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Sample records for nanometer-scale mass transport

  1. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Holt, Jason; Noy, Aleksandr; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  2. Fabrication of a Carbon Nanotube-Embedded Silicon Nitride Membrane for Studies of Nanometer-Scale Mass Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D; Bakajin, O

    2004-08-25

    A membrane consisting of multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for fluid mechanics studies on the nanometer scale. Characterization by tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is free of large voids. An upper limit to the diffusive flux of D{sub 2}O of 2.4x10-{sup 8} mole/m{sup 2}-s was determined, indicating extremely slow transport. By contrast, hydrodynamic calculations of water flow across a nanotube membrane of similar specifications predict a much higher molar flux of 1.91 mole/m{sup 2}-s, suggesting that the nanotubes produced possess a 'bamboo' morphology. The carbon nanotube membranes were used to make nanoporous silicon nitride membranes, fabricated by sacrificial removal of the carbon. Nitrogen flow measurements on these structures give a membrane permeance of 4.7x10{sup -4} mole/m{sup 2}-s-Pa at a pore density of 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. Using a Knudsen diffusion model, the average pore size of this membrane is estimated to be 66 nm, which agrees well with TEM observations of the multiwall carbon nanotube outer diameter. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications inseparations and chemical sensing.

  3. Driven DNA Transport into an Asymmetric Nanometer-Scale Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Misakian, Martin; Robertson, Baldwin; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2000-10-01

    To understand the mechanism by which individual DNA molecules enter nanometer-scale pores, we studied the concentration and voltage dependence of polynucleotide-induced ionic-current blockades of a single α-hemolysin ion channel. We find that the blockade frequency is proportional to the polymer concentration, that it increases exponentially with the applied potential, and that DNA enters the pore more readily through the entrance that has the larger vestibule. We also measure the minimum value of the electrical potential that confines a modified polymer inside the pore against random diffusion and repulsive forces.

  4. Mass-producible and efficient optical antennas with CMOS-fabricated nanometer-scale gap.

    PubMed

    Seok, Tae Joon; Jamshidi, Arash; Eggleston, Michael; Wu, Ming C

    2013-07-15

    Optical antennas have been widely used for sensitive photodetection, efficient light emission, high resolution imaging, and biochemical sensing because of their ability to capture and focus light energy beyond the diffraction limit. However, widespread application of optical antennas has been limited due to lack of appropriate methods for uniform and large area fabrication of antennas as well as difficulty in achieving an efficient design with small mode volume (gap spacing < 10nm). Here, we present a novel optical antenna design, arch-dipole antenna, with optimal radiation efficiency and small mode volume, 5 nm gap spacing, fabricated by CMOS-compatible deep-UV spacer lithography. We demonstrate strong surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal with an enhancement factor exceeding 108 from the arch-dipole antenna array, which is two orders of magnitude stronger than that from the standard dipole antenna array fabricated by e-beam lithography. Since the antenna gap spacing, the critical dimension of the antenna, can be defined by deep-UV lithography, efficient optical antenna arrays with nanometer-scale gap can be mass-produced using current CMOS technology.

  5. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jingtian Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2016-01-21

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ∼66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ∼2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  6. A switchable DNA origami nanochannel for regulating molecular transport at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dianming; Zhang, Yiyang; Wang, Miao; Dong, Yuanchen; Zhou, Chao; Isbell, Mark Antonin; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Huajie; Liu, Dongsheng

    2016-02-21

    A nanochannel with a shutter at one end was built by DNA nanotechnology. Using DNA hybridization the shutter could be opened or closed, influencing the transport of materials through the channel. This process was visualized by an enzyme cascade reaction occurring in the structure.

  7. A switchable DNA origami nanochannel for regulating molecular transport at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dianming; Zhang, Yiyang; Wang, Miao; Dong, Yuanchen; Zhou, Chao; Isbell, Mark Antonin; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Huajie; Liu, Dongsheng

    2016-02-01

    A nanochannel with a shutter at one end was built by DNA nanotechnology. Using DNA hybridization the shutter could be opened or closed, influencing the transport of materials through the channel. This process was visualized by an enzyme cascade reaction occurring in the structure.A nanochannel with a shutter at one end was built by DNA nanotechnology. Using DNA hybridization the shutter could be opened or closed, influencing the transport of materials through the channel. This process was visualized by an enzyme cascade reaction occurring in the structure. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details including methods, materials, ESI figures and DNA sequences. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08206d

  8. Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Based Topographical Imaging and Nanometer Scale Resolved Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Nikiforov, Maxim; Bradshaw, James A; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Nanometer scale proximal probe thermal desorption/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TD/ESI-MS) was demonstrated for molecular surface sampling of caffeine from a thin film using a 30 nm diameter nano-thermal analysis (nano-TA) probe tip in an atomic force microscope (AFM) coupled via a vapor transfer line and ESI interface to a MS detection platform. Using a probe temperature of 350 C and a spot sampling time of 30 s, conical desorption craters 250 nm in diameter and 100 nm deep were created as shown through subsequent topographical imaging of the surface within the same system. Automated sampling of a 5 x 2 array of spots, with 2 m spacing between spots, and real time selective detection of the desorbed caffeine using tandem mass spectrometry was also demonstrated. Estimated from the crater volume (~2x106 nm3), only about 10 amol (2 fg) of caffeine was liberated from each thermal desorption crater in the thin film. These results illustrate a relatively simple experimental setup and means to acquire in automated fashion sub-micrometer scale spatial sampling resolution and mass spectral detection of materials amenable to TD. The ability to achieve MS-based chemical imaging with 250 nm scale spatial resolution with this system is anticipated.

  9. Measuring carbon and N2 fixation in field populations of colonial and free-living unicellular cyanobacteria using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry(1).

    PubMed

    Foster, Rachel A; Sztejrenszus, Saar; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2013-06-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria are now recognized as important to the marine N and C cycles in open ocean gyres, yet there are few direct in situ measurements of their activities. Using a high-resolution nanometer scale secondary ion mass spectrometer (nanoSIMS), single cell N2 and C fixation rates were estimated for unicellular cyanobacteria resembling N2 fixer Crocosphaera watsonii. Crocosphaera watsonii-like cells were observed in the subtropical North Pacific gyre (22°45' N, 158°0' W) as 2 different phenotypes: colonial and free-living. Colonies containing 3-242 cells per colony were observed and cell density in colonies increased with incubation time. Estimated C fixation rates were similarly high in both phenotypes and unexpectedly for unicellular cyanobacteria 85% of the colonial cells incubated during midday were also enriched in (15) N above natural abundance. Highest (15) N enrichment and N2 fixation rates were found in cells incubated overnight where up to 64% of the total daily fixed N in the upper surface waters was attributed to both phenotypes. The colonial cells retained newly fixed C in a sulfur-rich matrix surrounding the cells and often cells of both phenotypes possessed areas (<1 nm) of enriched (15) N and (13) C resembling storage granules. The nanoSIMS imaging of the colonial cells also showed evidence for a division of N2 and C fixation activity across the colony where few individual cells (<34%) in a given colony were enriched in both (15) N and (13) C above the colony average. Our results provide new insights into the ecophysiology of unicellular cyanobacteria.

  10. Metastability at the nanometer scale

    SciTech Connect

    Desre, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Under constraints and at the nanometer scale, transitory metastable states can be generated in multicomponents materials. Examples illustrating such specific states are presented. They concern (1) the crystalline nucleation in a growing undercooled liquid droplet formed from a liquid parent phase; (2) the suppression of intermetallic nucleation in solid solutions or glasses subjected to sharp concentration gradients; (3) the nanocrystalline transitory state preceding amorphization by ball milling. In connection with this latter example, a thermodynamic model for the nanocrystal to glass transition, based on a hypothesis of a topological disorder wetting at the nanograin boundaries, is proposed.

  11. Placement of oppositely charged aminoacids at a polypeptide termini determines the voltage-controlled braking of polymer transport through nanometer-scale pores.

    PubMed

    Asandei, Alina; Chinappi, Mauro; Lee, Jong-Kook; Ho Seo, Chang; Mereuta, Loredana; Park, Yoonkyung; Luchian, Tudor

    2015-06-01

    Protein and solid-state nanometer-scale pores are being developed for the detection, analysis, and manipulation of single molecules. In the simplest embodiment, the entry of a molecule into a nanopore causes a reduction in the latter's ionic conductance. The ionic current blockade depth and residence time have been shown to provide detailed information on the size, adsorbed charge, and other properties of molecules. Here we describe the use of the nanopore formed by Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin and polypeptides with oppositely charged segments at the N- and C-termini to increase both the polypeptide capture rate and mean residence time of them in the pore, regardless of the polarity of the applied electrostatic potential. The technique provides the means to improve the signal to noise of single molecule nanopore-based measurements.

  12. Functional nanometer-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tsz On Mario

    Nanometer-scale structures have properties that are fundamentally different from their bulk counterparts. Much research effort has been devoted in the past decades to explore new fabrication techniques, model the physical properties of these structures, and construct functional devices. The ability to manipulate and control the structure of matter at the nanoscale has made many new classes of materials available for the study of fundamental physical processes and potential applications. The interplay between fabrication techniques and physical understanding of the nanostructures and processes has revolutionized the physical and material sciences, providing far superior properties in materials for novel applications that benefit society. This thesis consists of two major aspects of my graduate research in nano-scale materials. In the first part (Chapters 3--6), a comprehensive study on the nanostructures based on electrospinning and thermal treatment is presented. Electrospinning is a well-established method for producing high-aspect-ratio fibrous structures, with fiber diameter ranging from 1 nm--1 microm. A polymeric solution is typically used as a precursor in electrospinning. In our study, the functionality of the nanostructure relies on both the nanostructure and material constituents. Metallic ions containing precursors were added to the polymeric precursor following a sol-gel process to prepare the solution suitable for electrospinning. A typical electrospinning process produces as-spun fibers containing both polymer and metallic salt precursors. Subsequent thermal treatments of the as-spun fibers were carried out in various conditions to produce desired structures. In most cases, polymer in the solution and the as-spun fibers acted as a backbone for the structure formation during the subsequent heat treatment, and were thermally removed in the final stage. Polymers were also designed to react with the metallic ion precursors during heat treatment in some

  13. Electrochemistry at Nanometer-Scaled Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, John J.; Bo Zhang; White, Henry S.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical studies using nanometer-scaled electrodes are leading to better insights into electrochemical kinetics, interfacial structure, and chemical analysis. Various methods of preparing electrodes of nanometer dimensions are discussed and a few examples of their behavior and applications in relatively simple electrochemical experiments…

  14. Nanometer-scale embossing of polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Hoh, Maria; Werbin, Jeffrey L; Dumas, Julie K; Heinz, William F; Hoh, Jan H

    2010-02-16

    Microstructured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is an important and widely used material in biology and chemistry. Here we report that micrometer- and nanometer-scale features can be introduced into the surface of PDMS in a process that is functionally equivalent to embossing. We show that surface features <50 nm can be replicated onto the surface of previously cured PDMS at room temperature and at low pressure. This type of embossing can be performed on samples in solution. It also allows one template to be used for many different types of microstructures by changing the embossing time or serial embossing at different alignments. The balance between elastic and plastic properties of the PDMS has the effect of high-pass filtering the features that are captured and produces a sample that is suitable for sensitive surface characterization technologies such as atomic force microscopy. These findings extend the applications of PDMS as well as open the possibility for new uses.

  15. Nanometer-scale organic thin film transistors from self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Vuillaume, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    A survey of the most interesting results on nanometer-scale organic thin film transistors (nano-OTFT) is presented. Additionally, we discuss our recent results on the properties of end-group functionalized organic self-assembled monolayers and on their use in the fabrication of nanometer-scale field-effect transistors. Nanometer-scale organic transistors (channel length 30 nm) were fabricated, with a self-assembled monolayer as gate insulator. The carrier transport in these transistors, as a function of the channel length, was investigated, and a transition from a dispersive to a ballistic transport at a channel length of 200 nm was observed. On a molecular scale, alkyl monolayers functionalized at their omega-ends by aromatic moieties were prepared. A high anisotropic conductivity in molecular insulator/semiconductor heterostructures of monolayer thickness was observed. These molecular architectures provide a basis for the building blocks of molecular transistors.

  16. Cell biology of the future: Nanometer-scale cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Taraska, Justin W

    2015-10-26

    Understanding cellular structure is key to understanding cellular regulation. New developments in super-resolution fluorescence imaging, electron microscopy, and quantitative image analysis methods are now providing some of the first three-dimensional dynamic maps of biomolecules at the nanometer scale. These new maps--comprehensive nanometer-scale cellular cartographies--will reveal how the molecular organization of cells influences their diverse and changeable activities.

  17. Flow and evaporation in single micrometer and nanometer scale pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, A. E.; Yang, C.; Siwy, Z. S.; Taborek, P.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.

    2014-07-21

    We report measurements of pressure driven flow of fluids entering vacuum through a single pipe of micrometer or nanometer scale diameter. Nanopores were fabricated by etching a single ion track in polymer or mica foils. A calibrated mass spectrometer was used to measure the flow rates of nitrogen and helium through pipes with diameter ranging from 10 μm to 31 nm. The flow of gaseous and liquid nitrogen was studied near 77 K, while the flow of helium was studied from the lambda point (2.18 K) to above the critical point (5.2 K). Flow rates were controlled by changing the pressure drop across the pipe in the range 0–31 atm. When the pressure in the pipe reached the saturated vapor pressure, an abrupt flow transition was observed. A simple viscous flow model is used to determine the position of the liquid/vapor interface in the pipe. The observed mass flow rates are consistent with no slip boundary conditions.

  18. Substrate comprising a nanometer-scale projection array

    DOEpatents

    Cui, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Connor, Stephen T; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui; Burkhard, George

    2012-11-27

    A method for forming a substrate comprising nanometer-scale pillars or cones that project from the surface of the substrate is disclosed. The method enables control over physical characteristics of the projections including diameter, sidewall angle, and tip shape. The method further enables control over the arrangement of the projections including characteristics such as center-to-center spacing and separation distance.

  19. First Observation of Mechanochromism at the Nanometer Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Carpick, R.W.; Sasaki, D.Y.; Burns, A.R.

    1999-07-07

    A mechanically-induced color transition (''mechanochromism'') in polydiacetylene thin films has been generated at the nanometer scale using the tips of two different scanning probe microscopes. A blue-to-red chromatic transition in polydiacetylene molecular trilayer films, polymerized from 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (poly-PCDA), was found to result from shear forces acting between the tip and the poly-PCDA molecules, as independently observed with near-field scanning optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Red domains were identified by a fluorescence emission signature. Transformed regions as small as 30 nm in width were observed with AFM. The irreversibly transformed domains preferentially grow along the polymer backbone direction. Significant rearrangement of poly-PCDA bilayer segments is observed by AFM in transformed regions. The removal of these segments appears to be a characteristic feature of the transition. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of nanometer-scale mechanochromism in any material.

  20. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-09-10

    A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.

  1. Carbon Nanotubules: Building Blocks for Nanometer-Scale Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnott, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    The proposed work consisted of two projects: the investigation of fluid permeation and diffusion through ultrafiltration membranes composed of carbon nanotubules and the design and study of molecular transistors composed of nanotubules. The progress made on each project is summarized and also discussion about additional projects, one of which is a continuation of work supported by another grant, is included. The first project was Liquid Interactions within a Nanotubule Membrane. The second was the design of nanometer-scale hydrocarbon electronic devices. The third was the investigation of Mechanical properties of Nanotubules and Nanotubule bundles. The fourth project was to investigate the growth mechanisms of Carbon Nanotubules.

  2. Probing single nanometer-scale pores with polymeric molecular rulers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; DiMarzio, Edmund A.; Wang, Qian; Stanford, Vincent M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that individual molecules of single-stranded DNA can be driven electrophoretically through a single Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin ion channel. Polynucleotides thread through the channel as extended chains and the polymer-induced ionic current blockades exhibit stable modes during the interactions. We show here that polynucleotides can be used to probe structural features of the α-hemolysin channel itself. Specifically, both the pore length and channel aperture profile can be estimated. The results are consistent with the channel crystal structure and suggest that polymer-based "molecular rulers" may prove useful in deducing the structures of nanometer-scale pores in general.

  3. Spin Coherence and Magnetization Transport in Nanometer-Scale Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-31

    Leveraging IBM’s experimental facilities and using IBM and BU’s established expertise in STM nanoassembly and theoretical modeling of spin dynamics...targeted two main goals: • Establish a fundamental understanding of the spin dynamics of nanoassembled structures • Explore the potential for...of the g value of a single atom • Measure spectrum of spin excitations in nanoassembled magnetic structures. • Build a foundation of knowledge

  4. Imaging high-speed friction at the nanometer scale

    PubMed Central

    Thorén, Per-Anders; de Wijn, Astrid S.; Borgani, Riccardo; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Friction is a complicated phenomenon involving nonlinear dynamics at different length and time scales. Understanding its microscopic origin requires methods for measuring force on nanometer-scale asperities sliding at velocities reaching centimetres per second. Despite enormous advances in experimental technique, this combination of small length scale and high velocity remain elusive. We present a technique for rapidly measuring the frictional forces on a single asperity over a velocity range from zero to several centimetres per second. At each image pixel we obtain the velocity dependence of both conservative and dissipative forces, revealing the transition from stick-slip to smooth sliding friction. We explain measurements on graphite using a modified Prandtl–Tomlinson model, including the damped elastic deformation of the asperity. With its improved force sensitivity and small sliding amplitude, our method enables rapid and detailed surface mapping of the velocity dependence of frictional forces with less than 10 nm spatial resolution. PMID:27958267

  5. Magnetic structures of nanometer scale Dy, Cr and Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Robinson, R.A.; Lawson, A.C.; Kwei, G.H.; Sickafus, K.E. ); Eastman, J.A. ); Burkel, E. . Sektion Physik, Lehrstuhl Peisl)

    1992-10-01

    Materials composed of nanometer-sized structures are becoming technologically relevant as the sizes of electronic devices approach the nanometer scale. Questions as to the performance and durability of these devices can be partially addressed through the characterization and understanding of the magnetic structures and properties of nanometer-sized materials. The purpose of the present work is to understand the relationship between the microstructure of nanocrystalline materials and their magnetic structures and properties. This paper summarizes three separate experiments: (1) an X-ray diffraction and anomalous absorption (XANES) study of nanocrystalline Dy, (2) neutron diffraction measurements of the magnetic structure of nanocrystalline Cr, and (3) the measurement of the magnetization density of a single twist grain boundary in Ni.

  6. Carbon Nanotubules: Building Blocks for Nanometer-Scale Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnott, Susan B.

    1997-01-01

    Proximal probe technology has provided researchers with new ways to investigate and manipulate matter on the nanometer scale. We have studied, through molecular dynamics simulations, using a many-body empirical potential, the indentation of a hydrogen-terminated, diamond (111 ) surface, with a proximal probe tip that consists of an open, hydrogen-terminated, (10,10) carbon nanotubule. The simulations showed that upon indenting 1.8 A, the tubule deforms but returns to its original shape upon retraction. The Young's modulus of the tubule was determined using the predicted Euler buckling force and was found to be comparable to measured and calculated values. In a second series of simulations, an open (10, 10) nanotubule was heated to 4500 K and allowed to close. We find that at this temperature the resulting cap contains numerous imperfections, including some not mentioned previously in the literature.

  7. Imaging high-speed friction at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Thorén, Per-Anders; de Wijn, Astrid S; Borgani, Riccardo; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B

    2016-12-13

    Friction is a complicated phenomenon involving nonlinear dynamics at different length and time scales. Understanding its microscopic origin requires methods for measuring force on nanometer-scale asperities sliding at velocities reaching centimetres per second. Despite enormous advances in experimental technique, this combination of small length scale and high velocity remain elusive. We present a technique for rapidly measuring the frictional forces on a single asperity over a velocity range from zero to several centimetres per second. At each image pixel we obtain the velocity dependence of both conservative and dissipative forces, revealing the transition from stick-slip to smooth sliding friction. We explain measurements on graphite using a modified Prandtl-Tomlinson model, including the damped elastic deformation of the asperity. With its improved force sensitivity and small sliding amplitude, our method enables rapid and detailed surface mapping of the velocity dependence of frictional forces with less than 10 nm spatial resolution.

  8. Imaging high-speed friction at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorén, Per-Anders; de Wijn, Astrid S.; Borgani, Riccardo; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2016-12-01

    Friction is a complicated phenomenon involving nonlinear dynamics at different length and time scales. Understanding its microscopic origin requires methods for measuring force on nanometer-scale asperities sliding at velocities reaching centimetres per second. Despite enormous advances in experimental technique, this combination of small length scale and high velocity remain elusive. We present a technique for rapidly measuring the frictional forces on a single asperity over a velocity range from zero to several centimetres per second. At each image pixel we obtain the velocity dependence of both conservative and dissipative forces, revealing the transition from stick-slip to smooth sliding friction. We explain measurements on graphite using a modified Prandtl-Tomlinson model, including the damped elastic deformation of the asperity. With its improved force sensitivity and small sliding amplitude, our method enables rapid and detailed surface mapping of the velocity dependence of frictional forces with less than 10 nm spatial resolution.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Materials with Nanometer Scale Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    William D. Nix

    2004-10-31

    We have been engaged in research on the mechanical properties of materials with nanometer-scale microstructural dimensions. Our attention has been focused on studying the mechanical properties of thin films and interfaces and very small volumes of material. Because the dimensions of thin film samples are small (typically 1 mm in thickness, or less), specialized mechanical testing techniques based on nanoindentation, microbeam bending and dynamic vibration of micromachined structures have been developed and used. Here we report briefly on some of the results we have obtained over the past three years. We also give a summary of all of the dissertations, talks and publications completed on this grant during the past 15 years.

  10. Strategies for Probing Nanometer-Scale Electrocatalysts: From Single Particles to Catalyst-Membrane Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Korzeniewski, Carol

    2014-01-20

    The project primary objectives are to prepare and elucidate the promoting properties of materials that possess high activity for the conversion of hydrogen and related small molecules (water, oxygen, carbon monoxide and methanol) in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. One area of research has focused on the study of catalyst materials. Protocols were developed for probing the structure and benchmarking the activity of Pt and Pt bimetallic nanometer-scale catalyst against Pt single crystal electrode standards. A second area has targeted fuel cell membrane and the advancement of simple methods mainly based on vibrational spectroscopy that can be applied broadly in the study of membrane structure and transport properties. Infrared and Raman methods combined with least-squares data modeling were applied to investigate and assist the design of robust, proton conductive membranes, which resist reactant crossover.

  11. Understanding batteries on the micro- and nanometer scale

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In order to understand performance limitations and failure mechanisms of batteries, one has to investigate processes on the micro- and nanometer scale. A typical failure mechanism in lithium metal batteries is dendritic growth. During discharge, lithium is stripped of the anode surface and migrates to the cathode. During charge, lithium is deposited back on the anode. Repeated cycling can result in stripping and re-deposition that roughens the surface. The roughening of the surface changes the electric field and draws more metal to spikes that are beginning to grow. These can grow with tremendous mechanical force, puncture the separator, and directly connect the anode with the cathode which can create an internal short circuit. This can lead to an uncontrolled discharge reaction, which heats the cell and causes additional exothermic reactions leading to what is called thermal runaway. ORNL has developed a new technology called liquid electron microscopy. In a specially designed sample holder micro-chamber with electron-transparent windows, researchers can hold a liquid and take images of structures and particles at nanometer size. It's the first microscope holder of its kind used to investigate the inside of a battery while cycled.

  12. Combining dissimilar materials at nanometer scale for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2010-04-01

    The development of next-generation energy resources that are reliable and economically/environmentally acceptable is a key to harnessing and providing the resources essential for the life of mankind. Our research focuses on the development of novel semiconductor platforms that would significantly benefit energy harvesting, in particular, from light and heat. In these critical applications, traditional semiconductor solid-state devices, such as photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric (TE) devices based on a stack of single-crystal semiconductor thin films or single-crystal bulk semiconductor have several drawbacks, for instance; scalability-limits arise when ultra-large-scale implementation is envisioned for PV devices and performance-limits arise for TE devices in which the interplay of both electronic and phonon systems is important. In our research, various types of nanometer-scale semiconductor structures (e.g., nanowires and nanoparticles) coupled to or embedded within a micrometer-scale semiconductor structure (i.e., semiconductor nanomicrometer hybrid platforms) are explored to build a variety of non-conventional PV and TE devices. Two core projects are to develop semiconductor nano-micrometer hybrid platforms based on (1) an ensemble of single-crystal semiconductor nanowires connected to non-single-crystal semiconductor surfaces and (2) semimetallic nanoparticles embedded within a single-crystal semiconductor. The semiconductor nano-micrometer hybrid platforms are studied within the context of their basic electronic, optical, and thermal properties, which will be further assessed and validated by comparison with theoretical approaches to draw comprehensive pictures of physicochemical properties of these semiconductor platforms.

  13. Nanometer-scale features in dolomite from Pennsylvanian rocks, Paradox Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gournay, Jonas P.; Kirkland, Brenda L.; Folk, Robert L.; Lynch, F. Leo

    1999-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy reveals an association between early dolomite in the Pennsylvanian Desert Creek (Paradox Fm.) and small (approximately 0.1 μm) nanometer-scale textures, termed `nannobacteria'. Three diagenetically distinct dolomites are present: early dolomite, limpid dolomite, and baroque dolomite. In this study, only the early dolomite contained nanometer-scale features. These textures occur as discrete balls and rods, clumps of balls, and chains of balls. Precipitation experiments demonstrate that these textures may be the result of precipitation in an organic-rich micro-environment. The presence of these nanometer-scale textures in Pennsylvanian rocks suggests that these early dolomites precipitated in organic-rich, bacterial environments.

  14. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  15. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone

  16. Nanometer-Scale Electrical Potential Profiling Across Perovskite Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Chuanxiao; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Ke, Weijun; Wang, Changlei; Gorman, Brian; Yan, Yanfa; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2016-11-21

    We used Kelvin probe force microscopy to study the potential distribution on cross-section of perovskite solar cells with different types of electron-transporting layers (ETLs). Our results explain the low open-circuit voltage and fill factor in ETL-free cells, and support the fact that intrinsic SnO2 as an alternative ETL material can make high-performance devices. Furthermore, the potential-profiling results indicate a reduction in junction-interface recombination by the optimized SnO2 layer and adding a fullerene layer, which is consistent with the improved device performance and current-voltage hysteresis.

  17. Two-dimensional quantitative mapping of arsenic in nanometer-scale silicon devices using STEM EELS-EDX spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Servanton, G; Pantel, R; Juhel, M; Bertin, F

    2009-01-01

    Field emission gun (FEG) nanoprobe scanning electron transmission microscopy (STEM) techniques coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) are evaluated for the detection of the n-type dopant arsenic, in silicon semiconductor devices with nanometer-scale. Optimization of the experimental procedure, data extraction and the signal-to-noise ratio versus electron dose, show that arsenic detection below 0.1% should be possible. STEM EDX and EELS spectrum profiles have been quantified and compared with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses which show a good agreement. In addition, the arsenic doping level found inside large and small epitaxial devices have been compared using STEM EDX-EELS profiling. The average doping level is found to be similar but variable interface segregation has been observed. Finally, STEM EDX arsenic mapping acquired in a BiCMOS transistor cross-section shows strong heterogeneities and segregation in the epitaxially grown emitter part.

  18. Formation and properties of 3D metamaterial composites fabricated using nanometer scale laser lithography (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokes, Sharka M.; Perkins, Frank K.; Glembocki, Orest J.

    2015-08-01

    Metamaterials designed for the visible or near IR wavelengths require patterning on the nanometer scale. To achieve this, e-beam lithography is used, but it is extremely difficult and can only produce 2D structures. A new alternative technique to produce 2D and 3D structures involves laser fabrication using the Nanoscribe 3D laser lithography system. This is a direct laser writing technique which can form arbitrary 3D nanostructures on the nanometer scale and is based on multi-photon polymerization. We are creating 2D and 3D metamaterials via this technique, and subsequently conformally coating them using Atomic Layer Deposition of oxides and Ag. We will discuss the optical properties of these novel composite structures and their potential for dual resonant metamaterials.

  19. Urban Mass Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mervine, K. E.

    This bibliography is part of a series of Environmental Resource Packets prepared under a grant from EXXON Education Foundation. The most authoritative and accessible references in the urban transportation field are reviewed. The authors, publisher, point of view, level, and summary are given for each reference. The references are categorized…

  20. Mass transport contamination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was performed to determine the effects of outgassing and waste dumping on the contamination field around an orbiting spacecraft. The spacecraft was assumed to be spherical in shape with the mass flow emitting uniformly from the spherical surface at a constant rate and in a D'Lambertian spatial distribution. The outflow of gases were assumed to be neutrally charged and of a single species with a molecular weight characteristic of a composite of the actual species involved in the mass flow. The theoretical analysis showed that, for outgassing only, less than 1.5 percent of the outgas products will return to the Skylab spacecraft as a result of intermolecular collisions. When the total mass flow from the spacecraft, including waste dumps and reaction control motor firings, was considered, it was estimated that about 30 percent will return to the spacecraft.

  1. Computational study of nanometer-scale self-propulsion enabled by asymmetric chemical catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunfeng; Huang, Liping; Brenner, Donald W

    2009-07-07

    We present a detailed analysis of the self-propulsion of a model nanometer-scale motor by reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The nanomotor is decorated with catalysts on only one side that promotes exothermic reactions of the surrounding fuel. Unidirectional drift of the nanomotor is observed that is superimposed on its Brownian motion. The motor response upon the application of external loads is also investigated and the thermodynamic efficiency is calculated. It is shown that the propulsion of our nanomotor can be understood by a momentum transfer model which is akin to rocket propulsion.

  2. Research on key techniques of nanometer scale macro-micro dual-drive precision positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaohui; Du, Ruxu

    2007-12-01

    With the development of science and technology, high precision of positioning platform is needed in many areas, for example, cell fusing in biology and precision surgery in medical area. In such areas, both high efficiency and high precision are needed in some cases, for example, semiconductor processing equipment, super precision lathe etc. In a word, precision positioning platform becomes an important tool in exploring microscope world. Precision positioning platform is a key element in microscope operation. Macro/micro dual-drive precision positioning is a key technique in high-efficiency high-precision area. By such techniques, large distance and high precision can get. In order to realize nanometer scale macro/micro dual-drive precision positioning there are some key problems. First, system structure of macro/micro combination precision positioning platform is worthy to work on. Another key work is realization method of micrometer scale macroscope motion and nanometer scale microscope motion. The third is mechanics, drive, detection and control techniques in nanometer scale positioning of piezoelectric ceramics drive, in which realization of nanometer scale microscope positioning and micro drive is important by solving hysteresis, creep deformation and non-linearity in piezoelectric ceramics driving. To solve hysteresis problem, instead of traditional Preisach algorithm, a new type hysteresis model with simple computation and identification is needed. The inverse model is also easily to get. So we can present new control method to solve hysteresis and creep deformation problem based on this inverse model. Another way, hysteresis and creep deformation problem exist in traditional voltage-feedback power source for piezoelectric ceramics. To solve this problem, a new type current feedback power source for piezoelectric ceramics is presented. In the end, a macro-micro dual-drive super precision positioning mechanism is presented. Combining macro with micro

  3. Shape Reconstruction Based on a New Blurring Model at the Micro/Nanometer Scale

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yangjie; Wu, Chengdong; Wang, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Real-time observation of three-dimensional (3D) information has great significance in nanotechnology. However, normal nanometer scale observation techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), have some problems to obtain 3D information because they lack non-destructive, intuitive, and fast imaging ability under normal conditions, and optical methods have not widely used in micro/nanometer shape reconstruction due to the practical requirements and the imaging limitations in micro/nano manipulation. In this paper, a high resolution shape reconstruction method based on a new optical blurring model is proposed. Firstly, the heat diffusion physics equation is analyzed and the optical diffraction model is modified to directly explain the basic principles of image blurring resulting from depth variation. Secondly, a blurring imaging model is proposed based on curve fitting of a 4th order polynomial curve. The heat diffusion equations combined with the blurring imaging are introduced, and their solution is transformed into a dynamic optimization problem. Finally, the experiments with a standard nanogrid, an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and a microlens have been conducted. The experiments prove that the proposed method can reconstruct 3D shapes at the micro/nanometer scale, and the minimal reconstruction error is 3 nm. PMID:26927129

  4. Mechanical properties of organic matter in shales mapped at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyahu, M.; Emmanuel, S.; Day-Stirrat, R. J.; Macaulay, C.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical properties of organic matter strongly influence the way in which shales deform and fracture. However, the response of organic matter to mechanical stresses is not well understood, representing a critical obstacle to assessing oil and gas production in shale formations. Little is known about the mechanical properties of organic matter in fine grained rocks primarily because it often occupies tiny nanometer-scale voids between the mineral grains which cannot be accessed using standard mechanical testing techniques. Here, we report on the use of a new atomic force microscopy technique (PeakForce QNM) to map the mechanical properties of organic and inorganic components at the nanometer scale. We find that the method can identify different phases such as pyrite, quartz, clays, and organic matter. Furthermore, within the organic component Young's modulus values ranged from 0 - 25 GPa; in 3 different samples - all of which come from thermally mature Type II/III source rocks in the dry gas window - a modal value of 15-16 GPa was measured, with additional peaks measured at ≤ 10 GPa. In addition, the maps suggest that some porous organic macerals possess a soft core surrounded by a harder outer shell 50 - 100 nm thick. Our results demonstrate that the method represents a powerful new petrographic tool with which to characterize the mechanical properties of organic-rich sedimentary rocks.

  5. Polymer Droplet Dynamic Wetting Measurement at the Nanometer Scale on Smooth Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymaniha, Mohammadreza; Felts, Jonathan Robert; Anml Team

    2016-11-01

    Fluid spreading is a complex phenomenon driven strongly by intermolecular forces that requires nanometer scale microscopy to observe and understand. We present a technique for measuring molten polymer spreading dynamics with nanometer scale spatial resolution at elevated temperatures on sapphire, silicon oxide and mica using tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental setup is used to measure the spreading dynamics of polystyrene droplets with 2 μ m diameters at 115-175 C. Custom image processing algorithms realize the droplet height, radius, volume and contact angle of the droplet over time. The contact angle evolution followed a power law with time with experimental exponent values of -0.26, -0.08, and -0.2 for sapphire, silicon oxide, and mica, respectively at 115 C. The non-zero steady state contact angles result in a slower evolution of contact angle with time compared to Tanner's Law, as expected. We observe local crystallinity on the molten droplet surface, where crystalline structures appear to nucleate at the contact line and migrate toward the top of the droplet. Increasing the temperature from 115 C to 175 C reduced surface crystallinity from 35% to 12%, consistent with increasingly energetically favorable amorphous phase as the temperature approaches the melting temperature. This platform provides a way to measure spreading dynamics of extremely small volumes of heterogeneously complex fluids not possible through other means. Dr.Jonathan Felts is the principal investigator of the ANML research group in Mechanical Engineering Department of Texas A&M University.

  6. Nanometer-Scale Compositional Structure in III-V Semiconductor Heterostructures Characterized by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, A.A.; Bi, W.G.; Biefeld, R.M.; Tu, C.W.; Yu, E.T.; Zuo, S.L.

    1998-11-10

    Nanometer-scale compositional structure in InAsxP1.InNYAsxPl.x-Y/InP, grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy and in InAsl-xPJkAsl$b#InAs heterostructures heterostructures grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been characterized using cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. InAsxP1-x alloy layers are found to contain As-rich and P-rich clusters with boundaries formed preferentially within (T 11) and (111) crystal planes. Similar compositional structure is observed within InNYAsxP1-x-Y alloy layers. Imaging of InAsl-xp@Asl#bY superlattices reveals nanometer-scale clustering within both the hAsI-.p and InAsl$bY alloy layers, with preferential alignment of compositional features in the direction. Instances are observed of compositional structure correlated across a heterojunction interface, with regions whose composition corresponds to a smaller unstrained lattice, constant relative to the surrounding alloy material appearing to propagate across the interface.

  7. Nanometer-scale fabrication of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) films with post exposure baking.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kang, Se-Koo; Yeom, Geun-Young; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2013-03-01

    A nanometer-scale grating structure with a 60-nm-wide gap and 200-nm-wide ridge has been successfully demonstrated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate by using a 220-nm-thick hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) negative tone electron beam resist. A post exposure baking (PEB) process and hot development process with low concentration (3.5 wt%) of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution were introduced to realize the grating pattern. To study the effects of post exposure baking on the HSQ resist, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were carried out. From the FT-IR and XPS analyses, it was verified that a thin SiO2 with high cross-linked network structure was formed on the HSQ surface during the PEB step. This SiO2 layer prevents the formation of unwanted bonds on the HSQ surface, which results in clearly defined grating structures with a 60-nm-gap and 200-nm-wide-ridge on the 220-nm-thick HSQ resist. The nanometer-scale grating pattern was successfully transfered to the 280-nm-thick silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate by using inductively-coupled-plasma-reactive-ion-etching (ICP-RIE).

  8. Study of tunneling process effects on the fluctuation conductivity of a granular s-wave superconductor in nanometer-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefvand, A.; salehi, H.; Shoushtari, M. Zargar

    2016-12-01

    We investigate thermal transport in a granular s-wave dirty superconductor at nanometer-scale in 3d in the limit of large tunneling conductance, JT ≫ 1 at near and far from the critical temperature. Calculations is carried out by using Green's function, we obtain the impurity vertex (Cooperon) and fluctuations propagator in the presence of impurities. Then, by concerning Kubo formula we evaluate the three distinct contributions of the Aslamazov-Larkin (AL), Maki-Thompson (MT) and density of states (DOS). The distinctive contributions to fluctuations conductivity depend differently on the tunneling because of their different natures. Therefore, we will show that in the limit of ε ≪ JTη/Tc, where η is the mean level spacing in a grain and ɛ = ln T/Tc ≃(T -Tc) /Tc is the reduced temperature, the tunneling is effective also there is a crossover to the specific behavior of a homogeneous system, as T → Tc, from the point of view of the fluctuating Cooper pairs. In the limit of ε ≫ JTη/Tc, the tunneling is not effective, and the system behaves as an ensemble of real zero-dimensional grains.

  9. Three-dimensional nanometer-scale optical cavities of indefinite medium

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Yang, Xiaodong; Yin, Xiaobo; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturization of optical cavities has numerous advantages for enhancing light–matter interaction in quantum optical devices, low-threshold lasers with minimal power consumption, and efficient integration of optoelectronic devices at large scale. However, the realization of a truly nanometer-scale optical cavity is hindered by the diffraction limit of the nature materials. In addition, the scaling of the photon life time with the cavity size significantly reduces the quality factor of small cavities. Here we theoretically present an approach to achieve ultrasmall optical cavities using indefinite medium with hyperbolic dispersion, which allows propagation of electromagnetic waves with wave vectors much larger than those in vacuum enabling extremely small 3D cavity down to (λ/20)3. These cavities exhibit size-independent resonance frequencies and anomalous scaling of quality factors in contrast to the conventional cavities, resulting in nanocavities with both high Q/Vm ratio and broad bandwidth. PMID:21709266

  10. Direct observation of nanometer-scale Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Xiong, Feng; Hong, Sungduk; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2013-05-01

    We measure power dissipation in phase change memory (PCM) devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM) with ˜50 nm spatial and 0.2 K temperature resolution. The temperature rise in the Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is dominated by Joule heating, but at the GST-TiW contacts it is a combination of Peltier and current crowding effects. Comparison of SJEM and electrical measurements with simulations of the PCM devices uncovers a thermopower of ˜350 μV K-1 and a contact resistance of ˜2.0 × 10-8 Ω m2 (to TiW) for 25 nm thick films of face centered-cubic crystalline GST. Knowledge of such nanometer-scale Joule, Peltier, and current crowding effects is essential for energy-efficient design of future PCM technology.

  11. Nanometer-scale surface modification of Ti6Al4V alloy for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui; Luan, Ben Li

    2008-01-01

    This communication presents a novel technology to enhance the biocompatibility of bioinert Ti6Al4V alloy as implant materials for orthopaedic application. The surface of Ti6Al4V alloy was electrochemically activated in NaOH solution to create a porous structure with nanometer topographic features and an alkaline environment, thus promoting the formation of bone-like hydroxyapatite coating and enhancing the bonding strength of the coating. This innovative activation process was proved to be effective and essential. The activated surface was confirmed to be pure TiO2 and the formed coating was characterized of pure hydroxyapatite with a nanometer-scaled grain size structure by means of XPS, FESEM/SEM/EDX, XRD, and TEM techniques.

  12. Superhydrophilic TiO2 thin film by nanometer scale surface roughness and dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-02-01

    A remarkable enhancement in the hydrophilic nature of titanium dioxide (TiO2) films is obtained by surface modification in DC-glow discharge plasma. Thin transparent TiO2 films were coated on glass substrate by sol-gel dip coating method, and exposed in DC-glow discharge plasma. The plasma exposed TiO2 film exhibited a significant change in its wetting property contact angle, which is a representative of wetting property, has reduced to considerable limits 3.02° and 1.85° from its initial value 54.40° and 48.82° for deionized water and ethylene glycol, respectively. It is elucidated that the hydrophilic property of plasma exposed TiO2 films dependent mainly upon nanometer scale surface roughness. Variation, from 4.6 nm to 19.8 nm, in the film surface roughness with exposure time was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Analysis of variation in the values of contact angle and surface roughness with increasing plasma exposure time reveal that the surface roughness is the main factor which makes the modified TiO2 film superhydrophilic. However, a contribution of change in the surface states, to the hydrophilic property, is also observed for small values of the plasma exposure time. Based upon nanometer scale surface roughness and dangling bonds, a variation in the surface energy of TiO2 film from 49.38 to 88.92 mJ/m2 is also observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show change in the surface states of titanium and oxygen. The observed antifogging properties are the direct results of the development of the superhydrophilic wetting characteristics to TiO2 films.

  13. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable. PMID:26285123

  14. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable.

  15. Nanometer-scale structural, tribological, and optical properties of ultrathin poly(diacetylene) films

    SciTech Connect

    CARPICK,ROBERT W.; SASAKI,DARRYL Y.; BURNS,ALAN R.

    2000-04-17

    The ability to create organized ultrathin films using organic molecules provides systems whose chemical, mechanical, and optical properties can be controlled for specific applications. In particular, polymerization of oriented mono- and multi-layer films containing the diacetylene group has produced a variety of robust, highly oriented, and environmentally responsive films with unique chromatic properties. These two-dimensional poly(diacetylene) (PDA) films, where the conjugation runs parallel to the film surface, have previously been prepared in a variety of forms. Of particular interest is the optical absorption of PDA due to its {pi}-conjugated backbone. A wide variety of PDA materials, including bulk crystals, thin films, and solutions, exhibit a chromatic transition involving a significant shift in absorption from low to high energy bands of the visible spectrum, thus the PDA appears to transform from a blue to a red color. In addition, the red form is highly fluorescent, while the blue form is not. This transition can be brought about by heat binding of specific biological targets and applied stress (mechanochromism), among others. In this paper, the authors discuss the Langmuir deposition of ultrathin PDA films and the subsequent measurement of their structural, optical, and mechanical properties at the nanometer scale. By altering the head group functionality, the authors can choose between mono- and tri-layer PDA film structures. Measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM) reveal strongly anisotropic friction properties that are correlated with the orientation of the conjugated polymer backbone orientation. Furthermore, the authors can use the AFM tip or a near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) tip to locally convert the PDA from the blue form to the red form via applied stress. This represents the first time that mechanochromism has been observed at the nanometer scale. Dramatic structural changes are associated with this mechanochromic

  16. Positive feedback can lead to dynamic nanometer-scale clustering on cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrens, Martijn; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter; Mugler, Andrew

    2014-11-28

    Clustering of molecules on biological membranes is a widely observed phenomenon. A key example is the clustering of the oncoprotein Ras, which is known to be important for signal transduction in mammalian cells. Yet, the mechanism by which Ras clusters form and are maintained remains unclear. Recently, it has been discovered that activated Ras promotes further Ras activation. Here we show using particle-based simulation that this positive feedback is sufficient to produce persistent clusters of active Ras molecules at the nanometer scale via a dynamic nucleation mechanism. Furthermore, we find that our cluster statistics are consistent with experimental observations of the Ras system. Interestingly, we show that our model does not support a Turing regime of macroscopic reaction-diffusion patterning, and therefore that the clustering we observe is a purely stochastic effect, arising from the coupling of positive feedback with the discrete nature of individual molecules. These results underscore the importance of stochastic and dynamic properties of reaction diffusion systems for biological behavior.

  17. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    PubMed Central

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  18. Dispersion characteristics of nanometer-scaled silicon nitride suspended membrane waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandan, Bian; Xun, Lei; Shaowu, Chen

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the dispersion properties of nanometer-scaled silicon nitride suspended membrane waveguides around the communication wavelength and systematically study their relationship with the key structural parameters of the waveguide. The simulation results show that a suspended membrane waveguide can realize anomalous dispersion with a relatively thinner silicon nitride thickness in the range of 400 to 600 nm, whereas, for the same membrane thickness, a conventional rib or strip silicon nitride waveguide cannot support anomalous dispersion. In particular, a waveguide with 400 nm silicon nitride thickness and deep etch depth (r = 0.05) exhibits anomalous dispersion around the communication wavelength when the waveguide width ranges from 990 to 1255 nm, and the maximum dispersion is 22.56 ps/(nm·km). This specially designed anomalous dispersion silicon nitride waveguide is highly desirable for micro-resonator based optical frequency combs due to its potential to meet the phase-matching condition required for cascaded four-wave-mixing. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61435002, 61527823 61321063).

  19. Ultra-High Density Single Nanometer-Scale Anodic Alumina Nanofibers Fabricated by Pyrophosphoric Acid Anodizing

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Nishinaga, Osamu; Nakajima, Daiki; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-01-01

    Anodic oxide fabricated by anodizing has been widely used for nanostructural engineering, but the nanomorphology is limited to only two oxides: anodic barrier and porous oxides. Therefore, the discovery of an additional anodic oxide with a unique nanofeature would expand the applicability of anodizing. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a third-generation anodic oxide, specifically, anodic alumina nanofibers, by anodizing in a new electrolyte, pyrophosphoric acid. Ultra-high density single nanometer-scale anodic alumina nanofibers (1010 nanofibers/cm2) consisting of an amorphous, pure aluminum oxide were successfully fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The nanomorphologies of the anodic nanofibers can be controlled by the electrochemical conditions. Anodic tungsten oxide nanofibers can also be fabricated by pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The aluminum surface covered by the anodic alumina nanofibers exhibited ultra-fast superhydrophilic behavior, with a contact angle of less than 1°, within 1 second. Such ultra-narrow nanofibers can be used for various nanoapplications including catalysts, wettability control, and electronic devices. PMID:25491282

  20. Nanometer-scale imaging and pore-scale fluid flow modeling inchalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy; Radmilovich, Velimir

    2005-08-23

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk,diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is neededto resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping offluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existingtomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serialsectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has beendeveloped. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometersby using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface.After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of thissurface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievableusing this technique. A new image processing method uses directmorphological analysis of the pore space to characterize thepetrophysical properties of diverse formations. In addition to estimationof the petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relativepermeability and capillary pressures), the method is used for simulationof fluid displacement processes, such as those encountered in variousimproved oil recovery (IOR) approaches. Computed with the new methodcapillary pressure curves are in good agreement with laboratory data. Themethod has also been applied for visualization of the fluid distributionat various saturations from the new FIB data.

  1. Probing dynamics and pinning of single vortices in superconductors at nanometer scales.

    PubMed

    Embon, L; Anahory, Y; Suhov, A; Halbertal, D; Cuppens, J; Yakovenko, A; Uri, A; Myasoedov, Y; Rappaport, M L; Huber, M E; Gurevich, A; Zeldov, E

    2015-01-07

    The dynamics of quantized magnetic vortices and their pinning by materials defects determine electromagnetic properties of superconductors, particularly their ability to carry non-dissipative currents. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the complex physics of vortex matter, the behavior of vortices driven by current through a multi-scale potential of the actual materials defects is still not well understood, mostly due to the scarcity of appropriate experimental tools capable of tracing vortex trajectories on nanometer scales. Using a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference microscope we report here an investigation of controlled dynamics of vortices in lead films with sub-Angstrom spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. We measured, for the first time, the fundamental dependence of the elementary pinning force of multiple defects on the vortex displacement, revealing a far more complex behavior than has previously been recognized, including striking spring softening and broken-spring depinning, as well as spontaneous hysteretic switching between cellular vortex trajectories. Our results indicate the importance of thermal fluctuations even at 4.2 K and of the vital role of ripples in the pinning potential, giving new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation and electromagnetic response of superconductors.

  2. Three-dimensional integrated circuits for lab-on-chip dielectrophoresis of nanometer scale particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Samuel J.; Noyola, Arnaldo J.; Levitan, Steven P.; Chiarulli, Donald M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a mixed-technology micro-system for electronically manipulating and optically detecting virusscale particles in fluids that is designed using 3D integrated circuit technology. During the 3D fabrication process, the top-most chip tier is assembled upside down and the substrate material is removed. This places the polysilicon layer, which is used to create geometries with the process' minimum feature size, in close proximity to a fluid channel etched into the top of the stack. By taking advantage of these processing features inherent to "3D chip-stacking" technology, we create electrode arrays that have a gap spacing of 270 nm. Using 3D CMOS technology also provides the ability to densely integrate analog and digital control circuitry for the electrodes by using the additional levels of the chip stack. We show simulations of the system with a physical model of a Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, which has a radius of approximately 125 nm, being dielectrophoretically arranged into striped patterns. We also discuss how these striped patterns of trapped nanometer scale particles create an effective diffraction grating which can then be sensed with macro-scale optical techniques.

  3. Probing Rubber Cross-Linking Generation of Industrial Polymer Networks at Nanometer Scale.

    PubMed

    Gabrielle, Brice; Gomez, Emmanuel; Korb, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-23

    We present improved analyses of rheometric torque measurements as well as (1)H double-quantum (DQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) buildup data on polymer networks of industrial compounds. This latter DQ NMR analysis allows finding the distribution of an orientation order parameter (Dres) resulting from the noncomplete averaging of proton dipole-dipole couplings within the cross-linked polymer chains. We investigate the influence of the formulation (filler and vulcanization systems) as well as the process (curing temperature) ending to the final polymer network. We show that DQ NMR follows the generation of the polymer network during the vulcanization process from a heterogeneous network to a very homogeneous one. The time variations of microscopic Dres and macroscopic rheometric torques present power-law behaviors above a threshold time scale with characteristic exponents of the percolation theory. We observe also a very good linear correlation between the kinetics of Dres and rheometric data routinely performed in industry. All these observations confirm the description of the polymer network generation as a critical phenomenon. On the basis of all these results, we believe that DQ NMR could become a valuable tool for investigating in situ the cross-linking of industrial polymer networks at the nanometer scale.

  4. Real-Time Imaging of Plant Cell Wall Structure at Nanometer Scale, with Respect to Cellulase Accessibility and Degradation Kinetics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S. Y.

    2012-05-01

    Presentation on real-time imaging of plant cell wall structure at nanometer scale. Objectives are to develop tools to measure biomass at the nanometer scale; elucidate the molecular bases of biomass deconstruction; and identify factors that affect the conversion efficiency of biomass-to-biofuels.

  5. Composition Analysis of III-Nitrides at the Nanometer Scale: Comparison of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonef, Bastien; Lopez-Haro, Miguel; Amichi, Lynda; Beeler, Mark; Grenier, Adeline; Robin, Eric; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Mollard, Nicolas; Mouton, Isabelle; Monroy, Eva; Bougerol, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    The enhancement of the performance of advanced nitride-based optoelectronic devices requires the fine tuning of their composition, which has to be determined with a high accuracy and at the nanometer scale. For that purpose, we have evaluated and compared energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) in terms of composition analysis of AlGaN/GaN multilayers. Both techniques give comparable results with a composition accuracy better than 0.6 % even for layers as thin as 3 nm. In case of EDX, we show the relevance of correcting the X-ray absorption by simultaneous determination of the mass thickness and chemical composition at each point of the analysis. Limitations of both techniques are discussed when applied to specimens with different geometries or compositions.

  6. Alternating-current induced thermal fatigue of gold interconnects with nanometer-scale thickness and width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lijuan; Ling, Xue; Li, Xide

    2011-10-01

    With dramatic reduction in sizes of microelectronic devices, the characteristic width and thickness of interconnects in large-scale integrated circuits have reached nanometer scale. Thermal fatigue damage of so small interconnects has attracted more and more attentions. In this work, thermal fatigue of Au interconnects, 35 nm thick and 0.1-5 μm wide, is investigated by applying various alternating current densities to generate cycling temperature and strain in them. A multi-probe measuring system is installed in a scanning electron microscope and a probe-type temperature sensor is for the first time introduced into the system for real-time measuring the temperatures on the pads of the tested interconnects. A one-dimensional heat conduction equation, which uses measured temperatures on the pads as boundary conditions and includes a term of heat dissipation through the interface between the interconnect and the oxidized silicon substrate, is proposed to calculate the time-resolved temperature distribution along the Au interconnects. The measured fatigue lifetimes are presented versus current density and thermal cyclic strain, and the results show that narrower Au lines are more reliable. The failure mechanism of those Au interconnects differs from what is observed in thick interconnects with relatively larger grain size. Topography change caused by localized plasticity on the less-constrained surfaces of the interconnects have not been observed. Instead, grain growing and reorienting due to local temperature varying appear, and grain boundary migration and mergence take place during high temperature fatigue in such thin and narrow interconnects. These results seem to reflect a strain-induced boundary migration mechanism, and the damage morphology also suggests that fatigue of the interconnects with decreased grain size and film thickness is controlled by diffusive mechanisms and interface properties rather than by dislocation glide. Open circuit eventually took

  7. Nanometer-scale displacement measurement with high resolution using dual cavity Fabry-Pérot interferometer for biomimetic robots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    A sensor of a biomimetic robot has to measure very small environmental changes such as, nanometer scale strains or displacements. Fiber optic sensor can be also one of candidates for the biomimetic sensor because the sensor is like thread and the shape of the sensor is similar to muscle fiber. A fiber optic interferometer, which is an optical-based sensor, can measure displacement precisely, so such device has been widely studied for the measurement of displacement on a nanometer-scale. Especially, a Quadrature Phase-Shifted Fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer (QPS-FFPI) uses phase-information for this measurement, allowing it to provide a precision result with high resolution. In theory, the QPS-FFPI generates two sinusoidal signals of which the phase difference should be 90 degrees for the exact measurement of the displacement. In order to guarantee the condition of the phase difference, the relative adjustment of the cavities of the optical fibers is required. However, with such precise adjustment it is very hard to fix the proper difference of the two cavities for quadrature-phase-shifting. In this paper, a dual-cavity FFPI is newly proposed to measure the displacement on a nanometer-scale with a specific type of signal processing. In the signal processing, a novel phase-compensation algorithm is applied to force the phase difference to be exactly 90 degrees without any physical adjustment. As a result, the paper shows that the phase-compensated dual-cavity FFPI can effectively measure nanometer-scale displacement with high resolution under dynamic conditions.

