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Sample records for nanoparticle pet-ct imaging

  1. Preparation and (68)Ga-radiolabeling of porous zirconia nanoparticle platform for PET/CT-imaging guided drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Andras; Naszalyi Nagy, Lívia; Mihaly, Judith; Görres, Sebastian; Wittneben, Alexander; Leiter, Ina; Bankstahl, Jens P; Sajti, Laszlo; Kellermayer, Miklós; Zrínyi, Miklós; Ross, Tobias L

    2017-04-15

    This paper describes the preparation of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) isotope labeled porous zirconia (ZrO2) nanoparticle (NP) platform of nearly 100nm diameter and its first pharmacokinetic and biodistribution evaluation accomplished with a microPET/CTPet/CT) imaging system. Objectives of the investigations were to provide a nanoparticle platform which can be suitable for specific delivery of various therapeutic drugs using surface attached specific molecules as triggering agents, and at the same time, suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) tracing of the prospective drug delivery process. Radiolabeling was accomplished using DOTA bifunctional chelator. DOTA was successfully adsorbed onto the surface of nanoparticles, while the (68)Ga-radiolabeling method proved to be simple and effective. In the course of biodistribution studies, the (68)Ga-labeled DOTA-ZrNPs showed proper radiolabeling stability in their original suspension and in blood serum. μPet/CT imaging studies confirmed a RES-biodistribution profile indicating stable nano-sized labeled particles in vivo. Results proved that the new method offers the opportunity to examine further specifically targeted and drug payload carrier variants of zirconia NP systems using PET/CT imaging.

  2. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  3. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  4. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  5. PET/CT for radiotherapy: image acquisition and data processing.

    PubMed

    Bettinardi, V; Picchio, M; Di Muzio, N; Gianolli, L; Messa, C; Gilardi, M C

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on acquisition and processing methods in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for radiotherapy (RT) applications. The recent technological evolutions of PET/CT systems are described. Particular emphasis is dedicated to the tools needed for the patient positioning and immobilization, to be used in PET/CT studies as well as during RT treatment sessions. The effect of organ and lesion motion due to patient's respiration on PET/CT imaging is discussed. Breathing protocols proposed to minimize PET/CT spatial mismatches in relation to respiratory movements are illustrated. The respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques, developed to measure and compensate for organ and lesion motion, are then introduced. Finally a description is provided of different acquisition and data processing techniques, implemented with the aim at improving: i) image quality and quantitative accuracy of PET images, and ii) target volume definition and treatment planning in RT, by using specific and personalised motion information.

  6. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  7. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline, labelled with 18F or 11C, 11C-acetate and 18F- fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under development and evaluation in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Large prospective clinical PET/CT trials are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer patients. Because there are only limited available therapeutic options for advanced metastatic prostate cancer, there is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment modalities that could improve outcome. Prostate cancer represents an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for several reasons, including pattern of metastatic spread (lymph nodes and bone marrow, sites with good access to circulating antibodies), and small volume disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Anti PSMA RIT demonstrates antitumor activity and is well tolerated. Clinical trials are underway to further improve upon treatment efficacy and patient selection. This review focuses on the recent advances of clinical PET/CT imaging and RIT of prostate

  8. Disease quantification on PET/CT images without object delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Fitzpatrick, Danielle; Winchell, Nicole; Schuster, Stephen J.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    The derivation of quantitative information from images to make quantitative radiology (QR) clinically practical continues to face a major image analysis hurdle because of image segmentation challenges. This paper presents a novel approach to disease quantification (DQ) via positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images that explores how to decouple DQ methods from explicit dependence on object segmentation through the use of only object recognition results to quantify disease burden. The concept of an object-dependent disease map is introduced to express disease severity without performing explicit delineation and partial volume correction of either objects or lesions. The parameters of the disease map are estimated from a set of training image data sets. The idea is illustrated on 20 lung lesions and 20 liver lesions derived from 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT scans of patients with various types of cancers and also on 20 NEMA PET/CT phantom data sets. Our preliminary results show that, on phantom data sets, "disease burden" can be estimated to within 2% of known absolute true activity. Notwithstanding the difficulty in establishing true quantification on patient PET images, our results achieve 8% deviation from "true" estimates, with slightly larger deviations for small and diffuse lesions where establishing ground truth becomes really questionable, and smaller deviations for larger lesions where ground truth set up becomes more reliable. We are currently exploring extensions of the approach to include fully automated body-wide DQ, extensions to just CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone, to PET/CT performed with radiotracers other than FDG, and other functional forms of disease maps.

  9. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, John Keall, Paul J.; Siva, Shankar; Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: CT ventilation imaging is a novel functional lung imaging modality based on deformable image registration. The authors present the first validation study of CT ventilation using positron emission tomography with{sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles (PET-Galligas). The authors quantify this agreement for different CT ventilation metrics and PET reconstruction parameters. Methods: PET-Galligas ventilation scans were acquired for 12 lung cancer patients using a four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT scanner. CT ventilation images were then produced by applying B-spline deformable image registration between the respiratory correlated phases of the 4D-CT. The authors test four ventilation metrics, two existing and two modified. The two existing metrics model mechanical ventilation (alveolar air-flow) based on Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V{sub HU}) or Jacobian determinant of deformation (V{sub Jac}). The two modified metrics incorporate a voxel-wise tissue-density scaling (ρV{sub HU} and ρV{sub Jac}) and were hypothesized to better model the physiological ventilation. In order to assess the impact of PET image quality, comparisons were performed using both standard and respiratory-gated PET images with the former exhibiting better signal. Different median filtering kernels (σ{sub m} = 0 or 3 mm) were also applied to all images. As in previous studies, similarity metrics included the Spearman correlation coefficient r within the segmented lung volumes, and Dice coefficient d{sub 20} for the (0 − 20)th functional percentile volumes. Results: The best agreement between CT and PET ventilation was obtained comparing standard PET images to the density-scaled HU metric (ρV{sub HU}) with σ{sub m} = 3 mm. This leads to correlation values in the ranges 0.22 ⩽ r ⩽ 0.76 and 0.38 ⩽ d{sub 20} ⩽ 0.68, with r{sup ¯}=0.42±0.16 and d{sup ¯}{sub 20}=0.52±0.09 averaged over the 12 patients. Compared to Jacobian-based metrics, HU-based metrics lead to statistically significant

  10. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, John Keall, Paul J.; Siva, Shankar; Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: CT ventilation imaging is a novel functional lung imaging modality based on deformable image registration. The authors present the first validation study of CT ventilation using positron emission tomography with{sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles (PET-Galligas). The authors quantify this agreement for different CT ventilation metrics and PET reconstruction parameters. Methods: PET-Galligas ventilation scans were acquired for 12 lung cancer patients using a four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT scanner. CT ventilation images were then produced by applying B-spline deformable image registration between the respiratory correlated phases of the 4D-CT. The authors test four ventilation metrics, two existing and two modified. The two existing metrics model mechanical ventilation (alveolar air-flow) based on Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V{sub HU}) or Jacobian determinant of deformation (V{sub Jac}). The two modified metrics incorporate a voxel-wise tissue-density scaling (ρV{sub HU} and ρV{sub Jac}) and were hypothesized to better model the physiological ventilation. In order to assess the impact of PET image quality, comparisons were performed using both standard and respiratory-gated PET images with the former exhibiting better signal. Different median filtering kernels (σ{sub m} = 0 or 3 mm) were also applied to all images. As in previous studies, similarity metrics included the Spearman correlation coefficient r within the segmented lung volumes, and Dice coefficient d{sub 20} for the (0 − 20)th functional percentile volumes. Results: The best agreement between CT and PET ventilation was obtained comparing standard PET images to the density-scaled HU metric (ρV{sub HU}) with σ{sub m} = 3 mm. This leads to correlation values in the ranges 0.22 ⩽ r ⩽ 0.76 and 0.38 ⩽ d{sub 20} ⩽ 0.68, with r{sup ¯}=0.42±0.16 and d{sup ¯}{sub 20}=0.52±0.09 averaged over the 12 patients. Compared to Jacobian-based metrics, HU-based metrics lead to statistically significant

  11. Molecular imaging for prostate cancer: Performance analysis of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT versus choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Michaud, L; Touijer, K A

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for a precise and reliable imaging to improve the management of prostate cancer. In recent years the PET/CT with choline has changed the handling of prostate cancer in Europe, and it is commonly used for initial stratification or for the diagnosis of a biochemical recurrence, although it does not lack limitations. Other markers are being tested, including the ligand of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), that seems to offer encouraging prospects. The goal of this piece of work was to critically review the role of choline and PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. A systematic literature review of databases PUBMED/MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted searching for articles fully published in English on the PET marker in prostate cancer and its clinical application. It seems as 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT is better than PET/CT in prostate cancer to detect primary prostate lesions, initial metastases in the lymph nodes and recurrence. However, further research is required to obtain high-level tests. Also, other PET markers are studied. Moreover, the emergence of a new PET/MR camera could change the performance of PET imaging. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, Rob H. . E-mail: r.ireland@sheffield.ac.uk; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 {+-} 0.80 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 {+-} 1.22 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy.

  13. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  14. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  15. Pixel-feature hybrid fusion for PET/CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yang-Ming; Nortmann, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    Color blending is a popular display method for functional and anatomic image fusion. The underlay image is typically displayed in grayscale, and the overlay image is displayed in pseudo colors. This pixel-level fusion provides too much information for reviewers to analyze quickly and effectively and clutters the display. To improve the fusion image reviewing speed and reduce the information clutter, a pixel-feature hybrid fusion method is proposed and tested for PET/CT images. Segments of the colormap are selectively masked to have a few discrete colors, and pixels displayed in the masked colors are made transparent. The colormap thus creates a false contouring effect on overlay images and allows the underlay to show through to give contours an anatomic context. The PET standardized uptake value (SUV) is used to control where colormap segments are masked. Examples show that SUV features can be extracted and blended with CT image instantaneously for viewing and diagnosis, and the non-feature part of the PET image is transparent. The proposed pixel-feature hybrid fusion highlights PET SUV features on CT images and reduces display clutters. It is easy to implement and can be used as complementarily to existing pixel-level fusion methods.

  16. Parametric dynamic F-18-FDG PET/CT breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to estimate metabolic tissue properties from dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT image series and to display them as 3D parametric images. Each temporal PET series was obtained immediately after injection of 10 mCi of F-18-FDG and consisted of fifty 1- minute frames. Each consecutive frame was nonrigidly registered to the first frame using a finite element method (FEM) based model and fiducial skin markers. Nonlinear curve fitting of activity vs. time based on a realistic two-compartment model was performed for each voxel of the volume. Curve fitting was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) that minimized X2. We evaluated which parameters are most suitable to determine the spatial extent and malignancy in suspicious lesions. In addition, Patlak modeling was applied to the data. A mixture model was constructed and provided a classification system for the breast tissue. It produced unbiased estimation of the spatial extent of the lesions. We conclude that nonrigid registration followed by voxel-by-voxel based nonlinear fitting to a realistic two-compartment model yields better quality parametric images, as compared to unprocessed dynamic breast PET time series. By comparison with the mixture model, we established that the total cumulated activity and maximum activity parametric images provide the best delineation of suspicious breast tissue lesions and hyperactive subregions within the lesion that cannot be discerned in unprocessed images.

  17. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Nanabala, Raviteja; Thomas, Boben

    2017-02-01

    The potential applications of Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT in the imaging of prostate cancer are now well established. A few case reports regarding the potential use of Ga-PSMA PET/CT in nonprostate cancer malignancies are also published. Apparently, the tumor neoangiogenesis is the mechanism attributed to increased Ga-PSMA uptake in the tumor sites in nonprostatic malignancies. We describe the use of Ga-PSMA PET/CT in imaging multiple myeloma. The intense Ga-PSMA avidity of the lesions also opens up the possibility of theranostics with Lu-PSMA.

  18. Correlation of PET/CT and Image-Guided Biopsies of Pediatric Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nihayah, Saeed; Shammas, Amer; Vali, Reza; Parra, Dimitri; Alexander, Sarah; Amaral, Joao; Connolly, Bairbre

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate an early experience with correlation of PET/CT findings and image-guided biopsy results in pediatric patients. In a single-center retrospective case series, the inclusion criterion was performance of image-guided biopsy within 6 weeks of PET/CT, either before or after the biopsy. Forty-five patients (23 boys, 22 girls; age range, 4-17 years; median, 10.5 years; weight range, 14.6-86.2 kg; median, 48 kg) underwent 47 PET/CT examinations and biopsies. Nineteen patients (20 biopsies) had known malignancy, and 26 patients had suspected malignancy. The results were malignant in 24 cases, benign in 16, and inadequate or normal in 7 cases. Thirty-nine of 47 PET/CT examinations had positive results, and eight had negative results. Final analysis of 37 of the 47 cases (confounders excluded) showed concordant results between biopsy and PET in 36 cases and discordant results in one case. PET/CT can be used for disease staging and follow-up. In the future PET/CT can play a valuable role in directing image-guided biopsies of children.

  19. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively.

  20. Posttreatment PET/CT Rather Than Interim PET/CT Using Deauville Criteria Predicts Outcome in Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Prospective Study Comparing PET/CT with Conventional Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Sameer; Bhethanabhotla, Sainath; Kumar, Rakesh; Agarwal, Krishankant; Sharma, Punit; Thulkar, Sanjay; Malhotra, Arun; Dhawan, Deepa; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas

    2017-04-01

    Data about the significance of (18)F-FDG PET at interim assessment and end of treatment in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are limited. Methods: Patients (≤18 y) with HL were prospectively evaluated with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) and PET combined with low-dose CT (PET/CT) at baseline, after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, and after completion of treatment. Revised International Working Group (RIW) criteria and Deauville 5 point-scale for response assessment by PET/CT were used. All patients received doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine chemotherapy along with involved-field radiotherapy (25 Gy) for early stage (IA, IB, and IIA) and advanced stage (IIB-IV) with bulky disease. Results: Of the 57 enrolled patients, median follow-up was 81.6 mo (range, 11-97.5 mo). Treatment decisions were based on CECT. At baseline, PET/CT versus CECT identified 67 more disease sites; 23 patients (40.3%) were upstaged and of them in 9 patients (39%) upstaging would have affected treatment decision; notably none of these patients relapsed. The specificity of interim PET/CT based on RIW criteria (61.5%) and Deauville criteria (91.4%) for predicting relapse was higher than CECT (40.3%) (P = 0.03 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Event-free survival based on interim PET/CT (RIW) response was 93.3 ± 4.1 versus 89.6 ± 3.8 (positive vs. negative scan, respectively; P = 0.44). The specificity of posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) was 95.7% versus 76.4% by CECT (P = 0.006). Posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) showed significantly inferior overall survival in patients with positive scan versus negative scan results (66.4 ± 22.5 vs. 94.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.029). Conclusion: Interim PET/CT has better specificity, and use of Deauville criteria further improves it. Escalation of therapy based on interim PET in pediatric HL needs further conclusive evidence to justify its use. Posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) predicts overall survival and has better specificity in comparison to

  1. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of PET/CT and PET/MR imaging in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabhani, Khalsa Z; Syed, Rizwan; Michopoulou, Sofia; Alkalbani, Jokha; Afaq, Asim; Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; O'Meara, Celia; Groves, Ashley; Ell, Peter; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare whole-body PET/MR imaging and PET/CT, qualitatively and quantitatively, in oncologic patients and assess the confidence and degree of inter- and intraobserver agreement in anatomic lesion localization. Fifty patients referred for staging with known cancers underwent PET/CT with low-dose CT for attenuation correction immediately followed by PET/MR imaging with 2-point Dixon attenuation correction. PET/CT scans were obtained according to standard protocols (56 ± 20 min after injection of an average 367 MBq of (18)F-FDG, 150 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTATATE, or 333.8 MBq of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-choline; 2.5 min/bed position). PET/MR was performed with 5 min/bed position. Three dual-accredited nuclear medicine physicians/radiologists identified the lesions and assigned each to an exact anatomic location. The image quality, alignment, and confidence in anatomic localization of lesions were scored on a scale of 1-3 for PET/CT and PET/MR imaging. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the standardized uptake values. Intraclass correlation coefficients and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess intra- and interobserver agreement in image quality, alignment, and confidence in lesion localization for the 2 modalities. Two hundred twenty-seven tracer-avid lesions were identified in 50 patients. Of these, 225 were correctly identified on PET/CT and 227 on PET/MR imaging by all 3 observers. The confidence in anatomic localization improved by 5.1% when using PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. The mean percentage interobserver agreement was 96% for PET/CT and 99% for PET/MR imaging, and intraobserver agreement in lesion localization across the 2 modalities was 93%. There was 10% (5/50 patients) improvement in local staging with PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. In this first study, we show the effectiveness of whole-body PET/MR imaging in oncology. There is no statistically significant difference between PET

  2. Askin tumor: CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tingting; Guan, Yubao; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Jingxu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the imaging findings of Askin tumors on computed tomography (CT) and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET/CT).Seventeen cases of Askin tumors confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively analyzed in terms of CT (17 cases) and FDG-PET/CT data (6 cases).Fifteen of the tumors were located in the chest wall and the other 2 were in the anterior middle mediastinum. Of the 15 chest wall cases, 13 demonstrated irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses with cystic degeneration and necrosis, and 2 demonstrated homogeneous soft tissue masses on unenhanced CT scans. Two mediastinal tumors demonstrated the irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses. Calcifications were found in 2 tumors. The tumors demonstrated heterogeneously enhancement in 16 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case on contrast-enhanced scans. FDG-PET/CT images revealed increased metabolic activity in all 6 cases undergone FDG-PET/CT scan, and the lesion SUVmax ranged from 4.0 to 18.6. At initial diagnosis, CT and FDG-PET/CT scans revealed rib destruction in 9 cases, pleural effusion in 9 cases, and lung metastasis in 1 case. At follow-up, 12 cases showed recurrence and/or metastases, 4 cases showed improvement or remained stable, and 1 was lost to follow-up.In summary, CT and FDG-PET/CT images of Askin tumors showed heterogeneous soft tissue masses in the chest wall and the mediastinum, accompanied by rib destruction, pleural effusion, and increased FDG uptake. CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging play important roles in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Askin tumors.

  3. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paolo; Larobina, Michele; Di Lillo, Francesca; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Mettivier, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  4. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  5. Brain tissue segmentation in PET-CT images using probabilistic atlas and variational Bayes inference.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Wang, Jiabin; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    PET-CT provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scan, and has the potential to improve brain PET image segmentation, which can in turn improve quantitative clinical analyses. We propose a statistical segmentation algorithm that incorporates the prior anatomical knowledge represented by probabilistic brain atlas into the variational Bayes inference to delineate gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in brain PET-CT images. Our approach adds an additional novel aspect by allowing voxels to have variable and adaptive prior probabilities of belonging to each class. We compared our algorithm to the segmentation approaches implemented in the expectation maximization segmentation (EMS) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) packages in 26 clinical cases. The results show that our algorithm improves the accuracy of brain PET-CT image segmentation.

  6. Incidental Detection of Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Vatankulu, Betül; Uslu, Lebriz; Sönmezoglu, Kerim

    2016-09-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type II transmembrane protein. It has been shown to be expressed in various solid malignant neoplasms. We report a case of a prostate cancer patient who underwent (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging. There is a large thyroid nodule in the right thyroid gland, which had intense PSMA accumulation. Follicular thyroid lesions can be seen on (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  7. Integrated PET/CT in lung cancer imaging: history and technical aspects.

    PubMed

    De Wever, W; Stroobants, S; Verschakelen, J A

    2007-01-01

    Integrated PET/CT is a new anatomo-metabolic imaging modality combining two different techniques: Computed Tomography (CT) that provides very detailed anatomic information and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) that provides metabolic information. Integrated PET/CT has several advantages. One of the advantages is the use of CT data for attenuation correction that is significantly faster compared to that in conventional PET systems. Due to the use of CT data for attenuation correction, artefacts can be generated on PET images related to the use of intravenous or oral CT contrast agents, CT beam-hardening artefacts due to metallic implants and motion artefacts (respiratory motion, physical bowel motion, cardiac motion). The purpose of this review is to discuss some technical considerations concerning the CT protocol that can be used for PET/CT in lung cancer imaging and to give a short overview of the initial results of staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  8. Joint Segmentation of Anatomical and Functional Images: Applications in Quantification of Lesions from PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and MRI-PET-CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Foster, Brent; Xu, Ziyue; Yao, Jianhua; Chen, Xinjian; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for the joint segmentation of anatomical and functional images. Our proposed methodology unifies the domains of anatomical and functional images, represents them in a product lattice, and performs simultaneous delineation of regions based on random walk image segmentation. Furthermore, we also propose a simple yet effective object/background seed localization method to make the proposed segmentation process fully automatic. Our study uses PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and fused MRI-PET-CT scans (77 studies in all) from 56 patients who had various lesions in different body regions. We validated the effectiveness of the proposed method on different PET phantoms as well as on clinical images with respect to the ground truth segmentation provided by clinicians. Experimental results indicate that the presented method is superior to threshold and Bayesian methods commonly used in PET image segmentation, is more accurate and robust compared to the other PET-CT segmentation methods recently published in the literature, and also it is general in the sense of simultaneously segmenting multiple scans in real-time with high accuracy needed in routine clinical use. PMID:23837967

  9. (18)F-FDG PET/CT delayed images with forced diuresis for revaluating abdominopelvic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Chun; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Cui, Lan-Lan

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of delayed images after forced diuresis coupled with oral hydration in abdominopelvic (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Forty-six patients consisting of 17 urological diseases, 9 gynecological tumors, 18 colorectal malignancies, and 2 cancers of unknown primary site were retrospectively analyzed. All patients who presented with indeterminate or equivocal abdominopelvic foci on standard (18)F-FDG PET/CT underwent a delayed abdominopelvic imaging after administration of 20 mg furosemide intravenously and extra water intake of 500 mL. PET/CT images before and after furosemide were compared with each other and their findings correlated with pathology or clinical follow-up (>6 months). On initial PET/CT, the glucose metabolism characters of lesions were disguised by radioactive urine, or some undetermined (18)F-FDG accumulating foci near the urinary tract appeared. While postdiuretic PET/CT demonstrated an excellent urinary tracer washout, and hypermetabolic lesions could be clearly detected and precisely localized in all cases. On the other hand, the suspected active foci caused by potential stagnation of excreted (18)F-FDG in urinary tract were eliminated. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 94.4% (34/36), 8/10, 91.3% (42/46), respectively. Furthermore, the additional lesions with surrounding invasion or locoregional metastasis were discovered in 8 of 46 (17.4%) patients only by the delayed images, including 2 gynecological and 6 rectal malignancies. Detection of abdominopelvic malignancies can be improved using delayed (18)F-FDG PET/CT images after a diuretic and oral hydration.

  10. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: evaluation with phantom and patient data.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Nelson, Linda D; Small, Gary W; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers.

  11. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  12. PET/CT and MRI Imaging of a Eumycetoma of the Right Thigh.

    PubMed

    Besson, Florent L; Blanc-Durand, Paul; Meyer, Céline; Grimon, Gilles; Durand, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Eumycetoma is a chronic tropical fungal disease that infiltrates subcutaneous tissues, mainly in the feet and legs. Standard antifungal drugs are ineffective, and mutilating surgery is common. Morphological imaging is useful for assessing the local extent of the disease before surgery. FDG PET/CT may be of potential interest for the general extent, but PET descriptions remain scarce and mostly relate to the feet. Here, the authors present FDG PET/CT and MRI study of a very rare case of an extensive, biopsy-proven eumycetoma of the right thigh that was performed to guide potential surgery.

  13. (18)F-NaF PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for bone imaging.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, M; Mottaghy, F M; Payche, F; Behrendt, F F F; Van den Wyngaert, T; Fogelman, I; Strobel, K; Celli, M; Fanti, S; Giammarile, F; Krause, B; Langsteger, W

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide minimum standards for the performance and interpretation of (18)F-NaF PET/CT scans. Standard acquisition and interpretation of nuclear imaging modalities will help to provide consistent data acquisition and numeric values between different platforms and institutes and to promote the use of PET/CT modality as an established diagnostic modality in routine clinical practice. This will also improve the value of scientific work and its contribution to evidence-based medicine.

  14. Algorithm for lung cancer detection based on PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, Shinsuke; Ishimatsu, Keita; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohtsuka, Hideki; Nishitani, Hiromu; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    The five year survival rate of the lung cancer is low with about twenty-five percent. In addition it is an obstinate lung cancer wherein three out of four people die within five years. Then, the early stage detection and treatment of the lung cancer are important. Recently, we can obtain CT and PET image at the same time because PET/CT device has been developed. PET/CT is possible for a highly accurate cancer diagnosis because it analyzes quantitative shape information from CT image and FDG distribution from PET image. However, neither benign-malignant classification nor staging intended for lung cancer have been established still enough by using PET/CT images. In this study, we detect lung nodules based on internal organs extracted from CT image, and we also develop algorithm which classifies benignmalignant and metastatic or non metastatic lung cancer using lung structure and FDG distribution(one and two hour after administering FDG). We apply the algorithm to 59 PET/CT images (malignant 43 cases [Ad:31, Sq:9, sm:3], benign 16 cases) and show the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  15. Fluorine-18 labeled amino acids for tumor PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yiqiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Jun; Yao, Huiqian; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2017-09-01

    Tumor glucose metabolism and amino acid metabolism are usually enhanced, (18)F-FDG for tumor glucose metabolism PET imaging has been clinically well known, but tumor amino acid metabolism PET imaging is not clinically familiar. Radiolabeled amino acids (AAs) are an important class of PET/CT tracers that target the upregulated amino acid transporters to show elevated amino acid metabolism in tumor cells. Radiolabeled amino acids were observed to have high uptake in tumor cells but low in normal tissues and inflammatory tissues. The radionuclides used in labeling amino acids include (15)O, (13)N, (11)C, (123)I, (18)F and (68)Ga, among which the most commonly used is (18)F [1]. Available data support the use of certain (18)F-labeled AAs for PET/CT imaging of gliomas, neuroendocrine tumors, prostate cancer and breast cancer [2, 3]. With the progress of the method of (18)F labeling AAs [4-6], (18)F-labeled AAs are well established for tumor PET/CT imaging. This review focuses on the current status of key clinical applications of 18F-labeled AAs in tumor PET/CT imaging.

  16. Moving Beyond "Lumpology": PET/CT Imaging of Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2015-09-01

    High somatostatin receptor expression on the cell membrane of succinate dehydrogenase mutation-related pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma provides a potential target for imaging and therapy. (68)Ga-DOTATATE positron emission PET/CT may represent a new gold standard for staging pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma and have future therapeutic implications.

  17. Segmentation of brain PET-CT images based on adaptive use of complementary information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-02-01

    Dual modality PET-CT imaging provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scanning session, which can potentially be used to improve image segmentation of PET-CT data. The ability to distinguish structures for segmentation is a function of structure and modality and varies across voxels. Thus optimal contribution of a particular modality to segmentation is spatially variant. Existing segmentation algorithms, however, seldom account for this characteristic of PET-CT data and the results using these algorithms are not optimal. In this study, we propose a relative discrimination index (RDI) to characterize the relative abilities of PET and CT to correctly classify each voxel into the correct structure for segmentation. The definition of RDI is based on the information entropy of the probability distribution of the voxel's class label. If the class label derived from CT data for a particular voxel has more certainty than that derived from PET data, the corresponding RDI will have a higher value. We applied the RDI matrix to balance adaptively the contributions of PET and CT data to segmentation of brain PET-CT images on a voxel-by-voxel basis, with the aim to give the modality with higher discriminatory power a larger weight. The resultant segmentation approach is distinguished from traditional approaches by its innovative and adaptive use of the dual-modality information. We compared our approach to the non-RDI version and two commonly used PET-only based segmentation algorithms for simulation and clinical data. Our results show that the RDI matrix markedly improved PET-CT image segmentation.

  18. Imaging carotid body chemodectomas with 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT

    PubMed Central

    Naswa, N; Kumar, A; Sharma, P; Bal, C; Malhotra, A; Kumar, R

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of 68-gallium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-1-Nal3-octreotide (68Ga-DOTA-NOC) positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) in carotid body chemodectomas (CBCs). Methods : 5 patients with known CBCs (conventional imaging and angiography) were evaluated retrospectively (3 males, 2 females; mean age 36.6 years). All underwent PET-CT after injection of 148 MBq (4 mCi) of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC. Results : At baseline there were four bilateral CBCs and one unilateral CBC with an additional glomus tympanicum and bilateral glomus jugulare tumour in these five patients. All these lesions showed intense uptake on 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT. Apart from these known lesions, additional tumours were detected in three patients; glomus jugulare in one, aortic body tumour and multiple abdominal paragangliomas in another and unsuspected vertebral metastasis in the last. Overall it led to a change in management in 3 of the 5 patients (60%). Conclusion : 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT is a promising non-invasive imaging modality in the detection and characterisation of CBCs. PMID:22096221

  19. 64CuCl2 PET/CT imaging of mouse muscular injury induced by electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fang; Cai, Huawei; Peng, Fangyu

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is common in body injuries suffered in sports and car accidents. Development of new tracers is significant for assessing muscular injury with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and monitoring repair of muscle injury in response to treatment. Copper is required for wound healing and increased copper ions were detected in the soft tissue of wound in rodents and human. Based on the recent finding of increased 64Cu uptake in the traumatic brain injury, this study aimed to explore use of 64CuCl2 as a radiotracer for molecular imaging of muscular injury using PET/CT. Focally increased 64Cu uptake by the injured muscular tissue (5.4 ± 1.2% ID/g) was detected in the C57BL/6 mice with electroporation-induced skeletal muscle injury by PET/CT after intravenous injection of 64CuCl2 as a tracer, compared to low 64Cu uptake associated with muscular inflammation induced by intramuscular injection of lipopolysaccharides (0.82 ± 0.26% ID/g, P < 0.01) or physiological 64Cu uptake of the non-injured muscular tissues (0.78 ± 0.20% ID/g, P < 0.01). The findings support further investigation of 64CuCl2 as a new radiotracer for molecular imaging of skeletal muscle injury using PET/CT. PMID:28123866

  20. Cross-modality PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT imaging for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zuo, Chang-Jing; Jia, Ning-Yang; Wang, Jian-Hua; Hu, Sheng-Ping; Yu, Zhong-Fei; Zheng, Yuan; Zhang, An-Yu; Feng, Xiao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the diagnostic value of the cross-modality fusion images provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Data from 70 patients with pancreatic lesions who underwent CECT and PET/CT examinations at our hospital from August 2010 to October 2012 were analyzed. PET/CECT for the cross-modality image fusion was obtained using TureD software. The diagnostic efficiencies of PET/CT, CECT and PET/CECT were calculated and compared with each other using a χ2 test. P < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. RESULTS: Of the total 70 patients, 50 had PC and 20 had benign lesions. The differences in the sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy between CECT and PET/CECT in detecting PC were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). In 15 of the 31 patients with PC who underwent a surgical operation, peripancreatic vessel invasion was verified. The differences in the sensitivity, positive predictive value, NPV, and accuracy of CECT vs PET/CT and PET/CECT vs PET/CT in diagnosing peripancreatic vessel invasion were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). In 19 of the 31 patients with PC who underwent a surgical operation, regional lymph node metastasis was verified by postsurgical histology. There was no statistically significant difference among the three methods in detecting regional lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05 for each). In 17 of the 50 patients with PC confirmed by histology or clinical follow-up, distant metastasis was confirmed. The differences in the sensitivity and NPV between CECT and PET/CECT in detecting distant metastasis were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). CONCLUSION: Cross-modality image fusion of PET/CT and CECT is a convenient and effective method that can be used to diagnose and stage PC, compensating for the defects of PET/CT and CECT when they are conducted individually. PMID:25780297

  1. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mesguich, Charles; Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence; Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2014-12-01

    18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie-Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUVmax and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM.

  2. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K. Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.; Zhao, Liming

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  3. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-06-15

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical PET/CT scanners. Therefore, visual artifacts and overestimation and/or underestimation of the tracer uptake in regions adjacent to metallic implants are likely to occur and as such, inaccurate quantification of the tracer uptake and potential erroneous clinical interpretation of PET images is expected. Accurate quantification of PET data requires metal artifact reduction (MAR) of the CT images prior to the application of the CT-based attenuation correction procedure. In this review, the origins of metallic artifacts and their impact on clinical PET/CT imaging are discussed. Moreover, a brief overview of proposed MAR methods and their advantages and drawbacks is presented. Although most of the presented MAR methods are mainly developed for diagnostic CT imaging, their potential application in PET/CT imaging is highlighted. The challenges associated with comparative evaluation of these methods in a clinical environment in the absence of a gold standard are also discussed.

  4. A combined micro-PET/CT scanner for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Meei-Ling; Ni, Yu-Ching; Chen, Kuo-Wei; Liang, Hsing-Ching; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Fu, Ying-Kai

    2006-12-01

    A micro-PET/CT system was developed by combination of an in-house micro-CT and a microPET ® R4 scanner. The cone-beam micro-CT consists of a rotational gantry that fits an X-ray tube, a CCD-based X-ray detector, and motor-driven linear stages. The gantry was designed to be coaxial with the scanner of microPET ® R4. It can be moved for the convenience of mounting the Ge-68 point-source holder for PET's calibration. The image volumes obtained from two modalities is registered by a pre-determined, inherent spatial transformation function. This hardware-approach fusion, which provides accurate and no labor-intensive alignment, is suitable for mass scanning. The micro-PET/CT system has been operated successfully. Merging the anatomical and functional images benefit studies of the small animal imaging.

  5. Motion correction using anatomical information in PET/CT and PET/MR hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Lamare, Frederic; Merlin, Thibaut; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion causes qualitative and quantitative inaccuracies in whole body multi-modality imaging such as positron emission tomography coupled with computed tomography (PET/CT) and positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Solutions presented to date include motion synchronized PET and corresponding anatomical acquisitions (four dimensional [4D] PET/CT, 4D PET/MR), frequently referred to as the gating approach. This method is based on the acquisition of an external surrogate using an external device (pressure belt, optical monitoring system, spirometer etc.), subsequently used to bin PET and CT or MR anatomical data into a number of gates. A first limitation of this method is the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the resulting motion synchronized PET frames, given that every reconstructed frame contains only part of the count statistics available throughout a motion average PET acquisition. Another limitation is that the complex motion of internal organs cannot be fully estimated, characterized and modelled using a mono-dimensional motion signal. In order to resolve such issues, many advanced techniques have been proposed which include three consecutive major steps. These are based on firstly acquiring an external or internal motion surrogate, estimating or modelling the internal motion using anatomical information extracted from 4D anatomical images (CT and/or MR) and finally correcting for motion either in the PET raw data space, the image space or incorporate it within the PET image reconstruction which is the most optimal based motion correction method in PET/CT and in PET/MR imaging. Current research efforts are concentrating on combining the last two steps within a joint motion estimation/motion correction approach, the exploitation of MRI specific motion characterization sequences and the combination of both respiratory and cardiac motion corrections. The goal of this review is to present and discuss the different

  6. A Rare Case of Omentum Invasive Prostate Cancer: Staging With PSMA PET/CT Imaging and Response to Systemic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ladwa, Rahul; Gustafson, Sonja; McCaffrey, Elizabeth; Miles, Kenneth; O'Byrne, Kenneth

    2017-02-24

    The omentum is a rare metastatic site for prostatic adenocarcinoma. We present a case of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, with progressive omentum invasive prostate cancer identified on prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT scan. Omental biopsy revealed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma, and cabazitaxel chemotherapy was instituted with a prostate-specific antigen biochemical response. Repeat PSMA PET/CT imaging revealed increased avidity in omental metastasis. Despite prostate-specific antigen response, PSMA PET/CT did not correlate with a therapeutic response.

  7. Incidental diagnosis of tumor thrombosis on FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Erhamamci, S; Reyhan, M; Nursal, G N; Torun, N; Yapar, A F

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data are presented on patients with tumor thrombosis (TT) incidentally detected on FDG PET/CT imaging, as well as determining its prevalence and metabolic characteristics. Out of 12,500 consecutive PET/CT examinations of patients with malignancy, the PET/CT images of 15 patients with TT as an incidental finding were retrospectively investigated. A visual and semiquantitative analyses was performed on the PET/CT scans. An evaluation was made of the pattern of FDG uptake in the involved vessel as linear or focal via visual analyses. For the semiquantitative analyses, the metabolic activity was measured using SUVmax by drawing the region of interest at the site of the thrombosis and tumor (if any). The prevalence of occult TT was 0.12%. A total of 15 patients had various malignancies including renal (1 patient), liver (4), pancreas (2), stomach (1), colon (1), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (1), leiomyosarcoma (1), endometrial (1), ovarian (1), malign melanoma (1) and parotid (1). Nineteen vessels with TT were identified in 15 patients; three patients had more than one vessel. Various vessels were affected; the most common was the inferior vena cava (n=7) followed by the portal (n=5), renal (n=3), splenic (n=1), jugular (n=1), common iliac (n=1) and ovarian vein (n=1). The FDG uptake pattern was linear in 12 and focal in 3 patients. The mean SUVmax values in the TT and primary tumors were 8.40±4.56 and 13.77±6.80, respectively. Occult TT from various malignancies and locations was found incidentally in 0.12% of patients. Interesting cases with malign melanoma and parotid carcinoma and with TT in ovarian vein were first described by FDG PET/CT. Based on the linear FDG uptake pattern and high SUVmax value, PET/CT may accurately detect occult TT, help with the assessment of treatment response, contribute to correct tumor staging, and provide additional information on the survival rates of oncology patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All

  8. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand (68)Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for (18)F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for (68)Ga-Pentixafor than for (18)F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, (68)Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy.

  9. Particle Disease on Fluoride-18 (NaF) PET/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jonathan; Foster, Cameron; Shelton, David

    2011-01-01

    Particle disease is a loss of bone that commonly occurs about five years after arthroplasty. The cause is secondary to microabrasive wear and shedding of any portion of the prosthesis, and the microscopic foreign bodies activate inflammation which can lead to pain. This report describes the imaging findings of an 80-year-old female with particle disease detected with 18F-fluoride PET/CT. PMID:22470793

  10. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning.

    PubMed

    Pan, T

    2016-06-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: 1. Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning 2. The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy 3. PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment.

  11. Automated cardiac motion compensation in PET/CT for accurate reconstruction of PET myocardial perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Khawar; McGough, Robert J.; Berger, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Error-free reconstruction of PET data with a registered CT attenuation map is essential for accurate quantification and interpretation of cardiac perfusion. Misalignment of the CT and PET data can produce an erroneous attenuation map that projects lung attenuation parameters onto the heart wall, thereby underestimating the attenuation and creating artifactual areas of hypoperfusion that can be misinterpreted as myocardial ischemia or infarction. The major causes of misregistration between CT and PET images are the respiratory motion, cardiac motion and gross physical motion of the patient. The misalignment artifact problem is overcome with automated cardiac registration software that minimizes the alignment error between the two modalities. Results show that the automated registration process works equally well for any respiratory phase in which the CT scan is acquired. Further evaluation of this procedure on 50 patients demonstrates that the automated registration software consistently aligns the two modalities, eliminating artifactual hypoperfusion in reconstructed PET images due to PET/CT misregistration. With this registration software, only one CT scan is required for PET/CT imaging, which reduces the radiation dose required for CT-based attenuation correction and improves the clinical workflow for PET/CT.

  12. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  13. ACR-SPR-STR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Imaging.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rathan M; Janowitz, Warren R; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Lodge, Martin A; Parisi, Marguerite T; Ferguson, Mark R; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Gladish, Gregory W; Gupta, Narainder K

    2017-09-15

    This clinical practice parameter has been developed collaboratively by the American College of Radiology (ACR), the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR), and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR). This document is intended to act as a guide for physicians performing and interpreting positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) of cardiac diseases in adults and children. The primary value of cardiac PET/CT imaging include evaluation of perfusion, function, viability, inflammation, anatomy, and risk stratification for cardiac-related events such as myocardial infarction and death. Optimum utility of cardiac PET/CT is achieved when images are interpreted in conjunction with clinical information and laboratory data. Measurement of myocardial blood flow, coronary flow reserve and detection of balanced ischemia are significant advantages of cardiac PET perfusion studies. Increasingly cardiac PET/CT is used in diagnosis and treatment response assessment for cardiac sarcoidosis.

  14. 68Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT for Integrin Imaging in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Liang, Naixin; Zhang, Jingjing; Lang, Lixin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Shanqing; Zhao, Jun; Niu, Gang; Li, Fang; Zhu, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 (NOTA-PRGD2 is NOTA-PEG4-E[c(RGDfK)]2) PET/CT in lung cancer. Ninety-one patients (48 men and 43 women; age, 22-82 y) with suspected lung lesions on CT were enrolled with informed consent. Immediately after intravenous injection of 117.7 ± 37.7 MBq of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2, 15 patients underwent dynamic whole-body PET/CT scans for 1-2 h, and the remaining 76 patients underwent whole-body PET/CT scans at 30 ± 10 min after bolus injection. Each patient also underwent standard (18)F-FDG PET/CT for comparison. No side effect was found after (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 injection. (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 was rapidly cleared from the blood pool and primarily excreted through the urinary system. The standardized uptake values of proven malignancies were significantly higher than those of the benign ones. With an average standardized uptake value of greater than 1.3 being considered malignant, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT in diagnosing lung cancer were 83.8% (57/68), 91.3% (21/23), and 85.7% (78/91), respectively. The diagnostic value of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 for lung cancer is comparable to that of (18)F-FDG PET/CT. However, (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT is more specific than (18)F-FDG PET/CT in assessing lymph node metastasis, with positive and negative predictive values of 90.0% (27/30) and 93.8% (121/129), respectively, whereas those of (18)F-FDG PET/CT were 30.2% (29/96) and 90.5% (57/63), respectively. This study indicates the efficacy of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT in lung cancer diagnosis. (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT shows significant advantage over (18)F-FDG PET/CT in judging metastatic lymph nodes with higher specificity. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. Utility of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of postoperative pain following surgical spine fusion.

    PubMed

    Pouldar, D; Bakshian, S; Matthews, R; Rao, V; Manzano, M; Dardashti, S

    2017-08-01

    A retrospective case review of patients who underwent 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging of the spine with postoperative pain following vertebral fusion. To determine the benefit of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of persistent pain in the postoperative spine. The diagnosis of pain generators in the postoperative spine has proven to be a diagnostic challenge. The conventional radiologic evaluation of persistent pain after spine surgery with the use of plain radiographs, MRI, and CT can often fall short of diagnosis in the complex patient. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging is an alternative tool to accurately identify a patient's source of pain in the difficult patient. This retrospective study looked at 25 adult patients who had undergone 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging. All patients had persistent or recurrent back pain over the course of a 15-month period after having undergone spinal fusion surgery. All patients had inconclusive dedicated MRI. The clinical accuracy of PET/CT in identifying the pain generator and contribution to altering the decision making process was compared to the use of CT scan alone. Of the 25 patients studied, 17 patients had increased uptake on the 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT fusion images. There was a high-level correlation of radiotracer uptake to the patients' pain generator. Overall 88% of the studies were considered beneficial with either PET/CT altering the clinical diagnosis and treatment plan of the patient or confirming unnecessary surgery. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT proves to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of complex spine pathology of the postoperative patients. In varied cases, a high correlation of metabolic activity to the source of the patient's pain was observed.

  16. A framework based on hidden Markov trees for multimodal PET/CT image co-segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hanzouli-Ben Salah, Houda; Lapuyade-Lahorgue, Jerome; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Lambin, Philippe; Van Baardwijk, Angela; Monfrini, Emmanuel; Pieczynski, Wojciech; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hatt, Mathieu

    2017-08-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of a probabilistic quad-tree graph (hidden Markov tree, HMT) to provide fast computation, robustness and an interpretational framework for multimodality image processing and to evaluate this framework for single gross tumor target (GTV) delineation from both positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images. We exploited joint statistical dependencies between hidden states to handle the data stack using multi-observation, multi-resolution of HMT and Bayesian inference. This framework was applied to segmentation of lung tumors in PET/CT datasets taking into consideration simultaneously the CT and the PET image information. PET and CT images were considered using either the original voxels intensities, or after wavelet/contourlet enhancement. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), sensitivity (SE), positive predictive value (PPV) were used to assess the performance of the proposed approach on one simulated and 15 clinical PET/CT datasets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. The surrogate of truth was a statistical consensus (obtained with the Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation algorithm) of three manual delineations performed by experts on fused PET/CT images. The proposed framework was applied to PET-only, CT-only and PET/CT datasets, and were compared to standard and improved fuzzy c-means (FCM) multimodal implementations. A high agreement with the consensus of manual delineations was observed when using both PET and CT images. Contourlet-based HMT led to the best results with a DSC of 0.92 ± 0.11 compared to 0.89 ± 0.13 and 0.90 ± 0.12 for Intensity-based HMT and Wavelet-based HMT, respectively. Considering PET or CT only in the HMT led to much lower accuracy. Standard and improved FCM led to comparatively lower accuracy than HMT, even when considering multimodal implementations. We evaluated the accuracy of the proposed HMT-based framework for PET/CT image

  17. Feasibility of 18F-sodium fluoride PET/CT for imaging of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Richter, Ulrich; Bannas, Peter; Begemann, Philipp; Buchert, Ralph; Mester, Janos; Klutmann, Susanne

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence, distribution, and topographic relationship of vascular (18)F-sodium fluoride uptake and arterial calcification in major arteries. Image data obtained from 75 patients undergoing whole-body (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT were evaluated retrospectively. Arterial radiotracer uptake and calcification were analyzed qualitatively and semiquantitatively. (18)F-sodium fluoride uptake was observed at 254 sites in 57 (76%) of the 75 study patients, and calcification was observed at 1,930 sites in 63 (84%) of the patients. Colocalization of radiotracer accumulation and calcification could be observed in 223 areas of uptake (88%). However, only 12% of all arterial calcification sites showed increased radiotracer uptake. Our data indicate the feasibility of (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT for the imaging of mineral deposition in arterial wall alterations. (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT may provide relevant information about the morphologic and functional properties of calcified plaque.

  18. Diagnostic Value of 68Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT Imaging of Brain Tumors-Preliminary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Nanabala, Raviteja; Anees K, Muhammed; Jayaprakash, P G; Madhavan, Jayaprakash; Nair, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT for imaging brain lesions and its comparison with F-FDG. Ten patients with brain lesions were included in the study. Five patients were treated cases of glioblastoma with suspected recurrence. F-FDG and Ga PSMA-11 brain scans were done for these patients. Five patients were sent for assessing the nature (primary lesion/metastasis) of space occupying lesion in brain. They underwent whole body F-FDG PET/CT scan and a primary site elsewhere in the body was ruled out. Subsequently they underwent Ga PSMA-11 brain PET/CT imaging. Target to background ratios (TBR) for the brain lesions were calculated using contralateral cerebellar uptake as background. In five treated cases of glioblastoma with suspected recurrence the findings of Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT showed good correlation with that of F-FDG PET/CT scan. Compared to the F-FDG, Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT showed better visualization of the recurrent lesion (presence/absence) owing to its significantly high TBR. Among the five cases evaluated for lesion characterization glioma and atypical meningioma patients showed higher SUVmax in the lesion with Ga PSMA-11 than with F-FDG and converse in cases of lymphoma. TBR was better with Ga PSMA PET/CT in all cases. Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT brain imaging is a potentially useful imaging tool in the evaluation of brain lesions. Absence of physiological uptake of Ga PSMA-11 in the normal brain parenchyma results in high TBR values and consequently better visualization of metabolically active disease in brain.

  19. Diagnostic imaging in dermatology: utility of PET-CT in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, R; Serrano-Falcón, C; Rebollo Aguirre, A C

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma accounts for 5% of all malignant skin tumors and its incidence is increasing. In the natural course of melanoma, tumors grow locally and can spread via the lymph system or the blood. Because survival is directly related to the stage of the disease at diagnosis, early detection (secondary prevention) has an impact on prognosis. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine technique that generates images using molecules labeled with positron-emitting isotopes. The most widely used molecule is fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Because of the elevated glycolytic rate in tumor cells, which results in increased FDG uptake, greater quantities of FDG become trapped in tumor cells, enabling external detection. Today, most PET scanners are multimodal PET-computed tomography (CT) scanners, which provide more detailed information by combining morphological information with functional PET findings. The possible utility of PET-CT in patients with malignant melanoma is a subject of debate. Various questions have been raised: when the scan should be performed, whether PET-CT has advantages over conventional diagnostic methods, and whether PET-CT provides a real benefit to patients. In this review of the literature, we will analyze each of these questions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging of prostate cancer with PET/CT using 18F-Fluorocholine

    PubMed Central

    Vali, Reza; Loidl, Wolfgang; Pirich, Christian; Langesteger, Werner; Beheshti, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    While 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) has limited value in prostate cancer (PCa), it may be useful for specific subgroups of PCa patients with hormone-resistant poorly differentiated cell types. 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) PET/CT has been increasingly used in primary and recurrent PCa and has been shown to add valuable information. Although there is a correlation between the foci of activity and the areas of malignancy in the prostate gland, the clinical value of 18F-FCH is still controversial for detection of the malignant focus in the prostate. For the T-staging of PCa at diagnosis the value of 18F-FCH is limited. This is probably due to limited resolution of PET system and positive findings in benign prostate diseases. Conversely, 18F-FCH PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the delineation of local and distant nodal recurrence and bone metastases and is poised to have an impact on therapy management. In this review, recent studies of 18F-FCH PET/CT in PCa are summarized. PMID:25973332

  1. Yttrium-90 internal pair production imaging using first generation PET/CT provides high-resolution images for qualitative diagnostic purposes

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y H; Tan, E H; Lim, K Y; Ng, C E; Goh, S W

    2012-01-01

    Yttrium-90 (90Y) internal pair production can be imaged by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and is superior to bremsstrahlung single-photon emission CT/CT for evaluating hepatic 90Y microsphere biodistribution. We illustrate a case of 90Y imaging using first generation PET/CT technology, producing high-quality images for qualitative diagnostic purposes. PMID:21976634

  2. Orbital positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging findings in graves ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to describe orbital positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging findings, both structural and metabolic, in different clinical stages of Graves ophthalmopathy (GO). This prospective, observational, cross-sectional study examined 32 eyes of 16 patients with GO. Methods Patients were assessed with a complete ophthalmological evaluation and assigned a VISA classification for GO. All patients underwent serum thyroid hormone measurement, antibody profile, and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18-FDG PET/CT) of the orbits. The 18-FDG uptake on PET images was expressed in terms of maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax). CT images were analyzed, and orbital structures were measured in millimeters. Vision, inflammation, strabismus, and overall appearance were assessed according to the VISA classification system, thyroid hormone levels, antibody values, 18-FDG uptake, and thickness of orbital structures. Results Altogether, 32 eyes of 16 patients (10 women, 6 men; mean age 44.31 ± 13 years, range 20–71 years) were included. Three patients were hypothyroid, seven were euthyroid, and six were hyperthyroid. CT measurements of extraocular muscle diameter were elevated (P < 0.05), and muscle 18-FDG uptake values were increased. Eyes with a clinical VISA inflammation score of ≤ 4 had an average extraocular muscle SUVmax of 3.09, and those with a score of ≥ 5 had an average SUVmax of 3.92 (P = 0.09), showing no clear correlation between clinically observed inflammation and 18-FDG uptake. 18-FDG uptake values also did not show a correlation with extraocular muscle diameter as measured by CT (R2 = 0.0755, P > 0.05). Conclusions We demonstrated a lack of correlation between 18-FDG extraocular muscle uptake and either clinical inflammation score or muscle diameter. Although 18-FDG uptake has been used as an inflammation marker in other pathologies, inflammation in GO may

  3. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT imaging of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ronald; Deppen, Stephen; Smith, Gary; Shi, Chanjuan; Lehman, Jonathan; Clanton, Jeff; Moore, Brandon; Burns, Rena; Grogan, Eric L.; Massion, Pierre P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose 18F-FDG PET/CT is widely used to evaluate indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs). False positive results occur, especially from active granulomatous nodules. A PET-based imaging agent with superior specificity to 18F-FDG for IPNs, is badly needed, especially in areas of endemic granulomatous nodules. Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are expressed in many malignant cells including small cell and non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). 68Ga-DOTATATE, a positron emitter labeled somatostatin analog, combined with PET/CT imaging, may improve the diagnosis of IPNs over 18F-FDG by reducing false positives. Our study purpose was to test this hypothesis in our region with high endemic granulomatous IPNs. Methods We prospectively performed 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans in the same 30 patients with newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve lung cancer (N = 14) or IPNs (N = 15) and one metastatic nodule. 68Ga-DOTATATE SUVmax levels at or above 1.5 were considered likely malignant. We analyzed the scan results, correlating with ultimate diagnosis via biopsy or 2-year chest CT follow-up. We also correlated 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake with immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for SSTR subtype 2A (SSTR2A) in pathological specimens. Results We analyzed 31 lesions in 30 individuals, with 14 (45%) being non-neuroendocrine lung cancers and 1 (3%) being metastatic disease. McNemar’s result comparing the two radiopharmaceuticals (p = 0.65) indicates that their accuracy of diagnosis in this indication are equivalent. 68Ga-DOTATATE was more specific (94% compared to 81%) and less sensitive 73% compared to 93%) than 18F-FDG. 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake correlated with SSTR2A expression in tumor stroma determined by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining in 5 of 9 (55%) NSCLCs. Conclusion 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG PET/CT had equivalent accuracy in the diagnosis of non-neuroendocrine lung cancer and 68Ga-DOTATATE was more specific than 18F-FDG for the diagnosis of IPNs. IHC staining for SSTR2A

  4. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  5. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  6. Computer-assisted quantitative evaluation of therapeutic responses for lymphoma using serial PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Xue, Zhong; Xing, Jiong; Lee, Daniel Y; Gottschalk, Stephen M; Heslop, Helen E; Bollard, Catherine M; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-04-01

    Molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) have emerged as an essential diagnostic tool for monitoring treatment response in lymphoma patients. However, quantitative assessment of treatment outcomes from serial scans is often difficult, laborious, and time consuming. Automatic quantization of longitudinal PET/CT scans provides more efficient and comprehensive quantitative evaluation of cancer therapeutic responses. This study develops and validates a Longitudinal Image Navigation and Analysis (LINA) system for this quantitative imaging application. LINA is designed to automatically construct longitudinal correspondence along serial images of individual patients for changes in tumor volume and metabolic activity via regions of interest (ROI) segmented from a given time point image and propagated into the space of all follow-up PET/CT images. We applied LINA retrospectively to nine lymphoma patients enrolled in an immunotherapy clinical trial conducted at the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine. This methodology was compared to the readout by a diagnostic radiologist, who manually measured the ROI metabolic activity as defined by the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Quantitative results showed that the measured SUVs obtained from automatic mapping are as accurate as semiautomatic segmentation and consistent with clinical examination findings. The average of relative squared differences of SUVmax between automatic and semiautomatic segmentation was found to be 0.02. These data support a role for LINA in facilitating quantitative analysis of serial PET/CT images to efficiently assess cancer treatment responses in a comprehensive and intuitive software platform. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of image reconstruction bias on PET/CT 90Y dosimetry after radioembolization.

    PubMed

    Tapp, Katie N; Lea, William B; Johnson, Matthew S; Tann, Mark; Fletcher, James W; Hutchins, Gary D

    2014-09-01

    PET/CT imaging after radioembolization is a viable method for determining the posttreatment (90)Y distribution in the liver. Low true-to-random coincidence ratios in (90)Y PET studies limit the quantitative accuracy of these studies when reconstruction algorithms optimized for traditional PET imaging are used. This study examined these quantitative limitations and assessed the feasibility of generating radiation dosimetry maps in liver regions with high and low (90)Y concentrations. (90)Y PET images were collected on a PET/CT scanner and iteratively reconstructed with the vendor-supplied reconstruction algorithm. PET studies on a Jaszczak cylindric phantom were performed to determine quantitative accuracy and minimum detectable concentration (MDC). (90)Y and (18)F point-source studies were used to investigate the possible increase in detected random coincidence events due to bremsstrahlung photons. Retrospective quantitative analyses were performed on (90)Y PET/CT images obtained after 65 right or left hepatic artery radioembolizations in 59 patients. Quantitative image errors were determined by comparing the measured image activity with the assayed (90)Y activity. PET images were converted to dose maps through convolution with voxel S values generated using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo N-particle transport code system for multiparticle and high-energy applications. Tumor and parenchyma doses and potential bias based on measurements found below the MDC were recorded. Random coincidences were found to increase in (90)Y acquisitions, compared with (18)F acquisitions, at similar positron emission rates because of bremsstrahlung photons. Positive bias was observed in all images. Quantitative accuracy was achieved for phantom inserts above the MDC of 1 MBq/mL. The mean dose to viable tumors was 183.6 ± 156.5 Gy, with an average potential bias of 3.3 ± 6.4 Gy. The mean dose to the parenchyma was 97.1 ± 22.1 Gy, with an average potential bias of 8.9 ± 4.9 Gy. The low signal

  8. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT Integrated Imaging in Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yajuan; Yu, Hongjuan; Ma, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion. Methods A total of 176 patients with pleural effusion who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT examination to differentiate malignancy from benignancy were retrospectively researched. The images of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were visually analyzed. The suspected malignant effusion was characterized by the presence of nodular or irregular pleural thickening on CT imaging. Whereas on PET imaging, pleural 18F-FDG uptake higher than mediastinal activity was interpreted as malignant effusion. Images of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were interpreted by combining the morphologic feature of pleura on CT imaging with the degree and form of pleural 18F-FDG uptake on PET imaging. Results One hundred and eight patients had malignant effusion, including 86 with pleural metastasis and 22 with pleural mesothelioma, whereas 68 patients had benign effusion. The sensitivities of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in detecting malignant effusion were 75.0%, 91.7% and 93.5%, respectively, which were 69.8%, 91.9% and 93.0% in distinguishing metastatic effusion. The sensitivity of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in detecting malignant effusion was higher than that of CT imaging (p = 0.000). For metastatic effusion, 18F-FDG PET imaging had higher sensitivity (p = 0.000) and better diagnostic consistency with 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging compared with CT imaging (Kappa = 0.917 and Kappa = 0.295, respectively). The specificities of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were 94.1%, 63.2% and 92.6% in detecting benign effusion. The specificities of CT imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were higher than that of 18F-FDG PET imaging (p = 0.000 and p = 0.000, respectively), and CT imaging had better diagnostic consistency with

  9. Injectable facial fillers: imaging features, complications, and diagnostic pitfalls at MRI and PET CT.

    PubMed

    Mundada, Pravin; Kohler, Romain; Boudabbous, Sana; Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva

    2017-10-04

    Injectable fillers are widely used for facial rejuvenation, correction of disabling volumetric fat loss in HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy, Romberg disease, and post-traumatic facial disfiguring. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with the anatomy of facial fat compartments, as well as with the properties and key imaging features of commonly used facial fillers, filler-related complications, interpretation pitfalls, and dermatologic conditions mimicking filler-related complications. The distribution of facial fillers is characteristic and depends on the anatomy of the superficial fat compartments. Silicone has signature MRI features, calcium hydroxyapatite has characteristic calcifications, whereas other injectable fillers have overlapping imaging features. Most fillers (hyaluronic acid, collagen, and polyalkylimide-polyacrylamide hydrogels) have signal intensity patterns compatible with high water content. On PET-CT, most fillers show physiologic high FDG uptake, which should not be confounded with pathology. Abscess, cellulitis, non-inflammatory nodules, and foreign body granulomas are the most common filler-related complications, and imaging can help in the differential diagnosis. Diffusion weighted imaging helps in detecting a malignant lesion masked by injected facial fillers. Awareness of imaging features of facial fillers and their complications helps to avoid misinterpretation of MRI, and PET-CT scans and facilitates therapeutic decisions in unclear clinical cases. • Facial fillers are common incidental findings on MRI and PET-CT scans. • They have a characteristic appearance and typical anatomic distribution • Although considered as safe, facial filler injections are associated with several complications • As they may mask malignancy, knowledge of typical imaging features is mandatory. • MRI is a problem-solving tool for unclear cases.

