA (and epidermal growth factor) stimulates PGE2 production. We used the rat tracheal cell line EGV6, which has a lower basal level of PGE2 production and responds to TPA and EGF stimulation with a much greater increase in PGE2 synthesis than the previously used cell line, Incubation of EGV6 cultures with TPA or EGF resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in PGE2 synthesis up to 40-fold and 6-fold, respectively. Serum also stimulated PGE2 synthesis, while bombesin, retinoic acid, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide did not. PHS protein levels in microsomal preparations from the cells were estimated by Western analysis. Antibodies raised against murine PHS-2 cross reacted with the EGV-6 PHS while several antibody preparations that react with PHS-1 from ram or mouse reacted poorly with the cellular preparation. TPA treatment increased the de novo synthesis of PHS-2 while dexamethasone treatment reduced the response to TPA. Northern blot analysis of mRNA from EGV6 cultures using a ram PHS cDNA revealed a 2.8- and a 4.5- to 4.9-kb (designated 4.9 kb) transcript. Treatment with TPA or EGF increased the expression of both transcripts and this effect was further enhanced by cyclohexamide. To further define the PHS mRNA species of EGV6 cells, two well-characterized murine PHS cDNA probes were used. The constitutive murine PHS cDNA probe hybridized only with the 2.8-kb transcript, and the inducible murine PHS cDNA hybridized only with the 4.9-kb transcript. The rates of induction as well as degradation of the 4.9-kb PHS mRNA were much more rapid than those of the 2.8-kb mRNA species. Dexamethasone partially inhibited the induction of both PHS transcripts by

  1. The Role of Chemical Inhibition of Gap-Junctional Intercellular Communication in Toxicology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-31

    Florida. Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC has been implicated as an important epigenetic modulation during...Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology, February 1991, Dallas, Texas. A major epigenetic modulation induced by many tumor promoters both in vivo...GJIC in rat pancreatic epithelial cells. The results indicated that many chlorinated pesticides , the phorbol ester tumor promoter, TPA, and a number of

  2. Development of a Nanomaterials One-Week Intersession Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Keith A.; Bullen, Heather A.

    2008-01-01

    A novel one-week intersession lecture-lab hybrid course on nanomaterials is presented. The course provided a combination of background theory and hands-on laboratory experiments to educate students about nanomaterials and nanotechnology. The design of the course, subject matter, and laboratory experiments are discussed. Topics and level were…

  3. Biotemplated synthesis of perovskite nanomaterials for solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Nuraje, Nurxat; Dang, Xiangnan; Qi, Jifa; Allen, Mark A; Lei, Yu; Belcher, Angela M

    2012-06-05

    A synthetic method of using genetically engineered M13 virus to mineralize perovskite nanomaterials, particularly strontium titanate (STO) and bismuth ferrite (BFO), is presented. Genetically engineered viruses provide effective templates for perovskite nanomaterials. The virus-templated nanocrystals are small in size, highly crystalline, and show photocatalytic and photovoltaic properties.

  4. Recent Development of Nano-Materials Used in DNA Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Huang, Junran; Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin; Li, Yanbin

    2009-01-01

    As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future. PMID:22346713

  5. Effects of Copper Nanomaterials on Marine Benthic Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper nanomaterials (CuNMs) are used as an anti-bacterial and anti-fouling agent in numerous commercial and industrial products, including water purifiers, fungicides, wood and touch surfaces. The widespread popularity of copper nanomaterials in consumer products increases the r...

  6. Effects of Engineered Nanomaterials on Plants Growth: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hashemi, Farahnaz Sadat Golestan

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level. PMID:25202734

  7. Recent development of nano-materials used in DNA biosensors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Huang, Junran; Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin; Li, Yanbin

    2009-01-01

    As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  8. Nanomaterials for membrane fouling control: accomplishments and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Mi, Baoxia

    2013-11-01

    We report a review of recent research efforts on incorporating nanomaterials-including metal/metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-based nanomaterials, and polymeric nanomaterials-into/onto membranes to improve membrane antifouling properties in biomedical or potentially medical-related applications. In general, nanomaterials can be incorporated into/onto a membrane by blending them into membrane fabricating materials or by attaching them to membrane surfaces via physical or chemical approaches. Overall, the fascinating, multifaceted properties (eg, high hydrophilicity, superparamagnetic properties, antibacterial properties, amenable functionality, strong hydration capability) of nanomaterials provide numerous novel strategies and unprecedented opportunities to fully mitigate membrane fouling. However, there are still challenges in achieving a broader adoption of nanomaterials in the membrane processes used for biomedical applications. Most of these challenges arise from the concerns over their long-term antifouling performance, hemocompatibility, and toxicity toward humans. Therefore, rigorous investigation is still needed before the adoption of some of these nanomaterials in biomedical applications, especially for those nanomaterials proposed to be used in the human body or in contact with living tissue/body fluids for a long period of time. Nevertheless, it is reasonable to predict that the service lifetime of membrane-based biomedical devices and implants will be prolonged significantly with the adoption of appropriate fouling control strategies.

  9. Effects of engineered nanomaterials on plants growth: an overview.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Farzad; Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hashemi, Farahnaz Sadat Golestan; Baghdadi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level.

  10. Biophysical responses upon the interaction of nanomaterials with cellular interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun-Long; Putcha, Nirupama; Ng, Kee Woei; Leong, David Tai; Lim, Chwee Teck; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Chen, Xiaodong

    2013-03-19

    The explosion of study of nanomaterials in biological applications (the nano-bio interface) can be ascribed to nanomaterials' growing importance in diagnostics, therapeutics, theranostics (therapeutic diagnostics), and targeted modulation of cellular processes. However, a growing number of critics have raised concerns over the potential risks of nanomaterials to human health and safety. It is essential to understand nanomaterials' potential toxicity before they are tested in humans. These risks are complicated to unravel, however, because of the complexity of cells and their nanoscale macromolecular components, which enable cells to sense and respond to environmental cues, including nanomaterials. In this Account, we explore these risks from the perspective of the biophysical interactions between nanomaterials and cells. Biophysical responses to the uptake of nanomaterials can include conformational changes in biomolecules like DNA and proteins, and changes to the cellular membrane and the cytoskeleton. Changes to the latter two, in particular, can induce changes in cell elasticity, morphology, motility, adhesion, and invasion. This Account reviews what is known about cells' biophysical responses to the uptake of the most widely studied and used nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, metal, metal-oxide, and semiconductor nanomaterials. We postulate that the biophysical structure impairment induced by nanomaterials is one of the key causes of nanotoxicity. The disruption of cellular structures is affected by the size, shape, and chemical composition of nanomaterials, which are also determining factors of nanotoxicity. Currently, popular nanotoxicity characterizations, such as the MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, only provide end-point results through chemical reactions. Focusing on biophysical structural changes induced by nanomaterials, possibly in real-time, could deepen our understanding of the normal and altered states of subcellular structures and

  11. Phorbol ester-induced serine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor decreases its tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Takayama, S; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1988-03-05

    The effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the function of the insulin receptor was examined in intact hepatoma cells (Fao) and in solubilized extracts purified by wheat germ agglutinin chromatography. Incubation of ortho[32P]phosphate-labeled Fao cells with TPA increased the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor 2-fold after 30 min. Analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides from the beta-subunit of the receptor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and determination of their phosphoamino acid composition suggested that TPA predominantly stimulated phosphorylation of serine residues in a single tryptic peptide. Incubation of the Fao cells with insulin (100 nM) for 1 min stimulated 4-fold the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. Prior treatment of the cells with TPA inhibited the insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation by 50%. The receptors extracted with Triton X-100 from TPA-treated Fao cells and purified on immobilized wheat germ agglutinin retained the alteration in kinase activity and exhibited a 50% decrease in insulin-stimulated tyrosine autophosphorylation and phosphotransferase activity toward exogenous substrates. This was due primarily to a decrease in the Vmax for these reactions. TPA treatment also decreased the Km of the insulin receptor for ATP. Incubation of the insulin receptor purified from TPA-treated cells with alkaline phosphatase decreased the phosphate content of the beta-subunit to the control level and reversed the inhibition, suggesting that the serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit was responsible for the decreased tyrosine kinase activity. Our results support the notion that the insulin receptor is a substrate for protein kinase C in the Fao cell and that the increase in serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the receptor produced by TPA treatment inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vivo and in vitro. These data suggest that protein kinase C may regulate the function

  12. Hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Novogrodsky, A; Ravid, A; Rubin, A L; Stenzel, K H

    1982-01-01

    Agents that are known to be scavengers of hydroxyl radicals inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to a greater extent than they inhibit mitogenesis induced by concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin. These agents include dimethyl sulfoxide, benzoate, thiourea, dimethylurea, tetramethylurea, L-tryptophan, mannitol, and several other alcohols. Their inhibitory effect is not associated with cytotoxicity. The hydroxyl radical scavengers do not inhibit PMA-dependent amino acid transport in T cells or PMA-induced superoxide production by monocytes. Thus, they do not inhibit the primary interaction of PMA with responding cells. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with PMA increased cellular guanylate cyclase in most experiments, and dimethyl sulfoxide tended to inhibit this increase. In addition to inhibition of PMA-induced mitogenesis, hydroxyl radical scavengers markedly inhibited the activity of lymphocyte activating factor (interleukin 1). The differential inhibition of lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by different mitogens appears to be related to the differential macrophage requirements of the mitogens. The data suggest that hydroxyl radicals may be involved in mediating the triggering signal for lymphocyte activation. Some of the hydroxyl radical scavengers are inducers of cellular differentiation,. nd it is possible that their differentiating activity is related to their ability to scavenge free radicals. PMID:6122209

  13. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Danqing; He, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Ruowen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2016-09-01

    Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  14. The Nanopharmacology and Nanotoxicology of Nanomaterials: New Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Radomska, Anna; Leszczyszyn, Jarosław; Radomski, Marek W

    2016-01-01

    The very dynamic growth of nanotechnology, nanomaterials (sized 1-100 nm) and their medical applications over the past 10 years has promised to add a new impetus to the diagnostics and therapeutics of a wide range of human pathologies, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diseases of the central nervous system. This growth in nanomedicine also fuels advances in bioengineering, regenerative medicine and the development of medical devices. However, as with all new pharmaceuticals and medical devices, new opportunities are inherently accompanied by new challenges due to the ability of nanomaterials to interact with the body on the cellular, subcellular and molecular levels. This article reviews some of the most compelling problems related to the nanopharmacology and nanotoxicology of nanomaterials. The overview focuses on opportunities emerging from the development of multifunctional nanomaterials and nanotheranostics for the diagnostics and therapy of both major and rare diseases. Challenges related to the hemocompatibility of nanomaterials are also discussed.

  15. Physicochemical Properties of Nanomaterials: Implication in Associated Toxic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Gatoo, Manzoor Ahmad; Naseem, Sufia; Arfat, Mir Yasir; Mahmood Dar, Ayaz; Qasim, Khusro

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged as one of the leading fields of the science having tremendous application in diverse disciplines. As nanomaterials are increasingly becoming part of everyday consumer products, it is imperative to assess their impact on living organisms and on the environment. Physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles and engineered nanomaterials including size, shape, chemical composition, physiochemical stability, crystal structure, surface area, surface energy, and surface roughness generally influence the toxic manifestations of these nanomaterials. This compels the research fraternity to evaluate the role of these properties in determining associated toxicity issues. Reckoning with this fact, in this paper, issues pertaining to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials as it relates to the toxicity of the nanomaterials are discussed. PMID:25165707

  16. Recent advances in nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lingyi; Yao, Yao; Ping, Jianfeng; Ying, Yibin

    2017-05-15

    Antibiotics are able to be accumulated in human body by food chain and may induce severe influence to human health and safety. Hence, the development of sensitive and simple methods for rapid evaluation of antibiotic levels is highly desirable. Nanomaterials with excellent electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties have been recognized as one of the most promising materials for opening new gates in the development of next-generation biosensors. This review highlights the current advances in the nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection. Different kinds of nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, metal nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, up-conversion nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been applied to the construction of biosensors with two main signal-transducing mechanisms, i.e. optical and electrochemical. Furthermore, the current challenges and future prospects in this field are also included to provide an overview for future research directions.

  17. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Danqing; He, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Ruowen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  18. Nanomaterials for sample pretreatment prior to capillary electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Vojtech; Vaculovicova, Marketa

    2017-02-16

    Nanomaterials are, in analytical science, used for a broad range of purposes, covering the area of sample pretreatment as well as separation, detection and identification of target molecules. This review covers the application of nanomaterials for sample pretreatment in capillary electrophoresis. It targets the utilization of nanomaterials for sample purification, preconcentration and/or extraction coupled both off-line and on-line with capillary electrophoretic analysis. Especially due to their large surface area, nanoparticles and nanomaterials are exceptionally helpful in making up for the limited concentration detection limits provided by capillary electrophoresis. This method possesses excellent separation power; however, its sensitivity may be problematic in some cases. Therefore, this review is focused on utilization of nanomaterials as a powerful tool for sample preconcentration, which is so often required prior to capillary electrophoretic analysis.

  19. Toxicity, Uptake, and Translocation of Engineered Nanomaterials in Vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Pola; Church, Tamara L; Harris, Andrew T

    2012-09-04

    To exploit the promised benefits of engineered nanomaterials, it is necessary to improve our knowledge of their bioavailability and toxicity. The interactions between engineered nanomaterials and vascular plants are of particular concern, as plants closely interact with soil, water, and the atmosphere, and constitute one of the main routes of exposure for higher species, i.e. accumulation through the food chain. A review of the current literature shows contradictory evidence on the phytotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials. The mechanisms by which engineered nanomaterials penetrate plants are not well understood, and further research on their interactions with vascular plants is required to enable the field of phytotoxicology to keep pace with that of nanotechnology, the rapid evolution of which constantly produces new materials and applications that accelerate the environmental release of nanomaterials.

  20. A practical approach to determine dose metrics for nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Delmaar, Christiaan J E; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Oomen, Agnes G; Chen, Jingwen; de Jong, Wim H; Sips, Adriënne J A M; Wang, Zhuang; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, administered mass is used to describe doses of conventional chemical substances in toxicity studies. For deriving toxic doses of nanomaterials, mass and chemical composition alone may not adequately describe the dose, because particles with the same chemical composition can have completely different toxic mass doses depending on properties such as particle size. Other dose metrics such as particle number, volume, or surface area have been suggested, but consensus is lacking. The discussion regarding the most adequate dose metric for nanomaterials clearly needs a systematic, unbiased approach to determine the most appropriate dose metric for nanomaterials. In the present study, the authors propose such an approach and apply it to results from in vitro and in vivo experiments with silver and silica nanomaterials. The proposed approach is shown to provide a convenient tool to systematically investigate and interpret dose metrics of nanomaterials. Recommendations for study designs aimed at investigating dose metrics are provided.

  1. Nanomanufacturing metrology for cellulosic nanomaterials: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postek, Michael T.

    2014-08-01

    The development of the metrology and standards for advanced manufacturing of cellulosic nanomaterials (or basically, wood-based nanotechnology) is imperative to the success of this rising economic sector. Wood-based nanotechnology is a revolutionary technology that will create new jobs and strengthen America's forest-based economy through industrial development and expansion. It allows this, previously perceived, low-tech industry to leap-frog directly into high-tech products and processes and thus improves its current economic slump. Recent global investments in nanotechnology programs have led to a deeper appreciation of the high performance nature of cellulose nanomaterials. Cellulose, manufactured to the smallest possible-size ( 2 nm x 100 nm), is a high-value material that enables products to be lighter and stronger; have less embodied energy; utilize no catalysts in the manufacturing, are biologically compatible and, come from a readily renewable resource. In addition to the potential for a dramatic impact on the national economy - estimated to be as much as $250 billion worldwide by 2020 - cellulose-based nanotechnology creates a pathway for expanded and new markets utilizing these renewable materials. The installed capacity associated with the US pulp and paper industry represents an opportunity, with investment, to rapidly move to large scale production of nano-based materials. However, effective imaging, characterization and fundamental measurement science for process control and characterization are lacking at the present time. This talk will discuss some of these needed measurements and potential solutions.