  8. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K-1. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  9. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K{sup −1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  10. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Kyle L; Pop, Eric; King, William P

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K(-1). This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  11. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-03-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  12. The security of mass transport ticketing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sel, Marc; Seys, Stefaan; Verheul, Eric

    Mass transport ticketing systems in most developed countries are making a rapid transition from ‘traditional’ paper or carton-based ticketing systems towards a contactless ‘smart card‘ based approach. This article discusses the main IT security aspects of mass transport ticketing systems (metro, bus, etc).

  13. Nanometer-scale crystallization of thin HfO2 films studied by HF-chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Shinji; Miyata, Noriyuki; Migita, Shinji; Horikawa, Tsuyoshi; Toriumi, Akira

    2005-05-01

    We used a HF-chemical etching process to examine crystalline structures in thin HfO2 films grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition at 350-550°C. Nanometer-scale crystalline HfO2 nuclei were identified from all the HfO2 films. The nucleus density exponentially increased with increasing deposition temperature, but the diameter of the nuclei did not depend on the deposition temperature. We propose that the crystallization of thin HfO2 film during growth proceeds in a patchwork process with the increase of the crystalline HfO2 nuclei.

  14. Giant Peltier Effect in a Submicron-Sized Cu-Ni/Au Junction with Nanometer-Scale Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Atsushi; Kodzuka, Masaya; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ando, Koji; Takanashi, Koki; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Hono, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Akio

    2010-06-01

    We observed a giant Peltier effect in a submicron Cu-Ni/Au junction. The Peltier coefficient was evaluated to be 480 mV at room temperature from the balance between Joule heating and the Peltier cooling effect in the junction, which is 40 times that expected from the Seebeck coefficients of bulk Au and Cu-Ni alloy. This giant cooling effect lowered the inner temperature of the junction by 160 K. Microstructure analysis with a three-dimensional atom probe suggested that the giant Peltier effect possibly originated from nanometer-scale phase separation in the Cu-Ni layer.

  15. Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, tides, hydrological water redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. With only a few exceptions on the Earth surface, the temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have the capability of monitoring certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. These techniques include the very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging and Doppler tracking, and the Global Positioning System, all entail global observational networks. While considerable advances have been made in observing and understanding of the dynamics of Earth's rotation, only the lowest-degree gravitational variations have been observed and limited knowledge of geocenter motion obtained. New space missions, projects and initiatives promise to further improve the measurements and hence our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding and modeling capability of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as the solid Earth's response to such changes in constraining the modeling of Earth's mechanical properties.

  16. Processing considerations for adding nanometer-scale oxides to enhance flux pinning in high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y. |; Goretta, K.C.; Cuber, M.M.; Burdt, M.L.; Feng, L.R.; Chen, N.; Balachandran, U.; Xu, M.

    1997-07-01

    Several nanometer-scale oxide inclusions were added to Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} high-temperature superconductors to determine their effectiveness in creating intragranular flux-pinning sites. Powder pellets were fabricated and heat treated by partial-melt processing. Effects of the additives on melting response, superconducting properties, and microstructural development were examined. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions exhibited the most promise for forming stable pinning centers, ZrO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} additions were moderately promising, TiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZnO additions were less promising, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions destroyed superconductivity.

  17. Low pressure hand made PVD system for high crystalline metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Marimpul, Rinaldo; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2016-02-01

    High crystalline metal thin film preparation in application both for catalyst substrate or electrode in any electronic devices always to be considered in material functional material research and development. As a substrate catalyst, this metal take a role as guidance for material growth in order to resulted in proper surface structure although at the end it will be removed via etching process. Meanwhile as electrodes, it will dragging charges to be collected inside. This brief discussion will elaborate general fundamental principle of physical vapor deposition (PVD) system for metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale. The influence of thermodynamic parameters and metal characteristic such as melting point and particle size will be elucidated. Physical description of deposition process in the chamber can be simplified by schematic evaporation phenomena which is supported by experimental measurement such as SEM and XRD.

  18. Heterogeneous nanometer-scale Joule and Peltier effects in sub-25 nm thin phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-01

    We measure heterogeneous power dissipation in phase change memory (PCM) films of 11 and 22 nm thin Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) by scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM), with sub-50 nm spatial and ˜0.2 K temperature resolution. The heterogeneous Joule and Peltier effects are explained using a finite element analysis (FEA) model with a mixture of hexagonal close-packed and face-centered cubic GST phases. Transfer length method measurements and effective media theory calculations yield the GST resistivity, GST-TiW contact resistivity, and crystal fraction of the GST films at different annealing temperatures. Further comparison of SJEM measurements and FEA modeling also predicts the thermopower of thin GST films. These measurements of nanometer-scale Joule, thermoelectric, and interface effects in PCM films could lead to energy-efficient designs of highly scaled PCM technology.

  19. Low pressure hand made PVD system for high crystalline metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Marimpul, Rinaldo; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2016-02-08

    High crystalline metal thin film preparation in application both for catalyst substrate or electrode in any electronic devices always to be considered in material functional material research and development. As a substrate catalyst, this metal take a role as guidance for material growth in order to resulted in proper surface structure although at the end it will be removed via etching process. Meanwhile as electrodes, it will dragging charges to be collected inside. This brief discussion will elaborate general fundamental principle of physical vapor deposition (PVD) system for metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale. The influence of thermodynamic parameters and metal characteristic such as melting point and particle size will be elucidated. Physical description of deposition process in the chamber can be simplified by schematic evaporation phenomena which is supported by experimental measurement such as SEM and XRD.

  20. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Roback, R.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of axial and swirling coaxial jets is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently employed in a variety of computational procedures used throughout the propulsion community. Effort was directed toward the acquisition of length scale and dissipation rate data that will provide more accurate inlet boundary conditions for the computational procedures and a data base to evaluate the turbulent transport models in the near jet region where recirculation does not occur. Mass and momentum turbulent transport data with a blunt inner-jet inlet configuration will also be acquired.

  1. Oceanic mass transport by mesoscale eddies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Bo

    2014-07-18

    Oceanic transports of heat, salt, fresh water, dissolved CO2, and other tracers regulate global climate change and the distribution of natural marine resources. The time-mean ocean circulation transports fluid as a conveyor belt, but fluid parcels can also be trapped and transported discretely by migrating mesoscale eddies. By combining available satellite altimetry and Argo profiling float data, we showed that the eddy-induced zonal mass transport can reach a total meridionally integrated value of up to 30 to 40 sverdrups (Sv) (1 Sv = 10(6) cubic meters per second), and it occurs mainly in subtropical regions, where the background flows are weak. This transport is comparable in magnitude to that of the large-scale wind- and thermohaline-driven circulation.

  2. Atomistic study of a nanometer-scale pump based on the thermal ratchet concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, J. H.; Zambrano, Harvey

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel concept of nanoscale pump fabricated using Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. The development of nanofluidic systems provides unprecedented possibilities for the control of biology and chemistry at the molecular level with potential applications in low energy cost devices, novel medical tools, and a new generation of sensors. CNTs offer a number of attractive features for the fabrication of fluidic nanodevices including fast flow, useful electronic and thermal properties, high mechanical strength and biocompatibility. Therefore, the transport of liquids in CNTs is now of great interest in nanofluidics. Thermophoresis is the phenomenon observed when a mixture of two or more types of motile objects experience a force induced by a thermal gradient and the different types of objects respond to it differently, inducing a motion and segregation of the objects. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the possibility to design thermophoretic pumping devices fabricated of CNTs for water transport in nanoconduits. The design of the nanopumps is based on the concept of the Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet. We aknowledge partial support from Fondecyt project 11130559 and Redoc udec.

  3. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    PubMed Central

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-01-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:26440069

  4. Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, Pavel; Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin; Sun, Yu; Riva, Ricardo; Ran, Jiangjun

    2013-04-01

    Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has enormously extended our knowledge of the Earth's system by allowing natural mass transport of various origin to be quantified. This concerns, in particular, the depletion and replenishment of continental water stocks; shrinking of polar ice sheets; deformation of the Earth's crust triggered by large earthquakes, and isostatic adjustment processes. A number of research centers compute models of temporal gravity field variations and mass transport, using GRACE data as input. One of such models - Delft Mass Transport model - is being produced at the Delft University of Technology in collaboration with the GNSS Research Center of Wuhan University. A new release of this model, DMT-2, has been produced on the basis of a new (second) release of GRACE level-1b data. This model consists of a time-series of monthly solutions spanning a time interval of more than 8 years, starting from Feb. 2003. Each solution consists of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 120. Both unconstrained and optimally filtered solutions are obtained. The most essential improvements of the DMT-2 model, as compared to its predecessors (DMT-1 and DMT-1b), are as follows: (i) improved estimation and elimination of low-frequency noise in GRACE data, so that strong mass transport signals are not damped; (ii) computation of accurate stochastic models of data noise for each month individually with a subsequent application of frequency-dependent data weighting, which allows statistically optimal solutions to be compiled even if data noise is colored and gradually changes in time; (iii) optimized estimation of accelerometer calibration parameters; (iv) incorporation of degree 1 coefficients estimated with independent techniques; (v) usage of state-of-the-art background models to de-alias GRACE data from rapid mass transport signals (this includes the EOT11a model of ocean tides and the latest release of the AOD1B product describing

  5. Surface and grain boundary interdiffusion in nanometer-scale LSMO/BFO bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Virendra; Gaur, Anurag; Choudhary, R. J.; Gupta, Mukul

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxial 150 nm thick LSMO/BFO bilayer is deposited on STO (100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition, to study magnetoelectric effect. Unexpected low value of room temperature magnetization in bilayer indicates towards the possibility of interdiffusion. Further, sharp fall in the value of TC (53 K) also added our anxiety towards possible interdiffusion in BFO/LSMO system. Low-angle x-ray diffraction technique is used to investigate interdiffusion phenomena, and the temperature-dependent interdiffusivity is obtained by accurately monitoring the decay of the first-order modulation peak as a function of annealing time. It has been found that the diffusivity at different temperatures follows Arrhenius-type behavior. X-ray reflection (XRR) pattern obtained for the bilayer could not be fitted in the Parratt's formalism, which confirms the interdiffusion in it. Depth profiles of 209Bi, 56Fe ions measured by secondary ion mass spectroscope (SIMS) further substantiate the diffusion of these ions from upper BFO layer into lower LSMO layer.

  6. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; von Borany, J; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed.

  7. Experimental studies of fundamental issues in electron transfer through nanometer scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiromichi

    Electron transfer reactions constitute many of the primary events in materials science, chemistry, physics, and biochemistry, e.g. the electron transport properties and photoexcited processes in solids and molecules, chemical reactions, corrosion, photosynthesis, respiration, and so forth. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film provides us with a unique environment not only to understand and manipulate the surface electronic properties of a solid, but also to control electron transfer processes at the interface. The first topic in this thesis describes the structure and electron tunneling characterization of alkanethiol SAMs on InP(100). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the bonding of alkanethiols to n-InP surfaces and to measure the monolayer thickness. The results showed that the sulfur binds to In atoms on the surface, and provided film thicknesses of 6.4 A for C8H17SH, 11.1 A for C12H25SH, and 14.9 A for C16H 33SH, resulting in an average tilt angle of 55°. The analysis indicated that super-exchange coupling between the alkane chains plays an important role in defining electron tunneling barriers, especially for highly tilted chains. The second topic describes studies of cytochrome c bound to pure and mixed SAMs of o-terminated alkanethiol (terminated with pyridine, imidazole or nitrile groups) and alkanethiol on gold. Electrochemical methods are used to determine electron transfer rate constants of cytochrome c, and scanning tunneling microscopy to observe the cytochrome c on the SAM. Detailed analysis revealed direct association of the heme of cytochrome c with the terminal groups of the SAMs and a 'turning-over' of the electron transfer of cytochrome c from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime. The third topic describes studies of oxidation and reduction of cytochrome c in solution through eleven different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. Electron transfer rate constants of

  8. New single-molecule speckle microscopy reveals modification of the retrograde actin flow by focal adhesions at nanometer scales.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Smith, Matthew B; Ryan, Gillian L; Kiuchi, Tai; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-04-01

    Speckle microscopy directly visualizes the retrograde actin flow, which is believed to promote cell-edge protrusion when linked to focal adhesions (FAs). However, it has been argued that, due to rapid actin turnover, the use of green fluorescent protein-actin, the lack of appropriate analysis algorithms, and technical difficulties, speckle microscopy does not necessarily report the flow velocities of entire actin populations. In this study, we developed a new, user-friendly single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy using DyLight dye-labeled actin. Our new SiMS method enables in vivo nanometer-scale displacement analysis with a low localization error of ±8-8.5 nm, allowing accurate flow-velocity measurement for actin speckles with lifetime <5 s. In lamellipodia, both short- and long-lived F-actin molecules flow with the same speed, indicating they are part of a single actin network. These results do not support coexistence of F-actin populations with different flow speeds, which is referred to as the lamella hypothesis. Mature FAs, but not nascent adhesions, locally obstruct the retrograde flow. Interestingly, the actin flow in front of mature FAs is fast and biased toward FAs, suggesting that mature FAs attract the flow in front and actively remodel the local actin network.

  9. Imaging of chromosomes at nano-meter scale resolution using scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Toshio; Shichirii, Motoharu; Fukushi, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Kobori, Toshiro; Hagiwara, Shoji; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2002-12-01

    Topographic and fluorescent images of whole barley chromosomes stained with YOYO-1 were observed simultaneously by scanning near-field optical/ atomic force microscopy (SNOM/AFM). The chromosome was relatively smooth and flat in the topographic images and no significant difference in height was present between regions of high fluorescent and low fluorescent intensity in the chromosomes. The telomeric region, labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method, was also observed by SNOM/AFM at high resolution, and fluorescent signals of the telomeric region were clearly defined on the topographic image of chromatin fibers on the chromosome at the nano-meter scale level. Although the telomeric signals were usually visualized as a single fluorescent region at the end of sister chromatids by conventional light microscopy, they were observed separately as two fluorescent regions, less than 100-200 nm distance, using the SNOM/AFM. The SNOM/AFM offers great potential in identifying particular single gene location on chromosomes in the near future.

  10. Echoes in x-ray speckles track nanometer-scale plastic events in colloidal gels under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leheny, Robert; Rogers, Michael; Chen, Kui; Andrzejewski, Lukasz; Narayanan, Suresh; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Harden, James

    2015-03-01

    Any solid under applied stress possesses an elastic limit above which it yields. The microscopic signatures of yield are irreversible changes to the material's structure. We describe x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments on a concentrated nanocolloidal gel subject to in situ oscillatory shear strain that provide information about the spatial character of rearrangements above yielding at the nanometer scale. The oscillatory strain causes periodic echoes in the x-ray speckle pattern, creating peaks in the intensity autocorrelation function. The peak amplitudes are attenuated above a threshold strain, signaling the onset of irreversible particle rearrangements. The gel displays strain softening well below the threshold, indicating a range of strains at which deformations are nonlinear but reversible. Above the threshold strain, the peak amplitudes decay exponentially with the number of shear cycles, demonstrating that all regions in the sample are equally susceptible to yielding and that the probability of a region yielding is independent of previous shear history. The wave-vector dependence of the decay rate reveals a power-law distribution in the size of rearranging regions, suggesting a nonequilibrium critical transition at yielding.

  11. Precession electron diffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy: phase, orientation and strain mapping at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    Precession electron diffraction is a technique used in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to collect electron diffraction patterns while precessing the beam in a cone around the optic axis of the microscope. Electrons are strongly scattered by matter, resulting in dynamical diffraction effects and complex intensity distributions. Precession diffraction produces patterns that are nearly kinematical and lack the complicated intensity distributions of dynamical scattering. These patterns are readily indexed by computer, which allows for the structural characterization of the sample at each pixel. This technique is analogous to electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), but with higher spatial resolution. Like EBSD, precession diffraction is used to make phase and orientation maps in polycrystalline aggregates and deformed crystals. The technique also provides quantitative strain mapping at the nanometer scale for characterization of defects and coherent interfaces. This technique is especially useful for characterizing nano-scale intergrowths that are produced in high-pressure experiments and in naturally shocked samples. We are using this technique on our aberration corrects JEOL ARM200F STEM. Examples of experimentally and naturally transformed olivine will be presented.

  12. New single-molecule speckle microscopy reveals modification of the retrograde actin flow by focal adhesions at nanometer scales

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Smith, Matthew B.; Ryan, Gillian L.; Kiuchi, Tai; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Speckle microscopy directly visualizes the retrograde actin flow, which is believed to promote cell-edge protrusion when linked to focal adhesions (FAs). However, it has been argued that, due to rapid actin turnover, the use of green fluorescent protein–actin, the lack of appropriate analysis algorithms, and technical difficulties, speckle microscopy does not necessarily report the flow velocities of entire actin populations. In this study, we developed a new, user-friendly single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy using DyLight dye-labeled actin. Our new SiMS method enables in vivo nanometer-scale displacement analysis with a low localization error of ±8–8.5 nm, allowing accurate flow-velocity measurement for actin speckles with lifetime <5 s. In lamellipodia, both short- and long-lived F-actin molecules flow with the same speed, indicating they are part of a single actin network. These results do not support coexistence of F-actin populations with different flow speeds, which is referred to as the lamella hypothesis. Mature FAs, but not nascent adhesions, locally obstruct the retrograde flow. Interestingly, the actin flow in front of mature FAs is fast and biased toward FAs, suggesting that mature FAs attract the flow in front and actively remodel the local actin network. PMID:24501425

  13. Photoinduced mass transport in azo compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klismeta, K.; Teteris, J.; Aleksejeva, J.

    2013-12-01

    The photoinduced changes of optical properties in azobenzene containing compound thin films were studied under influence of polarized and non-polarized 532 nm laser light. Under influence of light azo compounds experience trans-cis isomerisation process, that can be observed in the absorbance spectrum of the sample. If the light is linearly polarized, molecules align perpendicularly to the electric field vector and as a result photoinduced dichroism and birefringence is obtained. If a known lateral polarization modulation of the light beam is present, mass transport of the azobenzene containing compound occurs. By measuring the surface relief with a profilometer the direction of mass transport can be determined. The studies of this work show that direct holographic recording of surface relief gratings can be used in optoelectronics, telecommunications and data storage.

  14. Three-dimensional nanometer scale analyses of precipitate structures and local compositions in titanium aluminide engineering alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstl, Stephan S. A.

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) alloys are among the fastest developing class of materials for use in high temperature structural applications. Their low density and high strength make them excellent candidates for both engine and airframe applications. Creep properties of TiAl alloys, however, have been a limiting factor in applying the material to a larger commercial market. In this research, nanometer scale compositional and structural analyses of several TiAl alloys, ranging from model Ti-Al-C ternary alloys to putative commercial alloys with 10 components are investigated utilizing three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and transmission electron microscopies. Nanometer sized borides, silicides, and carbide precipitates are involved in strengthening TiAl alloys, however, chemical partitioning measurements reveal oxygen concentrations up to 14 at. % within the precipitate phases, resulting in the realization of oxycarbide formation contributing to the precipitation strengthening of TiAl alloys. The local compositions of lamellar microstructures and a variety of precipitates in the TiAl system, including boride, silicide, binary carbides, and intermetallic carbides are investigated. Chemical partitioning of the microalloying elements between the alpha2/gamma lamellar phases, and the precipitate/gamma-matrix phases are determined. Both W and Hf have been shown to exhibit a near interfacial excess of 0.26 and 0.35 atoms nm-2 respectively within ca. 7 nm of lamellar interfaces in a complex TiAl alloy. In the case of needle-shaped perovskite Ti3AlC carbide precipitates, periodic domain boundaries are observed 5.3+/-0.8 nm apart along their growth axis parallel to the TiAl[001] crystallographic direction with concomitant composition variations after 24 hrs. at 800°C.

  15. An AEM-TEM study of nanometer-scale mineral associations in an aquifer sand: Implications for colloid mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Christopher H.; Ulery, April L.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1997-02-01

    Analytical and transmission electron microscopy (AEM-TEM) techniques were used to identify mineral juxtapositions at the nanometer-scale in the interstitial matrix of a shallow, Southeastern Coastal plain aquifer sand (Georgetown, South Carolina, USA). In doing so, we sought to infer particle-particle interaction mechanisms holding the matrix intact. The aquifer is a fine-to-medium quartz sand with approximately 12% by weight <63 μm size fraction composing the interstitial matrix. The clay-size fraction contains kaolinite, goethite, gibbsite, and vermiculite. The arrangement of the clay minerals is that of a framework of face-associated domains. Selective extraction revealed that goethite constituted 95% by weight of the free iron oxyhydroxides in the <63 μm size fraction, but AEM-TEM and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) indicated that the goethite occurred only in discrete aggregates among the clays. Conversely, the remaining 5% of the free iron oxyhydroxides comprised an amorphous iron phase which was found to be distributed throughout the matrix and directly associated with the clay particles. This evidence suggests that the amorphous iron oxyhydroxide phase could act as an effective binding intermediary among the clay-clay associations, possibly electrostatically or through bond linkages with the clay surfaces. In addition, HRTEM indicated the presence of another amorphous phase which appeared to hold the clay particle aggregates in a cementitious web. AEM suggested that this amorphous phase was silicon enriched, probably biogenic opal. This evidence suggests that instigating dissolution of the opaline silica phase may be necessary to induce substantial colloid mobilization in this aquifer sediment.

  16. Long dwell-time passage of DNA through nanometer-scale pores: kinetics and sequence dependence of motion.

    PubMed

    Jetha, Nahid N; Feehan, Christopher; Wiggin, Matthew; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Marziali, Andre

    2011-06-22

    A detailed understanding of the kinetics of DNA motion though nanometer-scale pores is important for the successful development of many of the proposed next-generation rapid DNA sequencing and analysis methods. Many of these approaches require DNA motion through nanopores to be slowed by several orders of magnitude from its native translocation velocity so that the translocation times for individual nucleotides fall within practical timescales for detection. With the increased dwell time of DNA in the pore, DNA-pore interactions begin to play an increasingly important role in translocation kinetics. In previous work, we and others observed that when the DNA dwell time in the pore is substantial (>1 ms), DNA motion in α-hemolysin (α-HL) pores leads to nonexponential kinetics in the escape of DNA out of the pore. Here we show that a three-state model for DNA escape, involving stochastic binding interactions of DNA with the pore, accurately reproduces the experimental data. In addition, we investigate the sequence dependence of the DNA escape process and show that the interaction strength of adenine with α-HL is substantially lower relative to cytosine. Our results indicate a difference in the process by which DNA moves through an α-HL nanopore when the motion is fast (microsecond timescale) as compared with when it is slow (millisecond timescale) and strongly influenced by DNA-pore interactions of the kind reported here. We also show the ability of wild-type α-HL to detect and distinguish between 5-methylcytosine and cytosine based on differences in the absolute ionic current through the pore in the presence of these two nucleotides. The results we present here regarding sequence-dependent (and dwell-time-dependent) DNA-pore interaction kinetics will have important implications for the design of methods for DNA analysis through reduced-velocity motion in nanopores.

  17. Friction characteristics of Cd-rich carbonate films on calcite surfaces: implications for compositional differentiation at the nanometer scale

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM) studies were carried out on cleaved calcite sections in contact with solutions supersaturated with respect to otavite (CdCO3) or calcite-otavite solid solutions (SS) as a means to examine the potential for future application of LFM as a nanometer-scale mineral surface composition mapping technique. Layer-by-layer growth of surface films took place either by step advancement or by a surface nucleation and step advancement mechanisms. Friction vs. applied load data acquired on the films and the calcite substrate were successfully fitted to the Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model for single asperity contacts. Following this model, friction differences between film and substrate at low loads were dictated by differences in adhesion, whereas at higher load they reflect differences in contact shear strength. In most experiments at fixed load, the film showed higher friction than the calcite surface, but the friction-load dependence for the different surfaces revealed that at low loads (0–40 nN), a calcian otavite film has lower friction than calcite; a result that is contrary to earlier LFM reports of the same system. Multilayer films of calcian-otavite displayed increasing friction with film thickness, consistent with the expectation that the film surface composition will become increasingly Cd-rich with increasing thickness. Both load- and thickness-dependence trends support the hypothesis that the contact shear strength correlates with the hydration enthalpy of the surface ions, thereby imparting friction sensitivity in the LFM to mineral-water interface composition. PMID:19549312

  18. MEMS Actuators for Tuning Nanometer-scale Airgaps in Heterostructures and Optical Instrumentation for Glacier Ice Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing Shan

    MEMS Actuators for Tuning Nanometer-scale Airgaps in Heterostructures: We developed a new actuator microstructure to control the spacing between closely spaced surfaces. Creating and controlling nanometer gaps is of interest in areas such as plasmonics and quantum electronics. For example, energy states in quantum well heterostructures can be tuned by adjusting the physical coupling distance between wells. Unfortunately, such an application calls for active control of a nano-scale air gap between surfaces which are orders of magnitude larger, which is difficult due to stiction forces. A vertical electrostatic wedge actuator was designed to control the air gap between two closely spaced quantum wells in a collapsed cantilever structure. A six-mask fab- rication process was developed and carried out on an InGaAs/InP quantum well het- erostructure on an InP substrate. Upon actuation, the gap spacing between the surfaces was tuned over a maximum range of 55 nm from contact with an applied voltage of 60 V. Challenges in designing and fabricating the device are discussed. Optical Instrumentation for Glacier Ice Studies: We explored new optical instrumentation for glacier ice studies. Glacier ice, such as that of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, is formed by the accumulation of snowfall over hundreds of thousands of years. Not all snowfalls are the same. Their isotopic compositions vary according to the planet's climate at the time, and may contain part of the past atmosphere. The physical properties and chemical content of the ice are therefore proxies of Earth's climate history. In this work, new optical methods and instrumentation based on light scattering and polarization were developed to more efficiently study glacier ice. Field deployments in Antarctica of said instrumentation and results acquired are presented.

  19. Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50 nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Attota, Ravikiran Dixson, Ronald G.

    2014-07-28

    We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30 nm–40 nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22 nm (k = 2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

  20. Nanometer-scale chemical heterogeneities of black carbon materials and their impacts on PCB sorption properties: soft X-ray spectromicroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Tae Hyun Yoon; Karim Benzerara; Sungwoo Ahn; Richard G. Luthy; Tolek Tyliszczak; Gordon E. Brown, Jr.

    2006-10-01

    Synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy was used to probe nanometer-scale chemical heterogeneities of black carbon (BC) materials, including anthracite coal, coke, and activated carbon (AC), and to study their impact on the partitioning of one type of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB-166: 2,3,4,4',5,6 hexachloro biphenyl) onto AC particles. Various carbon species (e.g., aromatic, ketonic/phenolic, and carboxylic functional groups) were found in all of the BC materials examined, and impurities (e.g., carbonate and potassium ions in anthracite coal) were identified in nanometer-scale regions of these samples. The show that these chemical heterogeneities in AC particles influence their sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). PCB-166 was found to accumulate preferentially on AC particles with the highest content of aromatic functionalities. These new findings from X-ray spectromicroscopy have the following implications for the role of BC materials in the environment: (1) the functional groups of BC materials vary on a 25-nanometer scale, and so does the abundance of the HOCs; (2) molecular-level characterization of HOC sorption preferences on AC will lead to an improved understanding of AC sorption properties for the remediation of HOCs in soils and sediments. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The design and building of an alternating current scanning tunneling microscope for nanometer scale imaging of insulating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Adam Jay David

    An alternating current scanning tunneling microscope (ACSTM) has been designed and built for the study of insulating surfaces on the nanometer scale. The instrument consists of an STM built within a microwave resonant cavity. This design allows for simultaneous operation for both DC and ACSTM. The instrument is housed in a nitrogen atmosphere glovebox for the observation and handling of air-sensitive samples. In order to achieve the detailed resolution of STM on insulating surfaces the ACSTM uses the application of a high frequency alternating current bias voltage across a tip-sample junction, the resulting alternating current can be measured. Specifically, the non-linearilty of the STM junction allows the third harmonic (TH) of the driving frequency to be used as the measured quantity for imaging and control. By using the third harmonic of the fundamental driving voltage as the measured quantity to control the tip-sample distance, STM quality images have been produced without the reliance on a conductive surface. The atomic scale resolution of a silicon dioxide surface and the growth of such layers appeared to provide an ideal system for imaging with the ACSTM. Through the use of DC STM we have shown how the H-Si(111) surface morphology is effected by the length of etch time and the kinetic effect of stirring the etchant solution. Several experimental results make use of the ACSTM employing the TH signal for measurement under both DC feedback control and under AC feedback control. We will address the experimental procedure, signal generation and sample dependence upon ACSTM image resolution. By comparing three sulfides (CuS, MoS2. and PbS) and H-Si(111), the TH signal generation and ultimate ACSTM resolution is explored. A more in depth analysis covers the application of the ACSTM to investigate the probe induced surface oxidation of natural PbS. With the ACSTM, the complete transformation from a semiconductive to an insulating surface is imaged in real-time for

  2. Diffuse mass transport in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, F. G.

    1981-08-01

    Variational methods are used to investigate the problems of diffusive mass transport in a porous medium. Calculations of the effective diffusivities are performed for a model pore structure generated by randomly placed, freely overlapping solid spheres all of the same radius. Effects of the tortuosity of the diffusion paths are considered. Numerical evaluations are used to test some approximate engineering models. For gaseous transition region diffusion the mean free path kinetic theory is used to derive a variational upper bound on the effective transition region diffusivity. For the simultaneous liquid or gas phase Fickian bulk diffusion in the void and Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface, an analytical expression for effective diffusion coefficient is obtained and compared with the usual engineering model of parallel surface and void diffusion. The simultaneous gaseous transition region diffusion in the void and the Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface are examined numerically.

  3. Resonance wave pumping: wave mass transport pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Violeau, Damien; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies a valveless pump (or Liebau pump) results in a strong pulsating flow. A free-surface version of the Liebau pump is presented. The experiment consists of a closed tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free-surface and a recirculation section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle is placed at an off-centre position at the free-surface and controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Near certain frequencies identified as resonance frequencies through a linear potential theory analysis, the system behaves like a pump. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is performed in the near free surface region and compared with simulations using Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. The mean eulerian mass flux field (ρ) is extracted. It is observed that the flow is located in the vicinity of the surface layer suggesting Stokes Drift (or Wave Mass Transport) is the source of the pumping. A model is developped to extend the linear potential theory to the second order to take into account these observations. The authors would like to acknowledge the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for their generous support.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of corrosion passivation and nanometer-scale lithography with self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamborini, Francis Patrick

    The research in this dissertation examines the possible applications of organomercaptan self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for corrosion passivation and nanometer-scale lithography. We examined linear-chain n-alkanethiol and aromatic SAMs in these studies and used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as the main tool for surface characterization. The corrosion passivation properties of n-alkanethiol SAMs were studied on Au in aqueous CN- and Br - solutions and on underpotentially deposited Cu on Au (Au/Cu-UPD) in aqueous HClO4. All SAMs suppress corrosion and shift the potential for corrosion to more positive potentials compared to that on the unmodified metals. We found that corrosion of n-alkanethiol SAM-modified Au begins at defects in the monolayer and the surface morphology depends on the functional end group of the SAM. Corrosion on the unpassivated metal surface begins at high energy sites such as step edges and pits. The chain length and functional end group of SAMs were varied to determine which factors were most important for the best protection against corrosion. We found that corrosion passivation improves with increasing chain length and more hydrophilic functional end groups like OH and COOH protect better than hydrophobic end groups like CH3. The passivation properties of linear-chain SAMs was compared with aromatic SAMs and we found that if they are equally thick and contain the same functional end group, the aromatic SAMs are superior. One goal of this research was to improve the barrier properties of SAMs. We found that depositing a single layer of Cu onto Au before adsorbing the SAM improved its barrier properties dramatically compared to when the SAM was adsorbed directly to the Au. In summary, the corrosion-related studies in this dissertation discuss the corrosion mechanism of SAM-modified metal surfaces, the important factors that determine the passivation properties of SAMs, and a strategy for dramatically improving the barrier properties of

  5. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a fiber tip of scanning near-field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Atie, Elie M.; Xie, Zhihua; El Eter, Ali; Salut, Roland; Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony

    2015-04-13

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nanometer scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e., in contact to the nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of “remote” (non contact) sensing on the nanometer scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM (Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy) fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, moveable, and background-free optical nanosensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This work paves the way towards an alternative class of nanopositioning techniques, based on the monitoring of diffraction-free plasmon resonance, that are alternative to nanomechanical and diffraction-limited optical interference-based devices.

  6. Lower nanometer-scale size limit for the deformation of a metallic glass by shear transformations revealed by quantitative AFM indentation.

    PubMed

    Caron, Arnaud; Bennewitz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    We combine non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and AFM indentation in ultra-high vacuum to quantitatively and reproducibly determine the hardness and deformation mechanisms of Pt(111) and a Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass with unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results on plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline Pt(111) are consistent with the discrete mechanisms established for larger scales: Plasticity is mediated by dislocation gliding and no rate dependence is observed. For the metallic glass we have discovered that plastic deformation at the nanometer scale is not discrete but continuous and localized around the indenter, and does not exhibit rate dependence. This contrasts with the observation of serrated, rate-dependent flow of metallic glasses at larger scales. Our results reveal a lower size limit for metallic glasses below which shear transformation mechanisms are not activated by indentation. In the case of metallic glass, we conclude that the energy stored in the stressed volume during nanometer-scale indentation is insufficient to account for the interfacial energy of a shear band in the glassy matrix.

  7. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  8. Terminology for mass transport and exchange

    PubMed Central

    BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, J. B.; CHINARD, F. P.; CRONE, C.; GORESKY, C. A.; LASSEN, N. A.; RENEMAN, R. S.; ZIERLER, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers in the physiological, engineering, and physical sciences. The goal is to provide a setting for quantitative descriptions of physiological transport phenomena. PMID:3963211

  9. Imaging Live Cells at the Nanometer-Scale with Single-Molecule Microscopy: Obstacles and Achievements in Experiment Optimization for Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Beth L.; Matson, Jyl S.; DiRita, Victor J.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane. PMID:25123183

  10. Nanometer-scale, quantitative composition mappings of InGaN layers from a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pantzas, K; Patriarche, G; Troadec, D; Gautier, S; Moudakir, T; Suresh, S; Largeau, L; Mauguin, O; Voss, P L; Ougazzaden, A

    2012-11-16

    Using elastic scattering theory we show that a small set of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements is sufficient to experimentally evaluate the scattering function of electrons in high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission microscopy (HAADF-STEM). We then demonstrate how to use this function to transform qualitative HAADF-STEM images of InGaN layers into precise, quantitative chemical maps of the indium composition. The maps obtained in this way combine the resolution of HAADF-STEM and the chemical precision of EDX. We illustrate the potential of such chemical maps by using them to investigate nanometer-scale fluctuations in the indium composition and their impact on the growth of epitaxial InGaN layers.

  11. Direct observation of nanometer-scale strain field around CoSi{sub 2}/Si interface using scanning moiré fringe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun; Jung, Younheum; Jung Kim, Joong; Byun, Gwangseon; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Heabum

    2014-04-21

    We report the use of scanning moiré fringe (SMF) imaging through high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to measure the strain field around a CoSi{sub 2} contact embedded in the source and drain (S/D) region of a transistor. The atomic arrangement of the CoSi{sub 2}/Si (111) interface was determined from the high-resolution (HR)-STEM images, and the strain field formed around the S/D region was revealed by nanometer-scale SMFs appearing in the STEM image. In addition, we showed that the strain field in the S/D region measured by SMF imaging agreed with results obtained via peak-pairs analysis of HR-STEM images.

  12. Mass and momentum turbulent transport experiments with confined coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of coaxial jets discharging into an expanded circular duct was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two components of velocity data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two-color LV system. A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with laser velocimeter (LV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems.

  13. Cooper-pair insulator phase in superconducting amorphous Bi films induced by nanometer-scale thickness variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollen, S. M.; Nguyen, H. Q.; Rudisaile, E.; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Shainline, J.; Xu, J. M.; Valles, J. M., Jr.

    2011-08-01

    Ultrathin films near the quantum insulator-superconductor transition (IST) can exhibit Cooper-pair transport in their insulating state. This Cooper-pair insulator (CPI) state is achieved in amorphous Bi films evaporated onto substrates with a topography varying on lengths slightly greater than the superconducting coherence length. We present evidence that this topography induces film thickness and corresponding superconducting coupling constant variations that promote Cooper-pair island formation. Analyses of many thickness-tuned ISTs show that weak links between superconducting islands dominate the transport. In particular, the IST occurs when the link resistance approaches the resistance quantum for pairs. These results support conjectures that the CPI is an inhomogeneous state of matter.

  14. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    The downstream mixing of coaxial jets discharging in an expanded duct was studied to improve turbulent transport models which are used in computational procedures throughout the propulsion community for combustor flow modeling. Laser velocimeter (LV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques were used to measure velocities and concentration and flow visualization techniques to determine the time dependent characteristics of the flow and the scale of the turbulent structure.

  15. Mass Transportation Operators' Beliefs about Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Pamela A.

    2001-01-01

    A study investigated 171 mass transit operators' beliefs about blindness and the factors that may influence their beliefs. There were statistically significant differences among transit operators' beliefs on the basis of the operators' ethnicity. White participants had significantly fewer irrational beliefs about blindness than Hispanic and…

  16. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  17. Dynamics of a surface-modified miniaturized SiN mechanical resonator via a nanometer-scale pore array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Joong; Cho, Myung Rae; Kim, Seunghwan; Park, Yun Daniel; Kouh, Taejoon

    2016-05-01

    We have fabricated porous miniaturized SiN resonators with various dimensions and studied their mechanical dynamics at their resonant modes. The surface modification of the resonators has been achieved by etching through a thin porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mask, prepared by two-step anodization. Even though these porous resonators show well-defined Lorentzian line-shapes at their resonant modes, the corresponding fundamental flexural resonance frequencies are lower than those from typical non-porous resonators. The change in the resonance frequency is due to the presence of the pores on the surface, which reduces the effective tensile stress across the beam structure, as shown from both experimental measurements and the computational model. In addition, the observed quality factor reveals the level of dissipation originating from the surface modification. The principal dissipation mechanism is found to be gas damping in the free molecular flow regime. Based on the dissipation measurement, one can see an increase in the surface-to-mass ratio, which is responsible for the increased dissipation in the porous beam structure. The work presented here demonstrates simple integration of mechanical elements with a nanopatterning technique based on an AAO as well as the tuning of mechanics via surface modification at a small scale. Such a scheme could provide an additional degree of freedom in developing a mechanical sensing element with enhanced effective surface area.

  18. Intrinsic Halide Segregation at Nanometer Scale Determines the High Efficiency of Mixed Cation/Mixed Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Gratia, Paul; Grancini, Giulia; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Jeanbourquin, Xavier; Mosconi, Edoardo; Zimmermann, Iwan; Dowsett, David; Lee, Yonghui; Grätzel, Michael; De Angelis, Filippo; Sivula, Kevin; Wirtz, Tom; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-12-14

    Compositional engineering of a mixed cation/mixed halide perovskite in the form of (FAPbI3)0.85(MAPbBr3)0.15 is one of the most effective strategies to obtain record-efficiency perovskite solar cells. However, the perovskite self-organization upon crystallization and the final elemental distribution, which are paramount for device optimization, are still poorly understood. Here we map the nanoscale charge carrier and elemental distribution of mixed perovskite films yielding 20% efficient devices. Combining a novel in-house-developed high-resolution helium ion microscope coupled with a secondary ion mass spectrometer (HIM-SIMS) with Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), we demonstrate that part of the mixed perovskite film intrinsically segregates into iodide-rich perovskite nanodomains on a length scale of up to a few hundred nanometers. Thus, the homogeneity of the film is disrupted, leading to a variation in the optical properties at the micrometer scale. Our results provide unprecedented understanding of the nanoscale perovskite composition.

  19. Dynamics of a surface-modified miniaturized SiN mechanical resonator via a nanometer-scale pore array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Joong; Cho, Myung Rae; Kim, Seunghwan; Park, Yun Daniel; Kouh, Taejoon

    2016-05-13

    We have fabricated porous miniaturized SiN resonators with various dimensions and studied their mechanical dynamics at their resonant modes. The surface modification of the resonators has been achieved by etching through a thin porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mask, prepared by two-step anodization. Even though these porous resonators show well-defined Lorentzian line-shapes at their resonant modes, the corresponding fundamental flexural resonance frequencies are lower than those from typical non-porous resonators. The change in the resonance frequency is due to the presence of the pores on the surface, which reduces the effective tensile stress across the beam structure, as shown from both experimental measurements and the computational model. In addition, the observed quality factor reveals the level of dissipation originating from the surface modification. The principal dissipation mechanism is found to be gas damping in the free molecular flow regime. Based on the dissipation measurement, one can see an increase in the surface-to-mass ratio, which is responsible for the increased dissipation in the porous beam structure. The work presented here demonstrates simple integration of mechanical elements with a nanopatterning technique based on an AAO as well as the tuning of mechanics via surface modification at a small scale. Such a scheme could provide an additional degree of freedom in developing a mechanical sensing element with enhanced effective surface area.

  20. Non-Fickian mass transport in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Chugunov, Vladimir A.; Hashida, Toshiyuki

    2011-02-01

    The paper provides an introduction to fundamental concepts of mathematical modeling of mass transport in fractured porous heterogeneous rocks. Keeping aside many important factors that can affect mass transport in subsurface, our main concern is the multi-scale character of the rock formation, which is constituted by porous domains dissected by the network of fractures. Taking into account the well-documented fact that porous rocks can be considered as a fractal medium and assuming that sizes of pores vary significantly (i.e. have different characteristic scales), the fractional-order differential equations that model the anomalous diffusive mass transport in such type of domains are derived and justified analytically. Analytical solutions of some particular problems of anomalous diffusion in the fractal media of various geometries are obtained. Extending this approach to more complex situation when diffusion is accompanied by advection, solute transport in a fractured porous medium is modeled by the advection-dispersion equation with fractional time derivative. In the case of confined fractured porous aquifer, accounting for anomalous non-Fickian diffusion in the surrounding rock mass, the adopted approach leads to introduction of an additional fractional time derivative in the equation for solute transport. The closed-form solutions for concentrations in the aquifer and surrounding rocks are obtained for the arbitrary time-dependent source of contamination located in the inlet of the aquifer. Based on these solutions, different regimes of contamination of the aquifers with different physical properties can be readily modeled and analyzed.

  1. Optical Field-Induced Mass Transport in Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teteris, J.; Reinfelde, M.; Aleksejeva, J.; Gertners, U.

    The dependence of the surface relief formation in amorphous chalcogenide (As2S3 and As-S-Se) and Disperse Red 1 dye grafted polyurethane polymer films on the polarization state of holographic recording light beams was studied. It is shown that the direction of lateral mass transport on the film surface is determined by the direction of light electric vector and photoinduced anisotropy in the film. We propose a photoinduced dielectropfhoretic model to explain the photoinduced mass transport in amorphous films. Model is based on the photoinduced softening of the matrix, formation of defects with enhanced or decreased polarizability, and their drift under the electrical field gradient of light.

  2. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments with Confined Coaxial Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Downstream mixing of coaxial jets discharging in an expanded duct was studied to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the propulsion community for combustor flow modeling. Flow visualization studies showed four major shear regions occurring; a wake region immediately downstream of the inlet jet inlet duct; a shear region further downstream between the inner and annular jets; a recirculation zone; and a reattachment zone. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two velocity component data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two color laser velocimeter (LV) system. Axial, radial and azimuthal velocities and turbulent momentum transport rate measurements in the r-z and r-theta planes were used to determine the mean value, second central moment (or rms fluctuation from mean), skewness and kurtosis for each data set probability density function (p.d.f.). A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data were obtained system. Velocity and mass transport in all three directions as well as concentration distributions were used to obtain the mean, second central moments, skewness and kurtosis for each p.d.f. These LV/LIF measurements also exposed the existence of a large region of countergradient turbulent axial mass transport in the region where the annular jet fluid was accelerating the inner jet fluid.

  3. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  4. Inexpensive read-out for coincident electron spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope at nanometer scale using micro channel plates and multistrip anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollander, R. W.; Bom, V. R.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Faber, J. S.; Hoevers, H.; Kruit, P.

    1994-09-01

    The elemental composition of a sample at nanometer scale is determined by measurement of the characteristic energy of Auger electrons, emitted in coincidence with incoming primary electrons from a microbeam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Single electrons are detected with position sensitive detectors, consisting of MicroChannel Plates (MCP) and MultiStrip Anodes (MSA), one for the energy of the Auger electrons (Auger-detector) and one for the energy loss of primary electrons (EELS-detector). The MSAs are sensed with LeCroy 2735DC preamplifiers. The fast readout is based on LeCroy's PCOS III system. On the detection of a coincidence (Event) energy data of Auger and EELS are combined with timing data to an Event word. Event words are stored in list mode in a VME memory module. Blocks of Event words are scanned by transputers in VME and two-dimensional energy histograms are filled using the timing information to obtain a maximal true/accidental ratio. The resulting histograms are stored on disk of a PC-386, which also controls data taking. The system is designed to handle 10 5 Events per second, 90% of which are accidental. In the histograms the "true" to "accidental" ratio will be 5. The dead time is 15%.

  5. Real-time ellipsometric modeling and characterization of the evolution of nanometer-scale Ge islands and pits in Ge homoepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, Housei

    2009-11-01

    Nanometer-scale Ge islands and pits are self-organized during GeH4 vacuum-ultraviolet-excited chemical vapor deposition on a Ge(001) substrate. We carried out simulation and fitting on real-time ellipsometric Ψ -Δ trajectories that reflect undergoing changes in the surface morphology. The islanded Ge epitaxial layer was optically represented by multiple stacked slabs with linearly varying graded indices from the bottom to the top of the islands. The dielectric function of each slab was calculated by mixing the dielectric functions of Ge with that of voids under Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The only model that could reproduce the roughening Ψ -Δ trajectory was preferential nucleation of Ge on the top surface of truncated pyramidal islands after almost 100% of the initial surface had been wet. The smoothing section was consistent with the model assuming nucleation on the sidewalls of islands as well as on the top surface, which led to simultaneous deepening and narrowing of the valleys or pits between the islands. This smoothing model was supported by atomic force microscopy images.

  6. Mass transfer and transport in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.; Ahn, J.; Kajiwara, S.; Kim, C.L.; Kimura, H.; Lung, H.; Williams, W.J.; Zavoshy, S.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report is in a continuing series of reports that present analytic solutions for the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides from geologic repositories of nuclear waste. Previous reports have dealt mainly with radionuclide transport in the far-field, away from the effects of the repository. In the present report, the emphasis is on near-field processes, the transfer and transport of radionuclides in the vicinity of the waste packages. The primary tool used in these analyses is mass transfer theory from chemical engineering. The thrust of our work is to develop methods for predicting the performance of geologic repositories. The subjects treated in the present report are: radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill; analysis of radionuclide transport through a backfill using a non-linear sorption isotherm; radionuclide transport from a prolate spheroid-equivalent waste form with a backfill; radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill, where the solubility, diffusivity and retardation coefficients are temperature dependent; a coupled near-field, far-field analysis where dissolution and migration rates are temperature dependent; transport of radionuclides from a point source in a three-dimensional flow field; and a general solution for the transport of radioactive chains in geologic media. There are several important results from the numerical evaluations. First, radioactive decay, higher sorption in the rock and the backfill steepens the gradient for mass transfer, and lead to higher dissolution rates. This is contrary to what was expected by some other workers, but is shown clearly in the analytical solutions. Second, the backfill serves to provide sorption sites so that there is a delay in the arrival of radionuclides in the rock, although this effect is not so important for the steady-state transport of long-lived radionuclides.

  7. Degree-1 Surface Mass Transport and Geocenter Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The longest-wavelength and hemisphere asymmetric surface mass transport is characterized by three degree-one spherical harmonic components. Such mass transport modes cause geocenter motion between the center-of-mass of the total Earth system (CM) and the center-of-figure of the solid Earth surface (CF), and deforms the solid Earth. GRACE's K-band ranging data system is not sensitive to these three variation modes. For a complete spherical harmonic spectral coverage of mass transport, degree-1 surface mass changes estimated through geocenter motion or degree-1 mass/deformation signatures from other space geodetic techniques should be combined with GRACE's time-variable gravity data. The degree-1 coefficients are critically important for mass variation assessments over large regions. For example, 1 mm error in geocenter motion can result in an error of 190 gigatons of global oceanic water mass change or, equivalently, an error of 0.5 mm of global mean sea level change when the geocenter motion is converted to degree-1 mass and combined with GRACE data. Yet, several different methods of geocenter motion estimation differ in results by more than 1 mm in annual amplitude. These differences have to be resolved after 13 years of successful GRACE operation. Recently, the difference between results from direct satellite laser ranging (SLR) determination and from a global inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) deformation measurements, GRACE, and an ocean bottom pressure (OBP) model has been largely reconciled as due to SLR's sparse station distribution. This result and our current efforts to examine possible systematic errors in GNSS data and the OBP model will be discussed along with a future perspective.

  8. Mass Transport Through Carbon Nanotube-Polystyrene Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Rongzhou; Tran, Tuan

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely used as test channels to study nanofluidic transport, which has been found to have distinctive properties compared to transport of fluids in macroscopic channels. A long-standing challenge in the study of mass transport through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is the determination of flow enhancement. Various experimental investigations have been conducted to measure the flow rate through CNTs, mainly based on either vertically aligned CNT membranes or individual CNTs. Here, we proposed an alternative approach that can be used to quantify the mass transport through CNTs. This is a simple method relying on the use of carbon nanotube-polystyrene bundles, which are made of CNTs pulled out from a vertically aligned CNT array and glued together by polystyrene. We experimentally showed by using fluorescent tagging that the composite bundles allowed measureable and selective mass transport through CNTs. This type of composite bundle may be useful in various CNT research areas as they are simple to fabricate, less likely to form macroscopic cracks, and offer a high density of CNT pores while maintaining the aligned morphology of CNTs.

  9. Mass transport mechanism in porous fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, I.; Lindholm, I.

    1969-01-01

    Results of experiments on hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells show that higher current densities are obtained with cell anodes having a 100 micron thin active layer of porous nickel containing silver electrocatalyst. Increase in current density is attributed to a convective mass transport mechanism.

  10. Engineering Near-Field Transport of Energy using Nanostructured Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-12

    applications. Recent computational studies on near-field radiative heat transfer (NFRHT) suggest that radiative energy transport between suitably chosen...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Engineering Near-Field Transport of Energy using Nanostructured Materials The views...Engineering Near-Field Transport of Energy using Nanostructured Materials Report Title The transport of heat at the nanometer scale is becoming

  11. Optimal Mass Transport for Shape Matching and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n2) to O(n). For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  12. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach.

  13. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-11-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimensional transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  14. Area-preservation mapping using optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Su, Zhengyu; Gu, Xianfeng David; Kaufman, Arie; Sun, Jian; Gao, Jie; Luo, Feng

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel area-preservation mapping/flattening method using the optimal mass transport technique, based on the Monge-Brenier theory. Our optimal transport map approach is rigorous and solid in theory, efficient and parallel in computation, yet general for various applications. By comparison with the conventional Monge-Kantorovich approach, our method reduces the number of variables from O(n2) to O(n), and converts the optimal mass transport problem to a convex optimization problem, which can now be efficiently carried out by Newton's method. Furthermore, our framework includes the area weighting strategy that enables users to completely control and adjust the size of areas everywhere in an accurate and quantitative way. Our method significantly reduces the complexity of the problem, and improves the efficiency, flexibility and scalability during visualization. Our framework, by combining conformal mapping and optimal mass transport mapping, serves as a powerful tool for a broad range of applications in visualization and graphics, especially for medical imaging. We provide a variety of experimental results to demonstrate the efficiency, robustness and efficacy of our novel framework.

  15. Demonstrating the influence of compression on artery wall mass transport.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Barry M; Walsh, Michael T

    2010-04-01

    The development of restenosis within the coronary arteries after a stenting procedure has been addressed with the development of the drug eluting stent device. However, in recent times the superiority of the drug eluting stent over bare metal stents has been brought into question. A lack of knowledge regarding the behavior of drug transport from the drug eluting devices contributes to this uncertainty. Questions arise as to whether drug eluting stents deliver sufficient amounts of therapeutic agents into the artery wall to suppress restenosis. Published investigations in this area have focused primarily on trends associated with how variations in stenting conditions affect mass transport behavior. However, experimentally validated numerical models that simulate mass transport within the artery wall are lacking. A novel experimental model was developed to validate computational predictions of species diffusion into a porous medium and an investigation into how stent strut compression influences mass transport was conducted. The study revealed that increased compressive forces on a porous media reduced the ability of species to diffuse through that media, and in relation to drug eluting stents will contribute to a reduction in therapeutic levels of drugs within the wall.