  10. The Basic Principles of FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Hess, Søren; Nielsen Braad, Poul-Erik; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Inglev, Signe; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) forms the basis of molecular imaging. FDG-PET imaging is a multidisciplinary undertaking that requires close interdisciplinary collaboration in a broad team comprising physicians, technologists, secretaries, radio-chemists, hospital physicists, molecular biologists, engineers, and cyclotron technicians. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of important basic issues and considerations pivotal to successful patient examinations, including basic physics, instrumentation, radiochemistry, molecular and cell biology, patient preparation, normal distribution of tracer, and potential interpretive pitfalls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. PET and PET-CT imaging findings of peritoneal and omental involvement in patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali D; Butros, Selim R; Scott, James; Blake, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective institutional-review-board-approved study was performed evaluating positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging findings of peritoneal and omental involvement of lymphoma. Twelve patients were identified with a wide spectrum of imaging findings on PET-CT including but not limited to peritoneal thickening, ascites, and serosal involvement. Lymphoma is among the rare causes of malignant peritoneal or omental involvement. The most common manifestations of peritoneal lymphomatosis are peritoneal 2-[fluorine 18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake with corresponding peritoneal thickening and nonobstructive serosal masses on CT. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thorax: normal and benign pathologic patterns in FDG-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason W; Gerbaudo, Victor H

    2014-04-01

    This article describes the normal patterns of thoracic (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) biodistribution, and expands on the role of FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of patients suffering from a spectrum of benign pathologic conditions that affect the chest. The discussion addresses the applications of FDG-PET/CT imaging in a wide variety of chest-related disorders. Familiarity with the normal thoracic biodistribution of FDG, coupled with knowledge of the potential nonmalignant causes of increased FDG uptake in the chest, is essential to minimize the incidence of incorrect interpretation of FDG-PET images in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeted Prostate Biopsy Using (68)Gallium PSMA-PET/CT for Image Guidance.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Demetrios N; Natarajan, Shyam; Jones, Tonye A; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Sisk, Anthony E; Marks, Leonard S

    2017-09-01

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) scanning is a sensitive method of prostate cancer detection. In a 71 y.o. man with a PSA of 49 (6%F), 4 negative MRI studies and 6 negative biopsies over an 8 year interval, a (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan showed a PSMA-avid spot in the prostate. Using image fusion technology, the lesion was target-biopsied and Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 (cancer core length of 12 mm) was identified. This case may herald a new application for PSMA scanning and prostate cancer imaging.

  14. Automatic co-segmentation of lung tumor based on random forest in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xueqing; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Weifang; Shi, Fei; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic method is proposed to segment the lung tumor in clinical 3D PET-CT images. The proposed method effectively combines PET and CT information to make full use of the high contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Our approach consists of three main parts: (1) initial segmentation, in which spines are removed in CT images and initial connected regions achieved by thresholding based segmentation in PET images; (2) coarse segmentation, in which monotonic downhill function is applied to rule out structures which have similar standardized uptake values (SUV) to the lung tumor but do not satisfy a monotonic property in PET images; (3) fine segmentation, random forests method is applied to accurately segment the lung tumor by extracting effective features from PET and CT images simultaneously. We validated our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 24 3D PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The average TPVF, FPVF and accuracy rate (ACC) were 83.65%, 0.05% and 99.93%, respectively. The correlation analysis shows our segmented lung tumor volumes has strong correlation ( average 0.985) with the ground truth 1 and ground truth 2 labeled by a clinical expert.

  15. Lymph node detection in IASLC-defined zones on PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yihua; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Lymph node detection is challenging due to the low contrast between lymph nodes as well as surrounding soft tissues and the variation in nodal size and shape. In this paper, we propose several novel ideas which are combined into a system to operate on positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT) images to detect abnormal thoracic nodes. First, our previous Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) approach is modified where lymph node zones predominantly following International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) specifications are modeled as objects arranged in a hierarchy along with key anatomic anchor objects. This fuzzy anatomy model built from diagnostic CT images is then deployed on PET/CT images for automatically recognizing the zones. A novel globular filter (g-filter) to detect blob-like objects over a specified range of sizes is designed to detect the most likely locations and sizes of diseased nodes. Abnormal nodes within each automatically localized zone are subsequently detected via combined use of different items of information at various scales: lymph node zone model poses found at recognition indicating the geographic layout at the global level of node clusters, g-filter response which hones in on and carefully selects node-like globular objects at the node level, and CT and PET gray value but within only the most plausible nodal regions for node presence at the voxel level. The models are built from 25 diagnostic CT scans and refined for an object hierarchy based on a separate set of 20 diagnostic CT scans. Node detection is tested on an additional set of 20 PET/CT scans. Our preliminary results indicate node detection sensitivity and specificity at around 90% and 85%, respectively.

  16. High-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice using clinical PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying Yi; Wang, Kai; Xu, Zuo Yu; Song, Yan; Wang, Chu Nan; Zhang, Chong Qing; Sun, Xi Lin; Shen, Bao Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Considering the general application of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. To estimate the feasibility of using clinical PET/CT with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for high-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of cancer xenografts in nude mice. Dynamic clinical PET/CT scans were performed on xenografts for 60 min after injection with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Scans were reconstructed with or without SharpIR method in two phases. And mice were sacrificed to extracting major organs and tumors, using ex vivo γ-counting as a reference. Strikingly, we observed that the image quality and the correlation between the all quantitive data from clinical PET/CT and the ex vivo counting was better with the SharpIR reconstructions than without. Our data demonstrate that clinical PET/CT scanner with SharpIR reconstruction is a valuable tool for imaging small animals in preclinical cancer research, offering dynamic imaging parameters, good image quality and accurate data quatification. PMID:28881772

  17. High-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice using clinical PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying Yi; Wang, Kai; Xu, Zuo Yu; Song, Yan; Wang, Chu Nan; Zhang, Chong Qing; Sun, Xi Lin; Shen, Bao Zhong

    2017-08-08

    Considering the general application of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. To estimate the feasibility of using clinical PET/CT with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for high-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of cancer xenografts in nude mice. Dynamic clinical PET/CT scans were performed on xenografts for 60 min after injection with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Scans were reconstructed with or without SharpIR method in two phases. And mice were sacrificed to extracting major organs and tumors, using ex vivo γ-counting as a reference. Strikingly, we observed that the image quality and the correlation between the all quantitive data from clinical PET/CT and the ex vivo counting was better with the SharpIR reconstructions than without. Our data demonstrate that clinical PET/CT scanner with SharpIR reconstruction is a valuable tool for imaging small animals in preclinical cancer research, offering dynamic imaging parameters, good image quality and accurate data quatification.

  18. Pulmonary nodule detection in PET/CT images: improved approach using combined nodule detection and hybrid FP reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yoya; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo

    2012-03-01

    In this study, an automated scheme for detecting pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images has been proposed using combined detection and hybrid false-positive (FP) reduction techniques. The initial nodule candidates were detected separately from CT and PET images. FPs were then eliminated in the initial candidates by using support vector machine with characteristic values obtained from CT and PET images. In the experiment, we evaluated proposed method using 105 cases of PET/CT images that were obtained in the cancer-screening program. We evaluated true positive fraction (TPF) and FP / case. As a result, TPFs of CT and PET detections were 0.76 and 0.44, respectively. However, by integrating the both results, TPF was reached to 0.82 with 5.14 FPs/case. These results indicate that our method may be of practical use for the detection of pulmonary nodules using PET/CT images.

  19. 18F-NaF PET/CT Images of Cardiac Metastasis From Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsien; Ko, Kuan-Yin; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Chen, Wei-Wu; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Osteosarcomas are aggressive with a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis. Cardiac osteosarcoma metastasis is rare. We described a 17-year-old boy who had right distal femoral osteosarcoma with lung metastases. During follow-up, right ventricular (RV) metastasis was noted and confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgical specimen. F-NaF PET/CT was then arranged 1 month after debulking surgery for residual tumor survey. The images showed intense F-NaF uptake at RV region, suggestive of residual cardiac metastases.

  20. 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma - A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Omer; Khan, Salman A

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder adenocarcinoma is an uncommon and serious disease. The primary disease grows rapidly with local invasion into the liver and with distant spread to lymph nodes. It is often detected late, due to which management can be challenging. Despite routine use of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) for detection, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often considered for a detailed assessment of the anatomic behavior of these tumors. We share three cases where 18-FDG PET/CT played a role in management thereof. PMID:26430572

  1. Fireworks-induced chest wall granulomatous disease: 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Le, Stephanie T; Nguyen, Ba Duong

    2014-04-01

    The authors present a case of 18F-FDG-avid granulomatous reaction induced by fireworks injury of the chest wall in a patient with esophageal adenocarcinoma. This hypermetabolic lesion, involving the right pectoralis muscles, appeared slightly more prominent on restaging PET/CT imaging following chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Excisional biopsy of the lesion established the diagnosis of foreign-body granulomatous-type inflammation with surrounding foci of non-polarizable black foreign material and ruled out malignancy. The patient recalled accidentally shooting himself in the chest with a Roman candle at the age of 3.

  2. Primary Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma on Dual-Time Point FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Qian; He, Lirong; Zhuang, Xiaoqing; Li, Fang

    2016-08-01

    A 59-year-old man presented cough, chest pain, and shortness of breath for 2 weeks and fever for 4 days. A contrast chest CT revealed a large right pulmonary artery filling defect, suggestive of pulmonary embolism that failed to respond to anticoagulation therapy. FDG PET/CT was performed to evaluate possible malignancy, which revealed intense activity in the right main pulmonary artery without any extrathoracic abnormality. The ratio of the SUVmax of this lesion to the liver was significantly increased in the delayed PET images. The pathological examination demonstrated primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

  3. Optimal Co-segmentation of Tumor in PET-CT Images with Context Information

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi; Bai, Junjie; Han, Dongfeng; Bhatia, Sudershan; Sun, Wenqing; Rockey, William; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PET-CT images have been widely used in clinical practice for radiotherapy treatment planning of the radiotherapy. Many existing segmentation approaches only work for a single imaging modality, which suffer from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this work we propose a novel method for the co-segmentation of the tumor in both PET and CT images, which makes use of advantages from each modality: the functionality information from PET and the anatomical structure information from CT. The approach formulates the segmentation problem as a minimization problem of a Markov Random Field (MRF) model, which encodes the information from both modalities. The optimization is solved using a graph-cut based method. Two sub-graphs are constructed for the segmentation of the PET and the CT images, respectively. To achieve consistent results in two modalities, an adaptive context cost is enforced by adding context arcs between the two subgraphs. An optimal solution can be obtained by solving a single maximum flow problem, which leads to simultaneous segmentation of the tumor volumes in both modalities. The proposed algorithm was validated in robust delineation of lung tumors on 23 PET-CT datasets and two head-and-neck cancer subjects. Both qualitative and quantitative results show significant improvement compared to the graph cut methods solely using PET or CT. PMID:23693127

  4. Clinical impact of PET/CT imaging after adjuvant therapy in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huan-Chun; Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Chien-Yu; Lee, Li-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2017-09-01

    This single-center retrospective study of prospectively collected data was aimed at comparing the clinical outcomes of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with symptomatic recurrences identified by PET/CT imaging following adjuvant therapy (Group A) versus those of cases with asymptomatic recurrences diagnosed through periodic post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance (Group B). We also sought to establish the priority of salvage therapy in the two study groups. We identified 111 patients with advanced resected OSCC who developed recurrences following adjuvant therapy (51 in Group A and 60 in Group B). Histopathology served as the gold standard for recurrent lesions. The impact of post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance was examined with Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The 2-year DSS and OS rates were marginally or significantly higher in Group B than in Group A (P = 0.073 and P = 0.025, respectively). Time-dependent ROC curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff values for time to positive PET/CT findings in relation to OS were 12 months for Group A and 9 months for Group B, respectively. Independent risk factors identified in multivariate analyses were used to devise two prognostic scoring systems for 2-year DSS and OS in each study group (all P < 0.001). Scheduled periodic PET/CT surveillance is a valuable tool for early detection of recurrent lesion(s) in asymptomatic OSCC patients who bear risk factors for disease recurrence. The presence of clinical symptoms and a short time to positive PET/CT findings were adverse prognostic factors for clinical outcome in patients with advanced OSCC. The priority of salvage therapy is discussed in each patient subgroup according to the devised prognostic scoring systems.

  5. ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ PET/CT imaging of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Withofs, Nadia; Charlier, Edith; Simoni, Paolo; Alvarez-Miezentseva, Victoria; Mievis, Frédéric; Giacomelli, Fabrice; Mella, Christine; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Malaise, Olivier; de Seny, Dominique; Malaise, Michel; Hustinx, Roland

    2015-12-01

    This work reports on musculoskeletal uptake of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂, targeting the integrin αvβ3, in patients who had undergone ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) for oncologic purposes. Whole-body ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ PET/CT images of 62 cancer patients were retrospectively reviewed to detect foci of musculoskeletal ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake. For 37 patients, a FDG PET/CT performed in clinical settings was available. In each joint with an abnormal uptake, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was estimated. A total of 260 musculoskeletal foci of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake were detected. Most common sites of uptake were joints and discs (n = 160; 61.5%), entheses (osteotendinous and osteoligamentous junctions; n = 55; 21.2%) and recent fractures (n = 18; 6.9%). In addition, 27 (10.4%) miscellaneous foci were detected. Out of the 146 lesions for which a FDG PET was available, 63% showed both ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ and FDG uptake, 33.6% did not show FDG avidity and 3.4% showed only FDG uptake. The uptake intensity of the 92 lesions positive with ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ and FDG was similar with both radiopharmaceuticals, but the target-to-background (blood pool or muscle) ratios were significantly higher with ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ than with FDG (p < 0.0001). The ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake in joints, spine degenerative diseases and tendons was highly prevalent in our population. Up to one-third of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ foci showed no FDG uptake suggesting that ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ signal may not be related to inflammatory angiogenesis only.

  6. Dynamic FDG PET/CT imaging with diuresis demonstrates an enterovesical fistula in a lymphoma patient with repeated colon diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pan-Fu; Ting, Wen-Chien; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Kao, Yu-Lin; Chang, Pai-Jung; Lee, Jong-Kang

    2013-04-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with follicular B-cell lymphoma was referred for a FDG PET/CT scan due to severe left lower abdominal pain to rule out recurrent cancer. These FDG PET/CT images and previous FDG PET/CT images 5 months ago both revealed an air bubble in the urinary bladder on the CT images. He had a recurrent urinary tract infection history for 6 months. A list-mode dynamic data acquisition with diuresis intravenous injection revealed linear FDG activity extending from the upper-left portion of the bladder to a soft tissue mass in the lower-left pelvic region. An enterovesical fistula was confirmed by surgery.

  7. Non-Target Activity Detection by Post-Radioembolization Yttrium-90 PET/CT: Image Assessment Technique and Case Examples

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Yung Hsiang; Tan, Andrew E. H.; Lo, Richard H. G.; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Tan, Bien Soo; Chow, Pierce K. H.; Ng, David C. E.; Goh, Anthony S. W.

    2013-01-01

    High resolution yttrium-90 (90Y) imaging of post-radioembolization microsphere biodistribution may be achieved by conventional positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners that have time-of-flight capability. However, reconstructed 90Y PET/CT images have high background noise, making non-target activity detection technically challenging. This educational article describes our image assessment technique for non-target activity detection by 90Y PET/CT, which qualitatively overcomes the problem of background noise. We present selected case examples of non-target activity in untargeted liver, stomach, gallbladder, chest wall, and kidney, supported by angiography and 90Y bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography with integrated computed tomography (SPECT/CT) or technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPECT/CT. PMID:24551594

  8. Characterization of PET/CT images using texture analysis: the past, the present… any future?

    PubMed Central

    Tixier, Florent; Pierce, Larry; Kinahan, Paul E.; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    After seminal papers over the period 2009 – 2011, the use of texture analysis of PET/CT images for quantification of intratumour uptake heterogeneity has received increasing attention in the last 4 years. Results are difficult to compare due to the heterogeneity of studies and lack of standardization. There are also numerous challenges to address. In this review we provide critical insights into the recent development of texture analysis for quantifying the heterogeneity in PET/CT images, identify issues and challenges, and offer recommendations for the use of texture analysis in clinical research. Numerous potentially confounding issues have been identified, related to the complex workflow for the calculation of textural features, and the dependency of features on various factors such as acquisition, image reconstruction, preprocessing, functional volume segmentation, and methods of establishing and quantifying correspondences with genomic and clinical metrics of interest. A lack of understanding of what the features may represent in terms of the underlying pathophysiological processes and the variability of technical implementation practices makes comparing results in the literature challenging, if not impossible. Since progress as a field requires pooling results, there is an urgent need for standardization and recommendations/guidelines to enable the field to move forward. We provide a list of correct formulae for usual features and recommendations regarding implementation. Studies on larger cohorts with robust statistical analysis and machine learning approaches are promising directions to evaluate the potential of this approach. PMID:27271051

  9. Image reconstruction for PET/CT scanners: past achievements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shan; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    PET is a medical imaging modality with proven clinical value for disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The integration of PET and CT on modern scanners provides a synergy of the two imaging modalities. Through different mathematical algorithms, PET data can be reconstructed into the spatial distribution of the injected radiotracer. With dynamic imaging, kinetic parameters of specific biological processes can also be determined. Numerous efforts have been devoted to the development of PET image reconstruction methods over the last four decades, encompassing analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. This article provides an overview of the commonly used methods. Current challenges in PET image reconstruction include more accurate quantitation, TOF imaging, system modeling, motion correction and dynamic reconstruction. Advances in these aspects could enhance the use of PET/CT imaging in patient care and in clinical research studies of pathophysiology and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21339831

  10. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with 18F-DOPA PET and PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Grasso, Cristina; Schillaci, Orazio

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to give an overview of the potential clinical utility of [18F]-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET and PET/CT for imaging of brain tumors. Review articles and reference lists were used to supplement the search findings. 18F-DOPA has been investigated as a PET tracer for primary brain tumors, metastases of somatic cancer, and evaluation of relapse of pathology in patients with brain tumor after surgery and/or radiotherapy on the basis of enhanced cell proliferation. Available studies have provided encouraging preliminary results for diagnosis of brain tumors and relapse after surgery/radiotherapy. In the brain, excellent discrimination between tumor and normal tissue can be achieved because of the low physiological uptake of 18F-DOPA and the high ratio between tumor and normal hemispheric tissue. Information on evaluation of brain metastases is limited but encouraging. PET and PET/CT with 18F-DOPA are useful in diagnosing primary brain tumors and should be recommended in the diagnosis of relapse of disease after surgical treatment and/or radiotherapy. Semiquantitative analysis could improve diagnosis while correlative imaging with MRI is essential. Limits are due to low knowledge of potential pitfalls.

  11. Initial Characterization of a Dedicated Breast PET/CT Scanner During Human Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Spencer L.; Wu, Yibao; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Fu, Lin; Packard, Nathan J.; Burkett, George W.; Yang, Kai; Lindfors, Karen K.; Shelton, David K.; Hagge, Rosalie; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Martinez, Steve R.; Qi, Jinyi; Boone, John M.; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2010-01-01

    We have constructed a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner capable of high-resolution functional and anatomic imaging. Here, we present an initial characterization of scanner performance during patient imaging. Methods The system consisted of a lutetium oxyorthosilicate–based dual–planar head PET camera (crystal size, 3 × 3 × 20 mm) and 768-slice cone-beam CT. The position of the PET heads (separation and height) could be adjusted for varying breast dimensions. For scanning, the patient lay prone on a specialized bed and inserted a single pendent breast through an aperture in the table top. Compression of the breast as used in mammography is not required. PET and CT systems rotate in the coronal plane underneath the patient sequentially to collect fully tomographic datasets. PET images were reconstructed with the fully 3-dimensional maximum a posteriori method, and CT images were reconstructed with the Feldkamp algorithm, then spatially registered and fused for display. Phantom scans were obtained to assess the registration accuracy between PET and CT images and the influence of PET electronics and activity on CT image quality. We imaged 4 women with mammographic findings highly suggestive of breast cancer (breast imaging reporting and data system, category 5) in an ongoing clinical trial. Patients were injected with 18F-FDG and imaged for 12.5 min per breast. From patient data, noise-equivalent counting rates and the singles-to-trues ratio (a surrogate for the randoms fraction) were calculated. Results The average registration error between PET and CT images was 0.18 mm. PET electronics and activity did not significantly affect CT image quality. For the patient trial, biopsy-confirmed cancers were visualized on dedicated breast PET/CT on all patient scans, including the detection of ductal carcinoma in situ in 1 case. The singles-to-trues ratio was found to be inversely correlated with breast volume in the field of view, suggesting that larger breasts trend

  12. Registration of parametric dynamic F-18-FDG PET/CT breast images with parametric dynamic Gd-DTPA breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Krol, Andrzej; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Feiglin, David

    2009-02-01

    This study was undertaken to register 3D parametric breast images derived from Gd-DTPA MR and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. Nonlinear curve fitting (Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm) based on realistic two-compartment models was performed voxel-by-voxel separately for MR (Brix) and PET (Patlak). PET dynamic series consists of 50 frames of 1-minute duration. Each consecutive PET image was nonrigidly registered to the first frame using a finite element method and fiducial skin markers. The 12 post-contrast MR images were nonrigidly registered to the precontrast frame using a free-form deformation (FFD) method. Parametric MR images were registered to parametric PET images via CT using FFD because the first PET time frame was acquired immediately after the CT image on a PET/CT scanner and is considered registered to the CT image. We conclude that nonrigid registration of PET and MR parametric images using CT data acquired during PET/CT scan and the FFD method resulted in their improved spatial coregistration. The success of this procedure was limited due to relatively large target registration error, TRE = 15.1+/-7.7 mm, as compared to spatial resolution of PET (6-7 mm), and swirling image artifacts created in MR parametric images by the FFD. Further refinement of nonrigid registration of PET and MR parametric images is necessary to enhance visualization and integration of complex diagnostic information provided by both modalities that will lead to improved diagnostic performance.

  13. Dual-modality brain PET-CT image segmentation based on adaptive use of functional and anatomical information.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Dual medical imaging modalities, such as PET-CT, are now a routine component of clinical practice. Medical image segmentation methods, however, have generally only been applied to single modality images. In this paper, we propose the dual-modality image segmentation model to segment brain PET-CT images into gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. This model converts PET-CT image segmentation into an optimization process controlled simultaneously by PET and CT voxel values and spatial constraints. It is innovative in the creation and application of the modality discriminatory power (MDP) coefficient as a weighting scheme to adaptively combine the functional (PET) and anatomical (CT) information on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Our approach relies upon allowing the modality with higher discriminatory power to play a more important role in the segmentation process. We compared the proposed approach to three other image segmentation strategies, including PET-only based segmentation, combination of the results of independent PET image segmentation and CT image segmentation, and simultaneous segmentation of joint PET and CT images without an adaptive weighting scheme. Our results in 21 clinical studies showed that our approach provides the most accurate and reliable segmentation for brain PET-CT images.

  14. Adrenal tuberculosis masquerading as disseminated malignancy: A pitfall of (18)F-FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gorla, A K R; Gupta, K; Sood, A; Biswal, C K; Bhansali, A; Mittal, B R

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive characterization of adrenal lesions is a commonly encountered diagnostic challenge. Characteristic clinical and correlative imaging findings may assist in only arriving at a probable diagnosis. Currently, (18)F-FDG PET/CT is considered to provide the most comprehensive imaging information. We here present a case of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis that highlights the need for caution during the interpretation of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and also the need to suggest histopathological correlation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  15. A web-based image viewer for multiple PET-CT follow-up studies.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Daiki; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Constantinescu, Liviu; Wen, Lingfeng; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    There exist many viewers for single-modal medical images that are efficient and are equipped with powerful analysis tools. However, there is a distinct lack of efficient image viewers for multi-modality images, particularly for displaying multiple follow-up studies that depict a patient's response to treatment over time. Such viewers would be required to display large amounts of image data. In this study, we present the TAGIGEN viewer--a web-based image viewer designed specifically for the visualisation of multi-modality follow-up studies. We innovate by defining a series of dynamically generated image grid layouts that display sets of related images together in order to improve the ability to compare and assimilate the myriad images. We adopted a web-based client-server image streaming technology, thus enabling interactive navigation of the images in a computationally efficient manner. Furthermore, our web-based approach is interoperable and requires no software installation. We evaluated the ability of our viewer in displaying and understanding a patient's follow-up images in a case study with combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) follow-up scans. We conducted a usability survey on 10 participants to measure the usefulness of our viewer, used as an outpatient viewer e.g. viewer designed for use by the patients, in tracking a patient's disease state across four PET-CT studies. Our initial results suggest that our viewer was able to efficiently visualise the patient data over time, and that the web-based implementation was fast (loading on average within 5.6 seconds with real-time navigation) and easy to use (overall survey score higher than 4 / 5).

  16. Impact of FDG-PET/CT Imaging on Nodal Staging for Head-And-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Ryuji . E-mail: murakami@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Uozumi, Hideaki; Hirai, Toshinori; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Ota, Kazutoshi D.D.S.; Murakami, Daizo; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Oya, Natsuo; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging on nodal staging for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 23 patients with head-and-neck SCC who were evaluated with FDG-PET/CT and went on to neck dissection. Two observers consensually determined the lesion size and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and compared the results with pathologic findings on nodal-level involvement. Two different observers (A and B) independently performed three protocols for clinical nodal staging. Methods 1, 2, and 3 were based on conventional modalities, additional visual information from FDG-PET/CT images, and FDG-PET/CT imaging alone with SUV data, respectively. Results: All primary tumors were visualized with FDG-PET/CT. Pathologically, 19 positive and 93 negative nodal levels were identified. The SUV{sub max} overlapped in negative and positive nodes <15 mm in diameter. According to receiver operating characteristics analysis, the size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values were 1.9, 2.5, and 3.0 for lymph nodes <10 mm, 10-15 mm, and >15 mm, respectively. These cutoff values yielded 79% sensitivity and 99% specificity for nodal-level staging. For Observer A, the sensitivity and specificity in Methods 1, 2, and 3 were 68% and 94%, 68% and 99%, and 84% and 99%, respectively, and Method 3 yielded significantly higher accuracy than Method 1 (p = 0.0269). For Observer B, Method 3 yielded the highest sensitivity (84%) and specificity (99%); however, the difference among the three protocols was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Imaging with FDG-PET/CT with size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values is an important modality for radiation therapy planning.

  17. Medullary thyroid carcinoma - PET/CT imaging with 68Ga-labelled gastrin and somatostatin analogues.

    PubMed

    Kunikowska, Jolanta; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Pawlak, Dariusz; Ruchała, Marek; Kolasa, Anna; Janicka-Jedyńska, Małgorzata; Woźniak, Aldona; Mikołajczak, Renata; Królicki, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    a 75-year-old man with a 10-year history of nodular goitre was referred for clinical evaluation. The ultrasound scan revealed enlarged thyroid right lobe almost fully filled with a heterogeneous nodule with numerous calcifications. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy suggested medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Before the surgery the patient was referred to the nuclear medicine department and somatostatin receptor imaging (SRS; 68Ga-DOTATATE) with PET/CT was performed. The scan demonstrated an increased uptake within the right thyroid mass. Subsequent PET/CT with 68Ga-gastrin analogue (MG48) revealed the same indications as the SRS: an increased alveolar uptake in the right thyroid mass without the signs of lymph node metastases. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and central lymph nodes dissection. Histopathology examination confirmed the presence of MTC with vascular invasion, but without lymph node metastases (pT3NoMx according to the 7th edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual). Immunohistochemical staining revealed positive reaction to calcitonin and CD56, whereas the reaction to thyroglobulin remained negative. The Ki-67 was 1%. Staining for SSTR2 and CCK2 showed high cytoplasmic expression in both cases. Knowledge of the presence of CCK2 receptor in MTC patients may be an important indication for the choice of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The presence of both the receptor types, cholecystokinin-2/gastrin and somatostatin, is possibly an interesting combination as far as the therapeutic target is concerned.

  18. Impact of PET/CT image reconstruction methods and liver uptake normalization strategies on quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, Georg; Boellaard, Ronald; Sterzer, Sergej; Kahraman, Deniz; Scheffler, Matthias; Wolf, Jürgen; Dietlein, Markus; Drzezga, Alexander; Kobe, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    In oncological imaging using PET/CT, the standardized uptake value has become the most common parameter used to measure tracer accumulation. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate ultra high definition (UHD) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) PET/CT reconstructions for their potential impact on quantification. We analyzed 40 PET/CT scans of lung cancer patients who had undergone PET/CT. Standardized uptake values corrected for body weight (SUV) and lean body mass (SUL) were determined in the single hottest lesion in the lung and normalized to the liver for UHD and OSEM reconstruction. Quantitative uptake values and their normalized ratios for the two reconstruction settings were compared using the Wilcoxon test. The distribution of quantitative uptake values and their ratios in relation to the reconstruction method used were demonstrated in the form of frequency distribution curves, box-plots and scatter plots. The agreement between OSEM and UHD reconstructions was assessed through Bland-Altman analysis. A significant difference was observed after OSEM and UHD reconstruction for SUV and SUL data tested (p < 0.0005 in all cases). The mean values of the ratios after OSEM and UHD reconstruction showed equally significant differences (p < 0.0005 in all cases). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the SUV and SUL and their normalized values were, on average, up to 60 % higher after UHD reconstruction as compared to OSEM reconstruction. OSEM and HD reconstruction brought a significant difference for SUV and SUL, which remained constantly high after normalization to the liver, indicating that standardization of reconstruction and the use of comparable SUV measurements are crucial when using PET/CT.

  19. Simultaneous whole-body PET/MR imaging in comparison to PET/CT in pediatric oncology: initial results.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Jürgen F; Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Gückel, Brigitte; Bezrukov, Ilja; Pfannenberg, Christina A; Reimold, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin; Fuchs, Jörg; Claussen, Claus D; Schwenzer, Nina F

    2014-10-01

    To compare positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and PET/computed tomography (CT) for lesion detection and interpretation, quantification of fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, and accuracy of MR-based PET attenuation correction in pediatric patients with solid tumors. Materials and Methods This prospective study had local ethics committee and German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices approval. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients and legal guardians. Twenty whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR examinations were performed in 18 pediatric patients (median age, 14 years; range, 11-17 years). (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR data were acquired sequentially on the same day for all patients. PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified with volume of interest measurements in lesions and healthy tissues. MR-based PET attenuation correction was compared with CT-derived attenuation maps (µ-maps). Lesion detection was assessed with separate reading of PET/CT and PET/MR data. Estimates of radiation dose were derived from the applied doses of (18)F-FDG and CT protocol parameters. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed to report correlation coefficients and relative deviations for comparison of SUVs, rates of lesion detection, and percentage reductions in radiation dose. PET SUVs showed strong correlations between PET of PET/CT (PETCT) and PET of PET/MR (PETMR) (r > 0.85 for most tissues). Apart from drawbacks of MR-based PET attenuation correction in osseous structures and lungs, similar SUVs were found on PET images corrected with CT-based µ-maps (13.1% deviation of SUVs for bone marrow and <5% deviation for other tissues). Lesion detection rate with PET/MR imaging was equivalent to that with PET/CT (61 areas of focal uptake on PETMR images vs 62 areas on PETCT images). Advantages of PET/MR were observed especially in soft-tissue regions. Furthermore, PET

  20. In vivo verification of proton beam path by using post-treatment PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Vargas, Carlos; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to establish the in vivo verification of proton beam path by using proton-activated positron emission distributions. Methods: A total of 50 PET/CT imaging studies were performed on ten prostate cancer patients immediately after daily proton therapy treatment through a single lateral portal. The PET/CT and planning CT were registered by matching the pelvic bones, and the beam path of delivered protons was defined in vivo by the positron emission distribution seen only within the pelvic bones, referred to as the PET-defined beam path. Because of the patient position correction at each fraction, the marker-defined beam path, determined by the centroid of implanted markers seen in the post-treatment (post-Tx) CT, is used for the planned beam path. The angular variation and discordance between the PET- and marker-defined paths were derived to investigate the intrafraction prostate motion. For studies with large discordance, the relative location between the centroid and pelvic bones seen in the post-Tx CT was examined. The PET/CT studies are categorized for distinguishing the prostate motion that occurred before or after beam delivery. The post-PET CT was acquired after PET imaging to investigate prostate motion due to physiological changes during the extended PET acquisition. Results: The less than 2 deg. of angular variation indicates that the patient roll was minimal within the immobilization device. Thirty of the 50 studies with small discordance, referred as good cases, show a consistent alignment between the field edges and the positron emission distributions from the entrance to the distal edge. For those good cases, average displacements are 0.6 and 1.3 mm along the anterior-posterior (D{sub AP}) and superior-inferior (D{sub SI}) directions, respectively, with 1.6 mm standard deviations in both directions. For the remaining 20 studies demonstrating a large discordance (more than 6 mm in either D{sub AP} or D{sub SI}), 13

  1. Functional imaging in differentiating bronchial masses: an initial experience with a combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Jindal, Tarun; Dutta, Roman; Kumar, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the role of combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in differentiating bronchial tumors observed in contrast enhanced computed tomography scan of chest. Prospective observational study. Place of study: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. 7 patients with bronchial mass detected in computed tomography scan of the chest were included in this study. All patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan, (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan and fiberoptic bronchoscope guided biopsy followed by definitive surgical excision. The results of functional imaging studies were analyzed and the results are correlated with the final histopathology of the tumor. Histopathological examination of 7 bronchial masses revealed carcinoid tumors (2 typical, 1 atypical), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (1), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (1), hamartoma (1), and synovial cell sarcoma (1). The typical carcinoids had mild (18)F-FDG uptake and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Atypical carcinoid had moderate uptake of (18)F-FDG and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor showed high uptake of (18)F-FDG and no uptake of (68)Ga DOTA-TOC. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma showed mild (18)F-FDG uptake and no (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Hamartoma showed no uptake on either scans. Synovial cell sarcoma showed moderate (18)F-FDG uptake and mild focal (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. This initial experience with the combined use of (18)F-FDG and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan reveals different uptake patterns in various bronchial tumors. Bronchoscopic biopsy will continue to be the gold standard; however, the interesting observations made in this study merits further evaluation of the utility of the combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in larger number of patients with bronchial masses.

  2. Mirror-image lymph node in FDG PET/CT and SPECT/CT for sentinel node detection.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Beatriz; Paredes, Pilar; Rubí, Sebastià; Pahisa, Jaume; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Pons, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of a patient with presumed stage IB1 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix in which FDG PET/CT scan revealed 1 hypermetabolic left iliac node suggestive to be malignant. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT studies previous to sentinel node (SLN) biopsy revealed unilateral drainage in the right pelvis. Intraoperative pathological assessment of the SLN showed no tumoral involvement, and the hypermetabolic node revealed macrometastasis. Tumor node invasion can lead to a lymphatic blockage and become false-negative for SLN technique. Although FDG PET/CT has lower sensitivity than surgical staging, this case shows its value as a preoperative imaging technique.

  3. Concurrent Diffuse Pyelonephritis and Prostatitis: Discordant Findings on Sequential FDG PET/CT and 67Ga SPECT/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lucaj, Robert; Achong, Dwight M

    2017-01-01

    A 45-year-old man underwent FDG PET/CT for initial imaging evaluation of recurrent Escherichia coli urinary tract infections, which demonstrated no significant FDG uptake in either kidney and subtle FDG uptake in the right prostate lobe. Subsequent Ga SPECT/CT demonstrated abnormal intense gallium uptake throughout the right kidney and entire prostate gland, clearly discordant with PET/CT findings and consistent with unexpected concurrent pyelonephritis and prostatitis. Although FDG has effectively replaced Ga in everyday clinical practice, the current case serves as a reminder that there is still a role for Ga in the evaluation of genitourinary infections.

  4. FDG PET/CT images demonstrating Fournier gangrene with bilateral pelvic muscle extension in a patient with recurrent rectosigmoid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Tien; Kao, Pan-Fu; Huang, Chi-Chou; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Lee, Jong-Kang

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old male patient with Parkinsonism was referred for an F-FDG PET/CT scan for suspicious recurrence of rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma. The FDG PET/CT scan revealed increased FDG uptakes in the lower pelvic region around the wall of the rectal stump, with extension to the bilateral pelvic sidewalls and the right gluteous minimus muscle. In addition, multiple small air bubbles were noted in the lesions on the attenuation CT images. Fournier gangrene was diagnosed. After treatment with intravenous antibiotics and debridement with sigmoidoscopic irrigation, the patient was discharged and remained uneventful during clinical follow-up for 50 days.

  5. Advances in image-guided radiation therapy-the role of PET-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Heron, Dwight E. . E-mail: heronD2@upmc.edu; Smith, Ryan P.; Andrade, Regiane S.

    2006-04-01

    In the era of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), the greatest challenge remains target delineation, as the opportunity to maximize cures while simultaneously decreasing radiation dose to the surrounding normal tissues is to be realized. Over the last 2 decades, technological advances in radiographic imaging, biochemistry, and molecular biology have played an increasing role in radiation treatment planning, delivery, and evaluation of response. Previously, fluoroscopy formed the basis of radiation treatment planning. Beginning in the late 1980s, computed tomography (CT) has become the basis for modern radiation treatment planning and delivery, coincident with the rise of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Additionally, multi-modality anatomic imaging registration was the solution pursued to augment delineation of tumors and surrounding structures on CT-based treatment planning. Although these imaging modalities provide the customary anatomic details necessary for radiation treatment planning, they have limitations, including difficulty with identification of small tumor deposits, tumor extension, and distinction from scar tissues. To overcome these limitations, PET and, more recently, PET-CT have been innovative regarding the extent of disease appraisal, target delineation in the treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response. We review the role of functional imaging in IGRT as it reassures transformations on the field of radiation oncology. As we move toward the era of IGRT, the use of multi-modality imaging fusion, and the introduction of more sensitive and specific PET-CT tracers may further assist target definition. Furthermore, the potential to predict early outcome or even detect early recurrence of tumor, may allow for the tailoring of intervention in cancer patients. The convergence of a biological target volume, and perhaps multi-tracer tumor, molecular, and genetic profile tumors will probably be vital in cancer treatment

  6. Automated detection of lung tumors in PET/CT images using active contour filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Adachi, Hayato; Tsujimoto, Masakazu; Fujita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo; Nishio, Masami; Kobayashi, Toshiki

    2015-03-01

    In a previous study, we developed a hybrid tumor detection method that used both computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. However, similar to existing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes, it was difficult to detect low-contrast lesions that touch to the normal organs such as the chest wall or blood vessels in the lung. In the current study, we proposed a novel lung tumor detection method that uses active contour filters to detect the nodules deemed "difficult" in previous CAD schemes. The proposed scheme detects lung tumors using both CT and PET images. As for the detection in CT images, the massive region was first enhanced using an active contour filter (ACF), which is a type of contrast enhancement filter that has a deformable kernel shape. The kernel shape involves closed curves that are connected by several nodes that move iteratively in order to enclose the massive region. The final output of ACF is the difference between the maximum pixel value on the deformable kernel, and pixel value on the center of the filter kernel. Subsequently, the PET images were binarized to detect the regions of increased uptake. The results were integrated, followed by the false positive reduction using 21 characteristic features and three support vector machines. In the experiment, we evaluated the proposed method using 100 PET/CT images. More than half of nodules missed using previous methods were accurately detected. The results indicate that our method may be useful for the detection of lung tumors using PET/CT images.

  7. Optimization of oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging based on a multiparameter analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, Vinicius O.; D’Errico, Francesco; Namías, Mauro; Larocca, Ticiana F.; Soares, Milena B. P.

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a method to achieve consistent clinical image quality in {sup 18}F-FDG scans accounting for patient habitus, dose regimen, image acquisition, and processing techniques. Methods: Oncological PET/CT scan data for 58 subjects were evaluated retrospectively to derive analytical curves that predict image quality. Patient noise equivalent count rate and coefficient of variation (CV) were used as metrics in their analysis. Optimized acquisition protocols were identified and prospectively applied to 179 subjects. Results: The adoption of different schemes for three body mass ranges (<60 kg, 60–90 kg, >90 kg) allows improved image quality with both point spread function and ordered-subsets expectation maximization-3D reconstruction methods. The application of this methodology showed that CV improved significantly (p < 0.0001) in clinical practice. Conclusions: Consistent oncological PET/CT image quality on a high-performance scanner was achieved from an analysis of the relations existing between dose regimen, patient habitus, acquisition, and processing techniques. The proposed methodology may be used by PET/CT centers to develop protocols to standardize PET/CT imaging procedures and achieve better patient management and cost-effective operations.

  8. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT: Joint EANM and SNMMI procedure guideline for prostate cancer imaging: version 1.0.

    PubMed

    Fendler, Wolfgang P; Eiber, Matthias; Beheshti, Mohsen; Bomanji, Jamshed; Ceci, Francesco; Cho, Steven; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hope, Thomas A; Kopka, Klaus; Krause, Bernd J; Mottaghy, Felix M; Schöder, Heiko; Sunderland, John; Wan, Simon; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Fanti, Stefano; Herrmann, Ken

    2017-03-10

    The aim of this guideline is to provide standards for the recommendation, performance, interpretation and reporting of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer imaging. These recommendations will help to improve accuracy, precision, and repeatability of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer essentially needed for implementation of this modality in science and routine clinical practice.

  9. A software tool for stitching two PET/CT body segments into a single whole-body image set.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tingting; Chang, Guoping; Clark, John W; Rohren, Eric M; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2012-05-10

    A whole-body PET/CT scan extending from the vertex of the head to the toes of the patient is not feasible on a number of commercially available PET/CT scanners due to a limitation in the extent of bed travel on these systems. In such cases, the PET scan has to be divided into two parts: one covering the upper body segment, while the other covering the lower body segment. The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate, using phantom and patient studies, a software tool that was developed to stitch two body segments and output a single whole-body image set, thereby facilitating the interpretation of whole-body PET scans. A mathematical model was first developed to stitch images from two body segments using three landmarks. The model calculates the relative positions of the landmarks on the two segments and then generates a rigid transformation that aligns these landmarks on the two segments. A software tool was written to implement this model while correcting for radioactive decay between the two body segments, and output a single DICOM whole-body image set with all the necessary tags. One phantom, and six patient studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the software. In these studies, six radio-opaque markers (BBs) were used as landmarks (three on each leg). All studies were acquired in two body segments with BBs placed in the overlap region of the two segments. The PET/CT images of each segment were then stitched using the software tool to create a single DICOM whole-body PET/CT image. Evaluation of the stitching tool was based on visual inspection, consistency of radiotracer uptake in the two segments, and ability to display the resultant DICOM image set on two independent workstations. The software tool successfully stitched the two segments of the phantom image, and generated a single whole-body DICOM PET/CT image set that had the correct alignment and activity concentration throughout the image. The stitched images were viewed by two independent

  10. Normal distribution pattern and physiological variants of 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Emre; Sahin, Onur Erdem; Ocak, Meltem; Akovali, Burak; Nematyazar, Jamal; Kabasakal, Levent

    2016-11-01

    Ga-PSMA-11 is a novel PET tracer suggested to be used for imaging of advanced prostate cancer. In this study, we aimed to present a detailed biodistribution of Ga-PSMA-11, including physiological and benign variants of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) imaging. We carried out a retrospective analysis of 40 patients who underwent PSMA PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging and who had no evidence of residual or metastatic disease on the scans. In addition, 16 patients who underwent PSMA PET/CT imaging with any indication other than prostate cancer were included in the study to evaluate physiological uptake in the normal prostate gland. The median, minimum-maximum, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) values were calculated for visceral organs, bone marrow and lymph nodes, and mucosal areas. Any physiological variants or benign lesions with Ga-PSMA-11 were also noted. Ga-PSMA-11 uptake was noted in the kidneys, parotid and submandibular glands, duodenum, small intestines, spleen, liver, and lacrimal glands, and mucosal uptake in the nasopharynx, vocal cords, pancreas, stomach, mediastinal blood pool, thyroid gland, adrenal gland, rectum, vertebral bone marrow, and testes. Celiac ganglia showed slight Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in 24 of 40 patients without the presence of any other pathologic lymph nodes in abdominal and pelvic areas. Variable uptake of Ga-PSMA-11 was observed in calcified choroid plexus, a thyroid nodule, an adrenal nodule, axillary lymph nodes and celiac ganglia, occasional osteophytes, and gallbladder. The patient group with PSMA PET/CT for indications other than prostate cancer (n=16) showed a slight radiotracer uptake in normal prostate gland (SUVmax: 5.5±1.6, range: 3.5-8.3). This study shows normal distribution pattern, range of SUVs, and physiological variants of Ga-PSMA-11. In addition, several potential pitfalls were documented to prevent misinterpretations of the scan.

  11. Prostate cancer: sextant localization with MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, and 11C-choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Testa, Claudia; Schiavina, Riccardo; Lodi, Raffaele; Salizzoni, Eugenio; Corti, Barbara; Farsad, Mohsen; Kurhanewicz, John; Manferrari, Fabio; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Tonon, Caterina; Monetti, Nino; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano; Coe, Manuela; Grigioni, Walter F; Martorana, Giuseppe; Canini, Romeo; Barbiroli, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    To retrospectively compare sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, three-dimensional (3D) MR spectroscopy, combined MR imaging and 3D MR spectroscopy, and carbon 11 (11C)-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for intraprostatic tumor sextant localization, with histologic findings as reference standard. The local ethics committee on human research provided approval and a waiver of informed consent for the retrospective study. MR imaging, 3D MR spectroscopy, and 11C-choline PET/CT results were retrospectively reviewed in 26 men with biopsy-proved prostate cancer (mean age, 64 years; range, 51-75 years) who underwent radical prostatectomy. Cancer was identified as areas of nodular low signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images. At 3D MR spectroscopy, choline-plus-creatine-to-citrate and choline-to-creatine ratios were used to distinguish healthy from malignant voxels. At PET/CT, focal uptake was visually assessed, and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were recorded. Agreement between 3D MR spectroscopic and PET/CT results was calculated, and ability of maximum SUV to help localize cancer was assessed with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Significant differences between positive and negative sextants with respect to mean maximum SUV were calculated with a paired t test. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were, respectively, 55%, 86%, and 67% at PET/CT; 54%, 75%, and 61% at MR imaging; and 81%, 67%, and 76% at 3D MR spectroscopy. The highest sensitivity was obtained when either 3D MR spectroscopic or MR imaging results were positive (88%) at the expense of specificity (53%), while the highest specificity was obtained when results with both techniques were positive (90%) at the expense of sensitivity (48%). Concordance between 3D MR spectroscopic and PET/CT findings was slight (kappa=0.139). In localizing cancer within the prostate, comparable specificity was obtained with either 3D MR

  12. Diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer with PET/CT imaging using the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist (68)Ga-RM2: Preliminary results in patients with negative or inconclusive [(18)F]Fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Gesche; Popp, Ilinca; Christian Rischke, H; Drendel, Vanessa; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Bartholomä, Mark; Weber, Wolfgang A; Mansi, Rosalba; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Meyer, Philipp T; Jilg, Cordula Annette

    2017-08-01

    [(18)F]fluoroethylcholine ((18)FECH) has been shown to be a valuable PET-tracer in recurrent prostate cancer (PCa), but still has limited accuracy. RM2 is a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) antagonist that binds to GRPr on PCa cells. Recent studies suggest that GRPr imaging with PET/CT is a promising technique for staging and restaging of PCa. We explore the value of GRPr-PET using the (68)Ga-labeled GRPr antagonist RM2 in a selected population of patients with biochemically recurrent PCa and a negative/inconclusive (18)FECH-PET/CT. In this retrospective study 16 men with biochemical PCa relapse and negative (n = 14) or inconclusive (n = 2) (18)FECH-PET/CT underwent whole-body (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT. Mean time from (18)FECH-PET/CT to (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT was 6.1 ± 6.8 months. Primary therapies in these patients were radical prostatectomy (n = 13; 81.3%) or radiotherapy (n = 3; 18.7%). 14/16 patients (87.5%) had already undergone salvage therapies because of biochemical relapse prior to (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT imaging. Mean ± SD PSA at (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT was 19.4 ± 53.5 ng/ml (range 1.06-226.4 ng/ml). (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT showed at least one region with focal pathological uptake in 10/16 patients (62.5%), being suggestive of local relapse (n = 4), lymph node metastases (LNM; n = 4), bone metastases (n = 1) and lung metastasis with hilar LNM (n = 1). Seven of ten positive (68)Ga-RM2 scans were positively confirmed by surgical resection and histology of the lesions (n = 2), by response to site-directed therapies (n = 2) or by further imaging (n = 3). Patients with a positive (68)Ga-RM2-scan showed a significantly higher median PSA (6.8 ng/ml, IQR 10.2 ng/ml) value than those with a negative scan (1.5 ng/ml, IQR 3.1 ng/ml; p = 0.016). Gleason scores or concomitant antihormonal therapy had no apparent impact on the detection of recurrent disease. Even in this highly selected population of patients with known biochemical recurrence but

  13. Clinical significance of creative 3D-image fusion across multimodalities [PET+CT+MR] based on characteristic coregistration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Matthew Jian-qiao; Ju, Xiangyang; Khambay, Balvinder S; Ayoub, Ashraf F; Chen, Chin-Tu; Bai, Bo

    2012-03-01

    To investigate a registration approach for 2-dimension (2D) based on characteristic localization to achieve 3-dimension (3D) fusion from images of PET, CT and MR one by one. A cubic oriented scheme of"9-point & 3-plane" for co-registration design was verified to be geometrically practical. After acquisiting DICOM data of PET/CT/MR (directed by radiotracer 18F-FDG etc.), through 3D reconstruction and virtual dissection, human internal feature points were sorted to combine with preselected external feature points for matching process. By following the procedure of feature extraction and image mapping, "picking points to form planes" and "picking planes for segmentation" were executed. Eventually, image fusion was implemented at real-time workstation mimics based on auto-fuse techniques so called "information exchange" and "signal overlay". The 2D and 3D images fused across modalities of [CT+MR], [PET+MR], [PET+CT] and [PET+CT+MR] were tested on data of patients suffered from tumors. Complementary 2D/3D images simultaneously presenting metabolic activities and anatomic structures were created with detectable-rate of 70%, 56%, 54% (or 98%) and 44% with no significant difference for each in statistics. Currently, based on the condition that there is no complete hybrid detector integrated of triple-module [PET+CT+MR] internationally, this sort of multiple modality fusion is doubtlessly an essential complement for the existing function of single modality imaging. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging chemokine receptor CXCR4 in chronic infection of the bone with (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT - first insights.

    PubMed

    Bouter, Caroline; Meller, Birgit; Sahlmann, Carsten Oliver; Staab, Wieland; Wester, Hans Jürgen; Kropf, Saskia; Meller, Johannes

    2017-07-20

    Due to its role in infection and inflammatory processes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 might be a potent target in imaging of infectious and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether the CXCR4 ligand (68)Ga-Pentixafor is suitable for imaging chronic infection of the bone. Methods: The study comprises 14 patients with suspected infection of the skeleton that underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor-(68)Ga-Pentixafor-Positron emission tomography/computed tomography(PET/CT) between 04/2015 and 02/2017 in our facility. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were retrospectively evaluated against a histological, bacteriological and clinical standard. Results were also compared to available bone scintigraphy, white blood cell scintigraphy and (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. Results:(68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was positive in 9/14 patients. Diagnoses included osteitis/osteomyelitis of peripheral bone, osteomyelitis of the maxilla and infected endoprostheses. Target-background ratios were 5,1 to 15 (mean 8,7). 8/9 cases were true positive confirmed by pathology, bacteriology or clinical observation. All negative cases were confirmed true negative by other imaging modalities and follow up. Conclusion: Imaging of CXCR4 expression with (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT appears suitable for diagnosing chronic infection of the skeleton. Findings of this study reveal a possible diagnostic gain in suspected chronic infections that are difficult to diagnose by other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. Real-time volume rendering visualization of dual-modality PET/CT images with interactive fuzzy thresholding segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinman; Cai, Weidong; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, Dagan

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization has become an essential part for imaging applications, including image-guided surgery, radiotherapy planning, and computer-aided diagnosis. In the visualization of dual-modality positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT), 3-D volume rendering is often limited to rendering of a single image volume and by high computational demand. Furthermore, incorporation of segmentation in volume rendering is usually restricted to visualizing the presegmented volumes of interest. In this paper, we investigated the integration of interactive segmentation into real-time volume rendering of dual-modality PET/CT images. We present and validate a fuzzy thresholding segmentation technique based on fuzzy cluster analysis, which allows interactive and real-time optimization of the segmentation results. This technique is then incorporated into a real-time multi-volume rendering of PET/CT images. Our method allows a real-time fusion and interchangeability of segmentation volume with PET or CT volumes, as well as the usual fusion of PET/CT volumes. Volume manipulations such as window level adjustments and lookup table can be applied to individual volumes, which are then fused together in real time as adjustments are made. We demonstrate the benefit of our method in integrating segmentation with volume rendering in its application to PET/CT images. Responsive frame rates are achieved by utilizing a texture-based volume rendering algorithm and the rapid transfer capability of the high-memory bandwidth available in low-cost graphic hardware.

  16. Multiple myeloma: 18F-FDG-PET/CT and diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mihailovic, Jasna; Goldsmith, Stanley J

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a relatively rare hematologic disorder characterized by proliferation of plasma cells, primarily involving the bone marrow. Extramedullary involvement also occurs with poor prognosis. Asymptomatic plasma cell disorders, monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance, and smoldering MM, which do not require therapy, should be distinguished from symptomatic MM, which requires treatment. MM may present with CRAB, elevated Calcium levels, Renal insufficiency, Anemia, and Bone lesions (including lytic lesions and osteopenia), as well as elevated levels of serum M protein or urine M protein or both. Nonsecretory myeloma in which serum and urine M proteins are absent occurs rarely, accounting for 1%-5% of patients with myeloma, but low levels of abnormal immunoglobulins are often present. Staging of patients with MM is done according to the Durie and Salmon criteria based on laboratory testing (determination of hemoglobin, serum calcium, and serum and urine M proteins) and conventional radiography. A variety of diagnostic imaging procedures have been employed to assess the extent of disease in MM and to evaluate the response to treatment as well as provide surveillance for the detection of recurrent disease. These include whole-body x-ray, which despite its limitations is regularly used to detect lytic bone lesions; CT radiography; MRI; and a variety of radionuclide imaging procedures, with (18)F-FDG-PET/CT emerging as the radionuclide procedure of choice. Recently, the Durie-Salmon criteria have been upgrade to the Durie-Salmon PLUS system, which includes (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI of the spine and pelvis.

  17. Summary of the UPICT Protocol for 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Oncology Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael M; Wahl, Richard L; Hoffman, John M; Yap, Jeffrey T; Sunderland, John J; Boellaard, Ronald; Perlman, Eric S; Kinahan, Paul E; Christian, Paul E; Hoekstra, Otto S; Dorfman, Gary S

    2015-06-01

    The Uniform Protocols for Imaging in Clinical Trials (UPICT) (18)F-FDG PET/CT protocol is intended to guide the performance of whole-body FDG PET/CT studies within the context of single- and multiple-center clinical trials of oncologic therapies by providing acceptable (minimum), target, and ideal standards for all phases of imaging. The aim is to minimize variability in intra- and intersubject, intra- and interplatform, interexamination, and interinstitutional primary or derived data. The goal of this condensed version of the much larger document is to make readers aware of the general content and subject area. The document has several main subjects: context of the imaging protocol within the clinical trial; site selection, qualification, and training; subject scheduling; subject preparation; imaging-related substance preparation and administration; imaging procedure; image postprocessing; image analysis; image interpretation; archiving and distribution of data; quality control; and imaging-associated risks and risk management.