  2. Design of Nanomaterial Synthesis by Aerosol Processes

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, Beat; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol synthesis of materials is a vibrant field of particle technology and chemical reaction engineering. Examples include the manufacture of carbon blacks, fumed SiO2, pigmentary TiO2, ZnO vulcanizing catalysts, filamentary Ni, and optical fibers, materials that impact transportation, construction, pharmaceuticals, energy, and communications. Parallel to this, development of novel, scalable aerosol processes has enabled synthesis of new functional nanomaterials (e.g., catalysts, biomaterials, electroceramics) and devices (e.g., gas sensors). This review provides an access point for engineers to the multiscale design of aerosol reactors for the synthesis of nanomaterials using continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics, and quantum mechanics models spanning 10 and 15 orders of magnitude in length and time, respectively. Key design features are the rapid chemistry; the high particle concentrations but low volume fractions; the attainment of a self-preserving particle size distribution by coagulation; the ratio of the characteristic times of coagulation and sintering, which controls the extent of particle aggregation; and the narrowing of the aggregate primary particle size distribution by sintering. PMID:22468598

  3. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This draft document presents two case studies of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) used (1) to remove arsenic from drinking water and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. The draft case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment approach that combines a product life cycle framework with the risk assessment paradigm. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks. Rather, the case studies are intended to help identify what needs to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. This draft document is part of a process that will inform the development of EPA’s research strategy to support nanomaterial risk assessments. The complex properties of various nanomaterials make evaluating them in the abstract or with generalizations difficult if not impossible. Thus, this document focuses on two specific uses of nano-TiO2, as a drinking water treatment and as topical sunscreen. These case studies do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments; rather, they present the structure for identifying and prioritizing research needed to support future assessments.

  4. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as part of a process to identify and prioritize research to inform future assessments of the potential ecological and health implications of these materials. Two specific applications of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) are considered: (1) as an agent for removing arsenic from drinking water; and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. These case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework that combines a product life cycle perspective with the risk assessment paradigm. They are intended to help identify what may need to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. These “case studies” do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments, nor are they intended to serve as a basis for risk management decisions in the near term on these specific uses of nano TiO2. Rather, the intent is to use this document in developing the scientific and technical information needed for future assessment efforts.

  5. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    DOE PAGES

    Niemann, Michael U.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Phani, Ayala R.; ...

    2008-01-01

    Nmore » anomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices.anostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS 2 / MoS 2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc.) and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.« less

  6. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xiong; Harper, Stacey L; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM) are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake), and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity). To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI). NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS), Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/. PMID:24098076

  7. Mechanochemically Driven Syntheses of Boride Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Richard G.

    Solid state metathesis reactions have proven to be a viable route to the production of unfunctionalized nanomaterials. However, current implementations of this approach are limited to self-propagating reactions. We have been investigating mechanically driven metathesis reactions. The use of high-energy ball mills allows control of crystallite sizes without the use of a capping group. Reinforcement materials with crystallite sizes on the order of 5-30 nm can be produced in such a manner. Borides are of particular interest due to their strength, high melting point, and electrical conductivity. The ultimate goal of this work is to prepare oxide and capping group-free nanoparticles suitable for incorporation in thermoelectric, polymer, and ceramic composites. Ultimately this work will facilitate the production of improved thermoelectric materials that will provide robust, deployable, power generation modules to supplement or replace fuel cell, Stirling, and battery-derived power sources. It will also result in scalable, bulk syntheses of tough, refractory, conductive nanomaterials for polymer composites with improved electrical properties, ceramic composites with enhanced fracture toughness, and composites with enhanced neutron reflectance and/or absorbance.

  8. Editorial: Functional nanomaterials for energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devan, Rupesh S.; Ma, Yuan -Ron; Kim, Jin -Hyeok; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Ghosh, Kartik C.

    2015-02-16

    In order to leap forward from the energy crisis issues and improve lifestyle, we all are looking positively toward nanomaterials or nanostructures. Thus, the exploration of new features of both typical and novel materials at the nanoscale level is playing important role in the development of innovative and improved energy technologies that have the capability of conserve/convert energy at large extend. By tailoring the surface morphology of materials in its nanoforms, the functional properties can be significantly adapted and specifically combined to produce highly potent multifunctional materials for conversion, storage, and consumption of energy in various forms. The papers selected for this special issue represent a good panel for addressing various energy applications including solar cell, fuel cells, nanofluid twisters, and gas sensors. Of course, the selected topic and the papers are not an exhaustive representation of the utilization of functional nanomaterials for energy applications. Nevertheless, they represent the rich and many-facet knowledge, which we have the pleasure of sharing with the readers.

  9. Health impact and safety of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Teow, Yiwei; Asharani, P V; Hande, M Prakash; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2011-07-07

    Many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) are being synthesized and explored for potential use in consumer and medical products. Already, nanoparticles (NPs) of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), zinc oxide (ZnO), silver (Ag) and other metals or their oxides are present in commercial products such as sunscreens, cosmetics, wound dressings, surgical tools, detergents, automotive paints and tires. More recent and advanced FDA-approved use of NMs includes quantum dots (QDs) in live cell imaging, zirconium oxides in bone replacement and prosthetic devices and nanocarriers in drug delivery. The benefits from nanotechnology are aplenty, comprising antimicrobial activities, scratch- and water-resistance, long-lasting shine, improved processor speeds and better display resolution, to name a few. While developers of these products often focus on the exciting beneficial aspects of their products, safety and toxicity issues are often not discussed in detail. Long-term effects such as chronic exposure and environmental pollution are even less documented. Along with widespread manufacture and use of NMs, concerns for occupational hazards, proper handling, disposal, storage, shipping and clean up are expected to rise. This review focus on the possible biological impact of engineered NPs, serving as a reminder that nanomaterials can become a double-edged sword if not properly handled.

  10. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray. This report represents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant sprays. This case study is organized around the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which structures available information pertaining to the product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors (i.e., humans, ecological populations, and the environment), and potential impacts in these receptors. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks. Instead, it is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and unknown about nano-Ag in a selected application. In turn, the external review draft of the document provided a starting point to identify and prioritize possible research directions to support future assessments of nanomaterials. The information presented in the case study and the questions raised in this document are a foundation for a process to determine priorities among various research topics and directions. After that process has been completed, a final chapter will be added to this document to summarize highlights from preceding chapters and the major research issues that have emerged.

  11. Editorial: Functional nanomaterials for energy applications

    DOE PAGES

    Devan, Rupesh S.; Ma, Yuan -Ron; Kim, Jin -Hyeok; ...

    2015-02-16

    In order to leap forward from the energy crisis issues and improve lifestyle, we all are looking positively toward nanomaterials or nanostructures. Thus, the exploration of new features of both typical and novel materials at the nanoscale level is playing important role in the development of innovative and improved energy technologies that have the capability of conserve/convert energy at large extend. By tailoring the surface morphology of materials in its nanoforms, the functional properties can be significantly adapted and specifically combined to produce highly potent multifunctional materials for conversion, storage, and consumption of energy in various forms. The papers selectedmore » for this special issue represent a good panel for addressing various energy applications including solar cell, fuel cells, nanofluid twisters, and gas sensors. Of course, the selected topic and the papers are not an exhaustive representation of the utilization of functional nanomaterials for energy applications. Nevertheless, they represent the rich and many-facet knowledge, which we have the pleasure of sharing with the readers.« less

  12. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xiong; Harper, Stacey L; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM) are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake), and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity). To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI). NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS), Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/.

  13. Uncertainty in Life Cycle Assessment of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seager, T. P.; Linkov, I.

    Despite concerns regarding environmental fate and toxicology, engineered nanostructured material manufacturing is expanding at an increasingly rapid pace. In particular, the unique properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) have made them attractive in many areas, including high-tech power applications such as experimental batteries, fuel cells or electrical wiring. The intensity of research interest in SWCNT has raised questions regarding the life cycle environmental impact of nanotechnologies, including assessment of: worker and consumer safety, greenhouse gas emissions, toxicological risks associated with production or product emissions and the disposition of nanoproducts at end of life. However, development of appropriate nanotechnology assessment tools has lagged progress in the nanotechnologies themselves. In particular, current approaches to life cycle assessment (LCA) — originally developed for application in mature manufacturing industries such as automobiles and chemicals — suffer from several shortcomings that make applicability to nanotechnologies problematic. Among these are uncertainties related to the variability of material properties, toxicity and risk, technology performance in the use phase, nanomaterial degradation and change during the product life cycle and the impact assessment stage of LCA. This chapter expounds upon the unique challenges presented by nanomaterials in general, specifies sources of uncertainty and variability in LCA of SWCNT for use in electric and hybrid vehicle batteries and makes recommendations for modeling and decision-making using LCA in a multi-criteria decision analysis framework under conditions of high uncertainty.1

  14. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  15. Morphofunctional study of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol acetate (TPA)-induced differentiation of U937 cells under exposure to a 6 mT static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Dini, Luciana; Dwikat, Majdi; Panzarini, Elisa; Vergallo, Cristian; Tenuzzo, Bernadetta

    2009-07-01

    This study deals with the morphofunctional influence of 72 h exposure to a 6 mT static magnetic field (SMF) during differentiation induced by 50 ng/ml 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol acetate (TPA) in human leukaemia U937 cells. The cell morphology of U937 cells was investigated by optic and electron microscopy. Specific antibodies and/or molecules were used to label CD11c, CD14, phosphatidylserine, F-actin and to investigate the distribution and activity of lysosomes, mitochondria and SER. [Ca(2+)](i) was evaluated with a spectrophotometer. The degree of differentiation in SMF-exposed cells was lower than that of non-exposed cells, the difference being exposure time-dependent. SMF-exposed cells showed cell shape and F-actin modification, inhibition of cell attachment, appearance of membrane roughness and large blebs and impaired expression of specific macrophagic markers on the cell surface. The intracellular localization of SER and lysosomes was only partially affected by exposure. A significant localization of mitochondria with an intact membrane potential at the cell periphery in non-exposed, TPA-stimulated cells was observed; conversely, in the presence of SMF, mitochondria were mainly localised near the nucleus. In no case did SMF exposure affect cell viability. The sharp intracellular increase of [Ca(2+)](i) could be one of the causes of the above-described changes.

  16. Diacylglycerol generated by exogenous phospholipase C activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway independent of Ras- and phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase C: dependence on protein kinase C-zeta.

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, M; Muriana, F J; van Der Hoeven, P C; de Widt, J; Schaap, D; Moolenaar, W H; van Blitterswijk, W J

    1997-01-01

    The role of diacylglycerol (DG) formation from phosphatidylcholine in mitogenic signal transduction is poorly understood. We have generated this lipid at the plasma membrane by treating Rat-1 fibroblasts with bacterial phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC). This treatment leads to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). However, unlike platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or epidermal growth factor (EGF), PC-PLC fails to activate Ras and to induce DNA synthesis, and activates MAPK only transiently (<45 min). Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) -alpha, -delta and -epsilon isotypes has little or no effect on MAPK activation by either PC-PLC or growth factors. However, Ro 31-8220, a highly selective inhibitor of all PKC isotypes, including atypical PKC-zeta but not Raf-1, blocks MAPK activation by PDGF and PC-PLC, but not that by EGF, suggesting that atypical PKC mediates the PDGF and PC-PLC signal. In line with this, PKC-zeta is activated by PC-PLC and PDGF, but not by EGF, as shown by a kinase assay in vitro, using biotinylated epsilon-peptide as a substrate. Furthermore, dominant-negative PKC-zeta inhibits, while (wild-type) PKC-zeta overexpression enhances MAPK activation by PDGF and PC-PLC. The results suggest that DG generated by PC-PLC can activate the MAPK pathway independent of Ras and phorbol-ester-sensitive PKC but, instead, via PKC-zeta. PMID:9169602

  17. Carbon Nanomaterials Interfacing with Neurons: An In vivo Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Baldrighi, Michele; Trusel, Massimo; Tonini, Raffaella; Giordani, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Developing new tools that outperform current state of the art technologies for imaging, drug delivery or electrical sensing in neuronal tissues is one of the great challenges in neurosciences. Investigations into the potential use of carbon nanomaterials for such applications started about two decades ago. Since then, numerous in vitro studies have examined interactions between these nanomaterials and neurons, either by evaluating their compatibility, as vectors for drug delivery, or for their potential use in electric activity sensing and manipulation. The results obtained indicate that carbon nanomaterials may be suitable for medical therapies. However, a relatively small number of in vivo studies have been carried out to date. In order to facilitate the transformation of carbon nanomaterial into practical neurobiomedical applications, it is essential to identify and highlight in the existing literature the strengths and weakness that different carbon nanomaterials have displayed when probed in vivo. Unfortunately the current literature is sometimes sparse and confusing. To offer a clearer picture of the in vivo studies on carbon nanomaterials in the central nervous system, we provide a systematic and critical review. Hereby we identify properties and behavior of carbon nanomaterials in vivo inside the neural tissues, and we examine key achievements and potentially problematic toxicological issues. PMID:27375413

  18. Occupational exposure limits for nanomaterials: state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, P. A.; Murashov, V.; Zumwalde, R.; Kuempel, E. D.; Geraci, C. L.

    2010-08-01

    Assessing the need for and effectiveness of controlling airborne exposures to engineered nanomaterials in the workplace is difficult in the absence of occupational exposure limits (OELs). At present, there are practically no OELs specific to nanomaterials that have been adopted or promulgated by authoritative standards and guidance organizations. The vast heterogeneity of nanomaterials limits the number of specific OELs that are likely to be developed in the near future, but OELs could be developed more expeditiously for nanomaterials by applying dose-response data generated from animal studies for specific nanoparticles across categories of nanomaterials with similar properties and modes of action. This article reviews the history, context, and approaches for developing OELs for particles in general and nanoparticles in particular. Examples of approaches for developing OELs for titanium dioxide and carbon nanotubes are presented and interim OELs from various organizations for some nanomaterials are discussed. When adequate dose-response data are available in animals or humans, quantitative risk assessment methods can provide estimates of adverse health risk of nanomaterials in workers and, in conjunction with workplace exposure and control data, provide a basis for determining appropriate exposure limits. In the absence of adequate quantitative data, qualitative approaches to hazard assessment, exposure control, and safe work practices are prudent measures to reduce hazards in workers.

  19. Comparative assessment of nanomaterial definitions and safety evaluation considerations.

    PubMed

    Boverhof, Darrell R; Bramante, Christina M; Butala, John H; Clancy, Shaun F; Lafranconi, Mark; West, Jay; Gordon, Steve C

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials continue to bring promising advances to science and technology. In concert have come calls for increased regulatory oversight to ensure their appropriate identification and evaluation, which has led to extensive discussions about nanomaterial definitions. Numerous nanomaterial definitions have been proposed by government, industry, and standards organizations. We conducted a comprehensive comparative assessment of existing nanomaterial definitions put forward by governments to highlight their similarities and differences. We found that the size limits used in different definitions were inconsistent, as were considerations of other elements, including agglomerates and aggregates, distributional thresholds, novel properties, and solubility. Other important differences included consideration of number size distributions versus weight distributions and natural versus intentionally-manufactured materials. Overall, the definitions we compared were not in alignment, which may lead to inconsistent identification and evaluation of nanomaterials and could have adverse impacts on commerce and public perceptions of nanotechnology. We recommend a set of considerations that future discussions of nanomaterial definitions should consider for describing materials and assessing their potential for health and environmental impacts using risk-based approaches within existing assessment frameworks. Our intent is to initiate a dialogue aimed at achieving greater clarity in identifying those nanomaterials that may require additional evaluation, not to propose a formal definition.

  20. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy) pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences. PMID:22697169

  1. [Nanomaterials in cosmetics--present situation and future].