  16. Optimal Filtering in Mass Transport Modeling From Satellite Gravimetry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, P.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Klees, R.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring natural mass transport in the Earth's system, which has marked a new era in Earth observation, is largely based on the data collected by the GRACE satellite mission. Unfortunately, this mission is not free from certain limitations, two of which are especially critical. Firstly, its sensitivity is strongly anisotropic: it senses the north-south component of the mass re-distribution gradient much better than the east-west component. Secondly, it suffers from a trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution: a high (e.g., daily) temporal resolution is only possible if the spatial resolution is sacrificed. To make things even worse, the GRACE satellites enter occasionally a phase when their orbit is characterized by a short repeat period, which makes it impossible to reach a high spatial resolution at all. A way to mitigate limitations of GRACE measurements is to design optimal data processing procedures, so that all available information is fully exploited when modeling mass transport. This implies, in particular, that an unconstrained model directly derived from satellite gravimetry data needs to be optimally filtered. In principle, this can be realized with a Wiener filter, which is built on the basis of covariance matrices of noise and signal. In practice, however, a compilation of both matrices (and, therefore, of the filter itself) is not a trivial task. To build the covariance matrix of noise in a mass transport model, it is necessary to start from a realistic model of noise in the level-1B data. Furthermore, a routine satellite gravimetry data processing includes, in particular, the subtraction of nuisance signals (for instance, associated with atmosphere and ocean), for which appropriate background models are used. Such models are not error-free, which has to be taken into account when the noise covariance matrix is constructed. In addition, both signal and noise covariance matrices depend on the type of mass transport processes under

  17. Mass Transport and Shear Stress in the Carotid Artery Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading sites for atherosclerosis, a major cause of death and disability in the developed world. The specific processes by which the complex flow found at the bifurcation and carotid sinus promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered key factors. Although the governing equations closely link shear stress and mass transfer, the pulsatile, transitional, and detached flow found at the CAB can lead to differences between regions of WSS and mass transfer statistics. In this study, CAB geometries are reconstructed from patient specific 3D ultrasound medical imaging. Using ANSYS FLUENT, the fluid flow and scalar transport was solved using realistic flow conditions and various mass transfer boundary conditions. The spatial and temporal resolution was validated against the analytical solution of the Graetz-Nusselt problem with constant wall flux to ensure the scalar transport is resolved for a Peclet number up to 100,000. High residence time regions are investigated by determining the number of cardiac cycles required to flush out the carotid sinus. The correlations between regions of low WSS, high OSI, and scalar concentration are computed and interpreted in the context of atherosclerotic plaque origin and progression.

  18. Modelling aeolian sand transport using a dynamic mass balancing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Weaver, Corinne M.

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. Whilst many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing field evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. At this scale of analysis, inertia in the saltation system causes changes in sediment transport to lag behind de/accelerations in flow. However, saltation inertia has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study, we present a new transport model that dynamically balances the sand mass being transported in the wind flow. The 'dynamic mass balance' (DMB) model we present accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) component of wind flow, as saltation is most strongly associated with the positive u component of the wind. The performance of the DMB model is tested by fitting it to two field-derived (Namibia's Skeleton Coast) datasets of wind velocity and sediment transport: (i) a 10-min (10 Hz measurement resolution) dataset; (ii) a 2-h (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset. The DMB model is shown to outperform two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (e.g. Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003), when predicting sand transport over the two experiments. For all measurement averaging intervals presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the DMB model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.48%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The DMB model also produced more realistic (less 'peaky') time series of sand flux than the other two models, and a more accurate distribution of sand flux data. The best predictions of total sand transport are achieved using

  19. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications. PMID:25622949

  20. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.

  1. Miocene mass-transport sediments, Troodos Massif, Cyprus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lord, A.R.; Harrison, R.W.; BouDagher-Fadel, M.; Stone, B.D.; Varol, O.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment mass-transport layers of submarine origin on the northern and southern flanks of the Troodos ophiolitic massif are dated biostratigraphically as early Miocene and late Miocene, respectively and therefore represent different seismogenic events in the uplift and erosional history of the Troodos terrane. Analysis of such events has potential for documenting Miocene seismic and uplift events regionally in the context of changing stress field directions and plate vectors through time. ?? 2009 The Geologists' Association.

  2. Photo-induced Mass Transport through Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yuan; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2014-03-01

    Among adaptable materials, photo-responsive polymers are especially attractive as they allow for spatiotemporal stimuli and response. We have recently developed a macromolecular network capable of photo-induced mass transport of covalently bound species. The system comprises of crosslinked chains that form an elastic network and photosensitive fluorescent arms that become mobile upon irradiation. We form loosely crosslinked polymer networks by Michael-Addition between multifunctional thiols and small molecule containing acrylate end-groups. The arms are connected to the network by allyl sulfide, that undergoes addition-fragmentation chain transfer (AFCT) in the presence of free radicals, releasing diffusible fluorophore. The networks are loaded with photoinitiator to allow for spatial modulation of the AFCT reactions. FRAP experiments within bulk elastomers are conducted to establish correlations between the fluorophore's diffusion coefficient and experimental variables such as network architecture, temperature and UV intensity. Photo-induced mass transport between two contacted films is demonstrated, and release of fluorophore into a solvent is investigated. Spatial and temporal control of mass transport could benefit drug release, printing, and sensing applications.

  3. STM tip-mediated mass transport on Cu surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. S. N.; Huang, R. Z.; Gao, T. F.; Zhang, R. J.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-02-01

    Atomic-scale simulations are performed to study atomic motion on Cu surfaces to illustrate the effect of the scanning tunneling microscopy tip on mass transport (MT) in the surfaces and on top of the Co island in heteroepitaxial Co/Cu(0 0 1) and Co/Cu(1 1 1) systems. First we investigate tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu(0 0 1) surface at zero bias voltage. With the help of the tip, the Co atom in the surface can freely diffuse toward its nearby vacancy site. So-called vacancy mechanism is used to interpret this phenomenon. Then tip-mediated atomic motion of Co adatoms on the Co islands supported by a Cu(1 1 1) surface is studied. It is revealed that the tip has a significant effect on the diffusion of adatoms on the islands and interlayer mass transport at the island edge. Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. By calculating the diffusion barriers, it is found that the jumping diffusion barrier on the island can be zero by the tip vertical manipulation while the Ehrlich-Schwoebel diffusion barrier at the island edge can be reduced by the tip lateral manipulation. Thus, the quality of thin films can be improved by controlling MT in and/or on the surface.

  4. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  5. Transport phenomena of crystal growth—heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Selected fundamentals of transport processes and their importance for crystal growth are given. First, principal parameters and equations of heat and mass transfer, like thermal flux, radiation and diffusion are introduced. The heat- and mass- balanced melt-solid and solution-solid interface velocities are derived, respectively. The today's significance of global numeric simulation for analysis of thermo-mechanical stress and related dislocation dynamics within the growing crystal is shown. The relation between diffusion and kinetic regime is discussed. Then, thermal and solutal buoyancy-driven and Marangoni convections are introduced. Their important interplay with the diffusion boundary layer, component and particle incorporation as well as morphological interface stability is demonstrated. Non-steady crystallization phenomena (striations) caused by convective fluctuations are considered. Selected results of global 3D numeric modeling are shown. Finally, advanced methods to control heat and mass transfer by external forces, such as accelerated container rotation, ultrasonic vibration and magnetic fields are discussed.

  6. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  7. Updated Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2: computation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Ditmar, Pavel; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Guo, Jing; Guo, Xiang; Liu, Xianglin; Zhao, Qile; Didova, Olga; Ran, Jiangjun; Sun, Yu; Tangdamrongsub, Natthachet; Gunter, Brian; Riva, Ricardo; Steele-Dunne, Susan

    2014-05-01

    A number of research centers compute models of mass transport in the Earth's system using primarily K-Band Ranging (KBR) data from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. These models typically consist of a time series of monthly solutions, each of which is defined in terms of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 60-120. One of such models, the Delft Mass Transport, release 2 (DMT-2), is computed at the Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) in collaboration with Wuhan University. An updated variant of this model has been produced recently. A unique feature of the computational scheme designed to compute DMT-2 is the preparation of an accurate stochastic description of data noise in the frequency domain using an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) model, which is derived for each particular month. The benefits of such an approach are a proper frequency-dependent data weighting in the data inversion and an accurate variance-covariance matrix of noise in the estimated spherical harmonic coefficients. Furthermore, the data prior to the inversion are subject to an advanced high-pass filtering, which makes use of a spatially-dependent weighting scheme, so that noise is primarily estimated on the basis of data collected over areas with minor mass transport signals (e.g., oceans). On the one hand, this procedure efficiently suppresses noise, which are caused by inaccuracies in satellite orbits and, on the other hand, preserves mass transport signals in the data. Finally, the unconstrained monthly solutions are filtered using a Wiener filter, which is based on estimates of the signal and noise variance-covariance matrices. In combination with a proper data weighting, this noticeably improves the spatial resolution of the monthly gravity models and the associated mass transport models.. For instance, the computed solutions allow long-term negative trends to be clearly seen in sufficiently small regions notorious

  8. Mass-transport processes at the steel-enamel interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Jha, A.; Cochrane, R. C.; Ali, S.

    2006-02-01

    Mass-transport processes at the enamel-steel interface were investigated by studying the rheological properties of the enamel and the microstructure of the enamel-steel interface. The thermophysical properties, e.g., the viscosity and spreading behavior of enamel were measured using the rotating bob and the sessile drop techniques, respectively. The results show that the viscosity of the enamel decreases sharply as the FeO concentration increases from 0 to 25 wt pct, while the contact angle changes with the increasing thickness of the NiO precoat. Microstructural characterization also revealed evidence for the presence of an interfacial gradient force (more specifically referred to as the Marangoni convection) confined within the 0- to 80-µm thickness at the enamel-steel interface. This force is responsible for a convective flow, which determines the formation of flow striae at the interface. The striae act as a sink for evolved gases and provide transport away from the enamel-steel interface. In addition, experimental simulation of Marangoni convection (interfacial-gradient force) was carried out by selectively doping the steel surface with excess Fe2O3 powder. The presence of convection flow was confirmed by analyzing the pattern of iron oxide particles dispersed across the surrounding enamel layers. Based on the microstructural characterization and the thermophysical data, we propose a mechanism for mass transport at the glass-steel interface.

  9. The effect of flow and mass transport in thrombogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, D

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical analysis of the contributions of flow and mass transport to a single reactive event at a blood vessel wall. The intent is to prepare the ground for a comprehensive study of the intertwining of these contributions with the reaction network of the coagulation cascade. We show that in all vessels with local mural activity, or in "large" vessels (d greater than 0.1 mm) with global reactivity, events at the tubular wall can be rigorously described by algebraic equations under steady conditions, or by ordinary differential forms (ODEs) during transient conditions. This opens up important ways for analyzing the combined roles of flow, transport, and coagulation reactions in thrombosis, a task hitherto considered to be completely intractable. We report extensively on the dependence of transport coefficient kL and mural coagulant concentration Cw on flow, vessel geometry, and reaction kinetics. It is shown that for protein transport, kL varies only weakly with shear rate gamma in large vessels, and not at all in the smaller tubes (d less than 10(-2) mm). For a typical protein, kL approximately 10(-3) cm s-1 within a factor of 3 in most geometries, irrespective of the mural reaction kinetics. Significant reductions in kL (1/10-1/1,000) leading to high-coagulant accumulation are seen mainly in stagnant zones vicinal to abrupt expansions and in small elliptical tubules. This is in accord with known physical observations. More unexpected are the dramatic increases in accumulation which can come about through the intervention of an autocatalytic reaction step, with Cw rising sharply toward infinity as the ratio of reaction to transport coefficient approaches unity. Such self-catalyzed reactions have the ability to act as powerful amplifiers of an otherwise modest influence of flow and transport on coagulant concentration. The paper considers as well the effect on mass transport of transient conditions occasioned by coagulation initiation or

  10. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; ...

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  11. Engineering Synergy: Energy and Mass Transport in Hybrid Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Seon; Coates, Nelson E; Forster, Jason D; Ruminski, Anne M; Russ, Boris; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Su, Norman C; Yang, Fan; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-14

    An emerging class of materials that are hybrid in nature is propelling a technological revolution in energy, touching many fundamental aspects of energy-generation, storage, and conservation. Hybrid materials combine classical inorganic and organic components to yield materials that manifest new functionalities unattainable in traditional composites or other related multicomponent materials, which have additive function only. This Research News article highlights the exciting materials design innovations that hybrid materials enable, with an eye toward energy-relevant applications involving charge, heat, and mass transport.

  12. Mass transport of adsorbates near a discontinuous structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, E.; Ying, S. C.; Elder, K. R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the mass transport dynamics of an adsorbed layer near a discontinuous incommensurate striped-honeycomb phase transition via numerical simulations of a coarse-grained model focusing on the motion of domain walls rather than individual atoms. Following an initial step profile created in the incommensurate striped phase, an intermediate hexagonal incommensurate phase nucleates and grows, leading to a bifurcation into two sharp profiles propagating in opposite directions as opposed to broad profiles induced by atomic diffusive motion. Our results are in agreement with recent numerical simulations of a microscopic model as well as experimental observations for the Pb/Si(111) adsorbate system.

  13. Experimental Studies on Mass Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental studies on mass transport of ternary compound, Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te by physical vapor transport (PVT) for source compositions up to X = 0.21 are presented. The effect of thermochemical (temperatures, vapor composition) and other factors (preparation of the source, crystal growth rate, temperature gradient) on composition and composition profiles of the grown crystals were investigated. A steep decrease in the mass flux with an increase in X(crystal) for X less than 0.1, and a difference in composition between the source and the deposited material have been observed. The composition profiles of the crystals were found to depend on the density and pretreatment of the source, and on the temperature gradient in the source zone. The homogeneity of the crystals improves at low undercoolings and/or when an appropriate excess of metal constituents is present in the vapor phase. The experimental results are in good agreement with our thermochemical model of this system.

  14. Angular momentum transport within evolved low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Mankovich, Christopher; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2014-06-10

    Asteroseismology of 1.0-2.0 M {sub ☉} red giants by the Kepler satellite has enabled the first definitive measurements of interior rotation in both first ascent red giant branch (RGB) stars and those on the helium burning clump. The inferred rotation rates are 10-30 days for the ≈0.2 M {sub ☉} He degenerate cores on the RGB and 30-100 days for the He burning core in a clump star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Evolution code, we calculate state-of-the-art stellar evolution models of low mass rotating stars from the zero-age main sequence to the cooling white dwarf (WD) stage. We include transport of angular momentum due to rotationally induced instabilities and circulations, as well as magnetic fields in radiative zones (generated by the Tayler-Spruit dynamo). We find that all models fail to predict core rotation as slow as observed on the RGB and during core He burning, implying that an unmodeled angular momentum transport process must be operating on the early RGB of low mass stars. Later evolution of the star from the He burning clump to the cooling WD phase appears to be at nearly constant core angular momentum. We also incorporate the adiabatic pulsation code, ADIPLS, to explicitly highlight this shortfall when applied to a specific Kepler asteroseismic target, KIC8366239.

  15. Mass Flux of ZnSe by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sha, Yi-Gao; Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Liu, Hao-Chieh; Brebrick, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Mass fluxes of ZnSe by physical vapor transport (PVT) were measured in the temperature range of 1050 to 1160 C using an in-situ dynamic technique. The starting materials were either baked out or distilled under vacuum to obtain near-congruently subliming compositions. Using an optical absorption technique Zn and Se, were found to be the dominant vapor species. Partial pressures of Zn and Se, over the starting materials at temperatures between 960 and 1140 C were obtained by measuring the optical densities of the vapor phase at the wavelengths of 2138, 3405, 3508, 3613, and 3792 A. The amount and composition of the residual gas inside the experimental ampoules were measured after the run using a total pressure gauge. For the first time, the experimentally determined partial pressures of Zn and Se, and the amount and composition of the residual gas were used in a one-dimensional diffusion limited analysis of the mass transport rates for a PVT system. Reasonable agreement between the experimental and theoretical results was observed.

  16. Sub-nanometer-scale measurements of the interaction of ultrafast soft x-ray free-electron-laser pulses with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S; Chapman, H; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; London, R; Bionta, R; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Nietubyc, R; Juha, L; Kuba, J; Bajt, S; Spiller, E; Baker, S; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Gullikson, E; Tschentscher, T; Plonjes, E; Toleikis, S

    2006-08-02

    Femtosecond pulses from soft-x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) [1] are ideal for directly probing matter at atomic length scales and timescales of atomic motion. An important component of understanding ultrafast phenomena of light-matter interactions is concerned with the onset of atomic motion which is impeded by the atoms inertia. This delay of structural changes will enable atomic-resolution flash-imaging [2-3] to be performed at upcoming x-ray FELs [4-5] with pulses intense enough to record the x-ray scattering from single molecules [6]. We explored this ultrafast high-intensity regime with the FLASH soft-x-ray FEL [7-8] by measuring the reflectance of nanostructured multilayer mirrors using pulses with fluences far in excess of the mirrors damage threshold. Even though the nanostructures were ultimately completely destroyed, we found that they maintained their integrity and reflectance characteristics during the 25-fs-long pulse, with no evidence for any structural changes during that time over lengths greater than 3 {angstrom}. In the recently built FLASH FEL [7], x-rays are produced from short electron pulses oscillating in a periodic magnet array, called an undulator, by the principle of self-amplification of spontaneous emission [9-10]. The laser quality of the x-ray pulses can be quantified by the peak spectral brilliance of the source, which is 10{sup 28} photons/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1% bandwidth) [8]; this is up to seven orders of magnitude higher than modern third-generation synchrotron sources. For our studies, the machine operated with pulses of 25 fs duration at a wavelength of 32.5 nm and energies up to 21 {micro}J. We focused these pulses to 3 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} onto our nanostructured samples, resulting in an the unprecedented heating rate of 5 x 10{sup 18} K/s, while probing the irradiated structures at the nanometer length scale. The x-ray reflectivity of periodic nanometer-scale multilayers [11] is very sensitive to changes in the atomic

  17. Self-oscillating surface of gel for autonomous mass transport.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryo; Murase, Yoko

    2012-11-01

    As a novel biomimetic gels deffering from conventonal stimuli-responsive polymer gels, we have developed a "self-oscillating" gel that swells and deswells periodically under constant condition without on-off switching of external stimuli. The gel is composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to which the catalyst of the oscillating chemical reaction, called Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, is covalently immobilized. The chemical oscillation is converted to the mechanical oscillation of the gel through the change in hydrophilicity of polymer chains with the redox changes of the immobilized catalyst. By utilizing the self-oscillating gel, several kinds of functional material systems such as biomimetic actuators, etc. are expected. Here we review a potential application to functional surface to realize autonomous mass-transport by utilizing the peristaltic motion of the gel. With the propagation of the chemical wave, the loaded cargo is autonomously transported on the surface. In order to fabricate the self-driven gel conveyer for a wider use including biomedical applications, the interactions between the self-oscillating gel and the loaded gel cargo were investigated and their influence on the transport phenomena were evaluated.

  18. Mu2e Transport Solenoid Cold-Mass Alignment Issues

    DOE PAGES

    Lopes, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Badgley, K.; ...

    2017-01-05

    The Muon-to-electron conversion experiment (Mu2e) at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation. It is composed of three large superconducting solenoids: the Production Solenoid (PS), the Transport Solenoid (TS) and the Detector Solenoid (DS). The TS is formed by two magnets: TS upstream (TSu) and downstream (TSd). Each has its own cryostat and power supply. Tolerance sensitivity studies of the position and angular alignment of each coil in this magnet system were performed in the past with the objective to demonstrate that the magnet design meets all the field requirements. Furthermore, the alignment of the cold-masses is criticalmore » to maximize the transmission of muons and to avoid possible backgrounds that would reduce the sensitivity of the experiment. Each TS magnet cold-mass can be individually aligned. Here, we discuss implications of the alignment of the TS cold-masses in terms of the displacement of the magnetic center. Consideration of the practical mechanical limits are also presented.« less

  19. Chemistry and mass transport of iodine in containment

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Kress, T.S.; Shockley, W.E.; Daish, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    TRENDS is a computer code for modeling behavior of iodine in containment. It tracks both chemical and physical changes and features such as calculation of radiation dose rates in water pools , radiolysis effects, hydrolysis, and deposition/revaporization on aerosols and structural surfaces. Every attempt has been made to account for all significant processes. Reaction rate constants for iodine hydrolysis and radiolysis were obtained by a variable algorithm that gives values closely modeling experimental data. TRENDS output provides the distribution of iodine in containment and release from containment as a function of time during a severe accident sequence. Initial calculations with TRENDS have shown that the amount of volatile iodine released from containment is sensitive to the value of the liquid-gas (evaporation) mass transport coefficient for I/sub 2/. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  1. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Mass Transport in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Dorado, Boris; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2012-06-26

    In this talk we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of U, O and fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2}. These processes all impact nuclear fuel performance. For example, the formation and retention of fission gas bubbles induce fuel swelling, which leads to mechanical interaction with the clad thereby increasing the probability for clad breach. Alternatively, fission gas can be released from the fuel to the plenum, which increases the pressure on the clad walls and decreases the gap thermal conductivity. The evolution of fuel microstructure features is strongly coupled to diffusion of U vacancies. Since both U and fission gas transport rates vary strongly with the O stoichiometry, it is also important to understand O diffusion. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using DFT techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface, which is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation. Surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting step for diffusion of such bubbles, which is an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials. As expected, the activation energy for surface diffusion is significantly lower than for bulk transport. These results are further discussed in terms of engineering-scale fission gas release models

  2. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Thomas, K.B.

    1994-09-01

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approx}Ph(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Ph, or {approx}DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 {degrees}C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  3. Triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry concept for thyroid transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Aqai, Payam; Fryganas, Christos; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel W F

    2012-08-07

    For the analysis of thyroid transporter ligands, a triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry (BioMS) concept was developed, with the aim at three different analytical objectives: rapid screening of any ligand, confirmation of known ligands in accordance with legislative requirements, and identification of emerging yet unknown ligands. These three purposes share the same biorecognition element, recombinant thyroid transport protein transthyretin (rTTR), and dedicated modes of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). For screening, a rapid and radiolabel-free competitive inhibition MS binding assay was developed with fast ultrahigh performance-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple-quadrupole-MS (UPLC-QqQ-MS) as the readout system. It uses the nonradioactive stable isotopic thyroid hormone (13)C(6)-L-thyroxine as the label of which the binding to rTTR is inhibited by any ligand such as thyroid drugs and thyroid endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). To this end, rTTR is either used in solution or immobilized on paramagnetic microbeads. The concentration-dependent inhibition of the label by the natural thyroid hormone l-thyroxine (T4), as a model analyte, is demonstrated in water at part-per-trillion and in urine at part-per-billion level. For confirmation of identity of known ligands, rTTR was used for bioaffinity purification for confirmation of naturally present free T4 in urine. As a demonstrator for identification of unknown ligands, the same rTTR was used again but in combination with nano-UPLC-quadrupole time-of-flight-MS (nLC-Q-TOF-MS) and urine samples spiked with the model "unknown" EDCs triclosan and tetrabromobisphenol-A. This study highlights the potential of BioMS using one affinity system, both for rapid screening and for confirmation and identification of known and unknown emerging thyroid EDCs.

  4. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, A. C., III; Britt, P. F.; Thomas, K. B.

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors' laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane (approximately Ph(CH2)3Ph, or approximately DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  5. Materials with engineered mesoporosity for programmed mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Dara V.

    Transport in nanostructured materials is of great interest for scientists in various fields, including molecular sequestration, catalysis, artificial photosynthesis and energy storage. This thesis will present work on the transport of molecular and ionic species in mesoporous materials (materials with pore sizes between 2 and 50 nm). Initially, discussion will focus on the synthesis of mesoporous ZnS nanorattles and the size selected mass transport of small molecules through the mesopores. Discussion will then shift of exploration of cation exchange and electroless plating of metals to alter the mesoporous hollow sphere (MHS) materials and properties. The focus of discussion will then shift to the transport of ions into and out of a hierarchically structured gold electrode. Finally, a model gamma-bactiophage was developed to study the electromigration of charged molecules into and out of a confined geometry. A catalytically active biomolecular species was encapsulated within the central cavity of ZnS MHS. Both the activity of the encapsulated enzyme and the size-selective transport through the wall of the MHS were verified through the use of a common fluorogen, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium azide. Additionally, the protection of the enzyme was shown through size-selected blocking of a protease. The mesoporous hollow sphere system introduces size-selectivity to catalyzed chemical reactions; future work may include variations in pore sizes, and pore wall chemical functionalization. The pore size in ZnS mesoporous hollow spheres is controlled between 2.5 and 4.1 nm through swelling of the lyotropic liquid crystal template. The incorporation of a swelling agent is shown to linearly vary the hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase, which templates the mesopores, while allowing the high fidelity synthesis of mesoporous hollow spheres. Fluorescnently labeled ssDNA was utilized as a probe to explore the change in mesopore permeability afforded by the swollen template

  6. Mass and charge transport in arbitrarily shaped microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruus, Henrik; Asger Mortensen, Niels; Okkels, Fridolin; Hoejgaard Olesen, Laurits

    2006-11-01

    We consider laminar flow of incompressible electrolytes in long, straight channels driven by pressure and electro-osmosis. We use a Hilbert space eigenfunction expansion to address the problem of arbitrarily shaped cross sections and obtain general results in linear-response theory for the mass and charge transport coefficients which satisfy Onsager relations [1,2]. In the limit of non-overlapping Debye layers the transport coefficients are simply expressed in terms of parameters of the electrolyte as well as half the hydraulic diameter R=2 A/P with A and P being the cross- sectional area and perimeter, respectively. In particular, we consider the limits of thin non-overlapping as well as strongly overlapping Debye layers, respectively, and calculate the corrections to the hydraulic resistance due to electro- hydrodynamic interactions.[1] N. A. Mortensen, F. Okkels, and H. Bruus, Phys. Rev. E 71, 057301 (2005) [2] N. A. Mortensen, L. H. Olesen, and H. Bruus, New J. Phys. 8, 37 (2006)

  7. Pulsatile flow and mass transport past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Fujioka, Hideki; Suresh, Vinod; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2006-01-01

    The mass transport of a pulsatile free-stream flow past a single circular cylinder is investigated as a building block for an artificial lung device. The free stream far from the cylinder is represented by a time-periodic (sinusoidal) component superimposed on a steady velocity. The dimensionless parameters of interest are the steady Reynolds number (Re), Womersley parameter (α), sinusoidal amplitude (A), and the Schmidt number (Sc). The ranges investigated in this study are 5⩽Re⩽40, 0.25⩽α⩽4, 0.25⩽A⩽0.75, and Sc =1000. A pair of vortices downstream of the cylinder is observed in almost all cases investigated. These vortices oscillate in size and strength as α and A are varied. For α <αc, where αc=0.005A-1.13Re1.33, the vortex is always attached to the cylinder (persistent); while for α >αc, the vortex is attached to the cylinder only during part of a time cycle (intermittent). The time-averaged Sherwood number, Sh̿, is found to be largely influenced by the steady Reynolds number, increasing approximately as Re1/2. For α =0.25, Sh̿ is less than the steady (α =0, A =0) value and decreases with increasing A. For α =2 and α =4, Sh̿ is greater than the steady value and increases with increasing A. These qualitatively opposite effects of pulsatility are discussed in terms of quasisteady versus unsteady transport. The maximum increase over steady transport due to pulsatility varies between 14.4% and 20.9% for Re =10-40, α =4, and A =0.75.

  8. Cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid transport via the glymphatic pathway modeled by optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-03-18

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4min over ∼3h in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins.

  9. Dynamic characterization of external and internal mass transport in heterotrophic biofilms from microsensors measurements.

    PubMed

    Guimerà, Xavier; Dorado, Antonio David; Bonsfills, Anna; Gabriel, Gemma; Gabriel, David; Gamisans, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of mass transport mechanisms in biofilm-based technologies such as biofilters is essential to improve bioreactors performance by preventing mass transport limitation. External and internal mass transport in biofilms was characterized in heterotrophic biofilms grown on a flat plate bioreactor. Mass transport resistance through the liquid-biofilm interphase and diffusion within biofilms were quantified by in situ measurements using microsensors with a high spatial resolution (<50 μm). Experimental conditions were selected using a mathematical procedure based on the Fisher Information Matrix to increase the reliability of experimental data and minimize confidence intervals of estimated mass transport coefficients. The sensitivity of external and internal mass transport resistances to flow conditions within the range of typical fluid velocities over biofilms (Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 7) was assessed. Estimated external mass transfer coefficients at different liquid phase flow velocities showed discrepancies with studies considering laminar conditions in the diffusive boundary layer near the liquid-biofilm interphase. The correlation of effective diffusivity with flow velocities showed that the heterogeneous structure of biofilms defines the transport mechanisms inside biofilms. Internal mass transport was driven by diffusion through cell clusters and aggregates at Re below 2.8. Conversely, mass transport was driven by advection within pores, voids and water channels at Re above 5.6. Between both flow velocities, mass transport occurred by a combination of advection and diffusion. Effective diffusivities estimated at different biofilm densities showed a linear increase of mass transport resistance due to a porosity decrease up to biofilm densities of 50 g VSS·L(-1). Mass transport was strongly limited at higher biofilm densities. Internal mass transport results were used to propose an empirical correlation to assess the effective diffusivity

  10. Pesticide transport with runoff from creeping bentgrass turf: Relationship of pesticide properties to mass transport.

    PubMed

    Rice, Pamela J; Horgan, Brian P; Rittenhouse, Jennifer L

    2010-06-01

    The off-site transport of pesticides with runoff is both an agronomic and environmental concern, resulting from reduced control of target pests in the area of application and contamination of surrounding ecosystems. Experiments were designed to measure the quantity of pesticides in runoff from creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris) turf managed as golf course fairway to gain a better understanding of factors that influence chemical availability and mass transport. Less than 1 to 23% of applied chloropyrifos, flutolanil, mecoprop-p (MCPP), dimethylamine salt of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), or dicamba was measured in edge-of-plot runoff when commercially available pesticide formulations were applied at label rates 23 +/- 9 h prior to simulated precipitation (62 +/- 13 mm). Time differential between hollow tine core cultivation and runoff did not significantly influence runoff volumes or the percentage of applied chemicals transported in the runoff. With the exception of chlorpyrifos, all chemicals of interest were detected in the initial runoff samples and throughout the runoff events. Chemographs of the five pesticides followed trends in agreement with mobility classifications associated with their soil organic carbon partition coefficient (K(OC).) Data collected from the present study provides information on the transport of chemicals with runoff from turf, which can be used in model simulations to predict nonpoint source pollution potentials and estimate ecological risks.

  11. Mass and charge transport in IPMC actuators with fractal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Longfei; Wu, Yucheng; Zhu, Zicai; Li, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) actuators have been attracting a growing interest in extensive applications, which consequently raises the demands on the accuracy of its theoretical modeling. For the last few years, rough landscape of the interface between the electrode and the ionic membrane of IPMC has been well-documented as one of the key elements to ensure a satisfied performance. However, in most of the available work, the interface morphology of IPMC was simplified with structural idealization, which lead to perplexity in the physical interpretation on its interface mechanism. In this paper, the quasi-random rough interface of IPMC was described with fractal dimension and scaling parameters. And the electro-chemical field was modeled by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set. Then, by simulation with Finite Element Method, a comprehensive analysis on he inner mass and charge transportation in IPMC actuators with different fractal interfaces was provided, which may be further adopted to instruct the performance-oriented interface design for ionic electro-active actuators. The results also verified that rough interface can impact the electrical and mechanical response of IPMC, not only from the respect of the real surface increase, but also from mass distribution difference caused by the complexity of the micro profile.

  12. Turbulence and mass-transports in stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, Virendra P.

    Boundary layer (BL) stratocumulus clouds are an important factor in the earth's radiation budget due to their high albedo and low cloud top heights. Continental BL stratocumulus clouds are closely coupled to the diurnal cycle and the turbulence in the BL affecting the surface energy and moisture budgets. In this study the turbulence and mass-transport structures in continental BL stratocumulus clouds are studied using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM)'s Southern Great Plains (SGP) observing facility located at Lamont, Oklahoma. High temporal (4 sec) and spatial (45 m) resolution observations from a vertically pointing 35 GHz cloud Doppler radar were used to obtain the in-cloud vertical velocity probability density function (pdf) in the absence of precipitation size hydrometeors. A total of 70 hours of radar data were analyzed to report half-hourly statistics of vertical velocity variance, skewness, updraft fraction, downdraft and velocity binned mass-flux at five cloud depth normalized levels. The variance showed a general decrease with increase in height in the cloud layer while the skewness is weakly positive in the cloud layer and negative near cloud top. The updraft fraction decreases with height with the decrease mainly occurring in the upper half of the cloud layer. The downdraft fraction increases with decrease in height with the increase being almost linear. The velocity of eddies responsible for maximum mass-transport decreases from of 0.4 ms-1 near cloud base to 0.2 ms-1 near cloud top. The half-hour periods were then classified based on the surface buoyancy flux as stable or unstable and it was found that the variance near cloud top is higher during the stable periods as compared to the unstable periods. Classification was also made based on the cloud depth to BL depth ratio (CBR) being greater or less than 0.3. The variance profile was similar for the classification while the skewness was almost zero during periods with CBR less 0

  13. Mass transport, faceting and behavior of dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, S.; Kashima, T.; Kariya, M.; Yukawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.

    2000-07-01

    The behavior of threading dislocations during mass transport of GaN was investigated in detail by transmission electron microscopy. Mass transport occurred at the surface. Therefore, growing species are supplied from the in-plane direction. The behavior of threading dislocations was found to be strongly affected by the mass transport process as well as the high crystallographic anisotropy of the surface energy of the facets particular to GaN.

  14. Promising approaches to crystallization of macromolecules suppressing the convective mass transport to the growing crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, K. M.; Popov, V. O.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    Conditions of mass transport to growing crystals are important factors that have an impact on the size and quality of macromolecular crystals. The mass transport occurs via two mechanisms — by diffusion and convection. The crystal quality can be influenced by changing (either suppressing or enhancing) the convective mass transport. The review gives an overview and analysis of the published data on different methods of macromolecular crystallization providing the suppression of convective mass transport to growing crystals in order to improve the crystal quality. The bibliography includes 91 references.

  15. Mass Transport Phenomena in Lipid Oxidation and Antioxidation.

    PubMed

    Laguerre, Mickaël; Bily, Antoine; Roller, Marc; Birtić, Simona

    2017-02-28

    In lipid dispersions, the ability of reactants to move from one lipid particle to another is an important, yet often ignored, determinant of lipid oxidation and its inhibition by antioxidants. This review describes three putative interparticle transfer mechanisms for oxidants and antioxidants: (a) diffusion, (b) collision-exchange-separation, and (c) micelle-assisted transfer. Mechanism a involves the diffusion of molecules from one particle to another through the intervening aqueous phase. Mechanism b involves the transfer of molecules from one particle to another when the particles collide with each other. Mechanism c involves the solubilization of molecules in micelles within the aqueous phase and then their transfer between particles. During lipid oxidation, the accumulation of surface-active lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs) beyond their critical micelle concentration may shift their mass transport from the collision-exchange-separation pathway (slow transfer) to the micelle-assisted mechanism (fast transfer), which may account for the transition from the initiation to the propagation phase. Similarly, the cut-off effect governing antioxidant activity in lipid dispersions may be due to the fact that above a certain hydrophobicity, the transfer mechanism for antioxidants changes from diffusion to collision-exchange-separation. This hypothesis provides a simple model to rationalize the design and formulation of antioxidants and dispersed lipids.

  16. Water mass structure and transport in the Tourbillon eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, John; Glynn, Simon

    1985-06-01

    CTD data collected during the Tourbillon Experiment have been used to identify the water masses present in a mesoscale eddy in the eastern North Atlantic, and their transports during the 50-day period of the Experiment. The core of the eddy was found to comprise North Atlantic Central Water within the temperature range 10 to 11°C, and evidence of downward movement of this water between 150 and 700 db and upward movement between 750 and 820 db is presented. Mediterranean Water (MW) was drawn around the eddy in a tongue which broke into separate patches during the Experiment. There is evidence of this MW having a dynamical role in the eddy: whilst it was present as a continuous tongue it did not progress around the eddy as fast as other water. There is also an indication of upward movement of this MW. The distribution of Labrador Sea Water showed some positive relationship to the location of the eddy centre, whilst low concentrations were noted beneath the MW tongue. Both θ-S analysis and charts of the planetary component of potential vorticity are used in an attempt to identify the source region of the eddy; it is concluded that the eddy had not moved far (perhaps 200 km) from its place of origin, and that the homogeneous water in its core may have been formed by deep winter convection somewhere between north and west of the area where the Experiment was conducted.

  17. Uncluttering graph layouts using anisotropic diffusion and mass transport.

    PubMed

    Frishman, Yaniv; Tal, Ayellet

    2009-01-01

    Many graph layouts include very dense areas, making the layout difficult to understand. In this paper, we propose a technique for modifying an existing layout in order to reduce the clutter in dense areas. A physically inspired evolution process based on a modified heat equation is used to create an improved layout density image, making better use of available screen space. Using results from optimal mass transport problems, a warp to the improved density image is computed. The graph nodes are displaced according to the warp. The warp maintains the overall structure of the graph, thus limiting disturbances to the mental map, while reducing the clutter in dense areas of the layout. The complexity of the algorithm depends mainly on the resolution of the image visualizing the graph and is linear in the size of the graph. This allows scaling the computation according to required running times. It is demonstrated how the algorithm can be significantly accelerated using a graphics processing unit (GPU), resulting in the ability to handle large graphs in a matter of seconds. Results on several layout algorithms and applications are demonstrated.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of mass transport and structure inside a phototrophic biofilm.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Baheerathan; Holmes, William M; Sloan, William T; Phoenix, Vernon R

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to utilize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to image structural heterogeneity and mass transport inside a biofilm which was too thick for photon based imaging. MRI was used to map water diffusion and image the transport of the paramagnetically tagged macromolecule, Gd-DTPA, inside a 2.5 mm thick cyanobacterial biofilm. The structural heterogeneity of the biofilm was imaged at resolutions down to 22 × 22 μm, enabling the impact of biofilm architecture on the mass transport of both water and Gd-DTPA to be investigated. Higher density areas of the biofilm correlated with areas exhibiting lower relative water diffusion coefficients and slower transport of Gd-DTPA, highlighting the impact of biofilm structure on mass transport phenomena. This approach has potential for shedding light on heterogeneous mass transport of a range of molecular mass molecules in biofilms.

  19. Statistical characteristics of velocity, concentration, mass transport, and momentum transport for coaxial jet mixing in a confined duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of coaxial jets discharging into an expanded circular duct was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used for combustor flow modeling. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two velocity component data was obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two-color LV system. A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data was obtained from simultaneous measurements with laser velocimeter (LV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems. These measurements were used to obtain mean, second central moment, skewness and kurtosis values for three velocity components and the concentration. These measurements showed the existence of countergradient turbulent axial mass transport where the annular jet fluid was accelerating the inner jet fluid. Results from the study are related to the assumptions employed in the current mass and momentum turbulent transport models.

  20. Theoretical monochromatic-wave-induced currents in intermediate water with viscosity and nonzero mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    Wave-induced mass-transport current theories with both zero and nonzero net mass (or volume) transport of the water column are reviewed. A relationship based on the Longuet-Higgens theory is derived for wave-induced, nonzero mass-transport currents in intermediate water depths for a viscous fluid. The relationship is in a form useful for experimental applications; therefore, some design criteria for experimental wave-tank tests are also presented. Sample parametric cases for typical wave-tank conditions and a typical ocean swell were assessed by using the relation in conjunction with an equation developed by Unluata and Mei for the maximum wave-induced volume transport. Calculations indicate that substantial changes in the wave-induced mass-transport current profiles may exist dependent upon the assumed net volume transport. A maximum volume transport, corresponding to an infinite channel or idealized ocean condition, produces the largest wave-induced mass-transport currents. These calculations suggest that wave-induced mass-transport currents may have considerable effects on pollution and suspended-sediments transport as well as buoy drift, the surface and midlayer water-column currents caused by waves increasing with increasing net volume transports. Some of these effects are discussed.

  1. MASS TRANSPORT EFFECTS ON THE KINETICS OF NITROBENZENE REDUCTION BY IRON METAL. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the importance of external mass transport on the overall rates of
    contaminant reduction by iron metal (Fe0), we have compared measured
    rates of surface reaction for nitrobenzene (ArNO2) to estimated rates
    of external mass transport...

  2. Effects of solution mass transport on the ECC ozonesonde background current. [Electrochemical Concentration Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, D. C.; Niazy, N.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the effective mass transport parameter for the electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde in order to determine the mass transport rate constant for the ECC as a function of pressure. It is shown that a pressure dependent factor in the background current originates in a convective mass transport parameter. It is determined that for atmospheric pressures greater than 100 mb the mass transport parameter is a constant, while at pressures less than 100 mb it decreases logarithmically with pressure. It is suggested that the background current correction is directly correlated to the mass transport parameter pressure dependence. The presently used background current correction, which is based on the partial pressure of oxygen, is found to lead to an overestimation of the integrated ozone value in the troposphere for the ECC ozonesonde data.

  3. Integrated mass transportation system study/definition/implementation program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, R. K.; Deptula, D. A.; Yorke, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Specific actions needed to plan and effect transportation system improvements are identified within the constraints of limited financial, energy and land use resources, and diverse community requirements. A specific program is described which would develop the necessary generalized methodology for devising improved transportation systems and evaluate them against specific criteria for intermodal and intramodal optimization. A consistent, generalized method is provided for study and evaluation of transportation system improvements.

  4. Magnetoelastic sensors in combination with nanometer-scale honeycombed thin film ceramic TiO2 for remote query measurement of humidity.

    PubMed

    Grimes, C A; Kouzoudis, D; Dickey, E C; Qian, D; Anderson, M A; Shahidain, R; Lindsey, M; Green, L

    2000-05-01

    Ribbonlike magnetoelastic sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of an acoustic bell; in response to an externally applied magnetic field impulse the sensors emit magnetic flux with a characteristic resonant frequency. The magnetic flux can be detected external to the test area using a pick-up coil, enabling query remote monitoring of the sensor. The characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic sensor changes in response to mass loads. [L.D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1986). p. 100].Therefore, remote query chemical sensors can be fabricated by combining the magnetoelastic sensors with a mass changing, chemically responsive layer. In this work magnetoelastic sensors are coated with humidity-sensitive thin films of ceramic, nanodimensionally porous TiO2 to make remote query humidity sensors.

  5. Magnetoelastic sensors in combination with nanometer-scale honeycombed thin film ceramic TiO2 for remote query measurement of humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Kouzoudis, D.; Dickey, E. C.; Qian, D.; Anderson, M. A.; Shahidain, R.; Lindsey, M.; Green, L.

    2000-01-01

    Ribbonlike magnetoelastic sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of an acoustic bell; in response to an externally applied magnetic field impulse the sensors emit magnetic flux with a characteristic resonant frequency. The magnetic flux can be detected external to the test area using a pick-up coil, enabling query remote monitoring of the sensor. The characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic sensor changes in response to mass loads. [L.D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1986). p. 100].Therefore, remote query chemical sensors can be fabricated by combining the magnetoelastic sensors with a mass changing, chemically responsive layer. In this work magnetoelastic sensors are coated with humidity-sensitive thin films of ceramic, nanodimensionally porous TiO2 to make remote query humidity sensors. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  7. Measurement and visualization of mass transport for the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ambient mass-spectrometry source.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  8. Fold and thrust systems in Mass Transport Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.; Levi, T.; Weinberger, R.

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in seismic reflection data from gravity-driven fold and thrust systems developed in offshore Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) reveal a number of significant features relating to displacement along thrusts. However, the data are still limited by the resolution of the seismic method, and are unable to provide detail of local fold and thrust processes. Investigation of exceptional gravity-driven contractional structures forming part of MTDs in lacustrine deposits of the Dead Sea Basin, enables us to present the first detailed outcrop analysis of fold and thrust systems cutting unlithified 'soft' sediments. We employ a range of established geometric techniques to our case study, including dip isogons, fault-propagation fold charts and displacement-distance diagrams previously developed for investigation of thrusts and folds in lithified rocks. Fault-propagation folds in unlithified sediments display tighter interlimb angles compared to models developed for lithified sequences. Values of stretch, which compares the relative thickness of equivalent hangingwall and footwall sequences measured along the fault plane, may be as low as only 0.3, which is significantly less than the minimum 0.5 values reported from thrusts cutting lithified rocks, and reflects the extreme variation in stratigraphic thickness around thrust-related folds. We suggest that the simple shear component of deformation in unlithified sediments may modify the forelimb thickness and interlimb angles to a greater extent than in lithified rocks. The average spacing of thrust ramps and the thickness of the thrust sequence display an approximate 5:1 ratio across a range of scales in MTDs. In general, thicker hangingwall and footwall sequences occur with larger thrust displacements, although displacement patterns on thrusts cutting unlithified (yet cohesive) sediments are more variable than those in lithified rocks. Line-length restoration of thrust systems in MTDs reveals 42% shortening, which

  9. Mass Transport Separation via Grace: Anthropogenic and Natural Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, J. O.; de Viron, O.

    2011-12-01

    The GRACE satellite has been monitoring the change in the mass distribution at the Earth surface for nearly 10 years. This becomes enough to study long-term mass change, and to separate interannual variations from trends. Up to now, many studies have shown a fast (and non-linear) loss of mass in many glaciers and ice sheets. They all have been attributed to global warming, though part of the mass variation is also associated with the classical long-term climate variation. Using climatic data as well as the GRACE mascon solution, we can separate the part associated to the anthropogenic part from the non-anthropogenic part, in order to better estimate those contributions. Results and implications from our analyses will be presented.

  10. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description—Darcy's law—fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media. PMID:25901931

  11. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media.

    PubMed

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-04-22

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description--Darcy's law--fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media.

  12. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-04-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description--Darcy's law--fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media.

  13. Mass transport in salt repositories: Steady-state transport through interbeds

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-03-01

    Salt has long been a candidate for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Because salt is extremely soluble in water, the existence of rock salt in the ground atest to the long-term stability of the salt. Both bedded salt and salt domes have been considered for nuclear waste disposal in the United States and Europe. While the salt is known to be quite pure in salt domes, bedded salt is interlaced with beds of sediments. Traditionally rock salt has not been considered water-conducting, but sediments layers would be classical porous media, capable of conducting water. Therefore there is interest in determining whether interbeds in bedded salt constitute pathway for radionuclide migration. In this report we consider steady-state migration of radionuclides from a single waste cylinder into a single interbed. Two approaches are used. In 1982 Neretnieks proposed an approach for calculating the steady-state transport of oxidants to a copper container. We have adapted that approach for calculating steady-state radionuclide migration away from the waste package, as a first approximation. We have also analyzed the problem of time-dependent radionuclide diffusion from a container through a backfill layer into a fracture, and we used the steady-state solution from that problem for comparison. Section 2 gives a brief summary of the geology of interbeds in bedded salt. Section 3 presents the mass transfer resistances approach of Neretnieks, summarizing the formulation and giving numerical illustrations of the steady-state two-dimensional diffusion analysis. Section 4 gives a brief statement of the steady-state result from a related analysis. Conclusions are stated in Section 5. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Hydrodynamic and Mass Transport Properties of Microfluidic Geometries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Bioanalytical Chemistry, 391:2453–2467, 2008. 18 [34] D. Mark, S. Haeberle, G. Roth , F. Von Setten, and R. Zengerle. Microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platforms...Biophysical Journal, 75:583–594, 1998. 23 [81] T. Mason , A. Pineda, C. Wofsy, and B. Goldstein. Effec- tive Rate Models for the Analysis of Transport

  15. Measurements of the transport efficiency of the fragment mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    Extensive calculations of the transport of reaction products were carried out during the design phase of the instrument using the computer code GIOS. These show that the energy acceptance depends strongly on the angular deviation from the optical axis of the instrument. In order to reliably measure cross sections using this instrument it is therefore necessary to verify these calculations empirically.

  16. Imaging the time-integrated cerebral metabolic activity with subcellular resolution through nanometer-scale detection of biosynthetic products deriving from (13)C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Takado, Yuhei; Knott, Graham; Humbel, Bruno M; Masoodi, Mojgan; Escrig, Stéphane; Meibom, Anders; Comment, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the brain but also an important source of building blocks for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Little is known about the use of glucose for biosynthesis in tissues at the cellular level. We demonstrate that local cerebral metabolic activity can be mapped in mouse brain tissue by quantitatively imaging the biosynthetic products deriving from [U-(13)C]glucose metabolism using a combination of in situ electron microscopy and secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (NanoSIMS). Images of the (13)C-label incorporated into cerebral ultrastructure with ca. 100 nm resolution allowed us to determine the timescale on which the metabolic products of glucose are incorporated into different cells, their sub-compartments and organelles. These were mapped in astrocytes and neurons in the different layers of the motor cortex. We see evidence for high metabolic activity in neurons via the nucleus (13)C enrichment. We observe that in all the major cell compartments, such as e.g. nucleus and Golgi apparatus, neurons incorporate substantially higher concentrations of (13)C-label than astrocytes.

  17. Structural design of a double-layered porous hydrogel for effective mass transport.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Hwang, Hyung Ju; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-03-01

    Mass transport in porous materials is universal in nature, and its worth attracts great attention in many engineering applications. Plant leaves, which work as natural hydraulic pumps for water uptake, have evolved to have the morphological structure for fast water transport to compensate large water loss by leaf transpiration. In this study, we tried to deduce the advantageous structural features of plant leaves for practical applications. Inspired by the tissue organization of the hydraulic pathways in plant leaves, analogous double-layered porous models were fabricated using agarose hydrogel. Solute transport through the hydrogel models with different thickness ratios of the two layers was experimentally observed. In addition, numerical simulation and theoretical analysis were carried out with varying porosity and thickness ratio to investigate the effect of structural factors on mass transport ability. A simple parametric study was also conducted to examine unveiled relations between structural factors. As a result, the porosity and thickness ratio of the two layers are found to govern the mass transport ability in double-layered porous materials. The hydrogel models with widely dispersed pores at a fixed porosity, i.e., close to a homogeneously porous structure, are mostly turned out to exhibit fast mass transport. The present results would provide a new framework for fundamental design of various porous structures for effective mass transport.

  18. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate bacterium-substratum interactions, understanding of bacterial mass transport is necessary. Comparisons of experimentally observed initial deposition rates with mass transport rates in parallel-plate-flow-chambers (PPFC) predicted by convective-diffusion yielded deposition efficiencies above unity, despite electrostatic repulsion. It is hypothesized that sedimentation is the major mass transport mechanism in a PPFC. The contribution of sedimentation to the mass transport in a PPFC was experimentally investigated by introducing a novel microscopy-based method. First, height-dependent bacterial concentrations were measured at different times and flow rates and used to calculate bacterial sedimentation velocities. For Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600, a sedimentation velocity of 240 μm h(-1) was obtained. Therewith, sedimentation appeared as the predominant contribution to mass transport in a PPFC. Also in the current study, deposition efficiencies of S. aureus ATCC 12600 with respect to the Smoluchowski-Levich solution of the convective-diffusion equation were four-to-five fold higher than unity. However, calculation of deposition efficiencies with respect to sedimentation were below unity and decreased from 0.78 to 0.36 when flow rates increased from 0.017 to 0.33 cm(3) s(-1). The proposed analysis of bacterial mass transport processes is simple, does not require additional equipment and yields a more reasonable interpretation of bacterial deposition in a PPFC.

  19. Smooth information flow in temperature climate network reflects mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2017-03-01

    A directed climate network is constructed by Granger causality analysis of air temperature time series from a regular grid covering the whole Earth. Using winner-takes-all network thresholding approach, a structure of a smooth information flow is revealed, hidden to previous studies. The relevance of this observation is confirmed by comparison with the air mass transfer defined by the wind field. Their close relation illustrates that although the information transferred due to the causal influence is not a physical quantity, the information transfer is tied to the transfer of mass and energy.

  20. Mass Transport through Nanostructured Membranes: Towards a Predictive Tool

    PubMed Central

    Darvishmanesh, Siavash; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a new mechanism to understand the transport of solvents through nanostructured membranes from a fundamental point of view. The findings are used to develop readily applicable mathematical models to predict solvent fluxes and solute rejections through solvent resistant membranes used for nanofiltration. The new model was developed based on a pore-flow type of transport. New parameters found to be of fundamental importance were introduced to the equation, i.e., the affinity of the solute and the solvent for the membrane expressed as the hydrogen-bonding contribution of the solubility parameter for the solute, solvent and membrane. A graphical map was constructed to predict the solute rejection based on the hydrogen-bonding contribution of the solubility parameter. The model was evaluated with performance data from the literature. Both the solvent flux and the solute rejection calculated with the new approach were similar to values reported in the literature. PMID:27918434

  1. Mechanism and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers by C. J. Barrett, A. Natansohn, and P. Rochon Submitted for publication in...DATE June 23, 1998 Tprhnjr.fil P^nnr I’: 4. TITLE AHO SU3TITLE Mechanism and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers...TRANSPORT IN THIN FILMS OF AZO POLYMERS Christopher J. Barrett’, Almeria L. Natansohn1, and Paul L. Rochon2. ’Dept. of Chemistry. Queen’s

  2. Mass spectrometer. [On Space Transportation System 2 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.; Carignan, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The quadrupole Mass Spectrometer of the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (IECM) operates in the range from 2 to 150 amu. It is pointed out that the Mass Spectrometer on STS-2 performed very well. It was found that the column density of H2O effluent from the Shuttle reached a maximum of 1 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm at 7 hr, 30 min and decreased by a factor of 7.5 during the subsequent 40 hrs. The count rate response of H2O could be correlated with mission-related events, taking into account the dumping of supply water, the operation of the Flash Evaporator System, and the firing of a primary reaction control system engine.