  18. Summary of the UPICT Protocol for 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Hoffman, John M.; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Sunderland, John J.; Boellaard, Ronald; Perlman, Eric S.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Christian, Paul E.; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Dorfman, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The Uniform Protocols for Imaging in Clinical Trials (UPICT) 18F-FDG PET/CT protocol is intended to guide the performance of whole-body FDG PET/CT studies within the context of single- and multiple-center clinical trials of oncologic therapies by providing acceptable (minimum), target, and ideal standards for all phases of imaging. The aim is to minimize variability in intra- and intersubject, intra- and inter-platform, interexamination, and interinstitutional primary or derived data. The goal of this condensed version of the much larger document is to make readers aware of the general content and subject area. The document has several main subjects: context of the imaging protocol within the clinical trial; site selection, qualification, and training; subject scheduling; subject preparation; imaging-related substance preparation and administration; imaging procedure; image postprocessing; image analysis; image interpretation; archiving and distribution of data; quality control; and imaging-associated risks and risk management. PMID:25883122

  19. Sinonasal oncocytic Schneiderian papilloma accompanied by intravascular lymphoma: A case report on FDG-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Masamichi; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Hiroko; Takeuchi, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is useful for the staging and assessment of treatment response in patients with lymphoma. Occasionally, benign lesions demonstrate avid FDG uptake and result in false positive findings. We report the case of an 82-year-old man presenting with cutaneous lesions, which were histopathologically diagnosed as intravascular lymphoma. FDG-PET/CT for staging demonstrated an FDG-avid mass extending from the right maxillary sinus to the nasal cavity, moderate uptake in the adrenal glands, mild uptake in the knee and the foot, and faint uptake in the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the legs. He subsequently underwent biopsy of the paranasal mass, which was diagnosed as oncocytic Schneiderian papilloma without lymphoma invasion. Glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 staining was highly positive in the papilloma cells, resulting in high FDG avidity. After completion of chemotherapy, the abnormal FDG uptakes in the skin, soft tissue, and adrenal glands disappeared on PET/CT. However, avid FDG uptake persisted in the sinonasal Schneiderian papilloma for 15 months before regression. Benign tumors with oncocytic components may show avid FDG uptake. Therefore, correct diagnosis of oncocytic Schneiderian papilloma on FDG images is difficult when other accompanying malignant tumors, especially lymphoma, are present. If post-therapeutic PET/CT images show a discordant lesion, oncocytic tumors, albeit uncommon, should be considered in the differential diagnoses.

  20. Intraobserver and Interobserver Variability in GTV Delineation on FDG-PET-CT Images of Head and Neck Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, Stephen L. |. E-mail: Stephen.Breen@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Publicover, Julia; De Silva, Shiroma; Pond, Greg; Brock, Kristy |; O'Sullivan, Brian |; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Waldron, John |; Keller, Anne |; Yu, Eugene; Hendler, Aaron |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if the addition of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data changes primary site gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT), contrast-enhanced CT, and FDG-PET-CT scans were obtained in 10 patients with head and neck cancers. Eight experienced observers (6 head and neck oncologists and 2 neuro-radiologists) with access to clinical and radiologic reports outlined primary site GTVs on each modality. Three cases were recontoured twice to assess intraobserver variability. The magnitudes of the GTVs were compared. Intra- and interobserver variability was assessed by a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Inter- and intraobserver reliability were calculated. Results: There were no significant differences in the GTVs across the image modalities when compared as ensemble averages; the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test showed that CT volumes were larger than PET-CT. Observers demonstrated the greatest consistency and were most interchangeable on contrast-enhanced CT; they performed less reliably on PET-CT. Conclusions: The addition of PET-CT to primary site GTV delineation of head and neck cancers does not change the volume of the GTV defined by this group of expert observers in this patient sample. An FDG-PET may demonstrate differences in neck node delineation and in other disease sites.

  1. Automated liver segmentation for whole-body low-contrast CT images from PET-CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuying; Li, Changyang; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-01-01

    Accurate objective automated liver segmentation in PET-CT studies is important to improve the identification and localization of hepatic tumor. However, this segmentation is an extremely challenging task from the low-contrast CT images captured from PET-CT scanners because of the intensity similarity between liver and adjacent loops of bowel, stomach and muscle. In this paper, we propose a novel automated three-stage liver segmentation technique for PET-CT whole body studies, where: 1) the starting liver slice is automatically localized based on the liver - lung relations; 2) the "masking" slice containing the biggest liver section is localized using the ratio of liver ROI size to the right half of abdomen ROI size; 3) the liver segmented from the "masking" slice forms the initial estimation or mask for the automated liver segmentation. Our experimental results from clinical PET-CT studies show that this method can automatically segment the liver for a range of different patients, with consistent objective selection criteria and reproducible accurate results.

  2. The additional diagnostic value of contemporary evaluation of FDG PET/CT scan and contrast enhanced CT imaging both acquired by a last generation PET/CT system in oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Cristina; Zompatori, Maurizio; Ambrosini, Valentina; Montesi, Valeria; Mezzetti, Simona; Ferretti, Alice; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Rubello, Domenico; Fanti, Stefano

    2013-03-01

    Last generation PET tomographs are equipped with a state-of-the-art CT scanner. Normally, CT images are acquired with suboptimal parameters and without intravenous contrast media, being used for attenuation correction and localization only. For this reason, no CT report is usually provided. Most of the patients who are referred for an FDG PET/CT scan, however, present with a diagnostic CT indicating that a PET/CT is required to characterize otherwise equivocal findings and, in the end, undergo both the techniques to reach a final diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the contemporary execution of both the techniques employing a PET/CT scanner on the conclusiveness of the final report. Secondary aim was to verify the concordance of the two reports. Thirty-eight patients affected by hypermetabolic malignant diseases (15F-23M, mean age 58±17 years) were enrolled. Twenty-two were in staging, 16 in restaging. They underwent a standard FDG PET/CT scan immediately followed by a diagnostic contrast enhanced (ce)CT scan acquired on the same tomograph. The PET/CT scan was reported by a nuclear medicine physician while the ceCT by a radiologist, independently. Then, they wrote a conclusive paragraph formulated by consensus. The results were compared in terms of stage (FDG PET/CT vs. ceCT and vs. final stage by consensus) and positivity of T, N and M by the inter-rater agreement K. In all the patients, a final, conclusive and agreed stage was reached. There was a high concordance in terms of stage between FDG PET/CT and ceCT (K=0.874), ceCT and final stage (K=0.936), FDG PET/CT and final stage (K=0.938). In two cases, ceCT contributed significantly to the final stage, while PET/CT in four patients. More in details, for the detection of T, there was a complete concordance between PET/CT and ceCT, despite PET/CT wasn't able to provide an accurate evaluation of nearby structures infiltration. K was 0.785 for the assessing of N and 0.718 for M. In general

  3. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  4. 64Cu-Labeled LyP-1-Dendrimer for PET-CT Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to detect and quantify macrophage accumulation can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information for atherosclerotic plaque. We have previously shown that LyP-1, a cyclic 9-amino acid peptide, binds to p32 proteins on activated macrophages, facilitating the visualization of atherosclerotic plaque with PET. Yet, the in vivo plaque accumulation of monomeric [18F]FBA-LyP-1 was low (0.31 ± 0.05%ID/g). To increase the avidity of LyP-1 constructs to p32, we synthesized a dendritic form of LyP-1 on solid phase using lysine as the core structural element. Imaging probes (FAM or 6-BAT) were conjugated to a lysine or cysteine on the dendrimer for optical and PET studies. The N-terminus of the dendrimer was further modified with an aminooxy group in order to conjugate LyP-1 and ARAL peptides bearing a ketone. Oxime ligation of peptides to both dendrimers resulted in (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimers with optical (FAM) and PET probes (6-BAT). For PET-CT studies, (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimer-6-BAT were labeled with 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 h) and intravenously injected into the atherosclerotic (ApoE–/–) mice. After two hours of circulation, PET-CT coregistered images demonstrated greater uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu in the aortic root and descending aorta. Ex vivo images and the biodistribution acquired at three hours after injection also demonstrated a significantly higher uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu (1.1 ± 0.26%ID/g) than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu (0.22 ± 0.05%ID/g) in the aorta. Similarly, subcutaneous injection of the LyP-1-dendrimeric carriers resulted in preferential accumulation in plaque-containing regions over 24 h. In the same model system, ex vivo fluorescence images within aortic plaque depict an increased accumulation and penetration of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-FAM as compared to the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-FAM. Taken together, the results suggest that the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer can be applied for in

  5. Improved correction for the tissue fraction effect in lung PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Millner, Lynn; Hutton, Brian F.; Maher, Toby M.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in imaging different pulmonary disorders using PET techniques. Previous work has shown, for static PET/CT, that air content in the lung influences reconstructed image values and that it is vital to correct for this ‘tissue fraction effect’ (TFE). In this paper, we extend this work to include the blood component and also investigate the TFE in dynamic imaging. CT imaging and PET kinetic modelling are used to determine fractional air and blood voxel volumes in six patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. These values are used to illustrate best and worst case scenarios when interpreting images without correcting for the TFE. In addition, the fractional volumes were used to determine correction factors for the SUV and the kinetic parameters. These were then applied to the patient images. The kinetic parameters K1 and Ki along with the static parameter SUV were all found to be affected by the TFE with both air and blood providing a significant contribution to the errors. Without corrections, errors range from 34-80% in the best case and 29-96% in the worst case. In the patient data, without correcting for the TFE, regions of high density (fibrosis) appeared to have a higher uptake than lower density (normal appearing tissue), however this was reversed after air and blood correction. The proposed correction methods are vital for quantitative and relative accuracy. Without these corrections, images may be misinterpreted.

  6. Automatic Lung Tumor Segmentation on PET/CT Images Using Fuzzy Markov Random Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum. PMID:24987451

  7. Automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images using fuzzy Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  8. Optimizing imaging protocols for overweight and obese patients: a lutetium orthosilicate PET/CT study.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Benjamin S; Dahlbom, Magnus; Auerbach, Martin A; Schiepers, Christiaan; Fueger, Barbara J; Weber, Wolfgang A; Silverman, Daniel H S; Ratib, Osman; Czernin, Johannes

    2005-04-01

    High photon attenuation and scatter in obese patients affect image quality. The purpose of the current study was to optimize lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) PET image acquisition protocols in patients weighing > or =91 kg (200 lb). Twenty-five consecutive patients (16 male and 9 female) weighing > or =91 kg (200 lb; range, 91-168 kg [200-370 lb]) were studied with LSO PET/CT. After intravenous injection of 7.77 MBq (0.21 mCi) of 18F-FDG per kilogram of body weight, PET emission scans were acquired for 7 min/bed position. Single-minute frames were extracted from the 7 min/bed position scans to reconstruct 1-7 min/bed position scans for each patient. Three reviewers independently analyzed all 7 reconstructed whole-body images of each patient. A consensus reading followed in cases of disagreement. Thus, 175 whole-body scans (7 per patient) were analyzed for number of hypermetabolic lesions. A region-of-interest approach was used to obtain a quantitative estimate of image quality. Fifty-nine hypermetabolic lesions identified on 7 min/bed position scans served as the reference standard. Interobserver concordance increased from 64% for 1 min/bed position scans to 70% for 3 min/bed position scans and 78% for 4 min/bed position scans. Concordance rates did not change for longer imaging durations. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that image noise decreased from 21% for 1 min/bed position scans to 14%, 13%, and 11% for, respectively, 4, 5, and 7 min/bed position scans. When compared with the reference standard, 14 lesions (24%) were missed on 1 min/bed position scans but only 2 (3%) on 4 min/bed position scans. Five minute/bed position scans were sufficient to detect all lesions identified on the 7 min/bed position scans. Lesion detectability and reader concordance peaked for 5 min/bed position scans, with no further diagnostic gain achieved by lengthening the duration of PET emission scanning. Thus, 5 min/bed position scans are sufficient for optimal lesion detection with

  9. SPNsim: A database of simulated solitary pulmonary nodule PET/CT images facilitating computer aided diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tzanoukos, G; Athanasiadis, E; Gaitanis, A; Georgakopoulos, A; Chatziioannou, A; Chatziioannou, S; Spyrou, G

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to design and develop a database of simulated solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) in pairs of computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) images, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods. We have developed an SPN image modeling pipeline to feed the database entitled SPNsim. The database is web-accessible and it is contains two subsets of simulated PET/CT SPN images. The first subset is currently composed of 1000 cases containing pairs of the transaxial CT and the corresponding PET slice with various types of simulated SPNs, presented as individual records. The second subset contains pairs of the transaxial CT and the corresponding PET slice of simulated SPNs, presenting cases of graded difficulty in diagnosis. The users of the database will have the ability to set queries in order to retrieve cases with certain characteristics, as well as characterized image sets. All images are freely available and may be downloaded from the website. SPNsim provides a useful reference data set for training and evaluation of computer aided detection (CAD) and diagnosis (CADx) systems focusing on SPN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  11. Targeted Molecular Imaging in Adrenal Disease—An Emerging Role for Metomidate PET-CT

    PubMed Central

    Mendichovszky, Iosif A.; Powlson, Andrew S.; Manavaki, Roido; Aigbirhio, Franklin I.; Cheow, Heok; Buscombe, John R.; Gurnell, Mark; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal lesions present a significant diagnostic burden for both radiologists and endocrinologists, especially with the increasing number of adrenal ‘incidentalomas’ detected on modern computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A key objective is the reliable distinction of benign disease from either primary adrenal malignancy (e.g., adrenocortical carcinoma or malignant forms of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PPGL)) or metastases (e.g., bronchial, renal). Benign lesions may still be associated with adverse sequelae through autonomous hormone hypersecretion (e.g., primary aldosteronism, Cushing’s syndrome, phaeochromocytoma). Here, identifying a causative lesion, or lateralising the disease to a single adrenal gland, is key to effective management, as unilateral adrenalectomy may offer the potential for curing conditions that are typically associated with significant excess morbidity and mortality. This review considers the evolving role of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in addressing the limitations of traditional cross-sectional imaging and adjunctive techniques, such as venous sampling, in the management of adrenal disorders. We review the development of targeted molecular imaging to the adrenocortical enzymes CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 with different radiolabeled metomidate compounds. Particular consideration is given to iodo-metomidate PET tracers for the diagnosis and management of adrenocortical carcinoma, and the increasingly recognized utility of 11C-metomidate PET-CT in primary aldosteronism. PMID:27869719

  12. Graph cut based co-segmentation of lung tumor in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of pulmonary tumor is important for clinicians to make appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) are two commonly used imaging technologies for image-guided radiation therapy. In this study, we present a graph-based method to integrate the two modalities to segment the tumor simultaneously on PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem. Two weighted sub-graphs are constructed for PET and CT. The characteristic information of the two modalities is encoded on the edges of the graph. A context cost is enforced by adding context arcs to achieve consistent results between the two modalities. An optimal solution can be achieved by solving a maximum flow problem. The proposed segmentation method was validated on 18 sets of PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The quantitative results show significant improvement of our method with a mean DSC value 0.82.

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT/MRI Fusion Images Showing Cranial and Peripheral Nerve Involvement in Neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Fernanda Borges; Itikawa, Emerson Nobuyuki; Alexandre, Leonardo Santos; Pitella, Felipe Arriva; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Wichert-Ana, Lauro

    2017-01-01

    We report a 56-year-old female patient with non-Hodgkin's diffuse large B cell lymphoma (NHL) who, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1 weighted and gadolinium-enhanced imaging, was found to have thickening and infiltration in 75% of peripheral nerves of the patient and enlargements of cranial nerves, possibly related to lymphomatous infiltration. Subsequent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-labeled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) showed widespread active involvement of the cervical plexus, bilateral peripheral nerves, right femoral nerve, the parasellar region of the skull, and marked hypermetabolism in the left trigeminal ganglia. This case re-emphasizes that while CT and MRI provide anatomical details, 18F-FDG PET/CT images better delineate the metabolic activity of neurolymphomatosis (NL) in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:28242998

  14. Method for transforming CT images for attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Jonathan P.J.; Townsend, David W.; Rappoport, Vitaliy; Bendriem, Bernard

    2006-04-15

    A tube-voltage-dependent scheme is presented for transforming Hounsfield units (HU) measured by different computed tomography (CT) scanners at different x-ray tube voltages (kVp) to 511 keV linear attenuation values for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) data reconstruction. A Gammex 467 electron density CT phantom was imaged using a Siemens Sensation 16-slice CT, a Siemens Emotion 6-slice CT, a GE Lightspeed 16-slice CT, a Hitachi CXR 4-slice CT, and a Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice CT at kVp ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. All of these CT scanners are also available in combination with a PET scanner as a PET/CT tomograph. HU obtained for various reference tissue substitutes in the phantom were compared with the known linear attenuation values at 511 keV. The transformation, appropriate for lung, soft tissue, and bone, yields the function 9.6x10{sup -5}{center_dot}(HU+1000) below a threshold of {approx}50 HU and a{center_dot}(HU+1000)+b above the threshold, where a and b are fixed parameters that depend on the kVp setting. The use of the kVp-dependent scaling procedure leads to a significant improvement in reconstructed PET activity levels in phantom measurements, resolving errors of almost 40% otherwise seen for the case of dense bone phantoms at 80 kVp. Results are also presented for patient studies involving multiple CT scans at different kVp settings, which should all lead to the same 511 keV linear attenuation values. A linear fit to values obtained from 140 kVp CT images using the kVp-dependent scaling plotted as a function of the corresponding values obtained from 80 kVp CT images yielded y=1.003x-0.001 with an R{sup 2} value of 0.999, indicating that the same values are obtained to a high degree of accuracy.

  15. Evaluation of 68Ga-Labeled MG7 Antibody: A Targeted Probe for PET/CT Imaging of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing; Li, Xiaowei; Yin, Jipeng; Liang, Cong; Liu, Lijuan; Qiu, Zhaoyan; Yao, Liping; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Kaichun

    2015-01-01

    MG7-Ag, a specific gastric cancer-associated antigen, can be used to non-invasively monitor gastric cancer by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, we prepared and evaluated a 68Ga-labeled MG7 antibody as a molecular probe for nanoPET/CT imaging of gastric cancer in a BGC-823 tumor xenografted mouse model. Macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N0,N00-triacetic acid (NOTA)-conjugated MG7 antibody was synthesized and radiolabeled with 68Ga (t1/2 = 67.71 min). Then, 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 was tested using in vitro cytological studies, in vivo nanoPET/CT and Cerenkov imaging studies as well as ex vivo biodistribution and histology studies. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 has an excellent radiolabeling efficiency of approximately 99% without purification, and it is stable in serum after 120 min of incubation. Cell uptake and retention studies confirmed that 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 has good binding affinity and tumor cell retention. For the nanoPET imaging study, the predominant uptake of 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 was visualized in tumor, liver and kidneys. The tumor uptake reached at its peak (2.53 ± 0.28%ID/g) at 60 min pi. Cherenkov imaging also confirmed the specificity of tumor uptake. Moreover, the biodistribution results were consistent with the quantification data of nanoPET/CT imaging. Histologic analysis also demonstrated specific staining of BGC-823 tumor cell lines. PMID:25733152

  16. Quantitative outcome of registration methods for correcting cardiac drift in cardiac PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Nye, Jonathan A; Tudorascu, Dana; Esteves, Fabio; Votaw, John R

    2016-03-08

    Myocardial perfusion studies suffer from artifacts caused by misalignment of the transmission and emission data due to the influences of voluntary and involuntary patient motion. Regardless of 68Ge or respiratory-averaged CT based attenuation correction and good patient cooperation, approximately 21% of perfusion studies exhibit artifacts arising from misalignment that cannot be corrected by manipulating the attenuation acquisition protocol. This misalignment, termed cardiac drift, is caused by slow-moving abdominal cavity contents that reposition the heart in the thorax and appear as myocardial uptake overlying the left CT lung in fused PET/CT images. This study evaluates three postimaging registration techniques to correct PET/CT misalignment by altering the transmission map to match myo-cardial uptake. Simulated misalignment studies were performed with a cardiac torso phantom filled with [18F]FDG at 10:1 myocardium/background. An air-filled saline bag affixed to the medial left lung surface served as a distensible lung. An initial CT acquisition was followed by successive PET acquisitions consisting of small displacements of the cardiac insert into the left lung. Phantom transmission scans were aligned to the myocardial uptake in the emission scans by applying 1) full rigid-body translations and rotations, 2) rigid-body restricted to medial / lateral and superior / inferior translation, or 3) an emission-driven method that adds myocardial tissue to the transmission scan. These methods were also applied to 10 low-likelihood coronary artery disease (CAD) patients showing signs of cardiac drift. Full rigid-body registration showed significant over-correction (p < 0.004) of activity concentrations in the artifact areas of the phantom data due the relocation of highly attenuating structures (i.e., spine). Inaccurate regional activity distributions were also observed as streaks extending from the spine and these results were replicated in the patient population. There

  17. Quantitative outcome of registration methods for correcting cardiac drift in cardiac PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Nye, Jonathon A; Tudorascu, Dana; Esteves, Fabio; Votaw, John R

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies suffer from artifacts caused by misalignment of the transmission and emission data due to the influences of voluntary and involuntary patient motion. Regardless of G68e or respiratory-averaged CT based attenuation correction and good patient cooperation, approximately 21% of perfusion studies exhibit artifacts arising from misalignment that cannot be corrected by manipulating the attenuation acquisition protocol. This misalignment, termed cardiac drift, is caused by slow-moving abdominal cavity contents that reposition the heart in the thorax and appear as myocardial uptake overlying the left CT lung in fused PET/CT images. This study evaluates three postimaging registration techniques to correct PET/CT misalignment by altering the transmission map to match myocardial uptake. Simulated misalignment studies were performed with a cardiac torso phantom filled with [F18]FDG at 10:1 myocardium/background. An air-filled saline bag affixed to the medial left lung surface served as a distensible lung. An initial CT acquisition was followed by successive PET acquisitions consisting of small displacements of the cardiac insert into the left lung. Phantom transmission scans were aligned to the myocardial uptake in the emission scans by applying 1) full rigid-body translations and rotations, 2) rigid-body restricted to medial / lateral and superior / inferior translation, or 3) an emission-driven method that adds myocardial tissue to the transmission scan. These methods were also applied to 10 low-likelihood coronary artery disease (CAD) patients showing signs of cardiac drift. Full rigid-body registration showed significant over-correction (p<0.004) of activity concentrations in the artifact areas of the phantom data due the relocation of highly attenuating structures (i.e., spine). Inaccurate regional activity distributions were also observed as streaks extending from the spine and these results were replicated in the patient population. There

  18. [Quality control of the research on mechanisms of acupuncture therapy by using PET-CT imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mai-lan; Lan, Lei; Zeng, Fang; Li, Xue-zhi; Liu, Xu-guang; Liang, Fan-rong

    2010-02-01

    Combining the functional metabolic imaging and anatomical imaging, PET-CT stands for the highest level of current nuclear medical imaging techniques, and has been applying increasingly in acupuncture studies. However, owning to complexity of the brain function and sensitivity of brain metabolism, the lower reproducibility of cerebral function imaging even may reverse many results. This has been provoked more and more attention by researchers. Its main cause is intimately related to poor experimental methodology. For this reason, the present paper raises the quality control of the research on mechanisms of acupuncture in the process of application of PET-CT techniques from (1) the included standards of participants, (2) the preparation of participants during the scanning process of PET-CT, (3) the setting of the scanning parameters, (4) the used machine and the imaging reagent, (5) the analysis of dada, (6) the standardization of acupuncture manipulation, and (7) the designs of the acupuncture operation, needling opportunity and scanning opportunity, hoping to offer some beneficial information for the coming researches.

  19. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis: Three Case Reports Imaging Using a Tri-Modality PET/CT-MR System.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT-MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine.We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT-MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway.Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis.The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD.

  20. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-12-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans.

  1. A novel 3D-printed phantom insert for 4D PET/CT imaging and simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cerviño, Laura; Soultan, Dima; Cornell, Mariel; Yock, Adam; Pettersson, Niclas; Song, William Y; Aguilera, Joseph; Advani, Sunil; Murphy, James; Hoh, Carl; James, Claude; Paravati, Anthony; Coope, Robin; Gill, Bradford; Moiseenko, Vitali

    2017-10-01

    To construct a 3D-printed phantom insert designed to mimic the variable PET tracer uptake seen in lung tumor volumes and a matching dosimetric insert to be used in simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) phantom studies, and to evaluate the design through end-to-end tests. A set of phantom inserts was designed and manufactured for a realistic representation of gated radiotherapy steps from 4D PET/CT scanning to dose delivery. A cylindrical phantom (φ80 × 120 mm) holds inserts for PET/CT scanning. The novel 3D printed insert dedicated to 4D PET/CT mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and low uptake in the periphery. This insert is a variable density porous cylinder (φ44.5 × 70.0 mm), ABS-P430 thermoplastic, 3D printed by fused deposition modeling an inner (φ11 × 42 mm) cylindrical void. The square pores (1.8 × 1.8 mm(2) each) fill 50% of outer volume, resulting in a 2:1 PET tracer concentration ratio in the void volume with respect to porous volume. A matching cylindrical phantom insert is dedicated to validate gated radiotherapy. It contains eight peripheral holes and one central hole, matching the location of the porous part and the void part of the 3D printed insert, respectively. These holes accommodate adaptors for Farmer-type ion chamber and cells vials. End-to-end tests were designed for imaging, planning, and dose measurements. End-to-end test were performed from 4D PET/CT scanning to transferring data to the planning system, target volume delineation, and dose measurements. 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of the phantom at different respiratory motion patterns and gating windows. A measured 2:1 18F-FDG concentration ratio between inner void and outer porous volume matched the 3D printed design. Measured dose in the dosimetric insert agreed well with planned dose on the imaging insert, within 3% for the static phantom and within 5% for most breathing patterns. The novel 3D printed phantom insert mimics variable PET tracer uptake typical of tumors

  2. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT imaging for a gastrointestinal mantle cell lymphoma with multiple lymphomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Makoto; Miyazaki, Masaya; Tanino, Mishie; Tanaka, Shinya; Miyashita, Kencho; Izumiyama, Koh; Mori, Akio; Irie, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Masanori; Morioka, Masanobu; Tsukamoto, Eriko

    2014-05-07

    Multiple lymphomatous polyposis (MLP) is an uncommon type of gastrointestinal lymphoma characterized by the presence of multiple polyps along the gastrointestinal tract. Most of this entity is in fact considered the counterpart of gastrointestinal tract involvement for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). To our knowledge, there have been no reports on [fluorine-18]-fluorodeoxy-glucose ((18)F-FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging for gastrointestinal MCL with MLP. We present the results of (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in a patient with gastrointestinal tract involvement of MCL showing continuous MLP from the stomach to the rectum and intestinal intussusception. FDG-PET/CT findings were false negative in typical MLP spreading widely over the gastrointestinal tract, but uptake was noted in large lesions with deep infiltration considered atypical as MLP. On FDG-PET/CT imaging, the Ki-67 proliferative index, which is a cell proliferation marker, showed neither correlation with the presence of uptake nor the maximum standardized uptake value.

  3. Molecular PET/CT imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Habib; Vees, Hansjörg; Wissmeyer, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The role of positron emission tomography (PET) during the past decade has evolved rapidly from that of a pure research tool to a methodology of enormous clinical potential. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET is currently the most widely used probe in the diagnosis, staging, assessment of tumor response to treatment, and radiation therapy planning because metabolic changes generally precede the more conventionally measured parameter of change in tumor size. Data accumulated rapidly during the last decade, thus validating the efficacy of FDG imaging and many other tracers in a wide variety of malignant tumors with sensitivities and specificities often in the high 90 percentile range. As a result, PET/computed tomography (CT) had a significant impact on the management of patients because it obviated the need for further evaluation, guided further diagnostic procedures, and assisted in planning therapy for a considerable number of patients. On the other hand, the progress in radiation therapy technology has been enormous during the last two decades, now offering the possibility to plan highly conformal radiation dose distributions through the use of sophisticated beam targeting techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using tomotherapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, and many other promising technologies for sculpted three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution. The foundation of molecular imaging-guided radiation therapy lies in the use of advanced imaging technology for improved definition of tumor target volumes, thus relating the absorbed dose information to image-based patient representations. This review documents technological advancements in the field concentrating on the conceptual role of molecular PET/CT imaging in radiation therapy treatment planning and related image processing issues with special emphasis on segmentation of medical images for the purpose of defining target volumes. There is still much more work to be done and many of

  4. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging in recurrent prostate cancer: Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Andrzej; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major health concern worldwide with up to 60% of patients experiencing biochemical relapse after radical treatment. Early diagnosis of PCa recurrence is of high importance for successful salvage therapy. The need for accurate imaging has prompted the introduction of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-based radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). Material and methods In this review we summarized and discussed the results of the studies analyzing the utility of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in patients who experienced a biochemical relapse of prostate cancer. Results PSMA-based PET scans have been proved to provide a superior diagnostic performance over other modalities for localization of the site of early PCa recurrence. 68Ga-PSMA has been also shown to have a higher sensitivity and specificity than other established PET radiotracers such as radiocholines. Conclusions The early studies show promising results and support the use of 68Ga-PSMA for PCa restaging. However, the number of studies concerning the utility of 68Ga-PSMA PET in the context of secondary PCa staging is limited and there is still a considerable scope for further research in this field. PMID:28461986

  5. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  6. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Catherine; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Nuyts, Johan; Ratib, Osman; Dupont, Patrick; Zaidi, Habib

    2008-08-21

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of (18)F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring.

  7. Initial human experience with Rubidium-82 renal PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Tahari, Abdel K; Bravo, Paco E; Rahmim, Arman; Bengel, Frank M; Szabo, Zsolt

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data have shown that Rubidium-82 chloride ((82)Rb) is a radiotracer with high first pass extraction and slow washout in the kidneys. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of human kidney imaging with (82)Rb positron emission tomography (PET) and obtain quantitative data of its uptake non-invasively. Eight healthy volunteers underwent dynamic PET/CT imaging with (82)Rb. A preprogrammed pump was used to insure reproducible injections. Tissue time activity curves were generated from the renal cortex. An input function was derived from the left ventricular blood pool (LVBP), the descending thoracic aorta and the abdominal aorta. Renal blood flow was estimated by applying a two-compartment kinetic model. Results obtained with different input functions were compared. Radiotracer accumulation was rapid and reached a plateau within 15-30 s after the bolus entered the kidneys. The derived K1 and k2 parameters were reproducible using input functions obtained from diverse vascular locations. K1 averaged 1.98 ± 0.14 mL/min/g. The average k2 was 0.35 ± 0.11/min. Correlation between K1 values obtained from the LVBP from different bed positions when the kidneys and abdominal aorta were in the same field of view was excellent (R = 0.95). Non-invasive quantitative human kidney imaging with (82)Rb PET is feasible. Advantages of renal PET with (82)Rb include excellent image quality with high image resolution and contrast. (82)Rb has potential as a clinical renal imaging agent in humans. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  8. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Catherine; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Nuyts, Johan; Ratib, Osman; Dupont, Patrick; Zaidi, Habib

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of 18F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring.

  9. Growing applications of FDG PET-CT imaging in non-oncologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Hongming; Codreanu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As the number of clinical applications of 2-[fluorine 18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) grows, familiarity with the conditions that can be diagnosed by this modality and when relevant pieces of additional information can be obtained becomes increasingly important for both requesting physicians and nuclear medicine physicians or radiologists who interpret the findings. Apart from its heavy use in clinical oncology, FDG PET-CT is widely used in a variety of non-oncologic conditions interconnecting to such disciplines as general internal medicine, infectious diseases, cardiology, neurology, surgery, traumatology, orthopedics, pediatrics, endocrinology, rheumatology, psychiatry, neuropsychology, and cognitive neuroscience. The aim of this review was to summarize the current evidence of FDG PET-CT applications in evaluating non-oncologic pathologies and the relevant information it can add to achieve a final diagnosis. PMID:26060443

  10. Quantitative imaging of (124)I with PET/ CT in pretherapy lesion dosimetry. Effects impairing image quantification and their corrections.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, W; Freudenberg, L; Bockisch, A

    2011-02-01

    Iodine-131-labelled agents are successfully used in cancer treatment. In the pretherapy dosimetry approach, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using (124)I provides a modality to estimate absorbed dose to tumours and can be considered as the preferred imaging method for this purpose in (131)I radiopharmaceutical therapies. For accurate dosimetry, serial measurements of activity concentrations (ACs) over an appropriate time period are necessary. Consequently, accurate AC determination is of paramount importance in PET/CT-based lesion dosimetry using (124)I-labelled agents. After presenting an historical overview of (124)I clinical application, this review focuses on factors impairing PET image quantification accuracy and on methods of correcting for these effects. Specifically, the emission of prompt gamma photons in the (124)I decay process that are detected in coincidence with each other and with the annihilation photon, and the low (124)I positron branching ration of only 23% raise concerns regarding image quantification accuracy. This review discusses this prompt gamma effect, its impact and approaches to correct for this phenomenon. In (124)I lesion dosimetry, recovery coefficients (RCs) are commonly used to compensate primarily for partial-volume effect but also, in a simplistic way, for prompt gamma coincidence effect; the main methodological factors affecting the RC-corrected (124)I AC are described. Finally, special issues in image (124)I quantification are reviewed, including coadministration of high therapeutic activities of 131I, shine-through artefact, and transmission-contamination effect occurring in stand-alone PET systems.

  11. Imaging features of Paget's disease on (11)C choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Cameron E; Goenka, Ajit H; Howe, Benjamin M; Broski, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the appearance of Paget's disease (PD) on (11)C choline PET/CT and correlate these findings to serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level and skeletal scintigraphy. With IRB approval, our institutional (11)C choline PET/CT database (9/2005-6/2015) was searched for patients with PD. Site of osseous involvement, CT appearance, and multiple semi-quantitative measures were measured and correlated with ALP and degree of uptake on bone scan. Our search identified 10 males (mean age 79.6 ± 7.8 years). Four had polyostotic disease and seven had more than one (11)C choline PET/CT. In total, 58 affected bones were evaluated on 25 PET/CTs. Mean lesion SUVmax was 2.6 ± 0.89 (range 1.0-4.4), SUVmax/Liver SUVmean 0.33 ± 0.13 (0.12-0.61), SUVmax/Liver SUVmax 0.29 ± 0.11 (0.10-0.52), SUVmax/BP SUVmean 2.47 ± 0.86 (0.91-4.22), and SUVmax/BP SUVmax 1.92 ± 0.71 (0.68-3.45). There was no correlation between ALP and any semiquantitative measure. Bone scan uptake was marked in 41 bones, moderate in nine, and mild in six. There was no correlation between lesion SUVmax and bone scan uptake (P = 0.26). Paget's disease on (11)C choline PET/CT demonstrates mild to moderate activity, which does not correlate with bone scan uptake or ALP level. It is important to recognize Paget's disease as a potential pitfall on (11)C choline PET/CT. However, the characteristic appearance on the CT portion of PET/CT examinations should allow confident diagnosis and differentiation from prostate cancer osseous metastases.

  12. Development of standardized image interpretation for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to detect prostate cancer recurrent lesions.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Stefano; Minozzi, Silvia; Morigi, Joshua James; Giesel, Frederik; Ceci, Francesco; Uprimny, Christian; Hofman, Michael S; Eiber, Matthias; Schwarzenbock, Sarah; Castellucci, Paolo; Bellisario, Cristina; Chauvie, Stéphane; Bergesio, Fabrizio; Emmett, Louise; Haberkorn, Uwe; Virgolini, Irene; Schwaiger, Markus; Hicks, Rodney J; Krause, Bernd J; Chiti, Arturo

    2017-09-01

    After primary treatment, biochemical relapse (BCR) occurs in a substantial number of patients with prostate cancer (PCa). PET/CT imaging with prostate-specific membrane antigen based tracers (68Ga-PSMA) has shown promising results for BCR patients. However, a standardized image interpretation methodology has yet to be properly agreed. The aim of this study, which was promoted and funded by European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), is to define standardized image interpretation criteria for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to detect recurrent PCa lesions in patients treated with primary curative intent therapy (radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy) who presented a biochemical recurrence. In the first phase inter-rater agreement between seven readers from seven international centers was calculated on the reading of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT images of 49 patients with BCR. Each reader evaluated findings in five different sites of recurrence (local, loco-regional lymph nodes, distant lymph nodes, bone, and other). In the second phase the re-analysis was limited to cases with poor, slight, fair, or moderate agreement [Krippendorff's (K) alpha<0.61]. Finally, on the basis of the consensus readings, we sought to define a list of revised consensus criteria for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT interpretation. Between-reader agreement for the presence of anomalous findings in any of the five sites was only moderate (K's alpha: 0.47). The agreement improved and became substantial when readers had to judge whether the anomalous findings were suggestive for a pathologic, uncertain, or non-pathologic image (K's alpha: 0.64). K's alpha calculations for each of the five sites of recurrence were also performed and evaluated. First Delphi round was thus conducted. A more detailed definition of the criteria was proposed by the project coordinator, which was then discussed and finally agreed by the seven readers. After the second Delphi round only four cases of disagreement still remained. These were evaluated for a

  13. (18)F-choline PET/CT pitfalls in image interpretation: an update on 300 examined patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-02-01

    F-choline PET/CT is an important diagnostic tool in the management of patients with prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this study was to describe and discuss some abnormal sites of uptake that we observed, not due to PC recurrence. Three hundred patients were submitted to F-choline PET/CT for staging or restaging of PC. Whole-body PET/CT was acquired 40 minutes after the F-choline administration. We found abnormal uptake of the tracer, not related to PC, in 48/300 patients (16%). Most of these findings were due to inflammatory processes. Furthermore, some malignant conditions, such as a case of colon cancer, a case of bladder carcinoma, and a multiple myeloma, were diagnosed. Mild uptake was also detected in some benign diseases, such as thymoma, adrenal adenoma, and sarcoidosis. Six patients showed focal brain uptake in correspondence to a meningioma. It is necessary for nuclear physicians, during clinical practice, to consider the possibility of F-choline uptake in some benign or malignant conditions for the intrinsic pharmacologic property of the tracer. An accurate medical investigation, correlative imaging with CT and/or MRI with contrast agents, laboratory data, and above all, histologic examination are often necessary for correct diagnosis.

  14. Automated quantitative Rb-82 3D PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging: normal limits and correlation with invasive coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S; Dey, Damini; Le Meunier, Ludovic; Hayes, Sean W; Fermin, Jimmy S; Cheng, Victor Y; Thomson, Louise E J; Friedman, John D; Germano, Guido; Slomka, Piotr J

    2012-04-01

    We aimed to characterize normal limits and to determine the diagnostic accuracy for an automated quantification of 3D 82-Rubidium (Rb-82) PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We studied 125 consecutive patients undergoing Rb-82 PET/CT MPI, including patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) and invasive coronary angiography, and 42 patients with a low likelihood (LLk) of CAD. Normal limits for perfusion and function were derived from LLk patients. QPET software was used to quantify perfusion abnormality at rest and stress expressed as total perfusion deficit (TPD). Relative perfusion databases did not differ in any of the 17 segments between males and females. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detection of CAD were 0.86 for identification of ≥50% and ≥70% stenosis. The sensitivity/specificity was 86%/86% for detecting ≥50% stenosis and 93%/77% for ≥70% stenosis, respectively. In regard to normal limits, mean rest and stress left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were 67% ± 10% and 75% ± 9%, respectively. Mean transient ischemic dilation ratio was 1.06 ± 0.14 and mean increase in LVEF with stress was 7.4% ± 6.1% (95th percentile of 0%). Normal limits have been established for 3D Rb-82 PET/CT analysis with QPET software. Fully automated quantification of myocardial perfusion PET data shows high diagnostic accuracy for detecting obstructive CAD.

  15. Imaging of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Expression in Metastatic Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Using 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Lütje, Susanne; Gomez, Benedikt; Cohnen, Joseph; Umutlu, Lale; Gotthardt, Martin; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Bockisch, Andreas; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) was shown to be overexpressed on the neovasculature of several malignancies. Here, the role of Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT for the detection of PSMA expression in patients with metastasized differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) was evaluated. Six patients with iodine-negative and F-FDG-positive metastasized DTC (mean TG, 1616 ng/mL) received 71-93 MBq of the Ga-labeled PSMA ligand and underwent PET/CT at 62 ± 7 minutes p.i.. Tumor accumulation capacity of the tracer and the detection rate of local recurrences and metastases were compared with F-FDG. Tracer uptake was quantified in terms of the SUVmax. In 5 of 6 patients, sites of putative metastatic disease could be identified using Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT. All lesions detected with Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT (n = 42) were confirmed by F-FDG PET/CT or conventional CT imaging. Using Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT, all tumor lesions identified with F-FDG PET/CT imaging could be visualized in 3 of 5 patients. In 2 patients, only the most prominent lesions detected with F-FDG PET/CT imaging were visualized by Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT. Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA uptake ranged from low in 1 patient (mean SUVmax 3.3) to intermediate (1 patient; mean SUVmax, 6.1) to intense (3 patients; mean SUVmax, 12.8, 16.2, and 18.3). The highest SUVmax values were observed for a bone lesion, reaching 39.7. These preliminary results indicate that Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT might be suitable for staging of patients with metastasized DTC. Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT could be useful for the identification of patients who might qualify for PSMA-targeted radionuclide therapy because of high PSMA uptake.

  16. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  17. Rare Endobronchial Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor in Pediatric Patient Detected on PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kara, Pelin Ozcan; Koc, Zehra Pinar; Citak, Elvan Caglar; Nayci, Ali; Bahadir, Gokhan Berktug; Kara, Taylan

    2017-09-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) can be seen in all age groups, although it is more common in children and adolescents. We report the FDG PET/CT findings in an 8-year-old boy with endobronchial IMT. Endobronchial IMT is more commonly seen in young adults.

  18. Renal Cell Carcinoma with Paraneoplastic Manifestations: Imaging with CT and F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ba D; Roarke, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of renal cell carcinoma with prominent inflammatory and paraneoplastic manifestations. The initial CT detection of renal malignancy and subsequent post-therapeutic F-18 FDG PET/CT diagnosis of occult osseous metastasis were based on the patient's anemia, thrombocytosis and abnormally increased levels of serum C-reactive protein.

  19. 68Ga-PSMA-11 Dynamic PET/CT Imaging in Primary Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias; Hadaschik, Boris A; Freitag, Martin T; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2016-11-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of Ga-PSMA-11 in patients suffering from primary prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. Twenty-four patients with primary, previously untreated PC were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning of the pelvis and whole-body PET/CT studies with Ga-PSMA-11. The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on two-tissue compartment modeling and a noncompartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). A total of 23/24 patients (95.8%) were Ga-PSMA-11 positive. In 9/24 patients (37.5%), metastatic lesions were detected. PC-associated lesions demonstrated the following mean values: SUVaverage = 14.3, SUVmax = 23.4, K1 = 0.24 (1/min), k3 = 0.34 (1/min), influx = 0.15 (1/min), and FD = 1.27. The parameters SUVaverage, SUVmax, k3, influx, and FD derived from PC-associated lesions were significantly higher than respective values derived from reference prostate tissue. Time-activity curves derived from PC-associated lesions revealed an increasing Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate but significant correlation between PSA levels and SUVaverage (r = 0.60) and SUVmax (r = 0.57), and a weak but significant correlation between Gleason score and SUVaverage (r = 0.33) and SUVmax (r = 0.28). Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT confirmed its capacity in detecting primary PC with a detection rate of 95.8%. Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed an increase in tracer uptake in PC-associated lesions during the 60 minutes of dynamic PET acquisition, a finding with potential applications in anti-PSMA approaches.

  20. Evaluation of Dual Time Point Imaging (18)F-FDG PET/CT for Lymph Node Staging in Vulvar Cancer.

    PubMed

    Collarino, Angela; Garganese, Giorgia; Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Stefanelli, Antonella; Perotti, Germano; Mirk, Paoletta; Fragomeni, Simona M; Ieria, Francesco P; Scambia, Giovanni; Giordano, Alessandro; Rufini, Vittoria

    2017-05-25

    This study aimed to assess the value of dual time point (DTP) (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in the prediction of lymph node (LN) status in patients with invasive vulvar cancer (VC) scheduled for inguinofemoral lymph node dissection (IFLD). Methods: From April 2013 to July 2015, all consecutive patients with VC scheduled for IFLD were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent a preoperative whole-body (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan at 1-hour (standard exam) and an additional scan from T11 to the groins at 3-hour (delayed exam) after (18)F-FDG injection. On both scans each groin was visually scored 0 or 1 concerning (18)F-FDG LN uptake relative to background. Semi-quantitative analysis included maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and the corresponding retention index of SUVmax (RImax), measured on both scans. The optimal cut-off value of these parameters was defined using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Histopathology was the standard of reference. Results: Thirty three patients were included with a total of 57 groins dissected and histologically evaluated. At histopathology 21 of 57 (37%) groins contained metastatic LNs. Concerning visual score, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value and accuracy were 95.2%, 75%, 96.4%, 69%, 82.5% on standard scan and 95.2%, 77.8%, 96.6%, 71.4%, 84.2% on delayed scan, respectively. At ROC analysis, sensitivity and specificity were 95.2% and 77.8% on standard and delayed (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for a SUVmax cut-off >1.32 and >1.88, respectively and 95.2% and 80% for a RImax cut-off > 0. Conclusion: Standard (18)F-FDG-PET/CT is an effective preoperative imaging for the prediction of LN status in VC, allowing to predict pathologically negative groins and thus to select the patients suitable for minimally invasive surgery. Delayed (18)F-FDG PET/CT did not improve the specificity and the positive predictive value in our series. Larger studies are needed for a further validation. Copyright

  1. 4'-[Methyl-11C]-thiothymidine PET/CT for proliferation imaging in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Toyohara, Jun; Seike, Ayako; Ito, Hideyuki; Endo, Hisako; Morooka, Miyako; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Mitsumoto, Takuya; Ito, Kimiteru; Okasaki, Momoko; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kubota, Kazuo

    2012-02-01

    A new tracer, 4'-[methyl-(11)C]-thiothymidine ((11)C-4DST), has been developed as an in vivo cell proliferation marker based on the DNA incorporation method. This study evaluated the potential of (11)C-4DST PET/CT for imaging proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), compared with (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Eighteen patients with lung lesions were examined by PET/CT using (11)C-4DST and (18)F-FDG. We constructed decay-corrected time-activity curves of 9 major regions as the mean standardized uptake value. We then compared the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of lung tumors on both (11)C-4DST and (18)F-FDG PET/CT with the Ki-67 index of cellular proliferation and with CD31-positive vessels as a marker of angiogenesis in surgical pathology. NSCLC was pathologically confirmed in 19 lesions of 18 patients. Physiologic accumulation of (11)C-4DST was high in liver, kidney, and bone marrow and low in aorta, brain, lung, and myocardium. Biodistribution of (11)C-4DST was almost stable by 20 min after injection of (11)C-4DST. Mean (11)C-4DST SUVmax for lung cancer was 2.9 ± 1.0 (range, 1.5-4.7), significantly different from mean (18)F-FDG SUVmax, which was 6.2 ± 4.5 (range, 0.9-17.3; P < 0.001). The correlation coefficient between SUVmax and Ki-67 index was higher with (11)C-4DST (r = 0.82) than with (18)F-FDG (r = 0.71). The correlation coefficient between SUVmax and CD31 was low with both (11)C-4DST (r = 0.21) and (18)F-FDG (r = 0.21), showing no significant difference between the tracers. A higher correlation with proliferation of lung tumors was seen for (11)C-4DST than for (18)F-FDG. (11)C-4DST PET/CT may allow noninvasive imaging of DNA synthesis in NSCLC.

  2. 11C-Acetate PET/CT Imaging in Localized Prostate Cancer: A study with MRI and Histopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Adler, Stephen; Valera, Vladimir A.; Bernardo, Marcelino; Shah, Vijay; Pohida, Thomas; McKinney, Yolanda; Kwarteng, Gideon; Daar, Dagane; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Eclarinal, Philip; Wade, Revia; Linehan, W. Marston; Merino, Maria J.; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    This work characterizes the uptake of 11C-Acetate in prostate cancer (PCa), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and normal prostate tissue in comparison with multi-parametric MRI, whole mount histopathology and clinical markers, to evaluate its potential utility for delineating intra-prostatic tumors in a population of patients with localized PCa. METHODS 39 men with presumed localized PCa underwent dynamic/static abdomen-pelvic 11C-Acetate PET/CT for 30-minutes and 3T multi-parametric (MP) MRI prior to prostatectomy. PET/CT images were registered to MRI using pelvic bones for initial rotation-translation, followed by manual adjustments to account for prostate motion and deformation from the MRI endorectal coil. Whole-mount pathology specimens were sectioned using an MRI-based patient specific mold resulting in improved registration between the MRI, PET and pathology. 11C-Acetate PET standardized uptake values were compared with MP-MRI and pathology. RESULTS 11C-Acetate uptake was rapid but reversible, peaking at 3–5 minutes post-injection and reaching a relative plateau at ~10 minutes. The average SUVmax(10–12min) of tumors was significantly higher than that of normal prostate tissue (4.4±2.05, range 1.8–9.2 vs. 2.1±0.94, range 0.7–3.4; p<0.001); however it was not significantly different from benign prostatic hyperplasia (4.8±2.01; range 1.8–8.8). A sector-based comparison with histopathology, including all tumors > 0.5 cm, revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 61.6 % and 80.0 % for 11C-Acetate PET/CT, and 82.3% and 95.1% for MRI, respectively. Considering only tumors >0.9 cm the 11C-Acetate accuracy was comparable to that of MRI. In a small cohort (n=9), 11C-Acetate uptake was independent of fatty acid synthase expression based on immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSION 11C-Acetate PET/CT demonstrates higher uptake in tumor foci than normal prostate tissue; however 11C-Acetate uptake in tumors is similar to BPH nodules. While 11C-Acetate PET/CT is not

  3. Oncological Patient Anxiety in Imaging Studies: the PET/CT Example.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Carla; Grilo, Ana; Lucena, Filipa; Carolino, Elisabete

    2016-07-02

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the subjective perception of anxiety pre- and post-procedure, and explore the relationship between demographic, clinical variables and cancer patients' anxiety during a positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan. Two hundred and thirty-two oncological out patients, with clinical indication for performing an (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT scan and attending a nuclear medicine (NM) department, participated in the study. Patients' anxiety and subjective experience of PET/CT were examined using two self-report questionnaires. The pre-procedure questionnaire focused on demographic information, level of knowledge regarding the scan and subjective perception of anxiety before the procedure. The post-procedure questionnaire included the subjective perception anxiety after the procedure, information adequacy and satisfaction with the NM department. The self-reported data indicate that patients were anxious during PET/CT. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant difference between the anxiety pre-procedure and post-procedure (z = -3909, p < 0.05), in which the anxiety pre-procedure has significantly higher values. No significant correlation was found between anxiety and age of the patients, education levels, adequacy of information or satisfaction with the NM Department. Perception of anxiety post-procedure differs between gender (U = 5641, p = 0.033). In conclusion, PET/CT generated anxiety levels in oncological patients, especially before the procedure. Although patients seemed to be satisfied with information delivered by staff and with the NM Department, attention has to be focused on effective interventions strategies that help patients to reduce anxiety.

  4. Transconvolution and the virtual positron emission tomograph-A new method for cross calibration in quantitative PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prenosil, George A.; Weitzel, Thilo; Hentschel, Michael; Klaeser, Bernd; Krause, Thomas

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) measurements on small lesions are impaired by the partial volume effect, which is intrinsically tied to the point spread function of the actual imaging system, including the reconstruction algorithms. The variability resulting from different point spread functions hinders the assessment of quantitative measurements in clinical routine and especially degrades comparability within multicenter trials. To improve quantitative comparability there is a need for methods to match different PET/CT systems through elimination of this systemic variability. Consequently, a new method was developed and tested that transforms the image of an object as produced by one tomograph to another image of the same object as it would have been seen by a different tomograph. The proposed new method, termed Transconvolution, compensates for differing imaging properties of different tomographs and particularly aims at quantitative comparability of PET/CT in the context of multicenter trials. Methods: To solve the problem of image normalization, the theory of Transconvolution was mathematically established together with new methods to handle point spread functions of different PET/CT systems. Knowing the point spread functions of two different imaging systems allows determining a Transconvolution function to convert one image into the other. This function is calculated by convolving one point spread function with the inverse of the other point spread function which, when adhering to certain boundary conditions such as the use of linear acquisition and image reconstruction methods, is a numerically accessible operation. For reliable measurement of such point spread functions characterizing different PET/CT systems, a dedicated solid-state phantom incorporating {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga filled spheres was developed. To iteratively determine and represent such point spread functions, exponential density functions in combination

  5. A Comparison of Techniques for (90)Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Bourgeois, Austin C; Bradley, Yong C

    2014-01-01

    (90)Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative (90)Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative (90)Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy (90)Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for (90)Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each (90)Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using (90)Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for (90)Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with (90)Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization (90)Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging.

  6. A Comparison of Techniques for 90Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bourgeois, Austin C.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2014-01-01

    90Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative 90Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative 90Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy 90Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for 90Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each 90Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using 90Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for 90Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with 90Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization 90Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging. PMID:24904832

  7. The application of PET-CT to post-mastectomy regional radiation therapy using a deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Sun; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Sang-Wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Young Seok; Park, Jin-Hong; Cho, Byung Chul; Kim, Su Ssan

    2013-04-29

    To evaluate the utility of the preoperative PET-CT using deformable image registration (DIR) in the treatment of patients with locally advanced breast cancer and to find appropriate radiotherapy technique for further adequate treatment of axillary nodal area. Sixty-five breast cancer patients who had level II, III axillary or supraclavicular lymph node metastasis on ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT and received postoperative radiotherapy after modified radical mastectomy were enrolled. One radiation oncologist contoured normal organs (axillary vessels, clavicular head, coracoids process and humeral head) and involved lymph nodes on PET-CT and simulation CT slices. After contouring, deformable image registration of PET-CT on simulation CT was carried out. To evaluate the performance of the DIR, Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and Center of mass (COM) were used. We created two plans, one was the historically designed three field plan and the other was the modified plan based on the location of axillary lymph node, and we compared the doses that irradiated the axillary lymph nodes. The DSCs for axillary artery, axillary vein, clavicular head, coracoids process and humeral head were 0.43 ± 0.15, 0.39 ± 0.20, 0.85 ± 0.10, 0.72 ± 0.20 and 0.77 ± 0.20, respectively. The distances between the COMs of axillary artery, axillary vein, clavicular head, coracoids process and humeral head in simulation CT and from PET-CT were 13.0 ±7.1, 20.2 ± 11.2, 4.4 ± 6.3, 3.7 ± 6.7, and 9.5 ± 25.0 mm, respectively. In the historically designed plan, only 57.7% of level II lymph nodes received more than 95% of prescribed dose and the coverage was improved to 70.0% with the modified plan (p < 0.01). For level III lymph nodes, the volumes received more than 95% of prescribed dose were similar in both plans (96.8 % vs 97.9%, p = 0.35). Deformable image registration of PET-CT on simulation CT was helpful in the identification of the location of the

  8. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Positron emission tomography (PET) uses small amounts of ... CT)? What is Positron Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Scanning? Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging ...

  9. Broad-spectrum multi-modality image registration: from PET, CT, and MRI to autoradiography, microscopy, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, P B

    2006-01-01

    Image registration and fusion are increasingly important components of both clinical and small-animal imaging and have lead to the development of a variety of pertinent hardware and software tools, including multi-modality, e.g. PET-CT, devices. At the same time, advances in microscopic imaging, including phosphor-plate digital autoradiography and immunohistochemistry, now allow ultra-high (sub-100 microm)-resolution molecular characterization of tissue sections. To date, however, in vivo imaging of intact subjects and ex vivo imaging of harvested tissues sections have remained separate and distinct, making it difficult to reliably inter-compare the former and the latter. The Department of Medical Physics and the Radiation Biophysics Laboratory at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, under the direction of Dr. Clifton Ling, has now designed, fabricated, and tested a stereotactic imaging system for so-called "broad-spectrum" image registration, from coarser-resolution in vivo imaging modalities such as PET, CT, and MRI to ultra-high-resolution ex vivo imaging techniques such as histology, autoradiography, and immunohistochemistry.

  10. PET/CT and Bremsstrahlung Imaging After 90Y DOTANOC Therapy for Rectal Net With Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Abdülrezzak, Ümmühan; Kula, Mustafa; Tutuş, Ahmet; Buyukkaya, Fikret; Karaca, Halit

    2015-10-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu or Y is promising with successful results in somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. In all radiation therapies, knowledge of the radiation dose received by the target, and other organs in the body is essential to evaluate the risks and benefits of any procedure. We report a case of liver metastases from a rectal neuroendocrine tumor, which was treated with Y DOTANOC. Posttreatment whole-body planar images were acquired through Bremsstrahlung radiations of Y on a γ-camera, and thoracolumbar PET/CT images were acquired on PET.

  11. Initial Experience of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging in High-risk Prostate Cancer Patients Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Budäus, Lars; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Salomon, Georg; Michl, Uwe; Heinzer, Hans; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Steuber, Thomas; Rosenbaum, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) overexpression theoretically enables targeting of prostate cancer (PCa) metastases using gallium Ga 68 ((68)Ga)-labeled PSMA ligands for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. Promising detection rates have been reported when using this approach for functional imaging of recurrent PCa; however, until now, the diagnostic accuracy of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for preoperatively identifying lymph node metastases (LNMs) had not been assessed. We retrospectively compared preoperative (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT lymph node (LN) findings with histologic work-up after radical prostatectomy (RP). Overall, 608 LNs containing 53 LNMs were detected during RP. LNMs were present in 12 of 30 patients (40%). The (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT scans identified 4 patients (33.3%) as LN true positive and 8 patients (66.7%) as false negative. Median size of (68)Ga-PSMA-PET/CT-detected versus undetected LNMs was 13.6 versus 4.3 mm (p<0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for LNM detection were 33.3%, 100%, 100%, and 69.2%, respectively. Per-side analyses revealed corresponding values of 27.3%, 100%, 100%, and 52.9%. Conversely, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT enabled tumor visualization in the prostate. In 92.9% of patients, the intraprostatic tumor foci were correctly predicted. Overall, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a promising tool for functional imaging; however, our initial experience revealed substantial influence of LNM size on the diagnostic accuracy of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in high-risk prostate cancer patients prior to radical prostatectomy. We found that lymph node metastasis detection rates were substantially influenced by lymph node metastasis size. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Can technical characteristics predict clinical performance in PET/CT imaging? A correlation study for thyroid cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Pianou, Nikoletta; Metaxas, Marinos; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether image characteristics could be used to predict the outcome of ROC studies in PET/CT imaging. Patients suspected for recurrent thyroid cancer underwent a standard whole body (WB) examination and an additional high-resolution head-and-neck (HN) F18-FDG PET/CT scan. The value of the latter was determined with an ROC study, the results of which showed that the WB+HN combination was better than WB alone for thyroid cancer detection and diagnosis. Following the ROC experiment, the WB and HN images of confirmed benign or malignant thyroid disease were analyzed and first and second order textural features were determined. Features included minimum, mean, and maximum intensity, as well as contrast in regions of interest encircling the thyroid lesions. Lesion size and standard uptake values (SUV) were also determined. Bivariate analysis was applied to determine relationships between WB and HN features and between observer ROC responses and the various feature values. The two sets showed significant associations in the values of SUV, contrast, and lesion size. They were completely different when the intensities were considered; no relationship was found between the WB minimum, maximum, and mean ROI values and their HN counterparts. SUV and contrast were the strongest predictors of ROC performance on PET/CT examinations of thyroid cancer. The high resolution HN images seem to enhance these relationships but without a single dramatic effect as was projected from the ROC results. A combination of features from both WB and HN datasets may possibly be a more robust predictor of ROC performance.