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetics are consumer products intended to contribute to increasing quality of life and designed for long-term daily use. Due to such features of cosmetics, they are required to ensure quality and safety at a high level, as well as to perform well, in response to consumers' demands. Recently, the technology associated with nanomaterials has progressed rapidly and has been applied to various products, including cosmetics. For example, nano-sized titanium dioxide has been formulated in sunscreen products in pursuit of improving its performance. As some researchers and media have expressed concerns about the safety of nanomaterials, a vague feeling of anxiety has been raised in society. In response to this concern, the Japan Cosmetic Industry Association (JCIA) has begun original research related to the safety assurance of nanomaterials formulated in cosmetics, to allow consumers to use cosmetics without such concerns. This paper describes the activities of the JCIA regarding safety research on nanomaterials, including a survey of the actual usage of nanomaterials in cosmetics, analysis of the existence of nanomaterials on the skin, and assessment of skin carcinogenicity of nano-sized titanium dioxide. It also describes the international status of safety assurance and regulation regarding nanomaterials in cosmetics.

  2. Granular biodurable nanomaterials: No convincing evidence for systemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Horn, Marcus; Gebel, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterials are usually defined by primary particle diameters ranging from 1 to 100 nm. The scope of this review is an evaluation of experimental animal studies dealing with the systemic levels and putative systemic effects induced by nanoparticles which can be characterized as being granular biodurable particles without known specific toxicity (GBP). Relevant examples of such materials comprise nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) and carbon black. The question was raised whether GBP nanomaterials systemically accumulate and may possess a relevant systemic toxicity. With few exceptions, the 56 publications reviewed were not performed using established standard protocols, for example, OECD guidelines but used non-standard study designs. The studies including kinetic investigations indicated that GBP nanomaterials were absorbed and systemically distributed to rather low portions only. There was no valid indication that GPB nanomaterials possess novel toxicological hazard properties. In addition, no convincing evidence for a relevant specific systemic toxicity of GBP nanomaterials could be identified. The minority of the papers reviewed (15/56) investigated both nanosized and microsized GBP materials in parallel. A relevant different translocation of GBP nanomaterials in contrast to GBP micromaterials was not observed in these studies. There was no evidence that GPB nanomaterials possess toxicological properties other than their micromaterial counterparts.

  3. Nano-QSPR Modelling of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials Properties.

    PubMed

    Salahinejad, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of chemical and physical properties of nanomaterials is of critical importance in a broad variety of nanotechnology researches. There is an increasing interest in computational methods capable of predicting properties of new and modified nanomaterials in the absence of time-consuming and costly experimental studies. Quantitative Structure- Property Relationship (QSPR) approaches are progressive tools in modelling and prediction of many physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, which are also known as nano-QSPR. This review provides insight into the concepts, challenges and applications of QSPR modelling of carbon-based nanomaterials. First, we try to provide a general overview of QSPR implications, by focusing on the difficulties and limitations on each step of the QSPR modelling of nanomaterials. Then follows with the most significant achievements of QSPR methods in modelling of carbon-based nanomaterials properties and their recent applications to generate predictive models. This review specifically addresses the QSPR modelling of physicochemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials including fullerenes, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and graphene.

  4. Double minute chromatin bodies and other chromosome alterations in human myeloid HL-60 leukemia cells susceptible or resistant to induction of differentiation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Au, W.W.; Callaham, M.F.; Workman, M.L.; Huberman, E.

    1983-12-01

    An analysis of the chromosomal karyotype of the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cell line and of a number of its sublines that exhibit varying degrees of resistance to induction of differentiation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate was conducted. The HL-60 cell line and the derived sublines contained two consistent marker chromosomes (9p- and t(10;13)), which suggested that they have a common and possibly clonal origin. HL-60 cells that are susceptible to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced cell differentiation contained double minute chromatine bodies. The sublines with different degrees of resistance showed a corresponding sequential reduction of double minute chromatin bodies in metaphase cells. This loss of double minute chromatin bodies was not associated with an appearance of homogeneously staining chromosomal regions. Resistant and susceptible HL-60 cell differed also in a number of other chromosomal alteration, including gains or losses involving chromosomes 5, 8, 11, 13, 16, and 17. Thus, it is suggested that acquisition of resistance to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced cell differentiation in the HL-60 cells may involve one or more of the above chromosomal changes.

  5. Phorbol ester-inducible T-cell-specific expression of variant mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Theunissen, H.J.M.; Paardekooper, M.; Maduro, L.J.; Michalides, R.J.A.M.; Nusse, R. )

    1989-08-01

    Acquired proviruses of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) in T-cell leukemias of male GR mice have rearrangements in the U3 region of their long terminal repeats (LTR). In contrast to the endogenous nonrearranged MMTV proviruses, these mutated copies are highly expressed in leukemic T cells. To investigate whether the sequence alterations in the LTR are responsible for the high expression of rearranged MMTV proviruses, the authors made constructs in which normal and variant LTRs drive the bacterial reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Two different rearranged LTRs were used, one containing a 420-base-pair (bp) deletion (L13) and another carrying a 456-bp deletion plus an 82-bp insertion (L42). These constructs were transfected into murine (GRSL) and human (MOLT-4) T-cell lines that either had or had not been treated with phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)). In GRSL cells, the L13-LTR-CAT construct showed transcriptional activity that was further enhanced by TPA. In MOLT-4 cells, both variant LTRs were active, but only after stimulation with TPA. In contrast, normal(N)-LTR-CAT constructs were not expressed, irrespective of TPA addition. They conclude that the LTR rearrangements generate TPA responsiveness and contribute to T-cell-specific expression of MMTV variants.

  6. Modulation of Purinergic Neuromuscular Transmission by Phorbol Dibutyrate is Independent of Protein Kinase C in Murine Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Silinsky, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasympathetic control of murine urinary bladder consists of contractile components mediated by both muscarinic and purinergic receptors. Using intracellular recording techniques, the purinergic component of transmission was measured as both evoked excitatory junctional potentials (EJPs) in response to electrical field stimulation and spontaneous events [spontaneous EJPs (sEJPs)]. EJPs, but not sEJPs, were abolished by the application of the Na+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin and the Ca2+ channel blocker Cd2+. Both EJPs and sEJPs were abolished by the application of the P2X1 antagonist 8,8′-[carbonylbis(imino-4,1-phenylenecarbonylimino-4,1-phenylenecarbonylimino)]bis-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid hexasodium salt (NF279). Application of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) increased electrically evoked EJP amplitudes with no effect on mean sEJP amplitudes. Similar increases in EJP amplitudes were produced by PDBu in the presence of either the nonselective protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine or the specific protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor 2-[1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)indol-3-yl]-3-(indol-3-yl) maleimide (GF109203X). These results suggest that PDBu increases the purinergic component of detrusor transmission through increasing neurogenic ATP release via a PKC-independent mechanism. PMID:22547572

  7. Modulation by cyclic AMP and phorbol myristate acetate of cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Y; Gemba, M

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and protein kinase C (PKC) have been suggested to modulate the generation of free radicals. We investigated the effects of cAMP and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, on cephaloridine (CER)-induced renal cell injury, which has been reported to be due to the generation of free radicals. Incubation of rat renal cortical slices with CER resulted in increases in lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and in decreases in gluconeogenesis and p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat renal cortical slices, suggesting free radical-induced injury in slices exposed to CER. A derivative of cAMP ameliorated not only the increase in lipid peroxidation but also the renal cell damage induced by CER. This amelioration by a cAMP derivative of lipid peroxidation and renal cell damage caused by CER was blocked by KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Lipid peroxidation and the indices of cell injury were increased by PMA. PMA also enhanced CER-induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the slices. This enhancement by PMA of CER-induced injury was blocked by H-7, a PKC inhibitor. These results indicated that intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and PKC modulate free radical-mediated nephrotoxicity induced by CER.

  8. Expression of the human B-cell surface protein CD20: alteration by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, M.A.; Cotner, T.; Gaur, L.; Torres, R.; Clark, E.A.

    1987-11-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1F5 recognizes human B-cell surface protein CD20 and can activate resting B cells; with this antibody the authors found CD20 to be a 35/37-kDa non-disulfide-linked protein. The protein has a pI of 7.5-8.0 and is phosphorylated in B-cell lines, tonsillar B cells, and peripheral blood B cells. Both CD20 surface expression and phosphorylation are increased on buoyant tonsillar B cells activated in vivo. Because phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) supports the activation signal initiated by monoclonal antibody 1F5, they studied the effect of PMA on CD20 expression. After brief incubation with mitogenic levels of PMA, the number of dense tonsillar B cells positive for CD20 protein transiently decreased. Paradoxically, the cells remaining positive had more surface CD20 than did control cells, and these remaining surface CD20 molecules were hyperphosphorylated. Furthermore, PMA not only induced phosphorylation of CD20 protein on Raji cells but also increased the internalization of CD20 molecules; both phosphorylation and internalization of CD20 molecules were decreased with the protein kinase C inhibitor palmitoyl carnitine. Conditions that increase CD20 phosphorylation are shown also to increase surface mobility of the molecule, suggesting that CD20 protein internalization may be a critical early event for B-cell entry into the G/sub 1/ phase of the cell cycle.

  9. Application of time-of-flight mass spectrometry for screening of crude glycerins for toxic phorbol ester contaminants.

    PubMed

    Herath, Kithsiri; Girard, Lauren; Reimschuessel, Renate; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi

    2017-03-01

    Since 2007, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received numerous complaints of pet illnesses that may be related to the consumption of jerky pet treats. Many of those treats include glycerin as an ingredient. Glycerin can be made directly from oils such as palm seed oil, but can also be derived from the seed oil of toxic Jatropha plant during biodiesel production. If crude glycerin from biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas is used in the manufacture of animal feed, toxic tigliane diterpene phorbol esters (PEs), namely Jatropha factors (JFs), may be present and could lead to animal illnesses. Considering the numerous uses of glycerin in consumer products there is a need for a rapid method to screen crude glycerin for JF toxins and other PE contaminants. We describe the development of an ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight (UHPLC/Q-TOF) method for screening crude glycerin for PEs. An exact mass database, developed in-house, of previously identified PEs from Jatropha curcas as well as putative compounds was used to identify possible contaminants.

  10. Nanomaterials for renewable energy production and storage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Can; Grätzel, Michaël; Kostecki, Robert; Mao, Samuel S

    2012-12-07

    Over the past decades, there have been many projections on the future depletion of the fossil fuel reserves on earth as well as the rapid increase in green-house gas emissions. There is clearly an urgent need for the development of renewable energy technologies. On a different frontier, growth and manipulation of materials on the nanometer scale have progressed at a fast pace. Selected recent and significant advances in the development of nanomaterials for renewable energy applications are reviewed here, and special emphases are given to the studies of solar-driven photocatalytic hydrogen production, electricity generation with dye-sensitized solar cells, solid-state hydrogen storage, and electric energy storage with lithium ion rechargeable batteries.

  11. Inorganic Nanomaterials as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hao, Xiaohong; Liang, Xingjie; Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Zhou, Guoqiang; Shen, Shigang; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-01-01

    For safe and effective therapy, drugs must be delivered efficiently and with minimal systemic side effects. Nanostructured drug carriers enable the delivery of small-molecule drugs as well as nucleic acids and proteins. Inorganic nanomaterials are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their unique physicochemical properties, such as facile preparation, good storage stability and biocompatibility. Many inorganic nanostructure-based drug delivery platforms have been prepared. Although there are still many obstacles to overcome, significant advances have been made in recent years. This review focuses on the status and development of inorganic nanostructures, including silica, quantum dots, gold, carbon-based and magnetic iron oxide-based nanostructures, as carriers for chemical and biological drugs. We specifically highlight the extensive use of these inorganic drug carriers for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the most important areas in the field that urgently require further study.

  12. Carbon and fullerene nanomaterials in plant system.

    PubMed

    Husen, Azamal; Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin

    2014-04-25

    Both the functionalized and non functionalized carbon nanomaterials influence fruit and crop production in edible plants and vegetables. The fullerene, C60 and carbon nanotubes have been shown to increase the water retaining capacity, biomass and fruit yield in plants up to ~118% which is a remarkable achievement of nanotechnology in recent years. The fullerene treated bitter melon seeds also increase the phytomedicine contents such as cucurbitacin-B (74%), lycopene (82%), charantin (20%) and insulin (91%). Since as little as 50 μg mL-1 of carbon nanotubes increase the tomato production by about 200%, they may be exploited to enhance the agriculture production in future. It has been observed that, in certain cases, non functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes are toxic to both plants and animals but the toxicity can be drastically reduced if they are functionalized.

  13. Redefining risk research priorities for nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Baun, Anders; Owen, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Chemical-based risk assessment underpins the current approach to responsible development of nanomaterials (NM). It is now recognised, however, that this process may take decades, leaving decision makers with little support in the near term. Despite this, current and near future research efforts are largely directed at establishing (eco)toxicological and exposure data for NM, and comparatively little research has been undertaken on tools or approaches that may facilitate near-term decisions, some of which we briefly outline in this analysis. We propose a reprioritisation of NM risk research efforts to redress this imbalance, including the development of more adaptive risk governance frameworks, alternative/complementary tools to risk assessment, and health and environment surveillance. PMID:21170127

  14. Supramolecular self-assemblies as functional nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busseron, Eric; Ruff, Yves; Moulin, Emilie; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we survey the diversity of structures and functions which are encountered in advanced self-assembled nanomaterials. We highlight their flourishing implementations in three active domains of applications: biomedical sciences, information technologies, and environmental sciences. Our main objective is to provide the reader with a concise and straightforward entry to this broad field by selecting the most recent and important research articles, supported by some more comprehensive reviews to introduce each topic. Overall, this compilation illustrates how, based on the rules of supramolecular chemistry, the bottom-up approach to design functional objects at the nanoscale is currently producing highly sophisticated materials oriented towards a growing number of applications with high societal impact.

  15. Nanomaterials and nanotechnology for skin tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Aezeden; Xing, Malcolm (Mengqiu)

    2012-01-01

    A recent literature review of the field shows that tissue-engineered skin has been in clinical use for the last several decades and that, over this time the technology has advanced rapidly. Despite this progress no synthetic skin yet produced has completely replicated normal, healthy skin. Therefore, researchers must continue to develop materials that successfully overcome the problems with current skin tissue substitutes. This paper is a comprehensive review of the prospects for nanotechnology and nanomaterials to close this gap by mimicking surface properties for reconstruction of a variety of skin tissues. In addition, a number of commercially available products that regenerate different layers of the burn-damaged or chronically wounded skin are reviewed. PMID:22928165

  16. Carbon and fullerene nanomaterials in plant system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Both the functionalized and non functionalized carbon nanomaterials influence fruit and crop production in edible plants and vegetables. The fullerene, C60 and carbon nanotubes have been shown to increase the water retaining capacity, biomass and fruit yield in plants up to ~118% which is a remarkable achievement of nanotechnology in recent years. The fullerene treated bitter melon seeds also increase the phytomedicine contents such as cucurbitacin-B (74%), lycopene (82%), charantin (20%) and insulin (91%). Since as little as 50 μg mL−1 of carbon nanotubes increase the tomato production by about 200%, they may be exploited to enhance the agriculture production in future. It has been observed that, in certain cases, non functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes are toxic to both plants and animals but the toxicity can be drastically reduced if they are functionalized. PMID:24766786

  17. Modification of conductive polyaniline with carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Sajjad; Alavijeh, Mahdi Soleimani

    2014-08-01

    The synthesis of polyaniline/single-wall nanotube, polyaniline/multi-wall nanotube and polyaniline/single-wall nanotube/graphen nanosheets nanocomposites by in situ polymerization are reported in this study. The substrates were treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and concentrated nitric acid before usage to functionalize with carboxylic and hydroxyl groups. Aniline monomers are adsorbed and polymerized on the surface of these fillers. Structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that nanomaterials dispersed into polymer matrix and made tubular structures with diameters several tens to hundreds nanometers depending on the polyaniline content. These nanocomposites can be used for production of excellent electrode materials applications in high-performance supercapacitors.

  18. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Matthew T.; Parmee, R. J.; Milne, William I.

    2016-02-01

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices.

