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Sample records for nanoparticle pulmonary toxicity

  1. Pulmonary applications and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Card, Jeffrey W.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Bonner, James C.; Nestmann, Earle R.

    2008-01-01

    Because of their unique physicochemical properties, engineered nanoparticles have the potential to significantly impact respiratory research and medicine by means of improving imaging capability and drug delivery, among other applications. These same properties, however, present potential safety concerns, and there is accumulating evidence to suggest that nanoparticles may exert adverse effects on pulmonary structure and function. The respiratory system is susceptible to injury resulting from inhalation of gases, aerosols, and particles, and also from systemic delivery of drugs, chemicals, and other compounds to the lungs via direct cardiac output to the pulmonary arteries. As such, it is a prime target for the possible toxic effects of engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the potential usefulness of nanoparticles and nanotechnology in respiratory research and medicine and to highlight important issues and recent data pertaining to nanoparticle-related pulmonary toxicity. PMID:18641236

  2. Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, Brian Christopher

    that carbon blacks contain free radical and other surface functionality as manufactured, and that exposure to ozone further functionalizes the surface. Samples of carbon black that have been exposed to ozone react with their ambient environment so that acid anhydride and cyclic ether functionality hydrolyze to form carboxylic acid functionality, observable by transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Persistent free radical content, but not free radical content from ozone exposure, may mediate the toxic response of cells to carbon blacks in vitro. Results showed that macrophages exposed to carbon blacks that had been exposed to ozone were not less viable in vitro than macrophages exposed to carbon blacks as manufactured because the free radical content that resulted from ozone exposure was not persistent in an aqueous medium. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to ozonated carbon blacks and ozone was less lethal to macrophages than carbon black exposure alone, possibly because the ozone oxidatively preconditioned the macrophages to resist oxidative stress. The nature of redox-active iron species on the surface of iron-loaded synthetic carbon particles was explored. The particles had been shown in previous studies to provoke an inflammatory response involving the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, which was correlated with their production of hydroxyl free radicals via the Fenton reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. It was found that the source of bioavailable Fenton-active iron on the surfaces of the particles was fluoride species that were byproducts of a step in the synthetic process. Fluoride ligated the iron already on the surface, forming a complex that resisted precipitation in the biological medium and thus made the iron more bioavailable. The results of this thesis aim to clarify whether the size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles should be considered more closely as criteria with which to develop better environmental controls

  3. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26828483

  4. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-27

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation.

  5. Pulmonary surfactant mitigates silver nanoparticle toxicity in human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Leo, Bey Fen; Chen, Shu; Abraham-Thomas, Nisha; Thorley, Andrew J; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2016-09-01

    Accompanying increased commercial applications and production of silver nanomaterials is an increased probability of human exposure, with inhalation a key route. Nanomaterials that deposit in the pulmonary alveolar region following inhalation will interact firstly with pulmonary surfactant before they interact with the alveolar epithelium. It is therefore critical to understand the effects of human pulmonary surfactant when evaluating the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of AgNPs on human alveolar type-I-like epithelial (TT1) cells in the absence and presence of Curosurf(®) (a natural pulmonary surfactant substitute), hypothesising that the pulmonary surfactant would act to modify toxicity. We demonstrated that 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs induce toxicity in human alveolar type I-like epithelial cells and, in agreement with our hypothesis, that pulmonary surfactant acts to mitigate this toxicity, possibly through reducing AgNP dissolution into cytotoxic Ag(+) ions. For example, IL-6 and IL-8 release by TT1 cells significantly increased 10.7- and 35-fold, respectively (P<0.01), 24h after treatment with 25μg/ml AgNPs. In contrast, following pre-incubation of AgNPs with Curosurf(®), this effect was almost completely abolished. We further determined that the mechanism of this toxicity is likely associated with Ag(+) ion release and lysosomal disruption, but not with increased reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides a critical understanding of the toxicity of AgNPs in target human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells and the role of pulmonary surfactant in mitigating this toxicity. The observations reported have important implications for the manufacture and application of AgNPs, in particular for applications involving use of aerosolised AgNPs.

  6. Simple in vitro models can predict pulmonary toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Giannakou, Christina; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Vermeulen, Jolanda; van Loveren, Henk; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2016-08-01

    To study the effects of nanomaterials after inhalation, a large number of in vitro lung models have been reported in literature. Although the in vitro models contribute to the reduction of animal studies, insufficient data exists to determine the predictive value of these in vitro models for the in vivo situation. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between in vitro and in vivo data by comparing the dose metrics of silver nanoparticles in an in vitro lung model of increasing complexity to our previously published in vivo inhalation study. In vivo, the previously published study showed that the alveolar dose expressed as particle surface area is the most suitable dose metric to describe the toxicity of silver nanoparticles after inhalation. The results of the present study show that particle surface area is a suitable dose metric to describe the effects of silver nanoparticles when using a simple monolayer of lung epithelial cells. The dose metric shifted from particle surface area to particle mass when adding an increasing number of macrophages. In addition, a co-culture of endothelial cells, epithelial cells and macrophages on a Transwell® insert correlated less well to the in vivo results compared to the epithelial monolayer. We conclude that for studying the acute pulmonary toxicity of nanoparticles simple in vitro models using an epithelial monolayer better predict the in vivo response compared to complex co-culture models.

  7. Evaluation of Pulmonary Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Following Inhalation and Intratracheal Instillation

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We conducted inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in order to examine their pulmonary toxicity. F344 rats were received intratracheal instillation at 0.2 or 1 mg of ZnO nanoparticles with a primary diameter of 35 nm that were well-dispersed in distilled water. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed at three days, one week, one month, three months, and six months after the instillation. As the inhalation study, rats were exposed to a concentration of inhaled ZnO nanoparticles (2 and 10 mg/m3) for four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The same endpoints as in the intratracheal instillation study were analyzed at three days, one month, and three months after the end of the exposure. In the intratracheal instillation study, both the 0.2 and the 1.0 mg ZnO groups had a transient increase in the total cell and neutrophil count in the BALF and in the expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2, chemokine for neutrophil, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker, in the BALF. In the inhalation study, transient increases in total cell and neutrophil count, CINC-1,-2 and HO-1 in the BALF were observed in the high concentration groups. Neither of the studies of ZnO nanoparticles showed persistent inflammation in the rat lung, suggesting that well-dispersed ZnO nanoparticles have low toxicity. PMID:27490535

  8. Evaluation of Pulmonary Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Following Inhalation and Intratracheal Instillation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We conducted inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in order to examine their pulmonary toxicity. F344 rats were received intratracheal instillation at 0.2 or 1 mg of ZnO nanoparticles with a primary diameter of 35 nm that were well-dispersed in distilled water. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed at three days, one week, one month, three months, and six months after the instillation. As the inhalation study, rats were exposed to a concentration of inhaled ZnO nanoparticles (2 and 10 mg/m³) for four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The same endpoints as in the intratracheal instillation study were analyzed at three days, one month, and three months after the end of the exposure. In the intratracheal instillation study, both the 0.2 and the 1.0 mg ZnO groups had a transient increase in the total cell and neutrophil count in the BALF and in the expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2, chemokine for neutrophil, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker, in the BALF. In the inhalation study, transient increases in total cell and neutrophil count, CINC-1,-2 and HO-1 in the BALF were observed in the high concentration groups. Neither of the studies of ZnO nanoparticles showed persistent inflammation in the rat lung, suggesting that well-dispersed ZnO nanoparticles have low toxicity. PMID:27490535

  9. Evaluation of Pulmonary Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Following Inhalation and Intratracheal Instillation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    We conducted inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in order to examine their pulmonary toxicity. F344 rats were received intratracheal instillation at 0.2 or 1 mg of ZnO nanoparticles with a primary diameter of 35 nm that were well-dispersed in distilled water. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed at three days, one week, one month, three months, and six months after the instillation. As the inhalation study, rats were exposed to a concentration of inhaled ZnO nanoparticles (2 and 10 mg/m³) for four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The same endpoints as in the intratracheal instillation study were analyzed at three days, one month, and three months after the end of the exposure. In the intratracheal instillation study, both the 0.2 and the 1.0 mg ZnO groups had a transient increase in the total cell and neutrophil count in the BALF and in the expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2, chemokine for neutrophil, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker, in the BALF. In the inhalation study, transient increases in total cell and neutrophil count, CINC-1,-2 and HO-1 in the BALF were observed in the high concentration groups. Neither of the studies of ZnO nanoparticles showed persistent inflammation in the rat lung, suggesting that well-dispersed ZnO nanoparticles have low toxicity.

  10. Pulmonary Toxicity of Instilled Silver Nanoparticles: Influence of Size, Coating and Rat Strain

    PubMed Central

    Seiffert, Joanna; Hussain, Farhana; Wiegman, Coen; Li, Feng; Bey, Leo; Baker, Warren; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary P.; Chang, Yan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhu, Jie; Tetley, Terry D.; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Particle size and surface chemistry are potential determinants of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) respiratory toxicity that may also depend on the lung inflammatory state. We compared the effects of intratracheally-administered AgNPs (20nm and 110nm; polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate-capped; 0.1 mg/Kg) in Brown-Norway (BN) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In BN rats, there was both a neutrophilic and eosinophilic response, while in SD rats, there was a neutrophilic response at day 1, greatest for the 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs. Eosinophilic cationic protein was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in BN and SD rats on day 1. BAL protein and malondialdehyde levels were increased in BN rats at 1 and 7 days, and BAL KC, CCL11 and IL-13 levels at day 1, with increased expression of CCL11 in lung tissue. Pulmonary resistance increased and compliance decreased at day 1, with persistence at day 7. The 20nm, but not the 110 nm, AgNPs increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness on day 1, which continued at day 7 for the citrate-capped AgNPs only. The 20nm versus the 110 nm size were more proinflammatory in terms of neutrophil influx, but there was little difference between the citrate-capped versus the PVP-capped AgNPs. AgNPs can induce pulmonary eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, features characteristic of asthma. PMID:25747867

  11. Toxicity evaluation of engineered nanoparticles for medical applications using pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Guadagnini, Rina; Moreau, Kevin; Hussain, Salik; Marano, Francelyne; Boland, Sonja

    2015-05-01

    There are a multitude of nanoparticles (NPs) which have shown great potentials for medical applications. A few of them are already used for lung therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. However, there are few toxicological studies which determine possible adverse pulmonary responses. It is thus important to propose in vitro screening strategies to evaluate the pulmonary toxicity of NPs used in nanomedicine. Our goal was to determine the cellular effects of several biomedical NPs with different physico-chemical characteristics (chemical nature, size and coating) to establish suitable tests and useful benchmark NPs. The effects of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), silica, iron oxide and titanium dioxide NPs were studied using human bronchial (16HBE) and alveolar epithelial cells (A549). We evaluated cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and pro-inflammatory response in both cell lines. We demonstrated that PLGA NPs are good candidates for negative control NPs and SiO2 NPs were revealed to be the best benchmark NPs. Coating of Fe3O4 with sodium oleate, a known biocompatible compound, led to an unexpected increase in cytotoxicity. Moreover, 16HBE cells are more sensitive than A549 cells and propidium iodide uptake is a more sensitive cytotoxicity test than WST-1. The measurement of oxidative stress does not systematically allow us to predict cellular responses and different other cellular endpoints should also be addressed. We conclude that a battery of assays and cell lines are necessary to accurately evaluate the pulmonary effects of NPs and that PLGA and SiO2 NPs are suitable candidates respectively for negative and positive controls. PMID:24286383

  12. Identification of the appropriate dose metric for pulmonary inflammation of silver nanoparticles in an inhalation toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Cassee, Flemming R; Fokkens, Paul H B; de la Fonteyne, Liset J J; Oomen, Agnes G; Krystek, Petra; de Jong, Wim H; van Loveren, Henk; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that induction of pulmonary toxicity by nanoparticles of the same chemical composition depends on particle size, which is likely in part due to differences in lung deposition. Particle size mostly determines whether nanoparticles reach the alveoli, and where they might induce toxicity. For the risk assessment of nanomaterials, there is need for a suitable dose metric that accounts for differences in effects between different sized nanoparticles of the same chemical composition. The aim of the present study is to determine the most suitable dose metric to describe the effects of silver nanoparticles after short-term inhalation. Rats were exposed to different concentrations (ranging from 41 to 1105 µg silver/m(3) air) of 18, 34, 60 and 160 nm silver particles for four consecutive days and sacrificed at 24 h and 7 days after exposure. We observed a concentration-dependent increase in pulmonary toxicity parameters like cell counts and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. All results were analysed using the measured exposure concentrations in air, the measured internal dose in the lung and the estimated alveolar dose. In addition, we analysed the results based on mass, particle number and particle surface area. Our study indicates that using the particle surface area as a dose metric in the alveoli, the dose-response effects of the different silver particle sizes overlap for most pulmonary toxicity parameters. We conclude that the alveolar dose expressed as particle surface area is the most suitable dose metric to describe the toxicity of silver nanoparticles after inhalation.

  13. Pulmonary toxicity and kinetic study of Cy5.5-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by optical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Park, Sue Nie; Yu, Mi Kyung; Jon, Sangyong; Jeong, Jayoung

    2009-08-15

    Recent advances in the development of nanotechnology and devices now make it possible to accurately deliver drugs or genes to the lung. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used as contrast agents, thermal therapy for cancer, and be made to concentrate to target sites through an external magnetic field. However, these advantages may also become problematic when taking into account safety and toxicological factors. This study demonstrated the pulmonary toxicity and kinetic profile of anti-biofouling polymer coated, Cy5.5-conjugated thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TCL-SPION) by optical imaging. Negatively charged, 36 nm-sized, Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was prepared for optical imaging probe. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was intratracheally instilled into the lung by a non-surgical method. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION slightly induced pulmonary inflammation. The instilled nanoparticles were distributed mainly in the lung and excreted in the urine via glomerular filtration. Urinary excretion was peaked at 3 h after instillation. No toxicity was found under the concentration of 1.8 mg/kg and the half-lives of nanoparticles in the lung and urine were estimated to be about 14.4 {+-} 0.54 h and 24.7 {+-} 1.02 h, respectively. Although further studies are required, our results showed that Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION can be a good candidate for use in pulmonary delivery vehicles and diagnostic probes.

  14. COMPARATIVE IN VITRO PULMONARY TOXICITY OF ENGINEERED, MANUFACTURED, AND ENVIRONMENTAL NANOPARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials display many unique physicochemical properties for a variety of applications and due to their novel propertiesapplications may have unique routes of exposure and toxicity. This study examines the: 1) ability of the MTT assay to generate false positives or...

  15. Toxicity of therapeutic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A; Bantz, Kyle C; Love, Sara A; Marquis, Bryce J; Haynes, Christy L

    2009-02-01

    A total of six nanotherapeutic formulations are already approved for medical use and more are in the approval pipeline currently. Despite the massive research effort in nanotherapeutic materials, there is relatively little information about the toxicity of these materials or the tools needed to assess this toxicity. Recently, the scientific community has begun to respond to the paucity of information by investing in the field of nanoparticle toxicology. This review is intended to provide an overview of the techniques needed to assess toxicity of these therapeutic nanoparticles and to summarize the current state of the field. We begin with background on the toxicological assessment techniques used currently as well as considerations in nanoparticle dosing. The toxicological research overview is divided into the most common applications of therapeutic nanoparticles: drug delivery, photodynamic therapy and bioimaging. We end with a perspective section discussing the current technological gaps and promising research aimed at addressing those gaps.

  16. [Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo

    2012-05-01

    We introduced the report on the pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials as a national project in Japan conducted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO project). Well-characterized and well-dispersed industrial nanomaterials were used in this project. Using multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), we conducted intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies. At a low dose (0.2 mg/rat) and a high dose (1 mg/rat) of almost individual MWCNTs, transient and persistent inflammatory responses were induced in the lungs following intratracheal instillation. Well-dispersed MWCNTs at a low concentration (0.37 mg/m3) did not induce pulmonary inflammation. Using single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we also conducted both studies. At low (0.2 mg/rat) and high doses (0.4 mg/rat) of well-dispersed SWCNTs, persistent inflammatory responses were induced in the lungs following intratracheal instillation. Well-dispersed MWCNTs at low and high concentrations (0.03 mg/m3 and 0.13 mg/m3, respectively) did not induce pulmonary inflammation. On the basis of these data from mainly inhalation studies, the acceptable exposure concentration of carbon nanotubes is proposed to be 0.03 mg/m3 in Japan.

  17. Toxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Medici, Serenella; Ledda, Alessia; Nurchi, Valeria Marina; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Peana, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays more than thousands of different nanoparticles are known, though no well-defined guidelines to evaluate their potential toxicity and to control their exposure are fully provided. The way of entry of nanoparticles together with their specificities such as chemistry, chemical composition, size, shape or morphology, surface charge and area can influence their biological activities and effects. A specific property may give rise to either a safe particle or to a dangerous one. The small size allows nanoparticles to enter the body by crossing several barriers, to pass into the blood stream and lymphatic system from where they can reach organs and tissues and strictly interact with biological structures, thus damaging their normal functions in different ways. This review provides a summary of what is known on the toxicology related to the specificity of nanoparticles, both as technological tools or ambient pollutants. The aim is to highlight their potential hazard and to provide a balanced update on all the important questions and directions that should be focused in the near future.

  18. Lung toxicity of biodegradable nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fattal, Elias; Grabowski, Nadége; Mura, Simona; Vergnaud, Juliette; Tsapis, Nicolas; Hillaireau, Hervé

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable nanoparticles exhibit high potentialities for local or systemic drug delivery through lung administration making them attractive as nanomedicine carriers. However, since particulate matter or some inorganic manufactured nanoparticles exposed to lung cells have provoked cytotoxic effects, inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, it becomes important to investigate nanomedicine toxicity towards the lungs. This is the reason why, in the present review, the behavior of biodegradable nanoparticles towards the different parts of the respiratory tract as well as the toxicological consequences, measured on several models in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo, are described. Taken all together, the different studies carried out so far conclude on no or slight toxicity of biodegradable nanoparticles.

  19. Nanoparticle toxicity and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevenslik, T.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have provided significant advancements in cancer treatment. But as in any technology, there is a darkside. Experiments have shown NPs in body fluids pose a health risk by causing DNA damage that in of itself may lead to cancer. To avoid the dilemma that NPs are toxic to both cancer cells and DNA alike, the mechanism of NP toxicity must be understood so that the safe use of NPs may go forward. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) of peroxide and hydroxyl radicals damage the DNA by chemical reaction, but require NPs provide energies of about 5 eV not possible by surface effects. Only electromagnetic (EM) radiations beyond ultraviolet (UV) levels may explain the toxicity of NPs. Indeed, experiments show DNA damage from <100 nm NPs mimic the same reaction pathways of conventional sources of ionizing radiation, Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize that NPs produce their own source of UV radiation, albeit at low intensity. Ionizing radiation from NPs at UV levels is consistent with the theory of QED induced EM radiation. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics. By this theory, fine < 100 nm NPs absorb low frequency thermal energy in the far infrared (FIR) from collisions with the water molecules in body fluids. Since quantum mechanics (QM) precludes NPs from having specific heat, absorbed EM collision energy cannot be conserved by an increase in temperature. But total internal reflection (TIR) momentarily confines the absorbed EM energy within the NP. Conservation proceeds by the creation of QED photons by frequency up-conversion of the absorbed EM energy to the TIR confinement frequency, typically beyond the UV. Subsequently, the QED photons upon scattering from atoms within the NP avoid TIR confinement and leak UV to the surroundings, thereby explaining the remarkable toxicity of NPs. But QED radiation need not be limited to natural or man-made NPs. Extensions suggest UV radiation is produced from biological NPs within the body, e.g., enzyme induced

  20. Nanoparticles: Is Toxicity a Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pragna

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology involving manipulation of atoms and molecules at the nanoscale is one of the frontier areas of research in modern science. During the last few years, nanotechnology has witnessed breakthroughs in the fields of medicine, environment, therapeutics, drug development and biotechnology. This is due to the unique properties of nanomaterials (e.g. chemical, mechanical, optical, magnetic, and biological) which make them desirable for commercial and medical applications. Considering the theory and practice of using nanoparticles, nanotechnology has a great potential in improving treatment of various disorders and in vitro diagnostics. However, there is not much information available on the toxicity of nanoparticles in relation to human health. Toxic effect of nanomaterials on humans is the primary concern of the health industry. Nanomaterials are able to cross biological membranes and access cells, tissues and organs that larger-sized particles normally cannot. Nanomaterials can gain access to the blood stream via inhalation or ingestion. This may lead to both genotoxicity and biochemical toxicity. In this review we try to show which types, sizes and concentrations of nanoparticles are safe for human use and this will help in developing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic models using nanoparticles.

  1. Evaluation of the role of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the pulmonary and the hepatic toxicity induced by cerium oxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalabotu, Siva Krishna

    The field of nanotechnology is rapidly progressing with potential applications in the automobile, healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, textiles, information technology, and environmental sectors. Nanomaterials are engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nanometers or less. With increased applications of nanotechnology, there are increased chances of exposure to manufactured nanomaterials. Recent reports on the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials have given scientific and regulatory agencies concerns over the safety of nanomaterials. Specifically, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has identified fourteen high priority nanomaterials for study. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles are one among the high priority group. Recent data suggest that CeO2 nanoparticles may be toxic to lung cell lines in vitro and lung tissues in vivo. Other work has proposed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the toxicity; however, the exact mechanism of the toxicity, has to our knowledge, not been investigated. Similarly, it is not clear whether CeO2 nanoparticles exhibit systemic toxicity. Here, we investigate whether pulmonary exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles is associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the lungs and liver of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our data suggest that the intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles can cause an increased lung weight to body weight ratio. Changes in lung weights were associated with the accumulation of cerium in the lungs, elevations in serum inflammatory markers, an increased Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, elevated caspase-3 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and diminished phosphorylation of ERK1/2-MAPK. Our findings from the study evaluating the possible translocation of CeO2 nanoparticles from the lungs to the liver suggest that CeO 2 nanoparticle exposure was associated with increased liver ceria levels, elevations in serum alanine transaminase

  2. Right or Left: The Role of Nanoparticles in Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xuefei; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Chunying; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rapid development of the nanotechnology industry in the last decade, nanoparticles (NPs) are omnipresent in our everyday life today. Many nanomaterials have been engineered for medical purposes. These purposes include therapy for pulmonary diseases. On other hand, people are endeavoring to develop nanomaterials for improvement or replacement of traditional therapies. On the other hand, nanoparticles, as foreign material in human bodies, are reported to have potential adverse effects on the lung, including oxidase stress, inflammation, fibrosis and genotoxicity. Further, these damages could induce pulmonary diseases and even injuries in other tissues. It seems that nanoparticles may exert two-sided effects. Toxic effects of nanomaterials should be considered when their use is developed for therapies. Hence this review will attempt to summarize the two-side roles of nanoparticles in both therapies for pulmonary diseases and initiation of lung diseases and even secondary diseases caused by lung injuries. Determinants of these effects such as physicochemical properties of nanoparticles will also be discussed. PMID:25268624

  3. Novel Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Rachel Jennifer

    The lung is an important target for gene and drug therapy of many diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF), tubuerculosis (TB) and lung cancer. In fact, the pulmonary route has been employed as a means of delivering drugs for centuries, dating back 4000 years to India where inhaled vapors were used for medicinal purpose. Currently, pulmonary administration of small, hydrophobic drugs leads to rapid local and systemic absorption. However, delivery of large biomacromolecules, such as therapeutic genes, has not yet been accomplished. Here, I test the hypothesis that a rationally engineered nanoparticle (NP) vector can improve delivery of large biomacromolecules. . In this dissertation I tested this hypothesis using a hybrid NP delivery system consisting of a blend of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE), a cationic polymer that is particularly useful for delivery of nucleic acids.. PBAE/PLGA nanoparticles (15% PBAE) loaded with plasmid DNA were surface modified with cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) via a PEGylated phospholipid linker. This optimized NP formulation was able to induce substantial intracellular uptake and transfect lung epithelial cells in vitro while imparting minimal cellular toxicity. In order to determine the most effective method to deliver these NPs to the lung I used fluorescently labeled particles to study the biodistribution of particles after administration to the lung of mice via various administration routes. I determined that the intranasal route was most effective. I further investigated this route and determined that an average of 37.1 +/- 15.1 % of lung cells had NP association after 4hrs. I also investigated the association of particles with different lung cell types like macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells and determined that our best particle formulations associated with approximately 80% of both of these cell types. To demonstrate the ability of the

  4. Amiodarone pulmonary toxicity: cytopathology, ultrastructure, and immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bedrossian, C W; Warren, C J; Ohar, J; Bhan, R

    1997-10-01

    One hundred ninety cardiac patients were prospectively enrolled in an amiodarone protocol. Over a 10-year period, 16 patients developed new or progressive respiratory symptoms while taking amiodarone. These symptoms included dyspnea associated with abnormal chest radiographs or new or worsening abnormalities on pulmonary function testing. Specimens for microscopic examination were obtained by fiberoptic bronchoscopy with transbronchial lung biopsy (TBB), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), open lung biopsy (OLB), or autopsy. Large foamy macrophages with characteristic lamellated cytoplasmic inclusions were noted in all specimens, regardless of other evidence of pulmonary toxicity, suggesting that foamy macrophages represent a routine drug effect. Foamy macrophages were not present in BAL specimens from 53 normal controls and were rarely seen in specimens from 27 patients who had other interstitial lung diseases. When present, the foamy macrophages were less prominent than those seen in specimens from patients receiving amiodarone. Fibrosis was noted in 11 of 16 histological specimens, whereas type II-cell-hyperplasia was observed in 7 of the 16 specimens. Four of the 16 patients with respiratory symptoms died, and their autopsy revealed a combination of foamy macrophages with fibrosis and type II cell hyperplasia reflective of amiodarone pulmonary toxicity. Hyperplastic type II cells were not found in the absence of fibrosis. Immunocytochemistry allowed differentiation between foamy macrophages and type II cells and represents a useful tool for future investigations of the pathogenesis of amiodarone-induced pulmonary disease.