  13. Inter- and Intra- observer agreement of FDG-PET/CT image interpretation in patients referred for assessment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Hiroshi; Mc Ardle, Brian; deKemp, Robert A; Nery, Pablo B; Juneau, Daniel; Renaud, Jennifer M; Klein, Ran; Clarkin, Owen; MacDonald, Karen; Leung, Eugene; Nair, Girish; Beanlands, Rob S B; Birnie, David

    2017-03-02

    Recent studies have reported the usefulness of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in aiding with the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis (CS). However, the image interpretation of FDG-PET for CS is sometimes challenging. We sought to investigate the inter- and intra-observer agreement and explore factors which lead to important discrepancies between readers. METHODS: We studied consecutive patients with no significant coronary artery disease who were referred for assessment of CS. Two experienced readers blinded to clinical information, imaging reports, independently reviewed FDG-PET/CT images. FDG-PET/CT images were interpreted according to a predefined standard operating procedure, with cardiac FDG uptake patterns categorized into 5 patterns; 1) none, 2) focal, 3) focal on diffuse, 4) diffuse and 5) isolated lateral wall and/or basal uptake. Overall image assessment was classified as either consistent with active CS or not. RESULTS: One hundred scans were included from 71 patients. Of these, 46 underwent FDG-PET/CT with no-restricted diet (no-restriction group) and 54 underwent FDG-PET/CT with low-carbohydrate, high fat and protein-permitted diet (low-carb group). There was agreement of the interpretation category in 74 of 100 scans. Kappa value of agreement among all 5 categories was 0.64 indicating moderate agreement. For overall clinical interpretation, there was agreement in 93 of 100 scans (kappa = 0.85). When scans were divided into the preparation groups; there was trend towards higher agreement in the low-carb group vs no-restriction (80% vs 67%, P = 0.08). Regarding the overall clinical interpretation, there was also trend towards greater agreement in the low-carb group vs no-restriction (96% vs 89%, P = 0.08). CONCLUSION: The inter-observer agreement of cardiac FDG uptake image patterns was moderate. However, agreement was better regarding overall interpretation of CS. Detailed pre-scan dietary

  14. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  15. Uterine leiomyosarcoma metastatic to thyroid shown by (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gauthé, M; Testart Dardel, N; Nascimento, C; Trassard, M; Banal, A; Alberini, J-L

    About one third of focal thyroid uptakes in a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) study are malignant, the most frequent histological type being papillary carcinoma. Metastases to the thyroid account for approximately 7.5% of thyroid malignancies and come mainly from kidney, lung, head and neck, and breast cancers. We report the case of a 64-year-old woman presenting a fast growing thyroid nodule whose primitive or metastatic origin was not obvious, for which (18)F-FDG PET/CT helped in the diagnostic process and in the later management of the patient. Histopathologic findings finally revealed a metastasis of uterine leiomyosarcoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  16. WE-AB-204-01: Performance Characterization of Regularized-Reconstruction Algorithm for 90Y PET/CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S; Mawlawi, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: {sup 90}Y PET/CT imaging and quantification have recently been suggested as an approach of treatment verification. However, due to low positron yield (32ppm), the {sup 90}Y-PET/CT images are very noisy. Iterative reconstruction techniques that employ regularization, e.g. block sequential regularized expectation maximization (BSREM) algorithm (recently implemented on GE scanners – QClear™), has the potential to increase quantitative accuracy with lower noise penalty compared to OSEM. Our aim is to investigate the performance of RR algorithms in {sup 90}Y PET/CT studies. Methods: A NEMA IEC phantom filled with 3GBq {sup 90}YCl{sub 2} (to simulate patient treatment) was imaged on GE-D690 for 1800s/bed. The sphere-to-background ratio of 7. The data were reconstructed using OSEM and BSREM with PSF modeling and TOF correction while varying the iterations (IT) from 1–6 with fixed 24subsets. For BSREM, the edge-preservation parameter (γ ) was 2 and the penalty-parameters (β) was varied 350–950. In all cases a post-reconstruction filter of 5.2mm (2pixel) transaxial and standard z-axis were used. Sphere average activity concentration (AC) and background standard deviation (SD) were then calculated from VOIs drawn in the spheres and background. Results: Increasing IT from 1to6, the %SD in OSEM increased from 30% to 80%, whereas %SD in BSREM images increased by <5% for all βs. BSREM with β=350 didn’t offer any improvement over OSEM (convergence of mean achieved at 2 IT, in this study). Increasing β from 350 to 950 reduced the AC accuracy of small spheres (<20mm) by 10% and noise from 40% to 20%, which resulted in CNR increase from 11 to 17. Conclusion: In count-limited studies such as {sup 90}Y PET/CT, BSREM can be used to suppress image noise and increase CNR at the expense of a relatively small decrease of quantitative accuracy. The BSREM parameters need to be optimized for each study depending on the radionuclides and count densities. Research

  17. PET/CT imaging for treatment verification after proton therapy: A study with plastic phantoms and metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Cascio, Ethan; Flanz, Jacob B.; Bonab, Ali A.; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Lohmann, Kevin; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    The feasibility of off-line positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for routine three dimensional in-vivo treatment verification of proton radiation therapy is currently under investigation at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In preparation for clinical trials, phantom experiments were carried out to investigate the sensitivity and accuracy of the method depending on irradiation and imaging parameters. Furthermore, they addressed the feasibility of PET/CT as a robust verification tool in the presence of metallic implants. These produce x-ray CT artifacts and fluence perturbations which may compromise the accuracy of treatment planning algorithms. Spread-out Bragg peak proton fields were delivered to different phantoms consisting of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), PMMA stacked with lung and bone equivalent materials, and PMMA with titanium rods to mimic implants in patients. PET data were acquired in list mode starting within 20 min after irradiation at a commercial luthetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT scanner. The amount and spatial distribution of the measured activity could be well reproduced by calculations based on the GEANT4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes. This phantom study supports the potential of millimeter accuracy for range monitoring and lateral field position verification even after low therapeutic dose exposures of 2 Gy, despite the delay between irradiation and imaging. It also indicates the value of PET for treatment verification in the presence of metallic implants, demonstrating a higher sensitivity to fluence perturbations in comparison to a commercial analytical treatment planning system. Finally, it addresses the suitability of LSO-based PET detectors for hadron therapy monitoring. This unconventional application of PET involves countrates which are orders of magnitude lower than in diagnostic tracer imaging, i.e., the signal of interest is comparable to the noise originating from the intrinsic radioactivity of

  18. High-throughput multiple-mouse imaging with micro-PET/CT for whole-skeleton assessment.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Masashi; Arentsen, Luke; Shanley, Ryan M; Hui, Susanta K

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies have proven that skeleton-wide functional assessment is essential to comprehensively understand physiological aspects of the skeletal system. Therefore, in contrast to regional imaging studies utilizing a multiple-animal holder (mouse hotel), we attempted to develop and characterize a multiple-mouse imaging system with micro-PET/CT for high-throughput whole-skeleton assessment. Using items found in a laboratory, a simple mouse hotel that houses four mice linked with gas anesthesia was constructed. A mouse-simulating phantom was used to measure uniformity in a cross sectional area and flatness (Amax/Amin*100) along the axial, radial and tangential directions, where Amax and Amin are maximum and minimum activity concentration in the profile, respectively. Fourteen mice were used for single- or multiple-micro-PET/CT scans. NaF uptake was measured at eight skeletal sites (skull to tibia). Skeletal (18)F activities measured with mice in the mouse hotel were within 1.6 ± 4% (mean ± standard deviation) of those measured with mice in the single-mouse holder. Single-holder scanning yields slightly better uniformity and flatness over the hotel. Compared to use of the single-mouse holder, scanning with the mouse hotel reduced study time (by 65%), decreased the number of scans (four-fold), reduced cost, required less computer storage space (40%), and maximized (18)F usage. The mouse hotel allows high-throughput, quantitatively equivalent scanning compared to the single-mouse holder for micro-PET/CT imaging for whole-skeleton assessment of mice.

  19. Feasibility of 18F-fluoromethylcholine PET/CT for imaging of vessel wall alterations in humans--first results.

    PubMed

    Bucerius, Jan; Schmaljohann, Jörn; Böhm, Ingrid; Palmedo, Holger; Guhlke, Stefan; Tiemann, Klaus; Schild, Hans Heinz; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Manka, Christoph

    2008-04-01

    Recently published data indicated (18)F-fluorocholine to be feasible for imaging vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in an animal model. Five patients undergoing whole-body (18)F-fluoromethylcholine-((18)F-FMCH-) PET/CT for imaging of prostate cancer disease were retrospectively evaluated. Whole-body PET scans were started immediately after i.v. injection of (18)F-FMCH. About 5-15 min after tracer injection, acquisition of scans of the pelvis and abdomen was performed. PET, CT, and PET/CT slices were generated for review and visual analyses of the abdominal aorta and the common iliac arteries were performed. Vascular findings in examined arteries and surrounding structures due to artifacts were excluded from further analysis. The lower threshold of (18)F-FMCH uptake was set above the background activity within the examined vessels. Morphological classification of vessel wall alterations (WA) included structural wall alterations without additional calcification (SWA), structural wall alterations associated with calcifications (SWC), and solely calcified lesions (CL). They were correlated with (18)F-FMCH uptake qualified as present and vice versa. A total of 31 WA were identified. Positive (18)F-FMCH uptake was found in 14 lesions (SWA: n = 5; SWC: n = 9). Sixteen of 17 (18)F-FMCH negative lesions were identified as CL without additional structural vessel wall alteration. One SWA did not show any (18)F-FMCH accumulation. None of the CLs as well as unaltered parts of the vessel wall showed (18)F-FMCH uptake. Our initial data in five patients with a total of 31 vessel wall alterations show promising results indicating for the first time the feasibility of (18)F-FMCH for in vivo imaging of structural WA in humans.

  20. High-throughput multiple-mouse imaging with micro-PET/CT for whole-skeleton assessment

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Masashi; Arentsen, Luke; Shanley, Ryan M; Hui, Susanta K

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have proven that skeleton-wide functional assessment is essential to comprehensively understand physiological aspects of the skeletal system. Therefore, in contrast to regional imaging studies utilizing a multiple-animal holder (mouse hotel), we attempted to develop and characterize a multiple-mouse imaging system with micro-PET/CT for high-throughput whole-skeleton assessment. Using items found in a laboratory, a simple mouse hotel that houses four mice linked with gas anesthesia was constructed. A mouse-simulating phantom was used to measure uniformity in a cross sectional area and flatness (Amax/Amin*100) along the axial, radial and tangential directions, where Amax and Amin are maximum and minimum activity concentration in the profile, respectively. Fourteen mice were used for single- or multiple-micro-PET/CT scans. NaF uptake was measured at eight skeletal sites (skull to tibia). Skeletal 18F activities measured with mice in the mouse hotel were within 1.6±4% (mean±standard deviation) of those measured with mice in the single-mouse holder. Single-holder scanning yields slightly better uniformity and flatness over the hotel. Compared to use of the single-mouse holder, scanning with the mouse hotel reduced study time (by 65%), decreased the number of scans (four-fold), reduced cost, required less computer storage space (40%), and maximized 18F usage. The mouse hotel allows high-throughput, quantitatively equivalent scanning compared to the single-mouse holder for micro-PET/CT imaging for whole-skeleton assessment of mice. PMID:24998335

  1. Design and performance of a respiratory amplitude gating device for PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting; Clark, John W. Jr.; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, the authors proposed a free-breathing amplitude gating (FBAG) technique for PET/CT scanners. The implementation of this technique required specialized hardware and software components that were specifically designed to interface with commercial respiratory gating devices to generate the necessary triggers required for the FBAG technique. The objective of this technical note is to introduce an in-house device that integrates all the necessary hardware and software components as well as tracks the patient's respiratory motion to realize amplitude gating on PET/CT scanners. Methods: The in-house device is composed of a piezoelectric transducer coupled to a data-acquisition system in order to monitor the respiratory waveform. A LABVIEW program was designed to control the data-acquisition device and inject triggers into the PET list stream whenever the detected respiratory amplitude crossed a predetermined amplitude range. A timer was also programmed to stop the scan when the accumulated time within the selected amplitude range reached a user-set interval. This device was tested using a volunteer and a phantom study. Results: The results from the volunteer and phantom studies showed that the in-house device can detect similar respiratory signals as commercially available respiratory gating systems and is able to generate the necessary triggers to suppress respiratory motion artifacts. Conclusions: The proposed in-house device can be used to implement the FBAG technique in current PET/CT scanners.

  2. Correlation of clinical outcomes with bremsstrahlung and Y-90 PET/CT imaging findings following Y-90 radiosynoviorthesis: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Barber, Thomas W; Cherk, Martin H; Powell, Anne; Yap, Kenneth S K; Billah, Baki; Kalff, Victor

    2016-12-01

    It is unclear how to predict which patients will respond to Y-90 radiosynoviorthesis. The aim of this study is to correlate clinical outcomes following Y-90 radiosynoviorthesis with bremsstrahlung and Y-90 PET/CT imaging findings. Fifty-one joints underwent bremsstrahlung planar and Y-90 PET/CT imaging following Y-90 radiosynoviorthesis. The Y-90 distribution pattern on bremsstrahlung planar imaging was classified as diffuse or non-diffuse and compared with the intra or extra-articular location of activity on Y-90 PET/CT. Treatment response was assessed by patients and clinicians at 6 months. In patients who underwent bremsstrahlung SPECT, side-by-side comparison with PET was performed with image quality/resolution scored using a five-point-scale. Bremsstrahlung planar images were classified as diffuse in 33/51 (65 %) and non-diffuse in 18/51 (35 %) scans. There was no association between treatment response and the bremsstrahlung planar imaging pattern. PET/CT confirmed an intra-articular location in all 33/33 (100 %) diffuse scans and an extra-articular location in 3/18 (17 %) non-diffuse scans. Of the three joints with extra-articular activity, none had any treatment response. Excluding these three joints, there remained no association between the bremsstrahlung planar imaging pattern and treatment response. Of the 42 joints imaged with SPECT, PET image quality/resolution was classified as superior in 40 (95 %). In one patient with extra-articular activity on PET/CT, SPECT/CT was unable to definitively localise the activity to the intra or extra-articular space. The distribution pattern on bremsstrahlung planar imaging did not correlate with clinical outcome following Y-90 radiosynoviorthesis in our study population. However, in patients with non-diffuse planar imaging patterns, Y-90 PET/CT should be considered to exclude extra-articular activity with PET providing superior image quality compared to SPECT.

  3. Non-rigid registration of serial dedicated breast CT, longitudinal dedicated breast CT and PET/CT images using the diffeomorphic demons method.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jonathan; Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Joshi, Anand A; Ferrero, Andrea; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2014-09-01

    Dedicated breast CT and PET/CT scanners provide detailed 3D anatomical and functional imaging data sets and are currently being investigated for applications in breast cancer management such as diagnosis, monitoring response to therapy and radiation therapy planning. Our objective was to evaluate the performance of the diffeomorphic demons (DD) non-rigid image registration method to spatially align 3D serial (pre- and post-contrast) dedicated breast computed tomography (CT), and longitudinally-acquired dedicated 3D breast CT and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images. The algorithmic parameters of the DD method were optimized for the alignment of dedicated breast CT images using training data and fixed. The performance of the method for image alignment was quantitatively evaluated using three separate data sets; (1) serial breast CT pre- and post-contrast images of 20 women, (2) breast CT images of 20 women acquired before and after repositioning the subject on the scanner, and (3) dedicated breast PET/CT images of 7 women undergoing neo-adjuvant chemotherapy acquired pre-treatment and after 1 cycle of therapy. The DD registration method outperformed no registration (p < 0.001) and conventional affine registration (p ≤ 0.002) for serial and longitudinal breast CT and PET/CT image alignment. In spite of the large size of the imaging data, the computational cost of the DD method was found to be reasonable (3-5 min). Co-registration of dedicated breast CT and PET/CT images can be performed rapidly and reliably using the DD method. This is the first study evaluating the DD registration method for the alignment of dedicated breast CT and PET/CT images. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Physiologic Imaging of Choroidal Melanoma: Before and After Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) standardized uptake values (SUV) in uveal melanoma before and after plaque brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 217 patients diagnosed with uveal melanoma and eligible for ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy underwent preoperative PET/CT to evaluate their intraocular tumor and screen for metastasis. Subsequent to undergoing plaque brachytherapy, patients' PET/CT SUV were periodically reevaluated over 42 months. Results: In this series, 37 (17%) choroidal melanoma patients were found to have an SUV of >2.0. Of these, 18 patients were able to undergo interval follow-up PET/CT scanning. There were 3 patients with T2, 11 patients with T3, and 4 patients with T4 melanomas according to 7th edition AJCC-UICC criteria. Mean apical thickness was 8.8 mm (range, 3-12.3 mm), and the largest mean tumor diameter was 15.1 mm (range, 12-19.9 mm). The mean initial SUV was 3.7 (range, 2.1-7.3). Patients were followed for a median 16 months (range, 6-42 months). The median time to a tumor SUV of 0 was 8.0 months (range, 6-18 months). There was one case of one interval increase in SUV that diminished after circumferential laser treatment. Conclusions: Intraocular PET/CT imaging provides a physiological assessment of tumor metabolism that can be used to evaluate changes after treatment. In this study, ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy was associated with extinguished tumor PET/CT SUV over time. PET/CT imaging can be used to assess choroidal melanomas for their response to treatment.

  5. Comparison of 18F-FDG-PET/CT and 18F-FDG-PET/MR imaging in oncology: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Singnurkar, Amit; Poon, Raymond; Metser, Ur

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature to evaluate the clinical performance of integrated (18)F-FDG PET/MR as compared with (18)F-FDG PET/CT in oncologic imaging. The literature was searched using MEDLINE and EMBASE via OVID. Studies comparing the diagnostic accuracy of integrated (18)F-FDG PET/MR and (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis, staging/restaging, assessment of treatment response, or evaluation of metastasis in patients with suspected or diagnosed cancers were deemed eligible for inclusion. Risk of bias and applicability concerns were assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. The overall quality of the studies was rated favorably with bias or applicability concerns in a few studies. Our review suggests that (18)F-FDG PET/MR performs comparably to (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of local lymph node and distant metastases and superiorly in determining the local extent of tumor. SUV obtained from (18)F-FDG PET/MR correlated highly with those obtained from (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Based on early evidence, (18)F-FDG PET/MR is comparable to (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the clinical scenarios examined in this review. The potential for interchangeability of (18)F-FDG PET/MR with (18)F-FDG PET/CT will vary by indication and the body site that is being imaged, with PET scanners integrated with MRI predicted to provide greater detail in the evaluation of local tumor extent, where (18)F-FDG PET/CT can be limited.

  6. Evaluation of 18F-FDG PET/CT as a diagnostic imaging and staging tool for feline oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Randall, E K; Kraft, S L; Yoshikawa, H; LaRue, S M

    2016-03-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) has been shown to be effective for staging human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) but its application for cats with oral SCC is unknown. Twelve cats with biopsy-proven oral SCC were imaged with whole body 18FDG-PET/CT to determine its value as a diagnostic imaging and staging tool and fine needle aspirates were obtained of accessible regional lymph nodes. All tumors were FDG avid and conspicuous on 18FDG-PET/CT images, with an average of the maximum standardized uptake value 9.88 ± 5.33 SD (range 2.9-24.9). Soft tissue infiltrative tumors that were subtle and ill defined on CT were highly visible and more extensive on FDG-PET/CT. Tumors invading the osseous structures were more similar in extent on 18FDG-PET/CT and CT although they were more conspicuous on PET images. Three cytologically confirmed metastases were hypermetabolic on PET, while two of those metastases were equivocal on CT.

  7. PET/CT imaging of age- and task-associated differences in muscle activity during fatiguing contractions

    PubMed Central

    Kalliokoski, Kari K.; Block, Derek E.; Gould, Jeffrey R.; Klingensmith, William C.; Enoka, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    The study compared positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) of [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([18F]-FDG) uptake by skeletal muscles and the amount of muscle activity as indicated by surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings when young and old men performed fatiguing isometric contractions that required either force or position control. EMG signals were recorded from thigh muscles of six young men (26 ± 6 yr) and six old men (77 ± 6 yr) during fatiguing contractions with the knee extensors. PET/CT scans were performed immediately after task failure. Glucose uptake in 24 leg muscles, quantified as standardized uptake values, was greater for the old men after the force task and differed across tasks for the young men (force, 0.64 ± 0.3 g/ml; position, 0.73 ± 0.3 g/ml), but not the old men (force, 0.84 ± 0.3 g/ml; position, 0.79 ± 0.26 g/ml) (age × task interaction; P < 0.001). In contrast, the rate of increase in EMG amplitude for the agonist muscles was greater for the young men during the two contractions and there was no difference for either group of subjects in the rate of increase in EMG amplitude across the two tasks. The imaging estimates of glucose uptake indicated age- and task-dependent differences in the spatial distribution of [18F]-FDG uptake by skeletal muscles during fatiguing contractions. The findings demonstrate that PET/CT imaging of [18F]-FDG uptake, but not surface EMG recordings, detected the modulation of muscle activity across the fatiguing tasks by the young men but not the old men. PMID:23412899

  8. Definition of vascular territories on myocardial perfusion images by integration with true coronary anatomy: a hybrid PET/CT analysis.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Mehrbod S; Lautamäki, Riikka; Merrill, Jennifer; Voicu, Corina; Epley, William; McBride, Gerald; Bengel, Frank M

    2010-02-01

    For interpretation of myocardial perfusion studies, tissue segments are usually assigned to coronary vascular territories based on general assumptions about the most frequent vascular distribution pattern. These assumptions may be inaccurate because of interindividual variability of coronary anatomy. This limitation may be overcome by hybrid imaging through the individual integration of coronary anatomy with myocardial tissue regions. We studied 71 consecutive patients who underwent (82)Rb perfusion PET/CT, including CT angiography, for work-up of coronary artery disease on a 64-slice PET/CT scanner. Coronary vessels as defined by CT were assigned to each of 17 myocardial segments for PET analysis using fusion images. Reassigned segmental maps were compared with standard assignment as proposed by the American Heart Association model, without knowledge of individual anatomy. The validity of segmental assignment was tested in 6 dogs by comparison of PET/CT with ex vivo dye staining of coronary territories. Dog studies showed excellent agreement between PET/CT-defined segments and ex vivo-stained territories (kappa, 0.80). In patients, 72% (51/71) demonstrated differences from the standard assignment in at least 1 myocardial segment; 112 of 1,207 segments were reassigned to nonstandard vascular territories. Most frequently, standard right coronary segments were reassigned to the left circumflex territory (39% of reassigned segments), standard circumflex segments were reassigned to the left anterior descending territory (30%), and standard left anterior descending segments were reassigned to either circumflex or right coronary (12% and 11%, respectively). In 27 studies with a myocardial perfusion defect, relative uptake in the vascular territory with the defect was significantly lower after CT-based reassignment and was higher in remote territories, resulting in better separation (ratio of defect to remote, 0.75 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.81 +/- 0.12 before reassignment; P = 0

  9. Breath-hold PET/CT-guided tumour ablation under general anaesthesia: accuracy of tumour image registration and projected ablation zone overlap.

    PubMed

    Shyn, P B; Tremblay-Paquet, S; Palmer, K; Tatli, S; Tuncali, K; Olubiyi, O I; Hata, N; Silverman, S G

    2017-03-01

    To assess single-breath-hold combined positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for accuracy of tumour image registration and projected ablation volume overlap in patients undergoing percutaneous PET/CT-guided tumour-ablation procedures under general anaesthesia. Eight patients underwent 12 PET/CT-guided tumour-ablation procedures to treat 20 tumours in the lung, liver, or adrenal gland. Using breath-hold PET/CT, the centre of the tumour was marked on each PET and CT acquisition by four readers to assess two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) spatial misregistration. Overlap of PET and CT projected ablation volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Interobserver differences were assessed with repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Technical success and local progression rates were noted. Mean tumour 2D PET/CT misregistrations were 1.02 mm (range 0.01-5.02), 1.89 (0.03-7.85), and 3.05 (0-10) in the x, y, and z planes. Mean 3D misregistration was 4.4 mm (0.36-10.74). Mean projected PET/CT ablation volume DSC was 0.72 (±0.19). No significant interobserver differences in 3D misregistration (p=0.73) or DSC (p=0.54) were observed. Technical success of ablations was 100%; one (5.3%) of 19 tumours progressed. Accurate spatial registration of tumours and substantial overlap of projected ablation volumes are achievable when comparing PET and CT acquisitions from single-breath-hold PET/CT. The results suggest that tumours visible only at PET could be accurately targeted and ablated using this technique. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Useful diagnostic biometabolic data obtained by PET/CT and MR fusion imaging using open source software.

    PubMed

    Antonica, Filippo; Asabella, Artor Niccoli; Ferrari, Cristina; Rubini, Domenico; Notaristefano, Antonio; Nicoletti, Adriano; Altini, Corinna; Merenda, Nunzio; Mossa, Emilio; Guarini, Attilio; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade numerous attempts were considered to co-register and integrate different imaging data. Like PET/CT the integration of PET to MR showed great interest. PET/MR scanners are recently tested on different distrectual or systemic pathologies. Unfortunately PET/MR scanners are expensive and diagnostic protocols are still under studies and investigations. Nuclear Medicine imaging highlights functional and biometabolic information but has poor anatomic details. The aim of this study is to integrate MR and PET data to produce distrectual or whole body fused images acquired from different scanners even in different days. We propose an offline method to fuse PET with MR data using an open-source software that has to be inexpensive, reproducible and capable to exchange data over the network. We also evaluate global quality, alignment quality, and diagnostic confidence of fused PET-MR images. We selected PET/CT studies performed in our Nuclear Medicine unit, MR studies provided by patients on DICOM CD media or network received. We used Osirix 5.7 open source version. We aligned CT slices with the first MR slice, pointed and marked for co-registration using MR-T1 sequence and CT as reference and fused with PET to produce a PET-MR image. A total of 100 PET/CT studies were fused with the following MR studies: 20 head, 15 thorax, 24 abdomen, 31 pelvis, 10 whole body. An interval of no more than 15 days between PET and MR was the inclusion criteria. PET/CT, MR and fused studies were evaluated by two experienced radiologist and two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Each one filled a five point based evaluation scoring scheme based on image quality, image artifacts, segmentation errors, fusion misalignment and diagnostic confidence. Our fusion method showed best results for head, thorax and pelvic districts in terms of global quality, alignment quality and diagnostic confidence,while for the abdomen and pelvis alignement quality and global quality resulted

  11. [Dual-time point images of the liver with (18)F-FDG PET/CT in suspected recurrence from colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fuster, D; Lafuente, S; Setoain, X; Navales, I; Perissinotti, A; Pavia, J; Paredes, P; Lomeña, F; Pons, F

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the potential improvement of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT using additional delayed images of the liver in operated colorectal cancer. The study prospectively included 71 patients (22 women, 49 men) with mean age of 65 ± 11 years with clinical, analytic or radiological suspicion of current disease. A whole body PET/CT scan was performed at 60 min. (standard images) and after 2 hr (delayed images) post-injection of 4.07 MBq/Kg of (18)F-FDG. Visual and quantitative SUV analysis of PET/CT findings was done. All findings were confirmed by histopathology and/or at least 6 months follow-up. Thirty-seven out of 71 patients were diagnosed of liver metastases (79 metastases). In 38/71 cases there was extra-hepatic disease in the form of local recurrence (10), abdominopelvic (3) or mediastinal (3) lymph nodes, bone (1) or lung metastases (16) and carcinomatosis (10). Sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of liver metastases in a patient-by-patient basis in standard (81% and 91%) and in delayed images (95% y 97%) was calculated. The number of lesions detected in delayed images was significantly higher (66/79) than in standard images (57/79). Sensitivity and specificity for PET/CT in the diagnosis of extra-hepatic disease was 84% and 70%, contributing to the detection of synchronous tumors in 5 patients. PET/CT may be useful in the diagnosis of extra-hepatic disease in suspected recurrence of colorectal cancer. Delayed images on PET/CT may increase the sensitivity to identify liver metastases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. Somatostatin receptor expression in lymphomas: a source of false diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor at (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Ruuska, Tiina; Ramírez Escalante, Yadith; Vaittinen, Samuli; Gardberg, Maria; Kiviniemi, Aida; Marjamäki, Päivi; Kemppainen, Jukka; Jyrkkiö, Sirkku; Minn, Heikki

    2017-07-07

    (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT is routinely used to image neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). A case of lymphoma initially thought to be NET based on a positive (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was recently seen at our institution. This prompted us to determine prospectively somatostatin receptor (SSTR) status in patients with lymphoma by immunohistochemical analysis of SSTR subtypes 2, 3 and 5 (SSTR2,3,5) and (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT imaging. Twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma were referred to (68)Ga-DOTANOC and FDG PET/CT prior to any treatment. Tracer uptake was evaluated visually by two nuclear medicine specialists. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were determined from 14 nodal and two extranodal regions with highest uptake in each patient. Lesions were then graded with Deauville score (1-5) on FDG PET/CT and modified Krenning score (0-4) on (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. SSTR2,3,5 status was analyzed from routine biopsies of lymphomatous tissue and matched to corresponding PET/CT findings. About 20/21 patients had FDG-positive lymphoma (Deauville score ≥3). Uptake of (68)Ga-DOTANOC was regarded as positive if Krenning score was ≥2 and resulted in 13/21 (62%) patients having (68)Ga-DOTANOC-positive lymphomas. The highest uptake of (68)Ga-DOTANOC was seen in Hodgkin's lymphoma of nodular sclerosis subtype and in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (SUVmax median 9.8 and 9.7, respectively). Both cases showed strong SSTR2 immunopositivity in tumor cells. Some patients had SSTR2 immunopositivity predominantly in endothelial and dendritic cells and follicular centers of lymph nodes contributing to a positive PET/CT with probably low tumor-specific uptake. SSTR3 and SSTR5 were negative in most lymphoma subtypes. According to this pilot study, (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT is positive in some lymphoma subtypes which express SSTRs. These tumors present a potential risk of being misinterpreted as NETs if a representative tumor sample is not available. Lymphomas with high

  13. Contribution of nonattenuation-corrected images on FDG-PET/CT in the assessment of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Ertan; Kara, Ahmet; Elboğa, Umut

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we aim to determine the diagnostic performance of nonattenuation-corrected (NAC) and attenuation-corrected (AC) FDG-PET/CT images in the assessment of solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). We reviewed the images of 41 patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT to diagnose SPNs. The visual analysis of FDG uptake intensity in SPN on AC and NAC PET images was made using a four-point score from 1 to 4 on both AC and NAC PET images. The cutoff value of SUVmax and visual uptake scores for malignancy were defined as ≥2.5 and ≥3, respectively. The significant visual uptake (≥2 visual point score) on AC and NAC PET images was considered to be positive 18F-FDG PET findings for lesion detectability. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were calculated for AC and NAC PET images. Based on the histopathology and imaging data, 22 of the SPNs (54 %) were malignant and 19 of them (46 %) were benign. The sensitivity and NPV were found to be 100 % in the detection of SPNs for AC and NAC PET images. For all SPNs and SPNs ≤2 cm, NAC PET image had a higher diagnostic performance for the SPN characterization as malignant or benign, when compared with AC PET image. The success rates of AC and NAC PET images were found to be similar for the detection of SPNs. NAC PET image had a higher diagnostic performance for the SPN characterization. It is thought that NAC PET image may provide additional contributions for characterization of SPNs.

  14. Optimal threshold of stimulated serum thyroglobulin level for (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hong; Zhang, Hu; Yu, Yong-Li; Gao, Yun-Chao

    2017-06-01

    This study was to explore the optimal threshold of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-stimulated serum thyroglobulin (s-Tg) for patients who were to receive (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT scan owing to clinical suspicion of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) recurrence but negative post-therapeutic (131)I whole-body scan ((131)I-WBS). A total of 60 qualified patients underwent PET/CT scanning from October 2010 to July 2014. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses showed that s-Tg levels over 49 μg/L led to the highest diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT to detect recurrence, with a sensitivity of 89.5% and a specificity of 90.9%. Besides, bivariate correlation analysis showed positive correlation between s-Tg levels and the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of (18)F-FDG in patients with positive PET/CT scanning, suggesting a significant influence of TSH both on Tg release and uptake of (18)F-FDG. So, positive PET/CT imaging is expected when patients have negative (131)I-WBS but s-Tg levels over 49 μg/L.

  15. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  16. PET/CT imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with 68Gallium-labeled somatostatin analogues: An overview and single institutional experience from India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms characterized by overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Functional imaging plays a crucial role in management of NETs. Recently, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Gallium (68Ga)-labeled somatostatin analogues has shown excellent results for imaging of NETs and better results than conventional SSTR scintigraphy. In this review we have discussed the utility of 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogue PET/CT in NETs for various established and potential indications. In addition we have also shared our own experience from a tertiary care center in India. PMID:24591775

  17. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study.

    PubMed

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-05-07

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [(18)F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and

  18. Early Detection of Bone Metastasis in Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Cervix by 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Damian, Andres; Lago, Graciela; Rossi, Susana; Alonso, Omar; Engler, Henry

    2017-03-01

    The neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare malignancy that has a poor prognosis due to early lymphatic and hematogenous spread. We herein report a case of a 27- year-old woman who was referred for initial staging of a neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma with previous unremarkable structural imaging. Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT revealed focal uptake at the primary tumor and in a solitary pelvic bone lesion suggestive of metastases that was further confirmed by CT-guided biopsy. Somatostatin receptor PET/CT may be a useful image modality for early detection of metastases to guide treatment in these patients.

  19. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by 6 different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses (EUD), and 2%-2mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, < 5% in treatment planning, and < 2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT

  20. Qualification of National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers for Quantitative PET/CT Imaging in Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Joshua S; Reddin, Janet S; Opanowski, Adam; Kinahan, Paul E; Siegel, Barry A; Shankar, Lalitha K; Karp, Joel S

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute developed the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) initiative in 2010 to prequalify imaging facilities at all of the National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive and clinical cancer centers for oncology trials using advanced imaging techniques, including PET. Here we review the CQIE PET/CT scanner qualification process and results in detail. Methods: Over a period of approximately 5 y, sites were requested to submit a variety of phantoms, including uniform and American College of Radiology-approved phantoms, PET/CT images, and examples of clinical images. Submissions were divided into 3 distinct time periods: initial submission (T0) and 2 requalification submissions (T1 and T2). Images were analyzed using standardized procedures, and scanners received a pass or fail designation. Sites had the opportunity to submit new data for scanners that failed. Quantitative results were compared across scanners within a given time period and across time periods for a given scanner. Results: Data from 65 unique PET/CT scanners across 56 sites were submitted for CQIE T0 qualification; 64 scanners passed the qualification. Data from 44 (68%) of those 65 scanners were submitted for T2. From T0 to T2, the percentage of scanners passing the CQIE qualification on the first attempt rose from 38% for T1 to 67% for T2. The most common reasons for failure were SUV outside specifications, incomplete submission, and uniformity issues. Uniform phantom and American College of Radiology-approved phantom results between scanner manufacturers were similar. Conclusion: The results of the CQIE process showed that periodic requalification may decrease the frequency of deficient data submissions. The CQIE project also highlighted the concern within imaging facilities about the burden of maintaining different qualifications and accreditations. Finally, for quantitative imaging-based trials, further evaluation of the relationships between the level of

  1. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Wollenweber, Scott D.; Stearns, Charles W.; Bowen, Stephen R.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. Methods: A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, SUV{sub peak}, and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RC{sub max}, RC{sub mean}, RC{sub peak}, and RC{sub vol}, representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. Results: For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, −1.8 ± 6.5, −3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were −8.4 ± 5.3, −10.5 ± 6.2, −7.6 ± 5.0, and −13.0 ± 7.7 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by

  2. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Alessio, Adam M.; Wollenweber, Scott D.; Stearns, Charles W.; Bowen, Stephen R.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. Methods: A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RCmax, RCmean, RCpeak, and RCvol, representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. Results: For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, −1.8 ± 6.5, −3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RCmax, RCpeak, RCmean, and RCvol. In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were −8.4 ± 5.3, −10.5 ± 6.2, −7.6 ± 5.0, and −13.0 ± 7.7 for RCmax, RCpeak, RCmean, and RCvol. When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by the patient-specific respiratory waveforms; when testing patient and sinusoidal waveforms

  3. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Nyflot, Matthew J; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Alessio, Adam M; Wollenweber, Scott D; Stearns, Charles W; Bowen, Stephen R; Kinahan, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUV(max), SUV(mean), SUV(peak), and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RC(max), RC(mean), RC(peak), and RC(vol), representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, -1.8 ± 6.5, -3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RC(max), RC(peak), RC(mean), and RC(vol). In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were -8.4 ± 5.3, -10.5 ± 6.2, -7.6 ± 5.0, and -13.0 ± 7.7 for RC(max), RC(peak), RC(mean), and RC(vol). When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by the patient-specific respiratory waveforms; when testing patient and sinusoidal waveforms separately

  4. Morphology supporting function: attenuation correction for SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tzu C.; Alessio, Adam M.; Miyaoka, Robert M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    Both SPECT, and in particular PET, are unique in medical imaging for their high sensitivity and direct link to a physical quantity, i.e. radiotracer concentration. This gives PET and SPECT imaging unique capabilities for accurately monitoring disease activity for the purposes of clinical management or therapy development. However, to achieve a direct quantitative connection between the underlying radiotracer concentration and the reconstructed image values several confounding physical effects have to be estimated, notably photon attenuation and scatter. With the advent of dual-modality SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MR scanners, the complementary CT or MR image data can enable these corrections, although there are unique challenges for each combination. This review covers the basic physics underlying photon attenuation and scatter and summarizes technical considerations for multimodal imaging with regard to PET and SPECT quantification and methods to address the challenges for each multimodal combination. PMID:26576737

  5. A Comparative Study of Noninvasive Hypoxia Imaging with 18F-Fluoroerythronitroimidazole and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/CT in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuchun; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Yong; Yu, Qingxi; Zhu, Shouhui; Wang, Suzhen; Zhao, Shuqiang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    This is a clinical study to compare noninvasive hypoxia imaging using 18F-fluoroerythronitroimidazole (18F-FETNIM) and 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with inoperable stages III-IV lung cancer. A total of forty-two patients with inoperable stages III-IV lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT (n = 18) and 18F-FMISO PET/CT (n = 24) before chemo/radiation therapy. The standard uptake values (SUVs) of malignant and normal tissues depict 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT uptake. Tumor-to-blood ratios (T/B) were used to quantify hypoxia. All patients with lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT successfully. Compared to 18F-FMISO, 18F-FETNIM showed similar uptake in muscle, thyroid, spleen, pancreas, heart, lung and different uptake in blood, liver, and kidney. Significantly higher SUV and T/B ratio with 18F-FMISO (2.56±0.77, 1.98±0.54), as compared to 18F-FETNIM (2.12±0.56, 1.42±0.33) were seen in tumor, P = 0.022, <0.001. For the patients with different histopathological subtypes, no significant difference of SUV (or T/B ratio) was observed both in 18F-FMISO and 18F-FETNIM in tumor. A significantly different SUV (or T/B ratio) was detected between < = 2cm, 2~5cm, and >5cm groups in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.015 (or P = 0.029), whereas no difference was detected in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.446 (or P = 0.707). Both 18F-FETNIM and 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher SUVs (or T/B ratios) in stage IV than stage III, P = 0.021, 0.013 (or P = 0.032, 0.02). 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher uptake than 18F-FETNIM in tumor/non-tumor ratio and might be a better hypoxia tracer in lung cancer.

  6. A Comparative Study of Noninvasive Hypoxia Imaging with 18F-Fluoroerythronitroimidazole and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/CT in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Yu, Qingxi; Zhu, Shouhui; Wang, Suzhen; Zhao, Shuqiang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This is a clinical study to compare noninvasive hypoxia imaging using 18F-fluoroerythronitroimidazole (18F-FETNIM) and 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer. Methods A total of forty-two patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT (n = 18) and 18F-FMISO PET/CT (n = 24) before chemo/radiation therapy. The standard uptake values (SUVs) of malignant and normal tissues depict 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT uptake. Tumor-to-blood ratios (T/B) were used to quantify hypoxia. Results All patients with lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT successfully. Compared to 18F-FMISO, 18F-FETNIM showed similar uptake in muscle, thyroid, spleen, pancreas, heart, lung and different uptake in blood, liver, and kidney. Significantly higher SUV and T/B ratio with 18F-FMISO (2.56±0.77, 1.98±0.54), as compared to 18F-FETNIM (2.12±0.56, 1.42±0.33) were seen in tumor, P = 0.022, <0.001. For the patients with different histopathological subtypes, no significant difference of SUV (or T/B ratio) was observed both in 18F-FMISO and 18F-FETNIM in tumor. A significantly different SUV (or T/B ratio) was detected between < = 2cm, 2~5cm, and >5cm groups in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.015 (or P = 0.029), whereas no difference was detected in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.446 (or P = 0.707). Both 18F-FETNIM and 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher SUVs (or T/B ratios) in stage IV than stage III, P = 0.021, 0.013 (or P = 0.032, 0.02). Conclusion 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher uptake than 18F-FETNIM in tumor/non-tumor ratio and might be a better hypoxia tracer in lung cancer. PMID:27322586

  7. SU-F-R-21: The Stability of Radiomics Features On 4D FDG-PET/CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to perform a stability analysis of 4D PET-derived features in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) based on six different respiratory phases. Methods: The 4D FDG-PET/CT respiratory phases were labeled as T0%, T17%, T33%,T50%, T67%, T83% phases, with the T0% phase approximately corresponding to the normal end-inspiration. Lesions were manually delineated based on fused PET-CT, using a standardized clinical delineation protocol. Six texture parameters were analyzed. Results: Results showed that the majority of assessed features had a low stability such as Homogeneity (0.385–0.416), Dissimilarity (3.707–3.861), Angular two moments (0.013–0.019), Contrast (39.782–49.562), Entropy(4.683–5.002) and Inverse differential moment (0.317–0.362) on different respiratory phases. Conclusion: This study suggest that further research of quantitative PET imaging features is warranted with respect to respiratory motion.

  8. ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia and Haematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Camus, Vincent; Edet-Sanson, Agathe; Bubenheim, Michael; Hitzel, Anne; Becker, Stéphanie; David, Marion; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Lenain, Pascal; Jardin, Fabrice; Contentin, Nathalie; Fontoura, Marie Laure; Cardinael, Nathalie; Vaudaux, Sandrine; Dubois, Sydney; Tilly, Hervé; Vera, Pierre; Leprêtre, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of hyper-metabolic infection sites revealed by fluorine-18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT) in patients with febrile neutropenia (FN). Forty-eight consecutive patients with haematological malignancies and persistent FN (temperature ≥ 38°C and neutrophil count <500 cells/μl for more than two days) as a consequence of intensive chemotherapy were prospectively included. Pathological FDG uptakes identified 31 foci of infections located in the lungs (n=15, 48.4 %), colon (n=4, 12.9%), pancreas (n=2, 6.5%), skin (n=3, 9.7%), ear-nose-throat area (n=5, 16.1%), central venous catheter tract (n=1, 3.2%) and gallbladder (n=1, 3.2%). These pathological FDG uptakes were observed in half of the 48 patients (n=24). Among the 38 patients with a clinical diagnosis of infection, 23 showed a pathological FDG uptake, resulting in a FDG-PET/CT sensitivity of 61% (95% CI, 43-76%). Our study confirmed the ability of FDG-PET/CT to diagnose infections in patients with persistent FN. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Unusual case of splenic sarcoidosis without morphological lesions detected by PET-CT in a patient with breast cancer: functional imaging between pitfalls and therapeutic guide.

    PubMed

    Paone, Gaetano; Di Lascio, Simona; Azzola, Andrea; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Pagani, Olivia

    2017-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman under treatment with letrozole for metastatic breast cancer underwent (18)F-FDG PET-CT for restaging. A new widespread intense splenic FDG uptake without nodular lesions and multiple FDG-avid mediastinal and abdominal nodes were observed. Based on these findings, a nodal and transbronchial lung biopsy was performed. Histological results were compatible with sarcoidosis. The patient began steroid treatment and 6 weeks after a PET-CT showed normalisation of both splenic and nodal uptake. In our case, (18)F-FDG PET-CT has been useful in detecting a rare case of splenic sarcoidosis without typical nodular lesions on CT images, impacting the patient's treatment and prognosis.

  10. A PET/CT-based strategy is a stronger predictor of survival than a standard imaging strategy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Max; Nielsen, Anne L; Pareek, Manan; Johansen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Jens A; Diaz, Anabel; Nielsen, Mie K; Christiansen, Janus M; Asmussen, Jon T; Nguyen, Nina; Gerke, Oke; Thomassen, Anders; Alavi, Abass; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Godballe, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether tumor staging by upfront (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) leads to improved discrimination of survival, when compared with traditionally used imaging strategies based on chest X-ray + head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (CXR/MRI) or chest computed tomography + head and neck MRI (CCT/MRI) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods: Blinded prospective cohort study based on paired data. Consecutive patients with histologically verified primary HNSCC were recruited at Odense University Hospital from September 2013 to March 2016. All included patients underwent CXR/MRI, CCT/MRI, and PET/CT on the same day. Tumors were categorized as localized (stages I-II), locally advanced (stages III-IVB), or metastatic (stage IVC) disease. Discriminative abilities for each imaging modality with respect to HNSCC staging were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox proportional-hazards regression with Harrell's C-index, and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Results: A total of 307 patients with histologically verified HNSCC were included. Use of PET/CT resulted in significantly altered stratification of tumor stage, when compared to either CXR/MRI or CCT/MRI (χ(2): P < 0.001 for both). Cancer stages based on PET/CT, but not CXR/MRI or CCT/MRI, were associated with significant differences in mortality risk in Kaplan-Meier analyses (P ≤ 0.002 for all PET/CT-based comparisons). Furthermore, overall discriminative ability was significantly greater for PET/CT (C-index: 0.712) than CXR/MRI (C-index: 0.675, P = 0.04 for difference) and CCT/MRI (C-index: 0.657, P = 0.02 for difference). Finally, PET/CT was significantly associated with a positive NRI when compared with CXR/MRI (0.184, P = 0.03), but not CCT/MRI (0.094%, P = 0.31). Conclusion: Tumor stages determined by PET/CT were associated with more distinct prognostic properties in terms of survival than those

  11. 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Hepatopancreatic Involvement - A Pictorial and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Omer; Mohiuddin, Sohaib; Farooqui, Saleem; Khan, Salman A; McCartney, William

    2015-01-01

    We share our experience with serial PET/CT imaging on a patient with extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) with hepatopancreatic involvement. RDD is a benign proliferative disorder of histiocytes mainly involving the lymph nodes. It typically presents with fever and painless cervical lymphadenopathy in young adults and less than half of RDS cases demonstrate extranodal involvement. RDD involvement of the liver and pancreas is extremely rare, and this case highlights the role of PET/CT in its management. PMID:26798568

  12. TU-AB-BRA-06: Texture Feature Reproducibility Between PET/CT and PET/MR Imaging Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Galavis, P; Friedman, K; Chandarana, H; Jackson, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiomics involves the extraction of texture features from different imaging modalities with the purpose of developing models to predict patient treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate texture feature reproducibility across [18F]FDG PET/CT and [18F]FDG PET/MR imaging in patients with primary malignancies. Methods: Twenty five prospective patients with solid tumors underwent clinical [18F]FDG PET/CT scan followed by [18F]FDG PET/MR scans. In all patients the lesions were identified using nuclear medicine reports. The images were co-registered and segmented using an in-house auto-segmentation method. Fifty features, based on the intensity histogram, second and high order matrices, were extracted from the segmented regions from both image data sets. One-way random-effects ANOVA model of the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to establish texture feature correlations between both data sets. Results: Fifty features were classified based on their ICC values, which were found in the range from 0.1 to 0.86, in three categories: high, intermediate, and low. Ten features extracted from second and high-order matrices showed large ICC ≥ 0.70. Seventeen features presented intermediate 0.5 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.65 and the remaining twenty three presented low ICC ≤ 0.45. Conclusion: Features with large ICC values could be reliable candidates for quantification as they lead to similar results from both imaging modalities. Features with small ICC indicates a lack of correlation. Therefore, the use of these features as a quantitative measure will lead to different assessments of the same lesion depending on the imaging modality from where they are extracted. This study shows the importance of the need for further investigation and standardization of features across multiple imaging modalities.

  13. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  14. (64)Cu-PSMA-617 PET/CT Imaging of Prostate Adenocarcinoma: First In-Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Grubmüller, Bernhard; Baum, Richard P; Capasso, Enza; Singh, Aviral; Ahmadi, Yasaman; Knoll, Peter; Floth, Andreas; Righi, Sergio; Zandieh, Shahin; Meleddu, Carlo; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Klingler, Hans Christoph; Mirzaei, Siroos

    2016-10-07

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell surface protein, which is overexpressed in nearly all cases of prostate cancer (PCa). PET imaging with (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC has recently found widespread application in the diagnosis of recurrent PCa. In this study, the diagnostic potential of (64)Cu-labeled PSMA ligand (PSMA-617) PET in patients with PCa has been investigated. The study was conducted simultaneously at two nuclear medicine centers, Austria (Vienna, Center 1) and Germany (Bad Berka, Center 2). The patients (n = 29) included in this study were referred for PET (Center 1, 21 patients) or PET/CT (Center 2, 8 patients) imaging with either a high suspicion of recurrent disease or for possible surgical or PSMA radioligand therapy planning. PET images of the whole body were performed at 1 hour p.i. and additional images of the pelvis at 2 hours p.i. In 23 of 29 patients, at least one focus of pathological tracer uptake suspicious for primary disease in the prostate lobe or recurrent disease was detected. Among healthy organs, the salivary glands, kidneys, and liver showed the highest radiotracer uptake. Lesions suspicious for PCa were detected with excellent contrast as early as 1 hour p.i. with high detection rates even at low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. The preliminary results of this study demonstrate the high potential of (64)Cu-PSMA ligand PET/CT imaging in patients with recurrent disease and in the primary staging of selected patients with progressive local disease. The acquired PET images showed an excellent resolution of the detected lesions with very high lesion-to- background contrast. Furthermore, the long half-life of (64)Cu allows distribution of the tracer to clinical PET centers that lack radiochemistry facilities for the preparation of (68)Ga-PSMA ligand (satellite concept).

  15. CD20 antigen imaging with ¹²⁴I-rituximab PET/CT in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tran, L; Huitema, A D R; van Rijswijk, M H; Dinant, H J; Baars, J W; Beijnen, J H; Vogel, W V

    2011-01-01

    Visualization of the CD20-antigen expression could provide a tool to localize sites of inflammation and could be of additive value in the diagnosis, and subsequently, in the treatment follow-up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab (Mabthera®), was radiolabeled with ¹²⁴Iodine. We report the first results of I¹²⁴-rituximab PET/CT in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Eligible patients received 50 MBq ¹²⁴I-rituximab. Wholebody PET/CT imaging was performed at 10 min, 24 h, 48 h and 72-96 h post injection. Images were evaluated primarily on a visual basis and were correlated with disease activity as determined by physical examination and clinical measures. Joints with visually detectable targeting of ¹²⁴I-rituximab were observed in 4 out of 5 evaluable patients. Only the images at 24 h and later showed accumulation in joints, indicating that the visualized signal represented active targeting of rituximab to the CD20 antigen. Several images showed CD20 positive B-cell infiltration in joints which were clinically normal, while a few clinically diagnosed arthritis localizations were not visualized. This discrepancy suggests that infiltration of CD20 positive B-cells in synovium is a phenomenon that is at least partially independent of clinical inflammation. The level of uptake in joints was generally low, representing less than 0.5% of the injected dose. We have shown the feasibility of CD20 antigen imaging using ¹²⁴I-rituximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Further research is needed to elucidate the clinical significance of demonstrated B-cell infiltration in rheumatic joints.

  16. A method of semi-quantifying β-AP in brain PET-CT 11C-PiB images.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiehui; Lin, Xiaoman; Wen, Junlin; Huang, Zhemin; Yan, Zhuangzhi

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common health problem for elderly populations. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT)11C-PiB for beta-P (amyloid-β peptide, β-AP) imaging is an advanced method to diagnose AD in early stage. However, in practice radiologists lack a standardized value to semi-quantify β-AP. This paper proposes such a standardized value: SVβ-AP. This standardized value measures the mean ratio between the dimension of β-AP areas in PET and CT images. A computer aided diagnosis approach is also proposed to achieve SVβ-AP. A simulation experiment was carried out to pre-test the technical feasibility of the CAD approach and SVβ-AP. The experiment results showed that it is technically feasible.

  17. Increased Utilization of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Imaging and Its Economic Impact for Patients Diagnosed With Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jinhai; Chu, Yiyi; Chamie, Karim; Smaldone, Marc C; Boorjian, Stephen A; Baillargeon, Jacques G; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Kerr, Preston; O'Malley, Padraic; Orihuela, Eduardo; Tyler, Douglas S; Freedland, Stephen J; Giordano, Sharon H; Vikram, Raghu; Kamat, Ashish M; Williams, Stephen B

    2017-07-26

    The purpose of this study was to examine temporal nationwide utilization patterns and predictors for use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) among patients diagnosed with bladder cancer. A total of 36,855 patients aged 66 years or older diagnosed with clinical stage TI-IV, N0M0 bladder cancer from 2004 to 2011 were analyzed. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to discern factors associated with receipt of imaging within 12 months from diagnosis. The Cochran-Armitage test for trend was used to determine changes in the proportion of patients receiving imaging after cancer diagnosis. Independent of clinical stage, there was marked increase in use of PET/CT throughout the study period (2011 vs. 2004: odds ratio, 17.55; 95% confidence interval, 10.14-30.38; P < .001). Although use of CT imaging remained stable during the study period, there was significantly decreased utilization of MRI (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.75; P < .001) in 2011 versus 2004. The mean incremental cost of PET/CT versus CT and MRI was $1040 and $612 (in 2016 dollars), respectively. Extrapolating these findings to the patients with bladder cancer in the United States results in excess spending of $11.6 million for PET/CT imaging. We identified rapid adoption of PET/CT imaging independent of clinical stage, resulting in excess national spending of $11.6 million for this imaging modality alone. Further value-based research discerning the clinical versus economic benefits of advanced imaging among patients with bladder cancer are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac PET/CT with Rb-82: optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction parameters.

    PubMed

    Chilra, P; Gnesin, S; Allenbach, G; Monteiro, M; Prior, J O; Vieira, L; Pires Jorge, J A

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to characterize the influence of time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) recovery corrections, as well as ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction parameters, in (82)Rb PET/CT quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Rest and stress list-mode dynamic (82)Rb PET acquisition data from 10 patients without myocardial flow defects and 10 patients with myocardial blood flow defects were reconstructed retrospectively. OSEM reconstructions were performed with Gaussian filters of 4, 6, and 8 mm, different iterations, and subset numbers (2 × 24; 2 × 16; 3 × 16; 4 × 16). Rest and stress global, regional, and segmental MBF and MFR were computed from time activity curves with FlowQuant(©) software. Left ventricular segmentation using the 17-segment American Heart Association model was obtained. Whole left ventricle (LV) MBF at rest and stress were 0.97 ± 0.30 and 2.30 ± 1.00 mL/min/g, respectively, and MFR was 2.40 ± 1.13. Concordance was excellent and all reconstruction parameters had no significant impact on MBF, except for the exclusion of TOF which led to significantly decreased concordance in rest and stress MBF in patients with or without perfusion defects on a coronary artery basis and in MFR in patients with perfusion defects. Changes in reconstruction parameters in perfusion (82)Rb PET/CT studies influence quantitative MBF analysis. The inclusion of TOF information in the tomographic reconstructions had significant impact in MBF quantification.