  19. Nanomaterials based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Bansi D.; Kumar, Saurabh; Mouli Pandey, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors have enormous potential to contribute to the evolution of new molecular diagnostic techniques for patients suffering with cancerous diseases. A major obstacle preventing faster development of biosensors pertains to the fact that cancer is a highly complex set of diseases. The oncologists currently rely on a few biomarkers and histological characterization of tumors. Some of the signatures include epigenetic and genetic markers, protein profiles, changes in gene expression, and post-translational modifications of proteins. These molecular signatures offer new opportunities for development of biosensors for cancer detection. In this context, conducting paper has recently been found to play an important role towards the fabrication of a biosensor for cancer biomarker detection. In this paper we will focus on results of some of the recent studies obtained in our laboratories relating to fabrication and application of nanomaterial modified paper based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection.

  20. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials derived from carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2010-02-01

    A tremendous growth in the field of carbon nanomaterials has led to the emergence of carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, mesoporous carbon and more recently graphene. Some of these materials have found applications in electronics, sensors, catalysis, drug delivery, composites, and so forth. The high temperatures and hydrocarbon precursors involved in their synthesis usually yield highly inert graphitic surfaces. As some of the applications require functionalization of their inert graphitic surface with groups like -COOH, -OH, and -NH(2), treatment of these materials in oxidizing agents and concentrated acids become inevitable. More recent works have involved using precursors like carbohydrates to produce carbon nanostructures rich in functional groups in a single-step under hydrothermal conditions. These carbon nanostructures have already found many applications in composites, drug delivery, materials synthesis, and Li ion batteries. The review aims to highlight some of the recent developments in the application of carbohydrate derived carbon nanostructures and also provide an outlook of their future prospects.

  1. Functionalization of nanomaterials with aryldiazonium salts.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed A; Salmi, Zakaria; Dahoumane, Si Amar; Mekki, Ahmed; Carbonnier, Benjamin; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2015-11-01

    This paper reviews the surface modification strategies of a wide range of nanomaterials using aryldiazonium salts. After a brief history of diazonium salts since their discovery by Peter Griess in 1858, we will tackle the surface chemistry using these compounds since the first trials in the 1950s. We will then focus on the modern surface chemistry of aryldiazonium salts for the modification of materials, particularly metallic, semiconductors, metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-based nanostructures, diamond and clays. The successful modification of sp(2) carbon materials and metals by aryldiazonium salts paved the way to innovative strategies for the attachment of aryl layers to metal oxide nanoparticles and nanodiamonds, and intercalation of clays. Interestingly, diazotized surfaces can easily trap nanoparticles and nanotubes while diazotized nanoparticles can be (electro)chemically reduced on electrode/materials surfaces as molecular compounds. Both strategies provided organized 2D surface assembled nanoparticles. In this review, aryldiazonium salts are highlighted as efficient coupling agents for many types of molecular, macromolecular and nanoparticulate species, therefore ensuring stability to colloids on the one hand, and the construction of composite materials and hybrid systems with robust and durable interfaces/interphases, on the other hand. The last section is dedicated to a selection of patents and industrial products based on aryldiazonium-modified nanomaterials. After nearly 160 years of organic chemistry, diazonium salts have entered a new, long and thriving era for the benefit of materials, colloids, and surface scientists. This tempts us to introduce the terminology of "diazonics" we define as the science and technology of aryldiazonium salt-derived materials.

  2. Nanomaterials for fresh-keeping and sterilization in food preservation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongfang; Gu, Ning

    2009-06-01

    Food sterilizing and antistaling technologies are very important to the public's health and safety and have been attracting more and more attentions. In the past several years, new development chance was created by the introduction of nanomaterials to this critical field. Nanomaterials possess lots of outstanding properties, such as unique quantum size effect, large surface area and catalytic properties, which jointly facilitate high effective fresh-keeping, and thus were considered as promising materials in food sterilization and antistale. This review article focuses on the patented applications of nanomaterials as food biocidal agents, bacteriostatic agents, catalysts and carriers for antistaling agents.

  3. Silicon nanomaterials platform for bioimaging, biosensing, and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; Fan, Chunhai; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-02-18

    Silicon nanomaterials are an important class of nanomaterials with great potential for technologies including energy, catalysis, and biotechnology, because of their many unique properties, including biocompatibility, abundance, and unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties, among others. Silicon nanomaterials are known to have little or no toxicity due to favorable biocompatibility of silicon, which is an important precondition for biological and biomedical applications. In addition, huge surface-to-volume ratios of silicon nanomaterials are responsible for their unique optical, mechanical, or electronic properties, which offer exciting opportunities for design of high-performance silicon-based functional nanoprobes, nanosensors, and nanoagents for biological analysis and detection and disease treatment. Moreover, silicon is the second most abundant element (after oxygen) on earth, providing plentiful and inexpensive resources for large-scale and low-cost preparation of silicon nanomaterials for practical applications. Because of these attractive traits, and in parallel with a growing interest in their design and synthesis, silicon nanomaterials are extensively investigated for wide-ranging applications, including energy, catalysis, optoelectronics, and biology. Among them, bioapplications of silicon nanomaterials are of particular interest. In the past decade, scientists have made an extensive effort to construct a silicon nanomaterials platform for various biological and biomedical applications, such as biosensors, bioimaging, and cancer treatment, as new and powerful tools for disease diagnosis and therapy. Nonetheless, there are few review articles covering these important and promising achievements to promote the awareness of development of silicon nanobiotechnology. In this Account, we summarize recent representative works to highlight the recent developments of silicon functional nanomaterials for a new, powerful platform for biological and

  4. Inhibition of neutrophil activation by alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M J; Gewurz, H; Siegel, J N

    1984-01-01

    We report that alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a naturally occurring human plasma protein and acute phase reactant of uncertain biological function, inhibits human neutrophil aggregation and superoxide anion generation induced by a variety of stimuli including zymosan treated serum, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and phorbol myristate acetate. Inhibition was transient, directly proportional to the glycoprotein concentration and inversely proportional to the concentration of the stimulus added. Desialyzation, resulting in the removal of a substantial portion of the molecule's negative charge, did not alter the effectiveness of AAG. Removal of the penultimate galactose residues from desialyzed AAG resulted in a slight but significant reversal of inhibition, suggesting that the heteropolysaccharide units of AAG may be important for inhibition of cellular function. We therefore suggest that the acute phase glycoprotein AAG may be a significant modulator of neutrophil as well as platelet and lymphocyte function during inflammation. PMID:6321072

  5. Solution-Based Processing of Monodisperse Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joohoon; Sangwan, Vinod K; Wood, Joshua D; Hersam, Mark C

    2017-02-27

    Exfoliation of single-layer graphene from bulk graphite and the subsequent discovery of exotic physics and emergent phenomena in the atomically thin limit has motivated the isolation of other two-dimensional (2D) layered nanomaterials. Early work on isolated 2D nanomaterial flakes has revealed a broad range of unique physical and chemical properties with potential utility in diverse applications. For example, the electronic and optical properties of 2D nanomaterials depend strongly on atomic-scale variations in thickness, enabling enhanced performance in optoelectronic technologies such as light emitters, photodetectors, and photovoltaics. Much of the initial research on 2D nanomaterials has relied on micromechanical exfoliation, which yields high-quality 2D nanomaterial flakes that are suitable for fundamental studies but possesses limited scalability for real-world applications. In an effort to overcome this limitation, solution-processing methods for isolating large quantities of 2D nanomaterials have emerged. Importantly, solution processing results in 2D nanomaterial dispersions that are amenable to roll-to-roll fabrication methods that underlie lost-cost manufacturing of thin-film transistors, transparent conductors, energy storage devices, and solar cells. Despite these advantages, solution-based exfoliation methods typically lack control over the lateral size and thickness of the resulting 2D nanomaterial flakes, resulting in polydisperse dispersions with heterogeneous properties. Therefore, post-exfoliation separation techniques are needed to achieve 2D nanomaterial dispersions with monodispersity in lateral size, thickness, and properties. In this Account, we survey the latest developments in solution-based separation methods that aim to produce monodisperse dispersions and thin films of emerging 2D nanomaterials such as graphene, boron nitride, transition metal dichalcogenides, and black phosphorus. First, we motivate the need for precise thickness

  6. Layer-by-Layer (LBL) Self-Assembled Biohybrid Nanomaterials for Efficient Antibacterial Applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanhao; Long, Yubo; Li, Qing-Lan; Han, Shuying; Ma, Jianbiao; Yang, Ying-Wei; Gao, Hui

    2015-08-12

    Although antibiotics have been widely used in clinical applications to treat pathogenic infections at present, the problem of drug-resistance associated with abuse of antibiotics is becoming a potential threat to human beings. We report a biohybrid nanomaterial consisting of antibiotics, enzyme, polymers, hyaluronic acid (HA), and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), which exhibits efficient in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity with good biocompatibility and negligible hemolytic side effect. Herein, biocompatible layer-by-layer (LBL) coated MSNs are designed and crafted to release encapsulated antibiotics, e.g., amoxicillin (AMO), upon triggering with hyaluronidase, produced by various pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The LBL coating process comprises lysozyme (Lys), HA, and 1,2-ethanediamine (EDA)-modified polyglycerol methacrylate (PGMA). The Lys and cationic polymers provided multivalent interactions between MSN-Lys-HA-PGMA and bacterial membrane and accordingly immobilized the nanoparticles to facilitate the synergistic effect of these antibacterial agents. Loading process was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). The minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) of MSN-Lys-HA-PGMA treated to antibiotic resistant bacteria is much lower than that of isodose Lys and AMO. Especially, MSN-Lys-HA-PGMA exhibited good inhibition for pathogens in bacteria-infected wounds in vivo. Therefore, this type of new biohybrid nanomaterials showed great potential as novel antibacterial agents.

  7. Two-dimensional soft nanomaterials: a fascinating world of materials.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaodong; Mai, Yiyong; Wu, Dongqing; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Xinliang

    2015-01-21

    The discovery of graphene has triggered great interest in two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials for scientists in chemistry, physics, materials science, and related areas. In the family of newly developed 2D nanostructured materials, 2D soft nanomaterials, including graphene, Bx Cy Nz nanosheets, 2D polymers, covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and 2D supramolecular organic nanostructures, possess great advantages in light-weight, structural control and flexibility, diversity of fabrication approaches, and so on. These merits offer 2D soft nanomaterials a wide range of potential applications, such as in optoelectronics, membranes, energy storage and conversion, catalysis, sensing, biotechnology, etc. This review article provides an overview of the development of 2D soft nanomaterials, with special highlights on the basic concepts, molecular design principles, and primary synthesis approaches in the context.

  8. A Decision Support Framework for Evaluation of Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are currently being developed and applied at rates that far exceed our ability to evaluate their potential for environmental or human health risks. The gap between material development and capacity for assessment grows wider every day. Transforma...

  9. Surface Engineering of Graphene-Based Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications. PMID:25117569

  10. Emerging roles of engineered nanomaterials in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Morris, V J

    2011-10-01

    Nanoscience is the study of phenomena and the manipulation of materials at the atomic or molecular level. Nanotechnology involves the design, production and use of structures through control of the size and shape of the materials at the nanometre scale. Nanotechnology in the food sector is an emerging area with considerable research and potential products. There is particular interest in the definition and regulation of engineered nanomaterials. This term covers three classes of nanomaterials: natural and processed nanostructures in foods; particulate nanomaterials metabolized or excreted on digestion; and particulate nanomaterials not broken down on digestion, which accumulate in the body. This review describes examples of these classes and their likely status in the food industry.

  11. The retina as a potential site of nanomaterial phototoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manufactured nanomaterials are designed for their unique properties, one of which is to be photoreactive. Photocatalysts are desirable in many applications including self-cleaning surfaces, sterilization and decontamination of polluted media, and photovoltaic devices. Photo-catal...

  12. Artificially controlled degradable inorganic nanomaterial for cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxin; Zhang, Ge; Guo, Quanwei; Ma, Liyi; Jia, Qi; Liu, Lidong; Zhou, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Multifunctional nanomaterials for cancer diagnosis and therapy have recently prompted widespread concern. To avoid nanotoxicity, the development of novel degradable functional materials must be our main focus. In this study, we firstly developed ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid calcium disodium salt (EDTA)- and bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped Mn3O4 nanoparticles (MONPs-BSA-EDTA) as a novel inorganic nanomaterials for multifunctional imaging-guided photothermal therapy, which can be degraded in a progress-controlled way by artificially introduced ascorbic acid. The degradation products can also be captured and their excretion accelerated. Careful studies suggested that the toxicity of the MONPs-BSA-EDTA and its degradation products is low. The degradation mechanism also suggests a new method of controlled drug release. The development of artificially controlled degradable inorganic nanomaterials also provides a new way to degrade nanomaterials and minimize ion release, which may have potential applications in cancer theranostics without nanotoxicity.

  13. Investigating the Toxicity and Environmental Fate of Graphene Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hersam Laboratory at Northwestern University works with the Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology and the United States Environmental Protection Agency to study the toxicity and environmental fate of emergent nanomaterials, specifically carbon-based nanomate...

  14. Determining the surface and interface structure of nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hove, Michel A.

    2004-06-14

    This paper informally speculates on the challenges of determining the atomic-scale surface and interface structure of nanomaterials. The relative capabilities of different techniques are compared. This includes discussion of theoretical methods needed to interpret experimental techniques.

  15. Nanomaterials and the environment: uses, methods and measurement.

    PubMed

    Carl Englert, Brian

    2007-11-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged as a field of science and engineering which offers many new product possibilities and potential solutions for a variety of problems. Nanomaterials come in many shapes and forms and contribute to potential products that do everything from sense analytes on a molecular level to function as self cleaning surfaces. With new and significant applications, it is likely that nanomaterial containing products may replace many of the products we use on a daily basis, leading to an increased presence of these materials in the environment. This will result in new needs and requirements from detection tools. It is likely that the analytical methods used to monitor nanomaterials in the environment will be very different than those used in risk assessment and exposure studies. This paper briefly outlines the history, impacts, and uses of nanomaterials and discusses possible methods of detection and quantification for environmental samples. The discussions in this article are specific to those matrices relating to wastewaters and sludge.

  16. Nanomaterials in the environment: behavior, fate, bioavailability, and effects.

    PubMed

    Klaine, Stephen J; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Batley, Graeme E; Fernandes, Teresa F; Handy, Richard D; Lyon, Delina Y; Mahendra, Shaily; McLaughlin, Michael J; Lead, Jamie R

    2008-09-01

    The recent advances in nanotechnology and the corresponding increase in the use of nanomaterials in products in every sector of society have resulted in uncertainties regarding environmental impacts. The objectives of this review are to introduce the key aspects pertaining to nanomaterials in the environment and to discuss what is known concerning their fate, behavior, disposition, and toxicity, with a particular focus on those that make up manufactured nanomaterials. This review critiques existing nanomaterial research in freshwater, marine, and soil environments. It illustrates the paucity of existing research and demonstrates the need for additional research. Environmental scientists are encouraged to base this research on existing studies on colloidal behavior and toxicology. The need for standard reference and testing materials as well as methodology for suspension preparation and testing is also discussed.

  17. Nanomaterials for enhanced immunity as an innovative paradigm in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Seth, Anushree; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Lim, Yong Taik

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of nanoparticle technology, novel and versatile properties of nanomaterials have been introduced, which has constantly expanded their applications in therapeutics. Introduction of nanomaterials for immunomodulation has opened up new avenues with tremendous potential. Interesting properties of nanoparticles, such as adjuvanticity, capability to enhance cross-presentation, polyvalent presentation, siRNA delivery for silencing of immunesuppressive gene, targeting and imaging of immune cells have been known to have immense utility in vaccination and immunotherapy. A thorough understanding of the merits associated with nanomaterials is crucial for designing of modular and versatile nanovaccines, for improved immune response. With the emerging prerequisites of vaccination, nanomaterial-based immune stimulation, seems to be capable of taking the field of immunization to a next higher level.