  5. TOXICITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES TO DAPHNIA MAGNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relatively little is known regarding toxicity of nanoparticles in the environment. It is widely assumed that the toxicity of nanoparticles will be less than that of their metallic ions. Also the effect of organics on metal toxicity is well established. Presented here are the resu...

  6. Pulmonary Oxygen Toxicity: Investigation and Mentoring

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY At sea level oxygen is toxic to man when breathed for more than twenty-four hours at a percentage greater than about forty percent. Pulmonary pathology is the first manifestation in subjects with previously normal lungs. In patients with pre-existing lung disease the results are often additive. There is, however, great variation in response from subject to subject and between patients. Queen's Belfast and Harvard University Medical School have been the sites of seminal investigations. Mentoring at both universities is due to training at the University of Copenhagen. PMID:18269117

  7. Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of toxicity of engineered nanoparticles to representatives of various trophic levels, including bacteria, plants, and multicellular aquatic/terrestrial organisms, to highlight important challenges within the field of econanotoxicity, challenges that analytical chemists are expertly poised to address. PMID:23427995

  8. Liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating iloprost exhibit enhanced vasodilation in pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pritesh P; Leber, Regina; Nagaraj, Chandran; Leitinger, Gerd; Lehofer, Bernhard; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea; Prassl, Ruth; Marsh, Leigh M

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin analogues are standard therapeutic options for vasoconstrictive diseases, including pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud’s phenomenon. Although effective, these treatment strategies are expensive and have several side effects. To improve drug efficiency, we tested liposomal nanoparticles as carrier systems. In this study, we synthesized liposomal nanoparticles tailored for the prostacyclin analogue iloprost and evaluated their pharmacologic efficacy on mouse intrapulmonary arteries, using a wire myograph. The use of cationic lipids, stearylamine, or 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) in liposomes promoted iloprost encapsulation to at least 50%. The addition of cholesterol modestly reduced iloprost encapsulation. The liposomal nanoparticle formulations were tested for toxicity and pharmacologic efficacy in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. The liposomes did not affect the viability of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Compared with an equivalent concentration of free iloprost, four out of the six polymer-coated liposomal formulations exhibited significantly enhanced vasodilation of mouse pulmonary arteries. Iloprost that was encapsulated in liposomes containing the polymer polyethylene glycol exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation of arteries. Strikingly, half the concentration of iloprost in liposomes elicited similar pharmacologic efficacy as nonencapsulated iloprost. Cationic liposomes can encapsulate iloprost with high efficacy and can serve as potential iloprost carriers to improve its therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25045260

  9. Nanoparticles, nanotechnology and pulmonary nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A J; Cemlyn-Jones, J; Robalo Cordeiro, C

    2013-01-01

    The recently emergent field of Nanotechnology involves the production and use of structures at the nanoscale. Research at atomic, molecular or macromolecular levels, has led to new materials, systems and structures on a scale consisting of particles less than 100 nm and showing unique and unusual physical, chemical and biological properties, which has enabled new applications in diverse fields, creating a multimillion-dollar high-tech industry. Nanotechnologies have a wide variety of uses from nanomedicine, consumer goods, electronics, communications and computing to environmental applications, efficient energy sources, agriculture, water purification, textiles, and aerospace industry, among many others. The different characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, chemical properties, solubility and degree of agglomeration will determine their effects on biological systems and human health, and the likelihood of respiratory hazards. There are a number of new studies about the potential occupational and environmental effects of nanoparticles and general precautionary measures are now fully justified. Adverse respiratory effects include multifocal granulomas, peribronchial inflammation, progressive interstitial fibrosis, chronic inflammatory responses, collagen deposition and oxidative stress. The authors present an overview of the most important studies about respiratory nanotoxicology and the effects of nanoparticles and engineered nanomaterials on the respiratory system.

  10. Some inferences from in vivo experiments with metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: the pulmonary phagocytosis response, subchronic systemic toxicity and genotoxicity, regulatory proposals, searching for bioprotectors (a self-overview).

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, Boris A; Privalova, Larisa I; Sutunkova, Marina P; Gurvich, Vladimir B; Loginova, Nadezhda V; Minigalieva, Ilzira A; Kireyeva, Ekaterina P; Shur, Vladimir Y; Shishkina, Ekaterina V; Beikin, Ya B; Makeyev, Oleg H; Valamina, Irene E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to overview and summarize previously published results of our experiments on white rats exposed to either a single intratracheal instillation or repeated intraperitoneal injections of silver, gold, iron oxide, copper oxide, nickel oxide, and manganese oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in stable water suspensions without any chemical additives. Based on these results and some corroborating data of other researchers we maintain that these NPs are much more noxious on both cellular and systemic levels as compared with their 1 μm or even submicron counterparts. However, within the nanometer range the dependence of systemic toxicity on particle size is intricate and non-unique due to complex and often contra-directional relationships between the intrinsic biological aggressiveness of the specific NPs, on the one hand, and complex mechanisms that control their biokinetics, on the other. Our data testify to the high activity of the pulmonary phagocytosis of NPs deposited in airways. This fact suggests that safe levels of exposure to airborne NPs are possible in principle. However, there are no reliable foundations for establishing different permissible exposure levels for particles of different size within the nanometric range. For workroom air, such permissible exposure levels of metallic NP can be proposed at this stage, even if tentatively, based on a sufficiently conservative approach of decreasing approximately tenfold the exposure limits officially established for respective micro-scale industrial aerosols. It was shown that against the background of adequately composed combinations of some bioactive agents (comprising pectin, multivitamin-multimineral preparations, some amino acids, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid) the systemic toxicity and even genotoxicity of metallic NPs could be markedly attenuated. Therefore we believe that, along with decreasing NP-exposures, enhancing organisms' resistance to their adverse action with the help of

  11. Some inferences from in vivo experiments with metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: the pulmonary phagocytosis response, subchronic systemic toxicity and genotoxicity, regulatory proposals, searching for bioprotectors (a self-overview)

    PubMed Central

    Katsnelson, Boris A; Privalova, Larisa I; Sutunkova, Marina P; Gurvich, Vladimir B; Loginova, Nadezhda V; Minigalieva, Ilzira A; Kireyeva, Ekaterina P; Shur, Vladimir Y; Shishkina, Ekaterina V; Beikin, Ya B; Makeyev, Oleg H; Valamina, Irene E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to overview and summarize previously published results of our experiments on white rats exposed to either a single intratracheal instillation or repeated intraperitoneal injections of silver, gold, iron oxide, copper oxide, nickel oxide, and manganese oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in stable water suspensions without any chemical additives. Based on these results and some corroborating data of other researchers we maintain that these NPs are much more noxious on both cellular and systemic levels as compared with their 1 μm or even submicron counterparts. However, within the nanometer range the dependence of systemic toxicity on particle size is intricate and non-unique due to complex and often contra-directional relationships between the intrinsic biological aggressiveness of the specific NPs, on the one hand, and complex mechanisms that control their biokinetics, on the other. Our data testify to the high activity of the pulmonary phagocytosis of NPs deposited in airways. This fact suggests that safe levels of exposure to airborne NPs are possible in principle. However, there are no reliable foundations for establishing different permissible exposure levels for particles of different size within the nanometric range. For workroom air, such permissible exposure levels of metallic NP can be proposed at this stage, even if tentatively, based on a sufficiently conservative approach of decreasing approximately tenfold the exposure limits officially established for respective micro-scale industrial aerosols. It was shown that against the background of adequately composed combinations of some bioactive agents (comprising pectin, multivitamin-multimineral preparations, some amino acids, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid) the systemic toxicity and even genotoxicity of metallic NPs could be markedly attenuated. Therefore we believe that, along with decreasing NP-exposures, enhancing organisms’ resistance to their adverse action with the help

  12. Effects of silver and gold nanoparticles of different sizes in human pulmonary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ávalos, Alicia; Haza, Ana Isabel; Mateo, Diego; Morales, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    Silver and gold nanoparticles (Ag-AuNPs) are currently some of the most manufactured nanomaterials. Accordingly, the hazards associated with human exposure to Ag-AuNPs should be investigated to facilitate the risk assessment process. In particular, because pulmonary exposure to Ag-AuNPs occurs during handling of these nanoparticles, it is necessary to evaluate the toxic response in pulmonary cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro mechanisms of toxicity of different sizes of silver (4.7 and 42 nm) and gold nanoparticles (30, 50 and 90 nm) in human pulmonary fibroblasts (HPF). The toxicity was evaluated by observing cell viability and oxidative stress parameters. Data showed that AgNPs-induced cytotoxicity was size-dependent, whereas the AuNPs of the three sizes showed similar cytotoxicity. Silver nanoparticles of 4.7 nm were much more toxic than the large silver nanoparticles and the AuNPs. However, the pre-treatment with the antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, protected HPF cells against treatment with Ag-AuNPs. The oxidative stress parameters revealed significant increase in reactive oxygen species levels, depletion of glutathione level and slight, but not statistically significant inactivation of superoxide dismutase, suggesting generation of oxidative stress. Hence, care has to be taken while processing and formulating the Ag-AuNPs till their final finished product.

  13. Pulmonary toxicity of inhaled and intravenous talc.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, M A

    1990-07-01

    Talc (magnesium silicate) is a widely used, generally considered benign substance. It is principally used as an inert filler material in drug tablets or as a drying ingredient in baby powders. However, in both cases inappropriate use can lead to severe pulmonary toxicological responses. On the one hand, intravenous injection of 'solubilized', CNS active pills can produce microemboli in small pulmonary vessels. This can lead to various degrees of granuloma formation, compromised pulmonary function, or death. Overzealous application of baby powder can also produce severe pulmonary complications if the infant inspires the powder. Although the data are relatively scarce, a number of reports suggest the existence of a chronic problem in this area.

  14. Comparative toxicity of 24 manufactured nanoparticles in human alveolar epithelial and macrophage cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Lanone, Sophie; Rogerieux, Françoise; Geys, Jorina; Dupont, Aurélie; Maillot-Marechal, Emmanuelle; Boczkowski, Jorge; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Hoet, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background A critical issue with nanomaterials is the clear understanding of their potential toxicity. We evaluated the toxic effect of 24 nanoparticles of similar equivalent spherical diameter and various elemental compositions on 2 human pulmonary cell lines: A549 and THP-1. A secondary aim was to elaborate a generic experimental set-up that would allow the rapid screening of cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles. We therefore compared 2 cytotoxicity assays (MTT and Neutral Red) and analyzed 2 time points (3 and 24 hours) for each cell type and nanoparticle. When possible, TC50 (Toxic Concentration 50 i.e. nanoparticle concentration inducing 50% cell mortality) was calculated. Results The use of MTT assay on THP-1 cells exposed for 24 hours appears to be the most sensitive experimental design to assess the cytotoxic effect of one nanoparticle. With this experimental set-up, Copper- and Zinc-based nanoparticles appear to be the most toxic. Titania, Alumina, Ceria and Zirconia-based nanoparticles show moderate toxicity, and no toxicity was observed for Tungsten Carbide. No correlation between cytotoxicity and equivalent spherical diameter or specific surface area was found. Conclusion Our study clearly highlights the difference of sensitivity between cell types and cytotoxicity assays that has to be carefully taken into account when assessing nanoparticles toxicity. PMID:19405955

  15. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  16. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  17. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  18. Metal oxide nanoparticles with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alan Man Ching; Guo, Mu Yao; Leung, Yu Hang; Chan, Charis M N; Wong, Stella W Y; Yung, Mana M N; Ma, Angel P Y; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Leung, Frederick C C; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Chan, Wai Kin; Lee, Hung Kay

    2015-10-01

    A number of different nanomaterials produced and incorporated into various products are rising. However, their environmental hazards are frequently unknown. Here we consider three different metal oxide compounds (SnO2, In2O3, and Al2O3), which have not been extensively studied and are expected to have low toxicity. This study aimed to comprehensively characterize the physicochemical properties of these nanomaterials and investigate their toxicity on bacteria (Escherichia coli) under UV illumination and in the dark, as well as on a marine diatom (Skeletonema costatum) under ambient illumination/dark (16-8h) cycles. The material properties responsible for their low toxicity have been identified based on comprehensive experimental characterizations and comparison to a metal oxide exhibiting significant toxicity under illumination (anatase TiO2). The metal oxide materials investigated exhibited significant difference in surface properties and interaction with the living organisms. In order for a material to exhibit significant toxicity, it needs to be able to both form a stable suspension in the culture medium and to interact with the cell walls of the test organism. Our results indicated that the observed low toxicities of the three nanomaterials could be attributed to the limited interaction between the nanoparticles and cell walls of the test organisms. This could occur either due to the lack of significant attachment between nanoparticles and cell walls, or due to their tendency to aggregate in solution. PMID:26143160

  19. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asharani, P. V.; Lian Wu, Yi; Gong, Zhiyuan; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to enhance our insight on the health and environmental impact of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np). Using starch and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as capping agents, silver nanoparticles were synthesized to study their deleterious effects and distribution pattern in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). Toxicological endpoints like mortality, hatching, pericardial edema and heart rate were recorded. A concentration-dependent increase in mortality and hatching delay was observed in Ag-np treated embryos. Additionally, nanoparticle treatments resulted in concentration-dependent toxicity, typified by phenotypes that had abnormal body axes, twisted notochord, slow blood flow, pericardial edema and cardiac arrhythmia. Ag+ ions and stabilizing agents showed no significant defects in developing embryos. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the embryos demonstrated that nanoparticles were distributed in the brain, heart, yolk and blood of embryos as evident from the electron-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS). Furthermore, the acridine orange staining showed an increased apoptosis in Ag-np treated embryos. These results suggest that silver nanoparticles induce a dose-dependent toxicity in embryos, which hinders normal development.

  20. Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: The Importance of Size, Shape, Chemical Composition, and Valence State in Determining Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnick, Katherine

    , cerium oxide nanoparticles were chemically modified using a process known as doping, to alter their valence state. The size and shape of the cerium oxide nanoparticles remained constant. Overall, results indicated that cerium oxide was not toxic in both RLE-6TN and NR8383 pulmonary rat cells, however, chemically modifying the valence state of the nanomaterial did affect the antioxidant potential. To determine if this trend was measureable in vivo, rats were exposed to various cerium oxide nanoparticles via intratracheal instillation and damage, changes in pulmonary cell differentials, and phagocytic cell activity were assessed. Results implicate that chemically modifying the nanoparticles had an effect on the overall damage induced by the material but did not dramatically affect inflammatory potential or phagocytic cell activity. Overall the data from these studies imply that size, shape, chemical composition, and valence state of nanomaterials can be manipulated to alter their toxicity.

  1. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W; Scheckel, Kirk G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag(+) under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10-15nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5mgL(-1), the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100mgL(-1) as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag(+). Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100mgL(-1) as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. PMID:27016684

  2. Consideration Of The Toxicity of Manufactured Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haasch, Mary L.; McClellan-Green, Patricia; Oberdörster, Eva

    2005-09-01

    Fullerene (C60 and single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, SWCNT and MWCNT, respectively) is engineered to be redox active and it is thought that the potential toxicity of fullerene exposure is related to the formation of reactive oxygen species. During manufacture, transport or during scientific investigation, there is a potential for human or environmental exposure to nanoparticles. Several studies regarding human exposure have indicated reasons for concern. There is a lack of studies addressing the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic species but one study using the fish, largemouth bass, exposed to fullerene has shown increased (10-17-fold) lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the brain. It is likely that repair enzymes or anti-oxidants may have been induced in gill and liver tissues that had reduced LPO compared to control tissues (Oberdörster, 2004). In support of that hypothesis, suppressive subtractive hybridization was used with liver tissue and the biotransformation enzyme, cytochrome P450, specifically CYP2K4, and other oxidoreductases related to metabolism, along with repair enzymes, were increased while proteins related to normal physiological homeostasis were decreased in fullerene-exposed fish. In a new study involving the exposure of a toxicological model fish species, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to water-soluble fullerene (nC60), uptake and distribution indicated that nC60 elevated LPO in the brain and induced expression of CYP2 family isozymes in the liver. In an in vitro study, BSA-coated SWCNT interfered with biotransformation enzyme activity. These studies taken together provide support to the hypothesis that the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles is related to oxidative stress and provide insight into possible mechanisms of toxicity as well as providing information for evaluating the risk to aquatic organisms exposed to manufactured nanoparticles.

  3. Pulmonary mass and multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung neoplasm as amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L.; García-Nieto, J C.; Ballesta, F; Prieto, E; Villanueva, M A.; Gallardo, J

    2001-07-01

    Amiodarone is an effective anti-arrhythmic agent. However, during long-term therapy, patients can develop severe adverse pulmonary reactions that are potentially life-threatening. A case of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is presented in a 78-year-old woman. She developed dyspnea and a pulmonary mass with associated multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung cancer following 5 years of treatment with amiodarone for atrial fibrillation. After drug withdrawal, and without any additional treatment, clinical and radiological improvement was observed, and radiological findings resolved completely within 6 months.

  4. Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diversity of engineered-nanomaterials and their applications as well as potential unknown health effects of these novel materials are significant challenges to assessing the health risks of nanotechnology. An integrated multi-tier testing strategy (www.epa.gov/nanoscience/) ...

  5. Pulmonary toxicity of beryllium in albino rat

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, K.A.; Agrawal, V.P.; Garg, V.

    1980-01-01

    Arsenic compounds, if chronically exposed to human beings, significantly increase incidences of epidermoid carcinomas of the skin and lung. Nickel has been considered to be an important metallic carcinogen. Regarding beryllium, different opinions are held so far as its carcinogenic nature is concerned. While it is reported that there is an equivocal increase in the incidences of respiratory cancers in patients with chronic pulmonary berylliosis, investigation shows no increase in the incidence of respiratory cancer. Among experimental animals, intravenous injections of suspensions of beryllium salts to rabbits have been shown to induce osteogenic sarcomas. This abstract deals with the histopathological and enzymological study of lungs of albino rats after prolonged beryllium treatment.

  6. [Evaluation of pulmonary toxicity of heavy metal compounds].

    PubMed

    Hirano, S

    1996-02-01

    The present report describes toxicological approaches to evaluate inflammatory potency of heavy metal compounds deposited in the lung. Although inhalation exposure is a well-accepted method to study effects of pulmonary toxicants, it requires expensive facilities and many man-hours to complete experiments. Intratracheal (i.t.) instillation, an alternative and simple method to expose animals to toxicants via airways, has been proved to be useful to investigate the pulmonary clearance of heavy metals. However, acute inhalation exposure caused more severe inflammatory lung injury than i. t. instillation when the same amount of nickel sulfate was administered in the rat. Among several biochemical inflammatory indices such as some enzyme activities and the protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, only lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity increased linearly with a wide range of doses of heavy metals. The increase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in BAL fluid, a cytological index of inflammatory responses of the lung, is believed to reflect pulmonary toxicity of heavy metals. However, more extensive study is required to elucidate the mechanism of transpulmonary PMN infiltration upon heavy metal insult. In addition to the linearity between LDH activity in BAL fluid and doses of heavy metals, the increase in this cytosolic enzyme activity is associated with cell lysis in the bronchoalveolar milieu and appears to be the best index to evaluate pulmonary inflammatory potency of heavy metals.

  7. A safety and tolerability study of differently-charged nanoparticles for local pulmonary drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Harush-Frenkel, Oshrat; Bivas-Benita, Maytal; Nassar, Taher; Springer, Chaim; Sherman, Yoav; Avital, Avraham; Altschuler, Yoram; Borlak, Jurgen; Benita, Simon

    2010-07-15

    Nanoparticle (NP) based drug delivery systems provide promising opportunities in the treatment of lung diseases. Here we examined the safety and tolerability of pulmonary delivered NPs consisting of PEG-PLA as a function of particle surface charge. The rationale for such a comparison should be attributed to the differential pulmonary toxicity of positively and negatively charged PEG-PLA NP. Thus, the local and systemic effects of pulmonary administered NPs were investigated following 5 days of daily endotracheal instillation to BALB/c mice that were euthanized on the eighth or nineteenth day of the experiment. We collected bronchoalveolar lavages and studied hematological as well as histochemistry parameters. Notably, the cationic stearylamine based PEG-PLA NPs elicited increased local and systemic toxic effects both on the eighth and nineteenth day. In contrast, anionic NPs of similar size were much better tolerated with local inflammatory effects observed only on the eighth experimental day after pulmonary instillation. No systemic toxicity effect was observed although a moderate change was noted in the platelet count that was not considered to be of clinical significance. No pathological observations were detected in the internal organs following instillation of anionic NPs. Overall these observations suggest that anionic PEG-PLA NPs are useful pulmonary drug carriers that should be considered as a promising therapeutic drug delivery system.