  3. Facile transfer of thickness controllable poly(methyl methacrylate) patterns on a nanometer scale onto SiO2 substrates via microcontact printing combined with simplified Langmuir-Schaefer technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Kwan; Kim, Dae-Il; Park, Jaehyun; Shin, Gunchul; Kim, Gyu Tae; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2008-12-16

    We report on the facile patterning of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) layers onto SiO2 substrates via microcontact printing combined with the simplified Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) technique. Langmuir film of PMMA was formed just by dropping a dilute PMMA solution onto the air/water surface in a glass Petri dish via self-assembly, and it was used as an ink for the patterned poly(dimethylsilioxane) (PDMS) stamp. The transferred film properties were systematically investigated with variation of postannealing temperature, molecular weight of PMMA, and the inking number. The patterned PMMA film surface was smooth with no vacancy defect in a few micrometers scale AFM images over the whole film area after post-annealing process. The thickness of the PMMA patterns was controlled on the nanometer scale by the number of inkings of the LS layer of PMMA on the PDMS stamp. By using the PMMA patterns as a barrier and a sacrificial layer against the chemical etching and metal deposition, SiO2 and metal patterns were fabricated, respectively. The PMMA layers also worked as a passivation layer against the patterning of V2O5 nanowires and the selective adsorption of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). We also fabricated thin film transistors using patterned SWCNTs with different percolation states and investigated the electrical properties.

  4. Mass and Momentum Transport Experiments with Swirling Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Roback, R.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of axial and swirling coaxial jets is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently employed in a variety of computational procedures used throughout the propulsion community. The axial coaxial jet study was completed under Phase 1. The swirling coaxial jet study, which is the subject of this paper, was conducted under Phase 2 of the contract. A TEACH code was acquired, checked out for several test cases, and is reported. A study to measure length scales and to obtain a limited number of measurements with a blunt trailing edge inlet is being conducted under Phase 3 of the contract.

  5. An analysis of three dimensional diffusion in a representative arterial wall mass transport model.

    PubMed

    Denny, William J; O'Connell, Barry M; Milroy, John; Walsh, Michael T

    2013-05-01

    The development and use of drug eluting stents has brought about significant improvements in reducing in-stent restenosis, however, their long term presence in the artery is still under examination due to restenosis reoccurring. Current studies focus mainly on stent design, coatings and deployment techniques but few studies address the issue of the physics of three dimensional mass transport in the artery wall. There is a dearth of adequate validated numerical mass transport models that simulate the physics of diffusion dominated drug transport in the artery wall whilst under compression. A novel experimental setup used in a previous study was adapted and an expansion of that research was carried out to validate the physics of three dimensional diffusive mass transport into a compressed porous media. This study developed a more sensitive method for measuring the concentration of the species of interest. It revalidated mass transport in the radial direction and presented results which highlight the need for an evaluation of the governing equation for transient diffusive mass transport in a porous media, in its current form, to be carried out.

  6. A Global Assessment of Accelerations in Mass Transport of Surface Geophysical Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Heflin, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mass transport in the Earth's surface geophysical fluid layer has complex spatiotemporal patterns. The GRACE gravity mission provides an unprecedented global capability to monitor this important process with high accuracy and resolution. Accurate assessments of global mass transport patterns and budget also depend critically on changes in degree-1 coefficients (geocenter motion) and in Earth's dynamic oblateness coefficient J2. We combine GRACE measurements, time series of GNSS data, JPL's ECCO ocean bottom pressure model, and high-resolution loose a priori models of mass variation regimes to derive complete spherical harmonic spectra of detrended mass variations up to degree and order 180. Mass accelerations are estimated along with linear, annual, semiannual, and the 161-day tidal aliasing components from coefficient time series. The appropriateness of a priori information and estimate uncertainties are further evaluated by variance component estimation and residual statistics of fitting the time series. During the GRACE data period of 2002.2-2015.0, accelerations in mass transport are geographically uneven with significant positive or negative accelerations in various parts of the world. While Greenland and West Antarctica show strong accelerated mass losses, Alaska and the Arctic Ocean have significant positive accelerations with reversals of earlier mass loss trends. No evidence of non-Arctic global mean sea level acceleration due to mass has been found. Depending on region, some estimated accelerations are also not steady over time due to large irregular and interannual variations.

  7. Systematic characterization of porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Fu; Barrera, Carlos M; Dauer, Edward A; Gu, Weiyong; Andreopoulos, Fotios; Huang, C-Y Charles

    2017-01-01

    One of the key challenges in porous scaffold design is to create a porous structure with desired mechanical function and mass transport properties which support delivery of biofactors and development of function tissue substitute. In recent years, polyurethane (PU) has become one of the most popular biomaterials in various tissue engineering fields. However, there are no studies fully investigating the relations between porosity and both mass transport and mechanical properties of PU porous scaffolds. In this paper, we fabricated PU scaffolds by combining phase inversion and salt (sodium chloride) leaching methods. The tensile and compressive moduli were examined on PU scaffolds fabricated with different PU concentrations (25%, 20% and 15% w/v) and salt/PU weight ratios (9/1, 6/1, 3/1 and 0/1). The mass transport properties of PU scaffolds including hydraulic permeability and glucose diffusivity were also measured. Furthermore, the relationships between the porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold were systemically investigated. The results demonstrated that porosity is a key parameter which governs both mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffolds. With similar pore sizes, the mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold can be described as single functions of porosity regardless of initial PU concentration. The relationships between scaffold porosity and properties can be utilized to facilitate porous PU scaffold fabrication with specific mass transport and mechanical properties. The systematic approach established in this study can be applied to characterization of other biomaterials for scaffold design and fabrication.

  8. Heat- and mass-transport in aqueous silica nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turanov, A. N.; Tolmachev, Yuriy V.

    2009-10-01

    Using the transient hot wire and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods we determined the thermal conductivity and the solvent self-diffusion coefficient (SDC) in aqueous suspensions of quasi-monodisperse spherical silica nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity was found to increase at higher volume fraction of nanoparticles in accordance with the effective medium theory albeit with a smaller slope. On the other hand, the SDC was found to decrease with nanoparticle volume fraction faster than predicted by the effective medium theory. These deviations can be explained by the presence of an interfacial heat-transfer resistance and water retention by the nanoparticles, respectively. We found no evidence for anomalous enhancement in the transport properties of nanofluids reported earlier by other groups.

  9. Transport in the interplanetary medium of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgazzi, A.; Lara, A.; Romero-Salazar, L.; Ventura, A.

    2008-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale structures of plasma and magnetic field expelled from the Sun to the interplanetary medium and generally observed in white light coronagraphs. During their travel, in the interplanetary medium these structures named interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), suffer acceleration or deceleration due to the interaction with the ambient solar wind. This process can be understood as a transference of momentum between the interplanetary CME (ICME) and the solar wind. This process seems to be fundamentally different for `slow' and `fast' ICMEs (compared with the ambient solar wind velocity). In this work, we approach the problem from the fluid dynamics point of view and consider the ICMEs - solar wind system as two interacting fluids under the action of viscous forces. We note that this interaction is a special case of interaction between low density plasmas. Using these viscous forces in the Newtons Second Law, we obtained an analytical solution for the ICME velocity as a function of time. By comparing our analytic results with empirical models found in recent literature, we suggested values for the viscosity and drag parameters in this system. In this first approximation we have neglected the magnetic field.

  10. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-12-31

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K{sub d} model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  11. Thermoelectric device with multiple, nanometer scale, elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Borshchevsky, Alexander (Inventor); Herman, Jennifer (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermoelectric device formed of nanowires on the nm scale. The nanowires are preferably of a size that causes quantum confinement effects within the wires. The wires are connected together into a bundle to increase the power density.

  12. Contact angle hysteresis at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Delmas, Mathieu; Monthioux, Marc; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2011-04-01

    Using atomic force microscopy with nonconventional carbon tips, the pinning of a liquid contact line on individual nanometric defects was studied. This mechanism is responsible for the occurrence of the contact angle hysteresis. The presence of weak defects which do not contribute to the hysteresis is evidenced for the first time. The dissipated energy associated with strong defects is also measured down to values in the range of kT, which correspond to defect sizes in the order of 1 nm.

  13. Nanometer Scale Morphology of Bacteriogenic Mn Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, M.; Obraztsova, A.; Tebo, B. M.; Bargar, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    Manganese oxides, which are ubiquitous in surface waters, soils, and sediments, are believed to result from the bacterially catalyzed oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(IV). Bacteriogenic Mn oxides exhibit high surface areas and degrade or oxidize a variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Via these reactions, Mn oxides influence the biogeochemical cycling of micronutrients and help to control the composition of natural waters. Recent EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and WAXS (wide angle X-ray scattering) investigations of bacteriogenic Mn oxides indirectly suggest that particles are as small as 10 or 20 nm , . However, no detailed systematic quantitative measurements of bacteriogenic Mn oxide particle sizes and morphology have been reported. We have characterized manganese oxides produced by the marine sporeforming bacterium Bacillus sp., strain SG-1 using SAXS (small angle X-ray scattering) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). TEM measurements indicate that the particles are layered structures having basal-plane widths of several hundred nm. WAXS measurements indicate that particles are extremely thin, ~1nm thick, which corresponds to a single Mn oxide layer. The particles appear to have particularly high aspect ratios, with the majority of all structural MnO6 octahedral units exposed to solution. Furthermore, it follows that basal plane sites are the overwhelmingly dominant surface binding sites. Particles with such small dimensions often have properties that are intermediate between those of molecular clusters and bulk materials. Therefore, the reactivity of natural manganese oxides is expected to differ substantially from that of synthetic crystalline analogs.

  14. Capillary adhesion at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the capillary adhesion from a nonvolatile liquid meniscus between a spherical tip and a flat substrate. The atomic structure of the tip, the tip radius, the contact angles of the liquid on the two surfaces, and the volume of the liquid bridge are varied. The capillary force between the tip and substrate is calculated as a function of their separation h. The force agrees with continuum predictions based on macroscopic theory for h down to ∼5 to 10 nm. At smaller h, the force tends to be less attractive than predicted and has strong oscillations. This oscillatory component of the capillary force is completely missed in the macroscopic theory, which only includes contributions from the surface tension around the circumference of the meniscus and the pressure difference over the cross section of the meniscus. The oscillation is found to be due to molecular layering of the liquid confined in the narrow gap between the tip and substrate. This effect is most pronounced for large tip radii and/or smooth surfaces. The other two components considered by the macroscopic theory are also identified. The surface tension term, as well as the meniscus shape, is accurately described by the macroscopic theory for h down to ∼1 nm, but the capillary pressure term is always more positive than the corresponding continuum result. This shift in the capillary pressure reduces the average adhesion by a factor as large as 2 from its continuum value and is found to be due to an anisotropy in the pressure tensor. The component in the plane of the substrate is consistent with the capillary pressure predicted by the macroscopic theory (i.e., the Young-Laplace equation), but the normal pressure that determines the capillary force is always more positive than the continuum counterpart.

  15. Dielectrophoresis of particles on the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Michael

    2003-03-01

    Dielectrophoresis is the phenomenon of force induced on particles suspended in non-uniform electric fields, the magnitude and direction of that force being dependent on such factors as the dielectric properties of particle and medium, and the frequency and magnitude of the applied electric field (Pohl 1978). Dielectrophoresis has been well-characterised over many years for particles on the micrometer scale such as cells. However, as the size of the particle is reduced below the micrometer scale, so other effects begin to dominate the dielectrophoretic response. In fact, for many years, manipulation of nanoparticles was presumed impossible because of the influence of effects such as the action of Brownian motion, electrohydrodynamic forces, high electric field gradients, the dominance of the motion of charges across the surface of the particle and the dielectric properties of the electrical double layer. However, experimental work in the last decade has shown that in fact, dielectrophoresis can be performed on particles down to molecular scale. By understanding the physics underlying the dielectrophoresis of nanoparticles, it is possible to determine the surface properties of such particles, as well as to separate them and manipulate them for particle detection (Hughes 2002). This technology may ultimately have a range of applications, from enhancing biosensors to detect viral bioterrorist attack, to the manipulation of molecules and DNA, and the ultimate goal of single molecule manipulation for nanotechnology. REFERENCES: Pohl, H. A. (1978) Dielectrophoresis (Cambridge; Cambridge University Press) Hughes, M. P (2002) Nanoelectromechanics in Engineering and Biology (Boca Raton; CRC Press)

  16. Mass Balance Implications of Wind-Transported Snow Loss From Antarctic Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, K. C.; Jacobs, S. S.; Cullather, R. I.

    2008-12-01

    Some fraction of the snow that falls as precipitation over the Antarctic ice sheet is transported across the coastline by the wind. This is a long-recognized but poorly constrained problem. If recent projections of increasing coastal wind speeds are correct, wind-blown snow transport will also intensify, as the relationship between mass transport and wind speed is strongly nonlinear. The large-scale importance of wind- transported snow to coastal ocean freshening or ice sheet mass balance depends on unknowns including details of the transport of snow by the wind, the net precipitation over Antarctica, and the effective length of its coastline. Prior estimates of snow loss into the ocean from Antarctica range over two orders of magnitude, from less than 2 to more than 200 Gt / year. Modeled annual snow transport based on measured winds at an automatic weather station site on the northern edge of the Ross Ice Shelf is in good agreement with measured values from Halley Station. When extrapolated around the coastline, these values fall between the reported extremes. Because most of Antarctica's coastal areas experience higher winds and greater snow supply than its ice shelves, this data provides a lower limit on the mass of snow removed from the ice sheet by the wind. From this lower bound we estimate the probable range of values for present-day wind blown snow export to the Southern Ocean, and explore the implications of projected rising winds for increases in wind-blown snow transport.

  17. Intraparticle mass transport mechanism in activated carbon adsorption of phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, E.G.; Miura, Y.; Yokomura, H.; Tajima, S.; Yamashita, S.; Chang, H.T.; Noll, K.E.

    1996-10-01

    Two parallel diffusion mechanisms, pore and surface, can control the rate of contaminant adsorption. The two mechanisms are different functions of temperature and adsorbate concentration. To develop a mechanistic design model for adsorption processes, the two mechanisms must be evaluated separately. In this paper, the authors show that the mechanisms can be separated accurately using a stepwise linearization technique. The technique can easily be incorporated in adsorption diffusion modeling. Two phenolic compounds were used in this study: p-chlorophenol (PCP) and p-nitrophenol (PNP). The application of the linearization technique is illustrated using two types of reactors: a completely mixed batch reactor and a differential reactor. The study results show that pore and surface diffusivity can be determined accurately using the linearization technique. Furthermore, the tortuosity for the absorbent can be estimated from the pore diffusivity. For PCP that is strongly adsorbed by the adsorbent, surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism controlling the intraparticle transport. For weakly adsorbed PNP, neither surface nor pore diffusion is dominant.

  18. Temporal variability of mass transport across Canary Islands Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Santana, Ángel; José Machín, Francisco; García-Weil, Luis; Sangrà, Pablo; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    The equatorward flowing Canary Current (CC) is the main feature of the circulation in the Canary Islands region. The CC flow perturbation by the Canary Islands originate the Canary Eddy Corridor which is the major pathway for long lived eddies in the subtropical North Atlantic (Sangrà et al., 2009, DSR). Therefore the variability of the CC passing through the Canary Archipelago will have both local and regional importance. Past studies on the CC variability trough the Canary Islands point out a clearly seasonal variability (Fraile-Nuez et al, 2010 (JGR); Hernández-Guerra et al, 2002 (DSR)). However those studies where focused on the eastern islands channels missing the variability through the western island channels which are the main source of long lived eddies. In order to fill this gap from November 2012 until September 2013 we conducted trimonthly surveys crossing the whole islands channels using opportunity ships (Naviera Armas Ferries). XBT and XCTD where launched along the cross channels transects. Additionally a closed box circling the Archipelago was performed on October 2013 as part of the cruise RAPROCAN-2013 (IEO) using also XBT and XCTD. Dynamical variables where derived inferring salinity from S(T,p) analytical relationships for the region updated with new XCTD data. High resolution, vertical sections of temperature, potential density, geostrophic velocity and transport where obtained. Our preliminary results suggest that the CC suffer a noticeable acceleration in those islands channels where eddy shedding is more frequent. They also indicate a clearly seasonal variability of the flows passing the islands channels. With this regard we observed significant differences on the obtained seasonal variability with respect the cited past studies on the eastern islands channel (Lanzarote / Fuerteventura - Africa coast). This work was co-funded by Canary Government (TRAMIC project: PROID20100092) and the European Union (FEDER).

  19. Fram Strait and Greenland Sea transports, water masses, and water mass transformations 1999-2010 (and beyond)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnela, Marika; Rudels, Bert; Goszczko, Ilona; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Schauer, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    The exchanges between the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean are important for the ocean circulation and climate. Transports are here estimated using summer hydrographic data from the Greenland Sea and the Fram Strait. Geostrophic transports are computed from hydrographic sections at 75°N in the Greenland Sea and at about 79°N in the Fram Strait. Geostrophic velocities are adjusted with summer velocities derived from Argo floats, and four conservation constraints are applied to a box closed by the two sections. The estimated net volume transports are 0.8 ± 1.5 Sv southward. Net freshwater transports through the Greenland Sea section are estimated at 54 ± 20 mSv and through the Fram Strait section at 66 ± 9 mSv. Heat loss in the area between the two sections is estimated at 9 ± 12 TW. Convection depths in the Greenland Sea are estimated from observations and vary between about 200 and 2000 dbar showing no trend. Water mass properties in the Greenland Sea are affected both by convection and lateral mixing. Vertical mixing is estimated from hydrography and based on it about 1 Sv of diluted Arctic Ocean waters are estimated to enter the Greenland Sea. The properties of Atlantic, intermediate, and deep waters are studied. Deep water properties are defined using water mass triangles and are subject to decadal changes.

  20. Single-Molecule Investigations of Morphology and Mass Transport Dynamics in Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Daniel A.; Park, Seok Chan; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Ito, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured materials such as mesoporous metal oxides and phase-separated block copolymers form the basis for new monolith, membrane, and thin film technologies having applications in energy storage, chemical catalysis, and separations. Mass transport plays an integral role in governing the application-specific performance characteristics of many such materials. The majority of methods employed in their characterization provide only ensemble data, often masking the nanoscale, molecular-level details of materials morphology and mass transport. Single-molecule fluorescence methods offer direct routes to probing these characteristics on a single-molecule/single-nanostructure basis. This article provides a review of single-molecule studies focused on measurements of anisotropic diffusion, adsorption, partitioning, and confinement in nanostructured materials. Experimental methods covered include confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained promise to deepen our understanding of mass transport mechanisms in nanostructures, thus aiding in the realization of advanced materials systems.

  1. Mass transport in a thin layer of power-law mud under surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Bai, Yuchuan; Xu, Dong

    2017-02-01

    The mass transport velocity in a two-layer system is studied theoretically. The wave motion is driven by a periodic pressure load on the free water surface, and mud in the lower layer is described by a power-law rheological model. Perturbation analysis is performed to the second order to find the mean Eulerian velocity. A numerical iteration method is employed to solve the non-linear governing equation at the leading order. The influence of rheological properties on fluid motion characteristics including the flow field, the surface displacement, the mass transport velocity, and the net discharge rates are investigated based on theoretical results. Theoretical analysis shows that under the action of interfacial shearing, a recirculation structure may appear near the interface in the upper water layer. A higher mass transport velocity at the interface does not necessarily mean a higher discharge rate for a pseudo-plastic fluid mud.

  2. Single-Molecule Investigations of Morphology and Mass Transport Dynamics in Nanostructured Materials.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Daniel A; Park, Seok Chan; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Ito, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured materials such as mesoporous metal oxides and phase-separated block copolymers form the basis for new monolith, membrane, and thin film technologies having applications in energy storage, chemical catalysis, and separations. Mass transport plays an integral role in governing the application-specific performance characteristics of many such materials. The majority of methods employed in their characterization provide only ensemble data, often masking the nanoscale, molecular-level details of materials morphology and mass transport. Single-molecule fluorescence methods offer direct routes to probing these characteristics on a single-molecule/single-nanostructure basis. This article provides a review of single-molecule studies focused on measurements of anisotropic diffusion, adsorption, partitioning, and confinement in nanostructured materials. Experimental methods covered include confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained promise to deepen our understanding of mass transport mechanisms in nanostructures, thus aiding in the realization of advanced materials systems.

  3. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-12-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  4. Local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of a solid surface with a nanometer-scale slit pore obtained by the perturbative method

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2015-03-07

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a liquid-solid interfacial system with a nanometer-scale slit pore in order to reveal local thermodynamic states: local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of the slit. The simulation also examined the transition mechanism between the two states of the liquid film: (a) liquid film on the slit and (b) liquid film in the slit, based on the local thermodynamic quantities from a molecular point of view. An instantaneous expression of the local pressure components and interfacial tensions, which is based on a volume perturbation, was presented to investigate time-dependent phenomena in molecular dynamics simulations. The interactions between the particles were described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential, and effects of the fluid-solid interaction intensity on the local pressure components and interfacial tensions of the fluid in the vicinity of the slit were examined in detail by the presented perturbative method. The results revealed that the local pressure components tangential to the solid surface in the vicinity of the 1st fluid layer from the solid surface are different in a two dimensional plane, and the difference became pronounced in the vicinity of the corner of the slit, for cases where the fluid-solid interaction intensities are relatively strong. The results for the local interfacial tensions of the fluid inside the slit suggested that the local interfacial tensions in the vicinity of the 2nd and 3rd layers of the solid atoms from the entrance of the slit act as a trigger for the transition between the two states under the influence of a varying fluid-solid interaction.

  5. Mass and momentum turbulent transport experiments with confined swirling coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, R.; Johnson, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Swirling coaxial jets mixing downstream, discharging into an expanded duct was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the combustion community. A combination of laser velocimeter (LV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques was employed to obtain mean and fluctuating velocity and concentration distributions which were used to derive mass and momentum turbulent transport parameters currently incorporated into various combustor flow models. Flow visualization techniques were also employed to determine qualitatively the time dependent characteristics of the flow and the scale of turbulence. The results of these measurements indicated that the largest momentum turbulent transport was in the r-z plane. Peak momentum turbulent transport rates were approximately the same as those for the nonswirling flow condition. The mass turbulent transport process for swirling flow was complicated. Mixing occurred in several steps of axial and radial mass transport and was coupled with a large radial mean convective flux. Mixing for swirling flow was completed in one-third the length required for nonswirling flow.

  6. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  7. Effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal transport in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, L.; Kuang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Intrinsic thermal resistivity critically depends on features of phonon dispersions dictated by harmonic interatomic forces and masses. Here we present the effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal conductivity (κ ) of functionalized graphene from first-principles calculations. We use graphane, a buckled graphene backbone with covalently bonded hydrogen atoms on both sides, as the base material and vary the mass of the hydrogen atoms to simulate the effect of mass variance from other functional groups. We find nonmonotonic behavior of κ with increasing mass of the functional group and an unusual crossover from acoustic-dominated to optic-dominated thermal transport behavior. We connect this crossover to changes in the phonon dispersion with varying mass which suppress acoustic phonon velocities, but also give unusually high velocity optic modes. Further, we show that out-of-plane acoustic vibrations contribute significantly more to thermal transport than in-plane acoustic modes despite breaking of a reflection-symmetry-based scattering selection rule responsible for their large contributions in graphene. This work demonstrates the potential for manipulation and engineering of thermal transport properties in two-dimensional materials toward targeted applications.

  8. Effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal transport in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Lindsay, L.; Kuang, Y.

    2017-03-13

    Intrinsic thermal resistivity critically depends on features of phonon dispersions dictated by harmonic interatomic forces and masses. We present the effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal conductivity (κ ) of functionalized graphene from first principles calculations. We also use graphane, a buckled graphene backbone with covalently bonded Hydrogen atoms on both sides, as the base material and vary the mass of the Hydrogen atoms to simulate the effect of mass variance from other functional groups. We find non-monotonic behavior of κ with increasing mass of the functional group and an unusual cross-over from acoustic-dominated tomore » optic-dominated thermal transport behavior. We connect this cross-over to changes in the phonon dispersion with varying mass which suppress acoustic phonon velocities, but also give unusually high velocity optic modes. Further, we show that out-of-plane acoustic vibrations contribute significantly more to thermal transport than in-plane acoustic modes despite breaking of a reflection symmetry based scattering selection rule responsible for their large contributions in graphene. Our work demonstrates the potential for manipulation and engineering of thermal transport properties in two dimensional materials toward targeted applications.« less

  9. High-Schmidt-number mass transport mechanisms from a turbulent flow to absorbing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Piomelli, Ugo; Boegman, Leon

    2012-08-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms involved in dissolved oxygen (DO) transfer from a turbulent flow to an underlying organic sediment bed populated with DO-absorbing bacteria. Our numerical study relies on a previously developed and tested computational tool that couples a bio-geochemical model for the sediment layer and large-eddy simulation for transport on the water side. Simulations have been carried out in an open channel configuration for different Reynolds numbers (Reτ = 180-1000), Schmidt numbers (Sc = 400-1000), and bacterial populations (χ* = 100-700 mg l-1). We show that the average oxygen flux across the sediment-water interface (SWI) changes with Reτ and Sc, in good agreement with classic heat-and-mass-transfer parametrizations. Time correlations at the SWI show that intermittent peaks in the wall-shear stress initiate the mass transfer and modulate its distribution in space and time. The diffusive sublayer acts as a de-noising filter with respect to the overlying turbulence; the instantaneous mass flux is not affected by low-amplitude background fluctuations in the wall-shear stress but, on the other hand, it is receptive to energetic and coherent near-wall transport events, in agreement with the surface renewal theory. The three transport processes involved in DO depletion (turbulent transport, molecular transport across the diffusive sublayer, and absorption in the organic sediment layer) exhibit distinct temporal and spatial scales. The rapidly evolving near-wall high-speed streaks transport patches of fluid to the edge of the diffusive sublayer, leaving slowly regenerating elongated patches of positive DO concentration fluctuations and mass flux at the SWI. The sediment surface retains the signature of the overlying turbulent transport over long time scales, allowed by the slow bacterial absorption.

  10. Peroxy radicals and ozone photochemistry in air masses undergoing long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. E.; Monks, P. S.; Jacob, M. J.; Penkett, S. A.; Lewis, A. C.; Stewart, D. J.; Whalley, L. K.; Methven, J.; Stohl, A.

    2009-09-01

    Concentrations of peroxy radicals (HO2+ΣiRiO2) in addition to other trace gases were measured onboard the UK Meteorological Office/Natural Environment Research Council British Aerospace 146-300 atmospheric research aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport of Ozone and Precursors (ITOP) campaign based at Horta Airport, Faial, Azores (38.58° N, 28.72° W) in July/August 2004. The overall peroxy radical altitude profile displays an increase with altitude that is likely to have been impacted by the effects of long-range transport. The peroxy radical altitude profile for air classified as of marine origin shows no discernable altitude profile. A range of air-masses were intercepted with varying source signatures, including those with aged American and Asian signatures, air-masses of biomass burning origin, and those that originated from the east coast of the United States. Enhanced peroxy radical concentrations have been observed within this range of air-masses indicating that long-range transported air-masses traversing the Atlantic show significant photochemical activity. The net ozone production at clear sky limit is in general negative, and as such the summer mid-Atlantic troposphere is at limit net ozone destructive. However, there is clear evidence of positive ozone production even at clear sky limit within air masses undergoing long-range transport, and during ITOP especially between 5 and 5.5 km, which in the main corresponds to a flight that extensively sampled air with a biomass burning signature. Ozone production was NOx limited throughout ITOP, as evidenced by a good correlation (r2=0.72) between P(O3) and NO. Strong positive net ozone production has also been seen in varying source signature air-masses undergoing long-range transport, including but not limited to low-level export events, and export from the east coast of the United States.

  11. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory`s site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone {sup 14}C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  12. A Comparison of Mass Transport Models for Evaluating U(VI) Desorption at the Decimeter Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, R.; Hay, M. B.; Miller, A. W.; Kohler, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Curtis, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Uranium (VI) is a contaminant of concern in aquifers at many former uranium mills and processing facilities. Estimating the time-scale for desorption is important for addressing the long term risk of groundwater contamination. Determination of the rate limiting processes in desorption requires the evaluation of hydrodynamic and chemical conditions at a site along with the nature of the processes themselves. This research compares different mass transport models against the results of a decimeter scale laboratory desorption experiment. Different grain size fractions of contaminated sediments from the Naturita Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Act site were used to create porous media systems with known physical and chemical heterogeneity. The goal is to better understand the mass transport limitations associated with uranium desorption. Two dimensional reactive transport models with no immobile zones, a single immobile zone and multiple immobile zones with a distribution of rate coefficients were compared with observations at selected monitoring locations in the domain and with the flux-averaged concentrations in the effluent. The artificial heterogeneity provided regions with a contrast of desorption rates relative to the adjacent advective rates; flow interruption events showed variable extents of the commonly observed concentration rebound indicative of mass transfer out of immobile zones which were generally reproduced by the model. A comparison of the alternative model results will be used to determine the level of complexity necessary to accurately represent mass transport in the individual breakthrough curves at sampling ports and in the integrated breakthrough curve for the entire experiment.

  13. Mass and heat transport in the two-phase Buckley-Leverett model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetzyanov, Atlas V.; Kushner, Alexei G.; Lychagin, Valentin V.

    2017-03-01

    In this article we study the initial boundary value problem for two-phase heat and mass transport in porous media described by the Buckley-Leverett model. We outline a method to construct asymptotic solutions of the initial boundary problem and show how to overcome singularities in solutions and shock waves.

  14. Measurements of Combined Axial Mass and Heat Transport in He II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Warren W.; Jones, Michael C.

    An experiment was performed that allowed measurements of both axial mass and heat transport of He-II (the superfluid phase of helium 4) in a long tube. The apparatus allowed the pressure difference and the temperature difference across the flow tube to each be independently adjusted, and the resulting steady-state values of net fluid velocity and…

  15. Mean Flow Velocities and Mass Transport for Equatorially-Trapped Water Waves with an Underlying Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, David; Sastre-Gomez, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the mean flow velocities, and related mass transport, which are induced by certain equatorially-trapped water waves. In particular, we examine a recently-derived exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the {β}-plane approximation at the equator which incorporates a constant underlying current.

  16. Volumetric vs Mass Velocity in Analyzing Convective-Diffusive Transport Processes in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Howard

    2000-11-01

    Because mass rather than volume is preserved in fluid-mechanical problems involving density changes, a natural predilection exists for quantifying convective-diffusive transport phenomena in terms of a velocity field based upon mass, rather than volume. Indeed, in the classic BSL "Transport Phenomena" textbook, but a single reference exists even to the very concept of a volume velocity, and even then it is relegated to a homework assignment. However, especially when dealing with transport in fluids in which the mass density of the conserved property being transported (e.g., chemical species, internal energy, etc.) is independent of the prevailing pressure, as is largely true in the case of liquids, overwhelming advantages exist is preferring the volume velocity over the more ubiquitous and classical mass velocity. In a generalization of ideas pioneered by D. D. Joseph and co-workers, we outline the reasons for this volumetric velocity preference in a broad general context by identifying a large class of physical problems whose solutions are rendered more accessible by exploiting this unconventional velocity choice.

  17. Aerosol properties and radiative forcing for three air masses transported in Summer 2011 to Sopot, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozwadowska, Anna; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Makuch, P.; Markowicz, K. M.; Petelski, T.; Strzałkowska, A.; Zieliński, T.

    2013-05-01

    Properties of atmospheric aerosols and solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface were measured during Summer 2011 in Sopot, Poland. Three cloudless days, characterized by different directions of incoming air-flows, which are typical transport pathways to Sopot, were used to estimate a radiative forcing due to aerosols present in each air mass.

  18. Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

    2013-11-01

    A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

  19. Mass transport in a porous microchannel for non-Newtonian fluid with electrokinetic effects.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sourav; De, Sirshendu

    2013-03-01

    Quantification of mass transfer in porous microchannel is of paramount importance in several applications. Transport of neutral solute in presence of convective-diffusive EOF having non-Newtonian rheology, in a porous microchannel was presented in this article. The governing mass transfer equation coupled with velocity field was solved along with associated boundary conditions using a similarity solution method. An analytical solution of mass transfer coefficient and hence, Sherwood number were derived from first principles. The corresponding effects of assisting and opposing pressure-driven flow and EOF were also analyzed. The influence of wall permeation, double-layer thickness, rheology, etc. on the mass transfer was also investigated. Permeation at the wall enhanced the mass transfer coefficient more than five times compared to impervious conduit in case of pressure-driven flow assisting the EOF at higher values of κh. Shear thinning fluid exhibited more enhancement of Sherwood number in presence of permeation compared to shear thickening one. The phenomenon of stagnation was observed at a particular κh (∼2.5) in case of EOF opposing the pressure-driven flow. This study provided a direct quantification of transport of a neutral solute in case of transdermal drug delivery, transport of drugs from blood to target region, etc.

  20. Investigating Mass Transport Limitations on Xylan Hydrolysis During Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heid M.; Parent, Yves; Chatterjee, Siddharth G.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Yarbrough, John M.; Himmel, Michael E.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-04-28

    Mass transport limitations could be an impediment to achieving high sugar yields during biomass pretreatment and thus be a critical factor in the economics of biofuels production. The objective of this work was to study the mass transfer restrictions imposed by the structure of biomass on the hydrolysis of xylan during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Mass transfer effects were studied by pretreating poplar wood at particle sizes ranging from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work showed a significant reduction in the rate of xylan hydrolysis in poplar when compared to the intrinsic rate of hydrolysis for isolated xylan that is possible in the absence of mass transfer. In poplar samples we observed no significant difference in the rates of xylan hydrolysis over more than two orders of magnitude in particle size. It appears that no additional mass transport restrictions are introduced by increasing particle size from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work suggests that the rates of xylan hydrolysis in biomass particles are limited primarily by the diffusion of hydrolysis products out of plant cell walls. A mathematical description is presented to describe the kinetics of xylan hydrolysis that includes transport of the hydrolysis products through biomass into the bulk solution. The modeling results show that the effective diffusion coefficient of the hydrolysis products in the cell wall is several orders of magnitude smaller than typical values in other applications signifying the role of plant cell walls in offering resistance to diffusion of the hydrolysis products.

  1. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  2. Thermal debinding modeling of mass transport and deformation in powder-injection molding compact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengjie, Ying; Lam, Y. C.; Yu, S. C. M.; Tam, K. C.

    2002-06-01

    A two-dimensional model of mass transport and deformation in thermal debinding for the powder-injection molding (PIM) compact, based on mass and heat transfer in deformable porous media and elasticity theory, is proposed. The primary mechanisms of mass transport, i.e., liquid flow, gas flow, vapor diffusion, and convection, as well as heat transfer, polymer pyrolysis, powder-particle packing, compact deformation, and their interactions are simultaneously included in the model. A computer code, in which integrated control-volume finite-difference and finite-element methods are employed, is developed to simulate the process. The simulated results revealed that the nonuniform distribution of polymer residue, which results from the nonuniform flow of the polymer, causes the nonuniform deformation in the compact. Severe nonuniform deformation in the compact might lead to cracking, distortion, and failure of the compact during the polymer-removal process.

  3. Global mass fixer algorithms for conservative tracer transport in the ECMWF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantakis, M.; Flemming, J.

    2014-01-01

    Various mass fixer algorithms (MFA) have been implemented in the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of ECMWF to ensure mass conservation of atmospheric tracers within the Semi-Lagrangian (SL) advection scheme. Emphasis has been placed in implementing schemes that despite being primarily global in nature adjust the solution mostly in regions where the advected field has large gradients and therefore interpolation (transport) error is assumed larger. The MFA have been tested in weather forecast, idealised and atmospheric dispersion cases. Applying these fixers to specific humidity and cloud fields did not change the accuracy of 10 day forecasts. In other words, global mass tracer conservation is achieved without deteriorating the solution accuracy. However, for longer forecast timescales or for forecasts in which correlated species are transported, experiments suggest that MFA may improve IFS forecasts.

  4. Global mass fixer algorithms for conservative tracer transport in the ECMWF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantakis, M.; Flemming, J.

    2014-05-01

    Various mass fixer algorithms (MFAs) have been implemented in the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to ensure mass conservation of atmospheric tracers within the semi-Lagrangian (SL) advection scheme. Emphasis has been placed in implementing schemes that despite being primarily global in nature adjust the solution mostly in regions where the advected field has large gradients and therefore interpolation (transport) error is assumed larger. The MFAs have been tested in weather forecast, idealised and atmospheric dispersion cases. Applying these fixers to specific humidity and cloud fields did not change the accuracy of 10-day forecasts. In other words, global mass tracer conservation is achieved without deteriorating the solution accuracy. However, for longer forecast timescales or for forecasts in which correlated species are transported, experiments suggest that MFAs may improve IFS forecasts.

  5. Electrocatalytic performance of fuel cell reactions at low catalyst loading and high mass transport.

    PubMed

    Zalitis, Christopher M; Kramer, Denis; Kucernak, Anthony R

    2013-03-28

    An alternative approach to the rotating disk electrode (RDE) for characterising fuel cell electrocatalysts is presented. The approach combines high mass transport with a flat, uniform, and homogeneous catalyst deposition process, well suited for studying intrinsic catalyst properties at realistic operating conditions of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Uniform catalyst layers were produced with loadings as low as 0.16 μgPt cm(-2) and thicknesses as low as 200 nm. Such ultra thin catalyst layers are considered advantageous to minimize internal resistances and mass transport limitations. Geometric current densities as high as 5.7 A cm(-2)Geo were experimentally achieved at a loading of 10.15 μgPt cm(-2) for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) at room temperature, which is three orders of magnitude higher than current densities achievable with the RDE. Modelling of the associated diffusion field suggests that such high performance is enabled by fast lateral diffusion within the electrode. The electrodes operate over a wide potential range with insignificant mass transport losses, allowing the study of the ORR at high overpotentials. Electrodes produced a specific current density of 31 ± 9 mA cm(-2)Spec at a potential of 0.65 V vs. RHE for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and 600 ± 60 mA cm(-2)Spec for the peak potential of the HOR. The mass activity of a commercial 60 wt% Pt/C catalyst towards the ORR was found to exceed a range of literature PEFC mass activities across the entire potential range. The HOR also revealed fine structure in the limiting current range and an asymptotic current decay for potentials above 0.36 V. These characteristics are not visible with techniques limited by mass transport in aqueous media such as the RDE.

  6. Multiscale mass transport in z ˜6 galactic discs: fuelling black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés

    2016-08-01

    By using Adaptive Mesh Refinement cosmological hydrodynamic N-body zoom-in simulations, with the RAMSES code, we studied the mass transport processes on to galactic nuclei from high redshift up to z ˜6. Due to the large dynamical range of the simulations, we were able to study the mass accretion process on scales from ˜50 kpc to ˜few 1 pc. We studied the black hole (BH) growth on to the Galactic Centre in relation with the mass transport processes associated to both the Reynolds stress and the gravitational stress on the disc. Such methodology allowed us to identify the main mass transport process as a function of the scales of the problem. We found that in simulations that include radiative cooling and supernovae feedback, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) grows at the Eddington limit for some periods of time presenting ≈ 0.5 throughout its evolution. The α parameter is dominated by the Reynolds term, αR, with αR ≫ 1. The gravitational part of the α parameter, αG, has an increasing trend towards the Galactic Centre at higher redshifts, with values αG ˜1 at radii ≲ few 101 pc contributing to the BH fuelling. In terms of torques, we also found that gravity has an increasing contribution towards the Galactic Centre at earlier epochs with a mixed contribution above ˜100 pc. This complementary work between pressure gradients and gravitational potential gradients allows an efficient mass transport on the disc with average mass accretion rates of the order of ˜few 1 M⊙ yr-1. These levels of SMBH accretion rates found in our cosmological simulations are needed in all models of SMBH growth that attempt to explain the formation of redshift 6-7 quasars.

  7. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  8. Density-of-states effective mass and scattering parameter measurements by transport phenomena in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. L.; Coutts, T. J.; Kaydanov, V. I.

    2000-02-01

    A novel machine has been developed to measure transport coefficients in the temperature range of 50-350 K of thin films deposited on electrically insulating substrates. The measured coefficients—resistivity, Hall, Seebeck, and Nernst—are applied to solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation to give information about the film's density-of-states effective mass, the Fermi energy level, and an energy-dependent scattering parameter. The machine is designed to eliminate or compensate for simultaneously occurring transport phenomena that would interfere with the desired measured quantity, while allowing for all four coefficients to be measured on the same sample. An average density-of-states effective mass value of 0.29±0.04me was measured on the transparent conductive oxide, cadmium stannate (CTO), over a carrier concentration range of 2-7×1020cm-3. This effective mass value matched previous results obtained by optical and thermoelectric modeling. The measured scattering parameter indicates that neutral impurities or a mixture of scattering mechanisms may inhibit the transport of carriers in CTO.

  9. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients. The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.

  10. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients.more » The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.« less

  11. High-Schmidt-number mass transport mechanisms from a turbulent flow to absorbing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Piomelli, Ugo; Boegman, Leon

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms involved in dissolved oxygen (DO) transfer from a turbulent flow to an underlying organic sediment bed, populated with DO-absorbing bacteria, relying on the coupling between the bio-geochemistry of the sediment layer and large-eddy simulation for the transport on the water side [Scalo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 117(C6), 2012]. Time correlations at the sediment-water interface (SWI) show that the diffusive sublayer acts as a de-noising filter with respect to the overlying turbulence; the mass flux is not affected by low-amplitude background fluctuations in the wall-shear stress but, rather, by energetic and coherent near-wall transport events, in agreement with the surface renewal theory. The spatial and temporal distribution of the mass flux is therefore modulated by rapidly evolving near-wall high-speed streaks (associated with intermittent peaks in the wall-shear stress) transporting patches of (rich-in-oxygen) fluid to the edge of the diffusive sublayer, leaving slowly-regenerating elongated patches of positive DO concentration fluctuation and mass flux at the SWI. The sediment surface retains the signature of the overlying turbulent transport over long time scales, allowed by the slow bacterial absorption. Currently postdoctoral fellow at Center for Turbulence Research (scalo@stanford.edu).

  12. Multicomponent mass transport model: a model for simulating migration of radionuclides in ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, J.F.; Kaszeta, F.E.; Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of the development of a one-dimensional radionuclide transport code, MMT2D (Multicomponent Mass Transport), for the AEGIS Program. Multicomponent Mass Transport is a numerical solution technique that uses the discrete-parcel-random-wald (DPRW) method to directly simulate the migration of radionuclides. MMT1D accounts for: convection;dispersion; sorption-desorption; first-order radioactive decay; and n-membered radioactive decay chains. Comparisons between MMT1D and an analytical solution for a similar problem show that: MMT1D agrees very closely with the analytical solution; MMT1D has no cumulative numerical dispersion like that associated with solution techniques such as finite differences and finite elements; for current AEGIS applications, relatively few parcels are required to produce adequate results; and the power of MMT1D is the flexibility of the code in being able to handle complex problems for which analytical solution cannot be obtained. Multicomponent Mass Transport (MMT1D) codes were developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to predict the movement of radiocontaminants in the saturated and unsaturated sediments of the Hanford Site. All MMT models require ground-water flow patterns that have been previously generated by a hydrologic model. This report documents the computer code and operating procedures of a third generation of the MMT series: the MMT differs from previous versions by simulating the mass transport processes in systems with radionuclide decay chains. Although MMT is a one-dimensional code, the user is referred to the documentation of the theoretical and numerical procedures of the three-dimensional MMT-DPRW code for discussion of expediency, verification, and error-sensitivity analysis.

  13. Implications of anthropogenic river stage fluctuations on mass transport in a valley fill aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boutt, D.F.; Fleming, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    In humid regions a strong coupling between surface water features and groundwater systems may exist. In these environments the exchange of water and solute depends primarily on the hydraulic gradient between the reservoirs. We hypothesize that daily changes in river stage associated with anthropogenic water releases (such as those from a hydroelectric dam) cause anomalous mixing in the near-stream environment by creating large hydraulic head gradients between the stream and adjacent aquifer. We present field observations of hydraulic gradient reversals in a shallow aquifer. Important physical processes observed in the field are explicitly reproduced in a physically based two-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow coupled to a simplistic surface water boundary condition. Mass transport simulations of a conservative solute introduced into the surface water are performed and examined relative to a stream condition without stage fluctuations. Simulations of 20 d for both fluctuating river stage and fixed high river stage show that more mass is introduced into the aquifer from the stream in the oscillating case even though the net water flux is zero. Enhanced transport by mechanical dispersion leads to mass being driven away from the hydraulic zone of influence of the river. The modification of local hydraulic gradients is likely to be important for understanding dissolved mass transport in near-stream aquifer environments and can influence exchange zone processes under conditions of high-frequency stream stage changes. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Mass Transport and Shear Stress as Mediators of Flow Effects on Atherosclerotic Plaque Origin and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading site for atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. The specific mechanisms by which perturbed flow at the bifurcation and in the carotid bulge promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered dominant factors. Shear stress causes restructuring of endothelial cells at the arterial wall which changes the wall's permeability. Long residence times are associated with enhanced mass transport through increased diffusion of lipids and white blood cells into the arterial wall. Although momentum and mass transfer are traditionally coupled by correlations similar to Reynolds Analogy, the complex flow patterns present in this region due to the pulsatile, transitional, detached flow associated with the complex geometry makes the validity of commonly accepted assumptions uncertain. We create solid models of the CAB from MRI or ultrasound medical images, build flow phantoms on clear polyester resin and use an IOR matching, blood mimicking, working fluid. Using PIV and dye injection techniques the shear stress and scalar transport are experimentally investigated. Our goal is to establish a quantitative relationship between momentum and mass transfer under a wide range of physiologically normal and pathological conditions.

  15. Finite element modeling of mass transport in high-Péclet cardiovascular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Kirk; Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2016-11-01

    Mass transport plays an important role in many important cardiovascular processes, including thrombus formation and atherosclerosis. These mass transport problems are characterized by Péclet numbers of up to 108, leading to several numerical difficulties. The presence of thin near-wall concentration boundary layers requires very fine mesh resolution in these regions, while large concentration gradients within the flow cause numerical stabilization issues. In this work, we will discuss some guidelines for solving mass transport problems in cardiovascular flows using a stabilized Galerkin finite element method. First, we perform mesh convergence studies in a series of idealized and patient-specific geometries to determine the required near-wall mesh resolution for these types of problems, using both first- and second-order tetrahedral finite elements. Second, we investigate the use of several boundary condition types at outflow boundaries where backflow during some parts of the cardiac cycle can lead to convergence issues. Finally, we evaluate the effect of reducing Péclet number by increasing mass diffusivity as has been proposed by some researchers. This work was supported by the NSF GRFP and NSF Career Award #1354541.

  16. Guidance and trajectory considerations in lunar mass transportation. [to space colonies at libration points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppenheimer, T. A.; Kaplan, D.

    1977-01-01

    Flight-mechanics problems associated with large-scale transport of lunar mass to a space colony or manufacturing facility are discussed. The proposed transport method involves launch of payloads from a mass-driver on the lunar surface, onto ballistic trajectories to a passive mass-catcher located near the L2 libration point, with the caught mass subsequently being transported to the colony. Arrival velocities at L2, sensitivities in arrival dispersion due to launch errors, and effects of launch site location are treated, via numerically integrated orbits in the restricted three-body problem. From any launch site it is possible to define a target point reached with zero dispersion due to errors in a selected component of launch velocity. Effects of lunar geometrical librations and of obliquity, as well as the conditions for biasing a trajectory away from L2 so as to reduce stationkeeping costs, are dealt with along with transfer orbits from L2 to the colony. The theory of capture and the theory of resonance lead to a colony orbit, with period approximately two weeks, reached from L2 with velocity increment as low as 9.02 m/sec.

  17. Mass transport disturbances in the distal graft/artery junction of a peripheral bypass graft.

    PubMed

    Devereux, P D; O'Callaghan, S M; Walsh, M T; McGloughlin, T

    2005-11-01

    Intimal hyperplasia (IH) development is a primary cause of failure of reconstructive bypass surgery. While the exact mechanism by which IH initiates and proliferates has yet to be fully elucidated, it is clear that the abnormal haemodynamics present in the downstream graft/artery junction are intrinsic in its development. Mass transport disturbances owing to abnormal haemodynamics have been associated with atherogenesis and it is for this reason that an investigation into transport of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a known promoter of the intimal hyperplastic response, at the downstream graft/artery junction was carried out. A steady flow analysis in a three-dimensional, idealized, downstream graft/artery junction was carried out using commercial computational fluid dynamics software. It was found that there is a two-and-half fold increase in the transport of PDGF to the artery wall at the bed of the junction when compared with an idealized, healthy artery. The presence of secondary flows in the downstream arterial section also leads to large disturbances in mass transport. It was concluded that PDGF transport in the downstream graft/artery junction tends to be highly disturbed and that there may be a role of this disturbance in the initiation and subsequent development of distal anastomotic intimal hyperplasia.

  18. Isotopic and trace element sensors for fluid flow, heat- and mass transport in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaolo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The flow of fluids through fractured rocks is critically important in hydrothermal systems associated with geothermal energy production, base metal ore deposits, and global geochemical cycles through the enormous volumes of fluids in mid-ocean ridge systems. The nature of heat and mass transport in hydrothermal systems is determined by the spacing and volume of fractures, the nature of chemical transport in matrix blocks between fractures, the dissolution and precipitation rates of minerals in the matrix blocks, and the rates of fluid flow. Directly measuring these properties in active systems is extremely difficult, but the chemical and isotopic composition of fluids, where they can be adequately sampled, provides this information in coded form. Deciphering the signals requires appropriate models for the mineral-fluid chemical reactions and transport in the inter-fracture rock matrix. Ultimately, numerical reactive transport models are required to properly account for coupling between mineral reaction kinetics and fluid phase transport, but it is surprisingly difficult to adequately represent isotopic exchange in these models. The difficulty comes partly from the additional bookkeeping that is necessary, but more fundamentally from limitations in the detailed molecular dynamics of the mineral-fluid interfaces and how they control isotopic exchange and partitioning. Nevertheless, relatively simple analytical models illustrate how the isotopic and trace element composition of fluids relates to fracture aperture and spacing, mineral dissolution kinetics, competition between diffusive and advective transport, and competition between chemical exchange and heat exchange. The large number of geochemical parameters that can be measured potentially allows for detailed characterization of the effective mass transport and system characteristics like average fracture spacing and mineral dissolution rates. Examples of useful analytical models and applications to available data

  19. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  20. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  1. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  2. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    DOE PAGES

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose–Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. Lastly, the presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  3. Can transport peak explain the low-mass enhancement of dileptons at RHIC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Y.; Hamagaki, H.; Hatsuda, T.; Hirano, T.

    2011-12-01

    We propose a novel relation between the low-mass enhancement of dielectrons observed at PHENIX and transport coefficients of QGP such as the charge diffusion constant D and the relaxation time τJ. We parameterize the transport peak in the spectral function using the second-order relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics by Israel and Stewart. Combining the spectral function and the full (3+1)-dimensional hydrodynamical evolution with the lattice EoS, theoretical dielectron spectra and the experimental data are compared. Detailed analysis suggests that the low-mass dilepton enhancement originates mainly from the high-temperature QGP phase where there is a large electric charge fluctuation as obtained from lattice QCD simulations.

  4. Numerical Computation of Mass Transport in Low Reynolds Number Flows and the Concentration Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    Understanding the physical mechanisms by which an individual cell interacts with its environment often requires detailed information about the fluid in which the cell is immersed. Mass transport between the interior of the cell and the external environment is influenced by the flow of the extracellular fluid and the molecular diffusivity. Analytical calculations of the flow field are challenging in simple geometries, and not generally available in more realistic cases with irregular domain boundaries. Motivated by these problems, we discuss the numerical solution of Stokes equation by implementing a Gauss-Seidel algorithm on a staggered computational grid. The computed velocity profile is used as input to numerically solve the advection-diffusion equation for mass transport. Special attention is paid to the case of two-dimensional flows at large Péclet number. The numerical results are compared with a perturbative analytical treatment of the concentration boundary layer.

  5. A non-equilibrium thermodynamics model of multicomponent mass and heat transport in pervaporation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaluenga, Juan P. G.; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2012-12-01

    The framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) is used to derive heat and mass transport equations for pervaporation of a binary mixture in a membrane. In this study, the assumption of equilibrium of the sorbed phase in the membrane and the adjacent phases at the feed and permeate sides of the membrane is abandoned, defining the interface properties using local equilibrium. The transport equations have been used to model the pervaporation of a water-ethanol mixture, which is typically encountered in the dehydration of organics. The water and ethanol activities and temperature profiles are calculated taking mass and heat coupling effects and surfaces into account. The NET approach is deemed good because the temperature results provided by the model are comparable to experimental results available for water-alcohol systems.

  6. An overview of polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer for hydrogen production: Modeling and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdol Rahim, A. H.; Tijani, Alhassan Salami; Kamarudin, S. K.; Hanapi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer (PEME) is a candidate for advanced engineering technology. There are many polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) models that have been reported, but none regarding PEME. This paper presents state of the art mass transport models applied to PEME, a detailed literature review of these models and associate methods have been conducted. PEME models are typically developed using analytical, semi empirical and mechanistic techniques that are based on their state and spatial dimensions. Methods for developing the PEME models are introduced and briefly explained. Furthermore the model cell voltage of PEME, which consists of Nernst voltage, ohmic over potential, activation over potential, and diffusion over potential is discussed with focus on mass transport modeling. This paper also presents current issues encountered with PEME model.

  7. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.C. )

    1992-06-01

    Mass transport through concrete barriers and release rate from concrete vaults are quantitatively evaluated. The thorny issue of appropriate diffusion coefficients for use in performance assessment calculations is covered, with no ultimate solution found. Release from monolithic concrete vaults composed of concrete waste forms is estimated with a semi-analytical solution. A parametric study illustrates the importance of different parameters on release. A second situation of importance is the role of a concrete shell or vault placed around typical waste forms in limiting mass transport. In both situations, the primary factor controlling concrete performance is cracks. The implications of leaching behavior on likely groundwater concentrations is examined. Frequently, lower groundwater concentrations can be expected in the absence of engineered covers that reduce infiltration.