  19. Long Half-life (89)Zr Labeled Radiotracers Can Guide In Suite Percutaneous Molecular Imaging PET/CT-guided Biopsies Without Reinjection of Radiotracer.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Francois H; Durack, Jeremy; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Ulaner, Gary A; Lewis, Jason S; Morris, Michael J; Solomon, Stephen B

    2017-08-17

    Rationale: To evaluate the feasibility of in suite Zr89 labeled radiotracer positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided biopsies performed without reinjection. Methods: From 2013-2016, 12 patients (7 males, 5 females; mean age 61 years, range 40-75) with suspected metastatic prostate or breast carcinoma on either imaging or biochemical progression underwent 14 percutaneous biopsies after diagnostic PET/CT using (89)Zr labeled radiotracers (mean dose: 180MBq; range: 126-189MBq) targeting prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) (n = 7) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) (n = 5). Biopsies were performed in a PET/CT suite without radiotracer reinjection. Results: Biopsies were performed without complications a mean of 6.2 days (range, 0-13) after injection of radiotracers in bone (n = 7), pleura (n = 3), lymph nodes (n = 2) and liver (n = 2). All biopsies were positive for malignancy on pathology. A concordance between the initial diagnostic imaging findings and biopsies results was observed. The additional radiation (mean dose length product) due to CT procedures was 1581 mGy/cm (379-2686). No complications were reported. Conclusion: Molecular imaging PET/CT-guided biopsies using (89)Zr labeled radiotracers are safe and effective without tracer reinjection. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. MO-G-17A-08: Applications of Quantitative PET/CT Imaging of Yttrium-90: A Tool for Improving Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; Bradley, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Yttrium-90 (Y90) PET/CT post-treatment imaging of radioembolization has fostered significant interest from both the interventional radiology and nuclear medicine communities over the past few years. Recent literature has demonstrated high quantitative accuracy of Y90 PET at the activity concentrations common in radioembolization. However, few have explored methods in which this information can be clinically applied toward improving patient care. Methods: IRB approval and informed consent was obtained for over 35 Y90 post-treatment imaging studies, performed under 2 distinct protocols. In protocol 1, Y90 PET/CT provided quantitative post-treatment imaging, which was then converted into 3D maps of absorbed-dose. Both images and absorbed dose maps were used to manage patient care. In protocol 2, tumor absorbed-dose measurements from Y90 PET/CT were compared to known tumoricidal thresholds. If insufficient absorbed dose was delivered to the tumor, the patient would have an additional Y90 infusion the same day, providing truly patient-specific Y90 PET/CT based treatment-planning. Results: Y90 PET/CT allowed for a superior post-radioembolization evaluation of technical success compared with conventional Y90 bremsstrahlung SPECT. Due to the exceptional resolution of PET, a direct comparison between the distribution of radioembolization and pre-treatment planning intentions can be made. Further, quantification of tumor absorbed-dose directly from PET/CT imaging allows for the prediction of treatment efficacy based on a comparison with known tumoricidal thresholds. This immediate evaluation allowed treating physicians to consider additional or alternate therapies before discovering clinical failure weeks later. One protocol 2 patient was found to have a subtumoricidal absorbed dose following radioembolization. This patient received a same-day infusion of additional Y90 with identical catheter placement to the first infusion. A robust treatment response was seen on

  1. Differentiation of benign from malignant cervical lymph nodes in patients with head and neck cancer using PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Payabvash, Seyedmehdi; Meric, Kaan; Cayci, Zuzan

    2016-01-01

    To differentiate malignant from benign cervical lymph nodes in patients with head/neck cancer. In this retrospective study, 39 patients with primary head/neck cancer who underwent Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computerized Tomography (CT) and image-guided lymph node biopsy were included. Overall, 23 (59%) patients had biopsy-proven malignant cervical lymphadenopathy. Malignant lymph nodes had higher maximum standardized uptake (SUV-max) value (P<.001) and short-axis diameter (P=.015) compared to benign nodes. An SUV-max of ≥2.5 was 100% sensitive, and an SUV-max ≥5.5 was 100% specific for malignant lymphadenopathy. The PET/CT SUV-max value can help with differentiation of malignant cervical lymph nodes in patients with head/neck cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Influence of PET/CT 68Ga somatostatin receptor imaging on proceeding with patients, who were previously diagnosed with 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC SPECT.

    PubMed

    Madrzak, Dorota; Mikołajczak, Renata; Kamiński, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was the assessment of utility of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) by SPECT imaging using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide (99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC) in patients with neuroendocrine neoplasm (NEN) or suspected NEN, referred to Nuclear Medicine Dept. of Voivodship Specialty Center in Rzeszow. The selected group of patients was referred also to 68Ga PET/CT. The posed question was the ratio of patients for whom PET/CT with 68Ga would change their management. The distribution of somatostatin receptors was imaged using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in 61 planar and SPECT studies between 13/05/2010 and 04/02/2013 in Nuclear Medicine Dept. of Voivodship Specialty Center in Rzeszow. The patient age was within a range of 17-80, with the average age of 57.6. The average age of women (65% of patients over-all) was 55.6 and the average age of men (35% of patients overall) was 61.4. In 46 participants (75% of the study group), that underwent SRS, NEN was documented using pathology tests. Selected patients were referred to PET/CT with 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogs, DOTATATE or DOTANOC. This study group consisted of 14 female and 10 male participants with age range of 35-77 and average age of 55.5 years. Patients were classified into 3 groups, as follows: detection - referral due to clinical symptoms and/or biochemical markers (CgA-Chromogranin A, IAA-indoleacetic acid) with the aim of primary diagnosis, staging - referral with the aim of assessment of tumor spread, and follow-up - assessment of the therapy. Out of 61 patients, 24 underwent both 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide SPECT and 68Ga PET/CT. The result of PET/CT was used as a basis for further evaluation. Therefore, the patients were divided into groups; true positive TP (confirmed presence of tissue somatostatin receptors with 68Ga PET/CT) and TN (68Ga PET/CT did not detect any changes and the results were comparable and had the same influence on treatment protocol). In case of SPECT, the results

  3. Accuracy of 3D volumetric image registration based on CT, MR and PET/CT phantom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Xie, Huchen; Ning, Holly; Citrin, Deborah; Capala, Jacek; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Guion, Peter; Arora, Barbara; Coleman, Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W

    2008-07-09

    Registration is critical for image-based treatment planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Although automatic registration is available, manual, visual-based image fusion using three orthogonal planar views (3P) is always employed clinically to verify and adjust an automatic registration result. However, the 3P fusion can be time consuming, observer dependent, as well as prone to errors, owing to the incomplete 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric image representations. It is also limited to single-pixel precision (the screen resolution). The 3D volumetric image registration (3DVIR) technique was developed to overcome these shortcomings. This technique introduces a 4th dimension in the registration criteria beyond the image volume, offering both visual and quantitative correlation of corresponding anatomic landmarks within the two registration images, facilitating a volumetric image alignment, and minimizing potential registration errors. The 3DVIR combines image classification in real-time to select and visualize a reliable anatomic landmark, rather than using all voxels for alignment. To determine the detection limit of the visual and quantitative 3DVIR criteria, slightly misaligned images were simulated and presented to eight clinical personnel for interpretation. Both of the criteria produce a detection limit of 0.1 mm and 0.1 degree. To determine the accuracy of the 3DVIR method, three imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET/CT) were used to acquire multiple phantom images with known spatial shifts. Lateral shifts were applied to these phantoms with displacement intervals of 5.0+/-0.1 mm. The accuracy of the 3DVIR technique was determined by comparing the image shifts determined through registration to the physical shifts made experimentally. The registration accuracy, together with precision, was found to be: 0.02+/-0.09 mm for CT/CT images, 0.03+/-0.07 mm for MR/MR images, and 0.03+/-0.35 mm for PET/CT images. This accuracy is consistent with the detection limit

  4. Characterizing active and inactive brown adipose tissue in adult humans using PET-CT and MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Aliya; Towse, Theodore F.; Walker, Ronald C.; Avison, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Activated brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermogenesis and whole body metabolism in mammals. Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging has identified depots of BAT in adult humans, igniting scientific interest. The purpose of this study is to characterize both active and inactive supraclavicular BAT in adults and compare the values to those of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT). We obtained [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 25 healthy adults. Unlike [18F]FDG PET, which can detect only active BAT, MRI is capable of detecting both active and inactive BAT. The MRI-derived fat signal fraction (FSF) of active BAT was significantly lower than that of inactive BAT (means ± SD; 60.2 ± 7.6 vs. 62.4 ± 6.8%, respectively). This change in tissue morphology was also reflected as a significant increase in Hounsfield units (HU; −69.4 ± 11.5 vs. −74.5 ± 9.7 HU, respectively). Additionally, the CT HU, MRI FSF, and MRI R2* values are significantly different between BAT and WAT, regardless of the activation status of BAT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify PET-CT and MRI FSF measurements and utilize a semiautomated algorithm to identify inactive and active BAT in the same adult subjects. Our findings support the use of these metrics to characterize and distinguish between BAT and WAT and lay the foundation for future MRI analysis with the hope that some day MRI-based delineation of BAT can stand on its own. PMID:27166284

  5. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E; Maguire, Gerald Q; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  6. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  7. Nonrigid registration of dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT images using deformable FEM model and CT image warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Krol, Andrzej; Unlu, Mehmet; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Coman, Ioana; Feiglin, David

    2007-03-01

    This study was undertaken to correct for motion artifacts in dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT images, to improve differential-image quality, and to increase accuracy of time-activity curves. Dynamic PET studies, with subjects prone, and breast suspended freely employed a protocol with 50 frames, each 1-minute long. A 30 s long CT scan was acquired immediately before the first PET frame. F-18-FDG was administered during the first PET time frame. Fiducial skin markers (FSMs) each containing ~0.5 μCi of Ge-68 were taped to each breast. In our PET/PET registration method we utilized CT data. For corresponding FSMs visible on the 1 st and n th frames, the geometrical centroids of FSMs were found and their displacement vectors were estimated and used to deform the finite element method (FEM) mesh of the CT image (registered with 1 st PET frame) to match the consecutive dynamic PET time frames. Each mesh was then deformed to match the 1 st PET frame using known FSM displacement vectors as FEM loads, and the warped PET timeframe volume was created. All PET time frames were thus nonrigidly registered with the first frame. An analogy between orthogonal components of the displacement field and the temperature distribution in steady-state heat transfer in solids is used, via standard heat-conduction FEM software with "conductivity" of surface elements set arbitrarily significantly higher than that of volume elements. Consequently, the surface reaches steady state before the volume. This prevents creation of concentrated FEM loads at the locations of FSMs and reaching incorrect FEM solution. We observe improved similarity between the 1 st and n th frames. The contrast and the spatial definition of metabolically hyperactive regions are superior in the registered 3D images compared to unregistered 3D images. Additional work is needed to eliminate small image artifacts due to FSMs.

  8. Thermal imaging is a non-invasive alternative to PET-CT for measurement of brown adipose tissue activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Law, James Matthew; Morris, David Edward; Engbeaya, Chioma Izzi; Salem, Victoria; Coello, Christopher; Robinson, Lindsay; Jayasinghe, Maduka; Scott, Rebecca; Gunn, Roger; Rabiner, Eugenii; Tan, Tricia; Dhillo, Waljit; Bloom, Stephen; Budge, Helen; Symonds, Michael

    2017-09-14

    Background: Obesity and its metabolic consequences are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) utilises glucose and free fatty acids to produce heat, thereby increasing energy expenditure. Effective evaluation of human BAT stimulators is constrained by current standard BAT assessment methods as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) requires exposure to high doses of ionising radiation. Infrared thermography (IRT) is a potential non-invasive, safe alternative, although direct corroboration with PET-CT has not previously been established. Methods: IRT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT data from 8 healthy male participants subjected to water jacket cooling were directly compared. Thermal images (TIs) were geometrically transformed to overlay PET-CT-derived maximum intensity projection (MIP) images from each subject and the areas of greatest intensity of temperature and glucose-uptake within the supraclavicular regions compared. Relationships between supraclavicular temperatures from IRT (TSCR) and the maximum rate of glucose uptake (MR(gluc)) from PET-CT were determined. Results: Glucose uptake on MR(gluc)MIP was positively correlated with change in TSCR relative to a reference region (r2 = 0.721; P = 0.008). Spatial overlap between areas of maximal MR(gluc)MIP and maximal TSCR was 29.5±5.1%. Prolonged cooling to 60 minutes was associated with further TSCR rise compared with cooling to 10 minutes. Conclusion: The supraclavicular hotspot identified on IRT closely corresponds to the area of maximal uptake on PET-CT-derived MR(gluc)MIP images. Greater increases in relative TSCR were associated with raised glucose uptake. IRT should now be considered a suitable method for measuring BAT activation, especially in populations where PET-CT is not feasible, practical or repeatable.

  9. Should PET/CT be implemented in the routine imaging work-up of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? A prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Cacicedo, Jon; Fernandez, Iratxe; Del Hoyo, Olga; Dolado, Ainara; Gómez-Suarez, Javier; Hortelano, Eduardo; Sancho, Aintzane; Pijoan, Jose I; Alvarez, Julio; Espinosa, Jose M; Gaafar, Ayman; Bilbao, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incremental staging information provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and its impact on management plans in patients with untreated stage III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We prospectively studied, between September 2011 and February 2013, 84 consecutive patients [median age 63.5 years (39-84); 73 men] with histologically confirmed HNSCC. First, based on a conventional work-up (physical examination, CT imaging of the head, neck and chest), the multidisciplinary Head and Neck Tumour Board documented the TNM stage and a management plan for each patient, outlining the modalities to be used, including surgery, radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy or a combination. After release of the PET/CT results, new TNM staging and management plans were agreed on by the multidisciplinary Tumour Board. Any changes in stage or intended management due to the PET/CT findings were then analysed. The impact on patient management was classified as: low (treatment modality, delivery and intent unchanged), moderate (change within the same treatment modality: type of surgery, radiation technique/dose) or high (change in treatment intent and/or treatment modality → curative to palliative, or surgery to chemoradiation or detection of unknown primary tumour or a synchronous second primary tumour). TNM stage was validated by histopathological analysis, additional imaging or follow-up. Accuracy of the conventional and PET/CT-based staging was compared using McNemar's test. Conventional and PET/CT stages were discordant in 32/84 (38 %) cases: the T stage in 2/32 (6.2 %), the N stage in 21/32 (65.7 %) and the M stage 9/32 (28.1 %). Patient management was altered in 22/84 (26 %) patients, with a moderate impact in 8 (9.5 %) patients and high impact in 14 (16.6 %) patients. PET/CT TNM classification was significantly more accurate (92.5 vs 73.7 %) than conventional staging with a p value < 0

  10. Can radicality of surgery be safely modulated on the basis of MRI and PET/CT imaging in locally advanced cervical cancer patients administered preoperative treatment?

    PubMed

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Petrillo, Marco; Restaino, Gennaro; Rufini, Vittoria; Macchia, Gabriella; Carbone, Arnaldo; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Lucidi, Alessandro; D'Angelo, Giorgia; Scambia, Giovanni

    2012-01-15

    The goal of this study was to prospectively analyze the diagnostic performances of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in predicting pathologically assessed residual disease in a large, single-institution series of locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients triaged to neoadjuvant treatments followed by radical surgery. Between April 2007 and March 2010, 96 patients with histologically documented cervical cancer (any histology) and FIGO stage IB2-IVA were enrolled. MRI and PET/CT were recommended to be performed within 4-6 weeks from the end of treatment, and histology was the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared using the McNemar test. For residual disease in the cervix, sensitivity was higher for MRI than for PET/CT (86.1% vs 63.1%; P = .002), while specificity was significantly higher for PET/CT compared with MRI (P = .002). There was no difference in accuracy values between the 2 imaging modalities. For MRI analysis of lymph node groups, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 35.7%, 95.9%, and 88.0%, respectively. Conversely, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for PET/CT were 28.6%, 97.8%, and 88.7%, respectively. Absence of follicular structures replaced by prevalent sclerosis and/or sinus histiocytosis was the most frequently documented morphological pattern in false-positive cases. Neither MRI nor PET/CT accurately detected residual disease in LACC patients triaged to radical surgery after neoadjuvant treatment, disallowing the option of avoiding or modulating completion surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  11. Combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for imaging of orbital tumours and tumours extending into the orbit.

    PubMed

    Klingenstein, Annemarie; Mueller-Lisse, Gerd-Ullrich; Haug, Alexander R; Garip-Kuebler, Aylin; Miller, Christina V; Hintschich, Christoph R

    2016-10-01

    To assess clinical and radiological performance of combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with secondary and primary intraorbital tumours. 14 adults with secondary and 1 child with primary orbital masses underwent combined whole-body PET/CT. Radiopharmaceutical tracers applied were (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose, (18F)-fluoroethylcholine (FEC) and (68Ga)-DOTATATE. Histopathology and/or all conventional radiographic work-up and clinical course served as standard of reference. Descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test were used for analysis. PET/CT detected all orbital masses. All 15 patients had malignant disease. Local osseous infiltration was correctly identified in 11 patients. Lymph node metastases were present in two of eight patients (25%) with haematogenous orbital metastases and in five of six patients (83%) with infiltrative carcinoma (p=0.05). Further distant metastases were present in all eight patients suffering from orbital metastases, but only one patient with infiltrative carcinoma (17%) presented with disseminated disease (p=0.003). In one metastasis, PET/CT excluded vital orbital tumour tissue after radiation therapy. Local recurrence was detected in another patient suffering from prostate cancer. PET/CT is a sensitive tool for the detection and localisation of orbital masses, enabling assessment of both morphology and cell metabolism. Detailed imaging of the head and neck region with a small field-of-view should be performed when suspecting lymphatic metastases. As metastatic disease to the orbit is associated with advanced disease, focus should be laid on whole-body imaging for staging of these patients. Different radiopharmaceutical tracers can be applied to distinguish the origin of orbital metastases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Early dynamic imaging in (68)Ga- PSMA-11 PET/CT allows discrimination of urinary bladder activity and prostate cancer lesions.

    PubMed

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Fritz, Josef; Warwitz, Boris; Scarpa, Lorenza; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Kendler, Dorota; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2017-05-01

    PET/CT with (68)Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-ligands has been proven to establish a promising imaging modality in the work-up of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical relapse. Despite a high overall detection rate, the visualisation of local recurrence may be hampered by high physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole body imaging, usually starting 60 min after injection. This study sought to verify whether early dynamic (68)Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC)PET/CT can differentiate pathologic PC-related tracer uptake from physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. Eighty consecutive PC patients referred to (68)Ga -PSMA-11 PET/CT were included in this retrospective analysis (biochemical relapse: n = 64; primary staging: n = 8; evaluation of therapy response/restaging: n = 8). In addition to whole-body PET/CT acquisition 60 min post injection early dynamic imaging of the pelvis in the first 8 min after tracer injection was performed. SUVmax of pathologic lesions was calculated and time-activity curves were generated and compared to those of urinary bladder and areas of physiologic tracer uptake. A total of 55 lesions consistent with malignancy on 60 min whole body imaging exhibited also pathologic (68)Ga-PSMA-11 uptake during early dynamic imaging (prostatic bed/prostate gland: n = 27; lymph nodes: n = 12; bone: n = 16). All pathologic lesions showed tracer uptake within the first 3 min, whereas urinary bladder activity was absent within the first 3 min of dynamic imaging in all patients. Suvmax was significantly higher in PC lesions in the first 6 min compared to urinary bladder accumulation (p < 0.001). In the subgroup of PC patients with biochemical relapse the detection rate of local recurrence could be increased from 20.3 to 29.7%. Early dynamic imaging in (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT reliably enables the differentiation of pathologic tracer uptake in PC lesions from physiologic

  13. Initial Fludeoxyglucose (18F) Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) Imaging of Breast Cancer – Correlations with the Primary Tumour and Locoregional Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Sevin; Gültekin, Salih Sinan; Ayaz, Ümit Yaşar; Dilli, Alper

    2017-01-01

    Summary Backround We aimed to evaluate initial PET/CT features of primary tumour and locoregional metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) in breast cancer and to look for potential relationships between several parameters from PET/CT. Material/Methods Twenty-three women (mean age; 48.66±12.23 years) with a diagnosis of primary invasive ductal carcinoma were included. They underwent PET/CT imaging for the initial tumour staging and had no evidence of distant metastates. Patients were divided into two groups. The LABC (locally advanced breast cancer) group included 17 patients with ipsilateral axillary lymph node (LN) metastases. The Non-LABC group consisted of six patients without LN metastases. PET/CT parameters including tumour size, axillary LN size, SUVmax of ipsilateral axillary LNs (SUVmax-LN), SUVmax of primary tumour (SUVmax-T) and NT ratios (SUVmax-LN/SUVmax-T) were compared between the groups. Correlations between the above-mentioned PET/CT parameters in the LABC group as well as the correlation between tumour size and SUVmax-T within each group were evaluated statistically. Results The mean values of the initial PET/CT parameters in the LABC group were significantly higher than those of the non-LABC group (p<0.05). The correlation between tumour size and SUVmax-T value within both LABC and non-LABC groups was statistically significant (p<0.05). In the LABC group, the correlations between the size and SUVmax-LN values of metastatic axillary LNs, between tumour size and metastatic axillary LN size, between SUVmax-T values and metastatic axillary LN size, between SUVmax-T and SUVmax-LN values, and between tumour size and SUVmax-LN values were all significant (p<0.05). Conclusions We found significant correlations between PET/CT parameters of the primary tumour and those of metastatic axillary LNs. Patients with LN metastases had relatively larger primary tumours and higher SUVmax values. PMID:28105247

  14. Renal Masses Detected on FDG PET/CT in Patients With Lymphoma: Imaging Features Differentiating Primary Renal Cell Carcinomas From Renal Lymphomatous Involvement.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, Carlos; Sala, Evis; Kumar, Anita; Goldman, Debra A; Schoder, Heiko; Hricak, Hedvig; Vargas, Hebert Alberto

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the (18)F-FDG PET/CT features of solid renal masses detected in patients with lymphoma and to evaluate the ability of PET/CT to differentiate renal cell carcinoma (RCC) from renal lymphomatous involvement. Thirty-six patients with solid renal masses on PET/CT performed for staging or follow-up of lymphoma were evaluated retrospectively. The features recorded for each renal mass included the following standardized uptake values (SUVs) on PET/CT: the maximum SUV (SUVmax), the mean SUV (SUVmean), the ratio of the SUVmax of the tumor to that of the normal kidney cortex, the ratio of the SUVmean of the tumor to that of the normal kidney cortex, the ratio of the SUVmax of the tumor to that of the normal liver, and the ratio of the SUVmean of the tumor to that of the normal liver. Renal mass size and margins (well defined vs infiltrative) and the presence of calcifications were evaluated on CT. Renal biopsy results were used as the reference standard. Relationships between imaging parameters and histopathologic findings were assessed. Of the 36 renal masses evaluated, 22 (61.1%) were RCCs and 14 (38.9%) were renal lymphomas. All SUV metrics were higher for renal lymphomas than for RCCs (p < 0.0001, for all). All renal lymphomas had an SUVmax higher than 5.98 g/mL (median, 10.99 g/mL), whereas all RCCs had an SUVmax lower than 5.26 g/mL (median, 2.91 g/mL). No statistically significant differences in mass size or margins were found between RCCs and renal lymphoma. PET/CT features may be useful for differentiating RCCs from renal involvement in patients with lymphoma with solid renal masses.

  15. Patient weight-based acquisition protocols to optimize (18)F-FDG PET/CT image quality.

    PubMed

    Nagaki, Akio; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Matsutomo, Norikazu

    2011-06-01

    The choice of injected dose of (18)F-FDG and acquisition time is important in obtaining consistently high-quality PET images. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal acquisition protocols based on patient weight for 3-dimensional lutetium oxyorthosilicate PET/CT. This study was a retrospective analysis of 76 patients ranging from 29 to 101 kg who were injected with 228-395.2 MBq of (18)F-FDG for PET imaging. The study population was divided into 4 weight-based groups: less than 45 kg (group 1), 45-59 kg (group 2), 60-74 kg (group 3), and 75 kg or more (group 4). We measured the true coincidence rate, random coincidence rate, noise-equivalent counting rate (NECR), and random fraction and evaluated image quality by the coefficient of variance (COV) in the largest liver slices. The true coincidence rate, random coincidence rate, and NECR significantly increased with increasing injected dose per kilogram (r = 0.91, 0.83, and 0.90; all P < 0.01). NECR maximized at 10.11 MB/kg in underweight patients. The true coincidence rate differed significantly among the 4 groups, except for group 3 versus group 4 (P < 0.01). The ratio of the true coincidence rate for group 2 to groups 3 and 4 was 1.4 and 1.6, respectively. The average random fraction for all 4 groups was approximately 35%. The COV of the 4 groups differed for all pairs (P < 0.01). The COVs in overweight patients were larger than those in underweight patients, and image quality in overweight patients was poor. We modified acquisition protocols for (18)F-FDG PET/CT according to the characteristics of a 3-dimensional lutetium orthosilicate PET scanner and PET image quality based on patient weight. The optimal acquisition time was approximately 1.4-1.6 times longer in overweight patients than in normal-weight patients. Estimation of optimal acquisition times using the true coincidence rate is more important than other variables in improving PET image quality.

  16. PSMA-PET/CT-Positive Paget Disease in a Patient with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer: Imaging and Bone Biopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Marieta; Zöphel, Klaus; Novotny, Vladimir; Laniado, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man diagnosed with Gleason score 4 + 5 = 9 clinically localized prostate cancer with 68Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) positive Paget bone disease is described. Immunohistochemical staining revealed weak PSMA positivity of the bone lesion supporting the hypothesis that neovasculature might explain positive PSMA-PET/CT findings in Paget disease. PMID:28396816

  17. PSMA-PET/CT-Positive Paget Disease in a Patient with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer: Imaging and Bone Biopsy Findings.

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Toma, Marieta; Zöphel, Klaus; Novotny, Vladimir; Laniado, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man diagnosed with Gleason score 4 + 5 = 9 clinically localized prostate cancer with (68)Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) positive Paget bone disease is described. Immunohistochemical staining revealed weak PSMA positivity of the bone lesion supporting the hypothesis that neovasculature might explain positive PSMA-PET/CT findings in Paget disease.

  18. Usefulness of 68Ga-DOTA-RGD (αvβ3) PET/CT Imaging in Thyroglobulin Elevation With Negative Iodine Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Rakhee; Shykla, Jaya; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Bhusari, Priya; Sood, Apurva; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Bhattacharya, Anish

    2017-06-01

    TENIS (thyroglobulin elevation with negative iodine scintigraphy) syndrome in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma is not a rare finding. In such patients, F-FDG PET/CT can help in disease evaluation. RGD tripeptide, used for imaging angiogenesis, may also help in disease detection in patients with negative radioiodine whole-body scan. We present 1 such case in whom Ga-RGD tripeptide imaging was helpful in disease detection in the setting of negative radioiodine whole-body scan.

  19. Is There an Additional Value of {sup 11}C-Choline PET-CT to T2-weighted MRI Images in the Localization of Intraprostatic Tumor Nodules?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Laura; Koole, Michel; Isebaert, Sofie; Joniau, Steven; Deroose, Christophe M.; Oyen, Raymond; Lerut, Evelyne; Budiharto, Tom; Mottaghy, Felix; Bormans, Guy; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Haustermans, Karin

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the additional value of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) to T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for localization of intraprostatic tumor nodules. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine prostate cancer patients underwent T2w MRI and {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT before radical prostatectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Tumor regions were outlined on the whole-mount histopathology sections and on the T2w MR images. Tumor localization was recorded in the basal, middle, and apical part of the prostate by means of an octant grid. To analyze {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT images, the same grid was used to calculate the standardized uptake values (SUV) per octant, after rigid registration with the T2w MR images for anatomic reference. Results: In total, 1,176 octants were analyzed. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of T2w MRI were 33.5%, 94.6%, and 70.2%, respectively. For {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT, the mean SUV{sub max} of malignant octants was significantly higher than the mean SUV{sub max} of benign octants (3.69 {+-} 1.29 vs. 3.06 {+-} 0.97, p < 0.0001) which was also true for mean SUV{sub mean} values (2.39 {+-} 0.77 vs. 1.94 {+-} 0.61, p < 0.0001). A positive correlation was observed between SUV{sub mean} and absolute tumor volume (Spearman r = 0.3003, p = 0.0362). No correlation was found between SUVs and prostate-specific antigen, T-stage or Gleason score. The highest accuracy (61.1%) was obtained with a SUV{sub max} cutoff of 2.70, resulting in a sensitivity of 77.4% and a specificity of 44.9%. When both modalities were combined (PET-CT or MRI positive), sensitivity levels increased as a function of SUV{sub max} but at the cost of specificity. When only considering suspect octants on {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT (SUV{sub max} {>=} 2.70) and T2w MRI, 84.7% of these segments were in agreement with the gold standard, compared with 80.5% for T2w MRI alone. Conclusions: The additional value of {sup

  20. 3D skeletal uptake of (18)F sodium fluoride in PET/CT images is associated with overall survival in patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindgren Belal, Sarah; Sadik, May; Kaboteh, Reza; Hasani, Nezar; Enqvist, Olof; Svärm, Linus; Kahl, Fredrik; Simonsen, Jane; Poulsen, Mads H; Ohlsson, Mattias; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Edenbrandt, Lars; Trägårdh, Elin

    2017-12-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) positron emission tomography combined with computer tomography (PET/CT) has shown to be more sensitive than the whole-body bone scan in the detection of skeletal uptake due to metastases in prostate cancer. We aimed to calculate a 3D index for NaF PET/CT and investigate its correlation to the bone scan index (BSI) and overall survival (OS) in a group of patients with prostate cancer. NaF PET/CT and bone scans were studied in 48 patients with prostate cancer. Automated segmentation of the thoracic and lumbar spines, sacrum, pelvis, ribs, scapulae, clavicles, and sternum were made in the CT images. Hotspots in the PET images were selected using both a manual and an automated method. The volume of each hotspot localized in the skeleton in the corresponding CT image was calculated. Two PET/CT indices, based on manual (manual PET index) and automatic segmenting using a threshold of SUV 15 (automated PET15 index), were calculated by dividing the sum of all hotspot volumes with the volume of all segmented bones. BSI values were obtained using a software for automated calculations. BSI, manual PET index, and automated PET15 index were all significantly associated with OS and concordance indices were 0.68, 0.69, and 0.70, respectively. The median BSI was 0.39 and patients with a BSI >0.39 had a significantly shorter median survival time than patients with a BSI <0.39 (2.3 years vs not reached after 5 years of follow-up [p = 0.01]). The median manual PET index was 0.53 and patients with a manual PET index >0.53 had a significantly shorter median survival time than patients with a manual PET index <0.53 (2.5 years vs not reached after 5 years of follow-up [p < 0.001]). The median automated PET15 index was 0.11 and patients with an automated PET15 index >0.11 had a significantly shorter median survival time than patients with an automated PET15 index <0.11 (2.3 years vs not reached after 5 years of follow-up [p < 0.001]). PET/CT indices

  1. 18F-DCFBC Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted PET/CT Imaging in Localized Prostate Cancer: Correlation With Multiparametric MRI and Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Turkbey, Baris; Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Liza; Adler, Stephen; Bednarova, Sandra; Berman, Rose; Ton, Anita T; McKinney, Yolanda; Eclarinal, Philip; Hill, Craig; Afari, George; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Mease, Ronnie C; Merino, Maria J; Jacobs, Paula M; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Pomper, Martin G; Choyke, Peter L

    2017-10-01

    To assess the ability of (N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-F-fluorobenzyl-L-cysteine) (F-DCFBC), a prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted PET agent, to detect localized prostate cancer lesions in correlation with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and histopathology. This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996-compliant, prospective, institutional review board-approved study included 13 evaluable patients with localized prostate cancer (median age, 62.8 years [range, 51-74 years]; median prostate-specific antigen, 37.5 ng/dL [range, 3.26-216 ng/dL]). Patients underwent mpMRI and F-DCFBC PET/CT within a 3 months' window. Lesions seen on mpMRI were biopsied under transrectal ultrasound/MRI fusion-guided biopsy, or a radical prostatectomy was performed. F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were evaluated blinded and separately for tumor detection on a lesion basis. For PET image analysis, MRI and F-DCFBC PET images were fused by using software registration; imaging findings were correlated with histology, and uptake of F-DCFBC in tumors was compared with uptake in benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules and normal peripheral zone tissue using the 80% threshold SUVmax. A total of 25 tumor foci (mean size, 1.8 cm; median size, 1.5 cm; range, 0.6-4.7 cm) were histopathologically identified in 13 patients. Sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 36% and 96%, respectively, for all tumors. For index lesions, the largest tumor with highest Gleason score, sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 61.5% and 92%, respectively. The average SUVmax for primary prostate cancer was higher (5.8 ± 4.4) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules (2.1 ± 0.3) or that of normal prostate tissue (2.1 ± 0.4) at 1 hour postinjection (P = 0.0033). The majority of index prostate cancers are detected with F-DCFBC PET/CT, and this may be a prognostic indicator based on uptake and staging. However, for detecting prostate cancer with high sensitivity, it

  2. Topology polymorphism graph for lung tumor segmentation in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui; Wang, Xiuying; Zhou, Jianlong; Eberl, Stefan; Yin, Yong; Feng, Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Accurate lung tumor segmentation is problematic when the tumor boundary or edge, which reflects the advancing edge of the tumor, is difficult to discern on chest CT or PET. We propose a ‘topo-poly’ graph model to improve identification of the tumor extent. Our model incorporates an intensity graph and a topology graph. The intensity graph provides the joint PET-CT foreground similarity to differentiate the tumor from surrounding tissues. The topology graph is defined on the basis of contour tree to reflect the inclusion and exclusion relationship of regions. By taking into account different topology relations, the edges in our model exhibit topological polymorphism. These polymorphic edges in turn affect the energy cost when crossing different topology regions under a random walk framework, and hence contribute to appropriate tumor delineation. We validated our method on 40 patients with non-small cell lung cancer where the tumors were manually delineated by a clinical expert. The studies were separated into an ‘isolated’ group (n = 20) where the lung tumor was located in the lung parenchyma and away from associated structures / tissues in the thorax and a ‘complex’ group (n = 20) where the tumor abutted / involved a variety of adjacent structures and had heterogeneous FDG uptake. The methods were validated using Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap and Hausdorff distance (HD) to compare shape similarity calculated as the maximum surface distance between the segmentation results and the manual delineations. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.881  ±  0.046 and HD of 5.311  ±  3.022 mm for the isolated cases and DSC of 0.870  ±  0.038 and HD of 9.370  ±  3.169 mm for the complex cases. Student’s t-test showed that our model outperformed the other methods (p-values <0.05).

  3. Preliminary PET/CT Imaging with Somatostatin Analogs [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TOC.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Drishty; Shinto, Ajit; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Sarma, Haladhar Dev; Dash, Ashutosh

    2017-03-27

    Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/X-ray computed tomography (SSTR-PET/CT) is a well-established technique for staging and detection of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Ga-68-labeled DOTA-conjugated octreotide analogs are the privileged radiotracers for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of NETs. Hence, we were interested in assessing the influence of promising, newer variant DOTAGA on the hydrophilicity, pharmacokinetics, and lesion pick-up of somatostatin analogs. Herein, the potential of ([(68)Ga]DOTAGA, Tyr(3), Thr(8)) octreotide ([(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TATE) and ([(68)Ga]DOTAGA, Tyr(3)) octreotide ([(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TOC) as NET imaging agents has been investigated. Amenability of [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-(TATE/TOC) to kit-type formulation has been demonstrated. Biodistribution studies were carried out in normal rats at 1 h post-injection (p.i.). [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-(TATE/TOC) PET/CT scans were carried out in patients (70-170 MBq, 1 h p.i.) with histologically confirmed well-differentiated NETs. [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TATE exhibited hydrophilicity similar to [(68)Ga]DOTA-TATE (log P = -3.51 vs -3.69) whereas [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TOC was more hydrophilic than [(68)Ga]DOTA-TOC (log P = -3.27 vs -2.93). [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [(68)Ga]DOTA-TATE showed almost identical blood and kidney uptake in normal rats whereas significantly fast clearance (p < 0.05) of [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TATE was observed from other non-specific organs (liver, lungs, spleen, intestine). [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TOC also demonstrated rapid clearance from blood and kidneys (p < 0.05) in comparison to [(68)Ga]DOTA-TOC. The metastatic lesions in NET patients were well identified by [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TOC. The phenomenal analogy was observed between [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [(68)Ga]DOTA-TATE as well as between [(68)Ga]DOTAGA-TOC and [(68)Ga]DOTA-TOC in biodistribution studies in rats. The good lesion detection ability of the two radiotracers indicates their potential as NET imaging radiotracers.

  4. Role of MR Imaging and FDG PET/CT in Selection and Follow-up of Patients Treated with Pelvic Exenteration for Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Miccò, Maura; Scelzo, Chiara; Vargas, Hebert A.; Sosa, Ramon E.; Sutton, Elizabeth J.; Chi, Dennis S.; Hricak, Hedvig; Sala, Evis

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic exenteration (PE) is a radical surgical procedure used for the past 6 decades to treat locally advanced malignant diseases confined to the pelvis, particularly persistent or recurrent gynecologic cancers in the irradiated pelvis. The traditional surgical technique known as total PE consists of resection of all pelvic viscera followed by reconstruction. Depending on the tumor extent, the procedure can be tailored to remove only anterior or posterior structures, including the bladder (anterior exenteration) or rectum (posterior exenteration). Conversely, more extended pelvic resection can be performed if the pelvic sidewall is invaded by cancer. Preoperative imaging evaluation with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is central to establishing tumor resectability and therefore patient eligibility for the procedure. These imaging modalities complement each other in diagnosis of tumor recurrence and differentiation of persistent disease from posttreatment changes. MR imaging can accurately demonstrate local tumor extent and show adjacent organ invasion. FDG PET/CT is useful in excluding nodal and distant metastases. In addition, FDG PET/CT metrics may serve as predictive biomarkers for overall and disease-free survival. This pictorial review describes different types of exenterative surgical procedures and illustrates the central role of imaging in accurate patient selection, treatment planning, and postsurgical surveillance. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26172364

  5. (90)Y-PET/CT Imaging Quantification for Dosimetry in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy: Analysis and Corrections of the Impairing Factors.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Cinzia; Bartolomei, Mirco; Mattone, Vincenzo; Casi, Michela; De Lauro, Francesco; Bartolini, Nerio; Gentili, Giovanni; Amadori, Sonia; Agostini, Monica; Sarti, Graziella

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the possibility to assess (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification for dosimetry in (90)Y-peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Tests were performed by Discovery 710 Elite (GE) PET/CT equipment. A body-phantom containing radioactive-coplanar-spheres was filled with (90)Y water solution to reproduce different signal-to-background-activity-ratios (S/N). We studied minimum detectable activity (MDA) concentration, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Subsequently, three recovery coefficients (RC)-based correction approaches were evaluated: maximum-RC, resolution-RC, and isovolume-RC. The analysis of the volume segmentation thresholding method was also assessed to derive a relationship between the true volume of the targets and the threshold to be applied to the PET images. (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification was then achieved on some patients and related with preclinical tests. Moreover, the dosimetric evaluation was obtained on the target regions. CNR value was greater than 5 if the MDA was greater than 0.2 MBq/mL with no background activity and 0.5-0.7 MBq/mL with S/N ranging from 3 to 6. FWHM was equal to 7 mm. An exponential fitting of isovolume RCs-based correction technique was adopted for activity quantification. Adaptive segmentation thresholding exponential curves were obtained and applied for target volume identification in three signal-to-background-activity-ratios. The imaging quantification study and dosimetric evaluations in clinical cases was feasible and the results were coherent with those obtained in preclinical tests. (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification is possible both in phantoms and in patients. Absorbed dose evaluations in clinical applications are strongly related to targets activity concentration.

  6. Assessment of Whether Patients' Knowledge, Satisfaction, and Experience Regarding Their 18F-Fluoride PET/CT Examination Affects Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Camilla; Johansson, Birgitta; Wassberg, Cecilia; Johansson, Silvia; Sundin, Anders; Ahlström, Håkan

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate patients' previous knowledge, satisfaction, and experience regarding an (18)F-fluoride PET/CT examination and to explore whether any discomfort or pain during the examination was associated with reduced image quality. A further aim was to explore whether patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was associated with their satisfaction and experience regarding the examination. Between November 2011 and April 2013, 50 consecutive patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer who were scheduled for (18)F-fluoride PET/CT were asked to participate in the study. A questionnaire was used to collect information on the patients' previous knowledge and experience regarding the examination. Image quality was assessed according to an arbitrary scale. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and the prostate cancer-specific module (QLQ-PR25) were used to assess HRQoL. Forty-six patients (96%) completed the questionnaire. Twenty-six percent did not at all know what a (18)F-fluoride PET/CT examination was. Most (52%-70%) were satisfied to a very high degree with the care provided by the nursing staff but were less satisfied with the information given before the examination. Image quality was similar between patients who were exhausted or claustrophobic during the examination and those who were not. No correlations between HRQoL and the patients' experience regarding (18)F-fluoride PET/CT were found. Most patients were satisfied with the care provided by the nursing staff, but there is still room for improvement, especially regarding the information provided before the examination. A long examination time may be strenuous for the patient, but there was no difference in image quality between patients who felt discomfort or pain during the examination and those who did not. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  7. The impact of 18 F-FET PET-CT on target definition in image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with skull base lesions.

    PubMed

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Prasad, Vikas; Budach, Volker

    2014-06-25

    18 F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine PET is gaining more indications in the field of oncology. We investigated the potentials of usage of FET-PET/CT in addition to MRI for definition of gross tumor volume (GTV) in stereotactic radiotherapy of lesions of skull base. We included in a prospective setting 21 cases. An MRI was performed, completed by FET PET/CT. Different GTV's were defined based on respective imaging tools: 1. GTVMRI, 2. GTV MRI /CT, 3. GTV composit (1 + 2), and GTVPET = GTV Boost. Lesions could be visualised by MRI and FET-PET/CT in all patients. FET tracer enhancement was found in all cases. Skull base infiltration by these lesions was observed by MRI, CT (PET/CT) and FET-PET (PET/CT) in all patients. Totally, brain tissue infiltration was seen in 10 patients. While, in 7 (out 10) cases, MRI and CT (from PET/CT) were indicating brain infiltration, FET-PET could add additional information regarding infiltrative behaviour: in 3 (out 10) patients, infiltration of the brain was displayed merely in FET-PET. An enlargement of GTVMRI/CT due to the FET-PET driven information, which revealed GTVcomposite , was necessary in 7 cases,. This enlargement was significant by definition (> 10% of GTVMRI/CT). The mean PET-effect on GTV counted for 1 ± 4 cm3. The restricted boost fields were based mainly on the GTVPET volume. In mean, about 8.5 cm3 of GTVMRI/CT, which showed no FET uptake, were excluded from target volume. GTV boost driven by only-PET-activity, was in mean by 33% smaller than the initial large treatment field, GTV composite, for those cases received boost treatment. FET-PET lead to significant (>10%) changes in the initial treatment fields in 11/21 patients and showed additional tumour volume relevant for radiation planning in 6/21 cases, and led to a subsequent decrease of more than 10% of the initial volumes for the boost fields. The implementation of FET PET into the planning procedures showed a benefit in terms of accurate definition of skull base lesions

  8. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGES

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; ...

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  9. Quantifying the effects of iodine contrast media on standardised uptake values of FDG PET/CT images: an anthropomorphic phantom study.

    PubMed

    Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Nordin, Abdul Jalil; Ackerly, Trevor; Van Every, Bruce; Martin, Ruth; Geso, Moshi

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to quantify the amount of change in Standardised Uptake Values (SUVs) of PET/CT images by simulating the set-up as closely as possible to the actual patient scanning. The experiments were conducted using an anthropomorphic phantom, which contained an amount of radioactivity in the form of Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in a primary plastic test tube and one litre saline bags, including the insertion of bony structures and another two test tubes containing different concentrations of iodine contrast media. Standard scanning protocols were employed for the PET/CT image acquisition. The highest absolute differences in the SUVmax and SUVmean values of the saline bags were found to be about 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The primary test tube showed the largest change of 1.5 in both SUVs; SUV max and SUVmean. However, none of these changes were found to be statistically significant. The clinical literature also contains no evidence to suggest that the changes of this magnitude would change the final diagnosis. Based on these preliminary data, we propose that iodine contrast media can be used during the CT scan of PET/CT imaging, without significantly affecting the diagnostic quality of this integrated imaging modality.

  10. Analysis of 18FDG PET/CT Imaging as a Tool for Studying Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Treatment in Non-human Primates.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander G; Maiello, Pauline; Coleman, M Teresa; Tomko, Jaime A; Frye, L James; Scanga, Charles A; Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2017-09-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the number one infectious agent in the world today. With the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains, new clinically relevant methods are needed that evaluate the disease process and screen for potential antibiotic and vaccine treatments. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) has been established as a valuable tool for studying a number of afflictions such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and inflammation/infection. Outlined here are a number of strategies that have been employed to evaluate PET/CT images in cynomolgus macaques that are infected intrabronchially with low doses of M. tuberculosis. Through evaluation of lesion size on CT and uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in lesions and lymph nodes in PET images, these described methods show that PET/CT imaging can predict future development of active versus latent disease and the propensity for reactivation from a latent state of infection. Additionally, by analyzing the overall level of lung inflammation, these methods determine antibiotic efficacy of drugs against M. tuberculosis in the most clinically relevant existing animal model. These image analysis methods are some of the most powerful tools in the arsenal against this disease as not only can they evaluate a number of characteristics of infection and drug treatment, but they are also directly translatable to a clinical setting for use in human studies.

  11. Random Walk and Graph Cut for Co-Segmentation of Lung Tumor on PET-CT Images.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Xiang, Deihui; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Lirong; Kopriva, Ivica; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-12-01

    Accurate lung tumor delineation plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Since the lung tumor has poor boundary in positron emission tomography (PET) images and low contrast in computed tomography (CT) images, segmentation of tumor in the PET and CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we effectively integrate the two modalities by making fully use of the superior contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Random walk and graph cut method is integrated to solve the segmentation problem, in which random walk is utilized as an initialization tool to provide object seeds for graph cut segmentation on the PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem which is solved by max-flow/min-cut method. A graph, including two sub-graphs and a special link, is constructed, in which one sub-graph is for the PET and another is for CT, and the special link encodes a context term which penalizes the difference of the tumor segmentation on the two modalities. To fully utilize the characteristics of PET and CT images, a novel energy representation is devised. For the PET, a downhill cost and a 3D derivative cost are proposed. For the CT, a shape penalty cost is integrated into the energy function which helps to constrain the tumor region during the segmentation. We validate our algorithm on a data set which consists of 18 PET-CT images. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to the graph cut method solely using the PET or CT is more accurate compared with the random walk method, random walk co-segmentation method, and non-improved graph cut method.

  12. Pediatric and adolescent lymphoma: comparison of whole-body STIR half-Fourier RARE MR imaging with an enhanced PET/CT reference for initial staging.

    PubMed

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A; Bainbridge, Alan; Prakash, Vineet; Bandula, Steven; De Vita, Enrico; Olsen, Oystein E; Hain, Sharon F; Stevens, Nicola; Daw, Stephen; Shankar, Ananth; Bomanji, Jamshed B; Humphries, Paul D

    2010-04-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of rapid whole-body anatomic magnetic resonance (MR) staging of pediatric and adolescent lymphoma to an enhanced positron emission tomographic (PET)/computed tomographic (CT) reference standard. Ethical permission was given by the University College London Hospital ethics committee, and informed written consent was obtained from all participants and/or parents or guardians. Thirty-one subjects (age range, 7.3-18.0 years; 18 male, 11 female) with histologically proved lymphoma were prospectively recruited. Pretreatment staging was performed with whole-body short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) half-Fourier rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) MR imaging, fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT, and contrast agent-enhanced chest CT. Twenty-six subjects had posttreatment PET/CT and compromised our final cohort. Eleven nodal and 11 extranodal sites per patient were assessed on MR imaging by two radiologists in consensus, with a nodal short-axis threshold of >1 cm and predefined extranodal positivity criteria. The same sites were independantly evaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians on PET/CT images. Disease positivity was defined as a maximum standardized uptake value >2.5 or nodal size >1 cm. An unblinded expert panel reevaluated the imaging findings, removing perceptual errors, and derived an enhanced PET/CT reference standard (taking into account chest CT and 3-month follow-up imaging) against which the reported and intrinsic performance of MR imaging was assessed by using the kappa statistic. There was very good agreement between MR imaging and the enhanced PET/CT reference standard for nodal and extranodal staging (kappa = 0.96 and 0.86, respectively) which improved following elimination of perceptual errors (kappa = 0.97 and 0.91, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging (following removal of perceptual error) were 98% and 99%, respectively, for nodal disease and 91% and 99

  13. The diagnostic value of PET/CT imaging with the (68)Ga-labelled PSMA ligand HBED-CC in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Avtzi, Eleni; Giesel, Frederik L; Holland-Letz, Tim; Linhart, Heinz G; Eder, Matthias; Eisenhut, Michael; Boxler, Silvan; Hadaschik, Boris A; Kratochwil, Clemens; Weichert, Wilko; Kopka, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2015-02-01

    Since the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC (=(68)Ga-DKFZ-PSMA-11), this method has been regarded as a significant step forward in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). However, published data exist for small patient cohorts only. The aim of this evaluation was to analyse the diagnostic value of (68)Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT in a large cohort and the influence of several possibly interacting variables. We performed a retrospective analysis in 319 patients who underwent (68)Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT from 2011 to 2014. Potential influences of several factors such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and doubling time (DT), Gleason score (GSC), androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), age and amount of injected tracer were evaluated. Histological verification was performed in 42 patients after the (68)Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT. Tracer uptake was measured in 901 representative tumour lesions. In 82.8% of the patients at least one lesion indicative of PCa was detected. Tumor-detection was positively associated with PSA level and ADT. GSC and PSA-DT were not associated with tumor-detection. The average maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of tumour lesions was 13.3 ± 14.6 (0.7-122.5). Amongst lesions investigated by histology, 30 were false-negative in 4 different patients, and all other lesions (n = 416) were true-positive or true-negative. A lesion-based analysis of sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) revealed values of 76.6%, 100%, 91.4% and 100%. A patient-based analysis revealed a sensitivity of 88.1%. Of 116 patients available for follow-up, 50 received local therapy after (68)Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT. (68)Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT can detect recurrent PCa in a high number of patients. In addition, the radiotracer is highly specific for PCa. Tumour detection is positively associated with PSA and ADT. (68)Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT can help delay systemic

  14. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) Combined with Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and Video-Electroencephalography (VEEG) Have Excellent Diagnostic Value in Preoperative Localization of Epileptic Foci in Children with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Long, Wei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Guang-Yin; Lu, Ji-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has on surgical decision making relative to video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and if the differences in these variables translates to differences in surgical outcomes. Material/Methods A total of 166 children with epilepsy undergoing preoperative DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT examinations, surgical resection of epileptic foci, and intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) monitoring were enrolled. All children were followed up for 12 months and grouped by Engles prognostic classification for epilepsy. Based on intraoperative ECoG as gold standard, the diagnostic values of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and combined application of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT in preoperative localization for epileptic foci were evaluated. Results The sensitivity of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 59.64%, 76.51%, and 93.98%, respectively; the accuracy of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, and DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT was 57.58%, 67.72%, 91.03%, 91.23%, and 96.49%, respectively. Localization accuracy rate of the combination of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 98.25% (56/57), which was higher than that of DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and of DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT. No statistical difference was found in the accuracy rate of localization between these three combined techniques. During the 12-month follow-up, children were grouped into Engles grade I (n=106), II (n=31), III (n=21), and IV (n=8) according to postoperative conditions. Conclusions All DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and PET-CT examinations have excellent accuracy in preoperative localization of epileptic foci and present excellent postoperative efficiency, suggesting that these combined imaging methods are suitable for serving as the

  15. Appropriateness criteria of FDG PET/CT in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    18Fluorine-2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) is a well-established functional imaging method widely used in oncology. In this article, we have incorporated the various indications for 18FDG PET/CT in oncology based on available evidence and current guidelines. Growing body of evidence for use of 18FDG PET/CT in select tumors is also discussed. This article attempts to give the reader an overview of the appropriateness of using 18F-FDG PET/CT in various malignancies. PMID:25969632

  16. Respiratory-gated PET/CT versus delayed images for the quantitative evaluation of lower pulmonary and hepatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tahari, Abdel K; Lodge, Martin A; Wahl, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion degrades fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) images of the lower chest and upper abdomen, as the blur introduced by breathing motion increases the apparent size of the moving tumour lesions and decreases their apparent uptake, reducing the sensitivity of PET in detection of small lesions. We assessed the role of delayed and respiratory-gated PET acquisition in the quantitative evaluation of lung and liver lesions. A retrospective analysis of 64 lesions was performed. After initial non-gated whole-body PET/CT, respiratory gating was performed with 15 min in list mode. Non-gated delayed images were obtained by summing all list mode data. SUV(max) adjusted for lean body mass (SUL(max)) was measured in the initial whole-body scan, the delayed non-gated scans and the individual gated bins for each lesion. The axial z-position of SUL(max) for each lesion in five respiratory-gated bins was determined. The mean SUL of the non-pathological liver parenchyma was also recorded for each patient. Tumour lesion SUL(max) increased by an average of 34% in the delayed non-gated scan as compared with the whole-body initial scan and further by an additional 17.2% in respiratory-gated images. The maximum lesion displacement was 6.2 ± 5.0 mm. Delayed imaging alone substantially increases the magnitude of the SUL of liver and lung lesions as compared with standard whole-body images and may allow for a more accurate definition of the lesion's volume and localisation and improve tracer quantitation in malignant lesions in the lungs or upper abdomen. While respiratory gating provides more optimal imaging with greatest increase in SUL(max), the benefit is small, and delayed imaging appears sufficient in most cases. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  17. Prospective comparison of (18)F-NaF PET/CT versus (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in mandibular extension of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with dedicated analysis software and validation with surgical specimen. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Raphael; Gantet, Pierre; Salabert, Anne Sophie; Julian, Anne; Hitzel, Anne; Herbault-Barres, Beatrice; Fontan, Charlotte; Alshehri, Sarah; Payoux, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to propose a new method to quantify radioactivity with PET/CT imaging in mandibular extension in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), using innovative software, and to compare results with microscopic surgical specimens. This prospective study enrolled 15 patients who underwent (18)F-NaF and (18)F-FDG PET/CT. We compared the delineations of bone invasions obtained with (18)F-NaF PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT with the results of histopathological analysis of mandibular resections (from right and left bone borders). A method for visualization and quantification of PET images was developed. For all patients, a significant difference (p = 0.032 for right limits and p = 0.011 for left limits) was observed between (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging and histopathology results, and no significant difference (p = 0.88 for right limits and p = 0.55 for left limits) was observed between (18)F-NaF PET/CT imaging and histopathology results. The right limits were less than 10 mm in 93% of patients, and the left limits were less than 10 mm in 86% of patients. The dedicated software enabled the objective delineation of radioactivity within the bone. We can confirm that (18)F-NaF is a precise and specific bone marker for the assessment of intraosseous mandibular extensions of head and neck cancers. Therapeutic, III. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in Lymphoma: Has Imaging-Directed Personalized Medicine Become a Reality?

    PubMed

    Barrington, Sally F; Johnson, Peter W M

    2017-10-01

    PET/CT using (18)F-FDG is an essential part of the management of patients with lymphoma. Efforts to standardize PET acquisition and reporting, including the 5-point Deauville scale, have enabled PET to become a surrogate for treatment success or failure in common lymphoma subtypes. This review summarizes the key clinical-trial evidence that supports PET-directed personalized approaches in lymphoma. PET-guided therapy has improved outcomes in Hodgkin lymphoma, using less chemotherapy and more selective radiotherapy. Attempts to intensify chemotherapy in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas have, however, proved ineffective in patients treated with rituximab and chemotherapy. Trials are under way to determine whether PET can obviate consolidation radiotherapy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. More recently, PET has been reported to be a reliable predictor of outcome in follicular lymphoma requiring treatment, and prospective trials to test PET-guided therapy in this disease are anticipated. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. PET/CT and High Resolution CT as potential imaging biomarkers associated with treatment outcomes in MDR-TB

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ray Y.; Dodd, Lori E.; Lee, Myungsun; Paripati, Praveen; Hammoud, Dima A.; Mountz, James M.; Jeon, Doosoo; Zia, Nadeem; Zahiri, Homeira; Coleman, M. Teresa; Carroll, Matthew W.; Lee, Jong Doo; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Herscovitch, Peter; Lahouar, Saher; Tartakovsky, Michael; Rosenthal, Alexander; Somaiyya, Sandeep; Lee, Soyoung; Goldfeder, Lisa C.; Cai, Ying; Via, Laura E.; Park, Seung-Kyu; Cho, Sang-Nae; Barry, Clifton E.

    2017-01-01

    Definitive clinical trials of new chemotherapies for tuberculosis (TB) treatment require following subjects until at least six months after treatment discontinuation to assess for durable cure, making these trials expensive and lengthy. Surrogate endpoints relating to treatment failure and relapse are currently limited to sputum microbiology, which has limited sensitivity and specificity. In this study we prospectively assessed radiographic changes using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) at two months and six months (CT only) in a cohort of subjects with multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB who were treated with second-line TB therapy for two years and then followed for an additional six months. CT scans were read semi-quantitatively by radiologists and computationally evaluated using custom software to provide volumetric assessment of TB-associated abnormalities. CT scans at six months assessed by readers were predictive of outcomes but not two months and changes in computed abnormal volumes were predictive at both time points. Quantitative changes in FDG uptake two months after starting treatment were associated with long-term outcomes. In this cohort, some radiologic markers were more sensitive than conventional sputum microbiology in distinguishing successful from unsuccessful treatment. These results support the potential of imaging biomarkers as possible surrogate endpoints in clinical trials of new TB drug regimens. Larger cohorts confirming these results are needed. PMID:25473034

  20. Pre-operative ⁶⁸Ga-DOTANOC somatostatin receptor PET/CT imaging demonstrating multiple synchronous lesions in a patient with head and neck paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Naswa, N; Karunanithi, S; Sharma, P; Soundararajan, R; Bal, C; Kumar, R

    2014-01-01

    Paragangliomas, or glomus tumors, are neoplasms arising from extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue. They frequently cause symptoms by over-production of catecholamines with known predilection to multicentricity. We describe the case of a patient with bilateral carotid body tumor who underwent a preoperative ⁶⁸Gallium labeled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI3-Octreotide (⁶⁸Ga-DOTANOC) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for staging. This is a unique case in which multiple paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma were demonstrated in a single patient using ⁶⁸Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT is an ideal imaging modality for the early diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, JianJie; Liu, XiaoFei; Pu, Chaoyu; Chen, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that may affect multiple cartilage throughout the body. We report on a middle-aged man presented with cough, chest tightness, and fever of unknown origin, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) was performed. And the imaging shows multiple increased FDG accumulation in tracheobronchial tree and all intercostal cartilages, as well as in nasal, right auricule, laryngeal cartilage. Based on the findings, the diagnosis of RP was made. Our case demonstrates that FDG PET/CT is an useful diagnostic tool to accurately determine the extent of inflammation throughout the body and to guiding the selection of a biopsy site.