  8. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  9. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  10. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Taylor, Larry

    2008-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. NASA established the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, LADTAG has recommended investigating its toxicity in the lungs of laboratory animals. After receiving this recommendation, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in exposed rodents. The rodent pulmonary toxicity studies proposed here are the same as those proposed by the LADTAG. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal instillation (ITI). This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. We succeeded in completing an ITI study on JSC-1 lunar dust simulant in mice (Lam et al., Inhalation Toxicology 14:901-916, 2002, and Inhalation Toxicology 14: 917-928, 2002), and have conducted a pilot ITI study to examine the acute toxicity of an Apollo lunar (highland) dust sample. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies have been planned to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The ITI results will also be

  11. Biological Mechanism of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Najealicka Nicole

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), like almost all nanoparticles, are potentially toxic beyond a certain concentration because the survival of the organism is compromised due to scores of pathophysiological abnormalities above that concentration. However, the mechanism of AgNP toxicity remains undetermined. Instead of applying a toxic dose, these investigations were attempted to monitor the effects of AgNPs at a non-lethal concentration on wild type Drosophila melanogaster by exposing them to nanoparticles throughout their development. All adult flies raised in AgNP doped food indicated that of not more than 50 mg/L had no negative influence on median survival; however, these flies appeared uniformly lighter in body color due to the loss of melanin pigments in their cuticle. Additionally, fertility and vertical movement ability were compromised after AgNP feeding. The determination of the amount of free ionic silver (Ag+) indicated that the observed biological effects had resulted from the AgNPs and not from Ag+. Biochemical analysis suggests that the activity of copper dependent enzymes, namely tyrosinase and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, were decreased significantly following the consumption of AgNPs, despite the constant level of copper present in the tissue. Furthermore, copper supplementation restored the loss of AgNP induced demelanization, and the reduction of functional Ctr1 in Ctr1 heterozygous mutants caused the flies to be resistant to demelanization. Consequently, these studies proposed a mechanism whereby consumption of excess AgNPs in association with membrane bound copper transporter proteins cause sequestration of copper, thus creating a condition that resembles copper starvation. This model also explained the cuticular demelanization effect resulting from AgNP since tyrosinase activity is essential for melanin biosynthesis. Finally, these investigations demonstrated that Drosophila, an established genetic model system, can be well utilized for further

  12. Toxic effects of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the liver and lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, L; Yousefi Babadi, V; Espanani, H R

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are magnetic nanoparticles which have widespread application in MRI and heat therapy of cancer as contrast elements. They are also used effectively for drug and gene delivery because of effective penetrating to the cells and tissues. However, these features cause Fe2O3 nanoparticles have toxic effects that are not completely understood yet. In this study, effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on lung tissue in adult male Wistar rats were studied. We used pulmonary inhalation method for nanoparticle administration and used ether as a helper. Our results showed administered nanoparticles penetrated to the circulation and rapidly reached to liver and created serious inflammation in lung and liver tissues. This study used two different nanoparticle doses (20 and 40 mg/kg) and two exposing numbers (7 and 14 times). Results showed significant enhancement of free radicals and reduction of the GSH in lung tissue. Histological studies showed nanoparticle treatment of rats caused pulmonary emphysema, interstitial hyperemia and inflammation in lungs. By increasing the administrated dose lung tissue showed all of the mentioned symptoms with increased intensity. Nanoparticle exposition causes presence of neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils in the lung tissue that confirmed there is a serious pathologic condition. Hepatic cells injuries cause penetration of the hepatic enzymes in to the blood serum (Tab. 2, Fig. 4, Ref. 32). Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  13. Toxic effects of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the liver and lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, L; Yousefi Babadi, V; Espanani, H R

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are magnetic nanoparticles which have widespread application in MRI and heat therapy of cancer as contrast elements. They are also used effectively for drug and gene delivery because of effective penetrating to the cells and tissues. However, these features cause Fe2O3 nanoparticles have toxic effects that are not completely understood yet. In this study, effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on lung tissue in adult male Wistar rats were studied. We used pulmonary inhalation method for nanoparticle administration and used ether as a helper. Our results showed administered nanoparticles penetrated to the circulation and rapidly reached to liver and created serious inflammation in lung and liver tissues. This study used two different nanoparticle doses (20 and 40 mg/kg) and two exposing numbers (7 and 14 times). Results showed significant enhancement of free radicals and reduction of the GSH in lung tissue. Histological studies showed nanoparticle treatment of rats caused pulmonary emphysema, interstitial hyperemia and inflammation in lungs. By increasing the administrated dose lung tissue showed all of the mentioned symptoms with increased intensity. Nanoparticle exposition causes presence of neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils in the lung tissue that confirmed there is a serious pathologic condition. Hepatic cells injuries cause penetration of the hepatic enzymes in to the blood serum (Tab. 2, Fig. 4, Ref. 32). Text in PDF www.elis.sk. PMID:26084739

  14. Pulmonary toxicity of cytostatic drugs: cell kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Godfrey, G.; Frome, E.; Lindenschmidt, R.C.

    1987-02-01

    Mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of /sup 3/H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide-treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2-3 weeks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature whereas in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It is concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemicals designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid.

  15. Cationic surface modification of PLG nanoparticles offers sustained gene delivery to pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Baoum, Abdulgader; Dhillon, Navneet; Buch, Shilpa; Berkland, Cory

    2010-05-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles are currently being explored as a nonviral gene delivery system; however, many obstacles impede the translation of these nanomaterials. For example, nanoparticles delivered systemically are inherently prone to adsorbing serum proteins and agglomerating as a result of their large surface/volume ratio. What is desired is a simple procedure to prepare nanoparticles that may be delivered locally and exhibit minimal toxicity while improving entry into cells for effectively delivering DNA. The objective of this study was to optimize the formulation of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles for gene delivery performance to a model of the pulmonary epithelium. Using a simple solvent diffusion technique, the chemistry of the particle surface was varied by using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (approximately 200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for 2 weeks. In A549 alveolar lung epithelial cells, high levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least 2 weeks. In contrast, PEI gene expression ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium.

  16. Pulmonary toxicity in mice following exposure to cerium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Yu, Xiaohong; Pan, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Lei; Sang, Xuezi; Lin, Anan; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yue; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-06-01

    The widespread application of lanthanoids (Lns) in manufacturing industries has raised occupational and environmental health concerns about the possible increased health risks to humans exposed to Lns in their working and living environments. Numerous studies have shown that exposures to Ln cause pulmonary injury in animals, but very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the pulmonary inflammation caused by cerium chloride (CeCl3) exposure. In this study, we evaluated the oxidative stress and molecular mechanism underlying with the pulmonary inflammation associated with chronic lung toxicity in mice treated with nasally instilled CeCl3 for 90 consecutive days. Our findings suggest that significant cerium accumulated in the lung, leading the obvious increase of the lung indices, significant increases in inflammatory cells and levels of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphate, and total protein, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and peroxidation of lipids, reduced antioxidant capacity, and pulmonary inflammation. CeCl3 exposure also activated nuclear factor κB, increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor α, cyclooxygenase-2, heme oxygenase 1, interleukin 2, interleukin 4, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, interleukin 10, interleukin 18, interleukin 1β, and CYP1A1. However, CeCl3 reduced the expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-inhibiting factor and heat shock protein 70. These findings suggest that the pulmonary inflammation caused by CeCl3 in mice is closely associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:24736977

  17. Pulmonary toxicity of printer toner following inhalation and intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Oyabu, Takako; Horie, Masanori; Kambara, Tatsunori; Izumi, Hiroto; Kuroda, Etsushi; Creutzenberg, Otto; Bellmann, Bernd; Pohlmann, Gerhard; Schuchardt, Sven; Hansen, Tanja; Ernst, Heinrich

    2013-10-01

    The pulmonary effects of a finished toner were evaluated in intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies, using toners with external additives (titanium dioxide nanoparticles and amorphous silica nanoparticles). Rats received an intratracheal dose of 1 mg or 2 mg of toner and were sacrificed at 3 days, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. The toner induced pulmonary inflammation, as evidenced by a transient neutrophil response in the low-dose groups and persistent neutrophil infiltration in the high-dose groups. There were increased concentrations of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as a marker of oxidative stress in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lung. In a 90-day inhalation study, rats were exposed to well-dispersed toner (mean of MMAD: 3.76 µm). The three mass concentrations of toner were 1, 4 and 16 mg/m(3) for 13 weeks, and the rats were sacrificed at 6 days and 91 days after the end of the exposure period. The low and medium concentrations did not induce neutrophil infiltration in the lung of statistical significance, but the high concentration did, and, in addition, upon histopathological examination not only showed findings of inflammation but also of fibrosis in the lung. Taken together, the results of our studies suggest that toners with external additives lead to pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis at lung burdens suggest beyond the overload. The changes observed in the pulmonary responses in this inhalation study indicate that the high concentration (16 mg/m(3)) is an LOAEL and that the medium concentration (4 mg/m(3)) is an NOAEL.

  18. Subchronic oral toxicity of silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles has resulted in their extensive application in health, electronic, consumer, medicinal, pesticide, and home products; however, silver nanoparticles remain a controversial area of research with respect to their toxicity in biological and ecological systems. Results This study tested the oral toxicity of silver nanoparticles (56 nm) over a period of 13 weeks (90 days) in F344 rats following Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guideline 408 and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP). Five-week-old rats, weighing about 99 g for the males and 92 g for the females, were divided into four 4 groups (10 rats in each group): vehicle control, low-dose (30 mg/kg), middle-dose (125 mg/kg), and high-dose (500 mg/kg). After 90 days of exposure, clinical chemistry, hematology, histopathology, and silver distribution were studied. There was a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the body weight of male rats after 4 weeks of exposure, although there were no significant changes in food or water consumption during the study period. Significant dose-dependent changes were found in alkaline phosphatase and cholesterol for the male and female rats, indicating that exposure to more than 125 mg/kg of silver nanoparticles may result in slight liver damage. Histopathologic examination revealed a higher incidence of bile-duct hyperplasia, with or without necrosis, fibrosis, and/or pigmentation, in treated animals. There was also a dose-dependent accumulation of silver in all tissues examined. A gender-related difference in the accumulation of silver was noted in the kidneys, with a twofold increase in female kidneys compared to male kidneys. Conclusions The target organ for the silver nanoparticles was found to be the liver in both the male and female rats. A NOAEL (no observable adverse effect level) of 30 mg/kg and LOAEL (lowest observable adverse effect level) of 125 mg/kg are suggested from the present study

  19. Pulmonary toxicity of Expancel microspheres in the rat.

    PubMed

    Porter, Dale W; Hubbs, Ann F; Baron, Paul A; Millecchia, Lyndell L; Wolfarth, Michael G; Battelli, Lori A; Schwegler-Berry, Diane E; Beighley, Christopher M; Andrew, Michael E; Castranova, Vincent

    2007-08-01

    Expancel microspheres are thermoplastic microspheres enclosing hydrocarbon. These microspheres expand when heated, producing many applications. Because they have unknown biological persistence and toxicity, we investigated the toxicity of two unexpanded (11.1 and 15.4 micro m mean diameter) and two expanded (3.1 and 5.5 micro m mass median aerodynamic diameter) Expancel microspheres in intratracheally-instilled, male, Sprague-Dawley rats. Pulmonary histopathology was evaluated at 28 days postexposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was evaluated at days 1, 7, 14, and 28 days postexposure. Crystalline silica was the positive control. By histopathology, both unexpanded and expanded microspheres caused granulomatous bronchopneumonia characterized by macrophages and giants cells, suggesting a persistent foreign body response. Expanded, but not unexpanded microspheres, also caused eosinophilic bronchitis and bronchiolitis, mucous metaplasia of airways and organized granulomatous inflammation with associated fibrosis and frequent airway obstruction. In contrast, alveolar macrophage activation, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, LDH and albumin in bronchoalveolar laveage fluid were initially elevated but returned to near control levels at 28 days, and did not reflect the persistent granulomatous bronchopneumonia caused by Expancel microspheres. These findings emphasize the importance of histopathology for evaluating pulmonary toxicity, suggest that Expancel microspheres are a potential occupational hazard, and indicate a need for additional studies on their potential pulmonary toxicity. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Toxicology Pathology for the following free supplemental resources: motion within unexpected microspheres in H&E-stained lung (supplementary Figure 1); broncholar epithelium 28 days following exposure to 551 DE 20 microspheres (supplementary Figure 2); membrane ruffling and some instances of

  20. Pulmonary toxicity and fibrogenic response of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Manke, Amruta; Wang, Liying; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been a subject of intensive research for a wide range of applications. However, because of their extremely small size and light weight, CNTs are readily inhaled into human lungs resulting in increased rates of pulmonary disorders, most notably fibrosis. Several studies have demonstrated the fibrogenic effects of CNTs given their ability to translocate into the surrounding areas in the lung causing granulomatous lesions and interstitial and sub-pleural fibrosis. However, the mechanisms underlying the disease process remain obscure due to the lack of understanding of the cellular interactions and molecular targets involved. Interestingly, certain physicochemical properties of CNTs have been shown to affect their respiratory toxicity, thereby becoming significant determinants of fibrogenesis. CNT-induced fibrosis involves a multitude of cell types and is characterized by the early onset of inflammation, oxidative stress and accumulation of extracellular matrix. Increased reactive oxygen species activate various cytokine/growth factor signaling cascades resulting in increased expression of inflammatory and fibrotic genes. Profibrotic growth factors and cytokines contribute directly to fibroblast proliferation and collagen production. Given the role of multiple players during the pathogenesis of CNT-induced fibrosis, the objective of this review is to summarize the key findings and discuss major cellular and molecular events governing pulmonary fibrosis. We also discuss the physicochemical properties of CNTs and their effects on pulmonary toxicities as well as various biological factors contributing to the development of fibrosis. PMID:23194015

  1. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  2. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Elshama, Said Said; El-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  3. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  4. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  5. Zebrafish: A complete animal model to enumerate the nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Presently, nanotechnology is a multi-trillion dollar business sector that covers a wide range of industries, such as medicine, electronics and chemistry. In the current era, the commercial transition of nanotechnology from research level to industrial level is stimulating the world's total economic growth. However, commercialization of nanoparticles might offer possible risks once they are liberated in the environment. In recent years, the use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an established animal model system for nanoparticle toxicity assay is growing exponentially. In the current in-depth review, we discuss the recent research approaches employing adult zebrafish and their embryos for nanoparticle toxicity assessment. Different types of parameters are being discussed here which are used to evaluate nanoparticle toxicity such as hatching achievement rate, developmental malformation of organs, damage in gill and skin, abnormal behavior (movement impairment), immunotoxicity, genotoxicity or gene expression, neurotoxicity, endocrine system disruption, reproduction toxicity and finally mortality. Furthermore, we have also highlighted the toxic effect of different nanoparticles such as silver nanoparticle, gold nanoparticle, and metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, Al2O3, CuO, NiO and ZnO). At the end, future directions of zebrafish model and relevant assays to study nanoparticle toxicity have also been argued. PMID:27544212

  6. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  7. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLC) for pulmonary application: a review of the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Zimmer, A; Pardeike, J

    2014-01-01

    Drug delivery by inhalation is a noninvasive means of administration that has following advantages for local treatment for airway diseases: reaching the epithelium directly, circumventing first pass metabolism and avoiding systemic toxicity. Moreover, from the physiological point of view, the lung provides advantages for systemic delivery of drugs including its large surface area, a thin alveolar epithelium and extensive vasculature which allow rapid and effective drug absorption. Therefore, pulmonary application is considered frequently for both, the local and the systemic delivery of drugs. Lipid nanoparticles - Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers - are nanosized carrier systems in which solid particles consisting of a lipid matrix are stabilized by surfactants in an aqueous phase. Advantages of lipid nanoparticles for the pulmonary application are the possibility of a deep lung deposition as they can be incorporated into respirables carriers due to their small size, prolonged release and low toxicity. This paper will give an overview of the existing literature about lipid nanoparticles for pulmonary application. Moreover, it will provide the reader with some background information for pulmonary drug delivery, i.e., anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system, formulation requirements, application forms, clearance from the lung, pharmacological benefits and nanotoxicity. PMID:24007657

  8. Release, transport and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soni, Deepika; Naoghare, Pravin K; Saravanadevi, Sivanesan; Pandey, Ram Avatar

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology have facilitated the synthesis of novel engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) that possess new and different physicochemical properties. These ENPs have been ex tensive ly used in various commercial sectors to achieve both social and economic benefits. However. the increasing production and consumption of ENPs by many different industries has raised concerns about their possible release and accumulation in the environment. Released EN Ps may either remain suspended in the atmosphere for several years or may accumulate and eventually be modified int o other substances. Settled nanoparticles can he easily washed away during ra in s. and therefore may easily enter the food chain via water and so il. Thus. EN Ps can contaminate air. water and soil and can subsequently pose adverse risks to the health of different organisms. Studies to date indicate that ENP transport to and within the ecosystem depend on their chemical and physical properties (viz .. size. shape and solubility) . Therefore. the EN Ps display variable behavior in the environment because of their individual properties th at affect their tendency for adsorption, absorption, diffusional and colloidal interaction. The transport of EN Ps also influences their fate and chemical transformation in ecosystems. The adsorption, absorption and colloidal interaction of ENPs affect their capacity to be degraded or transformed, whereas the tendency of ENPs to agglomerate fosters their sedimentation. How widely ENPs are transported and their environmental fate influence how tox ic they may become to environmental organisms. One barrier to fully understanding how EN Ps are transformed in the environment and how best to characterize their toxicity, is related to the nature of their ultrafine structure. Experiments with different animals, pl ants, and cell lines have revealed that ENPs induce toxicity via several cellular pathways that is linked to the size. shape. surface area

  9. Toxicity of food-relevant nanoparticles in intestinal epithelial models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Christie

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being incorporated into common consumer products, including in foods and food packaging, for their unique properties at the nanoscale. Food-grade silica and titania are used as anti-caking and whitening agents, respectively, and these particle size distributions are composed of approximately one-third nanoparticles. Zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles can be used for their antimicrobial properties. However, little is known about the interactions of nanoparticles in the body upon ingestion. This study was performed to investigate the role of nanoparticle characteristics including surface chemistry, dissolution, and material type on toxicity to the intestinal epithelium. Only mild acute toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was observed after 24-hour treatment of intestinal epithelial C2BBe1 cells based on the results of toxicity assays measuring necrosis, apoptosis, membrane damage, and mitochondrial activity. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were not observed to be toxic although all nanoparticles were internalized by cells. In vitro digestion of nanoparticles in solutions representing the stomach and intestines prior to treatment of cells did not alter nanoparticle toxicity. Long-term repeated treatment of cells weekly for 24 hours with nanoparticles did not change nanoparticle cytotoxicity or the growth rate of the treated cell populations. Thus, silica, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles were found to induce little toxicity in intestinal epithelial cells. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a model for silica used in foods that could be tracked in vitro and in vivo. To maintain an exterior of pure silica, a silica shell was hydrolyzed around a core particle of quantum dots or a fluorescent dye electrostatically associated with a commercial silica particle. The quantum dots used were optimized from a previously reported microwave quantum dot synthesis to a quantum yield of 40%. Characterization

  10. Toxicity assessment of silica nanoparticles, functionalised silica nanoparticles, and HASE-grafted silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Clément, Laura; Zenerino, Arnaud; Hurel, Charlotte; Amigoni, Sonia; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frédéric; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-04-15

    Numerous nanomaterials have recently been developed, and numerous practical applications have been found in water treatment, medicine, cosmetics, and engineering. Associative polymers, such as hydrophobically modified alkali-soluble emulsion (HASE) systems are involved in several applications and have been extensively studied due to their ability to form three-dimensional networked gels. However, the data on the potential environmental effects of this polymers are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of functionalisation of silica nanoparticles, and coupling of functionalised silica nanoparticles to the associative polymer HASE on their toxicity. Thus, acute and chronic toxicity tests included a modified acute test (72 h) using daphnies, algae, and plants as model organisms. Gradient of toxicity varied with the tested organisms. Our results revealed that the functionalised nanoparticules and NP grafted polymer cause a global decrease in toxicity compared to commercial nanoparticule and HASE polymer. PMID:23474257

  11. Febrile-range hyperthermia augments pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and amplifies pulmonary oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hasday, Jeffrey D; Garrison, Allen; Singh, Ishwar S; Standiford, Theodore; Ellis, Garrettson S; Rao, Srinivas; He, Ju-Ren; Rice, Penny; Frank, Mariah; Goldblum, Simeon E; Viscardi, Rose M

    2003-06-01

    Febrile-range hyperthermia (FRH) improves survival in experimental infections by accelerating pathogen clearance, but may also increase collateral tissue injury. We hypothesized that FRH would worsen the outcome of inflammation stimulated by a non-replicating agonist and tested this hypothesis in a murine model of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Using a conscious, temperature-controlled mouse model, we showed that maintaining a core temperature at FRH (39 degrees C to 40 degrees C) rather than at euthermic levels (36.5 degrees C to 37 degrees C) during hyperoxia exposure accelerated lethal pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, reduced the inspired oxygen threshold for lethality, induced expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and expanded the circulating neutrophil pool. In these same mice, FRH augmented pulmonary expression of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines, KC and LPS-induced CXC chemokine, enhanced recruitment of neutrophils, and changed the histological pattern of lung injury to a neutrophilic interstitial pneumonitis. Immunoblockade of CXC receptor-2 abrogated neutrophil recruitment, reduced pulmonary vascular injury, and delayed death. These combined data demonstrate that FRH may enlist distinct mediators and effector cells to profoundly shift the host response to a defined injurious stimulus, in part by augmenting delivery of neutrophils to sites of inflammation, such as may occur in infections. In certain conditions, such as in the hyperoxic lung, this process may be deleterious.

  12. Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity – A Frequently Missed Complication

    PubMed Central

    Sweidan, Alexander J.; Singh, Navneet K.; Dang, Natasha; Lam, Vinh; Datta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Amiodarone is often used in the suppression of tachyarrhythmias. One of the more serious adverse effects includes amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (APT). Several pulmonary diseases can manifest including interstitial pneumonitis, organizing pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, pulmonary nodules or masses, and pleural effusion. Incidence of APT varies from 5–15% and is correlated to dosage, age of the patient, and preexisting lung disease. DESCRIPTION A 56-year-old male with a past medical history of coronary artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was admitted for a coronary artery bypass graft. Post-operatively, the patient was admitted to the ICU for ventilator management and continued to receive his home dose of amiodarone 400 mg orally twice daily, which he had been taking for the past 3 months. The patient was found to be hypoxemic with a PaO2 52 mmHg and bilateral infiltrates on chest x-ray. Patient also complained of new onset dyspnea. Physical exam found bilateral rhonchi with bibasilar crackles and subcutaneous emphysema along the left anterior chest wall. Daily chest x-rays showed worsening of bilateral interstitial infiltrates and pleural effusions. A chest high-resolution computed tomography on post-operative day 3 showed extensive and severe bilateral ground glass opacities. APT was suspected and amiodarone was discontinued. A course of oral prednisone without antibiotics was initiated, and after one week of treatment the chest film cleared, the PaO2 value normalized and dyspnea resolved. DISCUSSION APT occurs via cytotoxic T cells and indirectly by immunological reaction. Typically the lungs manifest a diffuse interstitial pneumonitis with varying degrees of fibrosis. Infiltrates with a ‘ground-glass’ appearance appreciated on HRCT are more definitive than chest x-ray. Pulmonary nodules can be seen, frequently in the upper lobes. These are postulated to be accumulations of

  13. Effect of polymer grafting density on silica nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Chun; Liang, Mingtao; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Jia, Zhongfan; Monteiro, Michael J; Toth, Istvan

    2012-12-01

    Nanoparticles are commonly engineered with a layer of polymers on the surface used to increase their stability and biocompatibility, as well as providing multifunctional properties. Formulating the nanoparticle size and surface properties with polymers directly affects the way these nanoparticles interact with a biological system. Many previous studies have emphasized the importance of nanoparticle size and surface charge in affecting their toxicity in cells. However, the potential weakness in many of these studies is that the polymer grafting densities on nanoparticles have been disregarded during toxicity evaluation. In the current study, we hypothesized that the density of polymers on nanoparticles will affect their toxicity to cells, especially for nanoparticle cores that are toxic themselves. To address this issue, we synthesized a range of RAFT (reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer) polymers bearing different surface charges and coated them onto silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) with different grafting densities. The in vitro cytotoxicity of these SiNPs was evaluated using the MTT (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide) assay with Caco-2 cells. We found that neutral (biocompatible) polymers with a high grafting density on SiNPs were effective at protecting the cells from the toxicity of the silica core. High cellular toxicity was only observed for cationic polymer-SiNPs, while all other neutral and anionic polymer-SiNPs induced limited cellular toxicity. In contrast, the toxic effects induced by low density polymer-coated SiNPs were mostly attributed to the silica core, while the polymer coatings had a limited contribution. These findings are important indicators for the future evaluation of the toxicological profile of polymer-coated nanoparticles.