  8. Nanoparticle traffic on helical tracks: thermophoretic mass transport through carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Philipp A E; Walther, Jens H; Arcidiacono, Salvatore; Poulikakos, Dimos; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate and quantify thermophoretic motion of solid gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes subject to wall temperature gradients ranging from 0.4 to 25 K/nm. For temperature gradients below 1 K/nm, we find that the particles move "on tracks" in a predictable fashion as they follow unique helical orbits depending on the geometry of the carbon nanotubes. These findings markedly advance our knowledge of mass transport mechanisms relevant to nanoscale applications.

  9. Final Report - Ion Production and Transport in Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source Mass Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2014-05-14

    This document is the final report on a project that focused in the general theme of atmospheric-pressure ion production and transport for mass spectrometry. Within that general theme there were two main projects: the fundamental study of the transport of elemental ions through the vacuum interface of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), and fundamental studies of the ionization mechanisms in ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources for molecular mass spectrometry. In both cases the goal was to generate fundamental understanding of key instrumental processes that would lead to the development of instruments that were more sensitive and more consistent in their performance. The emphasis on consistency derives from the need for instruments that have the same sensitivity, regardless of sample type. In the jargon of analytical chemistry, such instruments are said to be free from matrix effects. In the ICPMS work each stage of ion production and of ion transport from the atmospheric pressure to the high-vacuum mass analyzer was studied. Factors controlling ion transport efficiency and consistency were identified at each stage of pressure reduction. In the ADI work the interactions between an electrospray plume and a fluorescent sample on a surface were examined microscopically. A new mechanism for analyte ion production in desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was proposed. Optical spectroscopy was used to track the production of reactive species in plasmas used as ADI sources. Experiments with mixed-gas plasmas demonstrated that the addition of a small amount of hydrogen to a helium ADI plasma could boost the sensitivity for some analytes by over an order of magnitude.

  10. Alternating photoinduced mass transport triggered by light polarization in azobenzene containing sol-gel films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, F.; Lassailly, Y.; Lahlil, K.; Boilot, J. P.; Peretti, J.

    2010-02-01

    Combined shear-force and near-field optical microscopies are used for real-time monitoring of the formation of photoinduced surface relief gratings in photochromic thin films containing azobenzene derivatives. The correlated optical and topographical images provide evidence that the direction of the photoinduced matter migration is defined by the light polarization pattern and that, for a given light intensity pattern, modulating the polarization between two orthogonal states gives rise to alternating mass transport.

  11. Interannual variability of water masses transports across A25-OVIDE section (subpolar atlantic gyre)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo, L. I.; García, M.; Mercier, H.; Conde, P.; Lherminier, P.; Pérez, F. F.; Gilcoto, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Ovide (Observatoire de la Variabilité Interannuelle à DEcennale) project has consisted on repeated trans-oceanic hydrographic section from Greenland to Portugal every other year (from 2002 to 2010). This project is part of the CLIVAR (Climate Variability and Predictability) and CARBOOCEAN international programs, both focused on ocean climate variability. The section crosses the main currents implicated in the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC), and is very close to the previous A25 section ("Fourex") of the WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) performed in 1997. The North Atlantic Ocean plays a crucial role in the global thermohaline circulation as can be considered the departure point of the MOC, where the warm salty waters are transformed by deep winter convection into deep waters. The water mass distribution in the section is derived by means of OMP method for every cruise, and then combined with absolute velocity fields to provide the relative contribution from each water mass to the final transport values. The water mass circulation pattern across the section is then discussed within the context of interannual variability of the main MOC components, in terms of the different water mass components. The mean transport for each of these water masses results in 11.7 ± 2.6 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) for central waters, 2.0 ± 0.69 Sv for SubArtic Intermediate Water, 0.58 ± 0.51 Sv for Antartic Intermediate water and MW 0.15 ± 1.3 Sv, all of them flowing northward and contributing to the upper branch of the MOC. On other hand, the lower MOC branch transports southward -8.5 ± 2.0 Sv of LSW, -3.3 ± 0.33 Sv of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water and -1.3 ± 0.92 Sv of Denmark Strait Overflow Water, with an almost zero net transport of North East Atlantic Deep Water of 0.17 ± 1.0 Sv. The knowledge of the variability and contribution of each water mass itself will allow a better understanding of the global circulation mechanisms in the

  12. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  13. Estimation of water table level and nitrate pollution based on geostatistical and multiple mass transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Varouhakis, Emmanouil A.; Papadopoulou, Maria P.

    2015-04-01

    As the sustainable use of groundwater resources is a great challenge for many countries in the world, groundwater modeling has become a very useful and well established tool for studying groundwater management problems. Based on various methods used to numerically solve algebraic equations representing groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport, numerical models are mainly divided into Finite Difference-based and Finite Element-based models. The present study aims at evaluating the performance of a finite difference-based (MODFLOW-MT3DMS), a finite element-based (FEFLOW) and a hybrid finite element and finite difference (Princeton Transport Code-PTC) groundwater numerical models simulating groundwater flow and nitrate mass transport in the alluvial aquifer of Trizina region in NE Peloponnese, Greece. The calibration of groundwater flow in all models was performed using groundwater hydraulic head data from seven stress periods and the validation was based on a series of hydraulic head data for two stress periods in sufficient numbers of observation locations. The same periods were used for the calibration of nitrate mass transport. The calibration and validation of the three models revealed that the simulated values of hydraulic heads and nitrate mass concentrations coincide well with the observed ones. The models' performance was assessed by performing a statistical analysis of these different types of numerical algorithms. A number of metrics, such as Mean Absolute Error (MAE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Bias, Nash Sutcliffe Model Efficiency (NSE) and Reliability Index (RI) were used allowing the direct comparison of models' performance. Spatiotemporal Kriging (STRK) was also applied using separable and non-separable spatiotemporal variograms to predict water table level and nitrate concentration at each sampling station for two selected hydrological stress periods. The predictions were validated using the respective measured values. Maps of water table

  14. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  15. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L; Nevers, Meredith B; Phanikumar, Mantha S

    2012-02-21

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s(-1)). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731-6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  16. A micro-mapping strategy to investigate mechanical and chemical mass transport in migmatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Pierre; Riel, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Migmatites are fantastic objects to study both mechanical and chemical mass transport occurring at mm to cm-scale. However, migmatitic outcrops are the result of complex space and time interactions between (i) melt producing reactions, (ii) melt gain/loss and (iii) retrograde reactions. This succession of events is recorded in the minerals and microstructures of migmatites, and accounts for their apparent complexity. In order to explore the controlling parameters of these chemico-mechanical mass transport, it is thus necessary to characterize in great details the compositional changes between the different migmatitic domains, such as between leucosome and residuum. In this contribution we show how suitable local effective bulk (LEB) compositions can be derived by means of standardized microprobe X-ray images, using the program XMapTools. For chemically heterogeneous samples, such as migmatites, these LEB allow to forward model the stable mineral assemblages for each domain. Those thermodynamic models are used to investigate the conditions of leucosome-residuum separation. The studied sample is a metapelite embedded within a metasedimentary xenolith in the Marcabeli pluton, El Oro Complex, Ecuador. The sample exhibits complex mineral patterns due to local melt redistribution (at mm to cm-scale). Such physical mass transport involves major changes that affect the local chemical composition observed today. At the same time gradients in chemical potential can be established between adjacent domains such as residuum and leucosome, thus triggering chemical interaction. Diffusive transport between domains aims to reduce such chemical potential gradients. Along a modelled P-T path the chemical and mineralogical evolution of micro-domains can be reconstructed for (at least the reactive parts of) the crystallization history.

  17. Criteria for local equilibrium in a system with transport of heat and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafskjold, Bjørn; Ratkje, Signe Kjelstrup

    1995-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is used to compute the coupled heat and mass transport in a binary isotope mixture of particles interacting with a Lennard-Jones/spline potential. Two different stationary states are studied, one with a fixed internal energy flux and zero mass flux, and the other with a fixed diffusive mass flux and zero temperature gradient. Computations are made for one overall temperature, T=2, and three overall number densities, n=0.1, 0.2, and 0.4. (All numerical values are given in reduced, Lennard-Jones units unless otherwise stated.) Temperature gradients are up to ∇ T=0.09 and weight-fraction gradients up to ∇ w 1=0.007. The flux-force relationships are found to be linear over the entire range. All four transport coefficients (the L-matrix) are determined and the Onsager reciprocal relationship for the off-diagonal coefficients is verified. Four different criteria are used to analyze the concept of local equilibrium in the nonequilibrium system. The local temperature fluctuation is found to be δ T≈0.03 T and of the same order as the maximum temperature difference across the control volume, except near the cold boundary. A comparison of the local potential energy, enthalpy, and pressure with the corresponding equilibrium values at the same temperature, density, and composition also verifies that local equilibrium is established, except near the boundaries of the system. The velocity contribution to the Boltzmann H-function agrees with its Maxwellian (equilibrium) value within 1%, except near the boundaries, where the deviation is up to 4%. Our results do not support the Eyring-type transport theory involving jumps across energy barriers; we find that its estimates for the heat and mass fluxes are wrong by at least one order of magnitude.

  18. Mass-conservative reconstruction of Galerkin velocity fields for transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudeler, C.; Putti, M.; Paniconi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate calculation of mass-conservative velocity fields from numerical solutions of Richards' equation is central to reliable surface-subsurface flow and transport modeling, for example in long-term tracer simulations to determine catchment residence time distributions. In this study we assess the performance of a local Larson-Niklasson (LN) post-processing procedure for reconstructing mass-conservative velocities from a linear (P1) Galerkin finite element solution of Richards' equation. This approach, originally proposed for a-posteriori error estimation, modifies the standard finite element velocities by imposing local conservation on element patches. The resulting reconstructed flow field is characterized by continuous fluxes on element edges that can be efficiently used to drive a second order finite volume advective transport model. Through a series of tests of increasing complexity that compare results from the LN scheme to those using velocity fields derived directly from the P1 Galerkin solution, we show that a locally mass-conservative velocity field is necessary to obtain accurate transport results. We also show that the accuracy of the LN reconstruction procedure is comparable to that of the inherently conservative mixed finite element approach, taken as a reference solution, but that the LN scheme has much lower computational costs. The numerical tests examine steady and unsteady, saturated and variably saturated, and homogeneous and heterogeneous cases along with initial and boundary conditions that include dry soil infiltration, alternating solute and water injection, and seepage face outflow. Typical problems that arise with velocities derived from P1 Galerkin solutions include outgoing solute flux from no-flow boundaries, solute entrapment in zones of low hydraulic conductivity, and occurrences of anomalous sources and sinks. In addition to inducing significant mass balance errors, such manifestations often lead to oscillations in concentration

  19. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    PubMed

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials.

  20. 1. Transport of Mass, Momentum and Energy in Planetary Magnetodisc Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilleos, Nicholas; André, Nicolas; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Brandt, Pontus C.; Delamere, Peter A.; Winglee, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The rapid rotation of the gas giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, leads to the formation of magnetodisc regions in their magnetospheric environments. In these regions, relatively cold plasma is confined towards the equatorial regions, and the magnetic field generated by the azimuthal (ring) current adds to the planetary dipole, forming radially distended field lines near the equatorial plane. The ensuing force balance in the equatorial magnetodisc is strongly influenced by centrifugal stress and by the thermal pressure of hot ion populations, whose thermal energy is large compared to the magnitude of their centrifugal potential energy. The sources of plasma for the Jovian and Kronian magnetospheres are the respective satellites Io (a volcanic moon) and Enceladus (an icy moon). The plasma produced by these sources is globally transported outwards through the respective magnetosphere, and ultimately lost from the system. One of the most studied mechanisms for this transport is flux tube interchange, a plasma instability which displaces mass but does not displace magnetic flux—an important observational constraint for any transport process. Pressure anisotropy is likely to play a role in the loss of plasma from these magnetospheres. This is especially the case for the Jovian system, which can harbour strong parallel pressures at the equatorial segments of rotating, expanding flux tubes, leading to these regions becoming unstable, blowing open and releasing their plasma. Plasma mass loss is also associated with magnetic reconnection events in the magnetotail regions. In this overview, we summarise some important observational and theoretical concepts associated with the production and transport of plasma in giant planet magnetodiscs. We begin by considering aspects of force balance in these systems, and their coupling with the ionospheres of their parent planets. We then describe the role of the interaction between neutral and ionized species, and how it determines

  1. Coping with model error in variational data assimilation using optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Lipeng; Carli, Francesca P.; Ebtehaj, Ardeshir Mohammad; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Georgiou, Tryphon T.

    2014-07-01

    Classical variational data assimilation methods address the problem of optimally combining model predictions with observations in the presence of zero-mean Gaussian random errors. However, in many natural systems, uncertainty in model structure and/or model parameters often results in systematic errors or biases. Prior knowledge about such systematic model error for parametric removal is not always feasible in practice, limiting the efficient use of observations for improved prediction. The main contribution of this work is to advocate the relevance of transportation metrics for quantifying nonrandom model error in variational data assimilation for nonnegative natural states and fluxes. Transportation metrics (also known as Wasserstein metrics) originate in the theory of Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) and provide a nonparametric way to compare distributions which is natural in the sense that it penalizes mismatch in the values and relative position of "masses" in the two distributions. We demonstrate the promise of the proposed methodology using 1-D and 2-D advection-diffusion dynamics with systematic error in the velocity and diffusivity parameters. Moreover, we combine this methodology with additional regularization functionals, such as the ℓ1-norm of the state in a properly chosen domain, to incorporate both model error and potential prior information in the presence of sparsity or sharp fronts in the underlying state of interest.

  2. Mass and momentum turbulent transport experiments with confined swirling coaxial jets. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Roback, R.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of swirling coaxial jets discharging into an expanded duct was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the combustion community. A combination of laser velocimeter and laser induced fluorescence techniques was employed to obtain mean and fluctuating velocity and concentration distributions which were used to derive mass and momentum turbulent transport parameters currently incorporated into various combustor flow models. Flow visualization techniques were also employed to determine qualitatively the time dependent characteristics of the flow and the scale of turbulence. Mean and fluctuating velocity profiles and probability density functions were obtained at selected axial and radial locations throughout the flow field. Mixing occurred in several steps of axial and radial mass transport and was coupled with a large radial mean convective flux. Major mixing regions were observed to occur (1) at the interface between the inner stream and the centerline recirculation zone, and (2) at the interface between the inner jet and the annular jet streams. Mixing for swirling flow was completed in one-third the length required for nonswirling flow.

  3. Mass and momentum turbulent transport experiments with swirling confined coaxial jets. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, R.; Johnson, B. V.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of swirling coaxial jets discharging into an expanded duct was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the combustion community. A combination of laser velocimeter and laser induced fluorescence techniques was employed to obtain mean and fluctuating velocity and concentration distributions at selected axial and radial locations throughout the flow field. Flow visualization techniques were also employed to determine qualitatively the time dependent characteristics of the flow and the scale of turbulence. Simultaneous two component velocity and concentration/velocity measurements provided data which were used to determine the average momentum and mass transport rates for each of three measurement planes. Mixing for swirling flows occurred in several steps of axial and radial mean convective flow and was completed in one-third the length required for nonswirling flow. Comparison of the mass and momentum transport processes for swirling and nonswirling flows indicated that large differences existed in these processes between the two flows.

  4. Mass-corrections for the conservative coupling of flow and transport on collocated meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich

    2016-01-15

    Buoyancy-driven flow models demand a careful treatment of the mass-balance equation to avoid spurious source and sink terms in the non-linear coupling between flow and transport. In the context of finite-elements, it is therefore commonly proposed to employ sufficiently rich pressure spaces, containing piecewise constant shape functions to obtain local or even strong mass-conservation. In three-dimensional computations, this usually requires nonconforming approaches, special meshes or higher order velocities, which make these schemes prohibitively expensive for some applications and complicate the implementation into legacy code. In this paper, we therefore propose a lean and conservatively coupled scheme based on standard stabilized linear equal-order finite elements for the Stokes part and vertex-centered finite volumes for the energy equation. We show that in a weak mass-balance it is possible to recover exact conservation properties by a local flux-correction which can be computed efficiently on the control volume boundaries of the transport mesh. We discuss implementation aspects and demonstrate the effectiveness of the flux-correction by different two- and three-dimensional examples which are motivated by geophysical applications.

  5. Biofilm dynamics characterization using a novel DO-MEA sensor: mass transport and biokinetics.

    PubMed

    Guimerà, Xavier; Moya, Ana; Dorado, Antonio David; Villa, Rosa; Gabriel, David; Gabriel, Gemma; Gamisans, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation process modeling is an essential tool for the optimization of biotechnologies related to gaseous pollutant treatment. In these technologies, the predominant role of biofilm, particularly under conditions of no mass transfer limitations, results in a need to determine what processes are occurring within the same. By measuring the interior of the biofilms, an increased knowledge of mass transport and biodegradation processes may be attained. This information is useful in order to develop more reliable models that take biofilm heterogeneity into account. In this study, a new methodology, based on a novel dissolved oxygen (DO) and mass transport microelectronic array (MEA) sensor, is presented in order to characterize a biofilm. Utilizing the MEA sensor, designed to obtain DO and diffusivity profiles with a single measurement, it was possible to obtain distributions of oxygen diffusivity and biokinetic parameters along a biofilm grown in a flat plate bioreactor (FPB). The results obtained for oxygen diffusivity, estimated from oxygenation profiles and direct measurements, revealed that changes in its distribution were reduced when increasing the liquid flow rate. It was also possible to observe the effect of biofilm heterogeneity through biokinetic parameters, estimated using the DO profiles. Biokinetic parameters, including maximum specific growth rate, the Monod half-saturation coefficient of oxygen, and the maintenance coefficient for oxygen which showed a marked variation across the biofilm, suggest that a tool that considers the heterogeneity of biofilms is essential for the optimization of biotechnologies.

  6. Mass-corrections for the conservative coupling of flow and transport on collocated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow models demand a careful treatment of the mass-balance equation to avoid spurious source and sink terms in the non-linear coupling between flow and transport. In the context of finite-elements, it is therefore commonly proposed to employ sufficiently rich pressure spaces, containing piecewise constant shape functions to obtain local or even strong mass-conservation. In three-dimensional computations, this usually requires nonconforming approaches, special meshes or higher order velocities, which make these schemes prohibitively expensive for some applications and complicate the implementation into legacy code. In this paper, we therefore propose a lean and conservatively coupled scheme based on standard stabilized linear equal-order finite elements for the Stokes part and vertex-centered finite volumes for the energy equation. We show that in a weak mass-balance it is possible to recover exact conservation properties by a local flux-correction which can be computed efficiently on the control volume boundaries of the transport mesh. We discuss implementation aspects and demonstrate the effectiveness of the flux-correction by different two- and three-dimensional examples which are motivated by geophysical applications.

  7. Oligomers modulate interfibril branching and mass transport properties of collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Catherine F; Brandner, Eric; Teo, Ka Yaw; Han, Bumsoo; Nauman, Eric; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L

    2013-10-01

    Mass transport within collagen-based matrices is critical to tissue development, repair, and pathogenesis, as well as the design of next-generation tissue engineering strategies. This work shows how collagen precursors, specified by intermolecular cross-link composition, provide independent control of collagen matrix mechanical and transport properties. Collagen matrices were prepared from tissue-extracted monomers or oligomers. Viscoelastic behavior was measured in oscillatory shear and unconfined compression. Matrix permeability and diffusivity were measured using gravity-driven permeametry and integrated optical imaging, respectively. Both collagen types showed an increase in stiffness and permeability hindrance with increasing collagen concentration (fibril density); however, different physical property–concentration relationships were noted. Diffusivity was not affected by concentration for either collagen type over the range tested. In general, oligomer matrices exhibited a substantial increase in stiffness and only a modest decrease in transport properties when compared with monomer matrices prepared at the same concentration. The observed differences in viscoelastic and transport properties were largely attributed to increased levels of interfibril branching within oligomer matrices. The ability to relate physical properties to relevant microstructure parameters, including fibril density and interfibril branching, is expected to advance the understanding of cell–matrix signaling, as well as facilitate model-based prediction and design of matrix-based therapeutic strategies.

  8. Resistance of Citrus Fruit to Mass Transport of Water Vapor and Other Gases 1

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yehoshua, Shimshon; Burg, Stanley P.; Young, Roger

    1985-01-01

    The resistance of oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) to ethylene, O2, CO2, and H2O mass transport was investigated anatomically with scanning electron microscope and physiologically by gas exchange measurements at steady state. The resistance of untreated fruit to water vapor is far less than to ethylene, CO2 and O2. Waxing partially or completely plugs stomatal pores and forms an intermittent cracked layer over the surface of fruit, restricting transport of ethylene, O2, and CO2, but not of water; whereas individual sealing of fruit with high density polyethylene films reduces water transport by 90% without substantially inhibiting gas exchange. Stomata of harvested citrus fruits are essentially closed. However, ethylene, O2 and CO2 still diffuse mainly through the residual stomatal opening where the relative transport resistance (approximately 6,000 seconds per centimeter) depends on the relative diffusivity of each gas in air. Water moves preferentially by a different pathway, probably through a liquid aqueous phase in the cuticle where water conductance is 60-fold greater. Other gases are constrained from using this pathway because their diffusivity in liquid water is 104-fold less than in air. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16664527

  9. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The 'minimum mass' protosolar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual 'minimum-mass' model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula.

  10. Mass balance method for estimating transcapillary protein transport in an extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, J.J.; Hing, C.T.

    1985-03-01

    A clinical procedure for applying the mass balance method to estimate transcapillary protein transport was compared with the experimental procedure of direct tissue monitoring of the rate of /sup 125/I- albumin accumulation in the dog hindlimb under conditions of venous pressure (Pv) elevation, norepinephrine infusion, and hemorrhagic hypotension. Over a wide range of venous protein flux (0.2 to 4.6 mg/min x 100 gm), the two estimates correlated well. The correlation coefficients were 0.987, 0.962, and 0.993 for Pv elevation in the control state, during norepinephrine infusion, and following hemorrhage, respectively. Since the clinical format requires only estimates of tissue blood flow, the change in tissue volume, and the change in protein concentration easily obtained with strain gauge plethysmography and venous blood sampling, it represents a relatively innocuous procedure for estimating protein transport which should be suitable for clinical application.

  11. Comparison of Flamelet Models with the Transported Mass Fraction Approach for Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenhai; Alabi, Ken; Ladeinde, Foluso

    2015-11-01

    In this study, two fully compressible RANS, LES, and combined RANS/LES flow solvers - AEROFLO and VULCAN, both of which were originally developed by the United States Department of Defense but have since been significantly enhanced and commercialized by our organization, are used to investigate the accuracy of flamelet-based approach when employed to model supersonic combustion. The flamelet results from both codes are assessed relative to solutions obtained by solving the transport equations for the mass fractions - which is also supported by one of the codes, and making familiar assumptions about the closure of the reaction rate. The studies are carried out in the flamelet regime, and the numerical procedures are based on high-order schemes, which are also used to solve the level-set and mixture fraction transport equations used to study, respectively, premixed and non-premixed combustion. The effects of supersonic Mach numbers on the results are discussed.

  12. Mass transport and crystal growth of the mixed ZrS2-ZrSe2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, Heribert; Goldman, Howard

    1986-01-01

    The solid solubility of the ZrS2-ZrSe2 system was reinvestigated by annealing techniques to establish the relationship between composition and lattice parameters. Mixed crystals of ZrS(2x)Se2(1-x) for selected compositions of the source material were grown by chemical vapor transport and characterized by X-ray diffraction and microscopic methods. The mass transport rates and crystal growth of ZrSSe were investigated and compared with those of other compositions. The mass fluxes of the mixed system showed an increase with increasing selenium content. The transport products were richer in ZrSe2 than the residual source materials when the ZrSe2 content of the starting materials was greater than 50 mol.-pct. The mass transport rates revealed an increasing mass flux with pressure.

  13. Neutrino Transport in Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries: Dynamical Mass Ejection and Neutrino-Driven Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, K.; Kiuchi, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our recent results of numerical-relativity simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers incorporating approximate neutrino transport. We in particular discuss dynamical mass ejection and neutrino-driven wind.

  14. A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

  15. Evaluation and optimization of mass transport of redox species in silicon microwire-array photoelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Meng, Andrew C.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical integration of a Ag electrical contact internally into a metal/substrate/microstructured Si wire array/oxide/Ag/electrolyte photoelectrochemical solar cell has produced structures that display relatively low ohmic resistance losses, as well as highly efficient mass transport of redox species in the absence of forced convection. Even with front-side illumination, such wire-array based photoelectrochemical solar cells do not require a transparent conducting oxide top contact. In contact with a test electrolyte that contained 50 mM/5.0 mM of the cobaltocenium+/0 redox species in CH3CN–1.0 M LiClO4, when the counterelectrode was placed in the solution and separated from the photoelectrode, mass transport restrictions of redox species in the internal volume of the Si wire array photoelectrode produced low fill factors and limited the obtainable current densities to 17.6 mA cm-2 even under high illumination. In contrast, when the physically integrated internal Ag film served as the counter electrode, the redox couple species were regenerated inside the internal volume of the photoelectrode, especially in regions where depletion of the redox species due to mass transport limitations would have otherwise occurred. This behavior allowed the integrated assembly to operate as a two-terminal, stand-alone, photoelectrochemical solar cell. The current density vs. voltage behavior of the integrated photoelectrochemical solar cell produced short-circuit current densities in excess of 80 mA cm-2 at high light intensities, and resulted in relatively low losses due to concentration overpotentials at 1 Sun illumination. The integrated wire array-based device architecture also provides design guidance for tandem photoelectrochemical cells for solar-driven water splitting. PMID:22904185

  16. Evaluation and optimization of mass transport of redox species in silicon microwire-array photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Meng, Andrew C; Lewis, Nathan S

    2012-09-25

    Physical integration of a Ag electrical contact internally into a metal/substrate/microstructured Si wire array/oxide/Ag/electrolyte photoelectrochemical solar cell has produced structures that display relatively low ohmic resistance losses, as well as highly efficient mass transport of redox species in the absence of forced convection. Even with front-side illumination, such wire-array based photoelectrochemical solar cells do not require a transparent conducting oxide top contact. In contact with a test electrolyte that contained 50 mM/5.0 mM of the cobaltocenium(+/0) redox species in CH(3)CN-1.0 M LiClO(4), when the counterelectrode was placed in the solution and separated from the photoelectrode, mass transport restrictions of redox species in the internal volume of the Si wire array photoelectrode produced low fill factors and limited the obtainable current densities to 17.6 mA cm(-2) even under high illumination. In contrast, when the physically integrated internal Ag film served as the counter electrode, the redox couple species were regenerated inside the internal volume of the photoelectrode, especially in regions where depletion of the redox species due to mass transport limitations would have otherwise occurred. This behavior allowed the integrated assembly to operate as a two-terminal, stand-alone, photoelectrochemical solar cell. The current density vs. voltage behavior of the integrated photoelectrochemical solar cell produced short-circuit current densities in excess of 80 mA cm(-2) at high light intensities, and resulted in relatively low losses due to concentration overpotentials at 1 Sun illumination. The integrated wire array-based device architecture also provides design guidance for tandem photoelectrochemical cells for solar-driven water splitting.

  17. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. II. THE RADIATIVE COOLING CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Michael, Scott; McConnell, Caitlin R.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: carmccon@indiana.edu

    2013-05-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protoplanetary disk subject to gravitational instabilities (GIs) at a time of approximate balance between heating produced by the GIs and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine cooling times, characterize GI-driven spiral waves and their resultant gravitational torques, and evaluate how accurately mass transport can be represented by an {alpha}-disk formulation. Four simulations, identical except for azimuthal resolution, are conducted with a grid-based three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. There are two regions in which behaviors differ as resolution increases. The inner region, which contains 75% of the disk mass and is optically thick, has long cooling times and is well converged in terms of various measures of structure and mass transport for the three highest resolutions. The longest cooling times coincide with radii where the Toomre Q has its minimum value. Torques are dominated in this region by two- and three-armed spirals. The effective {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses is typically a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and is only roughly consistent with local balance of heating and cooling when time-averaged over many dynamic times and a wide range of radii. On the other hand, the outer disk region, which is mostly optically thin, has relatively short cooling times and does not show convergence as resolution increases. Treatment of unstable disks with optical depths near unity with realistic radiative transport is a difficult numerical problem requiring further study. We discuss possible implications of our results for numerical convergence of fragmentation criteria in disk simulations.

  18. Angular momentum transport efficiency in post-main sequence low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, F.; Gellert, M.; Arlt, R.; Deheuvels, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Using asteroseismic techniques, it has recently become possible to probe the internal rotation profile of low-mass (≈1.1-1.5 M⊙) subgiant and red giant stars. Under the assumption of local angular momentum conservation, the core contraction and envelope expansion occurring at the end of the main sequence would result in a much larger internal differential rotation than observed. This suggests that angular momentum redistribution must be taking place in the interior of these stars. Aims: We investigate the physical nature of the angular momentum redistribution mechanisms operating in stellar interiors by constraining the efficiency of post-main sequence rotational coupling. Methods: We model the rotational evolution of a 1.25M⊙ star using the Yale Rotational stellar Evolution Code. Our models take into account the magnetic wind braking occurring at the surface of the star and the angular momentum transport in the interior, with an efficiency dependent on the degree of internal differential rotation. Results: We find that models including a dependence of the angular momentum transport efficiency on the radial rotational shear reproduce very well the observations. The best fit of the data is obtained with an angular momentum transport coefficient scaling with the ratio of the rotation rate of the radiative interior over that of the convective envelope of the star as a power law of exponent ≈3. This scaling is consistent with the predictions of recent numerical simulations of the Azimuthal Magneto-Rotational Instability. Conclusions: We show that an angular momentum transport process whose efficiency varies during the stellar evolution through a dependence on the level of internal differential rotation is required to explain the observed post-main sequence rotational evolution of low-mass stars.

  19. Groundwater contamination: identification of source signal by time-reverse mass transport computation and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussis, A. S.; Mazi, K.; Lykoudis, S.; Argyriou, A.

    2003-04-01

    Source signal identification is a forensic task, within regulatory and legal activities. Estimation of the contaminant's release history by reverse-solution (stepping back in time) of the mass transport equation, partialC/partialt + u partialC/partialx = D partial^2C/ partialx^2, is an ill-posed problem (its solution is non-unique and unstable). For this reason we propose the recovery of the source signal from measured concentration profile data through a numerical technique that is based on the premise of advection-dominated transport. We derive an explicit numerical scheme by discretising the pure advection equation, partialC/ partialt + u partial C/partialx = 0, such that it also models gradient-transport by matching numerical diffusion (leading truncation error term) to physical dispersion. The match is achieved by appropriate choice of the scheme’s spatial weighting coefficient q as function of the grid Peclet number P = u Δx/D: θ = 0.5 - P-1. This is a novel and efficient direct solution approach for the signal identification problem at hand that can accommodate space-variable transport parameters as well. First, we perform numerical experiments to define proper grids (in terms of Courant {bf C} = uΔt/Δx and grid Peclet P numbers) for control of spurious oscillations (instability). We then assess recovery of source signals, from perfect as well as from error-seeded field data, considering field data resulting from single- and double-peaked source signals. With perfect data, the scheme recovers source signals with very good accuracy. With imperfect data, however, additional data conditioning is required for control of signal noise. Alternating reverse profile computation with Savitzky-Golay low-pass filtering allows the recovery of well-timed and smooth source signals that satisfy mass conservation very well. Current research focuses on: a) optimising the performance of Savitzky-Golay filters, through selection of appropriate parameters (order of least

  20. Observation of graphene bubbles and effective mass transport under graphene films.

    PubMed

    Stolyarova, E; Stolyarov, D; Bolotin, K; Ryu, S; Liu, L; Rim, K T; Klima, M; Hybertsen, M; Pogorelsky, I; Pavlishin, I; Kusche, K; Hone, J; Kim, P; Stormer, H L; Yakimenko, V; Flynn, G

    2009-01-01

    Mechanically exfoliated graphene mounted on a SiO2/Si substrate was subjected to HF/H(2)O etching or irradiation by energetic protons. In both cases gas was released from the SiO2 and accumulated at the graphene/SiO2 interface resulting in the formation of "bubbles" in the graphene sheet. Formation of these "bubbles" demonstrates the robust nature of single layer graphene membranes, which are capable of containing mesoscopic volumes of gas. In addition, effective mass transport at the graphene/SiO2 interface has been observed.

  1. Gradual conditioning of non-Gaussian transmissivity fields to flow and mass transport data: 1. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capilla, José E.; Llopis-Albert, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    SummaryThe paper presents a new stochastic inverse method for the simulation of transmissivity ( T) fields conditional to T measurements, secondary information obtained from expert judgement and geophysical surveys, transient piezometric and solute concentration measurements, and travel time data. The formulation of the method is simple and derived from the gradual deformation method. It basically consists of an iterative optimization procedure in which successive combinations of T fields, that honour T measurements and soft data (secondary data obtained from expert judgement and/or geophysical surveys), gradually lead to a simulated T field conditional to flow and mass transport data. Every combination of fields requires minimizing a penalty function that penalizes the difference between computed and measured conditioning data. This penalty function depends on only one parameter. Travel time conditioning data are considered by means of a backward-in-time probabilistic model, which extends the potential applications of the method to the characterization of groundwater contamination sources. In order to solve the mass transport equation, the method implements a Lagrangian approach that allows avoiding numerical problems usually found in Eulerian methods. Besides, to deal with highly heterogeneous and non-Gaussian media, being able to reproduce anomalous breakthrough curves, a dual-domain approach is implemented with a first-order mass transfer approach. To determine the particle distribution between the mobile domain and the immobile domain the method uses a Bernoulli trial on the appropriate phase transition probabilities, derived using the normalized zeroth spatial moments of the multirate transport equations. The presented method does not require assuming the classical multiGaussian hypothesis thus easing the reproduction of T spatial patterns where extreme values of T show high connectivity. This feature allows the reproduction of a property found in real

  2. A First Principles Study of Mass Transport in the Dehydrogenation of Lithium Amides and Lithium Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolih, Biljana

    The pursuit of competitive alternatives to energy derived from the combustion of fossil fuels, has led to a great variety of new technologies. Exceptional develop- ments in electrochemical storage and production promise to lead to clean burning passenger vehicles. The high chemical density of a hydrogen fuel cell enables it to meet current standards for driving range and weight required of vehicles, making it an excellent candidate for universal application in the automotive industry. One of the biggest obstacles the fuel cell industry has yet to overcome is the means of practical hydrogen storage. Solid state metal hydrides are a class of materials that show potential for both economic and practical hydrogen storage. The search for the ideal metal hydride is defined by thermodynamic and kinetic constraints, since the requirements for a viable system are a rapid release of hydrogen in the temperature range of -40°C, to 80°C. First-principles density functional theory is an excellent method for gaining insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of metal hydride solid state reactions. In the work presented here, density functional theory is used to explore formation energies, concentrations and migration barriers of metal hydrides. In particular, the following systems were analyzed: • Li - N - H It is well known that the reactive hydride composite LiNH 2 + LiH reversibly releases a large amount of hydrogen gas, with more favorable thermodynamics than LiNH2 alone. Kinetics of mass transport during the dehydrogenation of LiNH2 + LiH are investigated. A model is developed for determining activation energies of native defects in bulk crystals. In order to establish whether mass transport is the rate-limiting step in the dehydrogenation reaction, results are compared to experimental values. • Li - Al - H Kinetics of mass transport during the dehydrogenation of the metal hydride LiAlH2 are investigated. It is known that LiAlH4 endothermically decomposes via a two

  3. Mass estimating techniques for earth-to-orbit transports with various configuration factors and technologies applied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, P. J.; Macconochie, I. O.

    1979-01-01

    A study of an array of advanced earth-to-orbit space transportation systems with a focus on mass properties and technology requirements is presented. Methods of estimating weights of these vehicles differ from those used for commercial and military aircraft; the new techniques emphasizing winged horizontal and vertical takeoff advanced systems are described utilizing the space shuttle subsystem data base for the weight estimating equations. The weight equations require information on mission profile, the structural materials, the thermal protection system, and the ascent propulsion system, allowing for the type of construction and various propellant tank shapes. The overall system weights are calculated using this information and incorporated into the Systems Engineering Mass Properties Computer Program.

  4. Effects of Mass Fluctuation on Thermal Transport Properties in Bulk Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ben; Zhai, Pengcheng; Yang, Xuqiu; Li, Guodong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we applied large-scale molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics to study the influence of mass fluctuation on thermal transport properties in bulk Bi2Te3, namely thermal conductivity (K), phonon density of state (PDOS), group velocity (v g), and mean free path (l). The results show that total atomic mass change can affect the relevant vibrational frequency on the micro level and heat transfer rate in the macro statistic, hence leading to the strength variation of the anharmonic phonon processes (Umklapp scattering) in the defect-free Bi2Te3 bulk. Moreover, it is interesting to find that the anharmonicity of Bi2Te3 can be also influenced by atomic differences of the structure such as the mass distribution in the primitive cell. Considering the asymmetry of the crystal structure and interatomic forces, it can be concluded by phonon frequency, lifetime, and velocity calculation that acoustic-optical phonon scattering shows the structure-sensitivity to the mass distribution and complicates the heat transfer mechanism, hence resulting in the low lattice thermal conductivity of Bi2Te3. This study is helpful for designing the material with tailored thermal conductivity via atomic substitution.

  5. Mass transport at the interface between a highly permeable porous medium and an open channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, C.; Pokrajac, D.

    2012-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange has been extensively studied in the literature. The majority of papers present the results of field studies and the associated engineering simulation models. The number of laboratory studies is smaller. Most of them are focused on the bulk scale effects, since the measurements within the bed at the grain scale are difficult and therefore rare. Measurement within the pores of a permeable bed becomes possible for some idealized pore configurations. Pokrajac and Manes (2009) and Manes et al. (2009) use constant diameter spheres packed in a cubic pattern, which form straight pores (with variable cross-sectional area) in three orthogonal directions. Their results include detailed velocity measurements and the characteristics of turbulence at the fluid/porous interface, but not the mass transport. The experimental study reported here uses the same porous medium and extends this work by including grain-scale mass transport measurements. The results presented involve the hydrodynamics and the mass transport at the fluid/pore interface and within the first pore under the surface of the medium. The experiments are carried out in a 11m long and 40cm wide tilting flume. The porous medium, placed on the flume bed, is composed of 5 layers of 12mm diameter plastic spheres packed in a cubic pattern. This arrangement was chosen in order to have a regular matrix, thereby allowing measurements of the velocities and solute concentration within a pore. The measurement window covers a central section of a longitudinal pore which is visible through a lateral pore. The velocity field is measured by means of the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), and the concentration field is measured using the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). These two techniques allow simultaneous non-intrusive measurements within a single pore. The experiments involved uniform, fully developed turbulent flow. The experimental conditions were: bed slope = 0.01, water depth = 45mm, depth

  6. Coupled electrochemical and heat/mass transport characteristics in passive direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong

    This thesis presents both experimental and theoretical investigations of coupled heat/mass transfer and electrochemical characteristics in the passive DMFC. Unlike active fuel cells, which can be operated under stabilized operating conditions, the discharging behavior of the passive DMFC usually varies with time, as the methanol concentration in the fuel reservoir decreases with time. This poses a difficulty in characterizing the performance of the passive DMFC under relatively stable operating conditions. In this work, we found that the performance of the passive DMFC became relatively stable as the cell operating temperature rose to a relatively stable value. This finding indicates that the performance of the passive DMFC can be characterized by collecting polarization data at the instance when the cell operating temperature under the open-circuit condition rises to a relatively stable value. With this proposed standard of passive DMFC performance characterization, the effects of two important parameters, including methanol concentration and cell orientation, on the passive DMFC performance were then investigated. It is found that the cell performance increased with methanol concentration. Unlike previous studies that attributed the improved performance as a result of increasing methanol concentration to the reduced anode mass transport polarization, our experimental results revealed that the improved cell performance was primarily due to the increased cell operating temperature as a result of the increased rate of methanol crossover with high methanol concentration operation. We also found that the performance was sensitive to the cell orientation. The vertical operation always yielded better performance than did the horizontal operation. This can be attributed to the increased operating temperature as a result of a higher rate of methanol crossover, which resulted from the stronger natural convection in the vertical orientation. These parametric studies

  7. The synergistic effect of ultrasound and chemical penetration enhancers on chorioamnion mass transport.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Aharon; Khoury, Luai; Adato, Yair; Wolloch, Lior; Ariel, Ilana; Hallak, Mordechai; Kost, Joseph

    2015-02-28

    In our previous study we proposed the use of chemical penetration enhancers for noninvasive detection of fetus abnormalities that can also be utilized for direct fetal drug delivery. In an attempt to further increase the mass transport rate across the amniotic membrane, thus shortening the procedure and improving the applicability of the proposed procedure, the effect and mechanism of combining ultrasound exposure with chemical penetration enhancers' application were assessed. The combined effect was evaluated in vitro on post-delivery human amniotic membrane and ex vivo on rat's whole amniotic sac. Ultrasound effect has been assessed by dye experiments using a customized image analysis program. Additional insights of ultrasound effect's mechanism on biological membranes are presented. Previously we have determined that chemical penetration enhancers affect the fetal membranes via two mechanisms termed as 'extractors' and 'fluidizers'. In this study, we found that combining ultrasound with a 'fluidizer' CPE (e.g. bupivacaine) results in a synergistic enhancement (90-fold) of fetal membrane's mass transport, while combining ultrasound with 'extractors' (e.g. ethanol and NMP) results in an antagonistic effect. The combined procedure is faster and gain greater accuracy than the applications of sole chemical penetration enhancers.

  8. Task 6.7.3 - Interfacial Mass Transport Effects in Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jan W. Nowok

    1998-02-01

    Advanced metal-matrix composites (MMCS) consisting of titanium-based alloys possess some unique mechanical, physical, and chemical characteristics that make them highly desirable for aircraft and gas turbine engines. Tailoring MMC properties is essential for advanced product design in materials processing. The main factors that affect materials processing and, further, the nature of a metal-ceramic interface, its structure, and morphological stability is liquid surface mass transport related to adhesional wetting (physical effect) and reactive wetting (chemical effect).' Surfaces and interfaces dominate many of the technologically important processes in composite materials such as liquid-solid sintering and joining. The objective of this work is threefold: 1) to get insight into the role of the nonstoichiometry of chemical composition in ceramic materials used as reinforcement components in MMC processing, 2) to extend previous energetic analysis of mass transport phenomena to wetting behavior between liquid metal and the quasi-solidlike skin resulting from the presolidification of liquid on nonstoichiometric solids on a scale of interatomic distance, and 3) to provide experimental verification of our concept.

  9. Task 6.7.3 - Interfacial Mass Transport Effects in Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jan W. Nowok

    1998-02-01

    Advanced metal-matrix composites (MMCS) consisting of titanium-based alloys possess some unique mechanical, physical, and chemical characteristics that make them highly desirable for aircraft and gas turbine engines. Tailoring MMC properties is essential for advanced product design in materials processing. The main factors that affect materials processing and, further, the nature of a metal-ceramic interface, its structure, and morphological stability is liquid surface mass transport related to adhesional wetting physical effect) and reactive wetting (chemical effect). Surfaces and interfaces dominate many of the technologically important processes in composite materials such as liquid-solid sintering and joining. The objective of this work is threefold: 1) to get insight into the role of the nonstoichiometry of chemical composition in ceramic materials used as reinforcement components in MMC processing, 2) to extend previous energetic analysis of mass transport phenomena to wetting behavior between liquid metal and the quasi-solid like skin resulting from the presolidification of liquid on nonstoichiometric solids on a scale of interatomic distance, and 3) to provide experimental verification of our concept.

  10. Numerical simulation on mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor for co-culture applications.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Lee, Thong-See; Yu, Peng; Low, Hong-Tong

    2007-06-01

    Microchannel bioreactors have applications for manipulating and investigating the fluid microenvironment on cell growth and functions in either single culture or co-culture. This study considers two different types of cells distributed randomly as a co-culture at the base of a microchannel bioreactor: absorption cells, which only consume species based on the Michaelis-Menten process, and release cells, which secrete species, assuming zeroth order reaction, to support the absorption cells. The species concentrations at the co-culture cell base are computed from a three-dimensional numerical flow-model incorporating mass transport. Combined dimensionless parameters are proposed for the co-culture system, developed from a simplified analysis under the condition of decreasing axial-concentration. The numerical results of species concentration at the co-culture cell-base are approximately correlated by the combined parameters under the condition of positive flux-parameter. Based on the correlated results, the critical value of the inlet concentration is determined, which depends on the effective microchannel length. For the flow to develop to the critical inlet concentration, an upstream length consisting only of release cells is needed; this upstream length is determined from an analytical solution. The generalized results may find applications in analyzing the mass transport requirements in a co-culture microchannel bioreactor.

  11. Facile synthesis of mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with enhanced mass transport and catalytic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Ren, Yanqun; Gou, Jinsheng; Liu, Baoyu; Xi, Hongxia

    2017-01-01

    A mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with multilamellar structure was successfully synthesized by employing a tetra-headgroup rigid bolaform quaternary ammonium surfactant. It was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, amines temperature programmed desorption (amines-TPD), and computer simulation. These results indicated that the dual-functional amphiphilic surfactants play a critical role for directing the multilamellar structure with high mesoporosity. The mass transport and catalytic performances of the zeolite were investigated by zero length column (ZLC) technique and aldol condensation reactions to evaluate the structure-property relationship. These results clearly indicated that the mass transport of selected molecules in hierarchical zeolite can be accelerated by introducing mesoporous structure with mesostructure with reduced diffusion length and an overall enhanced resistance against deactivation in reactions involving large molecules. Furthermore, the dual-functional surfactant approach of making hierarchical zeolite with MFI nanosheets framework would open up new opportunities for design and synthesis of hierarchical zeolites with controllable mesoporous structures.

  12. A heuristic simulation model of Lake Ontario circulation and mass balance transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, J.E.; Chalupnicki, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The redistribution of suspended organisms and materials by large-scale currents is part of natural ecological processes in large aquatic systems but can contribute to ecosystem disruption when exotic elements are introduced into the system. Toxic compounds and planktonic organisms spend various lengths of time in suspension before settling to the bottom or otherwise being removed. We constructed a simple physical simulation model, including the influence of major tributaries, to qualitatively examine circulation patterns in Lake Ontario. We used a simple mass balance approach to estimate the relative water input to and export from each of 10 depth regime-specific compartments (nearshore vs. offshore) comprising Lake Ontario. Despite its simplicity, our model produced circulation patterns similar to those reported by more complex studies in the literature. A three-gyre pattern, with the classic large counterclockwise central lake circulation, and a simpler two-gyre system were both observed. These qualitative simulations indicate little offshore transport along the south shore, except near the mouths of the Niagara River and Oswego River. Complex flow structure was evident, particularly near the Niagara River mouth and in offshore waters of the eastern basin. Average Lake Ontario residence time is 8 years, but the fastest model pathway indicated potential transport of plankton through the lake in as little as 60 days. This simulation illustrates potential invasion pathways and provides rough estimates of planktonic larval dispersal or chemical transport among nearshore and offshore areas of Lake Ontario. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  13. Solvent-Induced Crystallization in Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) during Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao

    2001-03-01

    The solvent transport in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and related phase transformation were investigated. The data of mass sorption were analyzed according to Harmon¡¦s model for Case I (Fickian), Case II (swelling) and anomalous transport. This transport process in PET is accompanied by the induced crystallization of the original amorphous state. The transformation was studied by wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), density gradient column, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). During this process, the matrix is under a compressive strain that causes different kinetic path of crystallization as compared to that by thermal annealing. This state of strain will assist the development of the solvent-induced crystallization. It also can be explained in terms of the principle of Le Chatelier if the local equilibrium is assumed. The model regarding the crystallization was proposed in terms of the study of long period L, the crystal thickness lc and the thickness of amorphous layer la, obtained from the linear correlation function and interface distribution function.

  14. Feeding the "aneurysm": Orogen-parallel mass transport into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David M.; Beaumont, Christopher; Braun, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif (NPHM; western Himalayan syntaxis) requires an influx of mass exceeding that in the adjacent Himalayan arc to sustain high topography and rapid erosional exhumation rates. What supplies this mass flux and feeds this "tectonic aneurysm?" We show, using a simple 3-D model of oblique orogen convergence, that velocity/strain partitioning results in horizontal orogen-parallel (OP) crustal transport, and the same behavior is inferred for the Himalaya, with OP transport diverting converging crust toward the syntaxis. Model results also show that the OP flow rate decreases in the syntaxis, thereby thickening the crust and forming a structure like the NPHM. The additional crustal thickening, over and above that elsewhere in the Himalayan arc, sustains the rapid exhumation of this "aneurysm." Normally, velocity/strain partitioning would be minimal for the Himalayan arc where the convergence obliquity is no greater than ~40°. However, we show analytically that the Himalayan system can act both as a critical wedge and exhibit strain partitioning if both the detachment beneath the wedge and the bounding rear shear zone, which accommodates OP transport, are very weak. Corresponding numerical results confirm this requirement and demonstrate that a Nanga Parbat-type shortening structure can develop spontaneously if the orogenic wedge and bounding rear shear zone can strain rate soften while active. These results lead us to question whether the position of NPHM aneurysm is localized by river incision, as previously suggested, or by a priori focused tectonic shortening of the crust in the syntaxis region as demonstrated by our models.

  15. Mitigation of along-track artifacts in unconstrained mass transport models based on GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, Pavel; Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Encarnação, João.

    2010-05-01

    The satellite gravity mission GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment), which was launched in 2002, offers a unique opportunity to monitor tiny variations of the Earth's gravity and associated mass transport from space. In particular, the redistribution of water in the Earth's system can be traced in this way, which is critical for monitoring key climate indicators such as ice-sheet mass balance, terrestrial water-storage change, sea-level rise, and ocean circulation. Unfortunately, mass transport models based on GRACE data suffer from along-track artifacts. In order to suppress these artifacts, various filtering algorithms are applied to unconstrained GRACE-based models at the post-processing stage. However, any filtering not only suppresses noise but also distorts signals. Therefore, it is important to study the precise origin of the along-track artifacts in an attempt to mitigate them already at the level of unconstrained solutions. We identify two major causes of along-track artifacts: (1) the presence of low-frequency noise in GRACE data and (2) the observation principle of the GRACE satellite mission, which results in a poor sensitivity of the collected inter-satellite ranging data to the East-West gradient of the gravity field. According to our studies, an increased level of noise at low frequencies can be mostly explained by inaccuracies in the estimated orbits of GRACE satellites. To suppress this type of noise, we propose: (i) to use more advanced orbit determination procedures that allow deficiencies of available force models to be mitigated; (ii) to apply proper data weighting in the frequency domain, so that that the influence of frequencies with a large noise level is downweighted. As far as East-West gradients are concerned, we find it important to use the statistically optimal combination of GRACE inter-satellite ranging data with other observations (particularly, absolute positions of GRACE and CHAMP satellites). The added value of each of

  16. Model development and verification for mass transport to Escherichia coli cells in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondzo, Miki; Al-Homoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    Theoretical studies imply that fluid motion does not significantly increase the molecular diffusive mass flux toward and away from microscopic organisms. This study presents experimental and theoretical evidence that small-scale turbulence modulates enhanced mass transport to Escherichia coli cells in a turbulent flow. Using the technique of inner region and outer region expansions, a model for dissolved oxygen and glucose uptake by E. coli was developed. The mass transport to the E. coli was modeled by the Sherwood (Sh)-Péclet (Pe) number relationship with redefined characteristic length and velocity scales. The model Sh = (1 + Pe1/2 + Pe) agreed with the laboratory measurements well. The Péclet number that quantifies the role and function of small-scale turbulence on E. coli metabolism is defined by Pe = (?) where Ezz is the root mean square of fluid extension in the direction of local vorticity, ηK is the Kolmogorov length scale, Lc is the length scale of E. coli, and D is the molecular diffusion coefficient. An alternative formulation for the redefined Pe is given by Pe = (?) where ? = 0.5(ɛν)1/4 is the Kolmogorov velocity averaged over the Kolmogorov length scale, ɛ is dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and ν is the kinematic viscosity of fluid. The dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy was estimated directly from measured velocity gradients and was within the reported range in engineered and natural aquatic ecosytems. The specific growth of E. coli was up to 5 times larger in a turbulent flow in comparison to the still water controls. Dissolved oxygen and glucose uptake were enhanced with increased ɛ in the turbulent flow.

  17. Silicon nanopore membrane (SNM) for islet encapsulation and immunoisolation under convective transport

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shang; Faleo, Gaetano; Yeung, Raymond; Kant, Rishi; Posselt, Andrew M; Desai, Tejal A; Tang, Qizhi; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-01-01

    Problems associated with islet transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) such as shortage of donor cells, use of immunosuppressive drugs remain as major challenges. Immune isolation using encapsulation may circumvent the use of immunosuppressants and prolong the longevity of transplanted islets. The encapsulating membrane must block the passage of host’s immune components while providing sufficient exchange of glucose, insulin and other small molecules. We report the development and characterization of a new generation of semipermeable ultrafiltration membrane, the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), designed with approximately 7 nm-wide slit-pores to provide middle molecule selectivity by limiting passage of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the use of convective transport with a pressure differential across the SNM overcomes the mass transfer limitations associated with diffusion through nanometer-scale pores. The SNM exhibited a hydraulic permeability of 130 ml/hr/m2/mmHg, which is more than 3 fold greater than existing polymer membranes. Analysis of sieving coefficients revealed 80% reduction in cytokines passage through SNM under convective transport. SNM protected encapsulated islets from infiltrating cytokines and retained islet viability over 6 hours and remained responsive to changes in glucose levels unlike non-encapsulated controls. Together, these data demonstrate the novel membrane exhibiting unprecedented hydraulic permeability and immune-protection for islet transplantation therapy. PMID:27009429

  18. Silicon nanopore membrane (SNM) for islet encapsulation and immunoisolation under convective transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shang; Faleo, Gaetano; Yeung, Raymond; Kant, Rishi; Posselt, Andrew M.; Desai, Tejal A.; Tang, Qizhi; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-03-01

    Problems associated with islet transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) such as shortage of donor cells, use of immunosuppressive drugs remain as major challenges. Immune isolation using encapsulation may circumvent the use of immunosuppressants and prolong the longevity of transplanted islets. The encapsulating membrane must block the passage of host’s immune components while providing sufficient exchange of glucose, insulin and other small molecules. We report the development and characterization of a new generation of semipermeable ultrafiltration membrane, the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), designed with approximately 7 nm-wide slit-pores to provide middle molecule selectivity by limiting passage of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the use of convective transport with a pressure differential across the SNM overcomes the mass transfer limitations associated with diffusion through nanometer-scale pores. The SNM exhibited a hydraulic permeability of 130 ml/hr/m2/mmHg, which is more than 3 fold greater than existing polymer membranes. Analysis of sieving coefficients revealed 80% reduction in cytokines passage through SNM under convective transport. SNM protected encapsulated islets from infiltrating cytokines and retained islet viability over 6 hours and remained responsive to changes in glucose levels unlike non-encapsulated controls. Together, these data demonstrate the novel membrane exhibiting unprecedented hydraulic permeability and immune-protection for islet transplantation therapy.