  2. Development and Validation of the Suprathreshold Stochastic Resonance-Based Image Processing Method for the Detection of Abdomino-pelvic Tumor on PET/CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Saroha, Kartik; Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Param Dev; Behera, Abhishek; Patel, Chetan; Bal, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    The detection of abdomino-pelvic tumors embedded in or nearby radioactive urine containing 18F-FDG activity is a challenging task on PET/CT scan. In this study, we propose and validate the suprathreshold stochastic resonance-based image processing method for the detection of these tumors. The method consists of the addition of noise to the input image, and then thresholding it that creates one frame of intermediate image. One hundred such frames were generated and averaged to get the final image. The method was implemented using MATLAB R2013b on a personal computer. Noisy image was generated using random Poisson variates corresponding to each pixel of the input image. In order to verify the method, 30 sets of pre-diuretic and its corresponding post-diuretic PET/CT scan images (25 tumor images and 5 control images with no tumor) were included. For each sets of pre-diuretic image (input image), 26 images (at threshold values equal to mean counts multiplied by a constant factor ranging from 1.0 to 2.6 with increment step of 0.1) were created and visually inspected, and the image that most closely matched with the gold standard (corresponding post-diuretic image) was selected as the final output image. These images were further evaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians. In 22 out of 25 images, tumor was successfully detected. In five control images, no false positives were reported. Thus, the empirical probability of detection of abdomino-pelvic tumors evaluates to 0.88. The proposed method was able to detect abdomino-pelvic tumors on pre-diuretic PET/CT scan with a high probability of success and no false positives.

  3. Automated localization and segmentation of lung tumor from PET-CT thorax volumes based on image feature analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hui; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT) plays an essential role in early tumor detection, diagnosis, staging and treatment. Automated and more accurate lung tumor detection and delineation from PET-CT is challenging. In this paper, on the basis of quantitative analysis of contrast feature of PET volume in SUV (standardized uptake value), our method firstly automatically localized the lung tumor. Then based on analysing the surrounding CT features of the initial tumor definition, our decision strategy determines the tumor segmentation from CT or from PET. The algorithm has been validated on 20 PET-CT studies involving non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Experimental results demonstrated that our method was able to segment the tumor when adjacent to mediastinum or chest wall, and the algorithm outperformed the other five lung segmentation methods in terms of overlapping measure.

  4. Neurosarcoidosis on FET and FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mico; Hsiao, Edward

    2017-03-01

    O-(2-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for brain tumor imaging because of its reported high sensitivity for biologically active tumor tissue. We present a case of biopsy-proven neurosarcoidosis showing FET uptake. It is an important cause of false-positive uptake on FET PET/CT.

  5. Spatial resolution and image qualities of Zr-89 on Siemens Biograph TruePoint PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sub; Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Jung Young; Kim, Byung Il; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-02-01

    Zirconium-89 (t(1/2)=78.41 hours) is an ideal metallic radioisotope for immuno-positron emission tomography (PET), given that its physical half-life closely matches the biological half-life of monoclonal antibodies. In this study, the authors measured the spatial resolution and image quality of Zr-89 PET and compared the results against those obtained using F-18 PET, which is widely regarded as the gold standard for comparison of imaging characteristics. The spatial resolution and image qualities of Zr-89 were measured on the Siemens Biograph Truepoint TrueV PET/CT scanner, partly according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards. For spatial resolution measurement, the Zr-89 point source was located at the center of the axial field of view (FOV) and offset 1/4 axial FOV from the center. For image quality measurements, an NEMA IEC Phantom was used. The NEMA IEC Phantom consists of six hot spheres that were filled with Zr-89 solution. Spatial resolution and image quality (%contrast, %background variability [BV], and source to background ratio [SBR]) were assessed to compare the imaging characteristics of F-18 with those of Siemens Biograph Truepoint TrueV. The transverse and axial spatial resolutions at 1 cm were 4.5 and 4.7 mm for Zr-89, respectively. The %contrast of Zr-89 was 25.5% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 89.8% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere, and for F-18, it was 32.5% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 103.9% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction method. The %BV of F-18 PET was 6.4% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 3.5% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the OSEM reconstruction. The SBR of Zr-89 was 1.8 for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 3.7 for the largest 37 mm sized sphere, and for F-18, it was 2.0 for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 4.1 for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the OSEM reconstruction method. This study assessed Zr-89

  6. Spatial Resolution and Image Qualities of Zr-89 on Siemens Biograph TruePoint PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Sub; Kim, Jung Young; Kim, Byung Il; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Zirconium-89 (t1/2=78.41 hours) is an ideal metallic radioisotope for immuno–positron emission tomography (PET), given that its physical half-life closely matches the biological half-life of monoclonal antibodies. In this study, the authors measured the spatial resolution and image quality of Zr-89 PET and compared the results against those obtained using F-18 PET, which is widely regarded as the gold standard for comparison of imaging characteristics. Materials and Methods: The spatial resolution and image qualities of Zr-89 were measured on the Siemens Biograph Truepoint TrueV PET/CT scanner, partly according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards. For spatial resolution measurement, the Zr-89 point source was located at the center of the axial field of view (FOV) and offset 1/4 axial FOV from the center. For image quality measurements, an NEMA IEC Phantom was used. The NEMA IEC Phantom consists of six hot spheres that were filled with Zr-89 solution. Spatial resolution and image quality (%contrast, %background variability [BV], and source to background ratio [SBR]) were assessed to compare the imaging characteristics of F-18 with those of Siemens Biograph Truepoint TrueV. Results: The transverse and axial spatial resolutions at 1 cm were 4.5 and 4.7 mm for Zr-89, respectively. The %contrast of Zr-89 was 25.5% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 89.8% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere, and for F-18, it was 32.5% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 103.9% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction method. The %BV of F-18 PET was 6.4% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 3.5% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the OSEM reconstruction. The SBR of Zr-89 was 1.8 for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 3.7 for the largest 37 mm sized sphere, and for F-18, it was 2.0 for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 4.1 for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the

  7. A dual radiologic contrast agent protocol for 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET/CT imaging of mice bearing abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Aide, Nicolas; Kinross, Kathryn; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Neels, Oliver; Potdevin, Titaina; Roselt, Peter; Dorow, Donna; Cullinane, Carleen; Hicks, Rodney J

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to improve abdominal tumor detection by use of a dual radiologic contrast protocol. eXia160® (Benitio international) was mixed with 2-deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D: -glucose or 3'-[¹⁸F]fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine for intravenous (IV) injections. Omnipaque® 300 (GE healthcare) was used for intraperitoneal (IP) injections. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans were acquired on a Siemens Biograph® equipped with point spread function reconstruction. The optimal concentration and injection schedule of IP contrast agent was studied in 12 mice. The impact of IP contrast media on PET quantitative accuracy was investigated by phantom studies and by imaging six mice before and after IP injection of Omnipaque®. The impact of a dual contrast media protocol on tumor delineation and quantitation was evaluated in 15 tumor-bearing mice using ex vivo counting as the reference. The optimal sequence was a mixture of tracer plus IV contrast agent followed by 1 mL of IP contrast agent (20 mg iodine/mL) administered 10 min before PET/CT acquisition. Phantom studies showed that the use of a 20-mg iodine/mL concentration of Omnipaque® led to a 4.8% overestimation of radioactivity concentration, as compared to saline. This was confirmed by animal studies that demonstrated a 4.3% overestimation. Tumor detection was excellent and correlation between PET/CT quantitative data and ex vivo counting was good (r² = 0.91, slope = 0.7). A dual radiologic contrast protocol is useful in PET/CT scanning of mice bearing abdominal tumors. Contrast agents used in this manner lead to a small but acceptable overestimation of quantitative PET data.

  8. The scope and potentials of functional radionuclide imaging towards advancing personalized medicine in oncology: emphasis on PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral heterogeneity within a given patient cohort has been a major challenge in clinical practice and is probably most prominently observed in the field of oncology. This has been the prime impetus of the cutting-edge preclinical and clinical research studies over recent times, many of which seek to further stratify patients based on patients' genetic, proteomic, and metabolic profile (the three key components of "-omics" research), in order to select the appropriate therapy according to an individual's best-fit. Data from functional radionuclide imaging particularly that obtained from PET-CT, with regard to characterization of an individual's tumor phenotype, can play a very important role in answering some of the critical decision-making questions on an individual basis. The role of molecular imaging with PET, SPECT, and planar radionuclide technologies is not confined to early response assessment of administered therapeutics (which is its major benefit compared to conventional methods), rather it has a much broader perspective and encompasses multiple steps in decision making steps of patient management. The immense impact of the radionuclide-based molecular imaging techniques on the selection of an appropriate treatment (at initial diagnosis, during therapy, or after therapy) or in defining the tumor biology has been documented and increasingly recognized through both large and small-scale studies. However, there has been relatively less systematic effort towards the development of a successful and definitive clinical model of "personalized cancer medicine" (based on accurate disease triaging on an individual basis) by the medical community that would be suitable for routine adoption. In this paper, an endeavor has been made to explore the potential of this approach and underscore the areas that would require further critical evaluation to make this a reality.

  9. Clinical application of FDG-PET/CT in metastatic infections.

    PubMed

    Kouijzer, Ilse J; Vos, Fidel J; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; Oyen, Wim J

    2017-06-01

    FDG-PET/CT has proven its clinical value and cost-effectiveness in diagnosing metastatic infections in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia. In identification of metastatic foci, FDG-PET/CT is useful as a screening method when localizing symptoms are absent because it provides whole-body coverage. FDG-PET/CT detects early metabolic activity rather than the late anatomical changes as visualized by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET/CT allows more precise localization of infection within a shorter time span between injection and diagnosis as compared to conventional nuclear imaging. This review focuses on the clinical application of imaging of metastatic infectious diseases, with an emphasis on FDG-PET/CT putting it in perspective with other imaging modalities.

  10. Current evidence base of FDG-PET/CT imaging in the clinical management of malignant pleural mesothelioma: emerging significance of image segmentation and global disease assessment.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Saboury, Babak; Torigian, Drew A; Alavi, Abass

    2011-10-01

    Increasingly, integrated positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging is playing a crucial role in the assessment of patients with known or suspected malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Based on the data reported in the literature, this combined modality is likely to become the instrument of choice for examining patients of MPM. The research on this subject has focused on the following five domains: (1) differentiation of MPM from other benign pleural diseases, (2) preoperative staging for the selection of appropriate candidates for surgery, (3) evaluation for therapy response and post-treatment surveillance for recurrence, (4) prognostication based upon the intensity of 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) uptake, and (5) planning of radiotherapy. These represent the bases for critical decision making in the management of mesothelioma, and FDG-PET/CT offers potential advantages over conventional CT imaging and thus can play a pivotal role in this regard. Optimal characterization of this potentially fatal disease with a high negative predictive value for MPM, superior capability for cancer staging initially and at the later course of disease, and ability for measuring therapeutic response and the precise determination of the target volume for radiotherapy planning represent distinct advantages of this promising molecular imaging tool. In this communication, we have explored the promising role of integrated FDG-PET/CT in the overall management of this serious malignancy. From the available data, the major role of PET-CT at present appears to be in the preoperative disease staging, response to treatment assessment, and post-treatment disease surveillance of MPM. In all these three areas, PET-CT convincingly shows better results than conventional anatomical imaging alone and thereby can aid in exploring novel therapeutic approaches. Disease prognosis and radiotherapy planning are evolving areas where this modality has demonstrated significant

  11. FDG PET-CT imaging of therapeutic response in granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease (GLILD) in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID).

    PubMed

    Jolles, S; Carne, E; Brouns, M; El-Shanawany, T; Williams, P; Marshall, C; Fielding, P

    2017-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common severe adult primary immunodeficiency and is characterized by a failure to produce antibodies leading to recurrent predominantly sinopulmonary infections. Improvements in the prevention and treatment of infection with immunoglobulin replacement and antibiotics have resulted in malignancy, autoimmune, inflammatory and lymphoproliferative disorders emerging as major clinical challenges in the management of patients who have CVID. In a proportion of CVID patients, inflammation manifests as granulomas that frequently involve the lungs, lymph nodes, spleen and liver and may affect almost any organ. Granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease (GLILD) is associated with a worse outcome. Its underlying pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood and there is limited evidence to inform how best to monitor, treat or select patients to treat. We describe the use of combined 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET-CT) scanning for the assessment and monitoring of response to treatment in a patient with GLILD. This enabled a synergistic combination of functional and anatomical imaging in GLILD and demonstrated a widespread and high level of metabolic activity in the lungs and lymph nodes. Following treatment with rituximab and mycophenolate there was almost complete resolution of the previously identified high metabolic activity alongside significant normalization in lymph node size and lung architecture. The results support the view that GLILD represents one facet of a multi-systemic metabolically highly active lymphoproliferative disorder and suggests potential utility of this imaging modality in this subset of patients with CVID. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  12. Clinical significance of incidental [18 F]FDG uptake in the gastrointestinal tract on PET/CT imaging: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shmidt, Eugenia; Nehra, Vandana; Lowe, Val; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2016-10-06

    The frequency and clinically important characteristics of incidental (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18 F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) uptake in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) on PET/CT imaging in adults remain elusive. All PET/CT reports from 1/1/2000 to 12/31/2009 at a single tertiary referral center were reviewed; clinical information was obtained from cases with incidental (18)F-FDG uptake in the GIT, with follow-up through October, 2012. Of the 41,538 PET/CT scans performed during the study period, 303 (0.7 %) had incidental GIT uptake. The most common indication for the PET/CT order was cancer staging (226 cases, 75 %), with 74 % for solid and 26 % for hematologic malignancies. Of those with solid malignancy, only 51 (17 %) had known metastatic disease. The most common site of GIT uptake was the colon, and of the 240 cases with colonic uptake, the most common areas of uptake were cecum (n = 65), sigmoid (n = 60), and ascending colon (n = 50). Investigations were pursued for the GIT uptake in 147 cases (49 %), whereas 51 % did not undergo additional studies, largely due to advanced disease. There were 73 premalignant colonic lesions diagnosed in 56 cases (tubular adenoma, n = 36; tubulovillous adenoma with low grade dysplasia, n = 27; sessile serrated adenoma, n = 4; tubulovillous adenoma with high grade dysplasia, n = 3; villous adenoma, n = 3), and 20 cases with newly diagnosed primary colon cancer. All 20 (100 %) patients with malignant colonic lesions had a focal pattern of [18 F]FDG uptake. Among cases with a known pattern of [18 F]FDG uptake, 98 % of those with premalignant lesions had focal [18 F]FDG uptake. Eighteen (90 %) of the cases with newly diagnosed colon cancer were not known to have metastatic disease of their primary tumor. Areas of incidental uptake in the ascending colon had the greatest chance (42 %) of being malignant and premalignant lesions than in any other area. Focality of uptake

  13. The role of PSMA PET/CT imaging in restaging of prostate cancer patients with low prostate-specific antigen levels.

    PubMed

    Kabasakal, Levent; Demirci, Emre; Nematyazar, Jamal; Akyel, Reşit; Razavi, Baresh; Ocak, Meltem; Aygun, Aslan; Obek, Can; Kural, Ali R

    2017-02-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is increasingly being recognized as a novel target for the PET imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) and Ga-DKFZ-11 (Ga-PSMA) has been suggested as a novel tracer for detection of PCa relapses and metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of PSMA PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent PCa with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. We carried out a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent PSMA PET/CT from November 2013 to December 2014 in our department. Among these patients, 50 out of 178 who had increasing PSA levels (<5 ng/ml) and did not have known metastasis were included in this study. Patients had an average PSA of 1.41 ng/ml. A total of 29 patients (58%) showed at least one positive lesion. PET positivity rates of 31% (n=4), 54% (n=13), and 88% (n=14) were observed in patients with a PSA level of less than 0.2, 0.2-2, and 2-5 ng/ml, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between positivity rate and Gleason scores and blood PSA levels. Verification was performed in 46 patients, with biopsy (n=3) and follow-up, and conventional imaging studies at the time of the PET/CT or during follow-up with a mean period of 10.6±3.3 months and ranged from 3.8 to 16.4 months. According to patient-based analysis of 46 cases, 57% of patients had true positive, 24% of patients had true negative, 2% of patients had false positive, an 18% of patients had false-negative findings. A sensitivity of 76.47% (95% confidence interval: 58.83-89.25%) and a specificity of 91.67% (95% confidence interval: 61.52-99.79%) were found. PET/CT with Ga-PSMA is a valuable tool for assessing recurrence of PCa with a high sensitivity in patients who have PSA levels between 0.2 and 5 ng/ml. In addition, this study suggests that PSMA PET/CT can be used in patients with very low (<0.2 ng/ml) but increasing PSA levels, which, in many cases, may influence further clinical management.

  14. Comparison of standard and delayed imaging to improve the detection rate of [(68)Ga]PSMA I&T PET/CT in patients with biochemical recurrence or prostate-specific antigen persistence after primary therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Nordlohne, Stefan; von Klot, Christoph-A; Henkenberens, Christoph; Sohns, Jan M; Christiansen, Hans; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Ross, Tobias L; Bengel, Frank M; Derlin, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of dual-time point imaging in PET/CT for detection of biochemically recurrent or persistent prostate cancer, using the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand [(68)Ga]PSMA I&T. 240 patients who underwent a [(68)Ga]PSMA I&T PET/CT in the context of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. Imaging consisted of a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified proportions of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values and target-to-background ratios were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. The overall detection rates of [(68)Ga]PSMA I&T PET/CT were 94.2, 71.8, 58.6, 55.9 and 38.9% for PSA levels of ≥2, 1 to <2, 0.5 to <1, >0.2 to <0.5, and 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. Although the target-to-background ratio improved significantly over time (P < 0.0001), the majority (96.6%) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease could already be detected in standard imaging. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 5.4% (10/184) of abnormal [(68)Ga]PSMA I&T PET/CT scans, and exclusively detected 3.4% (38/1134) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease. [(68)Ga]PSMA I&T PET/CT shows high detection rates in patients with prostate-specific antigen persistence or biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Delayed imaging can detect lesions with improved contrast compared to standard imaging. However, the impact on detection rates was limited in this study.

  15. (18)F-FDG PET/CT and sentinel lymph node biopsy in the staging of patients with cervical and endometrial cancer. Role of dual-time-point imaging.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, M; Paredes, P; Domènech, B; Fusté, P; Vidal-Sicart, S; Tapias, A; Torné, A; Pahisa, J; Ordi, J; Pons, F; Lomeña, F

    Definitive staging for cervical (CC) and endometrial cancer (EC) takes place once surgery is performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of PET/CT in detecting lymphatic metastasis in patients with CC and EC using dual-time-point imaging (DPI), taking the histopathological results of sentinel lymph node (SLN) and lymphadenectomy as the reference. A prospective study was conducted on 17 patients with early CC, and 13 patients with high-risk EC. The patients had a pre-operative PET/CT, MRI, SLN detection, and lymphadenectomy, when indicated. PET/CT findings were compared with histopathological results. In the pathology study, 4 patients with CC and 4 patients with EC had lymphatic metastasis. PET/CT showed hypermetabolic nodes in 1 patient with CC, and 5 with EC. Four of these had metastasis, one detected in the SLN biopsy. Four patients who had negative PET/CT had micrometastasis in the SLN biopsy, 1 patient with additional lymph nodes involvement. The overall patient-based sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of PET/CT to detect lymphatic metastasis was 20.0%, 100.0%, 100.0%, 87.9%, and 88.2%, respectively, in CC, and 57.1%, 88.9%, 66.7%, 84.2% and 80.0%, respectively, in EC. DPI showed higher retention index in malignant than in inflammatory nodes, although no statistically significant differences were found. PET/CT has low sensitivity in lymph node staging of CC and EC, owing to the lack of detection of micrometastasis. Thus, PET/CT cannot replace SLN biopsy. Although no statistically significant differences were found, DPI may help to differentiate between inflammatory and malignant nodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  16. (68)Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT for assessment of prostate cancer: evaluation of image quality after forced diuresis and delayed imaging.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Weiberg, Desiree; von Klot, Christoph; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Henkenberens, Christoph; Ross, Tobias L; Christiansen, Hans; Merseburger, Axel S; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-12-01

    Urinary radiotracer excretion of (68)Ga-Labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands may complicate the assessment of the prostate region and differentiation of lymph nodes from ureteral activity. The aim of this study was to assess the value of delayed imaging after forced diuresis. Sixty-six patients underwent (68)Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT for evaluation of prostate cancer at 60 min post-injection. In subgroups of patients, this was amended by delayed imaging after 180 min post-injection, preceded by furosemide and oral hydration early, at the time of tracer injection, or delayed, at 100 min post-injection. Urinary tracer activity within the bladder and focal ureteral activity was analyzed. After forced diuresis, linear and focal visualization of ureters was significantly reduced. After delayed furosemide, mean and peak bladder activity decreased (p < 0.001), and image quality of the prostate region improved on delayed images (p < 0.001). Early furosemide co-injection with tracer resulted in increased mean and peak bladder activity (p < 0.001) and in deteriorated image quality of the prostate region on delayed images (p = 0.008). Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT delayed imaging after forced diuresis can improve the assessment of prostate region and pelvic lymph nodes by removing excreted tracer from the lower urinary tract. • Forced diuresis can improve image quality in (68) Ga-PSMA I&T. • After forced diuresis, linear and focal visualization of ureters was reduced. • Timing of diuresis relative to (68) Ga-PSMA I&T injection is important. • Early furosemide co-injection with tracer resulted in deteriorated image quality on delayed images. • After delayed furosemide, image quality improved on delayed images.

  17. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique. PMID:24604942

  18. Predictive and prognostic value of FDG-PET/CT imaging and different response evaluation criteria after primary systemic therapy of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tőkés, Tímea; Kajáry, Kornélia; Szentmártoni, Gyöngyvér; Lengyel, Zsolt; Györke, Tamás; Torgyík, László; Somlai, Krisztián; Tőkés, Anna-Mária; Kulka, Janina; Dank, Magdolna

    2017-01-01

    (1) To predict pathological complete remission (pCR) and survival after primary systemic therapy (PST) in patients diagnosed with breast cancer by using two different PET/CT based scores: a simplified PERCIST-based PET/CT score (Method 1) and a combined PET/CT score supplemented with the morphological results of the RECIST system (Method 2) and (2) to assess the effect of different breast carcinoma subtypes on tumor response and its evaluation. Eighty-eight patients were enrolled in the study who underwent PET/CT imaging before and after PST. PET/CTs were evaluated by changes in maximum Standardized Uptake Value (SUVmax) and tumor size. Method 1 and 2 were applied to predict pathological complete remission (pCR). Kaplan-Meier analyses for survival were performed. Classification into biological subtypes was performed based on the pre-therapeutic tumor characteristics. A total of 30/88 patients showed pCR (34.1 %). Comparing pCR/non-pCR patient groups, significant differences were detected by changes in SUVmax (p < 0.001) and tumor size (p < 0.001) regarding the primary breast lesions. To predict pCR, Method 2 had higher sensitivity (72.4 % vs. 44.8 %) and negative predictive value (57.9 % vs. 45.8 %) with lower false negativity rate (16 vs. 32) than Method 1. pCR rate was higher in Her2-positive and triple negative tumors. Despite the significant differences detected between the biological subtypes regarding changes in primary tumor SUVmax (p = 0.007) and size (p = 0.015), the subtypes only had significant impact on response evaluation with Method 2 and not with Method 1. In our study, neither clinical nor pathological CR were predictors of longer progression-free survival. Our results suggest that combined PET/CT criteria are more predictive of pCR. The effect of biological subtypes is significant on pCR rate as well as on the changes in FDG-uptake and morphological tumor response. Response evaluation with combined criteria was also able to reflect the

  19. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe).

    PubMed

    Nanni, Cristina; Zamagni, Elena; Versari, Annibale; Chauvie, Stephane; Bianchi, Andrea; Rensi, Marco; Bellò, Marilena; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Gallamini, Andrea; Patriarca, Francesca; Gay, Francesca; Gamberi, Barbara; Cavo, Michele; Fanti, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    .43, 0.22 and 0.21, respectively, and on PET-EoT, the alpha coefficients were 0.07, 0.28, 0.25 and 0.21, respectively. BM was generally difficult to score since grades 2 and 3 are difficult to discriminate. However, since neither of the two grades is related to BM myelomatous involvement, the difference was not clinically relevant. Agreement on focal lesion scores and on the number of focal lesions was good. The new visual criteria for interpreting FDG PET/CT imaging in MM patients, IMPeTUs, were found to be feasible in clinical practice.

  20. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Miller-Jaster, Kirsten; Luna, Brian; Dey, Bappaditya; Bishai, William R; Jonsson, Colleen B; Jain, Sanjay; Mollura, Daniel J

    2013-07-23

    evaluations for both structural and functional imaging modalities. Apart from quantitative analysis of each animal, we also qualitatively showed how metabolic volumes were changing over time by examining serial PET/CT scans. Evaluation of the registration processes was based on precisely defined anatomical landmark points by expert clinicians. An average of 2.66, 3.93, and 2.52 mm errors was found in rabbit, ferret, and mouse data (all within the resolution limits), respectively. Quantitative results obtained from the proposed methodology were visually related to the progress and severity of the pulmonary infections as verified by the participating radiologists. Moreover, we demonstrated that lesions due to the infections were metabolically active and appeared multi-focal in nature, and we observed similar patterns in the CT images as well. Consolidation and ground glass opacity were the main abnormal imaging patterns and consistently appeared in all CT images. We also found that the gross and metabolic lesion volume percentage follow the same trend as the SUV-based evaluation in the longitudinal analysis. We explored the feasibility of using PET and CT imaging modalities in three distinct small animal models for two diverse pulmonary infections. We concluded from the clinical findings, derived from the proposed computational pipeline, that PET-CT imaging is an invaluable hybrid modality for tracking pulmonary infections longitudinally in small animals and has great potential to become routinely used in clinics. Our proposed methodology showed that automated computed-aided lesion detection and quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models are efficient and accurate as compared to the clinical standard of manual and semi-automated approaches. Automated analysis of images in pre-clinical applications can increase the efficiency and quality of pre-clinical findings that ultimately inform downstream experimental design in human clinical studies; this innovation

  1. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    agreements (all above 85%) with expert evaluations for both structural and functional imaging modalities. Apart from quantitative analysis of each animal, we also qualitatively showed how metabolic volumes were changing over time by examining serial PET/CT scans. Evaluation of the registration processes was based on precisely defined anatomical landmark points by expert clinicians. An average of 2.66, 3.93, and 2.52 mm errors was found in rabbit, ferret, and mouse data (all within the resolution limits), respectively. Quantitative results obtained from the proposed methodology were visually related to the progress and severity of the pulmonary infections as verified by the participating radiologists. Moreover, we demonstrated that lesions due to the infections were metabolically active and appeared multi-focal in nature, and we observed similar patterns in the CT images as well. Consolidation and ground glass opacity were the main abnormal imaging patterns and consistently appeared in all CT images. We also found that the gross and metabolic lesion volume percentage follow the same trend as the SUV-based evaluation in the longitudinal analysis. Conclusions We explored the feasibility of using PET and CT imaging modalities in three distinct small animal models for two diverse pulmonary infections. We concluded from the clinical findings, derived from the proposed computational pipeline, that PET-CT imaging is an invaluable hybrid modality for tracking pulmonary infections longitudinally in small animals and has great potential to become routinely used in clinics. Our proposed methodology showed that automated computed-aided lesion detection and quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models are efficient and accurate as compared to the clinical standard of manual and semi-automated approaches. Automated analysis of images in pre-clinical applications can increase the efficiency and quality of pre-clinical findings that ultimately inform downstream experimental

  2. Quantitative Imaging Analysis of FDG PET/CT Imaging for Detection of Central Neurolymphomatosis in a Case of Recurrent Diffuse B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Savells, Derek; Awan, Omer; Inayat, Faisal; Chaudhry, Ammar; Jerath, Nivedita; Graham, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare disease characterized by malignant lymphocytes infiltrating various structures of the nervous system. It typically manifests as a neuropathy involving the peripheral nerves, nerve roots, plexuses, or cranial nerves. It often presents as a complication of lymphoma, but it can be the presenting feature of recurrent lymphoma. It is essential to identify and initiate treatment early with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy in all cases of nodal or visceral (including neural) involvement with lymphoma. There are various diagnostic tests that can be used for its detection, such as cerebrospinal spinal fluid (CSF) cytology, electromyography (EMG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). FDG-PET/CT is the standard of care in lymphoma staging, restaging, and therapy response assessment, but has an inherent limitation in the detection of disease involvement in the central nervous system. While that is mostly true for visual assessment, there are quantitative methods to measure variation in the metabolic activity in the brain, which in turn helps detect the occurrence of neurolymphomatosis. PMID:26719822

  3. EXPLORER: Changing the molecular imaging paradigm with total-body PET/CT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Jones, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the highest sensitivity technique for human whole-body imaging studies. However, current clinical PET scanners do not make full use of the available signal, as they only permit imaging of a 15-25 cm segment of the body at one time. Given the limited sensitive region, whole-body imaging with clinical PET scanners requires relatively long scan times and subjects the patient to higher than necessary radiation doses. The EXPLORER initiative aims to build a 2-meter axial length PET scanner to allow imaging the entire subject at once, capturing nearly the entire available PET signal. EXPLORER will acquire data with ~40-fold greater sensitivity leading to a six-fold increase in reconstructed signal-to-noise ratio for imaging the total body. Alternatively, total-body images with the EXPLORER scanner will be able to be acquired in ~30 seconds or with ~0.15 mSv injected dose, while maintaining current PET image quality. The superior sensitivity will open many new avenues for biomedical research. Specifically for cancer applications, high sensitivity PET will enable detection of smaller lesions. Additionally, greater sensitivity will allow imaging out to 10 half-lives of positron emitting radiotracers. This will enable 1) metabolic ultra-staging with FDG by extending the uptake and clearance time to 3-5 hours to significantly improve contrast and 2) improved kinetic imaging with short-lived radioisotopes such as C-11, crucial for drug development studies. Frequent imaging studies of the same subject to study disease progression or to track response to therapy will be possible with the low dose capabilities of the EXPLORER scanner. The low dose capabilities will also open up new imaging possibilities in pediatrics and adolescents to better study developmental disorders. This talk will review the basis for developing total-body PET, potential applications, and review progress to date in developing EXPLORER, the first total-body PET scanner.

  4. Computerized PET/CT image analysis in the evaluation of tumour response to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Zhang, H H

    2015-01-01

    Current cancer therapy strategy is mostly population based, however, there are large differences in tumour response among patients. It is therefore important for treating physicians to know individual tumour response. In recent years, many studies proposed the use of computerized positron emission tomography/CT image analysis in the evaluation of tumour response. Results showed that computerized analysis overcame some major limitations of current qualitative and semiquantitative analysis and led to improved accuracy. In this review, we summarize these studies in four steps of the analysis: image registration, tumour segmentation, image feature extraction and response evaluation. Future works are proposed and challenges described. PMID:25723599

  5. Localization of medullary thyroid carcinoma after surgery using (11)C-methionine PET/CT: comparison with (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hye Won; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Ji In; Kim, Hee Kyung; Shin, Hyun Won; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Tumor localization is difficult in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) that have persistent hypercalcitoninemia after thyroidectomy. In this study, the (11)C-methionine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was compared with the (18)F-FDG PET/CT for diagnostic sensitivity in detecting residual or metastatic disease. (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were performed on 16 consecutive patients with MTC that had persistent hypercalcitoninemia after surgery in this prospective, single-center study. Patient- and lesion-based analyses were performed using a composite reference standard which was the sum of the lesions confirmed by all combined modalities, including neck ultrasonography (US) with or without fine needle aspiration cytology, CT, bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgery. By patient-based analysis, the sensitivities of (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were both 63%. By lesion-based analysis, the sensitivity of (11)C-methionine PET/CT was similar to (18)F-FDG PET/CT (73% vs. 80%). Excluding hepatic lesions, which could not be detected because of physiological uptake of methionine by the liver, the sensitivity of (11)C-methionine PET/CT was better than (18)F-FDG PET/CT especially for detecting cervical lymph node lesions; however, it was not superior to US. All patients with serum calcitonin levels ≥370 pg/mL showed uptake by (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT. This preliminary data showed that despite its similar sensitivity to (18)F-FDG PET/CT for detecting residual or metastatic MTC, (11)C-methionine PET/CT provided minimal additional information compared to combined (18)F-FDG PET/CT and neck US.

  6. Quantitative PET/CT scanner performance characterization based upon the society of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging clinical trials network oncology clinical simulator phantom.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, John J; Christian, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Trials Network (CTN) of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) operates a PET/CT phantom imaging program using the CTN's oncology clinical simulator phantom, designed to validate scanners at sites that wish to participate in oncology clinical trials. Since its inception in 2008, the CTN has collected 406 well-characterized phantom datasets from 237 scanners at 170 imaging sites covering the spectrum of commercially available PET/CT systems. The combined and collated phantom data describe a global profile of quantitative performance and variability of PET/CT data used in both clinical practice and clinical trials. Individual sites filled and imaged the CTN oncology PET phantom according to detailed instructions. Standard clinical reconstructions were requested and submitted. The phantom itself contains uniform regions suitable for scanner calibration assessment, lung fields, and 6 hot spheric lesions with diameters ranging from 7 to 20 mm at a 4:1 contrast ratio with primary background. The CTN Phantom Imaging Core evaluated the quality of the phantom fill and imaging and measured background standardized uptake values to assess scanner calibration and maximum standardized uptake values of all 6 lesions to review quantitative performance. Scanner make-and-model-specific measurements were pooled and then subdivided by reconstruction to create scanner-specific quantitative profiles. Different makes and models of scanners predictably demonstrated different quantitative performance profiles including, in some cases, small calibration bias. Differences in site-specific reconstruction parameters increased the quantitative variability among similar scanners, with postreconstruction smoothing filters being the most influential parameter. Quantitative assessment of this intrascanner variability over this large collection of phantom data gives, for the first time, estimates of reconstruction variance introduced into trials from allowing

  7. [18F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75+-selected donor T cells (1.0–13 × 105)/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-(18F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [18F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [18F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  8. Whole-body dynamic imaging with continuous bed motion PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Acuff, Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Most dynamic imaging protocols require long scan times that are beyond the range of what can be supported in a routine clinical environment and suffer from various difficulties related to step and shoot imaging techniques. In this short communication, we describe continuous bed motion (CBM) imaging techniques to create clinically relevant 15 min whole-body dynamic PET imaging protocols. We also present initial data that suggest that these CBM methods may be sufficient for quantitative analysis of uptake rates and rates of glucose metabolism. Multipass CBM PET was used in conjunction with a population-based input function to perform Patlak modeling of normal tissue. Net uptake rates were estimated and metabolic rates of glucose were calculated. Estimations of k3 (Ki/Vd) were calculated along with modeling of liver regions of interest to assess model stability. Calculated values of metabolic rates of glucose were well within normal ranges found in the previous literature. CBM techniques can potentially be used clinically to obtain reliable, quantitative multipass whole-body dynamic PET data. Values calculated for normal brain were shown to be within previously published values for normal brain glucose metabolism. PMID:26629770

  9. Angiogenesis Imaging Using (68)Ga-RGD PET/CT: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Eo, Jae Seon; Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis imaging is important for diagnostic and therapeutic treatment of various malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence has been known to bind with the αvβ3 integrin that is expressed on the surface of angiogenic blood vessels or tumor cells. Thus, various radiolabeled derivatives of RGD peptides have been developed for angiogenesis imaging. Among the various radionuclides, (68)Ga was the most widely studied for RGD peptide imaging because of its excellent nuclear physical properties, easy-to-label chemical properties, and cost-effectiveness owing to the availability of a (68)Ge-(68)Ga generator. Thus, various (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives have been developed and applied for preclinical and clinical studies. Clinical trials were performed for both malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Breast cancer, glioma, and lung cancer were malignant, and myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis, and moyamoya disease were nonmalignant among the investigated diseases. Further, these (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives could be applied to assess the effects of antiangiogenic treatment or theragnosis or both, of cancers. In conclusion, the angiogenesis imaging technology using (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives might be useful for the development of new therapeutic assessments, and for diagnostic and theragnostic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Accuracy of CT-based attenuation correction in PET/CT bone imaging.

    PubMed

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M; Mankoff, David A; MacDonald, Lawrence R; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-05-07

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a (68)Ga/(68)Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9 ± 0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers ranges from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important.

  11. Accuracy of CT-Based Attenuation Correction in PET/CT Bone Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M.; Mankoff, David A.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well-tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a 68Ga/68Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9±0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers range from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important. PMID:22481547

  12. Accuracy of CT-based attenuation correction in PET/CT bone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M.; Mankoff, David A.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-05-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a 68Ga/68Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9 ± 0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers ranges from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important.

  13. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P.; Rimoldi, O. E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  14. Rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma with surrounding ductal hyperplasia mimics breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Hickeson, Marc; Derbekyan, Vilma

    2011-07-01

    A 30-year-old woman was referred for an F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT to rule out lymphoma, and was found to have an incidental FDG-avid right breast nodule that grew significantly in size and FDG uptake on a subsequent scan, raising suspicion of a growing breast malignancy. Histologic evaluation showed a complex fibroadenoma with adenosis and surrounding ductal hyperplasia. Although variable F-18 FDG uptake in fibroadenomas has been described, a distinction between simple and complex fibroadenomas has not been made in the PET literature, even though complex fibroadenomas have a higher propensity to develop into malignancies. This case shows that a rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma can mimic a breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT scans, showing significant increase in both size and FDG-avidity on follow-up studies.

  15. Multitracer Molecular Imaging of Paget Disease Targeting Bone Remodeling, Fatty Acid Metabolism, and PSMA Expression on PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Weiberg, Desiree; Sohns, Jan M

    2016-12-01

    Paget disease is a chronic disorder resulting in enlarged and misshapen bones, and is caused by disorganized bone remodeling. We present the case of an 85-year-old man with prostatic adenocarcinoma and known Paget disease of the right iliac bone who underwent Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen ligand, C-acetate, and F-fluoride PET/CT for restaging of cancer. On all PET scans, increased tracer accumulation was observed in Paget disease of bone. Besides that Paget disease may mimic metastases on PET/CT using various radiotracers, including Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen ligands and C-acetate, this case highlights the potential of multiparametric disease characterization on PET.

  16. Diagnosis, PET/CT imaging, and treatment of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma in keratinized gingiva: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aral, Cüneyt A; Ağlarcı, Osman S; Yılmaz, Hasan H; Taşlı, Funda; Karaarslan, Serap; Hatipoğlu, Filiz; Sanal, Mustafa S

    2015-03-01

    A 58-year-old patient who smoked and had uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus was referred to our clinic. The patient had a suspicious asymptomatic lesion that was diagnosed as B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Immunohistochemistry revealed intense and diffuse expression of CD20, CD10, BCL-6, and Ki-67. A positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan showed focal pathological uptake of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose only in the subcutaneous tissue anterior to the left maxillary sinus. After lesion excision and five courses of chemotherapy, PET/CT scans demonstrated complete resolution of the lesion. Smoking, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and periodontal disease might be predisposing factors for oral NHL.

  17. Measurement of arterial activity on routine FDG PET/CT images improves prediction of risk of future CV events.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Amparo L; Abdelbaky, Amr; Truong, Quynh A; Corsini, Erin; MacNabb, Megan H; Lavender, Zachary R; Lawler, Meredith A; Grinspoon, Steven K; Brady, Thomas J; Nasir, Khurram; Hoffmann, Udo; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    routinely obtained PET/CT images, substantially improved incident CVD prediction beyond FRS among individuals undergoing cancer surveillance and provided information on the potential timing of such events. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. PET-CT image registration in the chest using free-form deformations.

    PubMed

    Mattes, David; Haynor, David R; Vesselle, Hubert; Lewellen, Thomas K; Eubank, William

    2003-01-01

    We have implemented and validated an algorithm for three-dimensional positron emission tomography transmission-to-computed tomography registration in the chest, using mutual information as a similarity criterion. Inherent differences in the two imaging protocols produce significant nonrigid motion between the two acquisitions. A rigid body deformation combined with localized cubic B-splines is used to capture this motion. The deformation is defined on a regular grid and is parameterized by potentially several thousand coefficients. Together with a spline-based continuous representation of images and Parzen histogram estimates, our deformation model allows closed-form expressions for the criterion and its gradient. A limited-memory quasi-Newton optimization algorithm is used in a hierarchical multiresolution framework to automatically align the images. To characterize the performance of the method, 27 scans from patients involved in routine lung cancer staging were used in a validation study. The registrations were assessed visually by two expert observers in specific anatomic locations using a split window validation technique. The visually reported errors are in the 0- to 6-mm range and the average computation time is 100 min on a moderate-performance workstation.

  19. Prediction of Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy Using Early-Time-Point (18)F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Advanced Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Steve Y; Lipson, Evan J; Im, Hyung-Jun; Rowe, Steven P; Gonzalez, Esther Mena; Blackford, Amanda; Chirindel, Alin; Pardoll, Drew M; Topalian, Suzanne L; Wahl, Richard L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning as an early predictor of response to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in patients with advanced melanoma. Methods: Twenty patients with advanced melanoma receiving ICI prospectively underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT at 3 scan intervals: before treatment initiation (SCAN-1), at days 21-28 (SCAN-2), and at 4 mo (SCAN-3). This study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was received from all patients who were enrolled between April 2012 and December 2013. Tumor response at each posttreatment time point was assessed according to RECIST 1.1, immune-related response criteria, PERCIST (PERCIST 1.0), and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. Performance characteristics of each metric to predict best overall response (BOR) at ≥ 4 mo were assessed. Results: Twenty evaluable patients were treated with ipilimumab (n = 16), BMS-936559 (n = 3), or nivolumab (n = 1). BOR at ≥ 4 mo included complete response (n = 2), partial response (n = 2), stable disease (n = 1), and progressive disease (n = 15). Response evaluations at SCAN-2 using RECIST 1.1, immune-related response criteria, PERCIST, and EORTC criteria demonstrated accuracies of 75%, 70%, 70%, and 65%, respectively, to predict BOR at ≥ 4 mo. Interestingly, the optimal PERCIST and EORTC threshold values at SCAN-2 to predict BOR were >15.5% and >14.7%, respectively. By combining anatomic and functional imaging data collected at SCAN-2, we developed criteria to predict eventual response to ICI with 100% sensitivity, 93% specificity, and 95% accuracy. Conclusion: Combining functional and anatomic imaging parameters from (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans performed early in ICI appears predictive for eventual response in patients with advanced melanoma. These findings require validation in larger cohorts. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. Exploring new frontiers in molecular imaging: Emergence of 68Ga PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Eik Hock; Goh, Soon Whatt

    2010-01-01

    Since US Food and Drug Administration approval of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose as a positron tracer, and the development of hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography machines, there has been a great increase in clinical application and progress in the field of nuclear molecular imaging. However, not underestimating the value of 18F, there are known limitations in the use of this cyclotron-produced positron tracer. We hence turn our focus to an emerging positron tracer, 68Ga, and examine the advantages, current clinical uses and potential future applications of this radioisotope. PMID:21160919

  1. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  2. Comparison of machine learning methods for classifying mediastinal lymph node metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer from (18)F-FDG PET/CT images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongkai; Zhou, Zongwei; Li, Yingci; Chen, Zhonghua; Lu, Peiou; Wang, Wenzhi; Liu, Wanyu; Yu, Lijuan

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to compare one state-of-the-art deep learning method and four classical machine learning methods for classifying mediastinal lymph node metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from (18)F-FDG PET/CT images. Another objective was to compare the discriminative power of the recently popular PET/CT texture features with the widely used diagnostic features such as tumor size, CT value, SUV, image contrast, and intensity standard deviation. The four classical machine learning methods included random forests, support vector machines, adaptive boosting, and artificial neural network. The deep learning method was the convolutional neural networks (CNN). The five methods were evaluated using 1397 lymph nodes collected from PET/CT images of 168 patients, with corresponding pathology analysis results as gold standard. The comparison was conducted using 10 times 10-fold cross-validation based on the criterion of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy (ACC), and area under the ROC curve (AUC). For each classical method, different input features were compared to select the optimal feature set. Based on the optimal feature set, the classical methods were compared with CNN, as well as with human doctors from our institute. For the classical methods, the diagnostic features resulted in 81~85% ACC and 0.87~0.92 AUC, which were significantly higher than the results of texture features. CNN's sensitivity, specificity, ACC, and AUC were 84, 88, 86, and 0.91, respectively. There was no significant difference between the results of CNN and the best classical method. The sensitivity, specificity, and ACC of human doctors were 73, 90, and 82, respectively. All the five machine learning methods had higher sensitivities but lower specificities than human doctors. The present study shows that the performance of CNN is not significantly different from the best classical methods and human doctors for classifying mediastinal lymph node metastasis of NSCLC from PET/CT images

  3. Effectiveness of the addition of the brain region to the FDG-PET/CT imaging area in patients with suspected or diagnosed lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Bekir; Urakci, Zuhat; Dostbil, Zeki; Unal, Kemal; Simsek, F Selcuk; Teke, Fatma; Goya, Cemil

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the brain region imaging in FDG-PET/CT scanning of patients with suspected or diagnosed lung cancer. We performed the study retrospectively on the medical charts of 427 patients. We divided the FDG-PET/CT field of view (FOV) into four major imaging regions: brain, head-neck, abdomen and pelvis. Metastatic findings on these regions were checked and determined the potential of these findings to affect the chemotherapy or radiotherapy protocol or surgical management. If metastatic findings had a potential to modify these parameters, we named this situation as "clinical contribution". Considering the number of bed positions of these regions, we calculated the clinical contribution of each region and named as "effective clinical contribution". Then, we calculated the metastatic findings, clinical contribution, and effective clinical contribution ratios. We found different brain metastasis ratios for lung cancer, solitary pulmonary mass (SPM), and solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) groups (8.7, 2.8 and 0.9 %, respectively). In addition, the clinical contribution and effective clinical contribution ratios in the brain region for these three groups were 6.4, 2.8, 0.0 and 6.4, 2.8, 0.0 %, respectively. The highest metastatic findings (30.6 %) and clinical contribution (9.8 %) ratios were found in the abdomen region of the lung cancer group. However, the highest effective clinical contribution ratio (6.8 %) was found in the brain region within the same group. The addition of the brain region to the limited whole-body FOV in FDG-PET/CT scanning seems to be effective in the lung cancer and SPM groups, but not in the SPN group.

  4. PET/MR Versus PET/CT Imaging: Impact on the Clinical Management of Small-Bowel Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pellino, Gianluca; Nicolai, Emanuele; Catalano, Onofrio A.; Campione, Severo; D’Armiento, Francesco P.; Salvatore, Marco; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy and clinical impact of hybrid positron emission tomography [PET]/magnetic resonance-enterography [MR-E] and PET/computed tomography-enterography [CT-E] in patients with Crohn’s disease [CD]. Methods: A total of 35 patients with symptomatic small-bowel CD who were scheduled to undergo operation were evaluated before operation by same-day PET/CT-E and PET/MR-E. PET/MR-E was also compared with MR-E alone. Imaging accuracy for detecting pathological sites and discriminating between fibrotic and inflammatory strictures was assessed. Treatment was adjusted according to imaging findings and change in medical/surgical strategy was also evaluated. Results: PET/CT-E, PET/MR-E, and MR-E were equally accurate in detecting CD sites. PET/MR-E was more accurate in assessing extra-luminal disease [p = 0.002], which was associated with higher need for stoma [p = 0.022] and distant localisation [p = 0.002]. When the latter was observed, laparoscopy was started with hand-assisted device, reducing operative time [p = 0.022]. PET/MR-E was also more accurate in detecting a fibrotic component compared with PET/CT-E [p = 0.043] and with MR-E [p = 0.024]. Fibrosis was more frequently classified as inflammation with MR-E compared with PET/MR-E [p = 0.019]. Out of 8 patients with predominantly inflammatory CD who received medical treatment, 6 [75%] remained surgery free. Overall, 29 patients received surgery. At median follow-up of 9 [6–22] months, no recurrences occurred in either the medical or the surgical group. Conclusions: Preoperative PET/MR-E imaging is highly accurate for assessing CD lesions before operation and contributed to clinical management of patients with small-bowel CD more often than PET/CT-E. PMID:26574490

  5. A navigation system for percutaneous needle interventions based on PET/CT images: design, workflow and error analysis of soft tissue and bone punctures.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Santos, Thiago; Klaeser, Bernd; Weitzel, Thilo; Krause, Thomas; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Peterhans, Matthias; Weber, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous needle intervention based on PET/CT images is effective, but exposes the patient to unnecessary radiation due to the increased number of CT scans required. Computer assisted intervention can reduce the number of scans, but requires handling, matching and visualization of two different datasets. While one dataset is used for target definition according to metabolism, the other is used for instrument guidance according to anatomical structures. No navigation systems capable of handling such data and performing PET/CT image-based procedures while following clinically approved protocols for oncologic percutaneous interventions are available. The need for such systems is emphasized in scenarios where the target can be located in different types of tissue such as bone and soft tissue. These two tissues require different clinical protocols for puncturing and may therefore give rise to different problems during the navigated intervention. Studies comparing the performance of navigated needle interventions targeting lesions located in these two types of tissue are not often found in the literature. Hence, this paper presents an optical navigation system for percutaneous needle interventions based on PET/CT images. The system provides viewers for guiding the physician to the target with real-time visualization of PET/CT datasets, and is able to handle targets located in both bone and soft tissue. The navigation system and the required clinical workflow were designed taking into consideration clinical protocols and requirements, and the system is thus operable by a single person, even during transition to the sterile phase. Both the system and the workflow were evaluated in an initial set of experiments simulating 41 lesions (23 located in bone tissue and 18 in soft tissue) in swine cadavers. We also measured and decomposed the overall system error into distinct error sources, which allowed for the identification of particularities involved in the process as well

  6. Monitoring of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using multiparametric, ²³Na sodium MR, and multimodality (PET/CT/MRI) imaging in locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael A; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Wolff, Antonio C; Gabrielson, Edward; Warzecha, Hind; Jeter, Stacie; Bluemke, David A; Wahl, Richard; Stearns, Vered

    2011-07-01

    We prospectively investigated using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to identify radiological biomarkers for treatment response in patients receiving preoperative systemic therapy (PST) for locally advanced breast cancer. Patients with a stage II or III breast cancer receiving PST were selected and underwent positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and breast biopsies at baseline and after the first cycle of PST (days 7-8) during the full course of treatment. PET/CT was acquired after injection of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (¹⁸FDG, 0.22 mCi/kg) and quantified with standardized uptake value assessment (SUV). Diagnostic breast MRI and sodium (²³Na) was acquired at 1.5 T. Total tissue sodium concentration (TSC), response criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), and volumes were quantified. Treatment response was determined by pathological assessment at surgery. Immunohistochemistry values of the proliferative index (Ki-67) were performed on biopsy specimens. Six of nineteen eligible women (43 ± 11 years) who received PST underwent radiological imaging of ¹⁸FDG-PET/CT and MRI for at least two cycles of treatment. Five patients had a pathological partial response (pPR) and one had pathological non-response (pNR). TSC decreased 21% in responders with increases in the non-responder (P = 0.03). Greater reduction in SUV was observed in responders (38%) compared to the non-responder (22%; P = 0.03). MRI volumes decreased after cycle 1 by 42% (responders) and 35% (non-responder; P = 0.11). Proliferation index Ki-67 declined in responders in the first cycle (median = 47%, range = 29-20%), but increased (4%) in the non-responder. Significant decreases in TSC, SUV, and Ki-67 were observed in responders with increases in TSC and Ki-67 in non-responders. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using multi-modality proton, ²³Na MRI, and PET/CT metrics as radiological

  7. Monitoring of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using multiparametric, 23Na sodium MR, and multimodality (PET/CT/MRI) imaging in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Wolff, Antonio C.; Gabrielson, Edward; Warzecha, Hind; Jeter, Stacie; Bluemke, David A.; Wahl, Richard; Stearns, Vered

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively investigated using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to identify radiological biomarkers for treatment response in patients receiving preoperative systemic therapy (PST) for locally advanced breast cancer. Patients with a stage II or III breast cancer receiving PST were selected and underwent positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and breast biopsies at baseline and after the first cycle of PST (days 7–8) during the full course of treatment. PET/CT was acquired after injection of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG, 0.22 mCi/kg) and quantified with standardized uptake value assessment (SUV). Diagnostic breast MRI and sodium (23Na) was acquired at 1.5 T. Total tissue sodium concentration (TSC), response criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), and volumes were quantified. Treatment response was determined by pathological assessment at surgery. Immunohistochemistry values of the proliferative index (Ki-67) were performed on biopsy specimens. Six of nineteen eligible women (43 ± 11 years) who received PST underwent radiological imaging of 18FDG-PET/CT and MRI for at least two cycles of treatment. Five patients had a pathological partial response (pPR) and one had pathological non-response (pNR). TSC decreased 21% in responders with increases in the non-responder (P = 0.03). Greater reduction in SUV was observed in responders (38%) compared to the non-responder (22%; P = 0.03). MRI volumes decreased after cycle 1 by 42% (responders) and 35% (non-responder; P = 0.11). Proliferation index Ki-67 declined in responders in the first cycle (median = 47%, range = 29–20%), but increased (4%) in the non-responder. Significant decreases in TSC, SUV, and Ki-67 were observed in responders with increases in TSC and Ki-67 in non-responders. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using multi-modality proton, 23Na MRI, and PET/CT metrics as radiological

  8. Imaging copper metabolism imbalance in Atp7b (-/-) knockout mouse model of Wilson's disease with PET-CT and orally administered 64CuCl2.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fangyu; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Sun, Xiankai; Muzik, Otto

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to determine the feasibility and utility of functional imaging of copper metabolism imbalance in Atp7b (-/-) knockout mouse model of Wilson's disease (WD) with positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) using orally administered copper-64 chloride ((64)CuCl(2)) as a tracer. Atp7b (-/-) KO mice (N = 5) were subjected to PET scanning using a hybrid PET-CT scanner, after oral administration of (64)CuCl(2) as a tracer. Time-dependent PET quantitative analysis was performed to assess gastrointestinal absorption and biodistribution of (64)Cu radioactivity in the Atp7b (-/-) KO mice, using C57BL wild-type (WT) mice (N = 5) as a normal control. Estimates of human radiation dosimetry were calculated based on biodistribution of (64)Cu radioactivity in live animals. PET-CT analysis demonstrated higher (64)Cu radioactivity in the liver of Atp7b (-/-) knockout mice compared with that in the control C57BL WT mice (p < 0.001), following oral administration of (64)CuCl(2) as a tracer. In addition, (64)Cu radioactivity in the lungs of the Atp7b (-/-) knockout mice was slightly higher than those in the control C57BL WT mice (p = 0.01). Despite initially higher renal clearance of (64)Cu, there was no significant difference of (64)Cu radioactivity in the kidneys of the Atp7b (-/-) KO mice and the control C57BL WT mice at 24 h post-oral administration of (64)CuCl(2) (p = 0.16). There was no significant difference in low (64)Cu radioactivity in the blood, brain, heart, and muscles between the Atp7b (-/-) knockout mice and control C57BL WT mice (p > 0.05). Based on the biodistribution of (64)Cu radioactivity in C57BL WT mice, radiation dosimetry estimates of (64)Cu in normal human subjects were obtained. An effective dose (ED) of 42.4 μSv/MBq (weighted dose over 22 organs) was calculated and the lower large intestines were identified as the critical organ for radiation exposure (120 μGy/MBq for males and 135 μGy/MBq for

  9. Functional imaging of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts using spectral CT: how does iodine concentration correlate with standardized uptake value of (18)FDG-PET-CT?

    PubMed

    Hu, Shudong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yerong; Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Liu, Yu; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between iodine concentration (IC) for the quantitative analysis of spectral CT and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-CT ((18)FDG PET-CT) as an indicator of therapeutic response to interstitial brachytherapy in transplanted human pancreatic carcinomas in BALB/c-nu mice. Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into immunodeficient BALB/c-nu mice. 30 mice bearing SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 15; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 15, 0 mCi). After 2 weeks of treatment, spectral CT and (18)FDG micro-PET-CT scan were performed. IC values and SUVmax in the lesions were measured. IC normalized to the muscle tissue is indicated as nIC. The relationships between the nIC and SUVmax of the transplantation tumours were analysed. 2 weeks after treatment, the nIC in three-phase scans and SUVmax of the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The nIC values of the three-phase scans have certain positive correlation with the SUVmax values (r = 0.69, p < 0.05; r = 0.73 and p < 0.05; r = 0.80, p < 0.05 in the 10-, 25- and 60-s phase, respectively). Spectral CT could serve as a valuable imaging modality, as our results suggest that nIC correlates with SUVmax of (18)FDG PET-CT for evaluating the therapeutic effect of (125)I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. Spectral CT offers opportunities to assess the therapeutic response of pancreatic cancer. This study supports the conclusion that nIC values in spectral CT could also serve as a valuable functional imaging parameter for early monitoring and evaluation of the therapeutic response of (125)I interstitial brachytherapy mouse models because the nIC correlates with the SUVmax of (18)FDG PET-CT.