  14. Dry Powder form of Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Shiehzadeh, Farideh; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Delivery to the lungs is an efficient way to deliver drugs directly to the site of action or to the blood circulation. Because of limitations of direct administration of free drugs, particulate drug delivery systems such as DPI formulations based on nanoparticles (NPs) have been of interest for pulmonary drug delivery. The prolonged residence of NPs in the lungs due to ability to escape from the clearance mechanisms such as mucociliary escalator, macrophage uptake (a size of 1-2 µm is ideal for macrophage phagocytosis), and translocation to the systemic circulation is amongst the key advantages of NPs. By this approach, the controlled pulmonary delivery of drugs, peptides, proteins, genes, siRNA, and vaccines is possible. Both natural (albumin, gelatin, alginate, collagen, cyclodextrin, and chitosan) and synthetic (poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), polyacrylates and polyanhydrides) polymers have been used in formulation of pulmonary nanovectors. As direct pulmonary administration of NPs is not feasible, by using the safe excipients, NPs could be converted to dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. These can provide a promising deposition and stability of NPs. In this article, the DPI formulations based on polymeric nanoparticles have been reviewed and categorized based on the polymer type used for preparation of NPs. PMID:26818872

  15. Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Chris R.; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chino, Junzo P.; Craciunescu, Oana; Steffey, Beverly; Folz, Rodney J.; Chao, Nelson J.; Rizzieri, David A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

  16. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Taylor, L.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Astronauts on the Moon will go in and out of the base for various activities, and will inevitably bring some dust into the living quarters. Depressurizing the airlock so that astronauts can exit for outdoor activities could also bring dust inside the airlock to the habitable area. Concerned about the potential health effects on astronauts exposed to airborne lunar dust, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust. The toxicity data also will be needed by toxicologists to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts residing in the lunar habitat and by environmental engineers to design an appropriate dust mitigation strategy. We conducted a study to examine biomarkers of toxicity (inflammation and cytotoxicity) in lung lavage fluids from mice intrapharyngeally instilled with lunar dust samples; we also collected lung tissue from the mice for histopathological examination 3 months after the dust instillation. Reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) having known toxicities and industrial exposure limits were studied in parallel with lunar dust so that the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. A 6-month histopathology study has been planned. These instillation experiments will be followed by inhalation studies, which are more labor intensive and technologically difficult. The animal inhalation studies will be conducted first with an appropriate lunar dust simulant to ensure that the exposure techniques to be used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of these studies collectively will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and enable us to establish exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  17. Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Amara L.; Marr, Linsey C.

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials in consumer products. Some of these products are likely to be aerosolized, making silver nanoparticles a high priority for inhalation toxicity assessment. To study the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles, we have exposed cultured lung cells to them at the air-liquid interface. Cells were exposed to suspensions of silver or nickel oxide (positive control) nanoparticles at concentrations of 2.6, 6.6, and 13.2 μg cm−2 (volume concentrations of 10, 25, and 50 μg ml−1) and to 0.7 μg cm−2 silver or 2.1 μg cm−2 nickel oxide aerosol at the air-liquid interface. Unlike a number of in vitro studies employing suspensions of silver nanoparticles, which have shown strong toxic effects, both suspensions and aerosolized nanoparticles caused negligible cytotoxicity and only a mild inflammatory response, in agreement with animal exposures. Additionally, we have developed a novel method using a differential mobility analyzer to select aerosolized nanoparticles of a single diameter to assess the size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:23484109

  18. Sulfidation of Silver Nanoparticles: Natural antidote to their toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Levard, Clément; Hotze, Ernest M.; Colman, Benjamin P.; Truong, Lisa; Yang, X. Y.; Bone, Audrey; Brown, Gordon E.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Meyer, Joel N.; Wiesner, Mark R.; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are highly dynamic in biological and environmental media. A critical need for advancing environmental health and safety research for nanomaterials is to identify commonly occurring physical and chemical transformations affecting nanomaterial properties and toxicity. Silver nanoparticles, one of the most ecotoxic and well-studied nanomaterials, readily sulfidize in the environment. Here, we show that very low degrees of sulfidation (0.019 S/Ag mass ratio) universally and significantly decreases the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to four diverse types of aquatic and terrestrial eukaryotic organisms. Toxicity reduction is primarily associated with a decrease in Ag+ availability after sulfidation due to the lower solubility of Ag2S relative to elemental Ag (Ag(0)). We also show that chloride in exposure media determines silver nanoparticle toxicity by controlling the speciation of Ag. These results highlight the need to consider environmental transformation of NPs in assessing their toxicity to accurately portray their potential environmental risks. PMID:24180218

  19. Mucoadhesive controlled release ciprofloxacin nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudumba, Sujata S.

    Controlled release of drugs to the lungs is an interesting and evolving field of research. The influence of physicochemical properties of nanoparticles on the controlled release of ciprofloxacin and in-vivo pharmacokinetics following pulmonary administration was evaluated. The physicochemical properties had an effect on encapsulation efficiency and surface charge, but no significant effect on particle size. The in-vitro release profiles of ciprofloxacin in phosphate buffered saline showed small differences over the range of physicochemical properties evaluated. The physicochemical properties of ciprofloxacin nanoparticles resulted in variable and unreliable nebulizer output using a vibrating mesh nebulizer whereas the impact on the aerosol properties of a jet nebulizer was negligible. Addition of mucoadhesive polymers in the nanoparticles had a three-fold increase in apparent half-life in rats by releasing ciprofloxacin over an extended release period on the surfaces of the lungs.

  20. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure was investigated. Results from 7-d sediment toxicity tests indicate that Ag...

  1. Assessing toxicity of copper nanoparticles across five cladoceran species.

    PubMed

    Song, Lan; Vijver, Martina G; de Snoo, Geert R; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-08-01

    As a result of ever increasing applications, nanoparticles will eventually end up in the environment. However, currently no common principle has been established to help understand the toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) across species. Therefore, it is difficult to estimate the potential risks of nanoparticles to untested species in the environment. The authors exposed 4 different sizes of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) and 1 submicron-sized copper particle to 5 cladoceran species (Daphnia magna, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia galeata, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Chydorus sphaericus) to investigate whether morphological attributes of species can help to assess the acute toxicity of CuNPs across species. The results showed that rod-shaped CuNPs caused much lower toxicity to all species than spherical CuNPs. Both the particles and ions contributed to the total toxicity of the CuNP suspensions. Moreover, the toxicity caused by particles in 5 different copper suspensions increases with decreasing body length, surface area, and body volume of neonates of 5 cladoceran species. Especially the correlations between body volume of the 5 cladoceran species tested and the corresponding toxicity caused by 5 different CuNPs were statistically significant, and in all cases radj (2) was higher than 0.51 (p < 0.001). The highest correlation was found between body volume and the toxicity of the 78-nm CuNPs (radj (2)  = 0.95, p < 0.001). To conclude, the correlations between attributes of cladoceran species and the toxicity of CuNPs reported in the present study evoke the possibility to assess and extrapolate the toxicity of nanoparticles across species with similar attributes.

  2. Toxicity and tissue distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Sung; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Yu, Kyeong Nam; Kim, Byung Gul; Park, Sung Jin; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Kee Ho; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Cho, Myung Haing

    2006-01-01

    The development of technology enables the reduction of material size in science. The use of particle reduction in size from micro to nanoscale not only provides benefits to diverse scientific fields but also poses potential risks to humans and the environment. For the successful application of nanomaterials in bioscience, it is essential to understand the biological fate and potential toxicity of nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological distribution as well as the potential toxicity of magnetic nanoparticles to enable their diverse applications in life science, such as drug development, protein detection, and gene delivery. We recently synthesized biocompatible silica-overcoated magnetic nanoparticles containing rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) within a silica shell of controllable thickness [MNPs@SiO2(RITC)]. In this study, the MNPs@SiO2(RITC) with 50-nm thickness were used as a model nanomaterial. After intraperitoneal administration of MNPs@SiO2(RITC) for 4 weeks into mice, the nanoparticles were detected in the brain, indicating that such nanosized materials can penetrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) without disturbing its function or producing apparent toxicity. After a 4-week observation, MNPs@SiO2(RITC) was still present in various organs without causing apparent toxicity. Taken together, our results demonstrated that magnetic nanoparticles of 50-nm size did not cause apparent toxicity under the experimental conditions of this study.

  3. Metal Nanoparticle Pollutants Interfere with Pulmonary Surfactant Function In Vitro☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Mandeep Singh; Zhao, Lin; Smith, Ronald; Possmayer, Fred; Petersen, Nils O.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reported associations between air pollution and pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases prompted studies on the effects of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) on pulmonary surfactant function. Low levels (3.7 mol % Au/lipid, 0.98% wt/wt) markedly inhibited adsorption of a semisynthetic pulmonary surfactant (dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol/surfactant protein B (SP-B); 70:30:1 wt %). Au NP also impeded the surfactant's ability to reduce surface tension (γ) to low levels during film compression and to respread during film expansion. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Au NP generated by a seed-growth method were spherical with diameters of ∼15 nm. Including palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol appeared to coat the NP with at least one lipid bilayer but did not affect NP shape or size. Similar overall observations occurred with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol was less effective in NP capping, although similar sized NP were formed. Including SP-B (1% wt/wt) appears to induce the formation of elongated strands of interacting threads with the fluid phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Including DPPC resulted in formation of aggregated, less spherical NP with a larger size distribution. With DPPC, strand formation due to SP-B was not observed. Agarose gel electrophoresis studies demonstrated that the aggregation induced by SP-B blocked migration of PG-coated NP. Migration was also influenced by the fluidity of the PGs. It is concluded that Au NP can interact with and sequester pulmonary surfactant phospholipids and, if inhaled from the atmosphere, could impede pulmonary surfactant function in the lung. PMID:17890383

  4. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles regulate translocation across pulmonary surfactant monolayer and formation of lipoprotein corona.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Jiao, Bao; Shi, Xinghua; Valle, Russell P; Fan, Qihui; Zuo, Yi Y

    2013-12-23

    Interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film, being the first line of host defense, represents the initial bio-nano interaction in the lungs. Such interaction determines the fate of the inhaled nanoparticles and their potential therapeutic or toxicological effect. Despite considerable progress in optimizing physicochemical properties of nanoparticles for improved delivery and targeting, the mechanisms by which inhaled nanoparticles interact with the pulmonary surfactant film are still largely unknown. Here, using combined in vitro and in silico methods, we show how hydrophobicity and surface charge of nanoparticles differentially regulate the translocation and interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film. While hydrophilic nanoparticles generally translocate quickly across the pulmonary surfactant film, a significant portion of hydrophobic nanoparticles are trapped by the surfactant film and encapsulated in lipid protrusions upon film compression. Our results support a novel model of pulmonary surfactant lipoprotein corona associated with inhaled nanoparticles of different physicochemical properties. Our data suggest that the study of pulmonary nanotoxicology and nanoparticle-based pulmonary drug delivery should consider this lipoprotein corona.

  5. Toxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles - the effect of nanoparticle properties.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yu Hang; Yung, Mana M N; Ng, Alan M C; Ma, Angel P Y; Wong, Stella W Y; Chan, Charis M N; Ng, Yip Hang; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Guo, Muyao; Wong, Mabel Ting; Leung, Frederick C C; Chan, Wai Kin; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Lee, Hung Kay

    2015-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the toxicity of CeO2 nanomaterials have been published in recent years, with some studies finding CeO2 nanoparticles to be toxic, while others found it to have protective effects against oxidative stress. To investigate the possible reasons for this, we have performed a comprehensive study on the physical and chemical properties of nanosized CeO2 from three different suppliers as well as CeO2 synthesized by us, and tested their toxicity. For toxicity tests, we have studied the effects of CeO2 nanoparticles on a Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli in the dark, under ambient and UV illuminations. We have also performed toxicity tests on the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum under ambient and UV illuminations. We found that the CeO2 nanoparticle samples exhibited significantly different toxicity, which could likely be attributed to the differences in interactions with cells, and possibly to differences in nanoparticle compositions. Our results also suggest that toxicity tests on bacteria may not be suitable for predicting the ecotoxicity of nanomaterials. The relationship between the toxicity and physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles is explicitly discussed in the light of the current results. PMID:25768267

  6. Toxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles - the effect of nanoparticle properties.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yu Hang; Yung, Mana M N; Ng, Alan M C; Ma, Angel P Y; Wong, Stella W Y; Chan, Charis M N; Ng, Yip Hang; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Guo, Muyao; Wong, Mabel Ting; Leung, Frederick C C; Chan, Wai Kin; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Lee, Hung Kay

    2015-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the toxicity of CeO2 nanomaterials have been published in recent years, with some studies finding CeO2 nanoparticles to be toxic, while others found it to have protective effects against oxidative stress. To investigate the possible reasons for this, we have performed a comprehensive study on the physical and chemical properties of nanosized CeO2 from three different suppliers as well as CeO2 synthesized by us, and tested their toxicity. For toxicity tests, we have studied the effects of CeO2 nanoparticles on a Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli in the dark, under ambient and UV illuminations. We have also performed toxicity tests on the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum under ambient and UV illuminations. We found that the CeO2 nanoparticle samples exhibited significantly different toxicity, which could likely be attributed to the differences in interactions with cells, and possibly to differences in nanoparticle compositions. Our results also suggest that toxicity tests on bacteria may not be suitable for predicting the ecotoxicity of nanomaterials. The relationship between the toxicity and physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles is explicitly discussed in the light of the current results.

  7. Nanoparticle-Mediated Pulmonary Drug Delivery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Paranjpe, Mukta; Müller-Goymann, Christel C.

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated as drug carriers for the application of different drugs via different routes of administration. Systems, such as solid lipid nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, have been investigated for a long time for the treatment of various lung diseases. The pulmonary route, owing to a noninvasive method of drug administration, for both local and systemic delivery of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) forms an ideal environment for APIs acting on pulmonary diseases and disorders. Additionally, this route offers many advantages, such as a high surface area with rapid absorption due to high vascularization and circumvention of the first pass effect. Aerosolization or inhalation of colloidal systems is currently being extensively studied and has huge potential for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of various diseases. Furthermore, the surfactant-associated proteins present at the interface enhance the effect of these formulations by decreasing the surface tension and allowing the maximum effect. The most challenging part of developing a colloidal system for nebulization is to maintain the critical physicochemical parameters for successful inhalation. The following review focuses on the current status of different colloidal systems available for the treatment of various lung disorders along with their characterization. Additionally, different in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo cell models developed for the testing of these systems with studies involving cell culture analysis are also discussed. PMID:24717409

  8. Nanoparticle-mediated pulmonary drug delivery: a review.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, Mukta; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2014-04-08

    Colloidal drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated as drug carriers for the application of different drugs via different routes of administration. Systems, such as solid lipid nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, have been investigated for a long time for the treatment of various lung diseases. The pulmonary route, owing to a noninvasive method of drug administration, for both local and systemic delivery of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) forms an ideal environment for APIs acting on pulmonary diseases and disorders. Additionally, this route offers many advantages, such as a high surface area with rapid absorption due to high vascularization and circumvention of the first pass effect. Aerosolization or inhalation of colloidal systems is currently being extensively studied and has huge potential for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of various diseases. Furthermore, the surfactant-associated proteins present at the interface enhance the effect of these formulations by decreasing the surface tension and allowing the maximum effect. The most challenging part of developing a colloidal system for nebulization is to maintain the critical physicochemical parameters for successful inhalation. The following review focuses on the current status of different colloidal systems available for the treatment of various lung disorders along with their characterization. Additionally, different in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo cell models developed for the testing of these systems with studies involving cell culture analysis are also discussed.

  9. Relationship between chemical composition and pulmonary toxicity of source-specific ambient particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have reported incidence of cardio-pulmonary disease associated with increase in particulate matter (PM) exposure. In this study, the pulmonary toxicity potential of combustion and ambient PM were investigated using data from animal studies at the US EPA....

  10. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological

  11. TOXICITY OF AMORPHOUS SILICA NANOPARTICLES IN MOUSE KERATINOCYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Hussain, Saber

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the uptake, localization and the cytotoxic effects of well-dispersed amorphous silica nanoparticles in mouse keratinocytes (HEL-30). Mouse keratinocytes were exposed for 24h to various concentrations of amorphous silica nanoparticles in homogeneous suspensions of average size distribution (30, 48, 118 and 535 nm SiO2) then assessed for uptake and biochemical changes. Results of transmission electron microscopy revealed all sizes of silica were taken up into the cells and localized into the cytoplasm. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay shows LDH leakage was dose- and size-dependent with exposure to 30 and 48 nm nanoparticles. However, no LDH leakage was observed for either 118 or 535 nm nanoparticles. The mitochondrial viability assay (MTT) showed significant toxicity for 30 and 48 nm at high concentrations (100 g/mL) compare to the 118 and 535 nm particles. Further studies were carried out to investigate if cellular reduced GSH and mitochondria membrane potential are involved in the mechanism of SiO2 toxicity. The redox potential of cells (GSH) was reduced significantly at concentrations of 50, 100 and 200 g/mL at 30 nm nanoparticle exposures. However, silica nanoparticles larger than 30 nm showed no changes in GSH levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation did not show any significant change between controls and the exposed cells. In summary, amorphous silica nanoparticles below 100 nm induced cytotoxicity suggest size-of the particles is critical to produce biological effects.

  12. Reducing Environmental Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles through Shape Control.

    PubMed

    Gorka, Danielle E; Osterberg, Joshua S; Gwin, Carley A; Colman, Benjamin P; Meyer, Joel N; Bernhardt, Emily S; Gunsch, Claudia K; DiGulio, Richard T; Liu, Jie

    2015-08-18

    The use of antibacterial silver nanomaterials in consumer products ranging from textiles to toys has given rise to concerns over their environmental toxicity. These materials, primarily nanoparticles, have been shown to be toxic to a wide range of organisms; thus methods and materials that reduce their environmental toxicity while retaining their useful antibacterial properties can potentially solve this problem. Here we demonstrate that silver nanocubes display a lower toxicity toward the model plant species Lolium multiflorum while showing similar toxicity toward other environmentally relevant and model organisms (Danio rerio and Caenorhabditis elegans) and bacterial species (Esherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) compared to quasi-spherical silver nanoparticles and silver nanowires. More specifically, in the L. multiflorum experiments, the roots of silver nanocube treated plants were 5.3% shorter than the control, while silver nanoparticle treated plant roots were 39.6% shorter than the control. The findings here could assist in the future development of new antibacterial products that cause less environmental toxicity after their intended use.

  13. The effects of engineered nanoparticles on pulmonary immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mohamud, Rohimah; Xiang, Sue D; Selomulya, Cordelia; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Hardy, Charles L; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENP), which could be composed of inorganic metals, metal oxides, metalloids, organic biodegradable and inorganic biocompatible polymers, are being used as carriers for vaccine and drug delivery. There is also increasing interest in their application as delivery agents for the treatment of a variety of lung diseases. Although many studies have shown ENP can be effectively and safely used to enhance the delivery of drugs and vaccines in the periphery, there is concern that some ENP could promote inflammation, with unknown consequences for lung immune homeostasis. In this study, we review research on the effects of ENP on lung immunity, focusing on recent studies using diverse animal models of human lung disease. We summarize how the inflammatory and immune response to ENP is influenced by the diverse biophysical and chemical characteristics of the particles including composition, size and mode of delivery. We further discuss newly described unexpected beneficial properties of ENP administered into the lung, where biocompatible polystyrene or silver nanoparticles can by themselves decrease susceptibility to allergic airways inflammation. Increasing our understanding of the differential effects of diverse types of nanoparticles on pulmonary immune homeostasis, particularly previously underappreciated beneficial outcomes, supports rational ENP translation into novel therapeutics for prevention and/or treatment of inflammatory lung disorders.

  14. Toxic effects of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Lawson, Rasheeda; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-sized gold, due to its beautiful and bountiful color and unique optical properties, is a versatile material for many industrial and societal applications. We have studied the effect of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 102. The gold nanoparticles in solution prepared using the citrate reduction method is found not to be toxic or mutagenic but photomutagenic to the bacteria; however, careful control experiments indicate that the photomutagenicity is due to the co-existing citrate and Au3+ ions, not due to the gold nanoparticle itself. Au3+ is also found to be photomutagenic to the bacteria at concentrations lower than 1 µM, but toxic at higher concentrations. The toxicity of Au3+ is enhanced by light irradiation. The photomutagenicity of both citrate and Au3+ is likely due to the formation of free radicals, as a result of light-induced citrate decarboxylation or Au3+ oxidation of co-existing molecules. Both processes can generate free radicals that may cause DNA damage and mutation. Studies of the interaction of gold nanoparticles with the bacteria indicate that gold nanoparticles can be absorbed onto the bacteria surface but not able to penetrate the bacteria wall to enter the bacteria. PMID:21415096

  15. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure were investigated. Results from 7-d sedimen...

  16. Nickel nanoparticles exposure and reproductive toxicity in healthy adult rats.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lu; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Dayong; Hu, Ke; Lu, Weiqi; Wei, Chao; Liang, Geyu; Pu, Yuepu

    2014-01-01

    Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), and lowered etradiol (E2) serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T) diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions. PMID:25407529

  17. Nickel Nanoparticles Exposure and Reproductive Toxicity in Healthy Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lu; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Dayong; Hu, Ke; Lu, Weiqi; Wei, Chao; Liang, Geyu; Pu, Yuepu

    2014-01-01

    Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), and lowered etradiol (E2) serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T) diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions. PMID:25407529

  18. A Review of Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Toxicity of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khalili Fard, Javad; Jafari, Samira; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the use of nanomaterials has received much attention in industrial and medical fields. However, some reports have mentioned adverse effects of these materials on the biological systems and cellular components. There are several major mechanisms for cytotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) such as physicochemical properties, contamination with toxic element, fibrous structure, high surface charge and radical species generation. In this review, a brief key mechanisms involved in toxic effect of NPs are given, followed by the in vitro toxicity assays of NPs and prooxidant effects of several NPs such as carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide NPs, quantum dots, gold NPs and silver NPs. PMID:26819915

  19. Assessment of pulmonary oxygen toxicity: relevance to professional diving; a review.

    PubMed

    van Ooij, P J A M; Hollmann, M W; van Hulst, R A; Sterk, P J

    2013-10-01

    When breathing oxygen with partial oxygen pressures PO₂ of between 50 and 300 kPa pathological pulmonary changes develop after 3-24h depending on the PO₂. This kind of injury (known as pulmonary oxygen toxicity) is not only observed in ventilated patients but is also considered an occupational hazard in oxygen divers or mixed gas divers. To prevent these latter groups from sustaining irreversible lesions adequate prevention is required. This review summarizes the pathophysiological effects on the respiratory tract when breathing oxygen with PO₂ of 50-300 kPa (hyperoxia). We discuss to what extent the most commonly used lung function parameters change after exposure to hyperoxia and its role in monitoring the onset and development of pulmonary oxygen toxicity in daily practice. Finally, new techniques in respiratory medicine are discussed with regard to their usefulness in monitoring pulmonary oxygen toxicity in divers.