  18. Antimicrobial nanomaterials as water disinfectant: applications, limitations and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fahim; Perales-Perez, Oscar J; Hwang, Sangchul; Román, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology and its application is one of the rapidly developing sciences. As demand of fresh drinking water is increasing, nanotechnology can contribute noticeable development and improvement to water treatment process. Disinfection process is the last and most important step in water and wastewater treatment process. Some nanomaterials can be used as disinfectants due to their antimicrobial properties and reduce the possibility of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation during traditional disinfection process. A significant number of research efforts is done or going on to understand the mechanisms and enhance the efficiency of nanomaterials as antimicrobial agents, although it will take more time to understand the full potential of nanomaterials in this field. This review paper focuses on inactivation pathways of benign nanomaterials, their possible and probable application and limitations as disinfectants and future opportunities for their application in water cleaning processes.

  19. Characterization of Carbon Onion Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unique properties of carbonaceous nanomaterials, including small particle size, high surface area, and manipulatable surface chemistry, provide high potential for their application to environmental remediation. While research has devoted to develop nanotechnology for environm...

  20. Recent applications of carbon nanomaterials in fluorescence biosensing and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jia; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-07-21

    Carbon-based nanomaterials as important agents for biological applications have emerged in the past few years due to their unique optical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties. Many of these applications rely on successful surface modifications. This review article comprises two main parts. In the first part, we briefly review the properties and surface modifications of several classes of carbon nanomaterials, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene and its derivatives, carbon dots (CDs) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs), as well as some other forms of carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerene, carbon nanohorns (CNHs) and carbon nanoonions (CNOs). In the second part, we focus on the biological applications of these carbon nanomaterials, in particular their applications for fluorescence biosensing as well as bioimaging.

  1. Surface engineering of graphene-based nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sixiang; Chen, Feng; Ehlerding, Emily B; Cai, Weibo

    2014-09-17

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications.

  2. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  3. Number of Hydroxyl Groups on the B-Ring of Flavonoids Affects Their Antioxidant Activity and Interaction with Phorbol Ester Binding Site of PKCδ C1B Domain: In Vitro and in Silico Studies.

    PubMed

    Kongpichitchoke, Teeradate; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Huang, Tzou-Chi

    2015-05-13

    Although flavonoids have been reported for their benefits and nutraceutical potential use, the importance of their structure on their beneficial effects, especially on signal transduction mechanisms, has not been well clarified. In this study, three flavonoids, pinocembrin, naringenin, and eriodictyol, were chosen to determine the effect of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of flavonoid structure on their antioxidant activity. In vitro assays, including DPPH scavenging activity, ROS quantification by flow cytometer, and proteins immunoblotting, and in silico analysis by molecular docking between the flavonoids and C1B domain of PKCδ phorbol ester binding site were both used to complete this study. Eriodictyol (10 μM), containing two hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, exhibited significantly higher (p < 0.05) antioxidant activity than pinocembrin and naringenin. The IC50 values of eriodictyol, naringenin, and pinocembrin were 17.4 ± 0.40, 30.2 ± 0.61, and 44.9 ± 0.57 μM, respectively. In addition, eriodictyol at 10 μM remarkably inhibited the phosphorylation of PKCδ at 63.4% compared with PMA-activated RAW264.7, whereas pinocembrin and naringenin performed inhibition activity at 76.8 and 72.6%, respectively. According to the molecular docking analysis, pinocembrin, naringenin, and eriodictyol showed -CDOCKER_energy values of 15.22, 16.95, and 21.49, respectively, reflecting that eriodictyol could bind with the binding site better than the other two flavonoids. Interestingly, eriodictyol had a remarkably different pose to bind with the kinase as a result of the two hydroxyl groups on its B-ring, which consequently contributed to greater antioxidant activity over pinocembrin and naringenin.

  4. Perspectives on the design of safer nanomaterials and manufacturing processes

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Charles; Heidel, Donna; Sayes, Christie; Hodson, Laura; Schulte, Paul; Eastlake, Adrienne; Brenner, Sara

    2015-01-01

    A concerted effort is being made to insert Prevention through Design principles into discussions of sustainability, occupational safety and health, and green chemistry related to nanotechnology. Prevention through Design is a set of principles that includes solutions to design out potential hazards in nanomanufacturing including the design of nanomaterials, and strategies to eliminate exposures and minimize risks that may be related to the manufacturing processes and equipment at various stages of the lifecycle of an engineered nanomaterial. PMID:26435688

  5. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting.

    PubMed

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Lowry, Gregory V; Unrine, Jason M; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical-chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical-chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans.

  6. Electron beam assisted synthesis of cadmium selenide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, M. C.; Guleria, A.; Singh, S.; Singh, A. K.; Adhikari, S.; Sarkar, S. K.

    2013-02-05

    Cadmium selenide nanomaterials of various shapes and sizes have been synthesized in different condensed media through electron beam irradiation using a 7 MeV linear accelerator. The microstructures in different media as well as the presence of capping reagents play a crucial role in the formation of nanomaterials of different shapes and sizes. Their optical properties could be efficiently tuned by controlling the synthetic parameters.

  7. Perspectives on the design of safer nanomaterials and manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Charles; Heidel, Donna; Sayes, Christie; Hodson, Laura; Schulte, Paul; Eastlake, Adrienne; Brenner, Sara

    2015-09-01

    A concerted effort is being made to insert Prevention through Design principles into discussions of sustainability, occupational safety and health, and green chemistry related to nanotechnology. Prevention through Design is a set of principles, which includes solutions to design out potential hazards in nanomanufacturing including the design of nanomaterials, and strategies to eliminate exposures and minimize risks that may be related to the manufacturing processes and equipment at various stages of the lifecycle of an engineered nanomaterial.

  8. Recent trends in nanomaterials immobilised enzymes for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Verma, Madan L; Puri, Munish; Barrow, Colin J

    2016-01-01

    Application of nanomaterials as novel supporting materials for enzyme immobilisation has generated incredible interest in the biotechnology community. These robust nanostructured forms, such as nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes, nanoporous, nanosheets, and nanocomposites, possess a high surface area to volume ratios that can cause a high enzyme loading and facilitate reaction kinetics, thus improving biocatalytic efficiency for industrial applications. In this article, we discuss research opportunities of nanoscale materials in enzyme biotechnology and highlight recent developments in biofuel production using advanced material supports for enzyme immobilisation and stabilisation. Synthesis and functionalisation of nanomaterial forms using different methods are highlighted. Various simple and effective strategies designed to result in a stable, as well as functional protein-nanomaterial conjugates are also discussed. Analytical techniques confirming enzyme loading on nanomaterials and assessing post-immobilisation changes are discussed. The current status of versatile nanomaterial support for biofuel production employing cellulases and lipases is described in details. This report concludes with a discussion on the likely outcome that nanomaterials will become an integral part of sustainable bioenergy production.

  9. Nanomaterials in consumer's goods: the problems of risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmoshinski, I. V.; Khotimchenko, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Nanotechnology and engineered nanomaterials are currently used in wide variety of cosmetic products, while their use in food industry, packaging materials, household chemicals etc. still includes a limited number of items and does not show a significant upward trend. However, the problem of priority nanomaterials associated risks is relevant due to their high production volumes and an constantly growing burden on the environment and population. In accordance with the frequency of use in mass-produced consumer goods, leading priority nanomaterials are silver nanoparticles (NPs) and (by a wide margin) NPs of gold, platinum, and titanium dioxide. Frequency of nanosized silica introduction into food products as a food additive, at the moment, seems to be underestimated, since the use of this nanomaterial is not declared by manufacturers of products and objective control of its content is difficult. Analysis of literature data on toxicological properties of nanomaterials shows that currently accumulated amount of information is sufficient to establish the safe doses of nanosized silver, gold and titanium dioxide. Data have been provided in a series of studies concerning the effect of oral intake of nanosized silica on the condition of laboratory animals, including on the performance of the immune system. The article examines the existing approaches to the assessment of population exposure to priority nanomaterials, characteristics of existing problems and risk management.

  10. Recent developments of phototherapy based on graphene family nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baomei; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jiyong; Zhai, Guangxi

    2016-10-19

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have drawn abundant interest in various fields such as biomedicine in recent years, thanks to their unique physico-chemical properties. Due to the ultra-high surface area of single-layered graphene, higher molecular loading is obtained. In addition, easy modifications are acquired because of its ample oxygen-content functional groups. Based on the above talking advantages, graphene-based nanomaterials have been widely explored as novel nano-vectors for disease theranostics. In this article, we give a comprehensive review about graphene-based nanomaterials, including introduction about different members of graphene family nanomaterials (GFNs), various modifications, toxicity and biomedical applications of graphene-based derivatives. More attentions are given to phototherapy application in this paper. The mechanisms of photothermal and photodynamic therapy are also offered. Finally, the prospects and challenges of the graphene-based nanomaterials are discussed in this review. That this review article will provide a comprehensive understanding of graphene-based nanomaterials is the pursuit.

  11. Interactions of nanomaterials and biological systems: implications to personalized nanomedicine☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Qing; Xu, Xiaoyang; Bertrand, Nicolas; Pridgen, Eric; Swami, Archana; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    The application of nanotechnology to personalized medicine provides an unprecedented opportunity to improve the treatment of many diseases. Nanomaterials offer several advantages as therapeutic and diagnostic tools due to design flexibility, small sizes, large surface-to-volume ratio, and ease of surface modification with multivalent ligands to increase avidity for target molecules. Nanomaterials can be engineered to interact with specific biological components, allowing them to benefit from the insights provided by personalized medicine techniques. To tailor these interactions, a comprehensive knowledge of how nanomaterials interact with biological systems is critical. Herein, we discuss how the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems can guide their design for diagnostic, imaging and drug delivery purposes. A general overview of nanomaterials under investigation is provided with an emphasis on systems that have reached clinical trials. Finally, considerations for the development of personalized nanomedicines are summarized such as the potential toxicity, scientific and technical challenges in fabricating them, and regulatory and ethical issues raised by the utilization of nanomaterials. PMID:22917779

  12. European Regulation Affecting Nanomaterials - Review of Limitations and Future Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2012-01-01

    After learning about the potential risks associated with various specific nanomaterials, concerns have been raised about adequacy of existing regulation in Europe and what should be done to address any potential regulatory gaps related to nanomaterials. Understanding the limitations of the current regulation in regard to nanomaterials is a starting point in a democratic and transparent process towards adapting existing laws and facilitating an informed discussion about which kind of regulatory options best address the identified limitations. In the following we will introduce key pieces of European legislation affecting nanomaterials, analyze their limitations, and provide a number of recommendations on how these can be overcome. We find that, although nanomaterials are in principle covered by the scope of many of the existing legislative frameworks, it is often unclear, if current regulations are actually applicable when it comes to specific nanomaterials and their diverse applications. Main limitations seem to be: that requirements to do safety evaluations are triggered by production volumes by tonnage not tailored to the nanoscale, the profound lack of (eco)toxicological data, and that thresholds values and occupational exposure limits cannot be established with existing methodologies. PMID:22942870

  13. European regulation affecting nanomaterials - review of limitations and future recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2012-01-01

    After learning about the potential risks associated with various specific nanomaterials, concerns have been raised about adequacy of existing regulation in Europe and what should be done to address any potential regulatory gaps related to nanomaterials. Understanding the limitations of the current regulation in regard to nanomaterials is a starting point in a democratic and transparent process towards adapting existing laws and facilitating an informed discussion about which kind of regulatory options best address the identified limitations. In the following we will introduce key pieces of European legislation affecting nanomaterials, analyze their limitations, and provide a number of recommendations on how these can be overcome. We find that, although nanomaterials are in principle covered by the scope of many of the existing legislative frameworks, it is often unclear, if current regulations are actually applicable when it comes to specific nanomaterials and their diverse applications. Main limitations seem to be: that requirements to do safety evaluations are triggered by production volumes by tonnage not tailored to the nanoscale, the profound lack of (eco)toxicological data, and that thresholds values and occupational exposure limits cannot be established with existing methodologies.

  14. [International trend of guidance for nanomaterial risk assessment].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years, several kinds of opinions or recommendations on the nanomaterial safety assessment have been published from international or national bodies. Among the reports, the first practical guidance of risk assessment from the regulatory body was published from the European Food Safety Authorities in May 2011, which included the determination of exposure scenario and toxicity testing strategy. In October 2011, European Commission (EC) adopted the definition of "nanomaterial" for regulation. And more recently, Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety of EC released guidance for assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetics in June 2012. A series of activities in EU marks an important step towards realistic safety assessment of nanomaterials. On the other hand, the US FDA announced a draft guidance for industry in June 2011, and then published draft guidance documents for both "Cosmetic Products" and "Food Ingredients and Food Contact Substances" in April 2012. These draft documents do not restrictedly define the physical properties of nanomaterials, but when manufacturing changes alter the dimensions, properties, or effects of an FDA-regulated product, the products are treated as new products. Such international movements indicate that most of nanomaterials with any new properties would be assessed or regulated as new products by most of national authorities in near future, although the approaches are still case by case basis. We will introduce such current international activities and consideration points for regulatory risk assessment.

  15. Mechanism of hard-nanomaterial clearance by the liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoi, Kim M.; Macparland, Sonya A.; Ma, Xue-Zhong; Spetzler, Vinzent N.; Echeverri, Juan; Ouyang, Ben; Fadel, Saleh M.; Sykes, Edward A.; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Kaths, Johann M.; Conneely, John B.; Alman, Benjamin A.; Selzner, Markus; Ostrowski, Mario A.; Adeyi, Oyedele A.; Zilman, Anton; McGilvray, Ian D.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-11-01

    The liver and spleen are major biological barriers to translating nanomedicines because they sequester the majority of administered nanomaterials and prevent delivery to diseased tissue. Here we examined the blood clearance mechanism of administered hard nanomaterials in relation to blood flow dynamics, organ microarchitecture and cellular phenotype. We found that nanomaterial velocity reduces 1,000-fold as they enter and traverse the liver, leading to 7.5 times more nanomaterial interaction with hepatic cells relative to peripheral cells. In the liver, Kupffer cells (84.8 +/- 6.4%), hepatic B cells (81.5 +/- 9.3%) and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (64.6 +/- 13.7%) interacted with administered PEGylated quantum dots, but splenic macrophages took up less material (25.4 +/- 10.1%) due to differences in phenotype. The uptake patterns were similar for two other nanomaterial types and five different surface chemistries. Potential new strategies to overcome off-target nanomaterial accumulation may involve manipulating intra-organ flow dynamics and modulating the cellular phenotype to alter hepatic cell interactions.

  16. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Carata, Elisabetta; Dini, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies. PMID:24216709

  17. Presence in, and release of, nanomaterials from consumer products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Westerhoff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products has led to concerns about their potential impact on humans and the environment. In order to fully assess the impacts and release of ENMs from consumer products, this chapter provides an overview of the types of consumer products that contain nanomaterials, the potential release mechanisms of these ENMs from consumer products, and the associated human exposure. Information from two large datasets on consumer goods associated with ENMs, namely, the U.S.-based Project for Emerging Nanotechnologies from the Woodrow Wilson International Center, and the European-based National Institute for Public Health and the Environment of Netherlands, have been summarized. These databases reveal that silver, titanium, carbon-based ENMs are the major nanomaterials associated with consumer products. The presence and potential release of silver, titanium, carbon-based, and other nanomaterials from consumer goods available in published literature are also summarized, as well as the potential human exposure scenarios of inhalation, ingestion, dermal, and combination of all means. The prospecting of nanomaterial in water and biosolids provides further evidence of ENM occurrence, which could be linked to the use of nanomaterials containing consumer goods. Finally, this overview provides guidelines on toxicity studies, which calls for further efforts to analyze the biological effects of ENMs on human beings and their exposure pathways in consumer products.