  19. Arabian Night and Sea Story - Biomarkers from a Giant Mass Transport Deposit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratenkov, Sophia; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Clift, Peter D.; George, Simon C.

    2016-04-01

    The study of mass transport deposits (MTDs) is an important field of research due to the potential insights into catastrophic events in the past and modern geohazard threats (e.g. tsunamis). Submarine mass movements are very significant processes in sculpturing the structure of continental margins, particularly in their extent and magnitude that have consequences both in the modern day, as well as in the geological past. An understanding of the complex stratigraphy of a submarine mass transport deposit (MTD) might help in reconstructing the provenance and transport pathways of sedimentary material and thus give important insights into sedimentary dynamics and processes triggering specific events. Drilling operations during International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 355 Arabian Sea Monsoon, which took place during April and May, 2015 cored two sites in Laxmi Basin. Site U1456 was cored to 1109.4 m below seafloor (mbsf), with the oldest recovered rock dated to ~13.5-17.7 Ma. Site U1457 was cored to 1108.6 mbsf, with the oldest rock dated to ~62 Ma. At each site, we cored through ~330 m and ~190 m of MTD material. The MTD layers mainly consist of interbedded lithologies of dark grey claystone, light greenish calcarenite and calcilutite, and conglomerate/breccia, with ages based on calcareous nannofossil and foraminifer biostratigraphy ranging from the Eocene to early Miocene (Pandey et al., 2015). This MTD, known as Nataraja Slide, is the third largest MTD known from the geological record and the second largest on a passive margin. Calvés et al. (2015) identified a potential source area offshore Sourashstra on the Indian continental margin and invoked the single step mass movement model to explain the mechanism of emplacement. Initial shipboard work demonstrated the high variability in total organic carbon and total nitrogen levels in different layers within the MTD, which raises a number of questions related to the source and composition of the organic

  20. Monthly Variation of Taiwan Strait Through-flow Transports and Associated Water Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, S.; Sheu, D.; Kuo, H.

    2005-05-01

    Through-flow transports and associated water masses are analyzed using current data measured by bottom-mounted and ship-board ADCP (1999-2001) across the central Taiwan Strait and strait-wide hydrographic data acquired from 79 CTD survey cruises (1986-2003). The East Asian monsoon, from southwest in July to August and northeast in October to March, controls the transport fluctuation which peaks in August (2.34 Sv northward), is hampered by the northeast monsoon after September and diminishes to the minimum (0.26 Sv southward) in December. The standard deviation of the calculated transport ranges from 0.56 to 1.05 Sv during northeast monsoon months and is relatively small in other months. A cluster analysis together with conventional T-S diagrams identifies the saline and warm Kuroshio Branch Water (KBW), the less saline South China Sea Surface Water (SCSSW), the brackish and cold China Coastal Water (CCW), the saline Subsurface Water (SW) (depth > 100 m) and the Diluted Coastal Water (DCW). The majority of the northward transport in summer carries the SCSSW to the East China Sea. Meanwhile, the DCW appears off the northwest bank of the strait and the SW resides in the bottom layer of a deep trench in the southeastern strait. The onset of the northeast monsoon in September drives the CCW from the Yangtze river mouth to the northern strait. In the southern strait, the northward-moving KBW replaces the SCSSW and meets the southward-intruding CCW in the middle strait during November to April.

  1. Mass transport of deposited particles by surface-to-surface contact.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, A; Sextro, R G; Byrne, M A

    2012-08-15

    The spread of particle-borne contamination by surface-to-surface contact and its implications for exposures within the indoor environment have been observed - largely qualitatively. The present study was conducted with the aim of quantifying the mass transfer efficiency (TE) of deposited aerosol particles when selected soft and hard surfaces come in contact. The surfaces used were 100% cotton, synthetic fleece, plastic laminate and brass. Contact transfer efficiencies ranging from 2 to 45% were observed; these are very significant numbers in terms of hazardous aerosol transport in the environment. Other observations include an increase in the mass transferred with increased surface roughness. An increase in the applied pressure between the two surfaces in contact leads to a step change in transfer efficiency, so that two pressure regimes can be identified, with a transition pressure between them that depends on surface type. Time of contact appears to have little to no effect on the mass transfer efficiency for the surfaces studied, while contaminant loading has some effect that is not systematic.

  2. Mass transport induced by internal Kelvin waves beneath shore-fast ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StøYlen, Eivind; Weber, Jan Erik H.

    2010-03-01

    A one-layer reduced-gravity model is used to investigate the wave-induced mass flux in internal Kelvin waves along a straight coast beneath shore-fast ice. The waves are generated by barotropic tidal pumping at narrow sounds, and the ice lid introduces a no-slip condition for the horizontal wave motion. The mean Lagrangian fluxes to second order in wave steepness are obtained by integrating the equations of momentum and mass between the material interface and the surface. The mean flow is forced by the conventional radiation stress for internal wave motion, the mean pressure gradient due to the sloping surface, and the frictional drag at the boundaries. The equations that govern the mean fluxes are expressed in terms of mean Eulerian variables, while the wave forcing terms are given by the horizontal divergence of the Stokes flux. Analytical results show that the effect of friction induces a mean Eulerian flux along the coast that is comparable to the Stokes flux. In addition, the horizontal divergence of the total mean flux along the coast induces a small mass flux in the cross-shore direction. This flux changes the mean thickness of the upper layer outside the trapping region and may facilitate geostrophically balanced boundary currents in enclosed basins. This is indeed demonstrated by numerical solutions of the flux equations for confined areas larger than the trapping region. Application of the theory to Arctic waters is discussed, with emphasis on the transport of biological material and pollutants in nearshore regions.

  3. Microbial air quality in mass transport buses and work-related illness among bus drivers of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority.

    PubMed

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Sundhiyodhin, Viboonsri; Luksamijarulkul, Soavalug; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan

    2004-06-01

    The air quality in mass transport buses, especially air-conditioned buses may affect bus drivers who work full time. Bus numbers 16, 63, 67 and 166 of the Seventh Bus Zone of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority were randomly selected to investigate for microbial air quality. Nine air-conditioned buses and 2-4 open-air buses for each number of the bus (36 air-conditioned buses and 12 open-air buses) were included. Five points of in-bus air samples in each studied bus were collected by using the Millipore A ir Tester Totally, 180 and 60 air samples collected from air-conditioned buses and open-air buses were cultured for bacterial and fungal counts. The bus drivers who drove the studied buses were interviewed towards histories of work-related illness while working. The results revealed that the mean +/- SD of bacterial counts in the studied open-air buses ranged from 358.50 +/- 146.66 CFU/m3 to 506 +/- 137.62 CFU/m3; bus number 16 had the highest level. As well as the mean +/- SD of fungal counts which ranged from 93.33 +/- 44.83 CFU/m3 to 302 +/- 294.65 CFU/m3; bus number 166 had the highest level. Whereas, the mean +/- SD of bacterial counts in the studied air-conditioned buses ranged from 115.24 +/- 136.01 CFU/m3 to 244.69 +/- 234.85 CFU/m3; bus numbers 16 and 67 had the highest level. As well as the mean +/- SD of fungal counts which rangedfrom 18.84 +/- 39.42 CFU/m3 to 96.13 +/- 234.76 CFU/m3; bus number 166 had the highest level. When 180 and 60 studied air samples were analyzed in detail, it was found that 33.33% of the air samples from open-air buses and 6.11% of air samples from air-conditioned buses had a high level of bacterial counts (> 500 CFU/m3) while 6.67% of air samples from open-air buses and 2.78% of air samples from air-conditioned buses had a high level of fungal counts (> 500 CFU/m3). Data from the history of work-related illnesses among the studied bus drivers showed that 91.67% of open-air bus drivers and 57.28% of air-conditioned bus drivers had

  4. Mechanisms of mass transport during coalescence-induced microfluidic drop dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, William S.; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2016-10-01

    Confinement-guided coalescence of drops in microfluidic devices is an effective means to manipulate the composition of individual droplets. Recently, Sun et al. [Lab Chip 11, 3949 (2011), 10.1039/c1lc20709a] have shown that coalescence between a long moving plug and an array of parked droplets in a microfluidic network can be used to flexibly manipulate the composition of the static droplet arrays. However, the transport mechanisms underlying this complex dilution process have not been elucidated. In this study, we develop phenomenological models and perform particle-based numerical simulations to identify the key mass transfer mechanisms influencing the concentration profiles of drops during coalescence-induced drop dilution. Motivated by experimental observations, in the simulations we consider (i) advection within the moving plug, (ii) diffusion in the moving plug and parked droplets, (iii) fluid advection due to initiation of coalescence, and (iv) advection in the coalesced plug due to the continuous phase flowing through the gutters in noncircular microchannels. We find that the dilution process is dominated by diffusion, recirculation in the moving plug, and gutter-flow-induced advection, but is only weakly affected by coalescence-induced advection. We show that the control parameters regulating dilution can be divided into those influencing the duration of mass transfer (e.g., plug length and velocity) and those affecting the rate of mass transfer (e.g., diffusion and gutter-flow-induced advection). Finally, we demonstrate that our simulations are able to predict droplet concentration profiles in experiments. The results from this study will allow better design of drop dilution microfluidic devices. Furthermore, the identification of gutter-flow-induced advection as an alternative mass transfer mechanism in two-phase flows could potentially lead to more efficient means of oil recovery from droplets trapped in porous media.

  5. VOC Composition of Air Masses Transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, B.; Parrish, D.; Holloway, J.; Huebler, G.; Fehsenfeld, F.

    2002-12-01

    Airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were performed using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) operated onboard a NOAA WP-3 aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) experiment in 2002. Enhancements of acetone (CH3COCH3), methanol (CH3OH), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and in some cases benzene were observed in air masses that were impacted by outflow from Asia. The enhancement ratios with respect to carbon monoxide are compared to emission factors for fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, which gives some insight into the sources responsible for the pollution. The observed mixing ratios for acetone, methanol and in particular acetonitrile were generally reduced in the marine boundary layer, suggesting the presence of an ocean uptake sink. The ocean uptake of acetonitrile was found to be particularly efficient in a zone with upwelling water off of the U.S. west coast. Reduced mixing ratios of acetone and methanol were observed in a stratospheric intrusion. This observation gives some information about the lifetime of these VOCs in the stratosphere. Enhanced concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were observed in air masses that were impacted by urban sources in California. The ratio between the concentrations of benzene, toluene and higher aromatics indicated the degree of photochemical oxidation. PTR-MS only gives information about the mass of the ions produced by proton-transfer reactions between H3O+ and VOCs in the instrument. The identification of VOCs was confirmed by coupling a gas-chromatographic (GC) column to the instrument and post-flight GC-PTR-MS analyses of canister samples collected during the flights.

  6. Nitrogen transport and transformations in a shallow aquifer receiving wastewater discharge: A mass balance approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSimone, L.A.; Howes, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen transport and transformations were followed over the initial 3 years of development of a plume of wastewater-contaminated groundwater in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Ammonification and nitrification in the unsaturated zone and ammonium sorption in the saturated zone were predominant, while loss of fixed nitrogen through denitrification was minor. The major effect of transport was the oxidation of discharged organic and inorganic forms to nitrate, which was the dominant nitrogen form in transit to receiving systems. Ammonification and nitrification in the unsaturated zone transformed 16-19% and 50-70%, respectively, of the total nitrogen mass discharged to the land surface during the study but did not attenuate the nitrogen loading. Nitrification in the unsaturated zone also contributed to a pH decrease of 2 standard units and to an N2O increase (46-660 ??g N/L in the plume). Other processes in the unsaturated zone had little net effect: Ammonium sorption removed <1% of the total discharged nitrogen mass; filtering of particulate organic nitrogen was less than 3%; ammonium and nitrate assimilation was less than 6%; and ammonia volatilization was less than 0.25%. In the saturated zone a central zone of anoxic groundwater (DO ??? 0.05 mg/L) was first detected 17 months after effluent discharge to the aquifer began, which expanded at about the groundwater-flow velocity. Although nitrate was dominant at the water table, the low, carbon-limited rates of denitrification in the anoxic zone (3.0-9.6 (ng N/cm3)/d) reduced only about 2% of the recharged nitrogen mass to N2. In contrast, ammonium sorption in the saturated zone removed about 16% of the recharged nitrogen mass from the groundwater. Ammonium sorption was primarily limited to anoxic zone, where nitrification was prevented, and was best described by a Langmuir isotherm in which effluent ionic concentrations were simulated. The initial nitrogen load discharged from the groundwater system may depend largely on

  7. New evidence for widespread mass transport on the Northeast Newfoundland Shelf revealed by Olex single-beam echo sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John; Piper, David J. W.; Skulski, Thomas; Lamplugh, Michael J.; Craft, Andrew; Roy, André

    2012-02-01

    Based on Olex single-beam sounder data, multibeam sonar surveys, and sparse seismic reflection profiles, we recognize a large area of anomalous bathymetry on the Northeast Newfoundland Shelf as having formed as a result of mass-transport processes. Transported masses include (1) an arcuate ridge of deformed material with an area of 430 km2, which has moved distances of ~20 km; (2) a 70-km2 mass of deformed material displaced 50 km along a nearly horizontal track flanked by 90-m-high berms. The movement of these and other sediment bodies has created a 150-m-high headwall escarpment extending 110 km along the north flank of the Notre Dame glacial trough. In addition, a 35-km2 block of undeformed material has moved 5 km to the southeast, away from the headwall, creating a gap of the same dimensions, while a smaller block of material originating in this vicinity has been displaced 24 km in the opposite direction, creating a 20-m-deep groove on the seafloor. There is evidence for mass transport and headwall formation elsewhere on the Northeast Newfoundland Shelf. Analysis of seismic reflection data indicates that the transported material most likely consists of stacked Quaternary till sheets that overlie Cenozoic, Mesozoic and older sedimentary rocks. Given the very low gradients involved, glaciotectonism is the most likely process to account for transport and deformation of the large sediment masses. However, some mass transport may have resulted from submarine sliding away from the headwalls that were created by the glacial transport.

  8. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    PubMed Central

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical–chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches. PMID:27506380

  9. A biphasic hyperelastic model for the analysis of fluid and mass transport in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Smith, Joshua H

    2009-02-01

    A biphasic hyperelastic finite element model is proposed for the description of the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The model takes into account finite deformations through an Ogden-type hyperelastic compressible function and a hydraulic conductivity dependent on deformation. The biphasic equations, implemented here for spherical symmetry using an updated Lagrangian algorithm, yielded radial coordinates and fluid velocities that were used with the convective-diffusive equation in order to predict mass transport in the brain. Results of the model were equal to those of a closed-form solution under infinitesimal deformations, however, for a wide range of material parameters, the model predicted important increments in the infusion sphere, reductions of the fluid velocities, and changes in the species content distribution. In addition, high localized deformation and stresses were obtained at the infusion sphere. Differences with the infinitesimal solution may be mainly attributed to geometrical nonlinearities related to the increment of the infusion sphere and not to material nonlinearities.

  10. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  11. Decay Characteristics of Surface Mounds with Contrasting Interlayer Mass Transport Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Wendelken, J. F.; Liu, Bang-Gui; Wang, E. G.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  12. Decay characteristics of surface mounds with contrasting interlayer mass transport channels.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Wendelken, J F; Liu, B G; Wang, E G; Zhang, Z

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  13. Modeling of the mass transport in porous media under laser beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtatowicz, Tomasz W.

    1995-03-01

    The vaporization of porous materials (especially internal vaporization of skeleton) has been largely ignored in studies of laser heating and processing of materials. The loss of energy associated with the vaporization process would keep the internal temperature of material from rising. In this paper the author presents the results of the computation of the heat losses for two different models of porous media: the sand and the pores' tree model. In his calculation the author uses the thermophysical parameters of gypsum slurry. In the first step a numerical simulation is carried out for the vaporization of solid skeleton and mass transport of vapor (without the viscosity of vapor), only. Then the water on the pore's wall was taken into account.

  14. Contribution of di-SIA to mass transport in Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.; Pechenkin, V. A.; Molodtsov, V. L.; Terentyev, D.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the diffusion characteristics of di-self interstitial atom (di-SIA) in BCC Fe-Cr alloys and corresponding mass transport of Fe and Cratoms in the temperature range 600-1000 K in the alloys with Cr content 5-25 at%, which is relevant for ferritic/martensitic steels. An original treatment is proposed in this work to account for a mixed migration mode composed of the diffusion of the cluster itself and break-up into a pair of independent SIAs. The ratio of self-diffusion coefficients of Cr and Fe is found to exceed unity in Fe-5Cr and Fe-10Cr alloys, which implies that under cascade-producing damage, 3D-migrating small SIA clusters will effectively contribute to the segregation of Cr to neutral and SIA-preferential sinks, eventually causing radiation induced segregation.

  15. High-speed mass-transport phenomena during carburization of aluminum alloy by laser plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariaut, F.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Semmar, N.; Le Menn, E.

    2006-04-01

    In the excimer laser carburizing process reported here, aluminum alloy samples have been treated in a propylene atmosphere, producing aluminum carbide surface layers. The layers have been characterized by nuclear reaction analysis that has shown carbon incorporation. X-ray diffraction at grazing incidence has evidenced aluminum carbide (Al4C3) phase. This study helps the understanding of the incorporation mechanisms of carbon in a surface. A micro-thermocapillary effect induced by heterogeneous surface formation has been evidenced. This original mass-transport phenomenon is very efficient in improving the carbon incorporation yield and hence in obtaining carbide layers several μm in thickness with a reduced laser pulse number. In order to obtain this micro-thermocapillary effect, the binary diagram of ceramic compounds must contain a peritectic.

  16. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Burch, J.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Kuntz, Kip; Omidi, N.; Read, A.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversies surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  17. Mass transport, corrosion, plugging, and their reduction in solar dish/Stirling heat pipe receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Goods, S.H.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1996-07-01

    Solar dish/Stirling systems using sodium heat pipe receivers are being developed by industry and government laboratories here and abroad. The unique demands of this application lead to heat pipe wicks with very large surface areas and complex three-dimensional flow patterns. These characteristics can enhance the mass transport and concentration of constituents of the wick material, resulting in wick corrosion and plugging. As the test times for heat pipe receivers lengthen, we are beginning to see these effects both indirectly, as they affect performance, and directly in post-test examinations. We are also beginning to develop corrective measures. In this paper, we report on our test experiences, our post-test examinations, and on our initial effort to ameliorate various problems.

  18. Comparison of one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for mass transport of radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Prickett, T.A.; Voorhees, M.L.; Herzog, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    This technical memorandum compares one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for studying regional mass transport of radionuclides in groundwater associated with deep repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In addition, this report outlines the general conditions for which a one- or two-dimensional model could be used as an alternate to a three-dimensional model analysis. The investigation includes a review of analytical and numerical models in addition to consideration of such conditions as rock and fluid heterogeneity, anisotropy, boundary and initial conditions, and various geometric shapes of repository sources and sinks. Based upon current hydrologic practice, each review is taken separately and discussed to the extent that the researcher can match his problem conditions with the minimum number of model dimensions necessary for an accurate solution.

  19. Upward mass transport and alloying during the growth of Co on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Quang Huy; Morgenstern, Karina

    2017-03-01

    Co growth on Cu(111) was investigated at several temperatures between 120 K and 300 K by variable-temperature fast-scanning tunneling microscopy at submonolayer coverage. Islands nucleate heterogeneously at step edges and homogeneously on terraces. The height and area distribution difference between these two types of differently nucleated islands is attributed to a step edge alloy. Furthermore, the transformation from one-monolayer high islands to two-monolayer high islands is followed in time-lapsed sequences between 145 and 165 K. A surprising low-energy barrier for upward mass transport of Eupward≈(0.15 ±0.04 ) eV is determined for islands on terraces. At 120 and 150 K, the terrace islands are pure Cu; in contrast, at room temperature, terrace islands larger than ≈120 nm2 alloy at their border.

  20. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical-chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches.

  1. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  2. Reservoir compartmentalization caused by mass transport deposition Northwest Stevens pool, Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, M.D.; McJannet, G.S.; Shiflett, D.W.; Deutsch, H.A.

    1996-12-31

    The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} sands of the Northwest Stevens Pool consist of six major subdivisions (A1-A6) and numerous sublayers. These sands are above the {open_quotes}N Point{close_quotes} stratigraphic marker, making them much younger than most other Stevens sands at Elk Hills. Cores show the A1-A3 sands to be possibly mass transport deposition, primarily debris flows, slumps, and sand injection bodies. The A4-A6 sands are characterized by normally graded sheet-like sand bodies Hospital of traditional outer fan turbidite lithofacies. Most current production from the A1-A2 interval comes from well 373A-7R, are completed waterflood wells that came on line in 1992 at 1400 BOPD. Well 373A-7R is an anomaly in the A1-A2 zone, where average production from the other ten wells is 200 BOPD. Other evidence for compartmentalization in the A1-A2 interval includes sporadic oil-water contacts and drawdown pressures, difficult log correlations, and rapid thickness changes. In 1973, well 362-7R penetrated 220 ft of wet Al sand. The well was redrilled updip and successfully completed in the A1, where the oil-water contact is more than 130 ft lower than the original hole and faulting is not apparent. In 1992, horizontal well 323H-7R unexpectedly encountered an entirely wet Al wedge zone. Reevaluation of the A1-A3 and other sands as mass transport origin is important for modeling initialization and production/development strategies.

  3. Reservoir compartmentalization caused by mass transport deposition Northwest Stevens pool, Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, M.D.; McJannet, G.S. ); Shiflett, D.W. ); Deutsch, H.A. )

    1996-01-01

    The [open quotes]A[close quotes] sands of the Northwest Stevens Pool consist of six major subdivisions (A1-A6) and numerous sublayers. These sands are above the [open quotes]N Point[close quotes] stratigraphic marker, making them much younger than most other Stevens sands at Elk Hills. Cores show the A1-A3 sands to be possibly mass transport deposition, primarily debris flows, slumps, and sand injection bodies. The A4-A6 sands are characterized by normally graded sheet-like sand bodies Hospital of traditional outer fan turbidite lithofacies. Most current production from the A1-A2 interval comes from well 373A-7R, are completed waterflood wells that came on line in 1992 at 1400 BOPD. Well 373A-7R is an anomaly in the A1-A2 zone, where average production from the other ten wells is 200 BOPD. Other evidence for compartmentalization in the A1-A2 interval includes sporadic oil-water contacts and drawdown pressures, difficult log correlations, and rapid thickness changes. In 1973, well 362-7R penetrated 220 ft of wet Al sand. The well was redrilled updip and successfully completed in the A1, where the oil-water contact is more than 130 ft lower than the original hole and faulting is not apparent. In 1992, horizontal well 323H-7R unexpectedly encountered an entirely wet Al wedge zone. Reevaluation of the A1-A3 and other sands as mass transport origin is important for modeling initialization and production/development strategies.

  4. A Comprehensive Flow, Heat and Mass Transport Uncertainty Quantification in Discrete Fracture Network Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples among others. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distributions function for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, for probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory.

  5. Mass transport analysis: inhalation rfc methods framework for interspecies dosimetric adjustment.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L M; Lou, S R; Su, S; Jarabek, A M

    2001-05-01

    In 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency introduced dosimetry modeling into the methods used to derive an inhalation reference concentration (RfC). The type of dosimetric adjustment factor (DAF) applied had to span the range of physicochemical characteristics of the gases listed on the Clean Air Act Amendments in 1991 as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and accommodate differences in available data with respect to their toxicokinetic properties. A framework was proposed that allowed for a hierarchy of dosimetry model structures, from optimal to rudimentary, and a category scheme that provided for limiting model structures based on physicochemical and toxicokinetic properties. These limiting cases were developed from restricting consideration to specific properties relying on an understanding of the generalized system based on mass transport theory. Physiochemical characteristics included the solubility and reactivity (e.g., propensity to dissociate, oxidize, or serve as a metabolic substrate) of the gas and were used as major determinants of absorption. Dosimetric adjustments were developed to evaluate portal of entry (POE) effects as well as remote (systemic) effects relevant to the toxicokinetic properties of the gas of interest. The gas categorization scheme consisted of defining three gas categories: (1) gases that are highly soluble and/or reactive, absorbing primarily in the extrathoracic airways; (2) gases that are moderately soluble and/or reactive, absorbing throughout the airways, as well as accumulating in the bloodstream; and (3) gases that have a low water solubility and are lipid soluble such that they are primarily absorbed in the pulmonary region and likely to act systemically. This article presents the framework and the mass transport theory behind the RfC method. Comparison to compartmental approaches and considerations for future development are also discussed.

  6. Mass-transport deposits: the role of gas in their triggering and final morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    Mass failure on continental slopes occurs when and where the shear stress at a certain level below the seafloor exceeds the resistance to shear of that level. A number of processes may cause this disequilibrium, including tectonic activity, excess sedimentation, etc. In several cases that will be presented from both seismic and outcrop data, it seems that gas migration plays a crucial role in defining the morphology of the basal surface. The clearest examples come from three separate sedimentary basins. In those three examples, the basal décollement of large-scale mass-transport deposits (MTDs), follows one stratigraphic level over most of the surveyed area, but locally jumps down to a ca. 100-m deeper level. These downward shifts in the basal surface occur right above the crest of underlying structural highs. The coincidence of this morphology with the deeper structure and in some cases with the presence of seismic indications of gas just below strongly suggest that gas did play a role in the location of the anomaly. Another seismic example shows numerous bright amplitude patches at the base of an MTD. The distribution of these anomalies, below relative thins of the transported mass, may indicate degassing by pressure decrease during, and maybe for some time after the gliding. Finally, a Cretaceous outcrop in SE France shows tubular carbonate concretions with a negative anomaly of 13C, interpreted to be diagnostic of methane-derived carbonates, just below the base of a 20-m thick slump. The following processes are envisioned to account for the relationship observed or inferred between anomalies in MTD morphology and gas migration pathways, and may not be mutually exclusive: • Processes initiated by the failure: local anomalies of the décollement surface - Pressure decrease by the spreading out of a failing mass of sediment may cause gas exsolution below the failure along gas migration pathways. Exsolution would then induce local loss of shear strength, and

  7. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  8. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Le Roy, L.

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  9. Physics-based agent to simulant correlations for vapor phase mass transport.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Varady, Mark J; Pearl, Thomas P; Fouse, Janet C; Riley, Patrick C; Mantooth, Brent A; Lalain, Teri A

    2013-12-15

    Chemical warfare agent simulants are often used as an agent surrogate to perform environmental testing, mitigating exposure hazards. This work specifically addresses the assessment of downwind agent vapor concentration resulting from an evaporating simulant droplet. A previously developed methodology was used to estimate the mass diffusivities of the chemical warfare agent simulants methyl salicylate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, di-ethyl malonate, and chloroethyl phenyl sulfide. Along with the diffusivity of the chemical warfare agent bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, the simulant diffusivities were used in an advection-diffusion model to predict the vapor concentrations downwind from an evaporating droplet of each chemical at various wind velocities and temperatures. The results demonstrate that the simulant-to-agent concentration ratio and the corresponding vapor pressure ratio are equivalent under certain conditions. Specifically, the relationship is valid within ranges of measurement locations relative to the evaporating droplet and observation times. The valid ranges depend on the relative transport properties of the agent and simulant, and whether vapor transport is diffusion or advection dominant.

  10. Role of preplasma for shortpulse laser-driven electron transport in mass-limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Sefkow, A. B.; Geissel, M.; Atherton, B.; Corwell, S. E.; Kimmel, M. W.; Rambo, P.; Schwarz, J.; Arefiev, A.; Breizman, B.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2012-10-01

    We report on experiments with the Z-Petawatt laser at Sandia National Labs using mm-sized foils and mass-limited targets of various thicknesses. Rear side accelerated proton beam measurements, in combination with simulation results, were used to infer hot electron transport in presence of preplasma. Full-scale, 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the ns to ps prepulse were performed. Preplasma properties (density profiles, temperatures, charge states) where then imported into a fully explicit and kinetic 2D particle-in-cell code to simulate, 10 ps of the main laser pulse interaction with the preplasma and target at full scale. A comparison of experimental data and numerical data shows outstanding agreement in all measured proton beam parameters, which gives confidence in the simulation results of hot electron transport. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. A multi-physical model for charge and mass transport in a flexible ionic polymer sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Asaka, Kinji; Takagi, Kentaro; Aabloo, Alvo; Horiuchi, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    An ionic polymer material can generate electrical potential and function as a bio-sensor under a non-uniform deformation. Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) is a typical flexible ionic polymer sensor material. A multi-physical sensing model is presented at first based on the same physical equations in the physical model for IPMC actuator we obtained before. Under an applied bending deformation, water and cation migrate to the direction of outside electrode immediately. Redistribution of cations causes an electrical potential difference between two electrodes. The cation migration is strongly restrained by the generated electrical potential. And the migrated cations will move back to the inner electrode under the concentration diffusion effect and lead to a relaxation of electrical potential. In the whole sensing process, transport and redistribution of charge and mass are revealed along the thickness direction by numerical analysis. The sensing process is a revised physical process of the actuation, however, the transport properties are quite different from those of the later. And the effective dielectric constant of IPMC, which is related to the morphology of the electrode-ionic polymer interface, is proved to have little relation with the sensing amplitude. All the conclusions are significant for ionic polymer sensing material design.

  12. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  13. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik Lehman; Joglekar, Archis S.; Ortega, Mario I.; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-11-20

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion(ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. In this paper, we have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasmaviscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasmaviscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasmaviscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Finally, plasmaviscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  14. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Vold, Erik Lehman; Joglekar, Archis S.; Ortega, Mario I.; ...

    2015-11-20

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion(ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. In this paper, we have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasmaviscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasmaviscosity andmore » to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasmaviscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Finally, plasmaviscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.« less

  15. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  16. Energy and Mass Transport of Magnetospheric Plasmas during the November 2003 Magnetic Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Chging; Moore, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Intensive energy and mass transport from the solar wind across the magnetosphere boundary is a trigger of magnetic storms. The storm on 20-21 November 2003 was elicited by a high-speed solar wind and strong southward component of interplanetary magnetic field. This storm attained a minimum Dst of -422 nT. During the storm, some of the solar wind particles enter the magnetosphere and eventually become part of the ring current. At the same time, the fierce solar wind powers strong outflow of H+ and O+ from the ionosphere, as well as from the plasmasphere. We examine the contribution of plasmas from the solar wind, ionosphere and plasmasphere to the storm-time ring current. Our simulation shows, for this particular storm, ionospheric O+ and solar wind ions are the major sources of the ring current particles. The polar wind and plasmaspheric H+ have only minor impacts. In the storm main phase, the strong penetration of solar wind electric field pushes ions from the geosynchronous orbit to L shells of 2 and below. Ring current is greatly intensified during the earthward transport and produces a large magnetic depression in the surface field. When the convection subsides, the deep penetrating ions experience strong charge exchange loss, causing rapid decay of the ring current and fast initial storm recovery. Our simulation reproduces very well the storm development indicated by the Dst index.

  17. Numerical analysis of the diffusive mass transport in brain tissues with applications to optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculae, Adrian P.; Otte, Andreas; Curticapean, Dan

    2013-03-01

    In the brain-cell microenvironment, diffusion plays an important role: apart from delivering glucose and oxygen from the vascular system to brain cells, it also moves informational substances between cells. The brain is an extremely complex structure of interwoven, intercommunicating cells, but recent theoretical and experimental works showed that the classical laws of diffusion, cast in the framework of porous media theory, can deliver an accurate quantitative description of the way molecules are transported through this tissue. The mathematical modeling and the numerical simulations are successfully applied in the investigation of diffusion processes in tissues, replacing the costly laboratory investigations. Nevertheless, modeling must rely on highly accurate information regarding the main parameters (tortuosity, volume fraction) which characterize the tissue, obtained by structural and functional imaging. The usual techniques to measure the diffusion mechanism in brain tissue are the radiotracer method, the real time iontophoretic method and integrative optical imaging using fluorescence microscopy. A promising technique for obtaining the values for characteristic parameters of the transport equation is the direct optical investigation using optical fibers. The analysis of these parameters also reveals how the local geometry of the brain changes with time or under pathological conditions. This paper presents a set of computations concerning the mass transport inside the brain tissue, for different types of cells. By measuring the time evolution of the concentration profile of an injected substance and using suitable fitting procedures, the main parameters characterizing the tissue can be determined. This type of analysis could be an important tool in understanding the functional mechanisms of effective drug delivery in complex structures such as the brain tissue. It also offers possibilities to realize optical imaging methods for in vitro and in vivo

  18. Constraints on the Magnitude of Vertical and Lateral Mass Transport on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.

    1997-01-01

    The role of vertical and lateral mass transport of crustal materials on the observed patterns of lunar surface composition, and the effects on our understanding of the geologic evolution of the planet, have been the subject of much debate in the lunar science community. The primary consensus that emerged from analyses of these processes in the 1970's and 1980's was that vertical and lateral mixing through impact gardening was a relatively inefficient process, and not likely to have contributed significantly to compositional units and variations on the Moon. The supporting evidence for this view is that unit boundaries (e.g. mare-highland contacts, contacts between mare color units) are still apparently quite distinct and sharp despite several aeons of impact activity, and cores from the Apollo landing sites did not show any evidence of widespread homogenization of the surface composition, nor distinct compositional gradients across geologic boundaries. In addition, modeling of vertical and lateral transport generally showed that the effects on composition should be confined to horizontal scales of about a kilometer and vertical scales of a meter. The problem with this consensus is that there is ample contradictory evidence. The fundamental discovery of Wood et al. (1970) was made possible by significant horizontal transport of highland material to the center of Mare Tranquillitatis. The continuous and discontinuous ejecta from the crater Copernicus has clearly influenced the surface composition of a large area of the lunar maria, while rays and ejecta from many highland craters are easily recognized in and around the nearside maria. Despite this contrary evidence, there have been few detailed studies to quantify the amount and rate of material redistribution through impact processes (a notable exception is reported in the paper by Pieters et al, 1985), largely because data adequate to critically analyze this process were lacking. However, the multispectral images

  19. Morphologic Variability of two Adjacent Mass-Transport Deposits: Twin Slides, Gela Basin (Sicily Channel).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minisini, D.; Trincardi, F.; Asioli, A.; Canu, M.; Foglini, F.

    2006-12-01

    Integrating geophysical, sedimentological, structural and paleontological data, we reconstruct the age, size and internal geometry of two adjacent and recent mass-transport deposits (Twin Slides) exposed on the seafloor of Gela Basin (Sicily Channel). Twin Slides are coeval (late-Holocene), and were likely triggered by an earthquake. Twin Slides originated from the mobilization of Pleistocene slope units, are only 6 km apart from each other, have their headscarps in similar water depth (230 m), and have a comparable run out distance (ca. 10 km). Both slides suggest a multistage evolution, but differ in internal organization and morphological expression. The northern slide shows a deposit characterised by pressure ridges in the toe region suggesting a component of plastic deformation, while the southern slide is characterised by large blocks and a reduced thickness of displaced masses. We ascribe the difference in deformation style and resulting morphology to the stratigraphic architecture of the Pleistocene progradational units involved in failure. In the case of the blocky southern slide the units affected by failure are slightly older (Eemian or pre-Emian) and more consolidated; furthermore, in the area where the headscarp is located these units appear affected by shallow faulting likely resulting in the definition of large blocks. The northern slide, instead, affects progradational units of the Last Glacial Maximum in an area where these units are more than 100 m thick and, possibly, underconsolidated.

  20. Back to the primordial universe by a monge-ampere-kantorovich mass transportation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, U.

    2003-04-01

    The Monge-Kantorovich mass transportation problem dates back to work by Monge in 1781 on how to optimally move earth from one place to another, knowing only the initial and final landscapes, the cost being a prescribed function of the distance travelled by "molecules" of earth. We solve the cosmological reconstruction problem of mapping the present locations of (mostly dark) matter, to their primordial locations, knowing only the current field of mass density, e.g. from a full-sky galaxy catalogue or a numerical simulation. Under the assumption that the map is close to potential, we reduce the problem to solving a nonlinear partial differential equation, originally written by Ampere in 1820, now known as the Monge-Ampere equation. Thanks to recent work by Y. Brenier, this becomes a Monge-Kantorovich problem with quadratic cost function and, in discretised form, an assignment problem: find the pairing between N departure and N arrival points which minimises the sum of the squared distances between paired points. The latter can be solved very efficiently by the auction algorithm of Bertsekas. When tested against N-body cosmological simulations, excellent reconstruction is obtained above a few megaparsecs. Based on the paper Frisch-Matarrese-Mohayaee-Sobolevski Nature 417, 260-262 (16 May 2002).

  1. Dynamics and mass transport of solutal convection in a closed porous media system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole; Akhbari, Daria; Hesse, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Most of the recent studies of CO2 sequestration are performed in open systems where the constant partial pressure of CO2 in the vapor phase results in a time-invariant saturated concentration of CO2 in the brine (Cs). However, in some closed natural CO2 reservoirs, e.g., Bravo Dome in New Mexico, the continuous dissolution of CO2 leads to a pressure drop in the gas that is accompanied by a reduction of Cs and thereby affects the dynamics and mass transport of convection in the brine. In this talk, I discuss the characteristics of convective CO2 dissolution in a closed system. The gas is assumed to be ideal and its solubility given by Henry's law. An analytical solution shows that the diffusive base state is no longer self-similar and that diffusive mass transfer declines rapidly. Scaling analysis reveals that the volume ratio of brine and gas η determines the behavior of the system. DNS show that no constant flux regime exists for η > 0 nevertheless, the quantity F /Cs2 remains constant, where F is the dissolution flux. The onset time is only affected by η when the Rayleigh number Ra is small. In this case, the drop in Cs during the initial diffusive regime significantly reduces the effective Ra and therefore delays the onset.

  2. Interpolation of longitudinal shape and image data via optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving "mass" (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury.

  3. Mass transport enhancement in annular-shaped lid-driven bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Al-Shannag, Mohammad

    2012-08-01

    The current study investigated numerically the two-dimensional (2D) incompressible flow and mass transfer in a lid-driven cavity of annular geometry accompanied by enzymatic surface-reactions. The lid-driven bioreactor had a square cross-section of (H × H) and a radius of curvature of r (c). This flow configuration gives the opportunity to evaluate effects of curvature as well as operational parameters on the bioreactor performance. For forced-convection, conservation equations were solved numerically, using fourth-order finite volume schemes, to identify the 2D flow structure and concentration distribution of substrate within the bioreactor. For pure diffusion, analytical solution was obtained. Substrate transfer rates were presented in terms of Sherwood number. While, effectiveness factor was computed to evaluate the force-convection contribution over pure molecular diffusion. Mass-transfer against surface-reaction resistance was estimated via Damkohler number. Results indicate the positive role of increasing Peclet number, Reynolds number, and radius of curvature in enhancing the substrate transport process.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Mass Transport, Dynamics, and Stirring in Isolated Thermal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, William H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant differences exist between isotopic signatures of typical mid-ocean ridge basalts and those associated with many ocean islands, with ocean island basalts (OIB) generally exhibiting more variability in trace element concentrations and a bias towards enrichment in more primitive isotopes in sonic cases. Such observations coupled with other geophysical evidence have been used to suggest that. OIB's are surface manifestations of upwellings originating in the deep interior near the core-mantle boundary that interact with distinct geochemical reservoirs as material is transported from the Earth's interior to the surface. Although many have studied the chemistry and dynamics of these mantle plumes, fundamental questions remain. Lagrangian coherent structures and elements of dynamical systems theory are used to extract key material lines and surfaces in isolated laminar plumes. These structures are shown to provide a taxonomic picture of plumes operating in different regimes, to govern how the plume interacts with the ambient during its ascent, and to have a pronounced effect on the origin of mass transported by the plume. A metric is developed to provide a means of predicting the morphology of mass transported by a general flow, and the rise velocity of the starting plume is used to investigate time scales for liftoff. All investigations are conducted using a series of experiments and numerical models where laminar, thermal plumes are generated in a high Prandtl number fluid having strongly temperature dependent viscosity. Experimental data are acquired using a custom-built stereoscopic particle image velocimetry with thermochromic liquid crystals to measure the 3D flow and temperature fields within the tank. A hybrid particle image particle tracking velocimetry scheme is presented which provides improved robustness to particle pattern deformation when using PIV techniques. In agreement with others, we find starting plumes rise with an essentially constant

  5. Mass transport of heavy metal ions and radon in gels used as sealing agents in containment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lakatos, I.; Bauer, K.; Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Kretzschmar, H.J.

    1997-12-31

    The diffusion and hydrodynamic mass transport of multivalent cations, mostly Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions and radon in polymer/silicate gels and Montanwax emulsions were studied. It was concluded that the self-conforming gels may decrease the hydrodynamic mass transport in porous and fractured media by 4-6 orders of magnitude. In water saturated systems, however, the diffusion transport can be restricted by hydrogels only to a moderate extent. On the other hand, the high and selective retention capacity of gels towards different diffusing species may open new vistas in the sealing technologies. Similar results were obtained for transport phenomena of radon. The almost perfect quenching process of radon and its nuclides in gels and emulsions further enhances the positive effects of the encapsulation methods. The laboratory experiments provided valuable new information to design the different containment technologies.

  6. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  7. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  8. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  9. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  10. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  11. Mass Transport Deposits in the Santaren Channel: Distribution, Characteristics, and Potential Triggering Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnyder, J.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine slope failures are a likely cause for tsunami generation along the East U.S. coast. A possible source are the large slope failures along western Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Numerical models simulate tsunami generation and propagation through the Straits of Florida, caused by these Pleistocene mass wasting events. In order to estimate the likelihood and extent of future landslides, distribution, characteristics, and possible triggering mechanisms of previous failures and their associated mass transport deposits (MTD) have to be investigated. In 2013, the University of Hamburg acquired 2D high-resolution multichannel seismic data, multibeam data, and subbottom profiles inside the Santaren Channel, along the slopes of western GBB and Cay Sal Bank (CSB). The two platforms are different in two ways. CSB is part of the Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt while GBB is situated in a tectonically quiet zone. In addition, the slopes of western GBB are on the leeward side of the bank, while the eastern slopes of CSB are in a windward position. Differences in nature and size of mass wasting events between the Cay Sal side and the western GBB side of the dataset show how influential the tectonically active Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt is to the generation of large MTDs in this area. In the study area, the slope failures can be divided in two categories; small-scale in situ failures with high frequencies on the slopes, dominant on the western GBB side, and large landslides with a lower frequency, but higher volumes and transport distances on the toe of the slope and in the basin, dominant on the Cay Sal side. The distribution of in situ failures, such as slump and debris flow alternation, shows the interplay between high and low inner strength of the sediment, respectively. On the other hand, large MTDs caused by submarine landslides suggest movement in an unconfined manner. Internal sediment preconditions derived from sea level oscillations are suggested as triggering mechanisms

  12. Adriatic water masses, their rates of formation and transport through the Otranto Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Orlić, Mirko

    2002-08-01

    The paper examines dense water formation in the South Adriatic by analysing temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen data collected during six along-Adriatic cruises carried out from the Jabuka Pit to the Otranto Strait. The least-squares tracer analysis method is applied to distinguish the fractions of the four characteristic deep, dense water masses of the Adriatic Sea. Two types of dense water generation are considered: (1) shelf type occurring during cold and dry winters in the North Adriatic and resulting in the North Adriatic dense water (NAdDW) which partially transforms to the Middle Adriatic dense water (MAdDW) on its way along the Italian shelf to the Bari Canyon, where it interacts with topography, violently mixes and sinks; and (2) deep-convection type occurring in the centre of the South Adriatic Pit, generating dense water which reaches down to 800 m, fills the bottom and enters the Ionian Sea through the Otranto Strait. Both processes are visible in the July 1976 data, as the previous winter was cold (February) and relatively dry over the whole Adriatic basin. Both types of processes can influence the bottom layer of the Otranto Strait, where the fraction of shelf-type dense water generated in the North and Middle Adriatic was occasionally observed along with the fraction of water generated by deep convection in the South Adriatic. During the non-generative period, the cyclonic South Adriatic Gyre moved more to the northwest in general, as the Levantine intermediate water (LIW) occupied southeastern part of the South Adriatic Pit. However, such behaviour was not observed in January 1980, when LIW filled much of the Adriatic, thus diminishing density gradients in the South Adriatic. By applying a simple box model of water masses, it is estimated that the decay time of the Adriatic water masses equals 26 months, whereas transport of the Adriatic deep water (ADW) in the Otranto Strait amounted to 0.34 Sv during summer 1975. In the winter 1974/75 the

  13. Constraining the efficiency of angular momentum transport with asteroseismology of red giants: the effect of stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggenberger, P.; Lagarde, N.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Ekström, S.; Georgy, C.; Meynet, G.; Salmon, S.; Ceillier, T.; García, R. A.; Mathis, S.; Deheuvels, S.; Maeder, A.; den Hartogh, J. W.; Hirschi, R.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Constraints on the internal rotation of red giants are now available thanks to asteroseismic observations. Preliminary comparisons with rotating stellar models indicate that an undetermined additional process for the internal transport of angular momentum is required in addition to purely hydrodynamic processes. Aims: We investigate how asteroseismic measurements of red giants can help us characterize the additional transport mechanism. Methods: We first determine the efficiency of the missing transport mechanism for the low-mass red giant KIC 7341231 by computing rotating models that include an additional viscosity corresponding to this process. We then discuss the change in the efficiency of this transport of angular momentum with the mass, metallicity, and evolutionary stage in the light of the corresponding viscosity determined for the more massive red giant KIC 8366239. Results: In the case of the low-mass red giant KIC 7341231, we find that the viscosity corresponding to the additional mechanism is constrained to the range νadd = 1 × 103-1.3 × 104 cm2 s-1. This constraint on the efficiency of the unknown additional transport mechanism during the post-main sequence is obtained independently of any specific assumption about the modeling of rotational effects during the pre-main sequence and the main sequence (in particular, the braking of the surface by magnetized winds and the efficiency of the internal transport of angular momentum before the post-main-sequence phase). When we assume that the additional transport mechanism is at work during the whole evolution of the star together with a solar-calibrated braking of the surface by magnetized winds, the range of νadd is reduced to 1-4 × 103 cm2 s-1. In addition to being sensitive to the evolutionary stage of the star, the efficiency of the unknown process for internal transport of angular momentum increases with the stellar mass.

  14. Coupled effects of temperature and mass transport on the isotope fractionation of zinc during electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; John, Seth G.; Kavner, Abby

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition of zinc metal electrodeposited on a rotating disc electrode from a Zn-citrate aqueous solution was investigated as a function of overpotential (electrochemical driving force), temperature, and rotation rate. Zn metal was measured to be isotopically light with respect to Zn+2 in solution, with observed fractionations varying from Δ66/64Znmetal-aqueous = -1.0‰ to -3.9‰. Fractionation varies continuously as a function of a dimensionless parameter described by the ratio of observed deposition rate to calculated mass-transport limiting rate, where larger fractionations are observed at lower deposition rates, lower temperature, and at faster electrode rotation rates. Thus, the large fractionation and its rate dependence is interpreted as a competition between the two kinetic processes with different effective activation energies: mass-transport-limited (diffusion limited) kinetics with a large activation energy, which creates small fractionations close to the predicted diffusive fractionation; and electrochemical deposition kinetics, with a smaller effective activation energy, which creates large fractionations at low deposition rates and high hydrodynamic fluxes of solute to the electrode. The results provide a framework for predicting isotope fractionation in processes controlled by two competing reactions with different kinetic isotope effects. Light isotopes are electroplated. In all cases light stable isotopes of the metals are preferentially electroplated, with mass-dependent behavior evident where three or more isotopes are measured. Fractionation is time-independent, meaning that the fractionation factor does not vary with the extent of reaction. In most of our experiments, we have controlled the extent of reaction such that only a small amount of metal is deposited from the stock solution, thus avoiding significant evolution of the reservoir composition. In such experiments, the observed isotope fractionation is constant as a

  15. Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Du, Shiyu; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Nerikar, Pankaj; Stanek, Christopher R.; Tonks, Michael; Millet, Paul; Biner, Bulent

    2012-06-04

    In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain

  16. Mass Conservation in a Chemical Transport Model and its Effect on CO2 and SF6 Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Z.; Weaver, C.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Chemical transport models (CTMs) must conserve mass to be useful for applications involving assessment of the effect of various pollutants on the troposphere and stratosphere. Furthermore, calculations of the evolution of constituents such as SF6 are used to evaluate overall model transport, and interpretation of such simulations is clouded if mass conservation is not assured. For realistic simulations or predictions, it is crucial that constituents are not produced or lost by transport or other processes in the CTMs. Analysis of CO2 and SF6 experiments using a CTM shows that problems with mass conservation can seriously degrade the simulations. Failure to conserve mass results from inconsistency of the surface pressure tendency and the divergence of horizontal mass flux when the model is forced by assimilated meteorological data. We have developed an effective method to eliminate the inconsistency by modifying the divergent part of the wind field. The changes in the wind fields are quite small but the impact on mass conservation is large. Parameterizations of physical processes such as convection or turbulent transport can also affect mass conservation. The lack of conservation is small but accumulates when integrations are lengthy such as required for SF6. This lack of conservation is found using winds from either a GCM or from an assimilation system. A simple adjustment removes much of the inaccuracy in the convective parameterization. A CO2 simulation using assimilated winds from the most recent version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System will be used to illustrate the impact of these transport improvements.

  17. The effect of volume phase changes, mass transport, sunlight penetration, and densification on the thermal regime of icy regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, Fraser P.; Salvail, James R.; Matson, Dennis L.; Brown, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    The present quantitative modeling of convective, condensational, and sublimational effects on porous ice crust volumes subjected to solar radiation encompasses the effect of such insolation's penetration of visible bandpass-translucent light, but opaque to the IR bandpass. Quasi-steady-state temperatures, H2O mass fluxes, and ice mass-density change rates are computed as functions of time of day and ice depth. When the effects of latent heat and mass transport are included in the model, the enhancement of near-surface temperature due to the 'solid-state greenhouse effect' is substantially diminished. When latent heat, mass transport, and densification effects are considered, however, a significant solid-state greenhouse effect is shown to be compatible with both morphological evidence for high crust strengths and icy shell decoupling from the lithosphere.

  18. Tracer Transport by Deep Convection: Implications of the Connection Between Convective Mass Fluxes and Large-Scale Circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, M. G.; Salzmann, M.; Tost, H.; Joeckel, P.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-12-01

    Global chemistry-transport models (CTMs) generally simulate vertical tracer transport by deep convection separately from the advective transport due to large-scale mean winds, even though a component of the large-scale transport, for instance in the Hadley and Walker cells, occurs in deep convective updrafts. This split treatment of vertical transport can have several significant implications for CTM simulations, such as numerical diffusion, misinterpretation of the transport characteristics in convectively active regions, and underestimation of the effects of convective tracer transport on ozone and other gases. Here we show that there is a significant overlap between the convective and large-scale advective vertical transport fluxes in the CTM MATCH, and discuss the main implications for tracer transport studies which can be expected due to this. We also give an outlook to the next step of this study, in which we are examining the connection between diagnosed convective mass fluxes and the vertical fluxes in the tropical Hadley and Walker Cells using the ECHAM5/MESSy GCM, which is set up with a flexible framework allowing the use of several different convection parameterizations. From the direct comparison of multiple deep convection parameterizations within the same model we expect to gain a better sense of the relationship between parameterized deep convection and large-scale circulations, as well as of the present uncertainty due to differences in convection parameterizations. This work is anticipated to contribute to the objectives of Activity 2 (vertical tracer distributions) of AC&C.

  19. Modeling highly transient flow, mass, and heat transport in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    A coupled flow-temperature model has been developed and verified for a 27.9-km reach of the Chattahoochee River between Buford Dam and Norcross, Ga. Flow in this reach of the Chattahoochee is continuous but highly regulated by Buford Dam, a flood-control and hydroelectric facility located near Buford, Ga. Calibration and verification utilized two sets of data collected under highly unsteady discharge conditions. Existing solution techniques, with certain minor improvements, were applied to verify the existing technology of flow and transport modeling. The linear, implicit finite-difference flow model was calibrated by use of a depth profile obtained at steady low flow and unsteady flow data obtained in March 1976. During the calibration period, the model was generally able to reproduce observed stages to within 0.15 m and discharges at less than 100 m 3 /s, to within 5 percent. Peak discharges of about 200 m 3 /s were under-estimated by about 20 percent. During the verification period, October 1975, the flow model reproduced observed stage changes to within about 0.15 m, and its timing and over-all performance was considered to be very good. Dye was added to the upstream end of the river reach at a constant rate while the river flow was highly unsteady. The numerical solution of either the conservative or nonconservative form of the mass-transport equation did an excellent job of simulating the observed concentrations of dye in the river. The temperature model was capable of predicting temperature changes through this reach of as large as 5.8?C with a RMS (root-mean-square) error of 0.32?C in October 1975 and 0.20?C in March 1976. Hydropulsation has a significant effect on the water temperature below Buford Dam. These effects are very complicated because they are quite dependent on the timing of the release with respect to both the time of day and past releases.