  20. Pulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and asbestos - similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig A; Murphy, Fiona A; MacFarlane, Marion; Chernova, Tatyana; Schinwald, Anja

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a valuable industrial product but there is potential for human pulmonary exposure during production and their fibrous shape raises the possibility that they may have effects like asbestos, which caused a worldwide pandemic of disease in the20th century that continues into present. CNT may exist as fibres or as more compact particles and the asbestos-type hazard only pertains to the fibrous forms of CNT. Exposure to asbestos causes asbestosis, bronchogenic carcinoma, mesothelioma, pleural fibrosis and pleural plaques indicating that both the lungs and the pleura are targets. The fibre pathogenicity paradigm was developed in the 1970s-80s and has a robust structure/toxicity relationship that enables the prediction of the pathogenicity of fibres depending on their length, thickness and biopersistence. Fibres that are sufficiently long and biopersistent and that deposit in the lungs can cause oxidative stress and inflammation. They may also translocate to the pleura where they can be retained depending on their length, and where they cause inflammation and oxidative stress in the pleural tissues. These pathobiological processes culminate in pathologic change - fibroplasia and neoplasia in the lungs and the pleura. There may also be direct genotoxic effects of fibres on epithelial cells and mesothelium, contributing to neoplasia. CNT show some of the properties of asbestos and other types of fibre in producing these types of effects and more research is needed. In terms of the molecular pathways involved in the interaction of long biopersistent fibres with target tissue the events leading to mesothelioma have been a particular area of interest. A variety of kinase pathways important in proliferation are activated by asbestos leading to pre-malignant states and investigations are under way to determine whether fibrous CNT also affects these molecular pathways. Current research suggests that fibrous CNT can elicit effects similar to asbestos but more

  1. Applications and toxicity of silver nanoparticles: a recent review.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stefania; Vlasceanu, George Mihail; Tiplea, Roxana Elena; Bucur, Ioana Raluca; Lemnaru, Madalina; Marin, Maria Minodora; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exhibit a consistent amount of flexible properties which endorse them for a larger spectrum of applications in biomedicine and related fields. Over the years, silver nanoparticles have been subjected to numerous in vitro and in vivo tests to provide information about their toxic behavior towards living tissues and organisms. Researchers showed that AgNPs have high antimicrobial efficacy against many bacteria species including Escherichia coli, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis and also viruses. Due to their novel properties, the incorporation of silver nanoparticles into different materials like textile fibers and wound dressings can extend their utility on the biomedical field while inhibiting infections and biofilm development. Among the noble metal nanoparticles, AgNPs present a series of features like simple synthesis routes, adequate and tunable morphology, and high surface to volume ratio, intracellular delivery system, a large plasmon field area recommending them as ideal biosensors, catalysts or photo-controlled delivery systems. In bioengineering, silver nanoparticles are considered potentially ideal gene delivery systems for tissue regeneration. The remote triggered detection and release of bioactive compounds of silver nanoparticles has proved their relevance also in forensic sciences. The authors report an up to date review related to the toxicity of AgNPs and their applications in antimicrobial activity and biosensors for gene therapy. PMID:25877089

  2. Applications and toxicity of silver nanoparticles: a recent review.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stefania; Vlasceanu, George Mihail; Tiplea, Roxana Elena; Bucur, Ioana Raluca; Lemnaru, Madalina; Marin, Maria Minodora; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exhibit a consistent amount of flexible properties which endorse them for a larger spectrum of applications in biomedicine and related fields. Over the years, silver nanoparticles have been subjected to numerous in vitro and in vivo tests to provide information about their toxic behavior towards living tissues and organisms. Researchers showed that AgNPs have high antimicrobial efficacy against many bacteria species including Escherichia coli, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis and also viruses. Due to their novel properties, the incorporation of silver nanoparticles into different materials like textile fibers and wound dressings can extend their utility on the biomedical field while inhibiting infections and biofilm development. Among the noble metal nanoparticles, AgNPs present a series of features like simple synthesis routes, adequate and tunable morphology, and high surface to volume ratio, intracellular delivery system, a large plasmon field area recommending them as ideal biosensors, catalysts or photo-controlled delivery systems. In bioengineering, silver nanoparticles are considered potentially ideal gene delivery systems for tissue regeneration. The remote triggered detection and release of bioactive compounds of silver nanoparticles has proved their relevance also in forensic sciences. The authors report an up to date review related to the toxicity of AgNPs and their applications in antimicrobial activity and biosensors for gene therapy.

  3. Comparative Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Toxicity Using Embryonic Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Wehmas, Leah C.; Anders, Catherine; Chess, Jordan; Punnoose, Alex; Pereira, Cliff B.; Greenwood, Juliet A.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs) are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L). This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (~22.7 fold) when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 hour toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample) were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity. PMID:26029632

  4. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Samantha J.; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B.; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P.; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P.; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E.; Elmore, Susan A.; Morrison, James P.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  5. Inhaled diesel emissions generated with cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additive induce adverse pulmonary and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C; Thomas, Ronald F; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E; Elmore, Susan A; Morrison, James P; Johnson, Crystal L; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe.

  6. Novel lipid hybrid albumin nanoparticle greatly lowered toxicity of pirarubicin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Xuanmiao; Li, Mei; Wu, Wenqi; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Ling; Gong, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Pirarubicin (THP) is an effective anthracycline for the treatment of solid tumor. However, its potential side effects are prominent and clinical use is restricted. We aimed to develop a novel pirarubicin-oleic acid complex albumin nanoparticle (THP-OA-AN) in order to reduce the toxicity of THP. Oleic acid, human serum albumin (HSA), and egg yolk lecithin E80 was used to prepare THP-OA-AN. Prepared THP-OA-AN was characterized and animal experiments were conducted to assess its tumor suppression effect, distribution, and toxicity. Comparison between THP and THP-OA-AN showed that, with retained antitumor efficiency, the toxicity of THP-OA-AN is significantly reduced regarding bone marrow suppression, cardiotoxicity, renal toxicity, and gastrointestinal toxicity. This study developed a safe and effective formulation of THP, which has greater potential for clinic use in the tumor therapy.

  7. Nanoparticle Toxicity Mechanisms: Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Azou, Béatrice; Marano, Francelyne

    Toxicology plays a key role in understanding the potentially harmful biological effects of nanoparticles, since epidemiological studies are still difficult to implement given the lack of data concerning exposure. For this reason, in 2005, Günter Oberdörster coined the term `nanotoxicology' to specify the emerging discipline that dealt with ultrafine particles (UFP). It involves in vivo or in vitro studies under controlled conditions to establish the dose-response relationship, so difficult to expose by epidemiological studies. It also aims to determine the thresholds below which biological effects are no longer observed. It is concerned with the role played by properties specific to nanoparticles in the biological response: size, surface reactivity, chemical composition, solubility, etc.

  8. Silver nanoparticle protein corona and toxicity: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Durán, Nelson; Silveira, Camila P; Durán, Marcela; Martinez, Diego Stéfani T

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are one of the most important materials in the nanotechnology industry. Additionally, the protein corona is emerging as a key entity at the nanobiointerface; thus, a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles is imperative. Therefore, literature reporting studies involving both single molecule protein coronas (i.e., bovine and human serum albumin, tubulin, ubiquitin and hyaluronic-binding protein) and complex protein coronas (i.e., fetal bovine serum and yeast extract proteins) were selected to demonstrate the effects of protein coronas on silver nanoparticle cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity. There is evidence that distinct and differential protein components may yield a "protein corona signature" that is related to the size and/or surface curvature of the silver nanoparticles. Therefore, the formation of silver nanoparticle protein coronas together with the biological response to these coronas (i.e., oxidative stress, inflammation and cytotoxicity) as well as other cellular biophysicochemical mechanisms (i.e., endocytosis, biotransformation and biodistribution) will be important for nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Researchers may benefit from the information contained herein to improve biotechnological applications of silver nanoparticles and to address related safety concerns. In summary, the main aim of this mini-review is to highlight the relationship between the formation of silver nanoparticle protein coronas and toxicity. PMID:26337542

  9. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. Immunoallergologic tests and bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid content.

    PubMed

    Nicolet-Chatelain, G; Prevost, M C; Escamilla, R; Migueres, J

    1991-02-01

    Amiodarone (A) is a widely-used antiarrhythmic drug. Pulmonary toxicity is the most serious adverse effect with an estimated mortality of 1 to 33 percent. In order to determine an element helpful for diagnosis, we examined four patients with amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity, three patients treated with A, without evidence of pulmonary toxicity but with a main underlying pulmonary disease, and four healthy volunteers. Daily and cumulative doses or duration of treatment were similar in the first two groups. Pulmonary function tests (spirometry, CO-diffusing capacity, arterial blood gases), roentgenographic examinations, pulmonary biopsies or immunoallergologic tests (skin reaction, lymphoblastic transformation test and human basophile degranulation test) did not provide any discriminatory element. In APT+, we observed an increased cellularity of the bronchoalveolar lavage. Neither the differential cell count nor the presence of foamy macrophages were distinguishable between APT+ and APT-. The phospholipid composition of BAL fluid showed a decreased total phospholipid and phospholipid/protein ratio in all patients compared to normal subjects. These changes reflect more the severity of pulmonary disease than the specificity of the causative agent. However, we observed that the unique PL which decreases in APT- and remains normal in APT+ is phosphatidyl-serine + phosphatidylinositol (PS + PI). This has to be confirmed and should be evaluated at different stages of the disease to determine an eventual specific element. We conclude that there are no data currently available to establish the diagnosis of APT except perhaps for the analysis of BAL PL content.

  10. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheng, Lin; Huang, Yue-wern; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Ma, Yinfa

    2006-12-31

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

  11. Antimicrobial efficacy and ocular cell toxicity from silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Colleen M.; Duchsherer, Nicole L.

    2009-01-01

    Silver in various forms has long been recognized for antimicrobial properties, both in biomedical devices and in eyes. However, soluble drugs used on the ocular surface are rapidly cleared through tear ducts and eventually ingested, resulting in decreased efficacy of the drug on its target tissue and potential concern for systemic side effects. Silver nanoparticles were studied as a source of anti-microbial silver for possible controlled-release contact lens controlled delivery formulations. Silver ion release over a period of several weeks from nanoparticle sources of various sizes and doses in vitro was evaluated in vitro against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA01. Mammalian cell viability and cytokine expression in response to silver nanoparticle exposure is evaluated using corneal epithelial cells and eye-associated macrophages cultured in vitro in serum-free media. Minimal microcidal and cell toxic effects were observed for several silver nanoparticle suspensions and aqueous extraction times for bulk total silver concentrations commensurate with comparative silver ion (e.g., Ag+(aq)) toxicity. This indicates that (1) silver particles themselves are not microcidal under conditions tested, and (2) insufficient silver ion is generated from these particles at these loadings to produce observable biological effects in these in vitro assays. If dosing allows substantially increased silver particle loading in the lens, the bactericidal efficacy of silver nanoparticles in vitro is one possible approach to limiting bacterial colonization problems associated with extended-wear contact lenses. PMID:19865601

  12. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Liau, Ian; Huang, G. Steve

    2009-08-01

    The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  13. Comparative toxicity of copper nanoparticles across three Lemnaceae species.

    PubMed

    Song, Lan; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-06-15

    Metallic nanoparticles can end up in aquatic ecosystems due to their widespread application. Even though the toxicological effects of metallic nanoparticles to a diversity of species have been reported extensively, the toxicological data achieved in different studies are not always comparable and little is known regarding the comparative toxicity of nanoparticles across species, as different test strategies and endpoints were applied. To attempt to fill this knowledge gap, Spirodela polyrhiza, Lemna minor and Wolffia arrhiza were exposed to 25 nm spherical copper nanoparticles to investigate the inhibiting effect of copper nanoparticle suspensions across species at three endpoints: total frond area, frond number and dry weight based relative growth rate. The total frond area based relative growth rate was found to be the most sensitive endpoint, with an EC50 of 1.15±0.09 mg/L for S. polyrhiza, 0.84±0.12 mg/L for L. minor and 0.64±0.05 mg/L for W. arrhiza. Both the particles and the copper ions contributed to the inhibiting effects of copper nanoparticle suspensions at all endpoints studied. Dose-response related inhibiting effects caused by the copper ions were found at all endpoints studied, whereas the particles only showed dose-response related inhibiting effects on the total frond area based relative growth rate. This suggests that different physiological processes are involved in case of exposure to particles and copper ions. W. arrhiza was found to be the most sensitive species tested and S. polyrhiza was the least sensitive species tested, when the inhibiting effect was evaluated based on the relative growth rate calculated from total frond area. These findings exemplify the importance of identifying the suitable endpoints of toxicity assessment and considering the intrinsic differences between species when evaluating the toxicological profile of metallic nanoparticles across species. PMID:25765374

  14. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guignabert, Christophe; Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Tu, Ly; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  15. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity following pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Vogel, Ulla; Ladefoged, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan

    2009-01-01

    Background The toxic and inflammatory potential of 5 different types of nanoparticles were studied in a sensitive model for pulmonary effects in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE-/-). We studied the effects instillation or inhalation Printex 90 of carbon black (CB) and compared CB instillation in ApoE-/- and C57 mice. Three and 24 h after pulmonary exposure, inflammation was assessed by mRNA levels of cytokines in lung tissue, cell composition, genotoxicity, protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Results Firstly, we found that intratracheal instillation of CB caused far more pulmonary toxicity in ApoE-/- mice than in C57 mice. Secondly, we showed that instillation of CB was more toxic than inhalation of a presumed similar dose with respect to inflammation in the lungs of ApoE-/- mice. Thirdly, we compared effects of instillation in ApoE-/- mice of three carbonaceous particles; CB, fullerenes C60 (C60) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as gold particles and quantum dots (QDs). Characterization of the instillation media revealed that all particles were delivered as agglomerates and aggregates. Significant increases in Il-6, Mip-2 and Mcp-1 mRNA were detected in lung tissue, 3 h and 24 h following instillation of SWCNT, CB and QDs. DNA damage in BAL cells, the fraction of neutrophils in BAL cells and protein in BAL fluid increased statistically significantly. Gold and C60 particles caused much weaker inflammatory responses. Conclusion Our data suggest that ApoE-/- model is sensitive for evaluating particle induced inflammation. Overall QDs had greatest effects followed by CB and SWCNT with C60 and gold being least inflammatory and DNA-damaging. However the gold was used at a much lower mass dose than the other particles. The strong effects of QDs were likely due to Cd release. The surface area of the instilled dose correlated well the inflammatory response for low toxicity particles. PMID:19138394

  16. Prolonged Hypocalcemic Effect by Pulmonary Delivery of Calcitonin Loaded Poly(Methyl Vinyl Ether Maleic Acid) Bioadhesive Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, J.; Minaiyan, M.; Forghanian, M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design a pulmonary controlled release system of salmon calcitonin (sCT). Therefore, poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) [P(MVEMA)] nanoparticles were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Fe2+ and Zn2+ ions. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The stability of sCT in the optimized nanoparticles was studied by electrophoretic gel method. Plasma calcium levels until 48 h were determined in rats as pulmonary-free sCT solution or nanoparticles (25 μg·kg−1), iv solution of sCT (5 μg·kg−1), and pulmonary blank nanoparticles. The drug remained stable during fabrication and tests on nanoparticles. The optimized nanoparticles showed proper physicochemical properties. Normalized reduction of plasma calcium levels was at least 2.76 times higher in pulmonary sCT nanoparticles compared to free solution. The duration of hypocalcemic effect of pulmonary sCT nanoparticles was 24 h, while it was just 1 h for the iv solution. There was not any significant difference between normalized blood calcium levels reduction in pulmonary drug solution and iv injection. Pharmacological activity of nanoparticles after pulmonary delivery was 65% of the iv route. Pulmonary delivery of P(MVEMA) nanoparticles of sCT enhanced and prolonged the hypocalcemic effect of the drug significantly. PMID:24701588

  17. Toxicity of silver and gold nanoparticles on marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Pérez, Sara; Blasco, Julián

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of nanomaterials in several novel industrial applications during the last decade has led to a rise in concerns about the potential toxic effects of released engineered nanoparticles (NPs) into the environment, as their potential toxicity to aquatic organisms is just beginning to be recognised. Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles to aquatic organisms, including microalgae, seems to be related to their physical and chemical properties, as well as their behaviour in the aquatic media where processes of dissolution, aggregation and agglomeration can occur. Although the production of these particles has increased considerably in recent years, data on their toxicity on microalgae, especially those belonging to marine or estuarine environments remain scarce and scattered. The literature shows a wide variation of results on toxicity, mainly due to the different methodology used in bioassays involving microalgae. These can range for up to EC50 data, in the case of AgNPs, representing five orders of magnitude. The importance of initial cellular density is also addressed in the text, as well as the need for keeping test conditions as close as possible to environmental conditions, in order to increase their environmental relevance. This review focuses on the fate and toxicity of silver, gold, and gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on microalgae, as key organisms in aquatic ecosystems. It is prompted by their increased production and use, and taking into account that oceans and estuaries are the final sink for those NPs. The design of bioassays and further research in the field of microalgae nanoecotoxicology is discussed, with a brief survey on newly developed technology of green (algae mediated) production of Ag, Au and Ag-Au bimetallic NPs, as well as some final considerations about future research on this field.

  18. Central nervous system toxicity of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Jianfeng; Shao, Longquan; Wei, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are increasingly used for the therapy, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease- or drug-induced mechanisms in the human biological system. In view of their small size, after certain modifications, NMs have the capacity to bypass or cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnology is particularly advantageous in the field of neurology. Examples may include the utilization of nanoparticle (NP)-based drug carriers to readily cross the blood–brain barrier to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases, nanoscaffolds for axonal regeneration, nanoelectromechanical systems in neurological operations, and NPs in molecular imaging and CNS imaging. However, NPs can also be potentially hazardous to the CNS in terms of nano-neurotoxicity via several possible mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, autophagy, and lysosome dysfunction, and the activation of certain signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the dual effect of NMs on the CNS and the mechanisms involved. The limitations of the current research are also discussed. PMID:26170667

  19. Acute fibrinous organising pneumonia: a manifestation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Fady; Ayaz, Syed Zain; Choate, Jacquelyn

    2014-10-29

    A 50-year-old man was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for acute arthritis of his right big toe. Within a few days, he developed dyspnoea, hypoxaemia and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. Symptoms improved with discontinuation of the antibiotic but worsened again with its reintroduction. An open lung biopsy was performed. We describe the workup performed and the factors that pointed to a final diagnosis of TMP-SMX-related pulmonary toxicity in the form of acute fibrinous organising pneumonia.

  20. Species-specific toxicity of ceria nanoparticles to Lactuca plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, Yuhui; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Xiao; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-02-01

    Species-specific differences in the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) have been reported, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We previously found that CeO2 NPs inhibited root elongation of head lettuce, whereas no toxic effect was observed on other plants (such as wheat, cucumber and radish). In this study, interactions between Lactuca plants and three types of CeO2 NPs (lab-synthesized 7 and 25 nm CeO2 NPs, and a commercial CeO2 NPs) were investigated. It was found that CeO2 NPs were toxic to three kinds of Lactuca genus plants and different CeO2 NPs showed different degrees of toxicity. The results of X-ray absorption near edge fine structure indicate that small parts of CeO2 NPs were transformed from Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in roots of the plants that were treated with CeO2 NPs during the seed germination stage. But the high sensitivity of Lactuca plants to the released Ce(3+) ions caused the species-specific phytotoxicity of CeO2 NPs. Differences in sizes and zeta potentials among three types of CeO2 NPs resulted in their different degrees of biotransformation which accounted for the discrepancy in the toxicity to Lactuca plants. This study is among the few, and may indeed the first, that addresses the relation between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles and its species-specific phytotoxicity.

  1. Nanoparticles: Their potential toxicity, waste and environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrzejewska-Piotrowska, Grazyna Golimowski, Jerzy; Urban, Pawel L.

    2009-09-15

    This literature review discusses specific issues related to handling of waste containing nanomaterials. The aims are (1) to highlight problems related to uncontrolled release of nanoparticles to the environment through waste disposal, and (2) to introduce the topics of nanowaste and nanotoxicology to the waste management community. Many nanoparticles used by industry contain heavy metals, thus toxicity and bioaccumulation of heavy metals contained in nanoparticles may become important environmental issues. Although bioavailability of heavy metals contained in nanoparticles can be lower than those present in soluble form, the toxicity resulting from their intrinsic nature (e.g. their size, shape or density) may be significant. An approach to the treatment of nanowaste requires understanding of all its properties - not only chemical, but also physical and biological. Progress in nanowaste management also requires studies of the environmental impact of the new materials. The authors believe Amara's law is applicable to the impact of nanotechnologies, and society might overestimate the short-term effects of these technologies, while underestimating the long-term effects. It is necessary to have basic information from companies about the level and nature of nanomaterials produced or emitted and about the expectation of the life cycle time of nanoproducts as a basis to estimate the level of nanowaste in the future. Without knowing how companies plan to use and store recycled and nonrecycled nanomaterials, development of regulations is difficult. Tagging of nanoproducts is proposed as a means to facilitate separation and recovery of nanomaterials.

  2. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO2-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO2 in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO2 exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO2 induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO2 and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO2 induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. PMID:22613087

  3. Biophysical inhibition of synthetic vs. naturally-derived pulmonary surfactant preparations by polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Reasonable suspicion has accumulated that inhaled nano-scale particulate matter influences the biophysical function of the pulmonary surfactant system. Hence, it is evident to provide novel insights into the extent and mechanisms of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in order to facilitate the fabrication of safe nanomedicines suitable for pulmonary applications. Negatively- and positively-charged poly(styrene) nanoparticles (diameters of ~100nm) served as model carriers. Nanoparticles were incubated with several synthetic and naturally-derived pulmonary surfactants to characterize the sensitivity of each preparation to biophysical inactivation. Changes in surface properties (i.e. adsorption and dynamic surface tension behavior) were monitored in a pulsating bubble surfactometer. Both nanoparticle formulations revealed a dose-dependent influence on the biophysical behavior of all investigated pulmonary surfactants. However, the surfactant sensitivity towards inhibition depended on both the carrier type, where negatively-charged nanoparticles showed increased inactivation potency compared to their positively-charged counterparts, and surfactant composition. Among the surfactants tested, synthetic mixtures (i.e. phospholipids, phospholipids supplemented with surfactant protein B, and Venticute®) were more susceptible to surface-activity inhibition as the more complex naturally-derived preparations (i.e. Alveofact® and large surfactant aggregates isolated from rabbit bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Overall, nanoparticle characteristics and surfactant constitution both influence the extent of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactants.

  4. Interaction of engineered nanoparticles with toxic and essential elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumakova, A. A.; Gmoshinski, I. V.; Khotimchenko, S. A.; Trushina, E. N.

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of engineered nanoparticles with toxic and essential trace elements must be taken into consideration when estimating risks of NPs presented in the natural environment. The purpose of this work was to study the possible influence of silica, titanium dioxide (rutile) and fullerenol NPs on the toxicity of cadmium and to research the status of some trace elements and related indices of immune function in experiments on laboratory animals. Young male Wistar rats received cadmium salt (1 mg/kg b.w. Cd) orally for 28 days separately or in conjunction with the said kinds of NPs in different doses. A number of effects was observed as a result of combined action of Cd together with NPs, increase in bioaccumulation of this toxic trace element in the liver was most evident. The observed effects didn't show simple dose- dependence in respect to nanomaterials that should be taken into consideration when assessing the possible risks of joint action of nanoparticles and toxic elements existing in the environment in extremely low doses. Violation of microelement homeostasis caused by the combined action of Cd and NPs can have various adverse effects, such as inhibition of T-cell immunity induced by co-administration of Cd with rutile NPs.

  5. Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, Ingrid L.; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures. PMID:24228068

  6. Molecular insights into the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Umbright, Christina; Roberts, Jenny R.; Cumpston, Amy; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David; Li, Shengqiao; Kashon, Michael; Joseph, Pius

    2015-01-01

    Identification of molecular target(s) and mechanism(s) of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity is important for the intervention and/or prevention of diseases associated with exposure to silica. Rats were exposed to crystalline silica by inhalation (15 mg m−3, 6 h per day, 5 days) and global gene expression profile was determined in the lungs by microarray analysis at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks following termination of silica exposure. The number of significantly differentially expressed genes (>1.5-fold change and <0.01 false discovery rate P-value) detected in the lungs during the post-exposure time intervals analyzed exhibited a steady increase in parallel with the progression of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity noticed in the rats. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of a representative set of 10 genes confirmed the microarray findings. The number of biological functions, canonical pathways and molecular networks significantly affected by silica exposure, as identified by the bioinformatics analysis of the significantly differentially expressed genes detected during the post-exposure time intervals, also exhibited a steady increase similar to the silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, respiratory diseases, cancer, and tissue remodeling and fibrosis were significantly differentially expressed in the rat lungs; however, unresolved inflammation was the single most significant biological response to pulmonary exposure to silica. Excessive mucus production, as implicated by significant overexpression of the pendrin coding gene, SLC26A4, was identified as a potential novel mechanism for silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Collectively, the findings of our study provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in the rat. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22431001

  7. Chemical warfare agent and biological toxin-induced pulmonary toxicity: could stem cells provide potential therapies?

    PubMed

    Angelini, Daniel J; Dorsey, Russell M; Willis, Kristen L; Hong, Charles; Moyer, Robert A; Oyler, Jonathan; Jensen, Neil S; Salem, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWAs) as well as biological toxins present a significant inhalation injury risk to both deployed warfighters and civilian targets of terrorist attacks. Inhalation of many CWAs and biological toxins can induce severe pulmonary toxicity leading to the development of acute lung injury (ALI) as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The therapeutic options currently used to treat these conditions are very limited and mortality rates remain high. Recent evidence suggests that human stem cells may provide significant therapeutic options for ALI and ARDS in the near future. The threat posed by CWAs and biological toxins for both civilian populations and military personnel is growing, thus understanding the mechanisms of toxicity and potential therapies is critical. This review will outline the pulmonary toxic effects of some of the most common CWAs and biological toxins as well as the potential role of stem cells in treating these types of toxic lung injuries.