  18. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induces protein kinase ceta-specific proliferative response in astrocytic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hussaini, I M; Karns, L R; Vinton, G; Carpenter, J E; Redpath, G T; Sando, J J; VandenBerg, S R

    2000-07-21

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activation has been implicated in cellular proliferation in neoplastic astrocytes. The roles for specific PKC isozymes in regulating this glial response, however, are not well understood. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression of PKC isozymes and the role of PKC-eta expression in regulating cellular proliferation in two well characterized astrocytic tumor cell lines (U-1242 MG and U-251 MG) with different properties of growth in cell culture. Both cell lines expressed an array of conventional (alpha, betaI, betaII, and gamma) and novel (theta and epsilon) PKC isozymes that can be activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Another novel PKC isozyme, PKC-eta, was only expressed by U-251 MG cells. In contrast, PKC-delta was readily detected in U-1242 MG cells but was present only at low levels in U-251 MG cells. PMA (100 nm) treatment for 24 h increased cell proliferation by over 2-fold in the U-251 MG cells, whereas it decreased the mitogenic response in the U-1242 MG cells by over 90%. When PKC-eta was stably transfected into U-1242 MG cells, PMA increased cell proliferation by 2.2-fold, similar to the response of U-251 MG cells. The cell proliferation induced by PMA in both the U-251 MG and U-1242-PKC-eta cells was blocked by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (0.5 micrometer) and the MEK inhibitor, PD 98059 (50 micrometer). Transient transfection of wild type U-251 with PKC-eta antisense oligonucleotide (1 micrometer) also blocked the PMA-induced increase in [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. The data demonstrate that two glioblastoma lines, with functionally distinct proliferative responses to PMA, express different novel PKC isozymes and that the differential expression of PKC-eta plays a determining role in the different proliferative capacity.

  19. Induction of phosphorylation and cell surface redistribution of acetylcholine receptors by phorbol ester and carbamylcholine in cultured chick muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms regulating the clustering of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) on the surface of cultured embryonic chick muscle cells. Treatment of these cells with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent activator of protein kinase C, was found to cause a rapid dispersal of AChR clusters, as monitored by fluorescence microscopy of cells labeled with tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated alpha-bungarotoxin. The loss of AChR clusters was not accompanied by an appreciable change in the amount of AChR on the surface of these cells, as measured by the specific binding of [125I]Bgt. Analysis of the phosphorylation pattern of immunoprecipitable AChR subunits showed that the gamma- and delta- subunits are phosphorylated by endogenous protein kinase activity in the intact muscle cells, and that the delta-subunit displays increased phosphorylation in response to TPA. Structural analogues of TPA which do not stimulate protein kinase C have no effect on AChR surface topography or phosphorylation. Exposure of chick myotubes to the cholinergic agonist carbamylcholine was found to cause a dispersal of AChR clusters with a time course similar to that of TPA. Like TPA, carbamylcholine enhances the phosphorylation of the delta-subunit of AChR. The carbamylcholine-induced redistribution and phosphorylation of AChR is blocked by the nicotinic AChR antagonist d-tubocurarine. TPA and carbamylcholine have no effect on cell morphology during the time- course of these experiments. These findings indicate that cell surface topography of AChR may be regulated by phosphorylation of its subunits and suggest a mechanism for dispersal of AChR clusters by agonist activation. PMID:3417778

  20. Differential regulation by phorbol ester of formyl-methionyl peptide and leukotriene B sub 4 receptors on human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.W.; Chung, S.; Richards, S. )

    1991-03-15

    Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with suboptimal does of phorbol myristyl acetate (PMA) will increase fMP receptor expression with parallel potentiation of superoxide generation. PMA-induced changes in leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) receptor expression were assessed in parallel with fMP receptor expression to determine if these two independent receptor classes are regulated in a similar manner by PKC. The relative density of fMP receptors was assessed by flow cytometry. The relative density of receptors for LTB{sub 4} was quantitated by incubating 2 {times} 10{sup 6} Ns with 10nM({sup 3}H)-LTB{sub 4} and determining the amount of radioactivity bound after filtration on glass fiber filters. Incubation of N with 10ng/mL PMA induced a 3.2-fold increase in fMP receptor expression by 5 min which was sustained for up to 15 min. In contrast, LTB{sub 4} receptor density decreased by 36% within 5 min. in response to 10 ng/mL PMA. Staurosporine, a potent antagonist of PKC, had no effect of fMP receptor expression but markedly enhanced LTB{sub 4} receptor expression by 1.7-fold at 200nM. PKC acts to decrease the surface expression of LTB{sub 4} receptors in contrast to the enhancement of fMP receptor expression, suggesting in contrast to the enhancement of fMP receptor expression, suggesting that potentiation of N function by PMA may be stimulus-specific.

  1. Phorbol ester stimulation of RasGRP1 regulates the sodium-chloride cotransporter by a PKC-independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Benjamin; Joshi, Leena M.; Cooke, Leslie L.; Vazquez, Norma; Musch, Mark W.; Hebert, Steven C.; Gamba, Gerardo; Hoover, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    The sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) is the principal salt-absorptive pathway in the mammalian distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and is the site of action of one of the most effective classes of antihypertensive medications, thiazide diuretics. We developed a cell model system to assess NCC function in a mammalian cell line that natively expresses NCC, the mouse DCT (mDCT) cell line. We used this system to study the complex regulation of NCC by the phorbol ester (PE) 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a diacylglycerol (DAG) analog. It has generally been thought that PEs mediate their effects on transporters through the activation of PKC. However, there are at least five other DAG/PE targets. Here we describe how one of those alternate targets of DAG/PE effects, Ras guanyl-releasing protein 1 (RasGRP1), mediates the PE-induced suppression of function and the surface expression of NCC. Functional assessment of NCC by using thiazide-sensitive 22Na+ uptakes revealed that TPA completely suppresses NCC function. Biotinylation experiments demonstrated that this result was primarily because of decreased surface expression of NCC. Although inhibitors of PKC had no effect on this suppression, MAPK inhibitors completely prevented the TPA effect. RasGRP1 activates the MAPK pathway through activation of the small G protein Ras. Gene silencing of RasGRP1 prevented the PE-mediated suppression of NCC activity, the activation of the H-Ras isoform of Ras, and the activation of ERK1/2 MAPK. This finding confirmed the critical role of RasGRP1 in mediating the PE-induced suppression of NCC activity through the stimulation of the MAPK pathway. PMID:18077438

  2. Inhibition of astroglia-induced endothelial differentiation by inorganic lead: a role for protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Laterra, J; Bressler, J P; Indurti, R R; Belloni-Olivi, L; Goldstein, G W

    1992-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial function in developing brain is particularly sensitive to lead toxicity, and it has been hypothesized that this results from the modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) by lead. We examined the effects of inorganic lead on an in vitro model of central nervous system endothelial differentiation in which astroglial cells induce central nervous system endothelial cells to form capillary-like structures. Capillary-like structure formation within C6 astroglial-endothelial cocultures was inhibited by lead acetate with 50% maximal inhibition at 0.5 microM total lead. Inhibition was independent of effects on cell viability or growth. Under conditions that inhibited capillary-like structure formation, we found that lead increased membrane-associated PKC in both C6 astroglial and endothelial cells. Prolonged exposure of C6 cells to 5 microM lead for up to 16 h resulted in a time-dependent increase in membranous PKC as determined by immunoblot analysis. Membranous PKC increased after 5-h exposures to as little as 50 nM lead and was maximal at approximately 1 microM. Phorbol esters were used to determine whether PKC modulation was causally related to the inhibition of endothelial differentiation by lead. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10 nM) inhibited capillary-like structure formation by 65 +/- 5%, whereas 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate was without effect. These findings suggest that inorganic lead induces cerebral microvessel dysfunction by interfering with PKC modulation in microvascular endothelial or perivascular astroglial cells. Images PMID:1438272

  3. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    The field of nanotechnology is continually advancing, and increasing amounts of consumer goods are being produced using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The health risks of occupational and/or consumer exposure to ENMs are not completely understood, although significant research indicates that pulmonary exposure to nanomaterials induces toxic effects in the lungs of exposed animals. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a specific category of ENMs and consist of sheets of graphene rolled into cylinders that are multiple layers thick in order to strengthen their rigidity. MWCNTs have a fiber-like shape, similar to that of asbestos, which allows for a high aspect ratio and makes them difficult to clear from the lung. Studies with rodent models have demonstrated that pulmonary exposure to ENMs, in particular MWCNTs, results in acute lung inflammation and the subsequent development of chronic fibrosis, suggesting a potential human health risk to individuals involved in the manufacturing of products utilizing these nanomaterials. Induction of IL-1beta secretion via activation of the inflammasome is a prime mechanism of MWCNT-induced inflammation. The inflammasome is a multi-protein scaffold found in a variety of cell types that forms in response to a variety of immune signals, including particulates. Sensitization with allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), increases levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in mice and in humans, and there is particular cause for concern in cases of MWCNT exposure in individuals with pre-existing allergic airway disease, such as asthma. MWCNT exposure exacerbates airway inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of pre-existing allergic asthma, suggesting that individuals suffering from asthma are more susceptible to the toxic pulmonary effects of MWCNT exposure. Asthma is an exceptionally prominent human disease, and therefore the goal of this research was to better understand how pre-existing allergic airway

  4. Characterization Techniques for Aggregated Nanomaterials in Biological and Environmental Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seongho

    Nanoparticles, which are defined as objects with characteristic lengths in the 10--9 -- 10--7 m (nanoscale) size range, are used with increasing frequency in a wide of applications, leading to increases in nanomaterial interactions with biological and environmental systems. There is therefore considerable interest in studying the influence nanomaterials can have when inside the human body or dispersed in the ambient environment. However, nanoparticles persist as homo aggregates or heterogeneous mixtures with organic matters, such as proteins, in biological and environmental systems. A large and growing body of research confirm that nanomaterial morphology as well as the degree of aggregation between nanomaterials influences nanomaterial interactions with their surroundings. Specifically, the structures/morphologies of nanoparticles determine their overall surface areas and corresponding surface reactivity (e.g. their catalytic activity). Nanoparticle transport properties (e.g. diffusion coefficient and extent of cellular uptake) are also determined by both their structures and surface properties. Unfortunately, techniques to characterize nanomaterial size and shape quantitatively, when nanomaterials have complex geometries or persist as aggregates, are lacking. Hydrodynamic sizes of nanoparticles and their aggregates can be inferred by dynamic light scattering (DLS) or nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). However, since these techniques are relied on the scattering light intensity properties, sizes of polydisperse sub 30 nm particles cannot be effectively measured in those techniques. For structure inference of aggregated nanomaterials, microscopy images have been used for qualitative visual analysis, but the quantitative morphology analysis technique is yet to be developed. Five studies in this dissertation are hence aimed to develop new techniques to provide improved morphology characterization of aggregated nanomaterials in various biological and environmental

  5. Substantiation of International Nanomaterials Security Group Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnov, A.; Sadovnikov, S.; Panfilov, S.; Magarshak, Yu.

    Nanotechnology has achieved the status as one of the critical R&D area. Scientists use the unique properties of atomic and molecular assemblages built at the nanometer scale. The ability to manipulate the physical, chemical, and biological properties of molecules and particles affords to design agents with set up properties. But the technology allows creating not only useful agents. Possible accidental or deliberate creation of new nanoparticles (NPs) with dangerous properties is highly probable minor product of progress in the new area. The article briefly describes some pathways in development and implementation of NPs for medicinal and the similar purposes. Some of NPs can effective facilitate and mask transport of various agents in various environments. Possible creation of new dangerous NPs (e.g. conjugates based on combination of extensively use NPs and chemical, biological and radioactive agents) as well as creation of brand new NPs and nanodevices with unique properties needs creation of international multidiscipline community for security evaluation of nanomaterials and technologies. The community will forecast possible dangerous unexpectedness in the field of nanoscale materials and devices and suggests rational pathways for prevention of the threats.

  6. Species sensitivity distributions for engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Garner, Kendra L; Suh, Sangwon; Lenihan, Hunter S; Keller, Arturo A

    2015-05-05

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are a relatively new strain of materials for which little is understood about their impacts. A species sensitivity distribution (SSDs) is a cumulative probability distribution of a chemical's toxicity measurements obtained from single-species bioassays of various species that can be used to estimate the ecotoxicological impacts of a chemical. The recent increase in the availability of acute toxicity data for ENMs enabled the construction of 10 ENM-specific SSDs, with which we analyzed (1) the range of toxic concentrations, (2) whether ENMs cause greater hazard to an ecosystem than the ionic or bulk form, and (3) the key parameters that affect variability in toxicity. The resulting estimates for hazardous concentrations at which 5% of species will be harmed ranged from <1 ug/L for PVP-coated n-Ag to >3.5 mg/L for CNTs. The results indicated that size, formulation, and the presence of a coating can alter toxicity, and thereby corresponding SSDs. Few statistical differences were observed between SSDs of an ENM and its ionic counterpart. However, we did find a significant correlation between the solubility of ENMs and corresponding SSD. Uncertainty in SSD values can be reduced through greater consideration of ENM characteristics and physiochemical transformations in the environment.

  7. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F.

    2014-03-31

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH{sub 2} and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI)

  8. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO2 nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH2 and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe2O4 have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI).

  9. Optical and optoelectronic properties of organic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satapathi, Soumitra

    In this dissertation research, organic nanomaterials, such as semiconducting polymer nanoparticles, graphene nanosheets and organic small molecules were successfully utilized for fabrication of organic solar cells, optical sensors and for high contrast imaging of cancer cells. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple miniemulsion technique. These size controllable polymeric nanoparticles were proven to be able to optimize the morphologies of the bulk heterojunction solar cells and to provide fundamental insight into the evolution of the nanostructures. Highly sensitive optical sensors were fabricated using these polymeric nanoparticles for efficient detection of nitroaromatic explosives, such as 2,4 dinitrotoluene (DNT) and 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous medium as well as in vapor the phase. Moreover, these water dispersible and fluorescent polymer nanodots were two-photon active and could be internalized by tumor cells as demonstrated by two-photon confocal imaging. In addition to the polymer nanoparticles, the role of the graphene nanosheets in the performance enhancement of dye sensitized solar cells was also investigated. The use of organic small molecules for optical sensing of different nerve gas agents and their potential use in multiphoton imaging of cancer cells were discussed. Controlling material properties at nanoscale for optoelectronics and imaging application as discussed in this dissertation would provide new dimensions in the areas of applied physics and materials science researches.

  10. Fabrication and Design of Optical Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Mark D.

    Over the past several decades, advances in nanometer scale fabrication has sparked interes in applications that take advantage of materials that are structured at these small length scales. Specifically, metallic optical nanomaterials have emerged as a new way to control light at length scales that are smaller than the wavelength of light and have optical properties that are distinctly different from their macroscale counterparts. Although there have been may advances in nanofabrication, the performance and widespread use of optical nanomaterials is still limited by fabrication and design challenges. This dissertation describes advances in the fabrication, characterization, and design of optical nanomaterials. First we demonstrate how a portable and compact photolithography system can be made using a light source composed of UV LEDs. Our solid-state photolithography (SSP) system brings the capabilities of one of the most important yet workhorse tools of micro- and nanotechnology--the mask aligner--to the benchtop. The two main highlights of chapter 2 include: (i) portable, low-cost photolithography and (ii) high quality patterning. We replace the mask aligner with a system composed of UV LEDs and a diffuser that can be built for as little as $30. The design of the SSP system alleviates the need for dedicated power supplies, vacuum lines and cooling systems, which makes it a true benchtop photolithography system. We further show that sub-wavelength features can be fabricated across 4-in wafers and that these patterns are of high quality such that they can be easily transferred into functional materials. Chapter 3 describes a parallel method to create nanometer scale textures over large areas with unprecedented control over wrinkle wavelength. The main points of this chapter include: (i) a new material system for nanowrinkles, (ii) wrinkles with tunable wavelengths, and (iii) a method for measuring the skin thickness. First, we show that RIE treatment of PS with

  11. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The draft document is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and, more importantly, what is not yet known that could be of value in assessing the broad implications of specific nanomaterials. Like previous case studies (see History/ Chronology below), this draft case study on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is based on the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach, which consists of both a framework and a process. Unlike previous case studies this case study incorporates information about a traditional (i.e., “non-nano-enabled”) product, against which the MWCNT flame-retardant coating applied to upholstery textiles (i.e., the “nano-enabled” product) can be compared. The comparative element serves dual-purposes: 1) to provide a more robust database that facilitates identification of data gaps related to the nano-enabled product and 2) to provide a context for identifying key factors and data gaps for future efforts to evaluate risk-related trade-offs between a nano-enabled and non-nano-enabled product. This draft case study does not represent a completed or even a preliminary assessment of MWCNTs; rather, it uses the CEA framework to structure information from available literature and other resources (e.g., government reports) on the product life cycle, fate and transport processes in various environmental media, exposure-dose characterization, and impacts in human, ecological, and environmental receptors.