  10. Performance characteristics and relationship of PSA value/kinetics on carbon-11 acetate PET/CT imaging in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fabio D; Yen, Chi-Kwan; Scholz, Mark C; Lam, Richard Y; Turner, Jeffrey; Bans, Larry L; Lipson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level alone cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and distant metastases after treatment with curative intent. With available salvage treatments, it has become important to localize the site of recurrence. 11C-Acetate PET/CT was performed in patients with rising PSA, with statistical analysis of detection rates, sites/location of detection, PSA kinetics and comparison with other tracers (FDG and Choline). Correlation to biopsy, subsequent imaging and PSA response to focal treatment was also performed. 88% (637) of 721 11C-Acetate PET/CT scans performed were positive. There was a statistically significant difference in PSA values between the positive and negative scans (P < 0.001 for mean difference) with the percentage of positive scans and PSA having a positive correlation. A PSA of 1.09 ng/mL was found to be an optimal cutoff. PSAdT was significantly correlated with a positive scan only when the PSA was < 1.0 ng/mL. For this subgroup, a PSAdT of < 3.8 months appeared significant (P < 0.05) as an optimal cutoff point. 11C-Acetate PET/CT demonstrates a high detection rate for the site of recurrence/metastasis in biochemical relapsed prostate cancer (88% overall detection rate, PPV 90.8%). This analysis suggests an optimal PSA threshold of > 1.09 ng/mL or a PSAdT of < 3.8 months when the PSA is below 1.0 ng/mL as independent predictors of positive findings. PMID:28123863

  11. Acupuncture regulates the glucose metabolism in cerebral functional regions in chronic stage ischemic stroke patients---a PET-CT cerebral functional imaging study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acupuncture has been applied to aid in the recovery of post-stroke patients, but its mechanism is unclear. This study aims to analyze the relationship between acupuncture and glucose metabolism in cerebral functional regions in post-stroke patients using 18 FDG PET-CT techniques. Forty-three ischemic stroke patients were randomly divided into 5 groups: the Waiguan (TE5) needling group, the TE5 sham needling group, the sham point needling group, the sham point sham needling group and the non-needling group. Cerebral functional images of all patients were then acquired using PET-CT scans and processed by SPM2 software. Results Compared with the non-needling group, sham needling at TE5 and needling/sham needling at the sham point did not activate cerebral areas. However, needling at TE5 resulted in the activation of Brodmann Area (BA) 30. Needling/sham needling at TE5 and needling at the sham point did not deactivate any cerebral areas, whereas sham needling at the sham point led to deactivation in BA6. Compared with sham needling at TE5, needling at TE5 activated BA13, 19 and 47 and did not deactivate any areas. Compared with needling at the sham point, needling at TE5 had no associated activation but a deactivating effect on BA9. Conclusion Needling at TE5 had a regulating effect on cerebral functional areas shown by PET-CT, and this may relate to its impact on the recovery of post-stroke patients. PMID:22738270

  12. Imaging primary prostate cancer with 11C-Choline PET/CT: relation to tumour stage, Gleason score and biomarkers of biologic aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Zhao, Yong; Li, Xin; Sun, Peng; Wang, Muwen; Wang, Ridong; Jin, Xunbo

    2012-01-01

    Background As a significant overlap of 11C-Choline standardized uptake value (SUV) between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, controversy exists regarding the clinical value of 11C-Choline PET/CT scan in primary prostate cancer. In this study, the SUVmax of the prostate lesions and the pelvic muscles were measured and their ratios (SUVmax-P/M ratio) were calculated. Then we evaluated whether the tracer 11C-Choline uptake, quantified as SUVmax-P/M ratio, correlated with tumour stage, Gleason score, and expression levels of several biomarkers of aggressiveness. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary prostate cancer underwent 11C-Choline PET/CT. Tumour specimens from these patients were graded histopathologically, and immunnohistochemistry for Ki-67, CD31, androgen receptor (AR), Her-2/neu, Bcl-2, and PTEN were performed. Results Both SUVmax and SUVmax-P/M ratio showed no significant difference between patients with tumour stage II and III, but significantly elevated in patients with tumour stage IV. SUVmax-P/M ratio was also significantly higher in lesions with Gleason score of 4+3 or higher versus less than or equal to 3+4. SUVmax-P/M ratio was found significantly correlated with expression levels of Ki-67 and CD31. In addition, a higher SUVmax-P/M ratio was demonstrated in Her-2/neu positive subgroup than negative subgroup. At the same time, Gleason score and expression levels of these biomarkers showed no significant association with SUVmax. Conclusions Using the parameter SUVmax-P/M ratio, 11C-Choline PET/CT may be a valuable non-invasive imaging technology in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer. PMID:23077456

  13. CT imaging of bone and bone marrow infiltration in malignant melanoma--Challenges and limitations for clinical staging in comparison to 18FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bier, Georg; Hoffmann, Vera; Kloth, Christopher; Othman, Ahmed E; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus; La Fougère, Christian; Pfannenberg, Christina; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Klumpp, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Rationale of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in comparison to PET/CT. Fifty patients (age 61 ± 15.12 years) with metastatic malignant melanoma underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT, including contrast-enhanced CT. 2 readers evaluated the CT images in consensus for bone and bone marrow lesions focusing on lesion location, type and size. PET/CT was used as reference standard to estimate sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value. Moreover, the bone marrow density was estimated in the long bones and the sacral bone. Serum hamoglobin, thrombocyte level and S100 protein were correlated with the presence or absence of bone and bone marrow lesions. According to PET/CT as standard of reference, of 594 bone and medullary lesions 495 were considered malignant. Of these 77.8% were medullary, 20.4% lytic, 1% sclerotic and 0.8% mixed lytic/sclerotic. Contrast-enhanced CT yielded a lesion-based sensitivity of 36.8% and a specificity of 87.9% (PPV 93.8%; NPV 21.8%). Patient-based sensitivity and specificity were 78.8% and 82.4%, respectively. Of the missed lesions, most were medullary (95.8%). A disseminated bone marrow involvement (defined as >10 bone marrow lesions or diffuse infiltration of a whole body segment) was described in 11 cases, in 6 cases the disseminated involvement was underestimated or missed on CT. In cases with disseminated bone marrow involvement the bone marrow density was significantly higher in the humerus (p=0.04), but not in the femur or sacral bone (p=0.06). Multivariate analysis revealed no isolated effect of bone metastases on S100 serum and hemoglobin level, but both were significantly altered in patients with disseminated bone marrow involvement (p<0.05). In conclusion, the diagnostic value of computed tomography for the detection of bone marrow metastases in patients with melanoma, is limited. Especially in cases with disseminated bone marrow

  14. The Clinical Impact of Additional Late PET/CT Imaging with (68)Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC) in the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Sattler, Lars Peter; Mier, Walter; Hadaschik, Boris A; Debus, Jürgen; Holland-Letz, Tim; Kopka, Klaus; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2017-05-01

    urinary bladder. Conclusion:(68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT at 3 h after injection showed most lesions characteristic for PCa with a higher uptake and contrast. In addition, the radioactivity signal within the urinary bladder was lower at 3 h after injection, especially when furosemide was applied. Consequently, scans at 3 h after injection detected more tumor lesions than at 1 h after injection. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  15. Is metal artefact reduction mandatory in cardiac PET/CT imaging in the presence of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads?

    PubMed

    Ghafarian, Pardis; Aghamiri, S M R; Ay, Mohammad R; Rahmim, Arman; Schindler, Thomas H; Ratib, Osman; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-02-01

    Cardiac PET/CT imaging is often performed in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads. However, metallic implants usually produce artefacts on CT images which might propagate to CT-based attenuation-corrected (CTAC) PET images. The impact of metal artefact reduction (MAR) for CTAC of cardiac PET/CT images in the presence of pacemaker, ICD and ECG leads was investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in phantom and clinical studies. The study included 14 patients with various leads undergoing perfusion and viability examinations using dedicated cardiac PET/CT protocols. The PET data were corrected for attenuation using both artefactual CT images and CT images corrected using the MAR algorithm. The severity and magnitude of metallic artefacts arising from these leads were assessed on both linear attenuation coefficient maps (μ-maps) and attenuation-corrected PET images. CT and PET emission data were obtained using an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and a dedicated heart phantom made in-house incorporating pacemaker and ICD leads attached at the right ventricle of the heart. Volume of interest-based analysis and regression plots were performed for regions related to the lead locations. Bull's eye view analysis was also performed on PET images corrected for attenuation with and without the MAR algorithm. In clinical studies, the visual assessment of PET images by experienced physicians and quantitative analysis did not reveal erroneous interpretation of the tracer distribution or significant differences when PET images were corrected for attenuation with and without MAR. In phantom studies, the mean differences between tracer uptake obtained without and with MAR were 10.16±2.1% and 6.86±2.1% in the segments of the heart in the vicinity of metallic ICD or pacemaker leads, and were 4.43±0.5% and 2.98±0.5% in segments far from the leads. Although the MAR algorithm was able to effectively improve the quality of

  16. The Role of PET/CT Molecular Imaging in the Diagnosis of Recurrence and Surveillance of Patients Treated for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Bonilla, Julio Francisco; Quirce, Remedios; Martínez-Rodríguez, I.; De Arcocha-Torres, María; Carril, José Manuel; Banzo, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide and its prognosis remains poor. Molecular imaging with 18F-FDG PET/CT can metabolically characterize the nature of lesions as benign or malignant, allowing a better staging at the diagnosis of this kind of patient. This advantage can also be applied in the re-staging due to the suspicion of recurrent disease. Many patients have a recurrence of the disease, including surgically treated patients. In the current context, with new personalized oncological treatments, the surveillance for recurrence and its accurate diagnosis are crucial to improve their survival. In this paper, we revise the current knowledge about the clinical and molecular factors related to the recurrent disease. In the context of new, promising, available personalized treatments, the role of molecular imaging with PET/CT and 18F-FDG and non-18F-FDG radiotracers in the follow-up of NSCLC-treated patients is especially attractive and interesting. PMID:27706025

  17. Imaging by ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiu; Li, Beilei; Cai, Liang; Shi, Hongcheng; Hou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) quite often present in the neck but are seldom accompanied with cellulitis at the first diagnosis of the disease. We report a 56 year old woman with gradually neck swelling, which was initially treated as cellulitis. After examined by ultrasonography, computed tomography and after pathologically assessments, the diagnosis of large B-cell lymphoma was made. This case highlights the usefulness of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) in staging and assessing treatment response in NHL.

  18. Metastatic Neuroblastoma in Adult Patient, Presenting as a Super Scan on 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Malik, Dharmender; Jois, Abhiram; Singh, Harmandeep; Bora, Girdhar S; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-09-01

    We report a case of 23-year-old man who presented with complaints of progressive abdominal distension for the past 3 months along with the loss of appetite and weight and had a large solid cystic mass in the left half of the abdominal cavity revealed on ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Subsequent biopsy and histopathology revealed it to be neuroblastoma. Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scan performed to rule out distant metastasis showed intense radiotracer uptake distributed throughout the skeleton, mimicking a super scan.

  19. Molecular imaging of late somatostatin receptor-positive metastases of renal cell carcinoma in the pancreas by 68Ga DOTATOC PET/CT: a rare differential diagnosis to multiple primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Peter, Luisa; Sänger, Jörg; Hommann, Merten; Baum, Richard Paul; Kaemmerer, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT, currently the most sensitive imaging modality for well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, is based on the molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) that are expressed in different tumor entities such as neuroendocrine neoplasms, lymphomas, meningiomas, or renal cell cancer (RCC). Most neuroendocrine neoplasms show a high expression of SSTR subtypes 2A and 5, whereas the overexpression of SSTR2A in RCC is mainly seen in peritumoral vessels. Here we report a case with strongly SSTR-positive pancreatic lesions detected by Ga DOTATOC PET/CT, which histologically turned out to be ultralate metastases of a RCC.

  20. Management of epithelial ovarian cancer from diagnosis to restaging: an overview of the role of imaging techniques with particular regard to the contribution of 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Musto, Alessandra; Grassetto, Gaia; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rampin, Lucia; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Colletti, Patrick M; Perkins, Alan C; Fagioli, Giorgio; Rubello, Domenico

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is a major form of cancer affecting women in the western world. The silent nature of this disease results in late presentation at an advanced stage in many patients. It is therefore important to assess the role of imaging techniques in the management of these patients. This article presents a review of the literature on the role of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in the different stages of management of epithelial ovarian cancer. Moreover, a comparison with other imaging techniques has been made and the relationship between (18)F-PET/CT and the assay of serum CA-125 levels has been discussed.

  1. Non-invasive breast biopsy method using GD-DTPA contrast enhanced MRI series and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso William

    This study was undertaken to develop a nonsurgical breast biopsy from Gd-DTPA Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance (CE-MR) images and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. A five-step process was developed to accomplish this. (1) Dynamic PET series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using a finite element method (FEM) based registration that requires fiducial skin markers to sample the displacement field between image frames. A commercial FEM package (ANSYS) was used for meshing and FEM calculations. Dynamic PET image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements SAVD and NCC. (2) Dynamic CE-MR series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using two registration methods: a multi-resolution free-form deformation (FFD) registration driven by normalized mutual information, and a FEM-based registration method. Dynamic CE-MR image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements, localization measurements, and qualitative comparison of motion artifacts. FFD registration was found to be superior to FEM-based registration. (3) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the PET/CT volume of activity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartmental Patlak model. Three parameters for this model were fitted; two of them describe the activity levels in the blood and in the cellular compartment, while the third characterizes the washout rate of F-18-FDG from the cellular compartment. (4) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the MR volume of signal intensity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartment Brix model. Three parameters for this model were fitted: rate of Gd exiting the compartment, representing the extracellular space of a lesion; rate of Gd exiting a blood compartment; and a parameter that characterizes the strength of signal intensities. Curve fitting used for PET/CT and MR series was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt nonlinear regression

  2. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Andriy; Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM(®)) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  3. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM®) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  4. Evaluation of the combined effects of target size, respiratory motion and background activity on 3D and 4D PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-June; Ionascu, Dan; Killoran, Joseph; Mamede, Marcelo; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Chin, Lee; Berbeco, Ross

    2008-07-01

    Gated (4D) PET/CT has the potential to greatly improve the accuracy of radiotherapy at treatment sites where internal organ motion is significant. However, the best methodology for applying 4D-PET/CT to target definition is not currently well established. With the goal of better understanding how to best apply 4D information to radiotherapy, initial studies were performed to investigate the effect of target size, respiratory motion and target-to-background activity concentration ratio (TBR) on 3D (ungated) and 4D PET images. Using a PET/CT scanner with 4D or gating capability, a full 3D-PET scan corrected with a 3D attenuation map from 3D-CT scan and a respiratory gated (4D) PET scan corrected with corresponding attenuation maps from 4D-CT were performed by imaging spherical targets (0.5-26.5 mL) filled with 18F-FDG in a dynamic thorax phantom and NEMA IEC body phantom at different TBRs (infinite, 8 and 4). To simulate respiratory motion, the phantoms were driven sinusoidally in the superior-inferior direction with amplitudes of 0, 1 and 2 cm and a period of 4.5 s. Recovery coefficients were determined on PET images. In addition, gating methods using different numbers of gating bins (1-20 bins) were evaluated with image noise and temporal resolution. For evaluation, volume recovery coefficient, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated as a function of the number of gating bins. Moreover, the optimum thresholds which give accurate moving target volumes were obtained for 3D and 4D images. The partial volume effect and signal loss in the 3D-PET images due to the limited PET resolution and the respiratory motion, respectively were measured. The results show that signal loss depends on both the amplitude and pattern of respiratory motion. However, the 4D-PET successfully recovers most of the loss induced by the respiratory motion. The 5-bin gating method gives the best temporal resolution with acceptable image noise. The results based on the 4D

  5. The Effect of Misregistration Between CT-Attenuation and PET-Emission Images in 13N-Ammonia Myocardial PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yoya; Ishida, Masaki; Ichikawa, Yasutaka; Suzawa, Naohisa; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Maeda, Hisato; Takeda, Kan; Sakuma, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    In 2-dimensional cardiac PET/CT, misregistration between the PET and CT images due to respiratory and cardiac motion causes tracer uptake to appear substantially reduced. The resolution and quality of the images have been considerably improved by the use of 3-dimensional (3D) PET acquisitions. In the current study, we investigated the impact that misregistration between PET and CT images has on myocardial (13)N-ammonia uptake in images reconstructed with 3D ordered-subset expectation maximization combined with time-of-flight and point-spread-function modeling. Eight healthy volunteers (7 men and 1 woman; mean age ± SD, 53 ± 19 y) underwent (13)N-ammonia cardiac PET/CT at rest. First, any misregistration between the PET and CT images was manually corrected to generate reference images. Then, the images were intentionally misregistered by shifting the PET images from the reference images by a degree of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, and 15 mm along both the x-axis (left) and the z-axis (cranial). For each degree of misregistration, the PET images were reconstructed using the CT-attenuation images. The left ventricular short-axis PET/CT images were divided into 4 segments: anterior wall, inferior wall, lateral wall, and septum. The erroneous decrease in myocardial uptake in basal, mid, and apical slices was visually graded using a 4-point scale (0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe). Wall-to-septum uptake ratios were evaluated for the anterior, inferior, and lateral walls in the basal, mid, and apical slices. A statistically significant reduction in myocardial (13)N-ammonia uptake in the anterior (P < 0.01) and lateral (P < 0.05) walls was observed when misregistration was 10 mm or more. The uptake ratios for the anterior, lateral, and inferior walls in the reference images were 1.00 ± 0.04, 0.96 ± 0.08, and 0.91 ± 0.03, respectively. The ratios for the anterior and lateral walls significantly decreased when misregistration exceeded 10 mm (anterior wall, 0.80

  6. Computer-assisted delineation of lung tumor regions in treatment planning CT images with PET/CT image sets based on an optimum contour selection method.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ze; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kuwazuru, Jumpei; Magome, Taiki; Yabu-Uchi, Hidetake; Honda, Hiroshi; Hirata, Hideki; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-11-01

    To assist radiation oncologists in the delineation of tumor regions during treatment planning for lung cancer, we have proposed an automated contouring algorithm based on an optimum contour selection (OCS) method for treatment planning computed tomography (CT) images with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images. The basic concept of the OCS is to select a global optimum object contour based on multiple active delineations with a level set method around tumors. First, the PET images were registered to the planning CT images by using affine transformation matrices. The initial gross tumor volume (GTV) of each lung tumor was identified by thresholding the PET image at a certain standardized uptake value, and then each initial GTV location was corrected in the region of interest of the planning CT image. Finally, the contours of final GTV regions were determined in the planning CT images by using the OCS. The proposed method was evaluated by testing six cases with a Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), which denoted the degree of region similarity between the GTVs contoured by radiation oncologists and the proposed method. The average three-dimensional DSC for the six cases was 0.78 by the proposed method, but only 0.34 by a conventional method based on a simple level set method. The proposed method may be helpful for treatment planners in contouring the GTV regions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. SU-D-9A-04: Brain PET/CT Imaging On a Scanner with a Large Axial Field-Of-View

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Gerbaudo, V; Hamberg, L; Seaver, K; Kijewski, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large axial field-of-view (FOV) PET/CT scanners are valued for high sensitivity. Brain PET image quality may depend on the head position within the FOV. We investigated the precision of activity estimation for brain PET imaging when the brain was positioned at the end (END) and in the middle (CEN) of the FOV. The additional CT dose for the CEN position was recorded. Methods: An image quality (Jaszczak) phantom and a striatal phantom were filled with F-18 and positioned in END and CEN locations. For each phantom and each location, we acquired a ∼1-hr listmode PET, rebinned the data into 10 frames with equal number of coincidence events, and reconstructed each frame using an iterative algorithm. For the striatal phantom, END and CEN were compared by drawing on each image three regions of interest (ROI) in axially separated uniform areas. The standard deviation of the activity estimation within each ROI was averaged over the 10 images. The coefficient of variation (CV) for activity estimation was calculated at each position. Image quality was assessed by inspecting the resolution bar pattern in the Jaszczak phantom at two different head positions. Results: The CV was the lowest for ROIs near the center of the FOV. For slices near the end, not only was the CV highest, but also the resolution pattern was degraded. CTDIvol summarized in the dose report indicated that the CT dose was ∼ 10% higher for CEN as compared to END position. Conclusion: Positioning the brain in the middle of the FOV in a large FOV PET/CT scanner allows more precise measurement of tracer uptake and better image quality at the cost of increased CT dose. For the end location longer scan times may minimize image quality degradation without any additional CT dose.

  8. [Utility of the PET/CT in vulvar cancer management].

    PubMed

    Peiró, V; Chiva, L; González, A; Bratos, R; Alonso, S; Márquez, R; Carballo, N; Alonso-Farto, J C

    2014-01-01

    To describe the clinical impact of PET/CT in the management of patients with vulvar cancer. Retrospective analysis of 13 PET/CT studies with (18)F-FDG (6 staging and 7 suspected recurrence) corresponding to 10 patients diagnosed with vulvar cancer by biopsy, with a mean age of 64.5 years. The preoperative PET/CT study was analyzed qualitatively according to the lesion region. Surgical excision was carried out, covering all the suspected areas according to the PET/CT study. This was compared with the histopathologic analysis. Abnormal vulvar PET/CT uptake was found in 9 out of the 13 studies and invasion of adjacent structures in 5 of them (urethra, perineal, vagina). The inguinal-femoral lymph nodes were considered as affected in 3 studies and one pelvic lymph node was also affected. Four of the studies had extralymphatic involvement: 3 in lung and 1 in ischiorectal fossa. The PET/CT showed a 100% sensitivity for the detection of the vulvar lesion in squamous cell carcinomas and 60% in non-squamous cell ones. There was a false positive result for local invasion due to urine contamination. One of the studies with lung metastases was related to a synchronous breast tumor. All the pathological lymph node levels detected in the PET/CT study were confirmed in the histopathology study. No new lesions were identified by surgery. PET/CT changed the therapeutic management in 8/13 studies (61.5%). PET/CT is postulated as a useful imaging test for the management of vulvar cancer, mainly in the identification of nodal metastases. It may affect both surgical planning and clinical management. Larger series are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel 3D graph cut based co-segmentation of lung tumor on PET-CT images with Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Chen, Xinjian; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Zhang, Bin; Xiang, Dehui

    2016-03-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) have been widely used in clinical practice for radiation therapy. Most existing methods only used one image modality, either PET or CT, which suffers from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this paper, a novel 3D graph cut method is proposed, which integrated Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs) into the graph cut method. We also employed the random walk method as an initialization step to provide object seeds for the improvement of the graph cut based segmentation on PET and CT images. The constructed graph consists of two sub-graphs and a special link between the sub-graphs which penalize the difference segmentation between the two modalities. Finally, the segmentation problem is solved by the max-flow/min-cut method. The proposed method was tested on 20 patients' PET-CT images, and the experimental results demonstrated the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Characterization of brown adipose tissue ¹⁸F-FDG uptake in PET/CT imaging and its influencing factors in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiaonan; Shao, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaosong; Wang, Yuetao

    2016-01-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT has been widely applied for tumor imaging. However, it is reported that many normal tissues, e.g., brown adipose tissue, can also uptake (18)F-FDG. The purpose of this study was to determine the imaging characteristics of (18)F-FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT) in PET/CT. A total of 2,944 patients who underwent PET/CT from September 2011 to March 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Imaging features of (18)F-FDG uptake in BAT were analyzed. Univariate analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the effect of age, gender, cancer status, body mass index (BMI), average daily maximum temperature of imaging month and fasting plasma glucose (Glu) on the positive rate of (18)F-FDG uptake in BAT. The results showed that 1.9% (57/2944) patients had (18)F-FDG uptake in BAT. (18)F-FDG, manifested as flaky, nodular and beaded shape, was symmetrically distributed in the adipose tissues of cervical and supraclavicular, mediastinal, paravertebral, and perirenal areas. Uptake of (18)F-FDG within cervical/supraclavicular area was most common (89.5%, 51/57) with an SUVmax ranging from 2.8 to 31.4. Univariate analysis showed that gender and cancer status were not significantly correlated with the BAT (18)F-FDG uptake rate. In contrast, age, BMI, Glu and average daily maximum temperature in the imaging month were significantly correlated with the BAT (18)F-FDG uptake rate (P<0.05). Further logistic regression analysis showed that only age, BMI and average daily maximum temperature were significant (OR<1, P<0.05). Based on the value of OR, the most significant factor that affects BAT (18)F-FDG uptake rate was age, followed by the average daily maximum temperature and BMI. We concluded that Chinese adult has low positive rate of (18)F-FDG uptake in BAT. Cervical/Supraclavicular is the most common area with BAT (18)F-FDG uptake. Age, average daily maximum temperature and BMI are independent factors affecting (18)F-FDG uptake.

  11. [Molecular imaging for PET-CT reporter gene in breast adenocarcinoma (HSV1-tk) of subcutaneous xenografts in living nude mice].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-gui; Dai, Dong; Fang, Na; Song, Xiu-yu; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Yan-jia; Men, Xiao-yuan

    2009-12-29

    To study the in vitro accumulation of (18)F-FHBG, its in vivo distribution and (18)F-FHBG PET-CT imaging for reporter gene (HSV1-tk) in nude mice with a xenograft of breast adenocarcinoma. The in vitro uptake of (18)F-FHBG in tumor cells of T47D and T47D-tk and the distribution of (18)F-FHBG in normal Kunming mice and nude mice with breast adenocarcinoma xenograft were detected by well-type gamma counter. Reporter gene PET-CT imaging with (18)F-FHBG was performed in nude mice with a xenograft of breast adenocarcinoma. And the expression location of HSV1-tk gene could be monitored by observing the in vitro and in vivo accumulation of (18)F-FHBG. The in vitro uptake of (18)F-FHBG in T47D-tk cells (143.67 dpm/10(4) +/- 5.82 dpm/10(4) cells) was significantly higher than that in T47D cells (2.23 dpm/10(4) +/- 0.23 dpm/10(4) cells) at 60 and 120 min post-injection (P < 0.001) and reaches a plateau at 60 min. In normal Kunming mice, (18)F-FHBG was mainly distributed in liver, intestine, kidney and bladder while there was no obvious radioactive accumulation in brain. (18)F-FHBG accumulated at a significantly higher level in T47D-tk tumors than in T47D tumors and its accumulation yielded the best image effect at 2 h by PET-CT imaging in nude mice. The in vitro uptake of (18)F-FHBG in T47D-tk cells is significantly higher than that in T47D cells. (18)F-FHBG is mainly excreted by digestive tract and urinary tract in mice. It agrees with the expression pattern of HSV1-tk gene. (18)F-FHBG can determine the localization of HSV1-tk gene expression in an efficient way. This study will offer a monitoring method and scientific base for (18)F-FHBG reporter gene imaging and HSV1-tk gene therapy in tumors.

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT-based early treatment response evaluation of nanoparticle-assisted photothermal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Jørgensen, Jesper T; Simón, Marina; Melander, Fredrik; Kristensen, Lotte K; Bendix, Pól M; Andresen, Thomas L; Oddershede, Lene B; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Within the field of nanoparticle-assisted photothermal cancer therapy, focus has mostly been on developing novel heat-generating nanoparticles with the right optical and dimensional properties. Comparison and evaluation of their performance in tumor-bearing animals are commonly assessed by changes in tumor volume; however, this is usually a late-occurring event. This study implements 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography imaging to perform early evaluation of the treatment outcome of photothermal therapy. Silica-gold nanoshells (NS) are administered intravenously to nude mice bearing human neuroendocrine tumor xenografts and the tumors are irradiated by a near-infrared laser. The animals are positron emission tomography scanned with 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose one day before and one day after treatment. Using this setup, a significant decrease in tumor uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose is found already one day after therapy in the group receiving NS and laser treatment compared to control animals. At this time point no change in tumor volume can be detected. Moreover, the change in tumor uptake, is used to stratify the animals into responders and non-responders, where the responding group matched improved survival. Overall, these findings support the use of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography imaging for preclinical and clinical evaluation and optimization of photothermal therapy.

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT-based early treatment response evaluation of nanoparticle-assisted photothermal cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simón, Marina; Melander, Fredrik; Kristensen, Lotte K.; Bendix, Pól M.; Andresen, Thomas L.; Oddershede, Lene B.; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Within the field of nanoparticle-assisted photothermal cancer therapy, focus has mostly been on developing novel heat-generating nanoparticles with the right optical and dimensional properties. Comparison and evaluation of their performance in tumor-bearing animals are commonly assessed by changes in tumor volume; however, this is usually a late-occurring event. This study implements 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography imaging to perform early evaluation of the treatment outcome of photothermal therapy. Silica-gold nanoshells (NS) are administered intravenously to nude mice bearing human neuroendocrine tumor xenografts and the tumors are irradiated by a near-infrared laser. The animals are positron emission tomography scanned with 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose one day before and one day after treatment. Using this setup, a significant decrease in tumor uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose is found already one day after therapy in the group receiving NS and laser treatment compared to control animals. At this time point no change in tumor volume can be detected. Moreover, the change in tumor uptake, is used to stratify the animals into responders and non-responders, where the responding group matched improved survival. Overall, these findings support the use of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography imaging for preclinical and clinical evaluation and optimization of photothermal therapy. PMID:28542311

  14. SU-E-I-100: Heterogeneity Studying for Primary and Lymphoma Tumors by Using Multi-Scale Image Texture Analysis with PET-CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dengwang; Wang, Qinfen; Li, H; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is studying tumor heterogeneity of the primary and lymphoma by using multi-scale texture analysis with PET-CT images, where the tumor heterogeneity is expressed by texture features. Methods: Datasets were collected from 12 lung cancer patients, and both of primary and lymphoma tumors were detected with all these patients. All patients underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan before treatment.The regions of interest (ROI) of primary and lymphoma tumor were contoured by experienced clinical doctors. Then the ROI of primary and lymphoma tumor is extracted automatically by using Matlab software. According to the geometry size of contour structure, the images of tumor are decomposed by multi-scale method.Wavelet transform was performed on ROI structures within images by L layers sampling, and then wavelet sub-bands which have the same size of the original image are obtained. The number of sub-bands is 3L+1.The gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated within different sub-bands, thenenergy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity were extracted from GLCM.Finally, heterogeneity statistical analysis was studied for primary and lymphoma tumor using the texture features. Results: Energy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity are calculated with our experiments for heterogeneity statistical analysis.Energy for primary and lymphomatumor is equal with the same patient, while gray in-homogeneity and inertia of primaryare 2.59595±0.00855, 0.6439±0.0007 respectively. Gray in-homogeneity and inertia of lymphoma are 2.60115±0.00635, 0.64435±0.00055 respectively. The experiments showed that the volume of lymphoma is smaller than primary tumor, but thegray in-homogeneity and inertia were higher than primary tumor with the same patient, and the correlation with lymphoma tumors is zero, while the correlation with primary tumor isslightly strong. Conclusion: This studying showed that there were effective heterogeneity

  15. Site Specific Discrete PEGylation of 124I-Labeled mCC49 Fab′ Fragments Improves Tumor MicroPET/CT Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H.; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D.; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W.; Tweedle, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2–4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab′ (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab′ (Fab′-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 (124I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab′ with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab′-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab′ by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab′-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab′-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab′-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A. PMID

  16. Site specific discrete PEGylation of (124)I-labeled mCC49 Fab' fragments improves tumor MicroPET/CT imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M; Povoski, Stephen P; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W; Tweedle, Michael F

    2013-11-20

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2-4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab' (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab' (Fab'-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG 12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 ((124)I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab' with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab'-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab' by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab'-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab'-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab'-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A.

  17. Bing-Neel Syndrome Case Report: A Previously Undocumented IgG Variant with MRI, PET/CT, and PET/MRI Imaging.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Daniel; Hallam, Simon; Haroon, Athar; Butler, Tom; Agrawal, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia is the most commonly reported subtype of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL); it is characterised by IgM secretion. Neurological complications are common usually as a result of hyperviscosity. In rare cases, cells can infiltrate the central nervous system; this is known as Bing-Neel syndrome. We report the case of a 57-year-old male with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma of the IgG-subtype with neurological symptoms and the consequent finding of lymphoplasmacytoid cells in his cerebrospinal fluid as well as deposits on MRI and PET-CT imaging. This is the first report of Bing-Neel syndrome in IgG-subtype LPL. We discuss the biological and radiological markers of his disease, including PET imaging, which has been minimal in this area to date.

  18. A pilot study of the prognostic significance of metabolic tumor size measurements in PET/CT imaging of lymphomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Botsivali, Maria; Politis, Nikolaos; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2015-03-01

    This study explores changes in metabolic tumor volume, metabolic tumor diameter, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), for earlier and more accurate identification of lymphomas' response to treatment using 18F- FDG PET/CT. Pre- and post-treatment PET/CT studies of 20 patients with Hodgkin disease (HL) and 7 patients with non- Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were retrospectively selected for this study. The diameter and volume of the metabolic tumor was determined by an in-house developed adaptive local thresholding technique based on a 50% threshold of the maximum pixel value within a region. Statistical analysis aimed at exploring associations between metabolic size measurements and SUVmax and the ability of the three biomarkers to predict the patients' response to treatment as defined by the four classes in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) guidelines. Results indicated moderate correlations between % change in metabolic tumor volume and % change in metabolic tumor maximum diameter (R=0.51) and between % change in maximum diameter and % change in SUVmax (R=0.52). The correlation between % change in tumor volume and % change in SUVmax was weak (R=0.24). The % change in metabolic tumor size, either volume or diameter, was a "very strong" predictor of response to treatment (R=0.89), stronger than SUVmax (R=0.63). In conclusion, metabolic tumor volume could have important prognostic value, possibly higher than maximum metabolic diameter or SUVmax that are currently the standard of practice. Volume measurements, however, should be based on robust and standardized segmentation methodologies to avoid variability. In addition, SUV-peak or lean body mass corrected SUV-peak may be a better PET biomarker than SUVmax when SUV-volume combinations are considered.

  19. Operational and Dosimetric Aspects of Pediatric PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Frederic H; Goodkind, Alison; MacDougall, Robert D; Oberg, Leah; Ziniel, Sonja I; Cappock, Richard; Callahan, Michael J; Kwatra, Neha; Treves, S Ted; Voss, Stephan D

    2017-09-01

    No consistent guidelines exist for the acquisition of a CT scan as part of pediatric PET/CT. Given that children may be more vulnerable to the effects of ionizing radiation, it is necessary to develop methods that provide diagnostic-quality imaging when needed, in the shortest time and with the lowest patient radiation exposure. This article describes the basics of CT dosimetry and PET/CT acquisition in children. We describe the variability in pediatric PET/CT techniques, based on a survey of 19 PET/CT pediatric institutions in North America. The results of the survey demonstrated that, although most institutions used automatic tube current modulation, there remained a large variation of practice, on the order of a factor of 2-3, across sites, pointing to the need for guidelines. We introduce the approach developed at our institution for using a multiseries PET/CT acquisition technique that combines diagnostic-quality CT in the essential portion of the field of view and a low-dose technique to image the remainder of the body. This approach leads to a reduction in radiation dose to the patient while combining the PET and the diagnostic CT into a single acquisition. The standardization of pediatric PET/CT provides an opportunity for a reduction in the radiation dose to these patients while maintaining an appropriate level of diagnostic image quality. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. Predicting Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer with Textural Features Derived from Pretreatment (18)F-FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Beukinga, Roelof J; Hulshoff, Jan B; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Muijs, Christina T; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Kats-Ugurlu, Gursah; Slart, Riemer H J A; Slump, Cornelis H; Mul, Véronique E M; Plukker, John Th M

    2017-05-01

    Adequate prediction of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) in esophageal cancer (EC) patients is important in a more personalized treatment. The current best clinical method to predict pathologic complete response is SUVmax in (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging. To improve the prediction of response, we constructed a model to predict complete response to nCRT in EC based on pretreatment clinical parameters and (18)F-FDG PET/CT-derived textural features. Methods: From a prospectively maintained single-institution database, we reviewed 97 consecutive patients with locally advanced EC and a pretreatment (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan between 2009 and 2015. All patients were treated with nCRT (carboplatin/paclitaxel/41.4 Gy) followed by esophagectomy. We analyzed clinical, geometric, and pretreatment textural features extracted from both (18)F-FDG PET and CT. The current most accurate prediction model with SUVmax as a predictor variable was compared with 6 different response prediction models constructed using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regularized logistic regression. Internal validation was performed to estimate the model's performances. Pathologic response was defined as complete versus incomplete response (Mandard tumor regression grade system 1 vs. 2-5). Results: Pathologic examination revealed 19 (19.6%) complete and 78 (80.4%) incomplete responders. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regularization selected the clinical parameters: histologic type and clinical T stage, the (18)F-FDG PET-derived textural feature long run low gray level emphasis, and the CT-derived textural feature run percentage. Introducing these variables to a logistic regression analysis showed areas under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUCs) of 0.78 compared with 0.58 in the SUVmax model. The discrimination slopes were 0.17 compared with 0.01, respectively. After internal validation, the AUCs decreased to 0.74 and 0.54, respectively. Conclusion

  1. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J.; Unholtz, D.; Kurz, C.; Parodi, K.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β+ activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β+ activity induced in the investigated

  2. MicroPET/CT Imaging of an Orthotopic Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme and Evaluation of Pulsed Low-Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Chunta, John L.; Robertson, John M.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Oliver Wong, Ching-Yee; Amin, Mitual; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive tumor that typically causes death due to local progression. To assess a novel low-dose radiotherapy regimen for treating GBM, we developed an orthotopic murine model of human GBM and evaluated in vivo treatment efficacy using micro-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) tumor imaging. Methods: Orthotopic GBM xenografts were established in nude mice and treated with standard 2-Gy fractionation or 10 0.2-Gy pulses with 3-min interpulse intervals, for 7 consecutive days, for a total dose of 14 Gy. Tumor growth was quantified weekly using the Flex Triumph (GE Healthcare/Gamma Medica-Ideas, Waukesha, WI) combined PET-single-photon emission CT (SPECT)-CT imaging system and necropsy histopathology. Normal tissue damage was assessed by counting dead neural cells in tissue sections from irradiated fields. Results: Tumor engraftment efficiency for U87MG cells was 86%. Implanting 0.5 x 10{sup 6} cells produced a 50- to 70-mm{sup 3} tumor in 10 to 14 days. A significant correlation was seen between CT-derived tumor volume and histopathology-measured volume (p = 0.018). The low-dose 0.2-Gy pulsed regimen produced a significantly longer tumor growth delay than standard 2-Gy fractionation (p = 0.045). Less normal neuronal cell death was observed after the pulsed delivery method (p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo brain tumor imaging and longitudinal assessment of tumor growth and treatment response with microPET/CT. Pulsed radiation treatment was more efficacious than the standard fractionated treatment and was associated with less normal tissue damage.

  3. Exploring New Multimodal Quantitative Imaging Indices for the Assessment of Osseous Tumor Burden in Prostate Cancer Using (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bieth, Marie; Krönke, Markus; Tauber, Robert; Dahlbender, Marielena; Retz, Margitta; Nekolla, Stephan G; Menze, Bjoern; Maurer, Tobias; Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus

    2017-10-01

    PET combined with CT and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands has gained significant interest for staging prostate cancer (PC). In this study, we propose 2 multimodal quantitative indices as imaging biomarkers for the assessment of osseous tumor burden using (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT and present preliminary clinical data. Methods: We defined 2 bone PET indices (BPIs) that incorporate anatomic information from CT and functional information from (68)Ga-PSMA PET: BPIVOL is the percentage of bone volume affected by tumor and BPISUV additionally considers the level of PSMA expression. We describe a semiautomatic computation method based on segmentation of bones in CT and of lesions in PET. Data from 45 patients with castration-resistant PC and bone metastases during (223)Ra-dichloride were retrospectively analyzed. We evaluated the computational stability and reproducibility of the proposed indices and explored their relation to the prostate-specific antigen blood value, the bone scan index (BSI), and disease classification using PERCIST. Results: On the technical side, BPIVOL and BPISUV showed an interobserver maximum difference of 3.5%, and their computation took only a few minutes. On the clinical side, BPIVOL and BPISUV showed significant correlations with BSI (r = 0.76 and 0.74, respectively, P < 0.001) and prostate-specific antigen values (r = 0.57 and 0.54, respectively, P < 0.01). When the proposed indices were compared against expert rating using PERCIST, BPIVOL and BPISUV showed better agreement than BSI, indicating their potential for objective response evaluation. Conclusion: We propose the evaluation of BPIVOL and BPISUV as imaging biomarkers for (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in a prospective study exploring their potential for outcome prediction in patients with bone metastases from PC. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  4. Synthesis, 68Ga-Radiolabeling, and Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of a Depsipeptide-Derived Compound as a Potential PET/CT Infection Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B.; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Hazari, Puja P.; Mishra, Anil K.; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R.; Sathekge, Mike M.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as 67/68Ga-citrate or 18F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with 68Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by 68Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3–2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  5. Staging recurrent ovarian cancer with 18FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    DRAGOSAVAC, SANJA; DERCHAIN, SOPHIE; CASERTA, NELSON M.G.; DE SOUZA, GUSTAVO

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of 2-deoxy-2-(18F)-fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with suspected ovarian cancer recurrence and describe the distribution of metastasis. A total of 45 female patients who underwent PET/CT scan due to raised CA-125 levels, clinical suspicion of ovarian cancer recurrence or alterations detected on ultrasound (US), CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this retrospective study. PET/CT results were compared with histological findings (n=15) or clinical, laboratory and repeated imaging techniques during subsequent follow-up for at least six months (n=30). CA-125 was elevated in 34 patients, 14 patients had clinical symptoms of disease and 23 presented with alterations on US, CT and MRI. A total of 42 patients were confirmed to have ovarian cancer recurrence, all with abnormal findings on PET/CT. Three patients remained free of disease during clinical follow-up, all with normal PET/CT findings. There were 11 patients with raised CA-125 levels and normal conventional imaging, all with positive PET/CT. Among the 11 patients with normal CA-125 levels, eight presented with positive PET/CT scan. Lymph nodes were the most frequent site of relapse of disease, followed by peritoneal implants. Distant sites of metastasis included the liver, spleen, pleura, lung and bone. PET/CT detected unsuspected lesions in 20/45 patients (44.4%). 18FDG PET/CT was a useful tool for evaluating the extent of ovarian cancer recurrence. In the current series, lymph nodes were the most frequent site of relapse of disease, with supradiaphragmatic lymph node metastasis in a large number of cases. PMID:23420711

  6. How we read FCH-PET/CT for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Beaulieu, Alexis

    2016-12-06

    Over the last decade, (18)F-fluorocholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT) has gained in popularity for the staging and restaging of patients with prostate cancer (PCa). However, despite abundant literature on the topic, there is a lack of publications on how to actually interpret FCH-PET/CT in a clinical setting. Here we propose a practical, TNM-oriented approach to read FCH-PET/CT, with notes on procedure technique, image display, review sequence and report structure. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance to radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and residents who are new to FCH-PET/CT, as well as to propose an alternate approach to more experienced physicians.

  7. Recommendations of the Spanish Societies of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging (SEMNiM), and Medical Physics (SEFM) on 18F-FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Caballero Perea, Begoña; Villegas, Antonio Cabrera; Rodríguez, José Miguel Delgado; Velloso, María José García; Vicente, Ana María García; Cabrerizo, Carlos Huerga; López, Rosa Morera; Romasanta, Luis Alberto Pérez; Beltrán, Moisés Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is a valuable tool for diagnosing and staging malignant lesions. The fusion of PET and computed tomography (CT) yields images that contain both metabolic and morphological information, which, taken together, have improved the diagnostic precision of PET in oncology. The main imaging modality for planning radiotherapy treatment is CT. However, PET-CT is an emerging modality for use in planning treatments because it allows for more accurate treatment volume definition. The use of PET-CT for treatment planning is highly complex, and protocols and standards for its use are still being developed. It seems probable that PET-CT will eventually replace current CT-based planning methods, but this will require a full understanding of the relevant technical aspects of PET-CT planning. The aim of the present document is to review these technical aspects and to provide recommendations for clinical use of this imaging modality in the radiotherapy planning process. PMID:24377032

  8. Recommendations of the Spanish Societies of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging (SEMNiM), and Medical Physics (SEFM) on (18)F-FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Caballero Perea, Begoña; Villegas, Antonio Cabrera; Rodríguez, José Miguel Delgado; Velloso, María José García; Vicente, Ana María García; Cabrerizo, Carlos Huerga; López, Rosa Morera; Romasanta, Luis Alberto Pérez; Beltrán, Moisés Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is a valuable tool for diagnosing and staging malignant lesions. The fusion of PET and computed tomography (CT) yields images that contain both metabolic and morphological information, which, taken together, have improved the diagnostic precision of PET in oncology. The main imaging modality for planning radiotherapy treatment is CT. However, PET-CT is an emerging modality for use in planning treatments because it allows for more accurate treatment volume definition. The use of PET-CT for treatment planning is highly complex, and protocols and standards for its use are still being developed. It seems probable that PET-CT will eventually replace current CT-based planning methods, but this will require a full understanding of the relevant technical aspects of PET-CT planning. The aim of the present document is to review these technical aspects and to provide recommendations for clinical use of this imaging modality in the radiotherapy planning process.

  9. The influence of respiratory motion on the cumulative SUV-volume histogram and fractal analyses of intratumoral heterogeneity in PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Toshiki; Morita, Keishin; Tsutsui, Yuji; Kidera, Daisuke; Mikasa, Shohei; Maebatake, Akira; Akamatsu, Go; Miwa, Kenta; Baba, Shingo; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of respiratory motion on the evaluation of the intratumoral heterogeneity of FDG uptake using cumulative SUV-volume histogram (CSH) and fractal analyses. We used an NEMA IEC body phantom with a homogeneous hot sphere phantom (HO) and two heterogeneous hot sphere phantoms (HE1 and HE2). The background radioactivity of (18)F in the NEMA phantom was 5.3 kBq/mL. The ratio of radioactivity was 4:2:1 for the HO and the outer rims of the HE1 and HE2 phantoms, the inner cores of the HE1 and HE2 phantoms, and background, respectively. Respiratory motion was simulated using a motion table with an amplitude of 2 cm. PET/CT data were acquired using Biograph mCT in motionless and moving conditions. The PET images were analyzed by both CSH and fractal analyses. The area under the CSH (AUC-CSH) and the fractal dimension (FD) was used as quantitative metrics. In motionless conditions, the AUC-CSHs of the HO (0.80), HE1 (0.75) and HE2 (0.65) phantoms were different. They did not differ in moving conditions (HO, 0.63; HE1, 0.65; HE2, 0.60). The FD of the HO phantom (0.77) was smaller than the FDs of the HE1 (1.71) and HE2 (1.98) phantoms in motionless conditions; however, the FDs of the HO (1.99) and HE1 (2.19) phantoms were not different from each other and were smaller than that of the HE2 (3.73) phantom in moving conditions. Respiratory motion affected the results of the CSH and fractal analyses for the evaluation of the heterogeneity of the PET/CT images. The influence of respiratory motion was considered to vary depending on the object size.

  10. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in multiple myeloma - Comparison to [(18)F]FDG and laboratory values.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Schreder, Martin; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Kortüm, Klaus Martin; Herrmann, Ken; Kropf, Saskia; Einsele, Herrmann; Buck, Andreas K; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Knop, Stefan; Lückerath, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a key factor for tumor growth and metastasis in several types of human cancer including multiple myeloma (MM). Proof-of-concept of CXCR4-directed radionuclide therapy in MM has recently been reported. This study assessed the diagnostic performance of the CXCR4-directed radiotracer [(68)Ga]Pentixafor in MM and a potential role for stratifying patients to CXCR4-directed therapies. Thirty-five patients with MM underwent [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for evaluation of eligibility for endoradiotherapy. In 19/35 cases, [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT for correlation was available. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with standard clinical parameters of disease activity. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected CXCR4-positive disease in 23/35 subjects (66%). CXCR4-positivity at PET was independent from myeloma subtypes, cytogenetics or any serological parameters and turned out as a negative prognostic factor. In the 19 patients in whom a comparison to [(18)F]FDG was available, [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected more lesions in 4/19 (21%) subjects, [(18)F]FDG proved superior in 7/19 (37%). In the remaining 8/19 (42%) patients, both tracers detected an equal number of lesions. [(18)F]FDG-PET positivity correlated with [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-PET positivity (p=0.018). [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides further evidence that CXCR4 expression frequently occurs in advanced multiple myeloma, representing a negative prognostic factor and a potential target for myeloma specific treatment. However, selecting patients for CXCR4 directed therapies and prognostic stratification seem to be more relevant clinical applications for this novel imaging modality, rather than diagnostic imaging of myeloma.

  11. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in multiple myeloma - Comparison to [18F]FDG and laboratory values

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Schreder, Martin; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Kortüm, Klaus Martin; Herrmann, Ken; Kropf, Saskia; Einsele, Herrmann; Buck, Andreas K.; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Knop, Stefan; Lückerath, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a key factor for tumor growth and metastasis in several types of human cancer including multiple myeloma (MM). Proof-of-concept of CXCR4-directed radionuclide therapy in MM has recently been reported. This study assessed the diagnostic performance of the CXCR4-directed radiotracer [68Ga]Pentixafor in MM and a potential role for stratifying patients to CXCR4-directed therapies. Thirty-five patients with MM underwent [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for evaluation of eligibility for endoradiotherapy. In 19/35 cases, [18F]FDG-PET/CT for correlation was available. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with standard clinical parameters of disease activity. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected CXCR4-positive disease in 23/35 subjects (66%). CXCR4-positivity at PET was independent from myeloma subtypes, cytogenetics or any serological parameters and turned out as a negative prognostic factor. In the 19 patients in whom a comparison to [18F]FDG was available, [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected more lesions in 4/19 (21%) subjects, [18F]FDG proved superior in 7/19 (37%). In the remaining 8/19 (42%) patients, both tracers detected an equal number of lesions. [18F]FDG-PET positivity correlated with [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET positivity (p=0.018). [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides further evidence that CXCR4 expression frequently occurs in advanced multiple myeloma, representing a negative prognostic factor and a potential target for myeloma specific treatment. However, selecting patients for CXCR4 directed therapies and prognostic stratification seem to be more relevant clinical applications for this novel imaging modality, rather than diagnostic imaging of myeloma. PMID:28042328

  12. Specificity of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for Prostate Cancer - Myths and Reality.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun

    2017-01-01

    68Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer is a novel imaging technique, which is rapidly gaining popularity. Sufficient evidence has been accumulated in literature regarding the usefulness of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. Recently literature regarding the localization of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging in non-prostatic malignancies is also published, thus questioning the specificity of the tracer with regards to prostate cancer. This commentary tries to address the issue of specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT and its relevance in imaging prostate cancer.

  13. Specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT for Prostate Cancer - Myths and Reality

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, Arun

    2017-01-01

    68Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer is a novel imaging technique, which is rapidly gaining popularity. Sufficient evidence has been accumulated in literature regarding the usefulness of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. Recently literature regarding the localization of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging in non-prostatic malignancies is also published, thus questioning the specificity of the tracer with regards to prostate cancer. This commentary tries to address the issue of specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT and its relevance in imaging prostate cancer. PMID:28242976

  14. Novel weight-based dose threshold for 18F-NaF PET-CT imaging using advanced PET-CT systems: a potential tool for reducing radiation burden.

    PubMed

    Marafi, Fahad; Esmail, Abdulreda; Rasheed, Rashid; Alkandari, Fareeda; Usmani, Sharjeel

    2017-09-01

    Fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (F-NaF) PET/CT is an important tool for detecting and evaluating metastatic bone cancer. Besides traditional dose metrics, recent methods such as real-time dose mapping, dose calculation from DICOM information, and their relevance to entrance skin exposure are currently in use to reduce the radiation burden. In this study, we have analyzed the data of 1062 patients retrospectively to evaluate patterns of absorbed dose for institutional weight-based dose protocol as compared with fixed dose method guidelines of Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI). The effective dose imparted by F-NaF (internal exposure) was calculated by using coefficient 0.089 mrem/mCi (0.024 mSv/MBq) according to ICRP publication 106. To estimate the effective dose from whole-body CT scan (external exposure), volume CT dose index (mGy) and dose length product (mGy cm) were directly obtained from the display screen of CT workstation. Effective dose was calculated by multiplying DLP (mGy cm) with ICRP conversion coefficient 'k' 0.015 (mSv/mGy cm). Of the total 1062 patients, there were metastases in 44% (464), probable malignancy in 9% (96), negative findings in 40.5% (433), equivocal findings in 3% (32), and probable benignancy in 3.5% (37). All patients were injected with an institutional agreed protocol of 2.22 MBq/kg (0.06 mCi/kg). The mean injected activity for entire population came out to be 4.79±0.99 mCi. The mean effective absorbed doses were 3.37±0.70 and 5.5±1.35 mSv for F-NaF alone and CT alone, respectively. The mean cumulative effective dose of combined F-NaF PET and CT scan was calculated to be 8.8±1.8 mSv. The minimum absorbed dose for our method was as follows: 1.37 mSv for Kuwait Cancer Control Center vs. 4.44 mSv for SNMMI. Absorbed dose for maximum injected activity was as follows: 5.7 mSv for Kuwait Cancer Control Center vs. 8.88 mSv for SNMMI. Our weight-based doses were also lower when compared

  15. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, 99mTc-HYNIC-octreotide SPECT/CT, and whole-body MR imaging in detection of neuroendocrine tumors: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Etchebehere, Elba Cristina Sá de Camargo; de Oliveira Santos, Allan; Gumz, Brenda; Vicente, Andreia; Hoff, Paulo Ghem; Corradi, Gustavo; Ichiki, Wilson André; de Almeida Filho, José Geraldo; Cantoni, Saulo; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Costa, Frederico Perego

    2014-10-01

    There are different metabolic imaging methods, various tracers, and emerging anatomic modalities to stage neuroendocrine tumor (NET). We aimed to compare NET lesion detectability among (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC)-octreotide (somatostatin receptor scintigraphy [SSRS]) SPECT/CT, (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, and whole-body diffusion-weighted MR imaging (WB DWI). Nineteen consecutive patients (34-77 y old; mean, 54.3 ± 10.4 y old; 10 men and 9 women) underwent SSRS SPECT/CT, (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, and WB DWI. Images were acquired with a maximum interval of 3 mo between them and were analyzed with masking by separate teams. Planar whole-body imaging and SPECT/CT were performed from thorax to pelvis using a double-head 16-slice SPECT/CT scanner 4 h after injection of 111-185 MBq of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-octreotide. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT was performed from head to feet using a 16-slice PET/CT scanner 45 min after injection of 185 MBq of tracer. WB DWI was performed in the coronal plane using a 1.5-T scanner and a body coil. The standard method of reference for evaluation of image performance was undertaken: consensus among investigators at the end of the study, clinical and imaging follow-up, and biopsy of suggestive lesions. McNemar testing was applied to evaluate the detectability of lesions using (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in comparison to SSRS SPECT/CT and WB DWI: a significant difference in detectability was noted for pancreas (P = 0.0455 and P = 0.0455, respectively), gastrointestinal tract (P = 0.0455 and P = 0.0455), and bones (P = 0.0082 and P = 0.0082). Two unknown primary lesions were identified solely by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, SSRS SPECT/CT, and WB DWI demonstrated, respectively, sensitivities of 0.96, 0.60, and 0.72; specificities of 0.97, 0.99, and 1.00; positive predictive values of 0.94, 0.96, and 1.00; negative predictive values of 0.98, 0.83, and 0.88; and accuracies of 0.97, 0.86, and 0.91. (68)Ga PET/CT seems to be more sensitive

  16. SU-E-T-189: First Experimental Verification of the Accuracy of Absolute Dose Reconstruction From PET-CT Imaging of Yttrium 90 Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Veltchev, I; Fourkal, E; Doss, M; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Yu, M; Horwitz, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the past few years there have been numerous proposals for 3D dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of patients undergoing radioembolization treatment of the liver with yttrium-90 microspheres. One of the most promising techniques uses convolution of the measured PET activity distribution with a pre-calculated Monte Carlo dose deposition kernel. The goal of the present study is to experimentally verify the accuracy of this method and to analyze the significance of various error sources. Methods: Optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLD) were used (NanoDot, Landauer) in this experiment. Two detectors were mounted on the central axis of a cylinder filled with water solution of yttrium-90 chloride. The total initial activity was 90mCi. The cylinder was inserted in a larger water phantom and scanned on a Siemens Biograph 16 Truepoint PET-CT scanner. Scans were performed daily over a period of 20 days to build a calibration curve for the measured absolute activity spanning 7 yttrium-90 half-lives. The OSLDs were mounted in the phantom for a predetermined period of time in order to record 2Gy dose. The measured dose was then compared to the dose reconstructed from the activity density at the location of each dosimeter. Results: Thorough error analysis of the dose reconstruction algorithm takes into account the uncertainties in the absolute PET activity, branching ratios, and nonlinearity of the calibration curve. The measured dose for 105-minute exposure on day 10 of the experiment was 219(11)cGy, while the reconstructed dose at the location of the detector was 215(47)cGy. Conclusion: We present the first experimental verification of the accuracy of the convolution algorithm for absolute dose reconstruction of yttrium-90 microspheres. The excellent agreement between the measured and calculated point doses will encourage the broad clinical adoption of the convolution-based dose reconstruction algorithm, making future quantitative dose

  17. 18F-Sodium Fluoride PET-CT Hybrid Imaging of the Lumbar Facet Joints: Tracer Uptake and Degree of Correlation to CT-graded Arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Behr, Spencer C.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Dillon, William P.; Talbott, Jason F.

    2016-01-01

    We aim to evaluate 18F-NaF uptake by facet joints with hybrid PET-CT technique. Specifically, we evaluate NaF uptake in the facet joints of the lower lumbar spine, and correlate with the morphologic grade of facet arthropathy on CT. 30 consecutive patients who underwent standard vertex to toes NaF PET-CT for re-staging of primary neoplastic disease without measurable or documented bony metastases were identified. Maximum (SUVmax) and average (SUVavg) standardized uptake values were calculated for each L3-4, L4-5, and L5-S1 facet joint (n = 180) and normalized to average uptake in the non-diseased femur. A Pathria grade (0-3) was assigned to each facet based upon the CT morphology. Spearman's rank correlation was performed for normalized SUVmax and SUVavg with Pathria grade. ANOVA was performed with Tukey-Kramer pairwise tests to evaluate differences in uptake between Pathria groups. Facet normalized SUVmax (r = 0.31, P < 0.001) and SUVavg (r = 0.28, P < 0.001) demonstrated a mild positive correlation with CT Pathria grade. There was a wide range of uptake values within each Pathria grade subgroup with statistically significant differences in uptake only between Pathria grade 3 as compared to grades 0, 1, and 2. In conclusion, NaF uptake and morphologic changes of the facet joint on CT are weakly correlated. Physiologic information provided by NaF uptake is often discrepant with structural findings on CT suggesting NaF PET may supplement conventional structural imaging for identification of pain generating facet joints. Prospective investigation into the relationship of facet joint NaF uptake with pain and response to pain interventions is warranted. PMID:27134557

  18. Effect of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients With Clinical Stage II and III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Groheux, David Moretti, Jean-Luc; Baillet, Georges; Espie, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Hindie, Elif; Hennequin, Christophe; Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert; Cuvier, Caroline; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel; Sarandi, Farid; Misset, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential effect of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial assessment of patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: During 14 consecutive months, 39 patients (40 tumors) who presented with Stage II or III breast cancer on the basis of a routine extension assessment were prospectively included in this study. PET/CT was performed in addition to the initial assessment. Results: In 3 cases, PET/CT showed extra-axillary lymph node involvement that had not been demonstrated with conventional techniques. Two of these patients had hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the subpectoral and infraclavicular regions, and the third had a hypermetabolic internal mammary node. PET/CT showed distant uptake in 4 women. Of these 4 women, 1 had pleural involvement and 3 had bone metastasis. Overall, of the 39 women, the PET/CT results modified the initial stage in 7 (18%). The modified staging altered the treatment plan for 5 patients (13%). It led to radiotherapy in 4 patients (bone metastasis, pleural lesion, subpectoral lymph nodes, and internal mammary nodes) and excision of, and radiotherapy to, the infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 patient. Conclusions: PET/CT can provide information on extra-axillary lymph node involvement and can uncover occult distant metastases in a significant percentage of patients. Therefore, initial PET/CT could enable better treatment planning for patients with Stage II and III breast cancer.