  8. Toxicological Considerations, Toxicity Assessment, and Risk Management of Inhaled Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bakand, Shahnaz; Hayes, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Novel engineered nanoparticles (NPs), nanomaterial (NM) products and composites, are continually emerging worldwide. Many potential benefits are expected from their commercial applications; however, these benefits should always be balanced against risks. Potential toxic effects of NM exposure have been highlighted, but, as there is a lack of understanding about potential interactions of nanomaterials (NMs) with biological systems, these side effects are often ignored. NPs are able to translocate to the bloodstream, cross body membrane barriers effectively, and affect organs and tissues at cellular and molecular levels. NPs may pass the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and gain access to the brain. The interactions of NPs with biological milieu and resulted toxic effects are significantly associated with their small size distribution, large surface area to mass ratio (SA/MR), and surface characteristics. NMs are able to cross tissue and cell membranes, enter into cellular compartments, and cause cellular injury as well as toxicity. The extremely large SA/MR of NPs is also available to undergo reactions. An increased surface area of the identical chemical will increase surface reactivity, adsorption properties, and potential toxicity. This review explores biological pathways of NPs, their toxic potential, and underlying mechanisms responsible for such toxic effects. The necessity of toxicological risk assessment to human health should be emphasised as an integral part of NM design and manufacture. PMID:27314324

  9. Biodistribution and toxicity of spherical aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Gwang-Hee; Yoon, Cheolho; Jeong, Uiseok; Kim, Younghun; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Dong-Wan

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of the nano-industry, concerns about their potential adverse health effects have been raised. Thus, ranking accurately their toxicity and prioritizing for in vivo testing through in vitro toxicity test is needed. In this study, we used three types of synthesized aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlONPs): γ-aluminum oxide hydroxide nanoparticles (γ-AlOHNPs), γ- and α-AlONPs. All three AlONPs were spherical, and the surface area was the greatest for γ-AlONPs, followed by the α-AlONPs and γ-AlOHNPs. In mice, γ-AlOHNPs accumulated the most 24 h after a single oral dose. Additionally, the decreased number of white blood cells (WBC), the increased ratio of neutrophils and the enhanced secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 were observed in the blood of mice dosed with γ-AlOHNPs (10 mg kg(-1)). We also compared their toxicity using four different in vitro test methods using six cell lines, which were derived from their potential target organs, BEAS-2B (lung), Chang (liver), HACAT (skin), H9C2 (heart), T98G (brain) and HEK-293 (kidney). The results showed γ-AlOHNPs induced the greatest toxicity. Moreover, separation of particles was observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of cells treated with γ-AlOHNPs, but not γ-AlONPs or α-AlONPs. In conclusion, our results suggest that the accumulation and toxicity of AlONPs are stronger in γ-AlOHNPs compared with γ-AlONPs and α-AlONPs owing their low stability within biological system, and the presence of hydroxyl group may be an important factor in determining the distribution and toxicity of spherical AlONPs. PMID:26437923

  10. Biodistribution and toxicity of spherical aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Gwang-Hee; Yoon, Cheolho; Jeong, Uiseok; Kim, Younghun; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Dong-Wan

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of the nano-industry, concerns about their potential adverse health effects have been raised. Thus, ranking accurately their toxicity and prioritizing for in vivo testing through in vitro toxicity test is needed. In this study, we used three types of synthesized aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlONPs): γ-aluminum oxide hydroxide nanoparticles (γ-AlOHNPs), γ- and α-AlONPs. All three AlONPs were spherical, and the surface area was the greatest for γ-AlONPs, followed by the α-AlONPs and γ-AlOHNPs. In mice, γ-AlOHNPs accumulated the most 24 h after a single oral dose. Additionally, the decreased number of white blood cells (WBC), the increased ratio of neutrophils and the enhanced secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 were observed in the blood of mice dosed with γ-AlOHNPs (10 mg kg(-1)). We also compared their toxicity using four different in vitro test methods using six cell lines, which were derived from their potential target organs, BEAS-2B (lung), Chang (liver), HACAT (skin), H9C2 (heart), T98G (brain) and HEK-293 (kidney). The results showed γ-AlOHNPs induced the greatest toxicity. Moreover, separation of particles was observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of cells treated with γ-AlOHNPs, but not γ-AlONPs or α-AlONPs. In conclusion, our results suggest that the accumulation and toxicity of AlONPs are stronger in γ-AlOHNPs compared with γ-AlONPs and α-AlONPs owing their low stability within biological system, and the presence of hydroxyl group may be an important factor in determining the distribution and toxicity of spherical AlONPs.

  11. Inhalation of Carbon Black Nanoparticles Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saputra, Devina; Yoon, Jin-ha; Park, Hyunju; Heo, Yongju; Yang, Hyoseon; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sangjin; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of recent studies have focused on the impact of particulate matter on human health. As a model for atmospheric particulate inhalation, we investigated the effects of inhaled carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) on mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The CNBPs were generated by a novel aerosolization process, and the mice were exposed to the aerosol for 4 hours. We found that CBNP inhalation exacerbated lung inflammation, as evidenced by histopathology analysis and by the expression levels of interleukin-6 protein, fibronectin, and interferon-γ mRNAs in lung tissues. Notably, fibronectin mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase in expression after CBNP exposure. These data suggest that the concentration of CBNPs delivered (calculated to be 12.5 μg/m3) can aggravate lung inflammation in mice. Our results also suggest that the inhalation of ultrafine particles like PM 2.5 is an impactful environmental risk factor for humans, particularly in susceptible populations with predisposing lung conditions. PMID:25071917

  12. Airway irritation, inflammation, and toxicity in mice following inhalation of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren T; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Steen S; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Keld A; Wallin, Håkan; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Koponen, Ismo K

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are used in a broad range of industrial processes and workers may be exposed to aerosols of the particles both during production and handling. Despite the widespread use of these particles, relatively few studies have been performed to investigate the toxicological effects in the airways following inhalation. In the present study, the acute (24 h) and persistent (13 weeks) effects in the airways after a single exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles were studied using a murine inhalation model. Mice were exposed 60 min to aerosols of either ZnO, TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 and the deposited doses in the upper and lower respiratory tracts were calculated. Endpoints were acute airway irritation, pulmonary inflammation based on analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell composition, DNA damage assessed by the comet assay and pulmonary toxicity assessed by protein level in BAL fluid and histology. All studied particles reduced the tidal volume in a concentration-dependent manner accompanied with an increase in the respiratory rate. In addition, ZnO and TiO2 induced nasal irritation. BAL cell analyses revealed both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation 24-h post-exposure to all particles except TiO2. The ranking of potency regarding induction of acute lung inflammation was Al2O3 = TiO2 < CeO2 ≪ ZnO. Exposure to CeO2 gave rise to a more persistent inflammation; both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation was seen 13 weeks after exposure. As the only particles, ZnO caused a significant toxic effect in the airways while TiO2 gave rise to DNA-strand break as shown by the comet assay. PMID:27323801

  13. Airway irritation, inflammation, and toxicity in mice following inhalation of metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Steen S.; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Keld A.; Wallin, Håkan; Nielsen, Gunnar D.; Koponen, Ismo K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metal oxide nanoparticles are used in a broad range of industrial processes and workers may be exposed to aerosols of the particles both during production and handling. Despite the widespread use of these particles, relatively few studies have been performed to investigate the toxicological effects in the airways following inhalation. In the present study, the acute (24 h) and persistent (13 weeks) effects in the airways after a single exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles were studied using a murine inhalation model. Mice were exposed 60 min to aerosols of either ZnO, TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 and the deposited doses in the upper and lower respiratory tracts were calculated. Endpoints were acute airway irritation, pulmonary inflammation based on analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell composition, DNA damage assessed by the comet assay and pulmonary toxicity assessed by protein level in BAL fluid and histology. All studied particles reduced the tidal volume in a concentration-dependent manner accompanied with an increase in the respiratory rate. In addition, ZnO and TiO2 induced nasal irritation. BAL cell analyses revealed both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation 24-h post-exposure to all particles except TiO2. The ranking of potency regarding induction of acute lung inflammation was Al2O3 = TiO2 < CeO2 ≪ ZnO. Exposure to CeO2 gave rise to a more persistent inflammation; both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation was seen 13 weeks after exposure. As the only particles, ZnO caused a significant toxic effect in the airways while TiO2 gave rise to DNA-strand break as shown by the comet assay. PMID:27323801

  14. Natural inorganic nanoparticles – formation, fate, and toxicity in the environment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis, stability, and toxicity of engineered metal nanoparticles (ENPs) have been extensively studied during the past two decades. In contrast, research on the formation, fate and ecological effects of naturally occurring nanoparticles (NNPs) has become a focus of attent...

  15. Pulmonary toxicity of cyclophosphamide: a 1-year study

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, C.C.; Sigler, C.; Lock, S.; Hakkinen, P.J.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The development of cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary lesions over a 1-year period was studied in mice. Male BALB/c mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Within 3 weeks there were scattered foci of intraalveolar foamy macrophages. With time, these foci increased in size and, 1 year later, occupied large areas in all lung lobes. There was also diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Chemical determination done 3, 12, 24, and 52 weeks after cyclophosphamide showed that lungs of animals treated with cyclophosphamide had significantly more hydroxyproline per lung than controls. One year after cyclophosphamide pressure - volume curves measured in vivo were shifted down and to the right and total lung volumes were decreased. A single injection of cyclophosphamide produced an irreversible and progressive pulmonary lesion. 16 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Toxicity of oxygen radicals in cultured pulmonary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Autor, A.P.; Bonham, A.C.; Thies, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase and catalase, which catalytically remove superoxide radicals and hydrogen perioxide, respectively, each separately protected cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells from loss of membrane integrity after exposure to oxygen radicals generated either cellularly (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) or chemically (dihydroxyfumarate). Nicotinamide, a precursor of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and an inhibitor of ADP-ribose synthetase, also protected cultured endothelial cells from loss of membrane integrity in a concentration-dependent manner after exposure to dihydroxyfumarate.

  17. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  18. Toxicity Effect of Silver Nanoparticles in Brine Shrimp Artemia

    PubMed Central

    Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Jennifer, Samou Michael; Prabhu, Durai; Chandhirasekar, Devakumar

    2014-01-01

    The present study revealed the toxic effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in Artemia nauplii and evaluated the mortality rate, hatching percentage, and genotoxic effect in Artemia nauplii/cysts. The AgNPs were commercially purchased and characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were spherical in nature and with size range of 30–40 nm. Artemia cysts were collected from salt pan, processed, and hatched in sea water. Artemia nauplii (II instar) were treated using silver nanoparticles of various nanomolar concentrations and LC50 value (10 nM) and mortality rate (24 and 48 hours) was evaluated. Hatching percentage of decapsulated cysts treated with AgNPs was examined. Aggregation of AgNPs in the gut region of nauplii was studied using phase contrast microscope and apoptotic cells in nauplii stained with acridine orange were observed using fluorescence microscope. DNA damage of single cell of nauplii was determined by comet assay. This study showed that as the concentration of AgNPs increased, the mortality rate, aggregation in gut region, apoptotic cells, and DNA damage increased in nauplii, whereas the percentage of hatching in Artemia cysts decreased. Thus this study revealed that the nanomolar concentrations of AgNPs have toxic effect on both Artemia nauplii and cysts. PMID:24516361

  19. Copper oxide nanoparticles are highly toxic: a comparison between metal oxide nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hanna L; Cronholm, Pontus; Gustafsson, Johanna; Möller, Lennart

    2008-09-01

    Since the manufacture and use of nanoparticles are increasing, humans are more likely to be exposed occupationally or via consumer products and the environment. However, so far toxicity data for most manufactured nanoparticles are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare different nanoparticles and nanotubes regarding cytotoxicity and ability to cause DNA damage and oxidative stress. The study was focused on different metal oxide particles (CuO, TiO2, ZnO, CuZnFe2O4, Fe3O4, Fe2O3), and the toxicity was compared to that of carbon nanoparticles and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). The human lung epithelial cell line A549 was exposed to the particles, and cytotoxicity was analyzed using trypan blue staining. DNA damage and oxidative lesions were determined using the comet assay, and intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using the oxidation-sensitive fluoroprobe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that there was a high variation among different nanoparticles concerning their ability to cause toxic effects. CuO nanoparticles were most potent regarding cytotoxicity and DNA damage. The toxicity was likely not explained by Cu ions released to the cell medium. These particles also caused oxidative lesions and were the only particles that induced an almost significant increase (p = 0.058) in intracellular ROS. ZnO showed effects on cell viability as well as DNA damage, whereas the TiO2 particles (a mix of rutile and anatase) only caused DNA damage. For iron oxide particles (Fe3O4, Fe2O3), no or low toxicity was observed, but CuZnFe2O4 particles were rather potent in inducing DNA lesions. Finally, the carbon nanotubes showed cytotoxic effects and caused DNA damage in the lowest dose tested. The effects were not explained by soluble metal impurities. In conclusion, this study highlights the in vitro toxicity of CuO nanoparticles.

  20. Species-specific toxicity of ceria nanoparticles to Lactuca plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, Yuhui; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Xiao; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-02-01

    Species-specific differences in the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) have been reported, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We previously found that CeO2 NPs inhibited root elongation of head lettuce, whereas no toxic effect was observed on other plants (such as wheat, cucumber and radish). In this study, interactions between Lactuca plants and three types of CeO2 NPs (lab-synthesized 7 and 25 nm CeO2 NPs, and a commercial CeO2 NPs) were investigated. It was found that CeO2 NPs were toxic to three kinds of Lactuca genus plants and different CeO2 NPs showed different degrees of toxicity. The results of X-ray absorption near edge fine structure indicate that small parts of CeO2 NPs were transformed from Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in roots of the plants that were treated with CeO2 NPs during the seed germination stage. But the high sensitivity of Lactuca plants to the released Ce(3+) ions caused the species-specific phytotoxicity of CeO2 NPs. Differences in sizes and zeta potentials among three types of CeO2 NPs resulted in their different degrees of biotransformation which accounted for the discrepancy in the toxicity to Lactuca plants. This study is among the few, and may indeed the first, that addresses the relation between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles and its species-specific phytotoxicity. PMID:24256192

  1. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies. PMID:26286636

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of a Pulmonary Surfactant Film Interacting with a Carbonaceous Nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Seungho; Chang, Rakwoo; Jeon, Jonggu; Violi, Angela

    2008-01-01

    This article reports an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation to study a model pulmonary surfactant film interacting with a carbonaceous nanoparticle. The pulmonary surfactant is modeled as a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayer with a peptide consisting of the first 25 residues from surfactant protein B. The nanoparticle model with a chemical formula C188H53 was generated using a computational code for combustion conditions. The nanoparticle has a carbon cage structure reminiscent of the buckyballs with open ends. A series of molecular-scale structural and dynamical properties of the surfactant film in the absence and presence of nanoparticle are analyzed, including radial distribution functions, mean-square displacements of lipids and nanoparticle, chain tilt angle, and the surfactant protein B peptide helix tilt angle. The results show that the nanoparticle affects the structure and packing of the lipids and peptide in the film, and it appears that the nanoparticle and peptide repel each other. The ability of the nanoparticle to translocate the surfactant film is one of the most important predictions of this study. The potential of mean force for dragging the particle through the film provides such information. The reported potential of mean force suggests that the nanoparticle can easily penetrate the monolayer but further translocation to the water phase is energetically prohibitive. The implication is that nanoparticles can interact with the lung surfactant, as supported by recent experimental data by Bakshi et al. PMID:18923102

  3. Toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Combarros, R G; Collado, S; Díaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in industrial and household applications will very likely lead to the release of such materials into the environment. As wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are usually the last barrier before the water is discharged into the environment, it is important to understand the effects of these materials in the biotreatment processes, since the results in the literature are usually contradictory. We proposed the use of flow cytometry (FC) technology to obtain conclusive results. Aqueous solutions of TiO2 nanoparticles (0-2 mg mL(-1)) were used to check its toxicity effect using Pseudomonas putida as simplified model of real sludge over room light. Physiological changes in P. putida from viable to viable but non-culturable cells were observed by flow cytometry in presence of TiO2. The damaged and dead cell concentrations were below 5% in all cases under study. Both FSC and SSC parameter increased with TiO2 dose dependent manner, indicating nanoparticles uptake by the bacteria. The biological removal of salicylic acid (SA) was also significantly impacted by the presence of TiO2 in the medium reducing the efficiency. The use of FC allows also to develop and fit segregated kinetic models, giving the impact of TiO2 nanoparticles in the physiological subpopulations growth and implications for SA removal.

  4. Toxicity of Calcium Hydroxide Nanoparticles on Murine Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Azadnia, Sina; Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major contributing factors, which may cause failure of endodontic treatment, is the presence of residual microorganisms in the root canal system. For years, most dentists have been using calcium hydroxide (CH) as the intracanal medicament between treatment sessions to eliminate remnant microorganisms. Reducing the size of CH particles into nanoparticles enhances the penetration of this medicament into dentinal tubules and increases their antimicrobial efficacy. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles and conventional CH on fibroblast cell line using the Mosmann’s Tetrazolium Toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on L929 murine fibroblast cell line by cell culture and evaluation of the direct effect of materials on the cultured cells. Materials were evaluated in two groups of 10 samples each at 24, 48 and 72 h. At each time point, 10 samples along with 5 positive and 5 negative controls were evaluated. The samples were transferred into tubes and exposed to fibroblast cells. The viability of cells was then evaluated. The Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Cytotoxicity of both materials decreased over time and for conventional CH was lower than that of nanoparticles. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles was similar to that of conventional CH. PMID:25598810

  5. A Review on the Respiratory System Toxicity of Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pacurari, Maricica; Lowe, Kristine; Tchounwou, Paul B; Kafoury, Ramzi

    2016-03-15

    The respiratory system represents the main gateway for nanoparticles' entry into the human body. Although there is a myriad of engineered nanoparticles, carbon nanoparticles/nanotubes (CNPs/CNTs) have received much attention mainly due to their light weight, very high surface area, durability, and their diverse applications. Since their discovery and manufacture over two decades ago, much has been learned about nanoparticles' interactions with diverse biological system models. In particular, the respiratory system has been of great interest because various natural and man-made fibrous particles are known to be responsible for chronic and debilitating lung diseases. In this review, we present up-to-date the literature regarding the effects of CNTs or carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the human respiratory system with respect to respiratory toxicity pathways and associated pathologies. This article is intended to emphasize the potentially dangerous effects to the human respiratory system if inadequate measures are used in the manufacture, handling, and preparation and applications of CNP or CNP-based products.

  6. Environmental feedbacks and engineered nanoparticles: mitigation of silver nanoparticle toxicity to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by algal-produced organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Louise M; Dickson, Helen; Klanjscek, Tin; Keller, Arturo A; McCauley, Edward; Nisbet, Roger M

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of nanotoxicity studies measures the effect of exposure to a toxicant on an organism and ignores the potentially important effects of the organism on the toxicant. We investigated the effect of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on populations of the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at different phases of batch culture growth and show that the AgNPs are most toxic to cultures in the early phases of growth. We offer strong evidence that reduced toxicity occurs because extracellular dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds produced by the algal cells themselves mitigate the toxicity of AgNPs. We analyzed this feedback with a dynamic model incorporating algal growth, nanoparticle dissolution, bioaccumulation of silver, DOC production and DOC-mediated inactivation of nanoparticles and ionic silver. Our findings demonstrate how the feedback between aquatic organisms and their environment may impact the toxicity and ecological effects of engineered nanoparticles.

  7. Environmental Feedbacks and Engineered Nanoparticles: Mitigation of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Algal-Produced Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Louise M.; Dickson, Helen; Klanjscek, Tin; Keller, Arturo A.; McCauley, Edward; Nisbet, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of nanotoxicity studies measures the effect of exposure to a toxicant on an organism and ignores the potentially important effects of the organism on the toxicant. We investigated the effect of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on populations of the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at different phases of batch culture growth and show that the AgNPs are most toxic to cultures in the early phases of growth. We offer strong evidence that reduced toxicity occurs because extracellular dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds produced by the algal cells themselves mitigate the toxicity of AgNPs. We analyzed this feedback with a dynamic model incorporating algal growth, nanoparticle dissolution, bioaccumulation of silver, DOC production and DOC-mediated inactivation of nanoparticles and ionic silver. Our findings demonstrate how the feedback between aquatic organisms and their environment may impact the toxicity and ecological effects of engineered nanoparticles. PMID:24086348

  8. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO{sub 2}-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO{sub 2} in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO{sub 2} exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO{sub 2} induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO{sub 2} and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO{sub 2} induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. -- Highlights: ► Cerium oxide exposure significantly affected the following parameters in the lung. ► Induced fibrotic cytokine OPN and TGF-β1 production and phospholipidosis. ► Caused imbalance of the MMP-9/ TIMP-1 ratio that favors fibrosis

  9. On the Toxicity of Therapeutically Used Nanoparticles: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, A.; Al-Daihan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Human beings have been exposed to airborne nanosized particles throughout their evolutionary stages, and such exposures have increased dramatically over the last century. The rapidly developing field of nanotechnology will result in new sources of this exposure, through inhalation, ingestion, and injection. Although nanomaterials are currently being widely used in modern technology, there is a serious lack of information concerning the human health and environmental implications of manufactured nanomaterials. Since these are relatively new particles, it is necessary to investigate their toxicological behavior. The objective of this review was to trace the cellular response to nanosized particle exposure. Therapeutic application of selected nanoparticles together with their range of toxic doses was also reviewed. Effect of therapeutically used nanoparticles on cell membrane, mitochondrial function, prooxidant/antioxidant status, enzyme leakage, DNA, and other biochemical endpoints was elucidated. This paper highlights the need for caution during the use and disposal of such manufactured nanomaterials to prevent unintended environmental impacts. PMID:20130771

  10. Comparison of the Pulmonary Oxidative Stress Caused by Intratracheal Instillation and Inhalation of NiO Nanoparticles when Equivalent Amounts of NiO Are Retained in the Lung.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masanori; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Izumi, Hiroto; Oyabu, Takako; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Okada, Takami; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kubo, Masaru; Shimada, Manabu; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    NiO nanoparticles were administered to rat lungs via intratracheal instillation or inhalation. During pulmonary toxicity caused by NiO nanoparticles, the induction of oxidative stress is a major factor. Both intratracheal instillation and inhalation of NiO nanoparticles induced pulmonary oxidative stress. The oxidative stress response protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was induced by the administration of NiO nanoparticles at both the protein and gene expression level. Additionally, certain oxidative-stress markers in the lung, such as 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, thioredoxin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the lung was also increased by the administration of NiO nanoparticles. When the amount of NiO in the lung is similar, the responses against pulmonary oxidative stress of intratracheal instillation and inhalation are also similar. However, the state of pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase was different between intratracheal instillation and inhalation, even if the amount of NiO in the lung was similar. Inhalation causes milder oxidative stress than that caused by intratracheal instillation. On evaluation of the nanoparticle-induced pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase, we should understand the different states of oxidative stress induced by intratracheal instillation and inhalation. PMID:26797643

  11. Methods for nanoparticle labeling of ricin and effect on toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Alastair W.; Yu, Jun; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Nativo, Paola; Graham, Duncan

    2009-09-01

    The unique optical properties associated with nanostructured materials that support the excitation of surface plasmons offer many new opportunities for the enhanced optical investigation of biological materials that pose a security threat. In particular, ricin is considered a significant bioterrorism risk due to its high toxicity combined with its ready availability as a byproduct in castor oil production. Therefore, the development of optical techniques capable of rapid on-site toxin detection with high molecular specificity and sensitivity continues to be of significant importance. Furthermore, understanding of the ricin cell entry and intracellular pathways remains poor due to a lack of suitable bioanalytical techniques. Initial work aimed at simultaneously tackling both these issues is described where different approaches for the nanoparticle labeling of ricin are investigated along with changes in ricin toxicity associated with the labeling process.