  12. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Independent Peer Review Draft document presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); it focuses on the specific example of MWCNTs as used in flame-retardant coatings applied to upholstery textiles. This case study is organized around the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which structures available information pertaining to the product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors (i.e., humans, ecological populations, and the environment), and potential impacts in these receptors. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks, or present an exhaustive review of the literature. Rather, it was used in an independent peer review to provide feedback on revisions that EPA made to the external review draft of the document based on public comments and the CEA process to identify research gaps for MWCNTs. This document seeks to identify what is known and unknown related to assessing the health and environmental implications of a nanomaterial; in this case multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) used in flame-retardant coatings applied to textiles.

  13. Optical Characterization of Natural Nontoxic Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Devulapalli; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic nanomaterials - carbon nanotubes, semiconductor nanoparticles, nanowires and nanorods, metal clusters in polymer films - are extensively studied for potential photonic applications. Naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes offer additional advantages of high tensile strength, nontoxcity and biocompatibility. Halloysite is receiving lot of attention for application as low cost nanoscale container for encapsulation of biologically active molecules, drugs, and anticorrosion agents. We studied the optical properties of halloysite nanotube samples of length ~1000 nm with 50 nm external diameter and 15 nm internal diameter. The hollysite sample was provided by Prof. Yuri Lvov, Institute for Micromanufacturing, Louisiana Tech. The sample suspended in water at a concentration 2.5 mg/ml exhibits a broad optical absorption band in the visible region with a peak ~600 nm. Z-scan studies are carried out, with 3 nsec laser pulses of frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, using 1 mm glass cell containing the sample suspended in acetone at a concentration 0.66 mg/ml. Open aperture z-scan measurements indicate two-photon absorption. Closed aperture z-scan measurements exhibit a positive nonlinear refractive index. Results of photoacoustic z-scan currently in progress will also be presented.

  14. Carbon Nanomaterials in Agriculture: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Servin, Alia D.; Pagano, Luca; Dhankher, Om Parkash; White, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    There has been great interest in the use of carbon nano-materials (CNMs) in agriculture. However, the existing literature reveals mixed effects from CNM exposure on plants, ranging from enhanced crop yield to acute cytotoxicity and genetic alteration. These seemingly inconsistent research-outcomes, taken with the current technological limitations for in situ CNM detection, present significant hurdles to the wide scale use of CNMs in agriculture. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current literature, including studies with both positive and negative effects of different CNMs (e.g., carbon nano-tubes, fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, and carbon nano-horns, among others) on terrestrial plants and associated soil-dwelling microbes. The effects of CNMs on the uptake of various co-contaminants will also be discussed. Last, we highlight critical knowledge gaps, including the need for more soil-based investigations under environmentally relevant conditions. In addition, efforts need to be focused on better understanding of the underlying mechanism of CNM-plant interactions. PMID:26941751

  15. Smart Mesoporous Nanomaterials for Antitumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Carmona, Marina; Colilla, Montserrat; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials for the treatment of solid tumours is receiving increasing attention by the scientific community. Among them, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique features that make them suitable nanocarriers to host, transport and protect drug molecules until the target is reached. It is possible to incorporate different targeting ligands to the outermost surface of MSNs to selectively drive the drugs to the tumour tissues. To prevent the premature release of the cargo entrapped in the mesopores, it is feasible to cap the pore entrances using stimuli-responsive nanogates. Therefore, upon exposure to internal (pH, enzymes, glutathione, etc.) or external (temperature, light, magnetic field, etc.) stimuli, the pore opening takes place and the release of the entrapped cargo occurs. These smart MSNs are capable of selectively reaching and accumulating at the target tissue and releasing the entrapped drug in a specific and controlled fashion, constituting a promising alternative to conventional chemotherapy, which is typically associated with undesired side effects. In this review, we overview the recent advances reported by the scientific community in developing MSNs for antitumor therapy. We highlight the possibility to design multifunctional nanosystems using different therapeutic approaches aimed at increasing the efficacy of the antitumor treatment. PMID:28347103

  16. Carbon nanomaterials-based electrochemical aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zonghua; Yu, Jianbo; Gui, Rijun; Jin, Hui; Xia, Yanzhi

    2016-05-15

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have attracted increasing attention due to their unique electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. CNMs are extensively applied in electronic, optoelectronic, photovoltaic and sensing devices fields, especially in bioassay technology. These excellent properties significantly depend on not only the functional atomic structures of CNMs, but also the interactions with other materials, such as gold nanoparticles, SiO2, chitosan, etc. This review systematically summarizes applications of CNMs in electrochemical aptasensors (ECASs). Firstly, definition and development of ECASs are introduced. Secondly, different ways of ECASs about working principles, classification and construction of CNMs are illustrated. Thirdly, the applications of different CNMs used in ECASs are discussed. In this review, different types of CNMs are involved such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene oxide, etc. Besides, the newly emerging CNMs and CNMs-based composites are also discoursed. Finally, we demonstrate the future prospects of CNMs-based ECASs, and some suggestions about the near future development of CNMs-based ECASs are highlighted.

  17. Glyconanoparticles: multifunctional nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    García, Isabel; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2010-07-01

    Metal-based glyconanoparticles (GNPs) are biofunctional nanomaterials that combine the unique physical, chemical and optical properties of the metallic nucleus with the characteristics of the carbohydrate coating. The latter characteristics comprise a series of advantages that range from ensuring water solubility, biocompatibility and stability to targeting properties. The selection of suitable carbohydrates for specifically targeting biomarkers opens up the possibility to employ metallic GNPs in diagnostics and/or therapy. Within the vast nanoscience field, this review intends to focus on the advances of multifunctional and multimodal GNPs, which make use of the 'glycocode' to specifically address pathogens or pathological-related biomedical problems. Examples of their potential application in antiadhesion therapy and diagnosis are highlighted. From the ex vivo diagnostic perspective, it can be predicted that GNPs will soon be used clinically. However, the in vivo application of metallic GNPs in humans will probably need more time. In particular, major concerns regarding nanotoxicity need to be exhaustively addressed. However, it is expected that the sugar shell of GNPs will lower the intrinsic toxicity of metal nanoclusters better than other non-natural coatings.

  18. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This draft document presents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant sprays. This case study is organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which combines a product life-cycle perspective with the risk assessment paradigm. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks. Instead, it is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and unknown about nano-Ag in a selected application and can be used as a starting point to identify and prioritize possible research directions to support future assessments of nanomaterials. The information presented in the case study and the questions raised in this document are a foundation for a process to determine priorities among various research topics and directions. After that process has been completed, a final chapter will be added to this document to summarize highlights from preceding chapters and the major research issues that have emerged.

  19. Stimuli-Responsive Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nature employs a variety of tactics to precisely time and execute the processes and mechanics of life, relying on sequential sense and response cascades to transduce signaling events over multiple length and time scales. Many of these tactics, such as the activation of a zymogen, involve the direct manipulation of a material by a stimulus. Similarly, effective therapeutics and diagnostics require the selective and efficient homing of material to specific tissues and biomolecular targets with appropriate temporal resolution. These systems must also avoid undesirable or toxic side effects and evade unwanted removal by endogenous clearing mechanisms. Nanoscale delivery vehicles have been developed to package materials with the hope of delivering them to select locations with rates of accumulation and clearance governed by an interplay between the carrier and its cargo. Many modern approaches to drug delivery have taken inspiration from natural activatable materials like zymogens, membrane proteins, and metabolites, whereby stimuli initiate transformations that are required for cargo release, prodrug activation, or selective transport. This Perspective describes key advances in the field of stimuli-responsive nanomaterials while highlighting some of the many challenges faced and opportunities for development. Major hurdles include the increasing need for powerful new tools and strategies for characterizing the dynamics, morphology, and behavior of advanced delivery systems in situ and the perennial problem of identifying truly specific and useful physical or molecular biomarkers that allow a material to autonomously distinguish diseased from normal tissue. PMID:25474531

  20. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄.

  1. Bio and nanomaterials in tribocorrosion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, Lidia

    2017-02-01

    The growing attention that the scientific community has paid in the last decades to the corrosion phenomena, including tribocorrosion is related to the huge economic, social and environmental losses (3,5 % GDP in industrialized countries as USA, UK, Japan and Germany), that result from the spread of damage of several metal constructions and devices. Tribocorrosion is defined as the chemical-electrochemical-mechanical process leading to a degradation of materials in sliding, rolling or erosion contacts immersed in a corrosive environment or even in water. That degradation results from the combined action of corrosion and wear are higher compared with addition of corrosion and wear degradation separately. This synergism between chemical, electrochemical, and mechanical processes on materials in sliding, abrasive or erosive contacts immersed in a liquid requires a multi-disciplinary approach (material science, electrochemistry, tribology, mechanics, and surface engineering). This paper presents few summary results obtained by studying the materials degradation by complex tribocorrosion processes in terms of two broad categories of applications: tribocorrosion in industrial systems with improved behaviour of nanomaterials as hybrid and nanocomposite layers and tribocorrosion in living systems with improved behaviour by surface modifications of biomaterials applying electrochemical techniques. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on the surface conditions of materials in sliding contacts and also on the kinetics of reactions that control the corrosion component in the material loss during tribocorrosion tests.

  2. Exploring release and recovery of nanomaterials from commercial polymeric nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busquets-Fité, Martí; Fernandez, Elisabet; Janer, Gemma; Vilar, Gemma; Vázquez-Campos, Socorro; Zanasca, R.; Citterio, C.; Mercante, L.; Puntes, Víctor

    2013-04-01

    Much concern has been raised about the risks associated with the broad use of polymers containing nanomaterials. Much is known about degradation and aging of polymers and nanomaterials independently, but very few studies have been done in order to understand degradation of polymeric nanocomposites containing nanomaterials and the fate of these nanomaterials, which may occur in suffering many processes such as migration, release and physicochemical modifications. Throughout the UE funded FP7 project NANOPOLYTOX, studies on the migration, release and alteration of mechanical properties of commercial nanocomposites due to ageing and weathering have been performed along with studies on the feasibility of recovery and recycling of the nanomaterials. The project includes the use as model nanocomposites of Polyamide-6 (PA), Polypropylene (PP) and Ethyl Vinyl Acetate (EVA) as polymeric matrix filled with a 3% in mass of a set of selected broadly used nanomaterials; from inorganic metal oxides nanoparticles (SiO2, TiO2 and ZnO) to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and Nanoclays. These model nanocomposites were then treated under accelerated ageing conditions in climatic chamber. To determine the degree of degradation of the whole nanocomposite and possible processes of migration, release and modification of the nanofillers, nanocomposites were characterized by different techniques. Additionally, recovery of the nanomaterials fro m the polymeric matrix was addressed, being successfully achieved for PA and PP based nanocomposites. In the case of PA, dissolution of the polymeric matrix using formic acid and further centrifugation steps was the chosen approach, while for PP based nanocomposites calcination was performed.

  3. Engineered Nanomaterials, Sexy New Technology and Potential Hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-05-04

    Engineered nanomaterials enhance exciting new applications that can greatly benefit society in areas of cancer treatments, solar energy, energy storage, and water purification. While nanotechnology shows incredible promise in these and other areas by exploiting nanomaterials unique properties, these same properties can potentially cause adverse health effects to workers who may be exposed during work. Dispersed nanoparticles in air can cause adverse health effects to animals not merely due to their chemical properties but due to their size, structure, shape, surface chemistry, solubility, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, mutagenicity, dermal toxicity, and parent material toxicity. Nanoparticles have a greater likelihood of lung deposition and blood absorption than larger particles due to their size. Nanomaterials can also pose physical hazards due to their unusually high reactivity, which makes them useful as catalysts, but has the potential to cause fires and explosions. Characterization of the hazards (and potential for exposures) associated with nanomaterial development and incorporation in other products is an essential step in the development of nanotechnologies. Developing controls for these hazards are equally important. Engineered controls should be integrated into nanomaterial manufacturing process design according to 10CFR851, DOE Policy 456.1, and DOE Notice 456.1 as safety-related hardware or administrative controls for worker safety. Nanomaterial hazards in a nuclear facility must also meet control requirements per DOE standards 3009, 1189, and 1186. Integration of safe designs into manufacturing processes for new applications concurrent with the developing technology is essential for worker safety. This paper presents a discussion of nanotechnology, nanomaterial properties/hazards and controls.

  4. Versatile in situ gas analysis apparatus for nanomaterials reactors.

    PubMed

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Snoek, Lavina C; Grobert, Nicole

    2014-09-02

    We report a newly developed technique for the in situ real-time gas analysis of reactors commonly used for the production of nanomaterials, by showing case-study results obtained using a dedicated apparatus for measuring the gas composition in reactors operating at high temperature (<1000 °C). The in situ gas-cooled sampling probe mapped the chemistry inside the high-temperature reactor, while suppressing the thermal decomposition of the analytes. It thus allows a more accurate study of the mechanism of progressive thermocatalytic cracking of precursors compared to previously reported conventional residual gas analyses of the reactor exhaust gas and hence paves the way for the controlled production of novel nanomaterials with tailored properties. Our studies demonstrate that the composition of the precursors dynamically changes as they travel inside of the reactor, causing a nonuniform growth of nanomaterials. Moreover, mapping of the nanomaterials reactor using quantitative gas analysis revealed the actual contribution of thermocatalytic cracking and a quantification of individual precursor fragments. This information is particularly important for quality control of the produced nanomaterials and for the recycling of exhaust residues, ultimately leading toward a more cost-effective continuous production of nanomaterials in large quantities. Our case study of multiwall carbon nanotube synthesis was conducted using the probe in conjunction with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Given the similarities of this particular CVD setup to other CVD reactors and high-temperature setups generally used for nanomaterials synthesis, the concept and methodology of in situ gas analysis presented here does also apply to other systems, making it a versatile and widely applicable method across a wide range of materials/manufacturing methods, catalysis, as well as reactor design and engineering.

  5. Challenges for In vitro to in Vivo Extrapolation of Nanomaterial Dosimetry for Human Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.

    2013-11-01

    The proliferation in types and uses of nanomaterials in consumer products has led to rapid application of conventional in vitro approaches for hazard identification. Unfortunately, assumptions pertaining to experimental design and interpretation for studies with chemicals are not generally appropriate for nanomaterials. The fate of nanomaterials in cell culture media, cellular dose to nanomaterials, cellular dose to nanomaterial byproducts, and intracellular fate of nanomaterials at the target site of toxicity all must be considered in order to accurately extrapolate in vitro results to reliable predictions of human risk.

  6. Culture medium-associated physicochemical insights on the cytotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kong, Huating; Wang, Lihua; Zhu, Ying; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-03-16

    Carbon nanomaterials are the most studied materials in nanotechnology. There have been numerous studies on cytotoxicity assessments of carbon nanomaterials, which, however, often lead to controversy. It is generally considered that chemical and physical properties of carbon nanomaterials should have specific biological outcomes. More recent studies have identified the significance of environmental factors surrounding nanomaterial-treated cells. In this perspective, we mainly review culture medium-associated physicochemical insights on the cytotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials, which are largely based on studies in our laboratory. These studies established the close relationship and interplay among the physicochemical properties of the nanomaterials, culture medium, and their toxicological responses.