  19. Dual-modality PET/CT instrumentation-today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Markus Nowak; Beyer, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has proven to be a clinically valuable imaging modality, particularly for oncology staging and therapy follow-up. The introduction of combined PET/CT imaging has helped address challenging imaging situations when anatomical information on PET-only was inadequate for accurate lesion localization. After a decade of PET/CT these combined systems have matured technically. Today, whole-body oncology staging is available with PET/CT in 15 min, or less. This review details recent developments in combined PET/CT instrumentation and points to implications for major applications in clinical oncology. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Comparison between 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging and Biological and Radiological Findings in Restaging of Hepatoblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Treglia, Giorgio; Pagano, Manuela; Fania, Piercarlo; Basso, Maria Eleonora; Fagioli, Franca; Ficola, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Background. In this study we retrospectively evaluated if 18F-FDG-PET/CT provided incremental diagnostic information over CI in a group of hepatoblastoma patients performing restaging. Procedure. Nine patients (mean age: 5.9 years; range: 3.1–12 years) surgically treated for hepatoblastoma were followed up by clinical examination, serum α-FP monitoring, and US. CI (CT or MRI) and PET/CT were performed in case of suspicion of relapse. Fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) were carried out for final confirmation if the results of CI, PET/CT, and/or α-FP levels were suggestive of relapse. PET/CT and CI findings were analyzed for comparison purposes, using FNAB as reference standard. Results. α-FP level was suggestive of disease recurrence in 8/9 patients. Biopsy was performed in 8/9 cases. CI and PET/CT resulted to be concordant in 5/9 patients (CI identified recurrence of disease, but 18F-FDG-PET/CT provided a better definition of disease extent); in 4/9 cases, CI diagnostic information resulted in negative findings, whereas PET/CT correctly detected recurrence of disease. 18F-FDG-PET/CT showed an agreement of 100% (8/8) with FNAB results. Conclusions. 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan seems to better assess HB patients with respect to CI and may provide incremental diagnostic value in the restaging of this group of patients. PMID:24063012

  1. [PET/CT in breast cancer: an update].

    PubMed

    Groheux, D; Moretti, J-L; Giacchetti, S; Hindié, E; Teyton, P; Cuvier, C; Bousquet, G; Misset, J-L; Boin, C; Espié, M

    2009-11-01

    The authors discuss the various roles of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the management of breast cancer. Roles of new tracers such as F-18 fluoro-L-thymidine (a marker of cell proliferation), 18-fluoro-17-B-estradiol (marker of estrogen receptor) and sodium fluoride (marker of bone matrix) are also mentioned. There is little justification for the use of FDG-PET/CT in patient with clinically T1 (< or = 2 cm) N0 tumours. Notably, it cannot be used as a substitute to SLNB "sentinel lymph node biopsy" for axillary staging due to limited sensitivity for the detection of small metastases. The case is different in higher risk patients, and especially so in patients with locally advanced disease. FDG-PET/CT in these patients might depict lymph node involvement in the level III of Berg or in supraclavicular or internal mammary basins. It might also uncover occult distant metastases, notably, early osteomedullary infiltration. Thus, for these tumors, initial PET/CT can enable better intramodality treatment planning or a change in treatment. PET/CT as a whole-body examination is also very efficient in case of suspicion of recurrence. On the other hand, many studies show that this functional imaging could be used to assess early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy or to chemotherapy of metastatic disease. 18FDG-PET/CT could thus become an unavoidable modality to answer various clinical situations.

  2. Whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (WB-DW-MRI) vs choline-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (choline-PET/CT) for selecting treatments in recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Moreno, A J; Herrando-Parreño, G; Muelas-Soria, R; Ferrer-Rebolleda, J; Broseta-Torres, R; Cozar-Santiago, M P; García-Piñón, F; Ferrer-Albiach, C

    2017-05-01

    To determine the effectiveness of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (WB-DW-MRI) in detecting metastases by comparing the results with those from choline-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (choline-PET/CT) in patients with biochemical relapse after primary treatment, and no metastases in bone scintigraphy, CT and/or pelvic MRI, or metastatic/oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Patients with this disease profile who could benefit from treatment with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) were selected and their responses to these techniques were rated. This was a prospective, controlled, unicentric study, involving 46 consecutive patients from our centre who presented biochemical relapse after adjuvant, salvage or radical treatment with external beam radiotherapy, or brachytherapy. After initial tests (bone scintigraphy, CT, pelvic MRI), 35 patients with oligometastases or without them were selected. 11 patients with multiple metastases were excluded from the study. WB-DW-MRI and choline-PET/CT was then performed on each patient within 1 week. The results were interpreted by specialists in nuclear medicine and MRI. If they were candidates for treatment with ablative SBRT (SABR), they were then evaluated every three months with both tests. Choline-PET/CT detected lesions in 16 patients that were not observable using WB-DW-MRI. The results were consistent in seven patients and in three cases, a lesion was observed using WB-DW-MRI that was not detected with choline-PET/CT. The Kappa value obtained was 0.133 (p = 0.089); the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of WB-DW-MRI were estimated at 44.93, 64.29, 86.11, and 19.15%, respectively. For choline-PET/CT patients, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 97.10, 58.33, 93.06, and 77.78%, respectively. Choline-PET/CT has a high global sensitivity while WB-DW-MRI has a high specificity, and so they are

  3. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Mok, Greta S P; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  4. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  5. MicroPET/CT imaging of αvβ₃ integrin via a novel ⁶⁸Ga-NOTA-RGD peptidomimetic conjugate in rat myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, Luca; Kusmic, Claudia; Panetta, Daniele; Arosio, Daniela; Petroni, Debora; Matteucci, Marco; Salvadori, Piero A; Casagrande, Cesare; L'Abbate, Antonio; Manzoni, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    The αvβ3 integrin is expressed in angiogenic vessels and is a potential target for molecular imaging of evolving pathological processes. Its expression is upregulated in cancer lesions and metastases as well as in acute myocardial infarction (MI) as part of the infarct healing process. The purpose of our study was to determine the feasibility of a new imaging approach with a novel (68)Ga-2,2',2″-(1,4,7-triazonane-1,4,7-triyl)triacetic acid (NOTA)-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) construct to assess integrin expression in the evolving MI. A straightforward labelling chemistry to attach the radionuclide (68)Ga to a NOTA-based chelating agent conjugated with a cyclic RGD peptidomimetic is described. Affinity for αvβ₃ integrin was assessed by in vitro receptor binding assay. The proof-of-concept in vivo studies combined the (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD with the flow tracer (13)N-NH₃ imaging in order to obtain positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging of both integrin expression and perfusion defect at 4 weeks after infarction. Hearts were then processed for immunostaining of integrin β₃. NOTA-RGD conjugate displayed a binding affinity for αvβ₃ integrin of 27.9 ± 6.8 nM. (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD showed stability without detectable degradation or formation of by-products in urine up to 2 h following injection in the rat. MI hearts exhibited (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD uptake in correspondence to infarcted and border zone regions. The tracer signal drew a parallel with vascular remodelling due to ischaemia-induced angiogenesis as assessed by immunohistochemistry. As compared to similar imaging approaches using the (18)F-galacto-derivative, we documented for the first time with microPET/CT imaging the (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD derivative that appears eligible for PET imaging in animal models of vascular remodelling during evolving MI. The simple chemistry employed to synthesize the (68)Ga-based radiotracer may greatly facilitate its translation to a clinical setting.

  6. An in vivo molecular imaging probe (18)F-Annexin B1 for apoptosis detection by PET/CT: preparation and preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Wei; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yu-Jia; Zhang, Ying-Jian; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Zhao, Qing; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu; Wang, Yue; Sun, Shu-Han

    2013-02-01

    There is an increasing need to develop non-invasive molecular imaging strategies for visualizing and quantifying apoptosis status of diseases (especially for cancer) for diagnosis and monitoring treatment response. Since externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) is one of the early molecular events during apoptosis, Annexin B1 (AnxB1), a member of Annexins family with high affinity toward the head group of PS, could be a potential positron emission tomography (PET) imaging probe for imaging cell death process after labeled by positron-emitting nuclides, such as (18)F. In the present study, we investigated a novel PET probe, (18)F-labeled Annexin B1 ((18)F-AnxB1), for apoptosis imaging. (18)F-AnxB1 was prepared reliably by conjugating AnxB1 with a (18)F-tag, N-succinimidyl 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB), in a radiolabeling yield of about 20 % within 40 min. The in vitro binding of (18)F-AnxB1 with apoptotic cells induced by anti-Fas antibody showed twofold increase compared to those without treatment, confirmed by flow cytometric analysis with AnxV-FITC/PI staining. Stability tests demonstrated (18)F-AnxB1 was rather stable in vitro and in vivo without degradation. The serial (18)F-AnxB1 PET/CT scans in healthy rats outlined its biodistribution and pharmacokinetics, indicating a rapid renal clearance and predominant accumulation into kidney and bladder at 2 h p.i. (18)F-AnxB1 PET/CT imaging was successfully applied to visualize in vivo apoptosis sites in tumor induced by chemotherapy and in kidney simulated by ischemia-reperfusion injury. The high-contrast images were obtained at 2 h p.i. to delineate apoptotic tumor. Apoptotic region could be still identified by (18)F-AnxB1 PET 4 h p.i., despite the high probe retention in kidneys. In summary, we have developed (18)F-AnxB1 as a PS-specific PET probe for the apoptosis detection and quantification which could have broad applications from disease diagnosis to treatment monitoring, especially in the cases of

  7. Whole-Body (18)F-FDG PET/CT Is Superior to CT as First-Line Diagnostic Imaging in Patients Referred with Serious Nonspecific Symptoms or Signs of Cancer: A Randomized Prospective Study of 200 Patients.

    PubMed

    Lebech, Anne-Mette; Gaardsting, Anne; Loft, Annika; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena; Bertelsen, Anne Kiil; Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Andersen, Kim Francis; Benzon, Eric von; Helms, Morten; Mathiesen, Lars R; David, Kim P; Kronborg, Gitte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    A fast-track pathway has been established in Denmark to investigate patients with serious nonspecific symptoms and signs of cancer (NSSC), who are not eligible to enter an organ-specific cancer program. The prevalence of cancer in this cohort is approximately 20%. The optimal screening strategy in patients with NSSC remains unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate whether (18)F-FDG PET/CT was superior to CT as an initial imaging modality in patients with NSSC. In a randomized prospective trial, the imaging modalities were compared with regard to diagnostic performance. Methods: Two hundred patients were randomized 1:1 to whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT or CT of the thorax and abdomen as the imaging modality. A tentative diagnosis was established after first-line imaging. The final referral diagnosis was adjudicated by the physician, when sufficient data were available. Results: One hundred ninety-seven patients were available for analysis because 3 patients withdrew consent before scanning. Thirty-nine (20%) patients were diagnosed with cancer, 10 (5%) with an infection, 15 (8%) with an autoimmune disease, and 76 (39%) with other diseases. In the remaining 57 patients (28%), no specific disease was found. (18)F-FDG PET/CT had a higher specificity (96% vs. 85%; P = 0.028) and a higher accuracy (94% vs. 82%; P = 0.017) than CT. However, there were no statistically significant differences in sensitivity (83% vs. 70%) or negative predictive values (96% vs. 92%). No difference in days to final referral diagnosis according to randomization group could be shown (7.2 vs. 7.6 d). However, for the subgroups in which the imaging modality showed a suggestion of malignancy, there was a significant delay to final diagnosis in the CT group compared with the (18)F-FDG PET/CT group (11.6 vs. 5.7 d; P = 0.02). Conclusion: Compared with CT, we found a higher diagnostic specificity and accuracy of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for detecting cancer in patients with NSSC. (18)F-FDG PET/CT should

  8. Comparative study of ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT imaging and serum hTERT mRNA quantification in cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ping, Bingqiong; Tsuno, Satoshi; Wang, Xinhui; Ishihara, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Taro; Miura, Keigo; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Shinohara, Yuki; Matsuki, Tsutomu; Tanabe, Yoshio; Tanaka, Noriaki; Ogawa, Toshihide; Shiota, Goshi; Miura, Norimasa

    2015-10-01

    We have reported on the clinical usefulness of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA quantification in sera in patients with several cancers. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) using ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has recently become an excellent modality for detecting cancer. We performed a diagnostic comparative study of FDG-PET/CT and hTERT mRNA quantification in patients with cancer. Four hundred seventy subjects, including 125 healthy individuals and 345 outpatients with cancer who had received medical treatments for cancer in their own or other hospitals, were enrolled. The subjects were diagnosed by FDG-PET/CT, and we measured their serum hTERT mRNA levels using real-time RT-PCR, correlating the quantified values with the clinical course. In this prospective study, we statistically assessed the sensitivity and specificity, and their clinical significance. hTERT mRNA and FDG-PET/CT were demonstrated to be correlated with the clinical parameters of metastasis and recurrence (P < 0.001), and of recurrence and tumor number in cancer compared with noncancer patients, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed a significant difference in the detection by FDG-PET/CT, ¹⁸F-FDG uptake, the detection by hTERT mRNA, and age. The use of both FDG-PET/CT and hTERT mRNA resulted in a positivity of 94.4% (221/234) for the detection of viable tumor cells. FDG-PET/CT is superior to hTERT mRNA quantification in the early detection of cancer and combinative use of FDG-PET/CT and hTERT mRNA may improve the diagnostic accuracy of cancer.

  9. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images*

    PubMed Central

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  10. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Mairani, A.; Hobbs, R. F.; Vergara Gil, A.; Pacilio, M.; Parodi, K.; Cremonesi, M.; Coca Pérez, M. A.; Di Dia, A.; Ferrari, M.; Guerriero, F.; Battistoni, G.; Pedroli, G.; Paganelli, G.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Sgouros, G.

    2013-11-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3-4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  11. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images.

    PubMed

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2013-11-21

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 10(8) primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  12. Determining the Minimal Required Radioactivity of 18F-FDG for Reliable Semiquantification in PET/CT Imaging: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Kai; Menard, David H; Cheng, David W

    2016-03-01

    In pursuit of as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) doses, this study investigated the minimal required radioactivity and corresponding imaging time for reliable semiquantification in PET/CT imaging. Using a phantom containing spheres of various diameters (3.4, 2.1, 1.5, 1.2, and 1.0 cm) filled with a fixed (18)F-FDG concentration of 165 kBq/mL and a background concentration of 23.3 kBq/mL, we performed PET/CT at multiple time points over 20 h of radioactive decay. The images were acquired for 10 min at a single bed position for each of 10 half-lives of decay using 3-dimensional list mode and were reconstructed into 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 10-min acquisitions per bed position using an ordered-subsets expectation maximum algorithm with 24 subsets and 2 iterations and a gaussian 2-mm filter. SUVmax and SUVavg were measured for each sphere. The minimal required activity (±10%) for precise SUVmax semiquantification in the spheres was 1.8 kBq/mL for an acquisition of 10 min, 3.7 kBq/mL for 3-5 min, 7.9 kBq/mL for 2 min, and 17.4 kBq/mL for 1 min. The minimal required activity concentration-acquisition time product per bed position was 10-15 kBq/mL⋅min for reproducible SUV measurements within the spheres without overestimation. Using the total radioactivity and counting rate from the entire phantom, we found that the minimal required total activity-time product was 17 MBq⋅min and the minimal required counting rate-time product was 100 kcps⋅min. Our phantom study determined a threshold for minimal radioactivity and acquisition time for precise semiquantification in (18)F-FDG PET imaging that can serve as a guide in pursuit of achieving ALARA doses. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  13. {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV{sub CT} to GTV{sub FUSED} was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  14. Effects of rigid and non-rigid image registration on test-retest variability of quantitative [18F]FDG PET/CT studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a valuable tool for monitoring response to therapy in oncology. In longitudinal studies, however, patients are not scanned in exactly the same position. Rigid and non-rigid image registration can be applied in order to reuse baseline volumes of interest (VOI) on consecutive studies of the same patient. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of various image registration strategies on standardized uptake value (SUV) and metabolic volume test-retest variability (TRT). Methods Test-retest whole-body [18F]FDG PET/CT scans were collected retrospectively for 11 subjects with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies (colorectal carcinoma). Rigid and non-rigid image registration techniques with various degrees of locality were applied to PET, CT, and non-attenuation corrected PET (NAC) data. VOI were drawn independently on both test and retest scans. VOI drawn on test scans were projected onto retest scans and the overlap between projected VOI and manually drawn retest VOI was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). In addition, absolute (unsigned) differences in TRT of SUVmax, SUVmean, metabolic volume and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were calculated in on one hand the test VOI and on the other hand the retest VOI and projected VOI. Reference values were obtained by delineating VOIs on both scans separately. Results Non-rigid PET registration showed the best performance (median DSC: 0.82, other methods: 0.71-0.81). Compared with the reference, none of the registration types showed significant absolute differences in TRT of SUVmax, SUVmean and TLG (p > 0.05). Only for absolute TRT of metabolic volume, significant lower values (p < 0.05) were observed for all registration strategies when compared to delineating VOIs separately, except for non-rigid PET registrations (p = 0.1). Non-rigid PET registration provided good volume TRT (7.7%) that was smaller

  15. Variability of Image Features Computed from Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jasmine A.; Budzevich, Mikalai; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Latifi, Kujtim; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2015-01-01

    Radiomics is being explored for potential applications in radiation therapy. How various imaging protocols affect quantitative image features is currently a highly active area of research. To assess the variability of image features derived from conventional [three-dimensional (3D)] and respiratory-gated (RG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images of lung cancer patients, image features were computed from 23 lung cancer patients. Both protocols for each patient were acquired during the same imaging session. PET tumor volumes were segmented using an adaptive technique which accounted for background. CT tumor volumes were delineated with a commercial segmentation tool. Using RG PET images, the tumor center of mass motion, length, and rotation were calculated. Fifty-six image features were extracted from all images consisting of shape descriptors, first-order features, and second-order texture features. Overall, 26.6% and 26.2% of total features demonstrated less than 5% difference between 3D and RG protocols for CT and PET, respectively. Between 10 RG phases in PET, 53.4% of features demonstrated percent differences less than 5%. The features with least variability for PET were sphericity, spherical disproportion, entropy (first and second order), sum entropy, information measure of correlation 2, Short Run Emphasis (SRE), Long Run Emphasis (LRE), and Run Percentage (RPC); and those for CT were minimum intensity, mean intensity, Root Mean Square (RMS), Short Run Emphasis (SRE), and RPC. Quantitative analysis using a 3D acquisition versus RG acquisition (to reduce the effects of motion) provided notably different image feature values. This study suggests that the variability between 3D and RG features is mainly due to the impact of respiratory motion. PMID:26692535

  16. Preparation of [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 for PET-CT imaging using a manual synthesis module and organic matrix based (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator.

    PubMed

    Nanabala, Raviteja; Anees, Muhammed K; Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A

    2016-08-01

    [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 is a relatively recently introduced radiopharmaceutical for PET-CT imaging of prostate cancer patients. The availability of (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator and PSMA-11 ligand from commercial sources is facilitating the production of the radiopharmaceutical in-house. This paper describes our experience on the preparation of ~200 batches of [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 for conducting PET-CT imaging in patients suspected/suffering from prostate cancer. The radiosynthesis of [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 was done in a hospital based nuclear medicine department using (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator and a manual synthesis module, both supplied by Isotope Technologies Garching (ITG), Germany. The production involved the reaction of 5μg (5.3nmol) of PSMA-11 ligand in 1 ml of 0.25M sodium acetate buffer with 4ml of (68)GaCl3 in 0.05M HCl for 5min at 105°C; followed by purification in a C18 cartridge and collection through a 0.22μm pore size filter. The radiochemical yields obtained were consistently high, 93.19%±3.76%, and there was hardly any batch failure. The radiochemical purity of the product was >99% and the product was stable for over 2h; however it was used in patients immediately after preparation. About 200 batches of [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 were prepared during the period and more than 300 patients received the tracer during the 14months of study. No adverse reaction was observed in any of the patients and the image qualities were consistent with literature reports. [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 with high radiochemical and radionuclidic purity is conveniently prepared by using a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator and manual synthesis module. The radiochemical yields are very high; and activity sufficient for 3-4 patients can be prepared in a single batch; multiple batches can be done on the same day and when needed after a gap of 1.5-2h. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical impact of PSMA-based (18)F-DCFBC PET/CT imaging in patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer after primary local therapy.

    PubMed

    Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Maria L; Shih, Joanna H; Adler, Stephen; Harmon, Stephanie; Bergvall, Ethan; Citrin, Deborah; Dahut, William; Ton, Anita T; McKinney, Yolanda; Weaver, Juanita; Eclarinal, Philip; Forest, Alicia; Afari, George; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Mease, Ronnie C; Merino, Maria J; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J; Jacobs, Paula; Pomper, Martin G; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2017-09-11

    The purpose of our study was to assess (18)F-DCFBC PET/CT, a PSMA targeted PET agent, for lesion detection and clinical management of biochemical relapse in prostate cancer patients after primary treatment. This is a prospective IRB-approved study of 68 patients with documented biochemical recurrence after primary local therapy consisting of radical prostatectomy (n = 50), post radiation therapy (n = 9) or both (n = 9), with negative conventional imaging. All 68 patients underwent whole-body (18)F-DCFBC PET/CT, and 62 also underwent mpMRI within one month. Lesion detection with (18)F-DCFBC was correlated with mpMRI findings and pre-scan PSA levels. The impact of (18)F-DCFBC PET/CT on clinical management and treatment decisions was established after 6 months' patient clinical follow-up. Forty-one patients (60.3%) showed at least one positive (18)F-DCFBC lesion, for a total of 79 lesions, 30 in the prostate bed, 39 in lymph nodes, and ten in distant sites. Tumor recurrence was confirmed by either biopsy (13/41 pts), serial CT/MRI (8/41) or clinical follow-up (15/41); there was no confirmation in five patients, who continue to be observed. The (18)F-DCFBC and mpMRI findings were concordant in 39 lesions (49.4%), and discordant in 40 lesions (50.6%); the majority (n = 32/40) of the latter occurring because the recurrence was located outside the mpMRI field of view. (18)F-DCFBC PET positivity rates correlated with PSA values and 15%, 46%, 83%, and 77% were seen in patients with PSA values <0.5, 0.5 to <1.0, 1.0 to <2.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The optimal cut-off PSA value to predict a positive (18)F-DCFBC scan was 0.78 ng/mL (AUC = 0.764). A change in clinical management occurred in 51.2% (21/41) of patients with a positive (18)F-DCFBC result, generally characterized by starting a new treatment in 19 patients or changing the treatment plan in two patients. (18)F-DCFBC detects recurrences in 60.3% of a population of patients with biochemical

  18. Novel 18F labeling strategy for polyester-based NPs for in vivo PET-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, Primiano Pio; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Baz Maldonado, Zuriñe; Llop Roig, Jordi; Borrós, Salvador

    2015-03-18

    Drug-loaded nanocarriers and nanoparticulate systems used for drug release require a careful in vivo evaluation in terms of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Nuclear imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) are ideal and noninvasive tools to investigate the biodistribution and biological fate of the nanostructures, but the incorporation of a positron emitter is required. Here we describe a novel approach for the (18)F-radiolabeling of polyester-based nanoparticles. Our approach relies on the preparation of the radiolabeled active agent 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzyl-2-bromoacetamide ([(18)F]FBBA), which is subsequently coupled to block copolymers under mild conditions. The labeled block copolymers are ultimately incorporated as constituent elements of the NPs by using a modified nano coprecipitation method. This strategy has been applied in the current work to the preparation of peptide-functionalized NPs with potential applications in drug delivery. According to the measurements of particle size and zeta potential, the radiolabeling process did not result in a statistically significant alteration of the physicochemical properties of the NPs. Moreover, radiochemical stability studies showed no detachment of the radioactivity from NPs even at 12 h after preparation. The radiolabeled NPs enabled the in vivo quantification of the biodistribution data in rats using a combination of imaging techniques, namely, PET and computerized tomography (CT). Low accumulation of the nanoparticles in the liver and their elimination mainly via urine was found. The different biodistribution pattern obtained for the "free" radiolabeled polymer suggests chemical and radiochemical integrity of the NPs under investigation. The strategy reported here may be applied to any polymeric NPs containing polymers bearing a nucleophile, and hence our novel strategy may find application for the in vivo and noninvasive investigation of a wide range of NPs.

  19. Utility of PET/CT Imaging Performed Early After Surgical Resection in the Adjuvant Treatment Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, Stephanie A.; Foote, Robert L. Lowe, Val J.; Brown, Paul D.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Kasperbauer, Jan L.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) early after surgical resection and before postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We studied a prospective cohort of 91 consecutive patients referred for postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after complete surgical resection. Tumor histologies included 62 squamous cell and 29 non-squamous cell cancers. Median time between surgery and postoperative PET/CT was 28 days (range, 13-75 days). Findings suspicious for persistent/recurrent cancer or distant metastasis were biopsied. Correlation was made with changes in patient care. Results: Based on PET/CT findings, 24 patients (26.4%) underwent biopsy of suspicious sites. Three patients with suspicious findings did not undergo biopsy because the abnormalities were not easily accessible. Eleven (45.8%) biopsies were positive for cancer. Treatment was changed for 14 (15.4%) patients (11 positive biopsy and 3 nonbiopsied patients) as a result. Treatment changes included abandonment of radiation therapy and switching to palliative chemotherapy or hospice care (4), increasing the radiation therapy dose (6), extending the radiation therapy treatment volume and increasing the dose (1), additional surgery (2), and adding palliative chemotherapy to palliative radiation therapy (1). Treatment for recurrent cancer and primary skin cancer were significant predictors of having a biopsy-proven, treatment-changing positive PET/CT (p < 0.03). Conclusions: Even with an expectedly high rate of false positive PET/CT scans in this early postoperative period, PET/CT changed patient management in a relatively large proportion of patients. PET/CT can be recommended in the postoperative, preradiation therapy setting with the understanding that treatment-altering PET/CT findings should be biopsied for confirmation.

  20. Anxiety in Cancer Patients during (18)F-FDG PET/CT Low Dose: A Comparison of Anxiety Levels before and after Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Ana; Vieira, Lina; Carolino, Elisabete; Oliveira, Cátia; Pacheco, Carolina; Castro, Maria; Alonso, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Assessing the level of anxiety in oncology patients who underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and identifying the main reasons that generate anxiety. Material and Method. The study included 81 cancer patients submitted to the (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Patients filled in the Scan Experience Questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Results. Substantial levels of anxiety were detected both before and after (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan (STAI mean > 30), with a significant increase in the state of anxiety after scan performance (p < 0.0001, Medianpre = 31.1, and Medianpos = 33.0). (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose results are the main cause of anxiety both before (79.1%) and after (86.9%) the scan. The information provided by staff both before and on the (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose day was classified mostly as completely understandable (70.5% and 75.3%, resp.) and as very useful (70.5% and 72.6%, resp.) and correlated positively with patients' overall satisfaction with NM Department (rS = 0.372, p = 0.004 and rS = 0.528, p = 0.000, resp.), but not with anxiety levels. Conclusions. Patients perceive high levels of anxiety during the (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and the concern with scan results was pointed out as the main factor for that emotional reaction.

  1. Anxiety in Cancer Patients during 18F-FDG PET/CT Low Dose: A Comparison of Anxiety Levels before and after Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Lina; Carolino, Elisabete; Oliveira, Cátia; Pacheco, Carolina; Castro, Maria; Alonso, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Assessing the level of anxiety in oncology patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and identifying the main reasons that generate anxiety. Material and Method. The study included 81 cancer patients submitted to the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Patients filled in the Scan Experience Questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Results. Substantial levels of anxiety were detected both before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan (STAI mean > 30), with a significant increase in the state of anxiety after scan performance (p < 0.0001, Medianpre = 31.1, and Medianpos = 33.0). 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose results are the main cause of anxiety both before (79.1%) and after (86.9%) the scan. The information provided by staff both before and on the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose day was classified mostly as completely understandable (70.5% and 75.3%, resp.) and as very useful (70.5% and 72.6%, resp.) and correlated positively with patients' overall satisfaction with NM Department (rS = 0.372, p = 0.004 and rS = 0.528, p = 0.000, resp.), but not with anxiety levels. Conclusions. Patients perceive high levels of anxiety during the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and the concern with scan results was pointed out as the main factor for that emotional reaction. PMID:28392942

  2. 18F-FDG PET/CT qualitative and quantitative evaluation in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients for detection of malignant transformation: comparison of early to delayed imaging with and without liver activity normalization.

    PubMed

    Chirindel, Alin; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Wahl, Richard

    2015-03-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT has shown increased accuracy, compared with morphologic imaging, in differentiating malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) from benign neurofibromas (BNFs) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Delayed (18)F-FDG PET imaging typically enhances malignant tumor to background. Our goal was to compare the effectiveness of early (1-h) and delayed (4-h) (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in differentiating MPNSTs from BNFs in patients with NF1, with and without liver activity normalization. NF1 patients presenting new symptoms or enlarging lesions were clinically evaluated with early and delayed (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging. SULmax (maximum standardized uptake value derived for lean body) and SULmax/liver (lesion uptake adjusted to mean liver activity) were obtained for all sites identified with abnormal metabolic activity. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations, including receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) comparison of early and delayed imaging sessions, were performed. Histopathology and clinical follow-up (1-9 y) were considered as a gold standard. Forty-one NF1 patients with early and delayed (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were identified, and 93 lesions were retrospectively analyzed, representing 24 MPNSTs (all histologically confirmed) and 69 BNFs (26 histologically confirmed). Qualitative evaluation on early imaging showed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for separating MPNSTs from BNFs of 91%, 84%, 67%, and 96% versus 91%, 81%, 63%, and 96%, respectively, on 4-h delayed imaging. The mean SULmax was significantly higher for MPNSTs than BNFs on both early scans (6.5 vs. 2.0, P < 0.01) and delayed imaging (8.3 vs. 2.3, P < 0.02). However, SULmax overlap between benign and malignant lesions persisted even after normalization to mean liver activity. ROC-derived best SULmax cutoffs were 3.2 on early (area under the curve, 0.973) and 4.1 on delayed scans (area under the curve, 0.978). ROC analysis

  3. SU-E-J-250: A Methodology for Active Bone Marrow Protection for Cervical Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using 18F-FLT PET/CT Image

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a radiation therapy treatment planning that would spare active bone marrow and whole pelvic bone marrow using 18F FLT PET/CT image. Methods: We have developed an IMRT planning methodology to incorporate functional PET imaging using 18F FLT/CT scans. Plans were generated for two cervical cancer patients, where pelvicactive bone marrow region was incorporated as avoidance regions based on the range: SUV>2., another region was whole pelvic bone marrow. Dose objectives were set to reduce the volume of active bone marrow and whole bone marraw. The volumes of received 10 (V10) and 20 (V20) Gy for active bone marrow were evaluated. Results: Active bone marrow regions identified by 18F FLT with an SUV>2 represented an average of 48.0% of the total osseous pelvis for the two cases studied. Improved dose volume histograms for identified bone marrow SUV volumes and decreases in V10(average 18%), and V20(average 14%) were achieved without clinically significant changes to PTV or OAR doses. Conclusion: Incorporation of 18F FLT/CT PET in IMRT planning provides a methodology to reduce radiation dose to active bone marrow without compromising PTV or OAR dose objectives in cervical cancer.

  4. In vivo imaging of macrophage activity in the coronary arteries using 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT: correlation with coronary calcium burden and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rominger, Axel; Saam, Tobias; Vogl, Eva; Ubleis, Christopher; la Fougère, Christian; Förster, Stefan; Haug, Alexander; Cumming, Paul; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bartenstein, Peter; Hacker, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    We measured the uptake of the somatostatin receptor ligand (68)Ga-[1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid]-D-Phe(1),Tyr(3)-octreotate (DOTATATE) in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) in association with calcified plaques (CPs) and cardiovascular risk factors. Seventy consecutive tumor patients were examined by whole-body (68)Ga-DOTATATE contrast-enhanced PET/CT. Blood-pool-corrected standardized uptake value (target-to-background ratio) was measured in the LAD, and CT images were used to detect CP. Cardiovascular risk factors and history of prior cardiovascular events were recorded. (68)Ga-DOTATATE uptake was detectable in the LAD of all patients. Target-to-background ratio in the LAD correlated significantly with the presence of CP (R = 0.34; P < 0.01), prior vascular events (R = 0.26; P < 0.05), and male sex (R = 0.29; P < 0.05), whereas CP correlated with these parameters but also with age (R = 0.34; P < 0.01) and hypertension (R = 0.25; P < 0.05). In a series of oncologic patients, those with prior cardiovascular events and calcified atherosclerotic plaques showed significantly increased (68)Ga-DOTATATE uptake in the LAD, suggesting a potential role of this tracer for plaque imaging in the coronary arteries.

  5. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of {sup 90}Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Fourkal, E.; Veltchev, I.; Lin, M.; Meyer, J.; Koren, S.; Doss, M.; Yu, J. Q.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for {sup 90}Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58–3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71–311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25–155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target

  6. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of 90Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Veltchev, I; Lin, M; Koren, S; Meyer, J; Doss, M; Yu, J Q

    2013-08-01

    The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres. The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for 90Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures. The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58-3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71-311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25-155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target (D90) was 53 Gy (range: 13-125 Gy). A

  7. 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in Patients With Biochemical Prostate Cancer Recurrence and Negative 18F-Choline-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Bluemel, Christina; Krebs, Markus; Polat, Bülent; Linke, Fränze; Eiber, Matthias; Samnick, Samuel; Lapa, Constantin; Lassmann, Michael; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Czernin, Johannes; Rubello, Domenico; Bley, Thorsten; Kropf, Saskia; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Buck, Andreas K.; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Investigating the value of 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in biochemically recurring prostate cancer patients with negative 18F-choline-PET/CT. Patients and Methods One hundred thirty-nine consecutive patients with biochemical recurrence after curative (surgery and/or radiotherapy) therapy were offered participation in this sequential clinical imaging approach. Patients first underwent an 18F-choline-PET/CT. If negative, an additional 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CTwas offered. One hundred twenty-five of 139 eligible patients were included in the study; 32 patients underwent additional 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT. Patients with equivocal findings (n = 5) on 18F-choline-PET/CT and those who declined the additional 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT (n = 9) were excluded. Images were analyzed visually for the presence of suspicious lesions. Findings on PET/CT were correlated with PSA level, PSA doubling time (dt), and PSA velocity (vel). Results The overall detection rates were 85.6% (107/125) for the sequential imaging approach and 74.4% (93/125) for 18F-choline-PET/CT alone. 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT detected sites of recurrence in 43.8% (14/32) of the choline-negative patients. Detection rates of the sequential imaging approach and 18F-choline-PET/CT alone increased with higher serum PSA levels and PSA vel. Subgroup analysis of 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in 18F-choline negative patients revealed detection rates of 28.6%, 45.5%, and 71.4% for PSA levels of 0.2 or greater to less than 1 ng/mL, 1 to 2 ng/mL, and greater than 2 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusions The sequential imaging approach designed to limit 68Ga-PSMA imaging to patients with negative choline scans resulted in high detection rates. 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT identified sites of recurrent disease in 43.8% of the patients with negative 18F-choline PET/CT scans. PMID:26975008

  8. Liver lesion detection and characterization in patients with colorectal cancer: a comparison of low radiation dose non-enhanced PET/CT, contrast-enhanced PET/CT, and liver MRI.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, Colin Patrick; Setty, Bindu N; Holalkere, Nagaraj; Sahani, Dushyant V; Fischman, Alan J; Blake, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    To compare low-radiation dose non-enhanced fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (NE-PET/CT), contrast-enhanced fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT (CE-PET/CT), and gadolinium-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection and characterization of liver lesions in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). In this retrospective review of imaging database of CRC patients with suspected liver metastases, 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; mean age, 63 years) evaluated with low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT, CE-PET/CT, and liver MRI were studied. The final diagnosis was established either by pathological examination or follow-up imaging over a period of at least 6 months for lesion stability or growth. The liver lesions were characterized on an ordinal scale of 0 to 6 (0 = absent, 1 = definitely benign, and 6 = definitely malignant). Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to compare performance of the 3 imaging methods. A total of 110 lesions were present on follow-up. The detection rate on low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT, CE-PET/CT, and MRI was 73.6%, 90.9%, and 95.4%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (P < 0.001) and CE-PET/CT (P < 0.001) had a higher detection rate than low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT. There was no significant statistical difference in lesion detection between MRI and CE-PET/CT (P = 0.11). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for characterization of detected liver lesions on low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT were 67%, 60%, and 66%, respectively; those on CE-PET/CT were 85%, 100%, and 86%, respectively; and those on MRI were 98%, 100%, and 98%, respectively. Comparative receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under curve of 0.74 for low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT, 0.86 for CE-PET/CT, and 0.97 for MRI. There were statistically significant differences in the accuracy of MRI, low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT, and CE-PET/CT for lesion characterization

  9. Low-dose 90Y PET/CT imaging optimized for lesion detectability and quantitative accuracy: a phantom study to assess the feasibility of pretherapy imaging to plan the therapeutic dose.

    PubMed

    Khazaee, Maryam; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Geramifar, Parham; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-09-11

    The overall aim of this work is to optimize the reconstruction parameters for low-dose yttrium-90 (Y) PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging, and to determine Y minimum detectable activity, in an endeavor to investigate the feasibility of performing low-dose Y imaging in-vivo to plan the therapeutic dose in radioembolization. This study was carried out using a Siemens Biograph 6 True Point PET/CT scanner. A Jaszczak phantom containing five hot syringes was imaged serially over 15 days. For 128 reconstruction parameters/algorithms, detectability performance and quantitative accuracy were evaluated using the contrast-to-noise ratio and the recovery coefficient, respectively. For activity concentrations greater than 2.5 MBq/ml, the linearity of the scanner was confirmed while the corresponding relative error was below 10%. Reconstructions with smaller numbers of iterations and smoother filters led to higher detectability performance, irrespective of the activity concentration and lesion size. In this study, the minimum detectable activity was found to be 3.28±10% MBq/ml using the optimized reconstruction parameters. Although the recovered activities were generally underestimated, for lesions with activity concentration greater than 4 MBq/ml, the amount of underestimation is limited to -15% for optimized reconstructions. Y PET/CT imaging, even with a low activity concentration, is feasible for depicting the distribution of Y implanted microspheres using optimized reconstruction parameters. As such, in-vivo PET/CT imaging of low-dose Y in the pretherapeutic stage may be feasible and fruitful to optimally plan the therapeutic activity delivered to patients undergoing radioembolization.

  10. 18F-FDG PET/CT in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tagliabue, Luca; Russo, Giovanna; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Urinary clearance of F-FDG and variability in bladder wall FDG uptake may hamper the interpretation and limit the use of FDG-PET/CT for imaging bladder tumors. Nevertheless, careful combined evaluation of both CT and FDG-PET images of the urinary tract can provide useful findings. We present 2 cases of bladder cancer detected by FDG-PET/CT. These cases suggest that FDG uptake can be indicative of malignancy in bladder cancer when viewed in conjunction with CT scans and that whole-body FDG-PET/CT scans should always be reviewed with particular attention to the urinary tract because abnormalities suggestive of bladder cancer can be found unexpectedly.

  11. The contribution of PET/CT to improved patient management.

    PubMed

    Ell, P J

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of both SPET/CT and PET/CT, multimodality imaging has truly entered routine clinical practice. Multiple slice spiral CT scanners have been incorporated with multiple detector gamma cameras or PET systems, such that the benefit of these modalities can be achieved in one patient sitting. The subject of this manuscript is PET/CT and its impact on patient management. Applications of PET/CT span the whole field of medical and surgical oncology since very few cancers do not take up the labelled glucose tracer, (18)F-FDG. Given the contrast achieved, high-quality data can be obtained with FDG PET/CT. This technology has now spread worldwide and has been the subject of intense interest, as witnessed by the vast body of published evidence. In this short overview, only a brief discussion of the main clinical applications is possible. Novel applications of PET/CT outside the field of oncology are expected in the near future.

  12. PET/CT in renal, bladder and testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Physician, Chief; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/CT is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in uro-oncology as well. In both bladder and renal cancer there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with only limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced in these malignancies. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder and testicular cancer. PMID:26099672

  13. Cerebellar Metastases From Prostate Cancer on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mico; Hsiao, Edward; Turner, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate extent of disease in prostate carcinoma. Parenchymal brain metastases originating from prostate cancer have highly variable imaging appearance. We present a 77-year-old man with cerebellar metastasis from prostate cancer showing focal uptake on prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT.

  14. Clinical significance of FDG-PET/CT at the postoperative surveillance in the breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Na Young; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Chae, Byung Joo; Seo, Ye Young

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical role of [(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) compared with conventional imaging (CI) to detect locoregional recurrence or distant metastasis during postoperative surveillance of patients with breast cancer. We included 1,819 examinations of 1,161 patients, who underwent FDG-PET/CT and CI, including mammography, breast ultrasound, whole-body bone scintigraphy, and chest radiography for postoperative surveillance. All patients had a history of surgery with or without adjuvant treatment due to more than stage II breast cancer between November 2003 and November 2009. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of CI, FDG-PET/CT, and combined CI and FDG-PET/CT for detecting locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, and incidental cancer. We also analyzed false-positive and false-negative results in both FDG-PET/CT and CI. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CI were 75.4, 98.7, 93.4, and 94.3 %. Those of FDG-PET/CT were 97.5, 98.8, 95.4, and 99.4 %. Those of the combined results were 98.6, 98.2, 96.7, and 99.7 %. Sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT was significantly higher than that of CI (P < 0.05). Sensitivity of combined CI and FDG-PET/CT results improved, but they were not significantly different from those of FDG-PET/CT alone (P = 0.43). Seventeen false-positive and nine false-negative cases were detected with FDG-PET/CT, and 19 false-positive and 88 false-negative cases were detected with CI. FDG-PET/CT is considered as an acceptable diagnostic imaging modality for postoperative surveillance of patients with breast cancer.

  15. A rare adult renal neuroblastoma better imaged by (18)F-FDG than by (68)Ga-dotanoc in the PET/CT scan.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Singh, Sharwan Kumar; Sood, Ashwani; Ashwathanarayama, Abhiram Gj; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Shukla, Jaya; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-03-20

    Primary renal neuroblastoma is an uncommon tumor in children and extremely rare in adults. We present a case of a middle aged female having a large retroperitoneal mass involving the right kidney with features of neuroblastoma on pre-operative histopathology. Whole-body fluorine-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) and (68)Ga-dotanoc PET/CT scans performed for staging and therapeutic potential revealed a tracer avid mass replacing the right kidney and also pelvic lymph nodes. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan showed better both the primary lesion and the metastases in the pelvic lymph nodes than the (68)Ga-dotanoc scan supporting diagnosis and treatment planning.

  16. Investigating the limits of PET/CT imaging at very low true count rates and high random fractions in ion-beam therapy monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, Christopher Bauer, Julia; Conti, Maurizio; Guérin, Laura; Eriksson, Lars; Parodi, Katia

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a tighter conformation of the applied dose to arbitrarily shaped tumor volumes with respect to photons, but is more sensitive to uncertainties in the radiotherapeutic treatment chain. Consequently, an independent verification of the applied treatment is highly desirable. For this purpose, the irradiation-induced β{sup +}-emitter distribution within the patient is detected shortly after irradiation by a commercial full-ring positron emission tomography/x-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner installed next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). A major challenge to this approach is posed by the small number of detected coincidences. This contribution aims at characterizing the performance of the used PET/CT device and identifying the best-performing reconstruction algorithm under the particular statistical conditions of PET-based treatment monitoring. Moreover, this study addresses the impact of radiation background from the intrinsically radioactive lutetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based detectors at low counts. Methods: The authors have acquired 30 subsequent PET scans of a cylindrical phantom emulating a patientlike activity pattern and spanning the entire patient counting regime in terms of true coincidences and random fractions (RFs). Accuracy and precision of activity quantification, image noise, and geometrical fidelity of the scanner have been investigated for various reconstruction algorithms and settings in order to identify a practical, well-suited reconstruction scheme for PET-based treatment verification. Truncated listmode data have been utilized for separating the effects of small true count numbers and high RFs on the reconstructed images. A corresponding simulation study enabled extending the results to an even wider range of counting statistics and to additionally investigate the impact of scatter coincidences. Eventually, the recommended

  17. The role of 18FDG, 18FDOPA PET/CT and 99mTc bone scintigraphy imaging in Erdheim-Chester disease.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, F J; Acevedo-Báñez, I; Martínez-Castillo, R; Tirado-Hospital, J L; Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Pachón-Garrudo, V M; Álvarez-Pérez, R M; García-Jiménez, R; Rivas-Infante, E; García-Morillo, J S; Borrego-Dorado, I

    2015-08-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocitosis, characterized by multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltration by foamy histiocytes that stain positively for CD68 marker but not express CD1a and S100 proteins. Etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown and only about 500 cases are related in the literature. Multisystemic involvement leads to a wide variety of clinical manifestations that results in a poor prognosis although recent advances in treatment. We present the clinical, nuclear medicine findings and therapeutic aspects of a serie of 6 patients with histopathological diagnosis of ECD, who have undergone both bone scintigraphy (BS) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET/CT scans in our institution. A complementary 18F-fluorodopa (18FDOPA)-PET/CT was performed in one case. Three different presentations of the disease were observed in our casuistic: most indolent form was a cutaneous confined disease, presented in only one patient. Multifocal involvement with central nervous system (CNS) preservation was observed in two patients. Most aggressive form consisted in a systemic involvement with CNS infiltration, presented in three patients. In our experience neurological involvement, among one case with isolate pituitary infiltration, was associated with mortality in all cases. 18FDG-PET/CT and BS were particularly useful in despite systemic involvement; locate the site for biopsy and the treatment response evaluation. By our knowledge, 18FDOPA-PET/CT not seems useful in the initial staging of ECD. A baseline 18FDG-PET/CT and BS may help in monitoring the disease and could be considered when patients were incidentally diagnosed and periodically 18FDG-PET/CT must be performed in the follow up to evaluate treatment response.

  18. Impact of (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in therapeutic decisions for malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinchun; Jones, Robin L; Lewis, David H; Eary, Janet F

    2013-06-01

    The decision to give neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with localized high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is often based on tumor grade evaluated from biopsies, but biopsies can have the inherent issue of sampling bias. Incorporation of SUVmax and heterogeneity assessed by F-FDG PET/CT could be other crucial components in the effort to tailor treatment to an individual patient, providing valuable parameters to guide the selection of the most appropriate management schedule for an individual. We present 1 representative case describing how FDG PET/CT can assist in clinical management decisions for treatment of malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvis.

  19. FDG PET/CT images demonstrating epididymo-orchitis in a patient with HIV, acute kidney injury and known epididymo-orchitis on scrotal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Sameer; Dharmaraja, Arjuna; Mehta, Pareen; Colletti, Patrick M; Wassef, Heidi

    2015-02-01

    A 52-year-old man with HIV was referred for an F-FDG PET/CT scan for the cause of kidney injury. FDG PET/CT scan revealed increased renal cortical FDG activity, which can be seen in HIV nephropathy or acute interstitial nephritis. Diffuse increased FDG uptake was demonstrated within the right testicle and epididymis, consistent with the patient's known right epididymo-orchitis, as diagnosed on ultrasound 1 week before admission. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes with increased FDG activity were also found within the right inguinal and external iliac nodal chains, which were presumed to be reactive. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with symptomatic improvement.

  20. FDG PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Susan E; Shulkin, Barry L; Gelfand, Michael J; McCarville, M Beth

    2017-09-08

    Osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric malignant bone tumor, frequently surgically managed with limb salvage rather than amputation. Local recurrences are seen in up to 9% of osteosarcoma patients, with CT and MRI imaging often limited by metal artifacts. To describe the [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences with correlation to findings on other imaging modalities. A retrospective review of pediatric osteosarcoma patients imaged with FDG PET/CT was performed in patients with pathologically proven local recurrences. FDG PET/CT findings were reviewed and correlated with available comparison imaging studies. Ten local osteosarcoma recurrences in eight pediatric osteosarcoma patients were imaged with FDG PET/CT. All eight patients had a local recurrence after limb salvage; two patients had a second local recurrence after amputation. All local recurrences were seen with FDG PET/CT, demonstrating solid (n=5) or peripheral/nodular (n=5) FDG uptake patterns. Maximum standard uptake values (SUVs) ranged from 3.0 to 15.7. In five recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and MRI, MRI was limited or nondiagnostic in three. In four recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and bone scan, the bone scan was negative in three. Local osteosarcoma recurrences are well visualized by FDG PET/CT, demonstrating either solid or peripheral/nodular FDG uptake with a wide range of maximum SUVs. FDG PET/CT demonstrates the full extent of local recurrences, while MRI can be limited by artifact from metallic hardware. PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than bone scan in detecting local osteosarcoma recurrences.

  1. PET/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Jong, I J; De Haan, T D; Wiegman, E M; Van Den Bergh, A C M; Pruim, J; Breeuwsma, A J

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the corner stone treatments for patients with prostate cancer. Especially for locally advanced tumors radiotherapy +/- adjuvant androgen deprivation treatment is standard of care. This brings up the need for accurate assessment of extra prostatic tumor growth and/or the presence of nodal metastases for selection of the optimal radiation dose and treatment volume. Morphological imaging like transrectal ultra sound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used but are limited in their accuracy in detecting extra prostatic extension and nodal metastases. In this article we present a structured review of the literature on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients with emphasis on: 1) the pretreatment assessment of extra prostatic tumor extension, nodal and distant metastases; 2) the intraprostatic tumor characterization and radiotherapy treatment planning; and 3) treatment evaluation and the use of PET/CT in guidance of salvage treatment. PET/CT is not an appropriate imaging technique for accurate T-staging of prostate cancer prior to radiotherapy. Although macroscopic disease beyond the prostatic capsule and into the periprostatic fat or in seminal vesicle is often accurately detected, the microscopic extension of prostate cancer remains undetected. Choline PET/CT holds a great potential as a single step diagnostic procedure of lymph nodes and skeleton, which could facilitate radiotherapy treatment planning. At present the use of PET/CT for treatment planning in radiotherapy is still experimental. Choline PET based tumor delineation is not yet standardized and different segmentation-algorithms are under study. However, dose escalation using dose-painting is feasible with only limited increases of the doses to the bladder and rectum wall. PET/CT using either acetate or choline is able to detect recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy but stratification of patients

  2. In-vivo quantification of hypoxic and metabolic status of NSCLC tumors using [18F]HX4 and [18F]FDG PET/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zegers, Catharina M.L.; van Elmpt, Wouter; Reymen, Bart; Even, Aniek J.G.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Öllers, Michel C.; Hoebers, Frank J.P.; Houben, Ruud M.A.; Eriksson, Jonas; Windhorst, Albert D.; Mottaghy, Felix M.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased tumor metabolism and hypoxia are related to poor prognosis in solid tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PET imaging is a non-invasive technique which is frequently used to visualize and quantify tumor metabolism and hypoxia. The aim of this study was to perform an extensive comparison of tumor metabolism using FDG PET and hypoxia using HX4 PET imaging. Materials/Methods FDG- and HX4-PET/CT images of 25 NSCLC patients were co-registered. At a global tumor-level, HX4 and FDG parameters were extracted from the gross-tumor-volume. The HX4-high fraction and high volume were defined using a tumor-to-blood ratio>1.4. For FDG-high fraction and high volume a SUV>50% of SUVmax was used. We evaluated the spatial correlation between HX4 and FDG uptake within the tumor, to quantify the (mis)match between volumes with a high FDG and high HX4 uptake. Results At a tumor-level, significant correlations were observed between FDG and HX4 parameters. For the primary GTV, the HX4-high fraction was three times smaller compared to the FDG-high fraction. In 53% of the primary lesions, less than 1cm3 of the HX4-high-volume was outside the FDG-high volume; for 37% this volume was 1.9–12cm3. Remarkably, a distinct uptake pattern was observed in 11%, with large hypoxic volumes localized outside the FDG-high volume. Conclusion Hypoxic tumor volumes are smaller than metabolic active volumes. Approximately half of the lesions showed a good spatial correlation between the PET tracers. In the other cases, a (partial)mismatch was observed. The addition of HX4-PET imaging has the potential to individualize patient treatment. PMID:25316821

  3. PET/CT in paediatric malignancies - An update

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Tewari, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging modality in adult oncological practice. Its role in childhood malignancies needs to be discussed as paediatric malignancies differ from adults in tumor subtypes and they have different tumor biology and FDG uptake patterns. This is also compounded by smaller body mass, dosimetric restrictions, and physiological factors that can affect the FDG uptake. It calls for careful planning of the PET study, preparing the child, the parents, and expertise of nuclear physicians in reporting pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies. In a broad perspective, FDG-PET/CT has been used in staging, assessment of therapy response, identifying metastases and as a follow-up tool in a wide variety of pediatric malignancies. This review outlines the role of PET/CT in childhood malignancies other than hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and leukemia. PMID:27688605

  4. Clinical impact and diagnostic accuracy of 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) brain imaging in patients with cognitive impairment: a tertiary centre experience in the UK.

    PubMed

    Motara, H; Olusoga, T; Russell, G; Jamieson, S; Ahmed, S; Brindle, N; Pillai, A; Scarsbrook, A F; Patel, C N; Chowdhury, F U

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical impact of combined 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) brain imaging performed in selected patients with cognitive impairment at a tertiary referral centre in the UK, and to assess the accuracy of FDG PET/CT to correctly establish the diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia (AD) in "real-world" clinical practice. Using an institutional radiology database, 136 patients were identified for inclusion in the study. FDG PET/CT was performed using a standard technique and interpreted by dual-trained radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Standardised questionnaires were sent to the referring clinicians to establish the final clinical diagnosis and to obtain information about the clinical impact of FDG PET/CT. There was a 72% questionnaire return (98/136), with mean patient follow-up of 471 (standard deviation 205) days. FDG PET/CT had an impact on patient management in 81%, adding confidence to the pre-test diagnosis in 43%, changing the pre-test diagnosis in 35%, reducing the need for further investigations in 42%, and resulting in a change in therapy in 32%. There was substantial correlation between the PET/CT diagnosis and final clinical diagnosis with a correlation (k) coefficient of 0.78 (p<0.0001). The accuracy of FDG PET/CT in diagnosis of AD was 94% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 87-99), with a sensitivity of 87% (95% CI: 75-92) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI: 87-99). FDG PET/CT brain imaging has a significant clinical impact when performed selectively in patients with cognitive impairment and shows high accuracy in the diagnosis of AD in "real-world" clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detection of primary site in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making: experience from a tertiary care centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous group of tumours which usually originate from small, occult primary sites and are characterized by over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Ga-68-labeled-somatostatin-analogues have shown superiority over other modalities for imaging of NETs. The objective of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detecting the primary site in patients with metastatic NETs of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making in such patients. Methods Between December 2011 and September 2014, a total of 263 patients underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT study in our department for various indications. Out of them, 68 patients (45 males, 23 females; mean age, 54.9±10.7 years; range, 31–78 years) with histopathologically proven metastatic NETs and unknown primary site (CUP-NET) on conventional imaging, who underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan as part of their clinical work-up were included for analyses. Histopathology (wherever available) and/or follow-up imaging were taken as reference standard. Quantitative estimation of SSTR expression in the form of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of detected primary and metastatic sites was calculated. Follow-up data of individual patients was collected through careful survey of hospital medical records and telephonic interviews. Results Maximum patients presented to our department with hepatic metastasis (50 out of 68 patients) and grade I NETs (>50%). Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan identified primary sites in 40 out of these 68 patients i.e., in approximately 59% patients. Identified primary sites were: small intestine [19], rectum [8], pancreas [7], stomach [4], lung [1] and one each in rare sites in kidney and prostate. In one patient, 2 primary sites were identified (one each in stomach and duodenum). Mean SUVmax of the detected primary sites was

  6. Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detection of primary site in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making: experience from a tertiary care centre in India.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, Ankur; Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S; Mahajan, Harsh

    2016-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous group of tumours which usually originate from small, occult primary sites and are characterized by over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Ga-68-labeled-somatostatin-analogues have shown superiority over other modalities for imaging of NETs. The objective of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detecting the primary site in patients with metastatic NETs of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making in such patients. Between December 2011 and September 2014, a total of 263 patients underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT study in our department for various indications. Out of them, 68 patients (45 males, 23 females; mean age, 54.9±10.7 years; range, 31-78 years) with histopathologically proven metastatic NETs and unknown primary site (CUP-NET) on conventional imaging, who underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan as part of their clinical work-up were included for analyses. Histopathology (wherever available) and/or follow-up imaging were taken as reference standard. Quantitative estimation of SSTR expression in the form of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of detected primary and metastatic sites was calculated. Follow-up data of individual patients was collected through careful survey of hospital medical records and telephonic interviews. Maximum patients presented to our department with hepatic metastasis (50 out of 68 patients) and grade I NETs (>50%). Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan identified primary sites in 40 out of these 68 patients i.e., in approximately 59% patients. Identified primary sites were: small intestine [19], rectum [8], pancreas [7], stomach [4], lung [1] and one each in rare sites in kidney and prostate. In one patient, 2 primary sites were identified (one each in stomach and duodenum). Mean SUVmax of the detected primary sites was 25.1±18.0 (median: 16

  7. Staging of Primary Abdominal Lymphomas: Comparison of Whole-Body MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Alessandro; Buemi, Francesco; Quagliozzi, Martina; Lombardi, Mariangela; Santagostino, Alberto; Sacchetti, Gian Mauro; Carriero, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences (WB-DW-MRI) with that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the staging of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Methods. This retrospective study involved 17 untreated patients with primary abdominal gastrointestinal lymphoma. All patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and WB-DW-MRI. Histopathology findings or at least 6 months of clinical and radiological follow-up was the gold standard. The Musshoff-modified Ann Arbor system was used for staging, and diagnostic