  20. Fate, mass balance, and transport of phosphorus in the septic system drainfields.

    PubMed

    Mechtensimer, Sara; Toor, Gurpal S

    2016-09-01

    Septic systems can be a potential source of phosphorus (P) in shallow groundwater. Our objective was to investigate the fate, mass balance, and transport of P in the drainfield of a drip-dispersal septic system. Drainfields were replicated in lysimeters (152.4 cm long, 91.4 cm wide, and 91.4 cm high). Leachate and effluent samples were collected over 67 events (n = 15 daily; n = 52 weekly flow-weighted) and analyzed for total P (TP), orthophosphate (PO4P), and other P (TP - PO4P). Mean TP was 15 mg L(-1) (84% PO4P; 16% other P) in the effluent and 0.16 mg L(-1) (47% PO4P, 53% other P) in the leachate. After one year, 46.8 g of TP was added with effluent and rainfall to each drainfield, of which, <1% leached, 3.8% was taken up by St. Augustine grass, leaving >95% in the drainfield. Effluent dispersal increased water extractable P (WEP) in the drainfield from <5 to >10 mg kg(-1). Using the P sorption maxima of sand (118 mg kg(-1)) and soil (260 mg kg(-1)), we estimated that ∼18% of the drainfield P sorption capacity was saturated after one year of effluent dispersal. We conclude that despite the low leaching potential of P dispersed with effluent in the first year of drainfield operation, a growing WEP pool in the drainfield and low P sorption capacity of Florida's sandy soils may have the potential to transport P to shallow groundwater in long-running septic systems.

  1. Mass transport of small retained molecules in polymer-based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-10-03

    The mass transport properties of a non-retained (thiourea) and three retained low molecular weight compounds (acetophenone, valerophenone, and octanophenone) along a 4.6mm×45mm PROSWIFT™ RP-1S monolithic column made of rigid cross-linked poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) copolymer was investigated in depth. Accurate protocols (peak parking experiments, measurement of the first and second central moments of peak profiles by numerical integration) combined with the use of validated models of effective diffusion along monolithic structures were applied for the determination of the longitudinal diffusion, the eddy dispersion, and the skeleton-eluent mass transfer resistances due to the finite analyte diffusivity across the polymer skeleton and to the slow absorption kinetics into the polymer volume. Experimental results show by increasing order of importance evidence that the resolution performance of this short and wide polymer-based monolithic HPLC column is limited by the slow analyte diffusivity across the polymer skeleton (smaller than one tenth of the bulk diffusion coefficient for k'>1), its large eddy dispersion HETP (Heddy≃100μm), and the slow rate of absorption (≃10Hz only) in the polymer volume for retained analytes. The column performance could be improved by preparing a more homogeneous material with a rigid internal mesoporous structure. This would provide a column bed having a larger specific surface area, allowing faster analyte diffusion across the mesoporous skeleton, a smaller eddy dispersion HETP, and a faster absorption kinetics in the polymeric monolith than those observed for the currently available materials.

  2. Coastal currents and mass transport of surface sediments over the shelf regions of Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, S.C.

    1970-01-01

    southward except near Monterey Canyon which acts as a physiographic barrier and the extreme southern end of the bay where currents are non persistent. Some sediments are also transported offshore by rip currents and other agencies and deposited in deeper, quieter waters. Supply of sediments to the canyon head results in over-filling and steepening with subsequent mass movement of sediments seaward followed by deposition in channels and on the broad deep sea fan. ?? 1970.

  3. Mass transport and electrode accessibility through periodic self-assembled nanoporous silica thin films.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chen; Hillhouse, Hugh W

    2007-05-08

    Ordered nanoporous silica films have attracted great interest for their potential use to template nanowires for photovoltaics and thermoelectrics. However, it is crucial to develop films such that an electrode under the nanoporous film is accessible to solution species via facile mass transport through well-defined pores. Here, we quantitatively measure the electrode accessibility and the effective species diffusivity for nearly all the known nanoporous silica film structures formed by evaporation-induced self-assembly upon dip-coating or spin-coating. Grazing-angle of incidence small-angle X-ray scattering was used to verify the nanoscale structure of the films and to ensure that all films were highly ordered and oriented. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was then used to assess the transport properties. A model has been developed that separates the electrode/film kinetics and the film transport properties from the film/solution interface and bulk solution effects. Accounting for this, the accessible area of the nanoporous film coated FTO electrode (1-theta) is obtained from the high-frequency data, while the effective diffusivity of the ferrocene dimethanol (D(FDM)) redox couple is obtained from intermediate frequencies. It was found that the degree of order and orientation in the film, in addition to the symmetry/topology, is a dominant factor that determines these two key parameters. The EIS data show that the (211) oriented double gyroid, (110) oriented distorted body center cubic, and (211) distorted primitive cubic silica films have significant accessibility (larger than 26% of geometric area). However, the double-gyroid films showed the highest diffusivity by over an order of magnitude. Both the (10) oriented 2D hexagonal and (111) oriented rhombohedral films were found to be highly blocking with only small accessibility due to microporosity. The impedance data were also collected to study the stability of the nanoporous silica films in aqueous

  4. A two-dimensional coupled flow-mass transport model based on an improved unstructured finite volume algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianzhong; Song, Lixiang; Kursan, Suncana; Liu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional coupled water quality model is developed for modeling the flow-mass transport in shallow water. To simulate shallow flows on complex topography with wetting and drying, an unstructured grid, well-balanced, finite volume algorithm is proposed for numerical resolution of a modified formulation of two-dimensional shallow water equations. The slope-limited linear reconstruction method is used to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The algorithm adopts a HLLC-based integrated solver to compute the flow and mass transport fluxes simultaneously, and uses Hancock's predictor-corrector scheme for efficient time stepping as well as second-order temporal accuracy. The continuity and momentum equations are updated in both wet and dry cells. A new hybrid method, which can preserve the well-balanced property of the algorithm for simulations involving flooding and recession, is proposed for bed slope terms approximation. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm are validated by the reasonable good agreement between numerical and reference results of several benchmark test cases. Results show that the proposed coupled flow-mass transport model can simulate complex flows and mass transport in shallow water.

  5. Mass transport phenomena between bubbles and dissolved gases in liquids under reduced gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Brockwell, Jonathan L.; Yung, Chain-Nan; Chai, An-Ti; Mcquillen, John B.; Sotos, Raymond G.; Neumann, Eric S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will describe the experimental and analytical work that has been done to establish justification and feasibility for a Shuttle mid-deck experiment involving mass transfer between a gas bubble and a liquid. The experiment involves the observation and measurement of the dissolution of an isolated, immobile gas bubble of specified size and composition in a thermostatted solvent liquid of known concentration in the reduced gravity environment of earth orbit. Methods to generate and deploy the bubble have been successful both in normal gravity using mutually buoyant fluids and under reduced gravity conditions in the NASA Lear Jet. Initialization of the experiment with a bubble of a prescribed size and composition in a liquid of known concentration has been accomplished using the concept of unstable equilibrium. Subsequent bubble dissolution or growth is obtained by a step increase or decrease in the liquid pressure. A numerical model has been developed which simulates the bubble dynamics and can be used to determine molecular parameters by comparison with the experimental data. The primary objective of the experiment is the elimination of convective effects that occur in normal gravity. The results will yield information on transport under conditions of pure diffusion.

  6. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Klaus, David M; Benoit, Michael R; Nelson, Emily S; Hammond, Timmothy G

    2004-03-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  7. Influence of the hydrodynamics on the biofilm formation by mass transport analysis.

    PubMed

    Herbert-Guillou, D; Tribollet, B; Festy, D

    2001-01-01

    Biofilm are formed wherever there is some water in our environment: pipes, pipelines, tap water systems, air conditioning systems... Furthermore, the ecological and economical consequences are very important: energy losses, bacterial contamination, material deterioration. The aim of this work is to develop a new method to detect and monitor the biofilm formation. This method can also determine some mechanical properties of the biofilm. An application of this method is a realization of a biofilm sensor. Biofilm is considered as an inert porous layer with respect to mass transport. In our experiment, the biofilm is grown on a gold electrode in natural seawater. Its thickness is determined by considering the oxygen diffusion limiting current measured for different rotation speeds on this electrode. Two different incubators are used during the biofilm development: one, with a laminar flow, permits the rotation of the electrode during the biofilm formation, and for the second, a tube is used under turbulent conditions during the biofilm formation. This experiment allows us to characterize the mechanical behavior (thickness, elasticity, rigidity) of the biofilm in function of different conditions of development.

  8. Thermodynamics and Mass Transport in Multicomponent, Multiphase H2O Systems of Planetary Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinli; Kieffer, Susan W.

    2009-05-01

    Heat and mass transport in low-temperature, low-pressure H2O systems are important processes on Earth, and on a number of planets and moons in the Solar System. In most occurrences, these systems will contain other components, the so-called noncondensible gases, such as CO2, CO, SO2, CH4, and N2. The presence of the noncondensible components can greatly alter the thermodynamic properties of the phases and their flow properties as they move in and on the planets. We review various forms of phase diagrams that give information about pressure-temperature-volume-entropy-enthalpy-composition conditions in these complex systems. Fluid dynamic models must be coupled to the thermodynamics to accurately describe flow in gas-driven liquid and solid systems. The concepts are illustrated in detail by considering flow and flow instabilities such as geysering in modern geothermal systems on Earth, paleofluid systems on Mars, and cryogenic ice-gas systems on Mars and Enceladus. We emphasize that consideration of single-component end-member systems often leads to conclusions that exclude many qualitatively and quantitatively important phenomena.

  9. Thermal advection and stratification effects on surface winds and the low level meridional mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad; Tiu, Felice S.

    1990-01-01

    Statistical tests are performed on the Seasat scatterometer observations to examine if and to what degree thermal advection and stratification effects manifest themselves in these remotely sensed measurements of mean wind and wind stress over the ocean. On the basis of a two layer baroclinic boundary layer model which is presented, it is shown that the thermal advection and stratification of the entire boundary layer as well as the geostrophic forcing influence the modeled near surface wind and wind stress profiles. Evidence of diurnal variation in the stratification under barotropic conditions is found in the data, with the daytime marine boundary layer being more convective than its nighttime counterpart. The temporal and spacial sampling pattern of the satellite makes it impossible to recover the full diurnal cycle, however. The observed effects of the thermal advection are shown to be statistically significant during the day (and presumed more convective) hours, causing a systematic increase in the poleward transport of mass and heat. The statistical results are in a qualitative agreement with the model simulations and cannot be reproduced in randomized control tests.

  10. Can a reduction in mass transport occur at invariant segmental time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Simone; Sferrazza, Michele

    2015-03-01

    The glassy dynamics of polymer melts adsorbed onto solid substrates shows a peculiar confinement effect: a severe reduction in mass transport occurs without a corresponding increase in segmental relaxation time. This phenomenon provides a ``negative violation'' of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation, not observed in bulk melts or confined water. Explaining those findings in analogy to the large drop of thermal expansion reported in polymers under 1D confinement, we considered the presence of an interfacial dead layer where tracer diffusivity assumes negligible values. To verify this hypothesis, we performed an extensive investigation of the diffusion of styrene oligomers, acting as tracers, into matrices of high molecular weight polystyrene, irreversibly adsorbed onto aluminum oxide. We demonstrate that the reduced interfacial diffusion is due to larger residence times of the tracers inside the dead layer, tDL. In particular, we show that tDL is directly proportional to the amount of irreversibly adsorbed monomers, a quantity limiting the available space for diffusion. We thus discuss of a dynamic dead layer evolving within the adsorbed layer, and of its role on the dynamics of glassy polymers under confinement and the ``negative violation'' the SE relation.

  11. Aqueous gradient by balancing diffusive and convective mass transport (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker I.; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe F.; Haque, Arefa

    2016-03-01

    In wounds, cells secret biomolecules such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein that controls many processes in healing. VEGF protein is expressed in a gradient in tissue, and its shape will be affected by the tissue injury sustained during wounding. In order to study the responses of keratinocyte cell migration to VEGF gradients and the geometric factors on wound healing, we designed a microfluidic gradient device that can generate large area gradients (1.5 cm in diameter) capable of mimicking arbitrary wound shapes. Microfluidic devices offer novel techniques to address biological and biomedical issues. Different from other gradient microfluidics, our device balances diffusion of biomolecules versus the convective clearance by a buffer flow on the opposite ends of the gradient. This allows us to create a large area gradient within shorter time scales by actively driving mass transport. In addition, the microfluidic device makes use of a porous filter membrane to create this balance as well as to deliver the resulting gradient to a culture of cells. The culture of cells are seeded above the gradient in a gasket chamber. However, Keratinocytes do not migrate effectively on filter paper. Therefore, in order to improve the motility of cells on the surface, we coated the filter paper with a 30m thick layer of gelatin type B. after observation under the microscope we found that the gelatin coated sample showed cells with more spread out morphology, with 97% viability, suggesting better adhesion than the non-coated sample.

  12. Dynamics, kinetics, and transport properties of the one-dimensional mass-disordered harmonic lattice.

    PubMed

    Likhachev, Vladimir N; Vinogradov, George A; Astakhova, Tatyana Yu; Yakovenko, Andrey E

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we thoroughly investigated the dynamics, kinetics, and the transport properties of the one-dimensional (1D) mass-disordered lattice of harmonic oscillators with the number of particles N < or =5000. The thermostat is simulated by the Langevin sources. Our method is adequate to any 1D lattice with linear equations of motion. Two accurate methods to calculate the temporal behavior of pair correlation functions were developed. The feature of the considered disordered model is an existence of localized states with great relaxation times tau to their stationary states. The exponential growth tau proportional variant exp(N) is observed. A method which allows us to extend the range of computed relaxation times up to tau approximately =(10)300 is suggested. The stationary state is unique. The thermal conduction x has the nonmonotonic character versus N: for the number of particles N < 300 the thermal conduction increases as x proportional variant ln N and reaches the maximal value at N approximately =300. At larger values the decreasing asymptotic is observed: x proportional variant N -alpha, and alpha approximately 0.27. An influence of parameters on the calculated properties was analyzed. Mathematical problems associated with the computation of very large times of establishing the stationary states were extensively studied.

  13. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  14. Numerical simulation of heat and mass transport during space crystal growth with MEPHISTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Minwu; Raman, Raghu; Degroh, Henry C., III

    1995-01-01

    The MEPHISTO space experiments are collaborative United States and French investigations aimed at understanding the fundamentals of crystal growth. Microgravity experiments were conducted aboard the USMP-1 and -2 missions on STS-52 and 62 in October 1992 and March 1994 respectively. MEPHISTO is a French designed and built Bridgman type furnace which uses the Seebeck technique to monitor the solid/liquid interface temperature and Peltier pulsing to mark the location and shape of the solid/liquid interface. In this paper the Bridgman growth of Sn-Bi and Bi-Sn under terrestrial and microgravity conditions is modeled using the finite element code, FIDAP*. The numerical model considers fully coupled heat and mass transport, fluid motion and solid/liquid phase changes in the crystal growth process. The primary goals of this work are: to provide a quantitative study of the thermal buoyancy-induced convection in the melt for the two flight experiments; to compare the vertical and horizontal growth configurations and systematically evaluate the effects of various gravity levels on the solute segregation. Numerical results of the vertical and horizontal Bridgman growth configurations are presented.

  15. Ebb-tidal jets: A model of suspended sediment and mass transport at tidal inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özsoy, Emin

    1986-01-01

    Mass transport by turbulent jets issuing from tidal inlets is investigated through a model that includes lateral mixing and entrainment, bottom friction, bathymetric changes, settling rate of particles (size), possible deposition/erosion at the bottom and ambient currents and concentrations. The bottom frictional jet becomes diluted more slowly than a classical jet. A non-vanishing concentration may result offshore and a maximum may occur in the core. The concentration of a jet on a sloping bottom decreases more rapidly due to increased dilution by entraiment. The effects of bottom friction and bottom slope compete in determining the jet concentration. Deposition to the bottom occurs within the jet mainly on both sides of the centre-line, and at lower rates on the centre-line. Erosion or deposition may occur at the jet core depending on the inlet flow conditions. In the case of erosion at the core, the material extracted is deposited on the margins and the offshore areas. Sorting of the sediments is expected, with coarser materials mainly deposited in the marginal areas, while the finer sediments are more uniformly distributed and jetted further off-shore. The main features of the model are verified through a limited set of observations. The qualitative agreement is enhanced for micro- and meso-tidal inlets that are dominated by tidal hydraulics.

  16. Mass Transport in Surface Diffusion of van der Waals Bonded Systems: Boosted by Rotations?

    PubMed

    Hedgeland, Holly; Sacchi, Marco; Singh, Pratap; McIntosh, Andrew J; Jardine, Andrew P; Alexandrowicz, Gil; Ward, David J; Jenkins, Stephen J; Allison, William; Ellis, John

    2016-12-01

    Mass transport at a surface is a key factor in heterogeneous catalysis. The rate is determined by excitation across a translational barrier and depends on the energy landscape and the coupling to the thermal bath of the surface. Here we use helium spin-echo spectroscopy to track the microscopic motion of benzene adsorbed on Cu(001) at low coverage (θ ∼ 0.07 ML). Specifically, our combined experimental and computational data determine both the absolute rate and mechanism of the molecular motion. The observed rate is significantly higher by a factor of 3.0 ± 0.1 than is possible in a conventional, point-particle model and can be understood only by including additional molecular (rotational) coordinates. We argue that the effect can be described as an entropic contribution that enhances the population of molecules in the transition state. The process is generally relevant to molecular systems and illustrates the importance of the pre-exponential factor alongside the activation barrier in studies of surface kinetics.

  17. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  18. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  19. Internal deformation and kinematic indicators within a tripartite mass transport deposit, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiesiak, Matheus S.; Kneller, Ben; Alsop, G. Ian; Milana, Juan Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The role of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in redistributing sediment from the shelf-break to deep water is becoming increasingly apparent and important in the study of basins. While seismic analysis may reveal the general morphology of such deposits, it is unable to provide information on the detailed geometry and kinematics of gravity-driven transport owing to the limits of seismic resolution. Outcrop analysis of ancient MTDs may therefore provide critical observations and data regarding the internal deformation and behavior during slope failure. One such field area where geometry and kinematics are clearly exposed is Cerro Bola in the Paganzo Basin of northwestern Argentina. This 8 km strike section exposes a mid to late Carboniferous succession, comprising fluvio-deltaic sediments, turbidites and MTDs. Our work focuses on the main MTD that is up to 180 m thick and is characterized by a silty matrix, containing sandstone blocks and siltstone rafts. Although we consider a single slope failure as the most likely scenario, a possible double failure might also explain the occurrence of a folded turbidite marker in the upper zone of the MTD. The MTD is host to a variety of deformational features such as folding, boudinage, shear zones, allochthonous strata, and secondary fabrics among others. These deformational features vary in intensity, scale and style, both vertically and laterally across the deposit. The vertical variation is the most notable, and the entire deposit can be subdivided into lower, middle and upper zones according to variations in texture and structures, including sandstone blocks, sand streaks and blebs in the matrix, folding on a variety of scales, and shear zones. The middle part of the MTD is characterized by the abundance of siltstone rafts. Various models are proposed for the origin of blocks and rafts within the MTD: erosion of underlying strata; fragmentation of the original protolith; or a mixture of both. Significantly, specific strain

  20. Future satellite missions for time-variable geopotential recovery - results from the ESA Mass Transport Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reubelt, T.; Sneeuw, N.; Visser, P. N. A. M.; van Dam, T.; Losch, M.

    2009-04-01

    With the successful GRACE mission (data collection since Spring 2002), global time-variable gravity fields can be recovered beyond the lower degrees for the first time. Although GRACE is able to detect significant features of the time-variable geopotential, e.g. the continental hydrological cycle, trends in ice-mass change in Antarctica or Greenland or sea level rise, its mission concept suffers from inherent deficiencies. The main limitations of GRACE are (i) the range-rate measurements (insufficient accuracy, anisotropy of the leader-follower-formation), (ii) aliasing due to spatial and temporal undersampling and (iii) inaccurate de-aliasing products. This leads to an erroneous North-South striping pattern and a limited accuracy and resolution for many scientific studies. Within the ESA project „Monitoring and Modeling Individual Sources of Mass Distribution and Transport in the Earth System by Means of Satellites" potential future satellite mission concepts, which could improve time-variable geopotential-recovery, have been studied. An improved accuracy of a future laser instrument as well as an enhanced temporal sampling have been regarded in the simulations, which were based on repeat orbits. An enhanced sampling can be achieved by means of multi-satellite-missions, where the spatial and/or temporal resolutions are improved by: 1) additional satellites on interleaved groundtracks and/or 2) time shifted satellites on the same groundtrack. Another possibility is the so-called Pete-Bender-design, where the satellites fly on different repeat-orbits with different inclinations, which also allows for more homogeneous groundtrack coverage. Sophisticated satellite-formations such as cartwheels or gravity wheels have not been regarded so far due to the unsolved technical problems (e.g. control of the laser instrument) related to these designs. The primary objective of the simulation studies was the precise recovery of the input hydrological signal and the trends of

  1. Flow field design and optimization based on the mass transport polarization regulation in a flow-through type vanadium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiong; Xing, Feng; Li, Xianfeng; Ning, Guiling; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium flow battery holds great promise for use in large scale energy storage applications. However, the power density is relatively low, leading to significant increase in the system cost. Apart from the kinetic and electronic conductivity improvement, the mass transport enhancement is also necessary to further increase the power density and reduce the system cost. To better understand the mass transport limitations, in the research, the space-varying and time-varying characteristic of the mass transport polarization is investigated based on the analysis of the flow velocity and reactant concentration in the bulk electrolyte by modeling. The result demonstrates that the varying characteristic of mass transport polarization is more obvious at high SoC or high current densities. To soften the adverse impact of the mass transport polarization, a new rectangular plug flow battery with a plug flow and short flow path is designed and optimized based on the mass transport polarization regulation (reducing the mass transport polarization and improving its uniformity of distribution). The regulation strategy of mass transport polarization is practical for the performance improvement in VFBs, especially for high power density VFBs. The findings in the research are also applicable for other flow batteries and instructive for practical use.

  2. Tectonic activity evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic Plate boundary from mass transport deposit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Casas, David; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruano, Patricia; Maldonado, Andrés.

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution and temporal occurrence of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the sedimentary infill of basins and submerged banks near the Scotia-Antarctic plate boundary allowed us to decode the evolution of the tectonic activity of the relevant structures in the region from the Oligocene to present day. The 1020 MTDs identified in the available data set of multichannel seismic reflection profiles in the region are subdivided according to the geographic and chronological distributions of these features. Their spatial distribution reveals a preferential location along the eastern margins of the eastern basins. This reflects local deformation due to the evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic transcurrent plate boundary and the impact of oceanic spreading along the East Scotia Ridge (ESR). The vertical distribution of the MTDs in the sedimentary record evidences intensified regional tectonic deformation from the middle Miocene to Quaternary. Intensified deformation started at about 15 Ma, when the ESR progressively replaces the West Scotia Ridge (WSR) as the main oceanic spreading center in the Scotia Sea. Coevally with the WSR demise at about 6.5 Ma, increased spreading rates of the ESR and numerous MTDs were formed. The high frequency of MTDs during the Pliocene, mainly along the western basins, is also related to greater tectonic activity due to uplift of the Shackleton Fracture Zone by tectonic inversion and extinction of the Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge and involved changes at late Pliocene. The presence of MTDs in the southern Scotia Sea basins is a relevant indicator of the interplay between sedimentary instability and regional tectonics.

  3. A Numerical Model of Anisotropic Mass Transport Through Grain Boundary Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yibo

    Tin (Sn) thin films are commonly used in electronic circuit applications as coatings on contacts and solders for joining components. It is widely observed, for some such system, that whiskers---long, thin crystalline structures---emerge and grow from the film. The Sn whisker phenomenon has become a highly active research area since Sn whiskers have caused a large amount of damage and loss in manufacturing, military, medical and power industries. Though lead (Pb) addition to Sn has been used to solve this problem for over five decades, the adverse environmental and health effects of Pb have motivated legislation to severely constrain Pb use in society. People are researching and seeking the reasons which cause whiskers and corresponding methods to solve the problem. The contributing factors to cause a Sn whisker are potentially many and much still remains unknown. Better understanding of fundamental driving forces should point toward strategies to improve (a) the accuracy with which we can predict whisker formation, and (b) our ability to mitigate the phenomenon. This thesis summarizes recent important research achievements in understanding Sn whisker formation and growth, both experimentally and theoretically. Focus is then placed on examining the role that anisotropy in grain boundary diffusivity plays in determining whisker characteristics (specifically, whether they form and, if so, where on a surface). To study this aspect of the problem and to enable future studies on stress driven grain boundary diffusion, this thesis presents a numerical anisotropic mass transport model. In addition to presenting details of the model and implementation, model predictions for a set of increasingly complex grain boundary networks are discussed. Preliminary results from the model provide evidence that anisotropic grain boundary diffusion may be a primary driving mechanism in whisker formation.

  4. Giant Mass Transport Deposits of the Caribbean Margin and their Tsunamigenic Potential, Offshore Northern Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, S.; Mann, P.; Carvajal, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    Three large (170-290 m thick, >1000 km3) Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) are recognized on seismic lines offshore northern Colombia covering a combined area of 27,000 km2, an area the size of the state of Massachusetts. These deposits record a number of massive slope failure events along the Northern Colombian Margin proximal to the actively prograding delta and fan of the Magdalena River, the 26th largest river in the world by discharge volume . The largest MTD covers an area >15,000 km2 outboard of the toe of the continental slope on the abyssal sea floor; the two smaller MTDs range from 5000 to 7000 km2 in area. The volume of the largest deposited measured from >160 km of seismic reflection data ranges from 2000 and 5000 km3, comparable in size to the giant Storegga Slide offshore Norway (3500 km3) and the Nuuanu slide offshore the island of Oahu, Hawai'i (~3000 km3). The timing of the MTDs can be constrained from sparse wells and seismic data to be mid to late Miocene (15-5.3 Ma) through the Plio-Pleistocene (2.6 Ma). Likely causative factors for the MTDs include: 1) elevated pore pressure due to generation of biogenic gas in the sediment column of the continental slopes as observed on seismic reflection data; 2) rapid sedimentation related to the Magdalena delta that has produced oversteepened slopes since the late Miocene (7-10 Ma); and 3) tectonic uplift and infrequent large earthquakes related to shallow, southeastward subduction beneath the nearby Southern Caribbean Fold Belt. Preliminary models of inferred tsunamis and their projected run-ups around the Caribbean Sea are presented.

  5. Mass transport processes in the southern Scotia Sea: Evidence of paleoearthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruano, Patricia; Bohoyo, Fernando; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Pérez, Lara F.; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Maldonado, Andrés; García, Marga; Medialdea, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    The southern margin of the Scotia Sea hosts the convergent boundary between the Scotia and Antarctic plates where a number of small basins are situated. Mass transport deposits (MTDs) within two of these small basins, Dove and Scan basins, reveal the importance of seismicity, slope instabilities and depositional processes in their growth patterns. Swath-bathymetry and very high-resolution seismic data show that there are over 200 MTDs in these basins in the last 100 ky record. MTD characterizations are determined on the basis of their regional distribution, shape, apparent size and depth. Their sedimentary and tectonic implications are discussed, as well as the evidence of different triggering mechanisms in this region, which is characterized at present by moderate-to-high magnitude, shallow to intermediate earthquakes. MTDs are more abundant in the Dove Basin (with lenticular and wedge shapes), suggesting that this basin was affected by active tectonics to a greater degree than the Scan Basin. This finding is significant in the overall evolutionary context of the Scotia Sea region and Scotia-Antarctic plate geodynamics. Nevertheless, other factors -volcanic activity, vigorous bottom-currents, and/or higher sedimentation rates - must also be considered for the generation of MTDs in the Scan Basin, where a variety of processes generated more diverse MTD morphologies. Paleoseismological estimations of the repeated occurrence of wedge shaped MTDs in contact with fault scarps point to potential sources of large magnitude (Mw ~ 7.2-7.3) paleoearthquakes in several sites, in agreement with the present high magnitudes of regional seismicity. This study shows MTDs to be appropriate as paleoearthquake indicators in active tectonic settings. The distribution of MTDs in the southern Scotia Sea has important implications for geodynamic and geohazard research. They may prove to be unmistakable stratigraphic markers for future basin analysis.

  6. The fabric of Mass Transport Deposits in the Ursa Basin, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Strong, H. E.; Schneider, J.; Sawyer, D. E.; Schleicher, A. M.; Germaine, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) in the Ursa Basin, Gulf of Mexico, are densified relative to surrounding, undeformed, sediments. MTDs form a large fraction of the stratigraphic record. Their properties control basin fluid flow, impact seismic imaging, and are important for the development of subsea infrastructure. MTD-2 is one outstanding ~50m thick example where at a depth of 104.5mbsf, the porosity is 35%, while the immediate undeformed sediment below has a porosity of 47%. We analyzed the fabric of sediment within and outside, both above and below, of the MTD’s at Ursa. High-resolution x-ray texture goniometry (HRXTG) quantifies the alignment of clay minerals and shows greater basal plane alignment of smectite and illite within the MTDs relative to sediment outside the MTDs. A non-MTD sample immediately below MTD-2 has a weak fabric (m.r.d. = 2.5) whereas samples within the MTD have moderate fabrics (m.r.d. = 3-3.5). Pore throat analysis illustrates that the increase in alignment and the decrease in porosity is associated with a shift in mode pore throat size from 121 to 52 nanometers in the MTD vs. outside of the MTD. SEM images on ion-milled surfaces confirm that large pore throats are lost within the MTD. We interpret that the densification within MTDs is due to sediment remolding during debris flow. Remolding reorients the original clay mineral fabric, resulting in grains that have closer packing, lower porosity, and greater alignment than non-remolded sediments at the same effective stress.

  7. Exploring electron beam induced heat and mass transport at the atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisielowski, Christian

    2011-03-01

    In recent years the performance of mid-voltage electron microscopes was significantly boosted to reach deep sub-Ångstrom resolution around 0.5 Å at 300 kV in broad beam (TEM) and focused probe (STEM) modes. Atomic resolution microscopy at voltages as low as 50 kV (and possibly below) was fostered. As a result the detection of single atoms across the Periodic Table of Elements is now possible even if light atoms are considered. After decades of striving for resolution enhancement, electron microscopy has now reached a limit that is given at a fundamental level by the Coulomb scattering process itself and by beam-sample interactions, which set a maximum dose limit that can be easily reached for soft and hard materials with the developed high-brightness electron guns. Consequently, new frontiers for electron microscopy emerge and this contribution addresses dynamic processes at the single atom level that can now be captured in time series of images at frequencies below 1 Hz reaching towards kHz. In this frequency range much of the observed atom dynamics is electron beam induced and the control of beam-sample interaction imposes constraints as well as opportunities. In this contribution it is shown that it seems feasible to exploit beam sample interactions to gain better insight into heat and mass transport in soft and hard matter at atomic resolution. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. 3. Mass Movements, Erosion Patterns and Sediment Transport along the Sutlej River (NW-Himalaya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Thiede, R. C.; Strecker, M. R.

    2003-04-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of mass movements in active orogens can provide valuable insights into the relation between sedimentation and erosion processes. In areas of high relief, hillslope processes dominate surface geomorphology and can lead to the damming of rivers and formation of lakes upstream. These basins provide a record of natural climatic variations along the river profile and divide the regions in different sedimentational and erosional compartments. To characterize the variations, digital elevation models were used for quantitative analysis of topography, basin-fill volume, and active channel gradients. High-resolution spatial data (digitized 1:25,000 to 1:100,000 topographic maps) and ASTER-derived digital elevation models (DEM) were processed to analyze topography. Combined with geological field measurements and observations we could distinguish erosional patterns within several study areas in the NW Himalayas. Precipitation data were derived from calibrated passive microwave satellite data (SSMI), providing information on a 10 year time series at sufficient spatial resolution (12.5 km2). Modern sediment flux and transport, discharge, geomorphic field observations including river width and slope define the boundary conditions for surface erosion calculations. The Sutlej Valley (32N, 78E) in NW India is dominated by the antecedent Sutlej River, the third-largest river in the Himalayas. It flows perpendicular through the orogen and cuts through all major geologic units of the Tethyan Himalaya, High and Lesser Himalayan Crystallines, and Lower Himalayan units. The geomorphologic changes across thrust faults bounding these units provide valuable insights into the evolution of the orogen. Tectonically active sectors of the orogen are manifested by pronounced knickpoints in longitudinal river profiles that cross active thrust faults. In contrast to other parts of the Himalayas, no (re-) activation of the MCT and STDS can be seen in the

  9. Modeling heat and mass transport phenomena at higher temperatures in solar distillation systems - The Chilton-Colburn analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsilingiris, P.T.

    2010-02-15

    In the present investigation efforts have been devoted towards developing an analysis suitable for heat and mass transfer processes modeling in solar distillation systems, when they are operating at higher temperatures. For this purpose the use of Lewis relation is not new although its validity is based on the assumptions of identical boundary layer concentration and temperature distributions, as well as low mass flux conditions, which are not usually met in solar distillation systems operating at higher temperatures associated with considerable mass transfer rates. The present analysis, taking into consideration these conditions and the temperature dependence of all pertinent thermophysical properties of the saturated binary mixture of water vapor and dry air, leads to the development of an improved predictive accuracy model. This model, having undergone successful first order validation against earlier reported measurements from the literature, appears to offer more accurate predictions of the transport processes and mass flow rate yield of solar stills when operated at elevated temperatures. (author)

  10. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S.; Walker, H.F.

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  11. Application of GIS in the study of mass transport of pollutants by Adyar and Cooum Rivers in Chennai, Tamilnadu.

    PubMed

    Gowri, V S; Ramachandran, S; Ramesh, R; Pramiladevi, I R R; Krishnaveni, K

    2008-03-01

    Residential, industrial, commercial, institutional and recreational activities discharge degradable and non-degradable wastes that reach the coastal water through rivers and cause coastal pollution. In the present study, mass transport of pollutants by Adyar and Cooum Rivers to the coastal water as a result of land-based discharges was estimated during low tide. The lowest and the highest flow recorded in Adyar varied from 514.59 to 2,585.08x10(6) litres/day. Similarly, the flow in Cooum River fluctuated between 266.45 and 709.34x10(6) litres/day. The present study revealed that the Adyar River transported 53.89-454.11 t/d of suspended solids, 0.06-19.64 t/d of ammonia, 15.95-123.24 t/d of nitrate and 0.4-17.86 t/d of phosphate, 0.004-0.09 kg/d of cadmium, 0.15-1.29 kg/d of lead and 3.03-17.58 kg/d of zinc to the coastal water owing to its high discharge. Similarly, the Cooum River transported 11.87-120.06 t/d of suspended solids, 0.08-58.7 t/d of ammonia, 6.11-29.25 t/d of nitrate and 0.66-10.73 t/d of phosphate, 0.003-0.021 kg/d of cadmium, 0.02-0.44 kg/d of lead and 1.36-3.87 kg/d of zinc. A higher concentration of suspended solids was noticed in post monsoon and summer months. An increase in the mass transport of ammonia, nitrate, phosphate in summer months (April and May) and an increase in the mass transport of cadmium, lead and zinc were observed in monsoon months (October-December) in both the rivers. Thus mass transport of pollutants study reveal that Cooum and Adyar Rivers in Chennai contribute to coastal pollution by transporting inorganic and trace metals significantly through land drainage.

  12. Interpretation of leaching data for cementitious waste forms using analytical solutions based on mass transport theory and empiricism

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Godbee, H.W.; Tallent, O.K.; Nestor, C.W. Jr. )

    1989-01-01

    The analysis of leaching data using analytical solutions based on mass transport theory and empiricism is presented. The waste forms leached to generate the data used in this analysis were prepared with a simulated radioactive waste slurry with traces of potassium ion, manganese ions, carbonate ions, phosphate ions, and sulfate ions solidified with several blends of cementitious materials. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the results of ANS - 16.1 tests. Data of fraction leached versus time is presented and discussed.

  13. Predictive data-derived Bayesian statistic-transport model and simulator of sunken oil mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echavarria Gregory, Maria Angelica

    -processing tasks proper of a basic GIS-like software. The result is a predictive Bayesian multi-modal Gaussian model, SOSim (Sunken Oil Simulator) Version 1.0rcl, operational for use with limited, randomly-sampled, available subjective and numeric data on sunken oil concentrations and locations in relatively flat-bottomed bays. The SOSim model represents a new approach, coupling a Lagrangian modeling technique with predictive Bayesian capability for computing unconditional probabilities of mass as a function of space and time. The approach addresses the current need to rapidly deploy modeling capability without readily accessible information on ocean bottom currents. Contributions include (1) the development of the apparently first pollutant transport model for computing unconditional relative probabilities of pollutant location as a function of time based on limited available field data alone; (2) development of a numerical method of computing concentration profiles subject to curved, continuous or discontinuous boundary conditions; (3) development combinatorial algorithms to compute unconditional multimodal Gaussian probabilities not amenable to analytical or Markov-Chain Monte Carlo integration due to high dimensionality; and (4) the development of software modules, including a core module containing the developed Bayesian functions, a wrapping graphical user interface, a processing and operating interface, and the necessary programming components that lead to an open-source, stand-alone, executable computer application (SOSim -- Sunken Oil Simulator). Extensions and refinements are recommended, including the addition of capability for accepting available information on bathymetry and maybe bottom currents as Bayesian prior information, the creation of capability of modeling continuous oil releases, and the extension to tracking of suspended oil (3-D). Keywords: sunken oil, Bayesian, Gaussian, model, stochastic, emergency response, recovery, statistical model, multimodal.

  14. Risk assessment of the fatality due to explosion in land mass transport infrastructure by fast transient dynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, G; Larcher, M; Casadei, F; Solomos, G

    2010-01-15

    Terrorist attacks in New York have shocked the world community showing clearly the vulnerability of air transport in such events. However, the terrorist attacks in Madrid and London showed that land mass transport infrastructure is equally vulnerable in case of similar attacks. The fact that there has not been substantial investment in the domain of risk analysis and evaluation of the possible effects due to such events in land mass transportation infrastructure leaves large room for new developments that could eventually fill this gap. In the present work using the finite element code EUROPLEXUS there has been a large effort to perform a complete study of the land mass infrastructure in case of explosion events. This study includes a train station, a metro station and a metro carriage providing thus valuable simulation data for a variety of different situations. For the analysis of these structures it has been necessary to apply a laser scanning method for the acquisition of geometrical data, to improve the simulation capabilities of EUROPLEXUS by adding failure capabilities for specific finite elements, to implement new material models (e.g. glass), and to add new modules that achieve data post-processing for the calculation of fatal and non-fatal injuries risk. The aforementioned improvements are explained in the present work with emphasis in the newly developed risk analysis features of EUROPLEXUS.

  15. Anatomy of mass transport deposits in the Dead Sea: sedimentary processes in an active tectonic hypersaline basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Nicolas; Hadzhiivanova, Elitsa; Neugebauer, Ina; Brauer, Achim; Schwab, Markus; Frank, Ute; Dulski, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Continental archives such as interplate endorheic lacustrine sedimentary basins provide an excellent source of data for studying regional climate, seismicity and environmental changes through time. Such is the case for the sediments that were deposited in the Dead Sea basin, a tectonically active pull-apart structure along the Dead Sea fault (DSF). This elongated basin is characterized by steep slopes and a deep and flat basin-floor, which are constantly shaped by seismicity and climate. In this study, we present initial results on the sedimentology and internal structure of mass transport deposits in the Pleistocene Dead Sea. The database used for this study consists of a long core retrieved at ~300 m water depth in the deepest part of the Dead Sea as part of an international scientific effort under the auspice of the ICDP. Micro-facies analysis coupled by elemental scanning (µXRF), granulometry and petrophysical measurements (magnetic susceptibility) have been carried out on selected intervals in order to decipher and identify the source-to-sink processes and controlling mechanisms behind the formation of mass transport deposits. The findings of this study allowed defining and characterizing the mass transport deposits into separate sedimentary facies according to the lake level and limnological conditions. Investigating sediments from the deep Dead Sea basin allowed better understanding and deciphering the depositional processes in relation with the tectonic forces shaping this basin.

  16. Relative contribution of set cathode potential and external mass transport on TCE dechlorination in a continuous-flow bioelectrochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Verdini, Roberta; Aulenta, Federico; de Tora, Francesca; Lai, Agnese; Majone, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Microbial bioelectrochemical systems, which use solid-state cathodes to drive the reductive degradation of contaminants such as the chlorinated hydrocarbons, are recently attracting considerable attention for bioremediation applications. So far, most of the published research has focused on analyzing the influence of key (bio)electrochemical factors influencing contaminant degradation, such as the cathode potential, whereas only few studies have examined the potential impact of mass transport phenomena on process performance. Here we analyzed the performance of a flow-through bioelectrochemical reactor, continuously fed with a synthetic groundwater containing trichloroethene at three different linear fluid velocities (from 0.3 m d(-1) to 1.7 m d(-1)) and three different set cathode potentials (from -250 mV to -450 mV vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). The obtained results demonstrated that, in the range of fluid velocities which are characteristics for natural groundwater systems, mass transport phenomena may strongly influence the rate and extent of reductive dechlorination. Nonetheless, the relative importance of mass transport largely depends on the applied cathode potential which, in turn, controls the intrinsic kinetics of biological reactions and the underlying electron transfer mechanisms.

  17. In-situ TEM-investigations of mass transport in ``near-bamboo'' Al-interconnects due to electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinen, Dirk; Schroeder, Herbert; Schilling, Werner

    1998-01-01

    Electromigration (EM)-driven mass transport in "near-bamboo" Al-lines, which consist mostly of "blocking grains," is an important topic of research on ULSI-metallizations. Because the most easy diffusion path, i.e. grain boundaries parallel to the line, is suppressed in bamboo-like Al-lines other paths have to be considered. In this work two other possible paths of diffusion were examined by in-situ observations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). For these experiments a special sample holder had to be constructed. One path is EM-driven intragranular diffusion in Al-lines. In this experiment, inert gas-filled voids with a mean diameter of about 10 nm, so-called bubbles, which were created after gas implantation and annealing of the Al-lines, serve as indicators of mass (or vacancy) transport. The in-situ EM-tests reveal no intragranular void motion over a period of more than 100 h at current densities of 1-1.75 MA/cm2 and temperatures of 150-225 °C. This leads to an estimation of the maximum void diffusion velocity which was compared with calculated values of surface and volume diffusion controlled void motion, respectively. The second point of interest was the behavior of dislocations in Al-lines under an applied EM-force. The importance of their observed motion for intragranular mass transport will be discussed.

  18. Sedimentary and structural controls on seismogenic slumping within mass transport deposits from the Dead Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.; Weinberger, R.; Levi, T.

    2016-10-01

    Comparatively little work has been undertaken on how sedimentary environments and facies changes can influence detailed structural development in slump sheets associated with mass transport deposits (MTDs). The nature of downslope deformation at the leading edge of MTDs is currently debated in terms of frontally emergent, frontally confined and open-toed models. An opportunity to study and address these issues occurs within the Dead Sea Basin, where six individual slump sheets (S1-S6) form MTDs in the Late Pleistocene Lisan Formation. All six slumps, which are separated from one another by undeformed beds, are traced towards the NE for up to 1 km, and each shows a change in sedimentary facies from detrital-rich in the SW, to more aragonite-rich in the NE. The detrital-rich facies is sourced predominantly from the rift margin 1.5 km further SW, while the aragonite-rich facies represents evaporitic precipitation in the hyper saline Lake Lisan. The stacked system of MTDs translates downslope towards the NE and follows a pre-determined sequence controlled by the sedimentary facies. Each individual slump roots downwards into underlying detrital-rich layers and displays a greater detrital content towards the SW, which is marked by increasing folding, while increasing aragonite content towards the NE is associated with more discrete thrusts. The MTDs thin downslope towards the NE, until they pass laterally into undeformed beds at the toe. The amount of contraction also reduces downslope from a maximum of 50% to < 10% at the toe, where upright folds form diffuse 'open-toed' systems. We suggest that MTDs are triggered by seismic events, facilitated by detrital-rich horizons, and controlled by palaeoslope orientation. The frequency of individual failures is partially controlled by local environmental influences linked to detrital input and should therefore be used with some caution in more general palaeoseismic studies. We demonstrate that MTDs display 'open toes' where

  19. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Glenn Charles

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  20. Co-transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by motile microorganisms leads to enhanced mass transfer under diffusive conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Jakobsen, Hans H; Winding, Anne; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    The environmental chemodynamics of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) are often rate-limited by diffusion in stagnant boundary layers. This study investigated whether motile microorganisms can act as microbial carriers that enhance mass transfer of HOCs through diffusive boundary layers. A new experimental system was developed that allows (1) generation of concentration gradients of HOCs under the microscope, (2) exposure and direct observation of microorganisms in such gradients, and (3) quantification of HOC mass transfer. Silicone O-rings were integrated into a Dunn chemotaxis chamber to serve as sink and source for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This resulted in stable concentration gradients in water (>24 h). Adding the model organism Tetrahymena pyriformis to the experimental system enhanced PAH mass transfer up to hundred-fold (benzo[a]pyrene). Increasing mass transfer enhancement with hydrophobicity indicated PAH co-transport with the motile organisms. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed such transport. The effective diffusivity of T. pyriformis, determined by video imaging microscopy, was found to exceed molecular diffusivities of the PAHs up to four-fold. Cell-bound PAH fractions were determined to range from 28% (naphthalene) to 92% (pyrene). Motile microorganisms can therefore function as effective carriers for HOCs under diffusive conditions and might significantly enhance mobility and availability of HOCs.

  1. MHD thermosolutal marangoni convection heat and mass transport of power law fluid driven by temperature and concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Chengru; Zheng, Liancun; Ma, Lianxi

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermosolutal Marangoni convection heat and mass transfer of power-law fluids driven by a power law temperature and a power law concentration which is assumed that the surface tension varies linearly with both the temperature and concentration. Heat and mass transfer constitutive equation is proposed based on N-diffusion proposed by Philip and the abnormal convection-diffusion model proposed by Pascal in which we assume that the heat diffusion depends non-linearly on both the temperature and the temperature gradient and the mass diffusion depends non-linearly on both the concentration and the concentration gradient with modified Fourier heat conduction for power law fluid. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using suitable similarity transformations. Approximate analytical solution is obtained using homotopy analytical method (HAM). The transport characteristics of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are analyzed in detail.

  2. Thermocline circulation and ventilation of the East/Japan Sea, part I: Water-mass characteristics and transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yuzhu; Chang, Kyung-Il; Yun, Jae-Yul; Kim, Kyung-Ryul

    2010-07-01

    three other major convection sites of the world's oceans, the Gulf of Lions, Labrador Sea and Greenland Sea, showing some common and distinctive features, especially the extremely low salinity of the EJS. Water-mass properties on neutral density surfaces are analyzed with the water-mass Turner angle (WTu) and circulation and transport are deducted from geostrophic calculations. From the 15-year mean hydrography, a basin-wide net annual mean transport of about 2.10±0.29 Sv (1 Sv=10 6 m 3 s -1) is estimated with summer and winter transports of 2.56±0.36 and 1.63±0.23 Sv, respectively. This transport is slightly less than the annual mean transport of the Tsushima Current at the KTS, 2.4 Sv from cable and 2.3 Sv from other direct current meter and geostrophic methods but matches the ±14% error bar of ±0.29 Sv adjusted by ±150 dbar from the reference level of 800 dbar. This error bar is close to the error of ±0.34 Sv determined from water-mass conservation residual in a separated study. Three mechanisms are discovered to explain the seasonal difference in the Tsushima Current transports: the stronger winter Ekman pumping, outcropping and southward crossing flow. During winter, the Tsushima Current branches are imposed under strong wind stress curl in the Ulleung Basin and Yamato Basin, showing a doubling Ekman downwelling transport, partly weakening the Tsushima Current flow in the eastern boundary. Meanwhile the thermocline isopycnal surfaces outcrop in winter, reducing volume transport due to reduced space and thickness. The southward currents in the southern Ulleung Basin and Yamato Basin are perpendicular to the Tsushima Current branches west of Japan, which weakens the eastern boundary current in winter.

  3. Oceanic transports of mass, heat, and salt in the western North Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taira, K.; Mori, T.; Saiki, M.; Nishida, H.; Matsumura, S.

    1991-01-01

    An optimum orbit of the satellite will be presented for confirmation of estimates of tides and interpolation errors. Hydrographic surveys complementary to the routine surveys will be planned in Phase 1 by using research vessels belonging to Japanese universities. Direction measurements of oceanic transports with moored current meters and shipborne acoustic Doppler velocimeters will be planned for selected sections as an activity of the Japan-WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) Project. In the operational phase of TOPEX/POSEIDON, the delivered altimeter data will be used for the computation of surface geostrophic velocities to be applied in the hydrographic sections of the Japan Meteorological Agency, Hydrographic Department, Japan Fisheries Agency, and the universities. The estimates of transports are made by the co-investigators of each agency. The composite of the transports in the circulations will be made at the Japan Oceanographic Data Center. The direct measurements of current velocity and transports will be made mainly by the principal investigator.

  4. Mass transport and organic matter distribution in paleoceanographic reconstruction of the northern Arabian Platform during the Early Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialik, Or; Waldmann, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The Barremian-Aptian sedimentary succession in the Western Levant is an important reservoir strata notably due to intercalation of carbonates and coarse siliciclastics. In much of the northern Levant this strata has been described as a transition from siliciclastic marginal marine deposits to carbonate shoals and lagoons - posing the possibility of similar configurations. Results from high-resolution elemental, mineralogical, sedimentological and petrophysical analyses measured on a set of long cores from northern Israel offers a unique look at this transition, in terms of the paleoceanography, geometry and ventilation conditions in the lead-up to Oceanic Anoxic Events 1a and 1b. Two intervals of abundant mass-transport deposits (MTDs) emplacement were identified in this succession: a Late Barremian series and an Aptian series. These MTDs are graded and/or chaotic, they significantly differ from the fine grained, fine laminated calcareous shale in-situ lithology. The background lithology was found to contain elevated organic matter, sulfur and iron content while bioturbation features are notably scarce or absent. At the contacts between the marine shales and the MTDs, there is a decrease in sulfur and iron, indicating more oxic conditions at the sediment-water interface of the emplaced units, compounded by a coeval oxygenation of the native deeper waters due to turbulence and mixing associated with mass transport. Together, these observations indicate emplacement of coarse-grained, shallow water MTDs at the lower termination of a slope, with gradient sufficient to support mass transport above a basal shear plane. The lithologies within the MTDs indicate high energy downslope transport of calcareous and terrestrial material into a low-energy basinal environment during the Late Barremian and Aptian. These background sediments bear evidence suggestive of at least two intervals of diminished oxygen in the lower water column, one predating OAE 1.

  5. Mass transport deposits as witness of Holocene seismic activity on the Ligurian margin, Western Mediterranean (ASTARTE project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samalens, Kevin; Cattaneo, Antonio; Migeon, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The Ligurian Margin (Western Mediterranean) is at the transition between the Southern Alpes and the Liguro-Provençal margin and it is one of the most seismic areas of France. Several historic earthquakes have been indexed; the strongest, on February 23rd, 1887, occurred offshore Menton and Imperia and also caused a tsunami wave. Its equivalent magnitude has been estimated between 6 and 6.5. In addition, a moderate recurrent seismicity shakes the margin. The aim of this study is to understand the link between seismic activity and slope destabilization, and to identify the sedimentary deposits resulting from mass transport or turbidity currents. During Malisar (Geoazur laboratory), Prisme 2 and Prisme 3 (Ifremer) cruises, bathymetry, seafloor imagery (SAR), geophysics data (CHIRP SYSIF and high resolution seismics), and sediment cores have been acquired on the continental slope, focussing on canyons and submarine landslides, and in the basin. These data record numerous mass transport deposits (slump, debrites) in the different physiographic areas of the margin. To search for evidences of past Ligurian margin seismicity during the Holocene, we focused on the northeast part of the margin, the Finale area. We identified and sampled acoustically transparent Mass Transport Deposits up to 20-m thick in the bottom of three coaleshing canyons: Noli, Pora and Centa canyons from W to E in the area offshore Finale Ligure. We also recovered an MTD in the collecting deeper canyon system. MTDs in cores appear as sediment with different degrees of deformation (tilted blocks, slump, debrites) and are topped by hemipelagites. The radiocarbon age of the top of MTDs can be considered synchronous and centered around 4900 yr BP. Mass wasting occurring over more than 50 km of the Ligurian margin could indicate that an earthquake stroke the Finale area sector at that time.

  6. Mass flux into the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif: Orogen-parallel transport, lower crustal flow, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, D. M.; Beaumont, C.; Braun, J.

    2011-12-01

    Relative to most of the Himalaya, the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif requires an additional mass flux into its base to balance extreme rates of surface denudation (>10 mm/a) over the last ~2-3 Ma. One proposed source is middle to lower crustal flow into the massif (e.g., Zeitler et al., 2001), which while likely inactive elsewhere along strike, may be sustainable by very rapid surface denudation, a high geothermal gradient, and thermal weakening of rocks beneath the syntaxes. An alternative source is orogen-parallel (OP) transport due to oblique convergence and strain partitioning along the Himalayan arc (e.g., Seeber and Pêcher, 1998). Several observations including (1) predominantly orogen-normal slip on the frontal thrusts deduced from seismic events, (2) OP extension accommodated on orogen-normal structures, and (3) distributed and segmented strike-slip faulting trending parallel to the arc are consistent with strain partitioning and OP mass transport. A key question is can this mechanism supply sufficient mass to the Nanga Parbat syntaxis, or is local channel flow required? We explore mass transport into the western Himalayan syntaxis region using lithospheric-scale 3D mechanical and coupled thermo-mechanical models of an arcuate orogen. The crust is either frictional plastic or power-law viscous, with a constant low viscosity lower crust present in some experiments. Applied velocity boundary conditions are transmitted to the base of the crust by a strong frictional plastic mantle lithosphere, and mantle detachment/subduction drives formation of a bivergent, arcuate orogen. To assess the magnitude of mass transport from strain partitioning, we first explore purely mechanical experiments featuring a 5-km-high Tibet-like plateau above a weak lower crust and with a frictional plastic decollement that dips at 10° beneath the incipient orogen, similar to the Himalayan basal detachment. Preliminary results show gravitational feedback from the plateau drives

  7. Gradual conditioning of non-Gaussian transmissivity fields to flow and mass transport data: 2. Demonstration on a synthetic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llopis-Albert, Carlos; Capilla, José E.