  12. Role of oxidative stress in thuringiensin-induced pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.-F. . E-mail: sftsai@tactri.gov.tw; Yang Chi; Liu, B.-L.; Hwang, J.-S.; Ho, S.-P. . E-mail: spho@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2006-10-15

    To understand the effect of thuringiensin on the lungs tissues, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administrated with thuringiensin by intratracheal instillation at doses 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. The rats were sacrificed 4 h after treatment, and lungs were isolated and examined. Subsequently, an effective dose of 1.6 mg/kg was selected for the time course study (4, 8, 12, and 24 h). Intratracheal instillation of thuringiensin resulted in lung damage, as evidenced by increase in lung weight and decrease in alkaline phosphatase (10-54%), an enzyme localized primarily in pulmonary alveolar type II epithelial cells. Furthermore, the administration of thuringiensin caused increases in lipid peroxidation (21-105%), the indices of lung injury. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) activities of lung tissue extracts were measured to evaluate the effect of thuringiensin on antioxidant defense system. The SOD activity and GSH content in lung showed significant decreases in a dose-related manner with 11-21% and 15-37%, respectively. Those were further supported by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, as indicated by increases in IL-1{beta} (229-1017%) and TNF-{alpha} (234%) levels. Therefore, the results demonstrated that changes in the pulmonary oxidative-antioxidative status might play an important role in the thuringiensin-induced lung injury.

  13. Early Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Uzung; Marinelli, Laura; Ali, Sayed; Huberfeld, Seymour; Barrera, Rafael; Chang, John B

    2016-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug that has been commonly used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. This drug is an iodine-containing compound that tends to accumulate in several organs, including the lungs. Especially, its main metabolically active metabolite desethylamiodarone can adversely affect many organs. A very well-known severe complication of amiodarone therapy is the amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. This article presents the case study of an 82-year-old male patient with acute amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. The patient underwent endovascular aneurysm repair for rapidly increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm. During the postoperative period the patient developed rapid atrial fibrillation and amiodarone therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the patient went into acute respiratory failure and was requiring high supplemental oxygen support and a chest X-ray revealed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. During the hospital course the patient required mechanical ventilator support. With discontinuation of amiodarone, supportive therapy and steroid treatment patient symptoms significantly improved. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity must be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients on the medication with progressive or acute respiratory symptoms. Early discontinuation of amiodarone and aggressive corticosteroid therapy should be considered as a viable treatment strategy. PMID:27574388

  14. Pulmonary extraction of propranolol in normal and oxygen-toxic sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.E.; Lanken, P.N.; Hansen-Flaschen, J.H.; Haselton, F.R.; Albelda, S.M.; Fishman, A.P.

    1989-07-01

    To help define the mechanisms involved in the handling of propranolol by normal and injured lungs, we studied the pulmonary extraction of (/sup 3/H)propranolol in 23 unanesthetized sheep. Extraction of propranolol by normal lungs during a single circulation was characterized by (1) subsequent back-diffusion and pulmonary retention of the drug, (2) no evidence of saturable uptake or binding, (3) no effect of isoproterenol or imipramine, and (4) no effect of increasing cardiac output by treadmill exercise. In lungs damaged by oxygen toxicity, (/sup 3/H)propranolol extraction decreased progressively to 63% of base line, paralleling progressive arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnia. In contrast, (/sup 14/C)serotonin extraction remained unchanged from base line. Our results suggest that in normal unanesthetized sheep, pulmonary extraction of propranolol occurs primarily by passive diffusion that is flow-limited. Also, lung injury induced by oxygen toxicity in sheep reduces the pulmonary extraction of propranolol. Indeed, in oxygen toxicity, the depressed extraction of propranolol is a more sensitive marker of lung injury than is serotonin extraction.

  15. Comparative toxicity of silicon dioxide, silver and iron oxide nanoparticles after repeated oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Seung-Hyun; You, Ji-Ran; Kim, Woo Ho; Jang, Ja-June; Min, Seung-Kee; Kim, Hee Chan; Chung, Doo Hyun; Jeong, Jayoung; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Che, Jeong-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Although silicon dioxide (SiO2), silver (Ag) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles are widely used in diverse applications from food to biomedicine, in vivo toxicities of these nanoparticles exposed via the oral route remain highly controversial. To examine the systemic toxicity of these nanoparticles, well-dispersed nanoparticles were orally administered to Sprague-Dawley rats daily over a 13-week period. Based on the results of an acute toxicity and a 14-day repeated toxicity study, 975.9, 1030.5 and 1000 mg kg(-1) were selected as the highest dose of the SiO2 , Ag and Fe2O3 nanoparticles, respectively, for the 13-week repeated oral toxicity study. The SiO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not induce dose-related changes in a number of parameters associated with the systemic toxicity up to 975.9 and 1000 mg kg(-1) , respectively, whereas the Ag nanoparticles resulted in increases in serum alkaline phosphatase and calcium as well as lymphocyte infiltration in liver and kidney, raising the possibility of liver and kidney toxicity induced by the Ag nanoparticles. Compared with the SiO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles showing no systemic distribution in all tissues tested, the Ag concentration in sampled blood and organs in the Ag nanoparticle-treated group significantly increased with a positive and/or dose-related trend, meaning that the systemic toxicity of the Ag nanoparticles, including liver and kidney toxicity, might be explained by extensive systemic distribution of Ag originating from the Ag nanoparticles. Our current results suggest that further study is required to identify that Ag detected outside the gastrointestinal tract were indeed a nanoparticle form or ionized form.

  16. Compared in vivo toxicity in mice of lung delivered biodegradable and non-biodegradable nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aragao-Santiago, Letícia; Hillaireau, Hervé; Grabowski, Nadège; Mura, Simona; Nascimento, Thais L; Dufort, Sandrine; Coll, Jean-Luc; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2016-01-01

    To design nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems for pulmonary administration, biodegradable materials are considered safe, but their potential toxicity is poorly explored. We here explore the lung toxicity in mice of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) and compare it to the toxicity of non-biodegradable ones. NP formulations of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coated with chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) or poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which renders 200 nm NPs of positive, negative or neutral surface charge respectively, were analyzed for their biodistribution by in vivo fluorescence imaging and their inflammatory potential after single lung nebulization in mice. After exposure, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell population, protein secretion and cytokine release as well as lung histology were carried out. The inflammatory response was compared to the one induced by non-biodegradable counterparts, namely, TiO2 of rutile and anatase crystal form and polystyrene (PS). PLGA NPs were mostly present in mice lungs, with little passage to other organs. An increase in neutrophil recruitment was observed in mice exposed to PS NPs 24 h after nebulization, which declined at 48 h. This result was supported by an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) in BAL supernatant at 24 h. TiO2 anatase NPs were still present in lung cells 48 h after nebulization and induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells to BAL. In contrast, regardless of their surface charge, PLGA NPs did not induce significant changes in the inflammation markers analyzed. In conclusion, these results point out to a safe use of PLGA NPs regardless of their surface coating compared to non-biodegradable ones.

  17. In Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a diversity of materials with unique physicochemical characteristics which raise concerns about their potential risk to human health. Rapid predictive testing methods are needed to characterize NMs health effects as well as to screen and prioritize N...

  18. Toxicity of mycotoxins for the rat pulmonary macrophage in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, W.G.; Gerberick, G.F.; Lewis, D.M.; Castranova, V.

    1986-04-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in grains is well documented. Workers in grain handling occupations are commonly exposed to grain dust aerosols. Work in our laboratory has shown that T-2 toxin is highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro, causing loss of viability, release of radiolabeled chromium, inhibition of macromolecular synthesis, inhibition of phagocytosis, and inhibition of macrophage activation. Similarly, patulin caused a significant release of radiolabeled chromium, decrease in ATP levels, significant inhibition of protein and RNA synthesis, and inhibition of phagocytosis. The data show that both T-2 toxin and patulin are highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The data further suggest that the presence of these mycotoxins in airborne respirable dust might present a hazard to exposed workers.

  19. Suppressing iron oxide nanoparticle toxicity by vascular targeted antioxidant polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cochran, David B; Wattamwar, Paritosh P; Wydra, Robert; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W; Eitel, Richard E; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2013-12-01

    The biomedical use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been of continued interest in the literature and clinic. Their ability to be used as contrast agents for imaging and/or responsive agents for remote actuation makes them exciting materials for a wide range of clinical applications. Recently, however, concern has arisen regarding the potential health effects of these particles. Iron oxide toxicity has been demonstrated in in vivo and in vitro models, with oxidative stress being implicated as playing a key role in this pathology. One of the key cell types implicated in this injury is the vascular endothelial cells. Here, we report on the development of a targeted polymeric antioxidant, poly(trolox ester), nanoparticle that can suppress oxidative damage. As the polymer undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis, active trolox is locally released, providing a long term protection against pro-oxidant agents. In this work, poly(trolox) nanoparticles are targeted to platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecules (PECAM-1), which are able to bind to and internalize in endothelial cells and provide localized protection against the cytotoxicity caused by iron oxide nanoparticles. These results indicate the potential of using poly(trolox ester) as a means of mitigating iron oxide toxicity, potentially expanding the clinical use and relevance of these exciting systems.

  20. Toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Nadine; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Kockentiedt, Sarah; Hintz, Werner; Tomas, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA NPs) are candidates for a drug delivery system, which can cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Because little is known about their toxicity, we exposed cells to PBCA NPs in vitro and in vivo and monitored their life and death assays. PBCA NPs were fabricated with different surfactants according to the mini-emulsion technique. Viabilities of HeLa and HEK293 cells after NP incubation were quantified by analysing cellular metabolic activity (MTT-test). We then repetitively injected i.v. rhodamine-labelled PBCA NP variations into rats and monitored the survival and morphology of retrogradely labelled neurons by in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) for five weeks. To test for carrier-efficacy and safety, PBCA NPs loaded with Kyotorphin were injected in rats, and a hot plate test was used to quantify analgesic effects. In vitro, we found dose-dependent cell death which was, however, only detectable at very high doses and mainly seen in the cultures incubated with NPs fabricated with the tensids SDS and Tween. However, the in vivo experiments did not show any NP-induced neuronal death, even with particles which were toxic at high dose in vitro, i.e. NPs with Tween and SDS. The increased pain threshold at the hot plate test demonstrated that PBCA NPs are able to cross the BBB and thus comprise a useful tool for drug delivery into the central nervous system (CNS). Our findings showing that different nanoparticle formulations are non-toxic have important implications for the value of NP engineering approaches in medicine. PMID:26420981

  1. Gene Expression and Pulmonary Toxicity of Chitosan-graft- Polyethylenimine as Aerosol Gene Carrier.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Taek; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Gyu Woo, Chang; Choi, Mansoo; Cho, Chong-Su; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (CHI-g-PEI) copolymer has been used for the improvement of low transfection efficiency of chitosan. The present study aims to test the pulmonary toxicity and efficiency of CHI-g-PEI as an aerosol gene carrier. Mice were exposed to aerosol containing green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyethylenimine (PEI) or GFP-CHI-g-PEI complexes for 30 min during the development of our nose-only exposure chamber (NOEC) system. CHI-g-PEI-mediated aerosol delivery demonstrated 15.65% enhancement of the fluorescence intensity. Compared to PEI, CHI-g-PEI showed no significant pulmonary toxicity. In summary, using CHI-g-PEI is safe and shows high transfection in aerosol gene delivery to animals, and enhanced efficiency was achieved through our aerosol gene delivery system. Therefore, CHI-g-PEI and this system would be applicable to future study for aerosol gene therapy. PMID:24250601

  2. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  3. Pulmonary toxicity of components of textile paint linked to the Ardystil syndrome: intratracheal administration in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Clottens, F L; Verbeken, E K; Demedts, M; Nemery, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It was hypothesised from an epidemiological investigation that a formula change from Acramin FWR (a polyurea) to Acramin FWN (a polyamide-amine) had led to severe pulmonary disease in textile printing sprayers in SPAIN AND ALGERIA. To verify this, the pulmonary toxicity of the components of the paint systems involved was assessed in experimental animals. METHODS: Individual components and relevant mixtures, diluted in phosphate buttered saline, were given by intratracheal instillation of 2 ml/kg to hamsters. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed on days 3, 7, 14, 28, and 92 after a single intratracheal instillation, by histology and by measuring wet and dry lung weight, protein concentration, the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase, inflammatory cell number and distribution in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and hydroxyproline content in dried lung tissue. RESULTS: Based on the doses that killed 50% of the animals (LD50s), the various components were found to be 10 to 1250 times more toxic when given intratracheally than when given orally (according to reported oral LD50s in rats). Acramin FWN, Acramin FWR, Acrafix FHN, or their mixtures caused lung damage. Protein concentration, enzyme activities, total cell number, and percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils were increased in BALF during the first week after intratracheal instillation. Lung weights remained high for at least a month. Histology showed inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent fibrosis with collagen deposition. This finding was confirmed by an increased hydroxyproline content in dried lung tissue. Acramoll W did not show toxic effects. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that there is no major difference, in hamsters, between the acute intratracheal toxicity of Acramin FWR and that of Acramin FWN. Consequently, there is no simple toxicological explanation for the epidemiological hypothesis. However

  4. Pulmonary toxicity of indium-tin oxide production facility particles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Badding, Melissa A.; Fix, Natalie R.; Orandle, Marlene S.; Barger, Mark W.; Dunnick, Katherine M.; Cummings, Kristin J.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. Occupational exposures to potentially toxic particles generated during ITO production have increased in recent years as the demand for consumer electronics continues to rise. Previous studies have demonstrated cytotoxicity in vitro and animal models have shown pulmonary inflammation and injury in response to various indium-containing particles. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which indium materials or specific processes in the workplace may be the most toxic to workers is unknown. Here we examined the pulmonary toxicity of three different particle samples that represent real-life worker exposures, as they were collected at various production stages throughout an ITO facility. Indium oxide (In2O3), sintered ITO (SITO) and ventilation dust (VD) particles each caused pulmonary inflammation and damage in rats over a time course (1, 7 and 90 days post-intratracheal instillation), but SITO and VD appeared to induce greater toxicity in rat lungs than In2O3 at a dose of 1 mg per rat. Downstream pathological changes such as PAP and fibrosis were observed in response to all three particles 90 days after treatment, with a trend towards greatest severity in animals exposed to VD when comparing animals that received the same dose. These findings may inform workplace exposure reduction efforts and provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of an emerging occupational health issue. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26472246

  5. Pulmonary toxicity of indium-tin oxide production facility particles in rats.

    PubMed

    Badding, Melissa A; Fix, Natalie R; Orandle, Marlene S; Barger, Mark W; Dunnick, Katherine M; Cummings, Kristin J; Leonard, Stephen S

    2016-04-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. Occupational exposures to potentially toxic particles generated during ITO production have increased in recent years as the demand for consumer electronics continues to rise. Previous studies have demonstrated cytotoxicity in vitro and animal models have shown pulmonary inflammation and injury in response to various indium-containing particles. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which indium materials or specific processes in the workplace may be the most toxic to workers is unknown. Here we examined the pulmonary toxicity of three different particle samples that represent real-life worker exposures, as they were collected at various production stages throughout an ITO facility. Indium oxide (In2O3), sintered ITO (SITO) and ventilation dust (VD) particles each caused pulmonary inflammation and damage in rats over a time course (1, 7 and 90 days post-intratracheal instillation), but SITO and VD appeared to induce greater toxicity in rat lungs than In2O3 at a dose of 1 mg per rat. Downstream pathological changes such as PAP and fibrosis were observed in response to all three particles 90 days after treatment, with a trend towards greatest severity in animals exposed to VD when comparing animals that received the same dose. These findings may inform workplace exposure reduction efforts and provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of an emerging occupational health issue.

  6. ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESPIRABLE TIRE PARTICLES AND ASSESSMENT OF CARDIO-PULMONARY TOXICITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental Analysis of Respirable Tire Particles and Assessment of Cardio-pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    R.R. Gottipolu, PhD1, E. Landa, PhD2, J.K. McGee, MS1, M.C. Schladweiler, BS1, J.G. Wallenborn, MS3, A.D. Ledbetter, BS1, J.E. Richards, MS1 and U.P. Kodavanti, PhD1. 1NHEER...

  7. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity--a fatal case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Range, Felix T; Hilker, Ekkehard; Breithardt, Günter; Buerke, Boris; Lebiedz, Pia

    2013-06-01

    Amiodarone is a widely used and very potent antiarrhythmic substance. Among its adverse effects, pulmonary toxicity is the most dangerous without a causal treatment option. Due to a very long half-life, accumulation can only be prevented by strict adherence to certain dosage patterns. In this review, we outline different safe and proven dosing schemes of amiodarone and compare the incidence and description of pulmonary toxicity. Reason for this is a case of fatal pulmonary toxicity due to a subacute iatrogenic overdosing of amiodarone in a 74-year-old male patient with known severe coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and ectopic atrial tachycardia with reduced function of kidneys and liver but without preexisting lung disease. Within 30 days, the patient received 32.2 g of amiodarone instead of 15.6 g as planned. Despite early corticosteroid treatment after fast exclusion of all other differential diagnoses, the patient died another month later in our intensive care unit from respiratory failure due to bipulmonal pneumonitis. PMID:23397327

  8. Toxicity assessment of zinc oxide nanoparticles using sub-acute and sub-chronic murine inhalation models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many commercial products and the potential for human exposure is increasing, few in vivo studies have addressed their possible toxic effects after inhalation. We sought to determine whether ZnO NPs induce pulmonary toxicity in mice following sub-acute or sub-chronic inhalation exposure to realistic exposure doses. Methods Mice (C57Bl/6) were exposed to well-characterized ZnO NPs (3.5 mg/m3, 4 hr/day) for 2 (sub-acute) or 13 (sub-chronic) weeks and necropsied immediately (0 wk) or 3 weeks (3 wks) post exposure. Toxicity was assessed by enumeration of total and differential cells, determination of total protein, lactate dehydrogenase activity and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid as well as measurements of pulmonary mechanics. Generation of reactive oxygen species was assessed in the lungs. Lungs were evaluated for histopathologic changes and Zn content. Zn concentration in blood, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, brain and BAL fluid was measured. Results An elevated concentration of Zn2+ was detected in BAL fluid immediately after exposures, but returned to baseline levels 3 wks post exposure. Dissolution studies showed that ZnO NPs readily dissolved in artificial lysosomal fluid (pH 4.5), but formed aggregates and precipitates in artificial interstitial fluid (pH 7.4). Sub-acute exposure to ZnO NPs caused an increase of macrophages in BAL fluid and a moderate increase in IL-12(p40) and MIP-1α, but no other inflammatory or toxic responses were observed. Following both sub-acute and sub-chronic exposures, pulmonary mechanics were no different than sham-exposed animals. Conclusions Our ZnO NP inhalation studies showed minimal pulmonary inflammation, cytotoxicity or lung histopathologic changes. An elevated concentration of Zn in the lung and BAL fluid indicates dissolution of ZnO NPs in the respiratory system after inhalation. Exposure concentration, exposure mode and time post

  9. Toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Magdalena; Sawicki, Krzysztof; Sikorska, Katarzyna; Popek, Sylwia; Kruszewski, Marcin; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have found many practical applications in industry and daily life. A widespread application of TiO2 NPs rises the question about safety of their use in the context of potential occupational, environmental and intentional exposure of humans and biota. TiO2 NPs easily enter the body through inhalation, cross blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the brain, especially in the cortex and hippocampus. Toxicity of these NPs and the molecular mechanisms of their action have been studied extensively in recent years. Studies showed that TiO2 NPs exposure resulted in microglia activation, reactive oxygen species production, activation of signaling pathways involved in inflammation and cell death, both in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, such action led to neuroinflammation, further brain injury. A spatial recognition memory and locomotor activity impairment has been also observed.

  10. Toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles on adult male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Abbasalipourkabir, Roghayeh; Moradi, Hemen; Zarei, Sadegh; Asadi, Soheila; Salehzadeh, Aref; Ghafourikhosroshahi, Abolfazl; Mortazavi, Motahareh; Ziamajidi, Nasrin

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) on adult male Wistar rats. Thirty male Wistar rats divided into five groups of six animals each were used for this study. For ten days, Groups one to four continuously received 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg nZnO, respectively. Group five served as the control group. At the end of the study, the rats were sacrificed and histopathological study of the liver and renal tissue, sperm analysis, serum oxidative stress parameters and some liver enzymes were done. The results of this study showed that nZnO at concentration more than 50 mg/kg lead to significant changes in liver enzymes, oxidative stress, liver and renal tissue and sperm quality and quantity. In conclusion, the toxicity of nZnO is more significant when the concentration is increased; however, the use of low doses requires further investigation.