  7. Inhibition of intermediary metabolism by amiodarone in dog thyroid slices

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquali, D.; Tseng, F.Y.; Rani, C.S.; Field, J.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Amiodarone, an iodine-containing antiarrhythmic drug, has been reported to interfere with thyroid function and thyroid hormone metabolism. We studied the effects of amiodarone on basal and agonist (thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), phorbol ester, or carbachol)-stimulated glucose oxidation, 32PO4 incorporation into phospholipids, and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) concentration in dog thyroid slices. Slices were preincubated with amiodarone at 37 degrees C for 1 h before the addition of agonist and the appropriate radioisotope. cAMP stimulation was measured after 20 min, glucose oxidation for 45 min, and 32PO4 incorporation into phospholipids for 2 h. Amiodarone (0.5 mM) had no effect on basal 14CO2 formation or 32PO4 incorporation into phospholipids but significantly inhibited TSH, phorbol ester, and carbachol stimulation of these parameters. It also inhibited cAMP stimulation by TSH. Inhibition of TSH-stimulated (14C)glucose oxidation was also obtained with another iodide-containing compound, iopanoic acid (0.5 mM), but not with iothalamate (up to 10 mM). Inhibition by amiodarone was still present, but to a lesser extent, when it was added at the same time as the agonist. Inhibition of stimulated (14C)glucose oxidation persisted even after the slices were incubated without amiodarone for 6 h. Inhibition by amiodarone, in contrast to that by inorganic iodide, was not prevented by 1 mM methimazole added at the same time as amiodarone. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects of amiodarone on thyroid function are not due to dissociation of iodide from the molecule.

  8. The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative: A Collaborative Approach to Assessing, Evaluating, and Advancing the State of the Field

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative (NDCI) explores the critical aspect of data curation within the development of informatics approaches to understanding nanomaterial behavior. Data repositories and tools for integrating and interrogating complex nanomaterial datasets are...

  9. Relating nanomaterial properties and microbial toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials are meeting diverse needs in consumer and industrial products. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are among the most commonly used materials and their potential for adversely affecting environmental systems raises concern. Complex microbial consortia underlie environmental processes, and the potential toxicity of nanoparticles to microbial systems, and the consequent impacts on trophic balances, is particularly worrisome. The diverse array of metal and metal oxides, the different sizes and shapes that can be prepared and the variety of possible surface coatings complicate toxicity assessments. Further complicating toxicity interpretations are the diversity of microbial systems and their metabolic capabilities. Here, we review various studies focused on nanoparticle-microbial interactions in an effort to correlate the physical-chemical properties of engineered metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to their biological response. Gaining a predictive understanding of nanoparticle toxicity, based on the physical-chemical properties of the material, will be key to the design and responsible use of nanotechnologies. General conclusions regarding the parent material of the nanoparticle and nanoparticle s size and shape on potential toxicity can be made. However, the surface coating of the material, which can be altered significantly by environmental conditions, can ameliorate or promote microbial toxicity. Understanding nanoparticle transformations and how the nanoparticle surface can be designed to control toxicity represents a key area for further study. Additionally, the vast array of microbial species and their intrinsic metabolic capabilities complicates extrapolations of nanoparticle toxicity. A molecular-based understanding of the various microbial responses to nanoparticle-induced stress is needed. Ultimately, to interpret the effect and eventual fate of engineered materials in the environment, an understanding of the relationship between nanoparticle

  10. Developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-05-15

    We summarized significant effects reported in the literature on the developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in rodents. The developmental toxicity of ENMs included not only structural abnormalities, but also death, growth retardation, and behavioral and functional abnormalities. Most studies were performed on mice using an injection route of exposure. Teratogenic effects were indicated when multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and TiO2-nanoparticles were administered to mice during early gestation. Reactive oxygen species levels were increased in placentas and malformed fetuses and their placentas after prenatal exposure to MWCNTs and SWCNTs, respectively. The pre- and postnatal mortalities and growth retardation in offspring increased after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Histopathological and functional abnormalities were also induced in placentas after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Maternal exposure to ENMs induced behavioral alterations, histopathological and biochemical changes in the central nervous system, increased susceptibility to allergy, transplacental genotoxicity, and vascular, immunological, and reproductive effects in offspring. The size- and developmental stage-dependent placental transfer of ENMs was noted after maternal exposure. Silver accumulated in the visceral yolk sac after being injected with Ag-NPs during early gestation. Although currently available data has provided initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of ENMs, that on the developmental toxicity of ENMs is still very limited. Further studies using well-characterized ENMs, state-of the-art study protocols, and appropriate routes of exposure are required in order to clarify these developmental effects and provide information suitable for risk assessments of ENMs.

  11. Effects of nanomaterials on marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Canesi, Laura; Corsi, Ilaria

    2016-09-15

    The development of nanotechnology will inevitably lead to the release of consistent amounts of nanomaterials (NMs) and nanoparticles (NPs) into marine ecosystems. Ecotoxicological studies have been carried out to identify potential biological targets of NPs, and suitable models for predicting their impact on the health of the marine environment. Recent studies in invertebrates mainly focused on NP accumulation and sub-lethal effects, rather than acute toxicity. Among marine invertebrates, bivalves represent by large the most studied group, with polychaetes and echinoderms also emerging as significant targets of NPs. However, major scientific gaps still need to be filled. In this work, factors affecting the fate of NPs in the marine environment, and their consequent uptake/accumulation/toxicity in marine invertebrates will be summarized. The results show that in different model species, NP accumulation mainly occurs in digestive tract and gills. Data on sub-lethal effects and modes of action of different types of NPs (mainly metal oxides and metal based NPs) in marine invertebrates will be reviewed, in particular on immune function, oxidative stress and embryo development. Moreover, the possibility that such effects may be influenced by NP interactions with biomolecules in both external and internal environment will be introduced. In natural environmental media, NP interactions with polysaccharides, proteins and colloids may affect their agglomeration/aggregation and consequent bioavailability. Moreover, once within the organism, NPs are known to interact with plasma proteins, forming a protein corona that can affect particle uptake and toxicity in target cells in a physiological environment. These interactions, leading to the formation of eco-bio-coronas, may be crucial in determining particle behavior and effects also in marine biota. In order to classify NPs into groups and predict the implications of their release into the marine environment, information on

  12. Engineered nanomaterials: exposures, hazards, and risk prevention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology presents the possibility of revolutionizing many aspects of our lives. People in many settings (academic, small and large industrial, and the general public in industrialized nations) are either developing or using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) or ENM-containing products. However, our understanding of the occupational, health and safety aspects of ENMs is still in its formative stage. A survey of the literature indicates the available information is incomplete, many of the early findings have not been independently verified, and some may have been over-interpreted. This review describes ENMs briefly, their application, the ENM workforce, the major routes of human exposure, some examples of uptake and adverse effects, what little has been reported on occupational exposure assessment, and approaches to minimize exposure and health hazards. These latter approaches include engineering controls such as fume hoods and personal protective equipment. Results showing the effectiveness - or lack thereof - of some of these controls are also included. This review is presented in the context of the Risk Assessment/Risk Management framework, as a paradigm to systematically work through issues regarding human health hazards of ENMs. Examples are discussed of current knowledge of nanoscale materials for each component of the Risk Assessment/Risk Management framework. Given the notable lack of information, current recommendations to minimize exposure and hazards are largely based on common sense, knowledge by analogy to ultrafine material toxicity, and general health and safety recommendations. This review may serve as an overview for health and safety personnel, management, and ENM workers to establish and maintain a safe work environment. Small start-up companies and research institutions with limited personnel or expertise in nanotechnology health and safety issues may find this review particularly useful. PMID:21418643

  13. Global life cycle releases of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Arturo A.; McFerran, Suzanne; Lazareva, Anastasiya; Suh, Sangwon

    2013-06-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are now becoming a significant fraction of the material flows in the global economy. We are already reaping the benefits of improved energy efficiency, material use reduction, and better performance in many existing and new applications that have been enabled by these technological advances. As ENMs pervade the global economy, however, it becomes important to understand their environmental implications. As a first step, we combined ENM market information and material flow modeling to produce the first global assessment of the likely ENM emissions to the environment and landfills. The top ten most produced ENMs by mass were analyzed in a dozen major applications. Emissions during the manufacturing, use, and disposal stages were estimated, including intermediate steps through wastewater treatment plants and waste incineration plants. In 2010, silica, titania, alumina, and iron and zinc oxides dominate the ENM market in terms of mass flow through the global economy, used mostly in coatings/paints/pigments, electronics and optics, cosmetics, energy and environmental applications, and as catalysts. We estimate that 63-91 % of over 260,000-309,000 metric tons of global ENM production in 2010 ended up in landfills, with the balance released into soils (8-28 %), water bodies (0.4-7 %), and atmosphere (0.1-1.5 %). While there are considerable uncertainties in the estimates, the framework for estimating emissions can be easily improved as better data become available. The material flow estimates can be used to quantify emissions at the local level, as inputs for fate and transport models to estimate concentrations in different environmental compartments.

  14. Allergic Responses Induced by the Immunomodulatory Effects of Nanomaterials upon Skin Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kuroda, Etsushi; Hirai, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Ishii, Ken J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, a vast array of nanomaterials has been created through the development of nanotechnology. With the increasing application of these nanomaterials in various fields, such as foods, cosmetics, and medicines, there has been concern about their safety, that is, nanotoxicity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to collect information about the biological effects of nanomaterials so that we can exploit their potential benefits and design safer nanomaterials, while avoiding nanotoxicity as a result of inhalation or skin exposure. In particular, the immunomodulating effect of nanomaterials is one of most interesting aspects of nanotoxicity. However, the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials through skin exposure have not been adequately discussed compared with the effects of inhalation exposure, because skin penetration by nanomaterials is thought to be extremely low under normal conditions. On the other hand, the immunomodulatory effects of nanomaterials via skin may cause severe problems for people with impaired skin barrier function, because some nanomaterials could penetrate the deep layers of their allergic or damaged skin. In addition, some studies, including ours, have shown that nanomaterials could exhibit significant immunomodulating effects even if they do not penetrate the skin. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the allergic responses induced by nanomaterials upon skin exposure. First, we discuss nanomaterial penetration of the intact or impaired skin barrier. Next, we describe the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials, focusing on the sensitization potential of nanomaterials and the effects of co-exposure of nanomaterials with substances such as chemical sensitizers or allergens, on the onset of allergy, following skin exposure. Finally, we discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials by describing the involvement of the protein corona in the interaction of

  15. Screw dislocation-driven growth of one-dimensional nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fei

    Nanoscience and nanotechnology are impacting our lives in many ways, from electronic and photonic devices to biosensors. They also hold the promise of tackling the renewable energy challenges facing us. However, one limiting scientific challenge is the effective and efficient bottom-up synthesis of nanomaterials. In this thesis, we discuss the fundamental theories of screw dislocation-driven growth of various nanostructures including one-dimensional nanowires and nanotubes, two-dimensional nanoplates, and three-dimensional hierarchical tree-like nanostructures. We then introduce the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to structurally characterize the dislocation-driven nanomaterials for future searching and identifying purposes. We summarize the guidelines for rationally designing the dislocation-driven growth and discuss specific examples to illustrate how to implement the guidelines. We also show that dislocation growth is a general and versatile mechanism that can be used to grow a variety of nanomaterials via distinct reaction chemistry and synthetic methods. The fundamental investigation and development of dislocation-driven growth of nanomaterials will create a new dimension to the rational design and synthesis of increasingly complex nanomaterials.

  16. Deformable devices with integrated functional nanomaterials for wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Jongsu; Son, Donghee; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-03-01

    As the market and related industry for wearable electronics dramatically expands, there are continuous and strong demands for flexible and stretchable devices to be seamlessly integrated with soft and curvilinear human skin or clothes. However, the mechanical mismatch between the rigid conventional electronics and the soft human body causes many problems. Therefore, various prospective nanomaterials that possess a much lower flexural rigidity than their bulk counterparts have rapidly established themselves as promising electronic materials replacing rigid silicon and/or compound semiconductors in next-generation wearable devices. Many hybrid structures of multiple nanomaterials have been also developed to pursue both high performance and multifunctionality. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art wearable devices based on one- or two-dimensional nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, single-crystal silicon and oxide nanomembranes, organic nanomaterials and their hybrids) in combination with zero-dimensional functional nanomaterials (e.g., metal/oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots). Starting from an introduction of materials strategies, we describe device designs and the roles of individual ones in integrated systems. Detailed application examples of wearable sensors/actuators, memories, energy devices, and displays are also presented.

  17. Fabrication of functional nanomaterials using flame assisted spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Purwanto, Agus

    2014-02-24

    Flame assisted spray pyrolysis (FASP) is a class of synthesis method for nanomaterials fabrication. The ability to control nanomaterials characteristics and easy to be-scaled up are the main features of FASP. The crystallinity and particles size of the prepared nanomaterials can be easily controlled by variation of fuel flow rate. The precursor concentration, carrier gas flow rate, and carrier gas can be also used to control the prepared nanomaterials. Energy related nanomaterials preparation uses as the example case in FASP application. These material are yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}). It needs strategies to produce these materials into nano-sized order. YAG:Ce nanoparticles only can be synthesized by FASP using the urea addition. The decomposition of urea under high temperature of flame promotes the breakage of YAG:Ce particles into nanoparticles. In the preparation of WO{sub 3}, the high temperature flame can be used to gasify WO{sub 3} solid material. As a result, WO{sub 3} nanoparticles can be prepared easily. Generally, to produce nanoparticles via FASP method, the boiling point of the material is important to determine the strategy which will be used.

  18. Carbon nanomaterials for electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and sensing.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Deep; Sangwan, Vinod K; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-04-07

    In the last three decades, zero-dimensional, one-dimensional, and two-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (i.e., fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, respectively) have attracted significant attention from the scientific community due to their unique electronic, optical, thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties. While early work showed that these properties could enable high performance in selected applications, issues surrounding structural inhomogeneity and imprecise assembly have impeded robust and reliable implementation of carbon nanomaterials in widespread technologies. However, with recent advances in synthesis, sorting, and assembly techniques, carbon nanomaterials are experiencing renewed interest as the basis of numerous scalable technologies. Here, we present an extensive review of carbon nanomaterials in electronic, optoelectronic, photovoltaic, and sensing devices with a particular focus on the latest examples based on the highest purity samples. Specific attention is devoted to each class of carbon nanomaterial, thereby allowing comparative analysis of the suitability of fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene for each application area. In this manner, this article will provide guidance to future application developers and also articulate the remaining research challenges confronting this field.

  19. Deformable devices with integrated functional nanomaterials for wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Jongsu; Son, Donghee; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    As the market and related industry for wearable electronics dramatically expands, there are continuous and strong demands for flexible and stretchable devices to be seamlessly integrated with soft and curvilinear human skin or clothes. However, the mechanical mismatch between the rigid conventional electronics and the soft human body causes many problems. Therefore, various prospective nanomaterials that possess a much lower flexural rigidity than their bulk counterparts have rapidly established themselves as promising electronic materials replacing rigid silicon and/or compound semiconductors in next-generation wearable devices. Many hybrid structures of multiple nanomaterials have been also developed to pursue both high performance and multifunctionality. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art wearable devices based on one- or two-dimensional nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, single-crystal silicon and oxide nanomembranes, organic nanomaterials and their hybrids) in combination with zero-dimensional functional nanomaterials (e.g., metal/oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots). Starting from an introduction of materials strategies, we describe device designs and the roles of individual ones in integrated systems. Detailed application examples of wearable sensors/actuators, memories, energy devices, and displays are also presented.

  20. 2D nanomaterials based electrochemical biosensors for cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Xiong, Qirong; Xiao, Fei; Duan, Hongwei

    2017-03-15

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that early diagnosis holds the key towards effective treatment outcome. Cancer biomarkers are extensively used in oncology for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Electrochemical sensors play key roles in current laboratory and clinical analysis of diverse chemical and biological targets. Recent development of functional nanomaterials offers new possibilities of improving the performance of electrochemical sensors. In particular, 2D nanomaterials have stimulated intense research due to their unique array of structural and chemical properties. The 2D materials of interest cover broadly across graphene, graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide), and graphene-like nanomaterials (i.e., 2D layered transition metal dichalcogenides, graphite carbon nitride and boron nitride nanomaterials). In this review, we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of 2D nanomaterials and their applications in electrochemical biosensing of cancer biomarkers (nucleic acids, proteins and some small molecules), and present a personal perspective on the future direction of this area.