    2009-06-01

    SummaryIn the first paper of this series a methodology for the generation of non-Gaussian transmissivity fields conditional to flow, mass transport and secondary data was presented. This methodology, referred to as the gradual conditioning (GC) method, constitutes a new and advanced powerful approach in the field of stochastic inverse modelling. It is based on gradually changing an initial transmissivity ( T) field, conditioned only to T and secondary data, to honour flow and transport measured data. The process is based on combining the initial T field with other seed T fields in successive iterations maintaining the stochastic structure of T, previously inferred from data. The iterative procedure involves the minimization of a penalty function which depends on one parameter, and is made up by the weighted summation of the square deviations among flow and/or transport variables, and the corresponding known measurements. The GC method leads gradually to a final simulated field, uniformly converging to a better reproduction of conditioning data as more iterations are performed. The methodology is now demonstrated on a synthetic aquifer in a non-multi-Gaussian stochastic framework. First, an initial T field is simulated, and retained as reference T field. With prescribed head boundary conditions, transient flow created by an abstraction well and a mass solute plume migrating through the formation, a long-term and large scale hypothetical tracer experiment is run in this reference synthetic aquifer. Then T, piezometric head ( h), solute concentration ( c) and travel time ( τ) are sampled at a limited number of points, and for different time steps where applicable. Using this limited amount of information the GC method is applied, conditioning to different sets of these sampled data and model results are compared to those from the reference synthetic aquifer. Results demonstrate the ability and robustness of the GC method to include different types of data without

  8. Channeling, channel density and mass recovery in aquifer transport, with application to the MADE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, A.

    2014-12-01

    Channeling effects in heterogeneous formations are studied through a new quantity denoted as channel density a(x,t). Focusing on advection only, a(x,t) is defined as the relative number of streamtubes (or channels) containing solute between x and x + dx at a given time t, regardless of the mass that they carry. The channel density generally differs from the widely employed longitudinal mass distribution m(x,t), and their difference increases with time and the degree of heterogeneity. The difference between a and m reflects the nonuniformity of mass distribution relative to the plume geometry. In particular, the "fast" channels typically carry a larger fraction of mass than their share in their relative volume, which in turn can be rather small. Detecting such channels by a network of monitoring wells may be a challenging task, which might explain the poor solute recovery of some field experiments at increasing times. After application of the proposed concepts to the simple case of stratified formations, we model the channel density and mass distribution pertaining to the MADE experiment, which exhibited poor mass recovery at large times. The results presented in this study emphasize the possible channeling effects at MADE and the general difficulty in sampling the leading edge of the plume, which in turn may contain a significant fraction of the plume mass.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of steady-state momentum and mass transport in a bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kenneth A; Saini, Sunil; Wick, Timothy M

    2002-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models to quantify momentum and mass transport under conditions of tissue growth will aid bioreactor design for development of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs. Fluent CFD models are used to calculate flow fields, shear stresses, and oxygen profiles around nonporous constructs simulating cartilage development in our concentric cylinder bioreactor. The shear stress distribution ranges from 1.5 to 12 dyn/cm(2) across the construct surfaces exposed to fluid flow and varies little with the relative number or placement of constructs in the bioreactor. Approximately 80% of the construct surface exposed to flow experiences shear stresses between 1.5 and 4 dyn/cm(2), validating the assumption that the concentric cylinder bioreactor provides a relatively homogeneous hydrodynamic environment for construct growth. Species mass transport modeling for oxygen demonstrates that fluid-phase oxygen transport to constructs is uniform. Some O(2) depletion near the down stream edge of constructs is noted with minimum pO(2) values near the constructs of 35 mmHg (23% O(2) saturation). These values are above oxygen concentrations in cartilage in vivo, suggesting that bioreactor oxygen concentrations likely do not affect chondrocyte growth. Scale-up studies demonstrate the utility and flexibility of CFD models to design and characterize bioreactors for growth of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  10. Commuter exposure to black carbon, carbon monoxide, and noise in the mass transport khlong boats of Bangkok, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A. D.; Velasco, E.; Ho, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Khlong (canal) boats are a unique mass transport alternative in the congested city of Bangkok. Canals and rivers provide exclusive transit-ways for reducing the commuting time of thousands of city residents daily. However, as a consequence of the service characteristics and boats design and state of repair, they can represent a potential public health risk and an important source of black carbon and greenhouse gases. This work quantifies commuter exposure to black carbon, CO and noise when waiting for and travelling in these diesel fueled boats. Exposure to toxic pollutants and acute noise is similar or worse than for other transportation modes. Mean black carbon concentrations observed at one busy pier and along the main canal were much higher than ambient concentrations at sites impacted by vehicular traffic. Concentrations of CO were similar to those reported for roadside areas of Bangkok. The equivalent continuous sound levels registered at the landing pier were similar to those reported for roadsides, but values recorded inside the boats were significantly higher. We believe that the boat service is a viable alternative mode of mass transport, but public safety could be improved to provide a high quality service, comparable to modern rail systems or emerging bus rapid transit systems. These investments would also contribute to reduce the emission of black carbon and other greenhouse and toxic pollutants.

  11. Geochemical Mass Balance and Elemental Transport during the Weathering of the Black Shale of Shuijingtuo Formation in Northeast Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Sixiang; Wu, Xiyong; Zhao, Siyuan; Liao, Xin; Zhu, Baolong

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of the processes that control the behavior of major elements with respect to weathering profile is essential to calculate the mobility, redistribution, and mass fluxes of elements. Hence, this study aims to determine the geochemical mass balance, strain, elemental correlation, and transport in weathering profiles. We constructed three weathering profiles for the black shale of Shujingtuo formation. As per the principal component analysis of major elements, density, and pH values, the first component represents the “elemental factor” and the second denotes the “external factor.” The “depletion” pattern is a mass transportation pattern, and Na, K, and Mg are depleted along transect relative to the composition of fresh rock. Fe is redeposited at the bottom half of the saprock zone, whereas Al is accumulated at the regolith zone. The Fe and Al patterns are attributed to the “depletion–addition” and “addition” patterns, respectively. The strain in profiles A and B demonstrates the expansion at the regolith zone and part of the saprock zone. In profile C, however, these zones collapsed at all depths. In chemical weathering, Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Si are depleted in the following order: valley (C) > near mountaintop (B) > ridge (A). PMID:25197710

  12. Geochemical mass balance and elemental transport during the weathering of the black shale of Shuijingtuo formation in Northeast Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Ling, Sixiang; Wu, Xiyong; Zhao, Siyuan; Liao, Xin; Ren, Yong; Zhu, Baolong

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of the processes that control the behavior of major elements with respect to weathering profile is essential to calculate the mobility, redistribution, and mass fluxes of elements. Hence, this study aims to determine the geochemical mass balance, strain, elemental correlation, and transport in weathering profiles. We constructed three weathering profiles for the black shale of Shujingtuo formation. As per the principal component analysis of major elements, density, and pH values, the first component represents the "elemental factor" and the second denotes the "external factor." The "depletion" pattern is a mass transportation pattern, and Na, K, and Mg are depleted along transect relative to the composition of fresh rock. Fe is redeposited at the bottom half of the saprock zone, whereas Al is accumulated at the regolith zone. The Fe and Al patterns are attributed to the "depletion-addition" and "addition" patterns, respectively. The strain in profiles A and B demonstrates the expansion at the regolith zone and part of the saprock zone. In profile C, however, these zones collapsed at all depths. In chemical weathering, Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Si are depleted in the following order: valley (C) > near mountaintop (B) > ridge (A).

  13. Jet engine applications for materials with nanometer-scale dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, J. W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of advanced military and commercial gas turbine engines is often linked to advances in materials technology. High performance gas turbine engines being developed require major material advances in strength, toughness, reduced density and improved temperature capability. The emerging technology of nanostructured materials has enormous potential for producing materials with significant improvements in these properties. Extraordinary properties demonstrated in the laboratory include material strengths approaching theoretical limit, ceramics that demonstrate ductility and toughness, and materials with ultra-high hardness. Nanostructured materials and coatings have the potential for meeting future gas turbine engine requirements for improved performance, reduced weight and lower fuel consumption.

  14. Jet engine applications for materials with nanometer-scale dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, J. W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of advanced military and commercial gas turbine engines is often linked to advances in materials technology. High performance gas turbine engines being developed require major material advances in strength, toughness, reduced density and improved temperature capability. The emerging technology of nanostructured materials has enormous potential for producing materials with significant improvements in these properties. Extraordinary properties demonstrated in the laboratory include material strengths approaching theoretical limit, ceramics that demonstrate ductility and toughness, and material with ultra-high hardness. Nanostructured materials and coatings have the potential for meeting future gas turbine engine requirements for improved performance, reduced weight and lower fuel consumption.

  15. Contact and capillary forces at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shengfeng

    In this thesis I use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the physics of nanoasperity contacts and contrast their behavior to predictions of traditional continuum theories. Contact area plays a central role in continuum theories of friction and adhesion. In Chapter II, I use simulations of nanoscopic contacts between clean surfaces with simple geometry to show that it is difficult to extend the continuum notion of contact to the atomic scale. Definitions of contact area based on interatomic forces have a strong dependence on temperature, atomic structure of the surfaces in contact, and length of time interval during which the contact area is measured. Even for atomically flat surfaces, contact area grows linearly with the load pushing surfaces together, and pressures comparable to the ideal hardness are needed to achieve full contact at typical temperatures. A simple harmonic mean-field theory is developed that provides a quantitative description of this behavior and explains why the instantaneous forces on atoms are found to have a universal exponential distribution. The mean field theory also describes single-asperity contact by a spherical tip. The static and kinetic friction for this latter geometry are shown to have different scaling with load and the effect of contact stiffness on kinetic friction is explored. The properties of these clean surfaces are strongly dependent on the detailed atomic structure of the solids. However, experimental surfaces are typically coated with an adsorbed layer of small molecules from the surrounding air. In Chapter III, I study the effect of an adsorbed monolayer on contact and friction of nanoasperities. Results show that monolayers reduce sensitivity to atomic structure and lead to a friction that scales more linearly with load than with contact area. Three different measures of contact area are studied and their load dependence is compared with the continuum prediction. In Chapter IV, I study capillary adhesion between a spherical tip and a flat substrate induced by a liquid bridge connecting them. The capillary force is measured as a function of tip-substrate separation. It is shown that the average adhesion can be smaller than that predicted by the continuum theory by as much as a factor of 2. The shift is found to be due to pressure anisotropy in the liquid bridge. Results further show that the meniscus shape and its contribution to the capillary force are quite close to continuum predictions down to a separation of a few molecular diameters.

  16. Local mechanical spectroscopy with nanometer-scale lateral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulevey, F.; Gremaud, G.; Sémoroz, A.; Kulik, A. J.; Burnham, N. A.; Dupas, E.; Gourdon, D.

    1998-05-01

    A new technique has been developed to probe the viscoelastic and anelastic properties of submicron phases of inhomogeneous materials. The measurement gives information related to the internal friction and to the variations of the dynamic modulus of nanometer-sized volumes. It is then the nanoscale equivalent to mechanical spectroscopy, a well-known macroscopic technique for materials studies, also sometimes called dynamic mechanical (thermal) analysis. The technique is based on a scanning force microscope, using the principle of scanning local-acceleration microscopy (SLAM), and allows the sample temperature to be changed. It is called variable-temperature SLAM, abbreviated T-SLAM. According to a recent proposition to systematize names of scanning probe microscope based methods, this technique should be included in the family of "mechanothermal analysis with scanning microscopy." It is suited for studying defect dynamics in nanomaterials and composites by locating the dissipative mechanisms in submicron phases. The primary and secondary relaxations, as well as the viscoplasticity, were observed in bulk PVC. The wide range of phenomena demonstrate the versatility of the technique. A still unexplained increase of the stiffness with increasing temperature was observed just below the glass transition. All of these observations, although their interpretation in terms of physical events is still tentative, are in agreement with global studies. This technique also permits one to image the variations of the local elasticity or of the local damping at a fixed temperature. This enables the study of, for instance, the homogeneity of phase transitions in multiphased materials, or of the interface morphologies and properties. As an illustration, the homogeneity of the glass transition temperature of PVC in a 50/50 wt % PVC/PB polymer blend has been demonstrated. Due to the small size of the probed volume, T-SLAM gives information on the mechanical properties of the near-surface, which may differ from bulk properties.

  17. Carbon Nanotubules: Building Blocks for Nanometer-Scale Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnott, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    The proposed work consisted of two projects: the investigation of fluid permeation and diffusion through ultrafiltration membranes composed of carbon nanotubules and the design and study of molecular transistors composed of nanotubules. I will outline the progress made on each project and also discuss additional projects, one of which is a continuation of work supported by an 1995-1996 NASA Ames Computer grant.

  18. Nanometer scale mechanical properties of Au(111) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, M.; Folch, A.; Neubauer, G.

    1992-11-01

    The mechanical properties of gold films of (111) orientation were studied as a function of load when contacted by a single asperity Pt-Rh alloy tip. The interaction forces were measured in the direction perpendicular to the surface. The contribution of various types of forces (van der Waals, capillarity from contaminants, and metallic adhesion) in the process of contact was determined. We investigated the elastic and plastic response of the gold film as a function of applied load by examination of the contact area in subsequent imaging with STM and AFM.

  19. Photonic nanojet-enhanced nanometer-scale germanium photodiode.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mehdi; Simpson, Jamesina J

    2013-08-01

    A design challenge for photodiodes yielding both high speed and responsivity is the necessity to concentrate incident light into a subwavelength active volume region. Photonic nanojets have been reported in the literature as a means to focus an incident plane wave to a subwavelength-waist propagating beam with applications ranging from next-generation DVDs to characterizing subwavelength features within dielectric targets. In the present work, a new application of photonic nanojets is proposed, focusing electromagnetic energy into a photodiode. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain solutions are conducted to determine the advantages of photonic nanojet-enhanced photodiodes at near-infrared wavelengths (1310 nm). We find that photonic nanojets provide a factor of 26 increase in the volume-integrated electric field within the subwavelength active volume of the photodiode of size 0.0045 μm³. Furthermore, this increase is achieved independent of the incident polarization and over a broad bandwidth. Photonic nanojets may thus serve as an attractive alternative to plasmonics for some applications.

  20. Mechanical properties of materials with nanometer scale dimensions and microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, William D.

    2015-08-05

    The three-year grant for which this final report is required extends from 2011 to 2015, including a one-year, no-cost extension. But this is just the latest in a long series of grants from the Division of Materials Sciences of DOE and its predecessor offices and agencies. These include contracts or grants from: the Metallurgy Branch of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (from the late 1960s to the mid-1970s), the Materials Science Program of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (from the mid- to late- 1970s), and the Division of Materials Science of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy (from the early 1980s to the present time). Taken all together, these offices have provided nearly continuous support for our research for nearly 50 years. As we have said on many occasions, this research support has been the best we have ever had, by far. As we look back on the nearly five decades of support from the Division of Materials Sciences and the predecessor offices, we find that the continuity of support that we have enjoyed has allowed us to be most productive and terms of papers published, doctoral students graduated and influence on the field of materials science. This report will, of course, cover the three-year period of the present grant, in summary form, but will also make reference to the output that resulted from support of previous grants from the Division of Materials Sciences and its predecessor offices.

  1. Local viscosity and environment on the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sangmin

    2002-01-01

    Local viscosity and environment of various systems were studied by electrical, mechanical and optical methods. Dielectric loss peaks of both normal-mode relaxation and of segmental motion of cis-polyisoprene with various molecular weights were measured at different film thickness. While the normal mode relaxation was retarded as film thickness decreases, segemental mode was not. This contrasting thickness and temperature dependence of the normal-mode and segmental relaxtion modes indicates strong breakdown of time-temperature superposition. Furthermore, the normal mode relaxation of the lower molecular weight polyisoprene showed more retardation than that of higher one. Both large shear with low frequency and small shear with high frequency were applied to molecularly confined OMCTS (Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) inside SFA to observe its stick to slip transition. Large shear caused the structural changes of the film and small shear probed the rheological properties of the confined liquid during the slow large shear process. Shear probe also detected dynamic lateral alignment of OMCTS near mica surface during the repeated approaches and separations. When triangular normal force was applied, force distance profile and viscoelastic components were measured at the same time by capacitance and shear device respectively. Although each OMCTS layer always appears at the same distance from the solid wall, its viscoelastic measurement showed additional sub changes even at the same film thickness. New optical setup for two photon excitation time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy and lifetime measurements was built and used to understand the local environment and viscosity. The rotational correlation time constants by the fluorescence anisotropy provide the information on the hydrodynamic volume and local viscosity near the probe. Instead, the fluorescence lifetime does the local environment near the probe such as pH, temperature and polarity of the medium. Based on these fluorescence measurements, it was shown that the motions of DNA and polystyrene at the surface were more retarded than those in bulk. Also, local viscosity of the pluronic polymer which shows sol to gel phase transition was compared to the bulk viscosity near the transition temperature and the local viscosity change is much smaller than bulk viscosity. With the combination of dielectric measurement, the motion of polymer chains and local viscosity were separately measured for the ion conductive polypropylene oxide.

  2. Climatology of wintertime long-distance transport of surface-layer air masses arriving urban Beijing in 2001-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Xiang-De, XU

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the FLEXPART-WRF coupled modeling system is used to conduct 12-year Lagrangian modeling over Beijing, China, for the winters of 2001-2012. Based on large trajectory tracking ensembles, the long-range air transport properties, in terms of geographic source regions within the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) and large-scale ventilation, and its association with air quality levels were quantified from a climatological perspective. The results show the following: (1) The air masses residing in the near-surface layer over Beijing potentially originate from broader atmospheric boundary-layer regions, which cover vast areas with the backward tracking time elapsed. However, atmospheric transport from northeastern China and, to a lesser extent, from the surrounding regions of Beijing is important. (2) The evolution of air quality over Beijing is negatively correlated with large-scale ventilation conditions, particularly at a synoptic timescale. Thus, the simple but robust backward-trajectory ventilation (BV) index defined in this study could facilitate operational forecasting of severe air pollution events. (3) By comparison, the relatively short-range transport occurring over transport timescales of less than 3 days from southern and southeastern Beijing and its surrounding areas plays a vital role in the formation of severe air pollution events during the wintertime. (4) Additionally, an interannual trend analysis suggests that the geographic sources and ventilation conditions also changed, at least over the last decade, corresponding to the strength variability of the winter East Asian monsoon.

  3. Large-scale transport of a CO-enhanced air mass from Europe to the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, V. S.; Miles, T.; Reichle, H. G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    On November 14, 1981, the shuttle-borne Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) experiment observed a carbon monoxide (CO) enhanced air mass in the middle troposphere over the Middle East. The primary source of this polluted air was estimated by constructing adiabatic isentropic trajectories backwards from the MAPS measurement location over a 36 h period. The isentropic diagnostics indicate that CO-enhanced air was transported southeastward over the Mediterranean from an organized synoptic-scale weather regime, albeit of moderate intensity, influencing central Europe on November 12. Examination of the evolving synoptic scale vertical velocity and precipitation patterns during this period, in conjuction with Meteosat visible, infrared, and water vapor imagery, suggests that the presence of this disturbed weather system over Europe may have created upward transport of CO-enhanced air between the boundary-layer and midtropospheric levels, and subsequent entrainment in the large-scale northwesterly jet stream flow over Europe and the Mediterranean.

  4. National urban mass transportation statistics. 1983 Section 15 annual report. Transit financial and operating data reported for years ending between January 1, 1983 and December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report summarizes the financial and operating data submitted annually to the Urban Mass Transportation Administration by the nation's public-transit operators. It contains aggregate industry statistics and detailed financial and operating data on the individual transit systems.

  5. Heat and mass transport during a groundwater replenishment trial in a highly heterogeneous aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Simone; Prommer, Henning; Siade, Adam; Harris, Brett; Trefry, Mike; Martin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Changes in subsurface temperature distribution resulting from the injection of fluids into aquifers may impact physiochemical and microbial processes as well as basin resource management strategies. We have completed a 2 year field trial in a hydrogeologically and geochemically heterogeneous aquifer below Perth, Western Australia in which highly treated wastewater was injected for large-scale groundwater replenishment. During the trial, chloride and temperature data were collected from conventional monitoring wells and by time-lapse temperature logging. We used a joint inversion of these solute tracer and temperature data to parameterize a numerical flow and multispecies transport model and to analyze the solute and heat propagation characteristics that prevailed during the trial. The simulation results illustrate that while solute transport is largely confined to the most permeable lithological units, heat transport was also affected by heat exchange with lithological units that have a much lower hydraulic conductivity. Heat transfer by heat conduction was found to significantly influence the complex temporal and spatial temperature distribution, especially with growing radial distance and in aquifer sequences with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution. We attempted to estimate spatially varying thermal transport parameters during the data inversion to illustrate the anticipated correlations of these parameters with lithological heterogeneities, but estimates could not be uniquely determined on the basis of the collected data.

  6. Comparison of different mass transport calculation methods for wind erosion quantification purposes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative estimation of the material transported by the wind is essential in the study and control of wind erosion, although methods for its calculation are still controversial. Sampling the dust cloud at discrete heights, fitting an equation to the data, and integrating this equation from the so...

  7. Final Report: Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications (2012-2016)

    SciTech Connect

    James, Brian David; Huya-Kouadio, Jennie Moton; Houchins, Cassidy; DeSantis, Daniel Allen

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes project activities for Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) Contract Number DE-EE0005236 to the U.S. Department of Energy titled “Transportation Fuel Cell System Cost Assessment”. The project defined and projected the mass production costs of direct hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell power systems for light-duty vehicles (automobiles) and 40-foot transit buses. In each year of the five-year contract, the fuel cell power system designs and cost projections were updated to reflect technology advances. System schematics, design assumptions, manufacturing assumptions, and cost results are presented.

  8. Microphysics of mass-transport in coupled droplet-pairs at low Reynolds number and the role of convective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qingming; Sau, Amalendu

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial mass-transport and redistribution in the micro-scale liquid droplets are important in diverse fields of research interest. The role of the "inflow" and the "outflow" type convective eddy-pairs in the entrainment of outer solute and internal relocation are examined for different homogeneous and heterogeneous water droplet pairs appearing in a tandem arrangement. Two micro-droplets of pure (rain) water interact with an oncoming outer air stream (Re ≤ 100) contaminated by uniformly distributed SO2. By virtue of separation/attachment induced non-uniform interfacial shear-stress gradient, the well-defined inflow/outflow type pairs of recirculating eddy-based convective motion quickly develops, and the eddies effectively attract/repel the accumulated outer solute and control the physical process of mass-transport in the droplet-pair. The non-uniformly shear-driven flow interaction and bifurcation of the circulatory internal flow lead to growth of important micro-scale "secondary" eddies which suitably regroup with the adjacent "primary" one to create the sustained inflow/outflow type convective dynamics. The presently derived flow characteristics and in-depth analysis help to significantly improve our understanding of the micro-droplet based transport phenomena in a wider context. By tuning "Re" (defined in terms of the droplet diameter and the average oncoming velocity of the outer air) and gap-ratio "α," the internal convective forcing and the solute entrainment efficiency could be considerably enhanced. The quantitative estimates for mass entrainment, convective strength, and saturation characteristics for different coupled micro-droplet pairs are extensively examined here for 0.2 ≤ α ≤ 2.0 and 30 ≤ Re ≤ 100. Interestingly, for the compound droplets, with suitably tuned radius-ratio "B" (of upstream droplet with respect to downstream one) the generated "inflow" type coherent convective dynamics helped to significantly augment the centre

  9. Effect of reduced renal mass on renal ammonia transporter family, Rh C glycoprotein and Rh B glycoprotein, expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Young; Baylis, Chris; Verlander, Jill W; Han, Ki-Hwan; Reungjui, Sirirat; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2007-10-01

    Kidneys can maintain acid-base homeostasis, despite reduced renal mass, through adaptive changes in net acid excretion, of which ammonia excretion is the predominant component. The present study examines whether these adaptations are associated with changes in the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg). We used normal Sprague-Dawley rats and a 5/6 ablation-infarction model of reduced renal mass; control rats underwent sham operation. After 1 wk, glomerular filtration rate, assessed as creatinine clearance, was decreased, serum bicarbonate was slightly increased, and Na(+) and K(+) were unchanged. Total urinary ammonia excretion was unchanged, but urinary ammonia adjusted for creatinine clearance, an index of per nephron ammonia metabolism, increased significantly. Although reduced renal mass did not alter total Rhcg protein expression, both light microscopy and immunohistochemistry with quantitative morphometric analysis demonstrated hypertrophy of both intercalated cells and principal cells in the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct that was associated with increased apical and basolateral Rhcg polarization. Rhbg expression, analyzed using immunoblot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and measurement of cell-specific expression, was unchanged. We conclude that altered subcellular localization of Rhcg contributes to adaptive changes in single-nephron ammonia metabolism and maintenance of acid-base homeostasis in response to reduced renal mass.

  10. Monitoring mass transport in heterogeneously catalyzed reactions by field-gradient NMR for assessing reaction efficiency in a single pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buljubasich, L.; Blümich, B.; Stapf, S.

    2011-09-01

    An important aspect in assessing the performance of a catalytically active reactor is the accessibility of the reactive sites inside the individual pellets, and the mass transfer of reactants and products to and from these sites. Optimal design often requires a suitable combination of micro- and macropores in order to facilitate mass transport inside the pellet. In an exothermic reaction, fluid exchange between the pellet and the surrounding medium is enhanced by convection, and often by the occurrence of gas bubbles. Determining mass flow in the vicinity of a pellet thus represents a parameter for quantifying the reaction efficiency and its dependence on time or external reaction conditions. Field gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods are suggested as a tool for providing parameters sensitive to this mass flow in a contact-free and non-invasive way. For the example of bubble-forming hydrogen peroxide decomposition in an alumina pellet, the dependence of the mean-squared displacement of fluid molecules on spatial direction, observation time and reaction time is presented, and multi-pulse techniques are employed in order to separate molecular displacements from coherent and incoherent motion on the timescale of the experiment. The reaction progress is followed until the complete decomposition of H 2O 2.

  11. On the modelling of scalar and mass transport in combustor flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; So, R. M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented of a numerical study of swirling and nonswirling combustor flows with and without density variations. Constant-density arguments are used to justify closure assumptions invoked for the transport equations for turbulent momentum and scalar fluxes, which are written in terms of density-weighted variables. Comparisons are carried out with measurements obtained from three different axisymmetric model combustor experiments covering recirculating flow, swirling flow, and variable-density swirling flow inside the model combustors. Results show that the Reynolds stress/flux models do a credible job of predicting constant-density swirling and nonswirling combustor flows with passive scalar transport. However, their improvements over algebraic stress/flux models are marginal. The extension of the constant-density models to variable-density flow calculations shows that the models are equally valid for such flows.

  12. Mass and Momentum Transport in Microcavities for Diffusion-Dominant Cell Culture Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Pinero, Daniel; Hsieh, Adam H.; Atencia, Javier

    2012-01-01

    For the informed design of microfluidic devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena at the microscale. This letter outlines an analytically-driven approach to the design of rectangular microcavities extending perpendicular to a perfusion microchannel for microfluidic cell culture devices. We present equations to estimate the spatial transition from advection- to diffusion-dominant transport inside cavities as a function of the geometry and flow conditions. We also estimate the time required for molecules, such as nutrients or drugs to travel from the microchannel to a given depth into the cavity. These analytical predictions can facilitate the rational design of microfluidic devices to optimize and maintain long-term, physiologically-based culture conditions with low fluid shear stress.

  13. Relationships of dispersive mass transport and stochastic convective flow through hydrologic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Uncertainty in water flow velocity appears to be a major factor in determining the magnitude of contaminant dispersion expected in a ground water system. This report discusses some concepts and mathematical methods relating dispersive contaminant transport to stochastic aspects of ground water flow. The theory developed should not be construed as absolutely rigorous mathematics, but is presented with the intention of clarifying the physical concepts.

  14. Estimation of transport and degradation parameters for naphthalene and anthracene: influence of mass transfer on kinetics.

    PubMed

    Owabor, Chiedu N; Ogbeide, Samuel E; Susu, Alfred A

    2010-10-01

    The method of temporal moment solutions (MOM) for one-dimensional convective-dispersive solute transport involving linear equilibrium sorption and first-order degradation for time pulse sources has been applied to analyze experimental data from a soil microcosm reactor. Estimation of the pore water velocity V for a nonreactive solute was aided by the use of only the first normalized moment while the dispersion coefficient D, first-order degradation rate constant lambda, and the retardation factor R were estimated using both first and second normalized moments. These transport and degradation parameters were compared to those obtained by a transport model using a nonlinear least square curve-fitting program CXTFIT (version 2.0). Results obtained showed that the MOM fits the breakthrough curve with tailing better than the CXTFIT. The initial estimates of these parameters aided the reduction of the dimensionality of the search process of the non- steady-state model. A residual concentration of 1.12E-5 and 1.48 mg/l for naphthalene and 7.67E-4 and 1.61 mg/l for anthracene, in the axial and radial directions, respectively, suggests the preference of naphthalene during the biodegradation process. The surface concentration as depicted using three-dimensional plots showed that there is occlusion of the aromatics (naphthalene and anthracene) within the soil micropores, thereby limiting their bioavailability and in the long run increasing their toxicity.

  15. The role of angular momentum transport in establishing the accretion rate-protostellar mass correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2017-02-01

    We model the mass accretion rate M˙ to stellar mass M* correlation that has been inferred from observations of intermediate to upper mass T Tauri stars-that is M˙ ∝ M*1.3±0.3. We explain this correlation within the framework of quiescent disk evolution, in which accretion is driven largely by gravitational torques acting in the bulk of the mass and volume of the disk. Stresses within the disk arise from the action of gravitationally driven torques parameterized in our 1D model in terms of Toomre's Q criterion. We do not model the hot inner sub-AU scale region of the disk that is likely stable according to this criterion, and appeal to other mechanisms to remove or redistribute angular momentum and allow accretion onto the star. Our model has the advantage of agreeing with large-scale angle-averaged values from more complex nonaxisymmetric calculations. The model disk transitions from an early phase (dominated by initial conditions inherited from the burst mode of accretion) into a later self-similar mode characterized by a steeper temporal decline in M˙. The models effectively reproduce the spread in mass accretion rates that have been observed for protostellar objects of 0.2 M⊙ ≤ M* ≤ 3.0 M⊙, such as those found in the ρ Ophiuchus and Taurus star forming regions. We then compare realistically sampled populations of young stellar objects produced by our model to their observational counterparts. We find these populations to be statistically coincident, which we argue is evidence for the role of gravitational torques in the late time evolution of quiescent protostellar disks.

  16. Turbulent coherent-structure dynamics in a natural surface storage zone: Mechanisms of mass and momentum transport in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escauriaza, Cristian; Sandoval, Jorge; Mignot, Emmanuel; Mao, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows developed in surface storage zones (SSZ) in rivers control many physical and biogeochemical processes of contaminants in the water. These regions are characterized by low velocities and long residence times, which favor particle deposition, nutrient uptake, and flow interactions with reactive sediments. The dynamics of the flow in SSZ is driven by a shear layer that induces multiple vortical structures with a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. In this work we study the flow in a lateral SSZ of the Lluta River, a high-altitude Andean stream (4,000 masl), with a Re=45,800. We describe the large-scale turbulent coherent structures using field measurements and 3D numerical simulations. We measure the bed topography, instantaneous 3D velocities at selected points, the mean 2D free-surface velocity field, and arsenic concentration in the sediment. Numerical simulations of the flow are also performed using a DES turbulence model. We focus on the mass and momentum transport processes, analyzing the statistics of mass exchange and residence times in the SSZ. With this information we provide new insights on the flow and transport processes between the main channel and the recirculating region in natural conditions. Supported by Fondecyt 1130940.

  17. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Jennifer A.; Heywood, Karen J.; Chavanne, Cédric P.; Holland, Paul R.

    2013-04-01

    An array of five moorings was deployed from February 2009 to February 2010 across the Antarctic shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea (~18°W). Observations demonstrate the key processes responsible for variability in water masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year are linked with variability in wind stress over the array. This causes the deepening or shoaling of the pycnocline, past the depth of the moorings. In the upper 500 m, the seasonal cycle in salinity shows freshening in autumn, with the strongest freshening at the shallowest mooring (~250 m), furthest on-shelf. The sea ice concentration over the array exceeds 90% during this period and contributes a positive salt flux into the ocean during autumn. Freshening begins during strong along-shore (easterly) winds in late April 2009. This demonstrates that variations in Ekman transport and wind-driven mixing play a key role in determining the salinity of shelf waters around Antarctica. Transport of the Antarctic Slope Current also shows a seasonal cycle with a maximum during late April. Model simulations show the importance of along-shore advection, as the arrival of a fresh anomaly from upstream determines the timing of the salinity minimum at the array. These processes are likely to be important for other regions around the Antarctic continent.

  18. A 3D Hybrid Model for Tissue Growth: The Interplay between Cell Population and Mass Transport Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Markenscoff, Pauline; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To provide theoretical guidance for the design and in vitro cultivation of bioartificial tissues, we have developed a multiscale computational model that can describe the complex interplay between cell population and mass transport dynamics that governs the growth of tissues in three-dimensional scaffolds. The model has three components: a transient partial differential equation for the simultaneous diffusion and consumption of a limiting nutrient; a cellular automaton describing cell migration, proliferation, and collision; and equations that quantify how the varying nutrient concentration modulates cell division and migration. The hybrid discrete-continuous model was parallelized and solved on a distributed-memory multicomputer to study how transport limitations affect tissue regeneration rates under conditions encountered in typical bioreactors. Simulation results show that the severity of transport limitations can be estimated by the magnitude of two dimensionless groups: the Thiele modulus and the Biot number. Key parameters including the initial seeding mode, cell migration speed, and the hydrodynamic conditions in the bioreactor are shown to affect not only the overall rate, but also the pattern of tissue growth. This study lays the groundwork for more comprehensive models that can handle mixed cell cultures, multiple nutrients and growth factors, and other cellular processes, such as cell death. PMID:19619455

  19. Location - Dependent Coronary Artery Diffusive and Convective Mass Transport Properties of a Lipophilic Drug Surrogate Measured Using Nonlinear Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Joseph T.; Simon, Bruce R.; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Arterial wall mass transport properties dictate local distribution of biomolecules or locally delivered dugs. Knowing how these properties vary between coronary artery locations could provide insight into how therapy efficacy is altered between arterial locations. Methods We introduced an indocarbocyanine drug surrogate to the lumens of left anterior descending and right coronary (LADC; RC) arteries from pigs with or without a pressure gradient. Interstitial fluorescent intensity was measured on live samples with multiphoton microscopy. We also measured binding to porcine coronary SMCs in monoculture. Results Diffusive transport constants peaked in the middle sections of the LADC and RC arteries by 2.09 and 2.04 times, respectively, compared to the proximal and distal segments. There was no statistical difference between the average diffusivity value between LADC and RC arteries. The convection coefficients had an upward trend down each artery, with the RC being higher than the LADC by 3.89 times. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the convective and diffusive transport of lipophilic molecules changes between the LADC and the RC arteries as well as along their length. These results may have important implications in optimizing drug delivery for the treatment of coronary artery disease. PMID:23224981

  20. Basic coaxial mass driver construction and testing. [for eventual moon-space manufacturing site magnetic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, K.

    1977-01-01

    A basic coaxial mass driver has been constructed by a group of students to verify performance predictions in the acceleration range envisaged for the first lunar device. The bucket is guided by four copper tubes which also supply direct current excitation for its single aluminum coil, and is accelerated by twenty coaxial coils along a 2 m track, followed by a deceleration section. The coils are individually energized by electrolytic photoflash capacitors triggered by solid state switches on the basis of bucket position.

  1. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    DOE PAGES

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; ...

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determinemore » operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.« less

  2. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Terai, T.

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determine operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.

  3. How AGN and SN Feedback Affect Mass Transport and Black Hole Growth in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés; Volonteri, Marta; Dubois, Yohan

    2017-02-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we study the effect of supernova (SN) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the mass transport (MT) of gas onto galactic nuclei and the black hole (BH) growth down to redshift z∼ 6. We study the BH growth in relation to the MT processes associated with gravity and pressure torques and how they are modified by feedback. Cosmological gas funneled through cold flows reaches the galactic outer region close to freefall. Then torques associated with pressure triggered by gas turbulent motions produced in the circumgalactic medium by shocks and explosions from SNe are the main source of MT beyond the central ∼100 pc. Due to high concentrations of mass in the central galactic region, gravitational torques tend to be more important at high redshift. The combined effect of almost freefalling material and both gravity and pressure torques produces a mass accretion rate of order ∼ 1 {M}ȯ yr‑1 at approximately parsec scales. In the absence of SN feedback, AGN feedback alone does not affect significantly either star formation or BH growth until the BH reaches a sufficiently high mass of ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ to self-regulate. SN feedback alone, instead, decreases both stellar and BH growth. Finally, SN and AGN feedback in tandem efficiently quench the BH growth, while star formation remains at the levels set by SN feedback alone, due to the small final BH mass, ∼few times {10}5 {M}ȯ . SNe create a more rarefied and hot environment where energy injection from the central AGN can accelerate the gas further.

  4. Modeling mass transport in aquifers: The distributed-source problem. Research report, July 1988-June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, S.E.

    1990-08-01

    A new methodology to model the time and space evolution of groundwater variables in a system of acquifers when certain components of the model, such as the geohydrologic information, the boundary conditions, the magnitude and variability of the sources or physical parameters are uncertain and defined in stochastic terms. This facilitates a more realistic statistical representation of groundwater flow and groundwater pollution forecasting for either the saturated or the unsaturated zone. The method is based on applications of modern mathematics to the solution of the resulting stochastic transport equations. The procedure exhibits considerable advantages over the existing stochastic modeling techniques.

  5. Mass storage systems for data transport in the early space station era 1992-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Richard (Editor); Dalton, John (Editor); Healey, Mike (Editor); Kempster, Linda (Editor); Martin, John (Editor); Mccaleb, Fred (Editor); Sobieski, Stanley (Editor); Sos, John (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Program will provide a vehicle to deploy an unprecedented number of data producing experiments and operational devices. Peak down link data rates are expected to be in the 500 megabit per second range and the daily data volume could reach 2.4 terabytes. Such startling requirements inspired an internal NASA study to determine if economically viable data storage solutions are likely to be available to support the Ground Data Transport segment of the NASA data system. To derive the requirements for data storage subsystems, several alternative data transport architectures were identified with different degrees of decentralization. Data storage operations at each subsystem were categorized based on access time and retrieval functions, and reduced to the following types of subsystems: First in First out (FIFO) storage, fast random access storage, and slow access with staging. The study showed that industry funded magnetic and optical storage technology has a reasonable probability of meeting these requirements. There are, however, system level issues that need to be addressed in the near term.

  6. Large-Eddy Simulation of pollutant dispersion around a cubical building: analysis of the turbulent mass transport mechanism by unsteady concentration and velocity statistics.

    PubMed

    Gousseau, P; Blocken, B; van Heijst, G J F

    2012-08-01

    Pollutant transport due to the turbulent wind flow around buildings is a complex phenomenon which is challenging to reproduce with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In the present study we use Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to investigate the turbulent mass transport mechanism in the case of gas dispersion around an isolated cubical building. Close agreement is found between wind-tunnel measurements and the computed average and standard deviation of concentration in the wake of the building. Since the turbulent mass flux is equal to the covariance of velocity and concentration, we perform a detailed statistical analysis of these variables to gain insight into the dispersion process. In particular, the fact that turbulent mass flux in the streamwise direction is directed from the low to high levels of mean concentration (counter-gradient mechanism) is explained. The large vortical structures developing around the building are shown to play an essential role in turbulent mass transport.

  7. Earth System Data Records of Mass Transport from Time-Variable Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Talpe, M.; Nerem, R. S.; Landerer, F. W.; Watkins, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite measurements of time variable gravity have revolutionized the study of Earth, by measuring the ice losses of Greenland, Antarctica and land glaciers, changes in groundwater including unsustainable losses due to extraction of groundwater, the mass and currents of the oceans and their redistribution during El Niño events, among other findings. Satellite measurements of gravity have been made primarily by four techniques: satellite tracking from land stations using either lasers or Doppler radio systems, satellite positioning by GNSS/GPS, satellite to satellite tracking over distances of a few hundred km using microwaves, and through a gravity gradiometer (radar altimeters also measure the gravity field, but over the oceans only). We discuss the challenges in the measurement of gravity by different instruments, especially time-variable gravity. A special concern is how to bridge a possible gap in time between the end of life of the current GRACE satellite pair, launched in 2002, and a future GRACE Follow-On pair to be launched in 2017. One challenge in combining data from different measurement systems consists of their different spatial and temporal resolutions and the different ways in which they alias short time scale signals. Typically satellite measurements of gravity are expressed in spherical harmonic coefficients (although expansions in terms of 'mascons', the masses of small spherical caps, has certain advantages). Taking advantage of correlations among spherical harmonic coefficients described by empirical orthogonal functions and derived from GRACE data it is possible to localize the otherwise coarse spatial resolution of the laser and Doppler derived gravity models. This presentation discusses the issues facing a climate data record of time variable mass flux using these different data sources, including its validation.

  8. Aerosols in polluted versus nonpolluted air masses Long-range transport and effects on clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Van Valin, C. C.; Castillo, R. C.; Kadlecek, J. A.; Ganor, E.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on the physics and chemistry of clouds in the northeastern United States, aerosol and cloud-drop size distributions, elemental composition of aerosols as a function of size, and ionic content of cloud water were measured on Whiteface Mountain, NY, during the summers of 1981 and 1982. In several case studies, the data were cross-correlated with different air mass types - background continental, polluted continental, and maritime - that were advected to the sampling site. The results are the following: (1) Anthropogenic sources hundreds of kilometers upwind cause the small-particle (accumulation) mode number to increase from hundreds of thousands per cubic centimeter and the mass loading to increase from a few to several tens of micrograms per cubic meter, mostly in the form of sulfur aerosols. (2) A significant fraction of anthropogenic sulfur appears to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to affect the cloud drop concentration. (3) Clouds in Atlantic maritime air masses have cloud drop spectra that are markedly different from those measured in continental clouds. The drop concentration is significantly lower, and the drop size spectra are heavily skewed toward large drops. (4) Effects of anthropogenic pollutants on cloud water ionic composition are an increase of nitrate by a factor of 50, an increase of sulfate by more than one order of magnitude, and an increase of ammonium ion by a factor of 7. The net effect of the changes in ionic concentrations is an increase in cloud water acidity. An anion deficit even in maritime clouds suggests an unknown, possibly biogenic, source that could be responsible for a pH below neutral, which is frequently observed in nonpolluted clouds.

  9. [The nuclear matrix proteins (mol. mass 38 and 50 kDa) are transported by chromosomes in mitosis].

    PubMed

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    It was shown by immunofluorescence method that serum M68 and serum K43 from patients with autoimmune disease stain interphase nuclei and periphery of mitotic chromosomes of pig kidney cells. Western blotting reveals the polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa in serum M68, and the polypeptide with mol. mass of 38 kDa in serum K43. In the nuclear protein matrix, the antibodies to protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa stained only nucleolar periphery, while the antibodies to the protein with mol. mass of 50 kDa stained both the nucleolar periphery and all the interphase nucleus. It shows that among all components of nuclear protein matrix (lamina, internuclear network, residual nucleoli) only nucleolar periphery contains the 38 kDa protein, while the 50 kDa protein is a part of residual nucleolar periphery and takes part in nuclear protein network formation. In the interphase cells, both proteins were in situ localized in the nuclei, but one of them with mol. mass of 50 kDa was in the form of small clearly outlined granules, while the other (38 kDa) was in the form of small bright granules against the background of diffusely stained nuclei. Both proteins were also revealed as continuous ring around nucleolar periphery. During all mitotic stages, the 50 kDa protein was seen on the chromosomal periphery as a cover, and the 38 kDa protein formed separate fragments and granules around them. After nuclear and chromosome decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment, both antibodies stain interphase nuclei in diffuse manner, but in mitotic cells they stained the surface of the swollen chromosomes. The polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa maintained strong connection with chromosome periphery both in norm and under condition of decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment and at subsequent recondensation in isotonic medium. In contrast, the protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa partially lost the contact with a chromosome during recondensation appearing also in the form of granules in

  10. The use of Galerkin finite-element methods to solve mass-transport equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, David B.

    1977-01-01

    The partial differential equation that describes the transport and reaction of chemical solutes in porous media was solved using the Galerkin finite-element technique. These finite elements were superimposed over finite-difference cells used to solve the flow equation. Both convection and flow due to hydraulic dispersion were considered. Linear and Hermite cubic approximations (basis functions) provided satisfactory results: however, the linear functions were computationally more efficient for two-dimensional problems. Successive over relaxation (SOR) and iteration techniques using Tchebyschef polynomials were used to solve the sparce matrices generated using the linear and Hermite cubic functions, respectively. Comparisons of the finite-element methods to the finite-difference methods, and to analytical results, indicated that a high degree of accuracy may be obtained using the method outlined. The technique was applied to a field problem involving an aquifer contaminated with chloride, tritium, and strontium-90. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a. variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions, This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solution with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. And the literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  12. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions. This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solutions with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. The literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  13. Precipitation chemistry and corresponding transport patterns of influencing air masses at Huangshan Mountain in East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, ChunE; Deng, Xueliang; Yang, Yuanjian; Huang, Xiangrong; Wu, Biwen

    2014-09-01

    One hundred and ten samples of rainwater were collected for chemical analysis at the summit of Huangshan Mountain, a high-altitude site in East China, from July 2010 to June 2011. The volume-weighted-mean (VWM) pH for the whole sampling period was 5.03. SO{4/2-} and Ca2+ were the most abundant anion and cation, respectively. The ionic concentrations varied monthly with the highest concentrations in winter/spring and the lowest in summer. Evident inter-correlations were found among most ions, indicating the common sources for some species and fully mixing characteristics of the alpine precipitation chemistry. The VWM ratio of [SO{4/2-}]/[NO{3/-}] was 2.54, suggesting the acidity of rainwater comes from both nitric and sulfuric acids. Compared with contemporary observations at other alpine continental sites in China, the precipitation at Huangshan Mountain was the least polluted, with the lowest ionic concentrations. Trajectories to Huangshan Mountain on rainy days could be classified into six groups. The rainwater with influencing air masses originating in Mongolia was the most polluted with limited effect. The emissions of Jiangxi, Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces had a strong influence on the overall rain chemistry at Huangshan Mountain. The rainwater with influencing air masses from Inner Mongolia was heavily polluted by anthropogenic pollutants.

  14. Quantifying the contribution of long-range transport to Particulate Matter (PM) mass loadings at a suburban site in the North-Western Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, H.; Garg, S.; Kumar, V.; Sachan, H.; Arya, R.; Sarkar, C.; Chandra, B. P.; Sinha, B.

    2015-04-01

    Many sites in the densely populated Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP) frequently exceed the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) of 100 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM10 and 60 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM2.5 mass loadings, exposing residents to hazardous levels of PM throughout the year. We quantify the contribution of long range transport to elevated PM levels and the number of exceedance events through a back trajectory climatology analysis of air masses arriving at the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry facility (30.667° N, 76.729° E; 310 m a.m.s.l.) for the period August 2011-June 2013. Air masses arriving at the receptor site were classified into 6 clusters, which represent synoptic scale air mass transport patterns and the average PM mass loadings and number of exceedance events associated with each air mass type were quantified for each season. Long range transport from the west leads to significant enhancements in the average coarse mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. The contribution of long range transport from the west and south west (Source region: Arabia, Thar desert, Middle East and Afghanistan) to coarse mode PM varied between 9 and 57% of the total PM10-2.5 mass. Local pollution episodes (wind speed < 1 m s-1) contributed to enhanced coarse mode PM only during winter season. South easterly air masses (Source region: Eastern IGP) were associated with significantly lower coarse mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. For fine mode PM too, transport from the west usually leads to increased mass loadings during all seasons. Local pollution episodes contributed to enhanced PM2.5 mass loadings during winter and summer season. South easterly air masses were associated with significantly lower PM2.5 mass loadings during all seasons. Using simultaneously measured gas phase tracers we demonstrate that most PM2.5 originated from combustion sources. The fraction of days in each season during which the PM mass loadings exceeded the national ambient air

  15. Nanofluidic Transport over a Curved Surface with Viscous Dissipation and Convective Mass Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Zaffar; Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Maraj, E. N.

    2017-03-01

    This article is a numerical investigation of boundary layer flow of nanofluid over a bended stretching surface. The study is carried out by considering convective mass flux condition. Contribution of viscous dissipation is taken into the account along with thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to simplify the system of nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Computational results are extracted by means of a shooting method embedded with a Runge-Kutta Fehlberg technique. Key findings include that velocity is a decreasing function of curvature parameter K. Moreover, Nusselt number decreases with increase in curvature of the stretching surface while skin friction and Sherwood number enhance with increase in K.

  16. Global stability and exact solution of an arbitrary-solute nonlinear cellular mass transport system.

    PubMed

    Benson, James D

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of the cellular state as a function of extracellular concentrations and temperatures has been of interest to physiologists for nearly a century. One of the most widely used models in the field is one where mass flux is linearly proportional to the concentration difference across the membrane. These fluxes define a nonlinear differential equation system for the intracellular state, which when coupled with appropriate initial conditions, define the intracellular state as a function of the extracellular concentrations of both permeating and nonpermeating solutes. Here we take advantage of a reparametrization scheme to extend existing stability results to a more general setting and to a develop analytical solutions to this model for an arbitrary number of extracellular solutes.

  17. Mass Transport and Dynamics at Subauroral Latitudes During The March 17, 2013 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Coster, A. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    During geomagnetic storm periods, plasmasphere erosion carries cold dense plasma of ionospheric origin in a storm-enhanced density plume, extending from dusk toward and through the noontime cusp and dayside magnetopause and back across polar latitudes in a polar tongue of ionization. The March 17, 2013 large storm provided an excellent opportunity to observe these mass transfer processes using a number of ground and in-situ sensors. We examine dusk sector (20 MLT) plasmasphere erosion during the 17 March 2013 storm (Dst ~ 130 nT) using simultaneous, magnetically aligned direct sunward ion flux observations at high altitude by Van Allen Probes RBSP-A (at ~3.0 Re) and at topside ionospheric heights (~840 km) by DMSP F-18, along with direct F region ionospheric observations using the subauroral Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar system. Plasma erosion occurs at both high and low altitudes where the subauroral polarization stream flow overlaps the outer plasmasphere. At ~20 UT, RBSP-A observed ~1.2E12 m-2 s-1 erosion flux, while DMSP F-18 observed ~2E13 m-2 s-1 sunward flux. We find close similarities at high and low altitudes between the erosion plume in both invariant latitude spatial extent and plasma characteristics. Other incoherent scatter radar facilities at Poker Flat, along with both the mainland Europe and Svalbard EISCAT radars, also have observations available during this period. We use these combined, multi-scale data sets in comparison to model predictions of SAPS, e.g. BATSRUS/RAM, OpenGGCM-RM. We will highlight successes and areas where progress is needed in the quantitative understanding of cold ionospheric origin mass flow through the geospace system and its direct impact on energy coupling to the solar wind.

  18. Distinct synoptic patterns and air masses responsible for long-range desert dust transport and sea spray in Palermo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, K.; Paschalidou, A. K.; Kassomenos, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Undoubtedly, anthropogenic emissions carry a large share of the risk posed on public health by particles exposure in urban areas. However, natural emissions, in the form of desert dust and sea spray, are well known to contribute significantly to the PM load recorded in many Mediterranean environments, posing an extra risk burden on public health. In the present paper, we examine the synoptic climatology in a background station in Palermo, Italy, through K-means clustering of the mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) maps, in an attempt to associate distinct synoptic patterns with increased PM10 levels. Four-day backward trajectory analysis is then applied, in order to study the origins and pathways of air masses susceptible of PM10 episodes. It is concluded that a number of atmospheric patterns result in several kind of flows, namely south, west, and slow-moving/stagnant flows, associated with long-range dust transport and sea spray.

  19. Signal generator exciting an electromagnetic field for ion beam transport to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.; Kogan, V. T.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Antonov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    A high-voltage high-frequency signal generator is described that excites an electric field for ion beam transport from an ion source to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. Excitation signals to the number of two are high-frequency sine-wave out-of-phase signals with the same amplitudes. The amplitude and phase of the signals vary from 20 to 100 V and from 10 kHz to 1 MHz, respectively. The generator also produces a controlled bias voltage in the interval 50-200 V. The frequency and amplitude of the signals, as well as the bias voltage, are computer-controlled via the USB interface.

  20. Investigating the Effects of Anisotropic Mass Transport on Dendrite Growth in High Energy Density Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jinwang; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Ryan, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendrite formation on the electrode surface of high energy density lithium (Li) batteries causes safety problems and limits their applications. Suppressing dendrite growth could significantly improve Li battery performance. Dendrite growth and morphology is a function of the mixing in the electrolyte near the anode interface. Most research into dendrites in batteries focuses on dendrite formation in isotropic electrolytes (i.e., electrolytes with isotropic diffusion coefficient). In this work, an anisotropic diffusion reaction model is developed to study the anisotropic mixing effect on dendrite growth in Li batteries. The model uses a Lagrangian particle-based method to model dendrite growth in an anisotropic electrolyte solution. The model is verified by comparing the numerical simulation results with analytical solutions, and its accuracy is shown to be better than previous particle-based anisotropic diffusion models. Several parametric studies of dendrite growth in an anisotropic electrolyte are performed and the results demonstrate the effects of anisotropic transport on dendrite growth and morphology, and show the possible advantages of anisotropic electrolytes for dendrite suppression.

  1. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between n