  11. A Review on the Respiratory System Toxicity of Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Lowe, Kristine; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Kafoury, Ramzi

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory system represents the main gateway for nanoparticles’ entry into the human body. Although there is a myriad of engineered nanoparticles, carbon nanoparticles/nanotubes (CNPs/CNTs) have received much attention mainly due to their light weight, very high surface area, durability, and their diverse applications. Since their discovery and manufacture over two decades ago, much has been learned about nanoparticles’ interactions with diverse biological system models. In particular, the respiratory system has been of great interest because various natural and man-made fibrous particles are known to be responsible for chronic and debilitating lung diseases. In this review, we present up-to-date the literature regarding the effects of CNTs or carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the human respiratory system with respect to respiratory toxicity pathways and associated pathologies. This article is intended to emphasize the potentially dangerous effects to the human respiratory system if inadequate measures are used in the manufacture, handling, and preparation and applications of CNP or CNP-based products. PMID:26999172

  12. Acute pulmonary toxicity of urban particulate matter and ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, R.; Bjarnason, S. G.; Adamson, I. Y.; Hedgecock, C.; Kumarathasan, P.; Guénette, J.; Potvin, M.; Goegan, P.; Bouthillier, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the acute lung toxicity of urban particulate matter in interaction with ozone. Rats were exposed for 4 hours to clean air, ozone (0.8 ppm), the urban dust EHC-93 (5 mg/m3 or 50 mg/m3), or ozone in combination with urban dust. The animals were returned to clean air for 32 hours and then injected (intraperitoneally) with [3H]thymidine to label proliferating cells and killed after 90 minutes. The lungs were fixed by inflation, embedded in glycol methacrylate, and processed for light microscopy autoradiography. Cell labeling was low in bronchioles (0.14 +/- 0.04%) and parenchyma (0.13 +/- 0.02%) of air control animals. Inhalation of EHC-93 alone did not induce cell labeling. Ozone alone increased (P < 0.05) cell labeling (bronchioles, 0.42 +/- 0.16%; parenchyma, 0.57 +/- 0.21%), in line with an acute reparative cell proliferation. The effects of ozone were clearly potentiated by co-exposure with either the low (3.31 +/- 0.31%; 0.99 +/- 0.18%) or the high (4.45 +/- 0.51%; 1.47 +/- 0.18%) concentrations of urban dust (ozone X EHC-93, P < 0.05). Cellular changes were most notable in the epithelia of terminal bronchioles and alveolar ducts and did not distribute to the distal parenchyma. Enhanced DNA synthesis indicates that particulate matter from ambient air can exacerbate epithelial lesions in the lungs. This may extend beyond air pollutant interactions, such as to effects of inhaled particles in the lungs of compromised individuals. Images Figure 1 PMID:9403707

  13. Toxic effects of silica nanoparticles on zebrafish embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo; Shi, Huiqin; Tian, Linwei; Guo, Caixia; Huang, Peili; Zhou, Xianqing; Peng, Shuangqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been widely used in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Environmental exposure to nanomaterials is inevitable as they become part of our daily life. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the possible toxic effects of SiNPs exposure. In this study, zebrafish embryos were treated with SiNPs (25, 50, 100, 200 µg/mL) during 4-96 hours post fertilization (hpf). Mortality, hatching rate, malformation and whole-embryo cellular death were detected. We also measured the larval behavior to analyze whether SiNPs had adverse effects on larvae locomotor activity. The results showed that as the exposure dosages increasing, the hatching rate of zebrafish embryos was decreased while the mortality and cell death were increased. Exposure to SiNPs caused embryonic malformations, including pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, tail and head malformation. The larval behavior testing showed that the total swimming distance was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The lower dose (25 and 50 µg/mL SiNPs) produced substantial hyperactivity while the higher doses (100 and 200 µg/mL SiNPs) elicited remarkably hypoactivity in dark periods. In summary, our data indicated that SiNPs caused embryonic developmental toxicity, resulted in persistent effects on larval behavior. PMID:24058598

  14. Aquatic Toxicity Comparison of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Eun Kyung; Johari, Seyed Ali; Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Ellen; Lee, Ji Hyun; Chung, Young Shin; Yu, Il Je

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impact of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) released into freshwater environments, the toxicities of these nanomaterials were assessed and compared using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guidelines, including a "Daphnia sp., acute immobilization test," "Fish, acute toxicity test," and "freshwater alga and cyanobacteria, growth inhibition test." Based on the estimated median lethal/effective concentrations of AgNPs and AgNWs, the susceptibility to the nanomaterials was different among test organisms (daphnia > algae > fish), suggesting that the AgNPs are classified as "category acute 1" for Daphnia magna, "category acute 2" for Oryzias latipes, and "category acute 1" for Raphidocelis subcapitata, while the AgNWs are classified as "category acute 1" for Daphnia magna, "category acute 2" for Oryzias latipes, and "category acute 2" for Raphidocelis subcapitata, according to the GHS (Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals). In conclusion, the present results suggest that more attention should be paid to prevent the accidental or intentional release of silver nanomaterials into freshwater aquatic environments. PMID:26125025

  15. Mechanisms of Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liying

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has offered innovative discoveries in the medical, industrial, and consumer sectors. The unique physicochemical and electrical properties of engineered nanoparticles (NP) make them highly desirable in a variety of applications. However, these novel properties of NP are fraught with concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in structural and physicochemical properties of NP can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS generation, one of the most frequently reported NP-associated toxicities. Oxidative stress induced by engineered NP is due to acellular factors such as particle surface, size, composition, and presence of metals, while cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, NP-cell interaction, and immune cell activation are responsible for ROS-mediated damage. NP-induced oxidative stress responses are torch bearers for further pathophysiological effects including genotoxicity, inflammation, and fibrosis as demonstrated by activation of associated cell signaling pathways. Since oxidative stress is a key determinant of NP-induced injury, it is necessary to characterize the ROS response resulting from NP. Through physicochemical characterization and understanding of the multiple signaling cascades activated by NP-induced ROS, a systemic toxicity screen with oxidative stress as a predictive model for NP-induced injury can be developed. PMID:24027766

  16. Validation of an LDH Assay for Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xianglu; Gelein, Robert; Corson, Nancy; Wade-Mercer, Pamela; Jiang, Jingkun; Biswas, Pratim; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Elder, Alison; Oberdörster, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Studies showed that certain cytotoxicity assays were not suitable for assessing nanoparticle (NP) toxicity. We evaluated a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for assessing copper (Cu-40, 40 nm), silver (Ag-35, 35 nm; Ag-40, 40 nm), and titanium dioxide (TiO2-25, 25 nm) NPs by examining their potential to inactivate LDH and interference with β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), a substrate for the assay. We also performed a dissolution assay for some of the NPs. We found that the copper NPs, because of their high dissolution rate, could interfere with the LDH assay by inactivating LDH. Ag-35 could also inactivate LDH probably because of the carbon matrix used to cage the particles during synthesis. TiO2-25 NPs were found to adsorb LDH molecules. In conclusion, NP interference with the LDH assay depends on the type of NPs and the suitability of the assay for assessing NP toxicity should be examined case by case. PMID:21722700

  17. Aquatic Toxicity Comparison of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Ellen; Lee, Ji Hyun; Chung, Young Shin

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impact of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) released into freshwater environments, the toxicities of these nanomaterials were assessed and compared using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guidelines, including a “Daphnia sp., acute immobilization test,” “Fish, acute toxicity test,” and “freshwater alga and cyanobacteria, growth inhibition test.” Based on the estimated median lethal/effective concentrations of AgNPs and AgNWs, the susceptibility to the nanomaterials was different among test organisms (daphnia > algae > fish), suggesting that the AgNPs are classified as “category acute 1” for Daphnia magna, “category acute 2” for Oryzias latipes, and “category acute 1” for Raphidocelis subcapitata, while the AgNWs are classified as “category acute 1” for Daphnia magna, “category acute 2” for Oryzias latipes, and “category acute 2” for Raphidocelis subcapitata, according to the GHS (Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals). In conclusion, the present results suggest that more attention should be paid to prevent the accidental or intentional release of silver nanomaterials into freshwater aquatic environments. PMID:26125025

  18. Research of nickel nanoparticles toxicity with use of Aquatic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgaleva, T.; Morgalev, Yu; Gosteva, I.; Morgalev, S.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of nanoparticles with the particle size Δ50=5 nm on the test function of aquatic organisms was analyzed by means of biotesting methods with the use of a complex of test-organisms representing general trophic levels. The dependence of an infusoria Paramecium caudatum chemoattractant-elicited response, unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris Beijer growth rate, Daphnia magna Straus mortality and trophic activity and Danio rerio fish kill due to nNi disperse system concentration, is estimated. It is determined that the release of chlorella into cultivated environment including nNi as a feed for daphnias raises the death rate of entomostracans. The minimal concentration, whereby an organism response to the effect of nNi is registered, depends on the type of test organism and the analysed test function. L(E)C20 is determined for all the organisms used in bioassays. L(E)C50 is estimated for Paramecium caudatum (L(E)C50 = 0.0049 mg/l), for Chlorella vulgaris Beijer (L(E)C50 = 0.529 mg/l), for Daphnia m. S (L(E)C50 > 100 mg/l) and for fish Danio rerio (L(E)C50 > 100 mg/l). According to the Globally Harmonized System hazard substance evaluation criteria and Commission Directive 93/67/EEC, nNi belongs to the “acute toxicity 1” category of toxic substances.

  19. Toxicity of platinum (IV) salts for cells of pulmonary origin.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, M D; Vaughan, T O; Abernethy, D J; Garland, H R; Cox, C C; Coffin, D L

    1975-01-01

    The acute toxicity of tetravalent platinum was studied in vitro by use of rabbit alveolar macrophages and human lung fibroblasts (strain WI-38). Alveolar macrophages were exposed in tissue culture for 20 hr to platinum dioxide (PtO2) or platinum tetrachloride (PtCl4). There was no evidence of dissolution of PtO2 and no decrease in viable cells at concentrations as high as 500 mug/ml. PtCl4 was soluble in the macrophage system and after a 20-hr exposure, resulted in loss of viability in 50% of the cells originally present at a concentration of 0.30mM (59 mug Pt/ml). After a 20-hr exposure, rapidly growing human lung fibroblasts were rendered nonviable by PtCl4 at comparable concentrations. A decrease in total cellular ATP was observed at lower concentrations in macrophages and fibroblasts along with a reduction in phagocytic activity of macrophages as compared to controls. With the fibroblasts, a 50% decrease in incorporation of 14C-thymidine was observed after a 22-hr exposure to PtCl4 at a concentration of 0.007mM; higher concentrations were required to inhibit the incorporation of 14C-uridine and 14C-leucine. Time-course studies indicated that the inhibition of 14C-thymidine incorporation was nearly complete (90%) after 7 hr in the presence of 0.06mM PtCl4. Under the same conditions, there was little inhibition (15%) of 14C-leucine incorporation and moderate inhibition (50%) of 14C-uridine incorporation. Higher concentrations of PtCl4 were required to inhibit 14C-thymidine incorporation into the acid-soluble fraction than were required to inhibit incorporation into the acid-precipitable fraction. Hence, the preferential inhibition of DNA synthesis by PtCl4 may result from an impairment of the incorporation process. PMID:1241674

  20. Dose-Dependent Pulmonary Toxicity After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, David C. Smythe, W. Roy; Liao Zhongxing; Guerrero, Thomas; Chang, Joe Y.; McAleer, Mary F.; Jeter, Melenda D.; Correa, Arlene Ph.D.; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Liu, H. Helen; Komaki, Ritsuko; Forster, Kenneth M.; Stevens, Craig W.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of fatal pulmonary events after extrapleural pneumonectomy and hemithoracic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 63 consecutive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who underwent extrapleural pneumonectomy and IMRT at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The endpoints studied were pulmonary-related death (PRD) and non-cancer-related death within 6 months of IMRT. Results: Of the 63 patients, 23 (37%) had died within 6 months of IMRT (10 of recurrent cancer, 6 of pulmonary causes [pneumonia in 4 and pneumonitis in 2], and 7 of other noncancer causes [pulmonary embolus in 2, sepsis after bronchopleural fistula in 1, and cause unknown but without pulmonary symptoms or recurrent disease in 4]). On univariate analysis, the factors that predicted for PRD were a lower preoperative ejection fraction (p = 0.021), absolute volume of lung spared at 10 Gy (p = 0.025), percentage of lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}; p 0.002), and mean lung dose (p = 0.013). On multivariate analysis, only V{sub 20} was predictive of PRD (p = 0.017; odds ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.08) or non-cancer-related death (p = 0.033; odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.45). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that fatal pulmonary toxicities were associated with radiation to the contralateral lung. V{sub 20} was the only independent determinant for risk of PRD or non-cancer-related death. The mean V{sub 20} of the non-PRD patients was considerably lower than that accepted during standard thoracic radiotherapy, implying that the V{sub 20} should be kept as low as possible after extrapleural pneumonectomy.

  1. Toxicity, bioaccumulation, and biotransformation of silver nanoparticles in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhua; Ho, Kay T; Scheckel, Kirk G; Wu, Fengchang; Cantwell, Mark G; Katz, David R; Horowitz, Doranne Borsay; Boothman, Warren S; Burgess, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation, and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure was investigated. Results from 7-d sediment toxicity tests indicate that AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP did not exhibit toxicity to the amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia) at ≤75 mg/kg dry wt. A 28-d bioaccumulation study showed that Ag was significantly accumulated in the marine polychaete Nereis virens (N. virens) in the AgNP-citrate, AgNP-PVP and a conventional salt (AgNO3) treatments. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) results showed the distribution of Ag species in marine sediments amended with AgNP-citrate, AgNP-PVP, and AgNO3 was AgCl (50–65%) > Ag2S (32–42%) > Ag metal (Ag0) (3–11%). In N virens, AgCl (25–59%) and Ag2S (10–31%) generally decreased and, Ag metal (32–44%) increased, relative to the sediments. The patterns of speciation in the worm were different depending upon the coating of the AgNP and both types of AgNPs were different than the AgNO3 salt. These results show that the AgNP surface capping agents influenced Ag uptake, biotransformation, and/or excretion. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the bioaccumulation and speciation of AgNPs in a marine organism (N. virens).

  2. Differential effects of pirfenidone on acute pulmonary injury and ensuing fibrosis in the hamster model of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Racz, William J; Brien, James F; Margolin, Solomon B; Massey, Thomas E

    2003-09-01

    Pulmonary toxicity, including fibrosis, is a serious adverse effect associated with the antidysrhythmic drug amiodarone (AM). We tested the potential usefulness of pirfenidone against AM-induced pulmonary toxicity in the hamster model. Intratracheal AM administration resulted in pulmonary fibrosis 21 days posttreatment, as evidenced by an increased hydroxyproline content and histological damage. Dietary pirfenidone administration (0.5% w/w in chow), for 3 days prior to and continuously after AM, prevented fibrosis and suppressed elevation of pulmonary transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 mRNA content at 7 and 21 days post-AM. Protection against AM-induced lung damage was not observed when supplementation with pirfenidone was delayed until 7 days following AM administration, suggesting that alteration of early events in AM lung toxicity is necessary for the protective effect of pirfenidone. Both AM and bleomycin, another pulmonary fibrogen, caused inflammation 24 h after intratracheal dosing, measured as increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, protein content, and cellular alterations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, with the response to AM markedly greater than that to bleomycin. Administration of AM, but not bleomycin, also caused whole lung mitochondrial dysfunction, alveolar macrophage death, and an influx of eosinophils into the lung, of which pirfenidone was able to decrease only the latter. We conclude that: (1) AM induces alveolar macrophage death and severe, acute pulmonary inflammation with associated eosinophilia following intratracheal administration; (2) mitochondrial dysfunction may play an early role in AM pulmonary injury; and (3) pirfenidone decreases AM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the hamster, probably through suppression of TGF-beta1 gene expression.

  3. Toxicity of various silver nanoparticles compared to silver ions in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impacts of silver nanoparticles released into freshwater environments, the Daphnia magna 48-hour immobilization test was used. Methods The toxicities of silver nitrate, two types of colloidal silver nanoparticles, and a suspension of silver nanoparticles were assessed and compared using standard OECD guidelines. Also, the swimming behavior and visible uptake of the nanoparticles by Daphnia were investigated and compared. The particle suspension and colloids used in the toxicity tests were well-characterized. Results The results obtained from the exposure studies showed that the toxicity of all the silver species tested was dose and composition dependent. Plus, the silver nanoparticle powders subsequently suspended in the exposure water were much less toxic than the previously prepared silver nanoparticle colloids, whereas the colloidal silver nanoparticles and AgNO3 were almost similar in terms of mortality. The silver nanoparticles were ingested by the Daphnia and accumulated under the carapace, on the external body surface, and connected to the appendages. All the silver species in this study caused abnormal swimming by the D. magna. Conclusion According to the present results, silver nanoparticles should be classified according to GHS (Globally Harmonized System of classification and labeling of chemicals) as "category acute 1" to Daphnia neonates, suggesting that the release of nanosilver into the environment should be carefully considered. PMID:22472056

  4. The Stability of Silver Nanoparticles in a Model of Pulmonary Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Fen, Leo Bey; Chen, Shu; Kyo, Yoshihiko; Herpoldt, Karla-Luise; Terrill, Nicholas J.; Dunlop, Iain E.; McPhail, David S.; Shaffer, Milo S.; Schwander, Stephan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Ryan, Mary P.

    2013-01-01

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products has raised concerns about their potential impact on the environment and human health. Whether AgNPs dissolve and release Ag+ ions, or coarsen to form large aggregates, is critical in determining their potential toxicity. In this work, the stability of AgNPs in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major component of pulmonary surfactant, was investigated as a function of pH. Spherical, citrate-capped AgNPs with average diameters of 14 ± 1.6 nm (n=200) were prepared by a chemical bath reduction. The kinetics of Ag+ ion release was strongly pH-dependent. After 14 days of incubation in sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) or perchloric acid (HClO4) solutions, the total fraction of AgNPs dissolved varied from ~10 % at pH 3, to ~2 % at pH 5, with negligible dissolution at pH 7. A decrease in pH from 7 to 3 also promoted particle aggregation and coarsening. DPPC (100 mg.L−1) delayed the release of Ag+ ions, but did not significantly alter the total amount of Ag+ released after two weeks. In addition, DPPC improved the dispersion of the AgNPs and inhibited aggregation and coarsening. TEM images revealed that the AgNPs were coated with a DPPC layer serving as a semi-permeable layer. Hence, lung lining fluid, particularly DPPC, can modify the aggregation state and kinetics of Ag+ ion release of inhaled AgNPs in the lung. These observations have important implications for predicting the potential reactivity of AgNPs in the lung and the environment. PMID:23988335

  5. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Gil-Jong; Maeng, Eun-Ho; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnOSM20(+) NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm) on pregnant dams and embryo–fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5–19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnOSM20(+) NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%); resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. Morphological examinations of the fetuses demonstrated significant differences in incidences of abnormalities in the group administered 400mg/kg/day. Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Zn content of fetal tissue between the control and high-dose groups. These results showed that oral doses for the study with 15-days repeated of ZnOSM20(+) NPs were maternotoxic in the 200 mg/kg/day group, and embryotoxic in the 400 mg/kg/day group. PMID:25565834

  6. Vascular toxicity of silver nanoparticles to developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiejun; Mahapatra, Cecon T; Mapes, Christopher D; Khlebnikova, Maria; Wei, Alexander; Sepúlveda, Marisol S

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs, 1-100 nm) can enter the environment and result in exposure to humans and other organisms leading to potential adverse health effects. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of early life exposure to polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs, 50 nm), particularly with respect to vascular toxicity on zebrafish embryos and larvae (Danio rerio). Previously published data has suggested that PVP-AgNP exposure can inhibit the expression of genes within the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway, leading to delayed and abnormal vascular development. Here, we show that early acute exposure (0-12 h post-fertilization, hpf) of embryos to PVP-AgNPs at 1 mg/L or higher results in a transient, dose-dependent induction in VEGF-related gene expression that returns to baseline levels at hatching (72 hpf). Hatching results in normoxia, negating the effects of AgNPs on vascular development. Interestingly, increased gene transcription was not followed by the production of associated proteins within the VEGF pathway, which we attribute to NP-induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The impaired translation may be responsible for the observed delays in vascular development at later stages, and for smaller larvae size at hatching. Silver ion (Ag(+)) concentrations were < 0.001 mg/L at all times, with no significant effects on the VEGF pathway. We propose that PVP-AgNPs temporarily delay embryonic vascular development by interfering with oxygen diffusion into the egg, leading to hypoxic conditions and ER stress.

  7. Vascular toxicity of silver nanoparticles to developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiejun; Mahapatra, Cecon T; Mapes, Christopher D; Khlebnikova, Maria; Wei, Alexander; Sepúlveda, Marisol S

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs, 1-100 nm) can enter the environment and result in exposure to humans and other organisms leading to potential adverse health effects. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of early life exposure to polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs, 50 nm), particularly with respect to vascular toxicity on zebrafish embryos and larvae (Danio rerio). Previously published data has suggested that PVP-AgNP exposure can inhibit the expression of genes within the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway, leading to delayed and abnormal vascular development. Here, we show that early acute exposure (0-12 h post-fertilization, hpf) of embryos to PVP-AgNPs at 1 mg/L or higher results in a transient, dose-dependent induction in VEGF-related gene expression that returns to baseline levels at hatching (72 hpf). Hatching results in normoxia, negating the effects of AgNPs on vascular development. Interestingly, increased gene transcription was not followed by the production of associated proteins within the VEGF pathway, which we attribute to NP-induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The impaired translation may be responsible for the observed delays in vascular development at later stages, and for smaller larvae size at hatching. Silver ion (Ag(+)) concentrations were < 0.001 mg/L at all times, with no significant effects on the VEGF pathway. We propose that PVP-AgNPs temporarily delay embryonic vascular development by interfering with oxygen diffusion into the egg, leading to hypoxic conditions and ER stress. PMID:27499207

  8. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Gil-Jong; Maeng, Eun-Ho; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm) on pregnant dams and embryo-fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5-19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%); resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. Morphological examinations of the fetuses demonstrated significant differences in incidences of abnormalities in the group administered 400mg/kg/day. Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Zn content of fetal tissue between the control and high-dose groups. These results showed that oral doses for the study with 15-days repeated of ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs were maternotoxic in the 200 mg/kg/day group, and embryotoxic in the 400 mg/kg/day group. PMID:25565834

  9. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Erik Q.; Cafasso, Danielle E.; Lee, Karen W.M.; Pierce, Lisa M.

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ► Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ► W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ► W

  10. Evaluation of the Pulmonary Toxicity of Ambient Particulate Matter From Camp Victory, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Porter, K L; Green, F H Y; Harley, R A; Vallyathan, V; Castranova, V; Waldron, N R; Leonard, S S; Nelson, D E; Lewis, J A; Jackson, D A

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal reports in the press and epidemiological studies suggest that deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan may be associated with respiratory diseases and symptoms in U.S. military personnel and veterans. Exposures during military operations were complex, but virtually all service members were exposed to high levels of respirable, geogenic dust. Inhalation of other dusts has been shown to be associated with adverse health effects, but the pulmonary toxicity of ambient dust from Iraq has not been previously studied. The relative toxicity of Camp Victory dust was evaluated by comparing it to particulate matter from northern Kuwait, a standard U.S. urban dust, and crystalline silica using a single intratracheal instillation in rats. Lung histology, protein levels, and cell counts were evaluated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 1-150 d later. The Iraq dust provoked an early significant, acute inflammatory response. However, the level of inflammation in response to the Iraq dust, U.S. urban dust, and Kuwait dust rapidly declined and was nearly at control levels by the end of the study At later times, animals exposed to the Iraq, U.S. urban, or Kuwait dusts showed increased small airway remodeling and emphysema compared to silica-exposed and control animals without evidence of fibrosis or premalignant changes. The severity and persistence of pulmonary toxicity of these three dusts from the Middle East resemble those of a U.S. urban dust and are less than those of silica. Therefore, Iraq dust exposure is not highly toxic, but similar to other poorly soluble low-toxicity dusts.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE PULMONARY TOXICITY OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER FROM CAMP VICTORY, IRAQ

    PubMed Central

    Porter, K. L.; Green, F. H. Y.; Harley, R. A.; Vallyathan, V.; Castranova, V.; Waldron, N. R.; Leonard, S. S.; Nelson, D. E.; Lewis, J. A.; Jackson, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal reports in the press and epidemiological studies suggest that deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan may be associated with respiratory diseases and symptoms in U.S. military personnel and veterans. Exposures during military operations were complex, but virtually all service members were exposed to high levels of respirable, geogenic dust. Inhalation of other dusts has been shown to be associated with adverse health effects, but the pulmonary toxicity of ambient dust from Iraq has not been previously studied. The relative toxicity of Camp Victory dust was evaluated by comparing it to particulate matter from northern Kuwait, a standard U.S. urban dust, and crystalline silica using a single intratracheal instillation in rats. Lung histology, protein levels, and cell counts were evaluated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 1–150 d later. The Iraq dust provoked an early significant, acute inflammatory response. However, the level of inflammation in response to the Iraq dust, U.S. urban dust, and Kuwait dust rapidly declined and was nearly at control levels by the end of the study At later times, animals exposed to the Iraq, U.S. urban, or Kuwait dusts showed increased small airway remodeling and emphysema compared to silica-exposed and control animals without evidence of fibrosis or premalignant changes. The severity and persistence of pulmonary toxicity of these three dusts from the Middle East resemble those of a U.S. urban dust and are less than those of silica. Therefore, Iraq dust exposure is not highly toxic, but similar to other poorly soluble low-toxicity dusts. PMID:26594896

  12. Surface coating mediates the toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles towards human-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Nadège; Hillaireau, Hervé; Vergnaud, Juliette; Tsapis, Nicolas; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Fattal, Elias

    2015-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the toxicity of a series of poly(lactide-co-glycolic) (PLGA) nanoparticles on human-like THP-1 macrophages. Positively-, negatively-charged and neutral nanoparticles (200 nm) were prepared using chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as stabilizer. Stabilizer-free PLGA nanoparticles were obtained as well. When used at therapeutically relevant concentrations (up to 0.1 mg/mL in vitro), all tested nanoparticles showed no or scarce signs of toxicity, as assessed by cell mitochondrial activity, induction of apoptosis and necrosis, production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. At high concentrations (above 1mg/mL), cytotoxicity was found to be induced by the presence of stabilizers, whatever the toxicological pattern of the stabilizer itself. While stabilizer-free PLGA nanoparticles exerted no cytotoxicity, the slightly cytotoxic CS polymer conferred PLGA nanoparticles significant cytotoxicity when used as nanoparticle stabilizer; more surprisingly, the otherwise innocuous PVA and PF68 polymers also conferred a significant cytotoxicity to PLGA nanoparticles. These results unveiled the critical toxicological contribution played by stabilizers used for the formulation of PLGA nanoparticles when used at high concentrations, which may have implications for local toxicities of PLGA-based nanomedicine, and provided additional insight in cytotoxic effects of internalized nanoparticles.

  13. Size-dependent toxicity of silica nano-particles to Chlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kitao; Suematsu, Hitoshi; Kiyomiya, Emiko; Aoki, Motohide; Sato, Mamiko; Moritoki, Nobuko

    2008-08-01

    SiO(2) nano-particles were found to exhibit size-dependent toxicity toward the alga, Chlorella kessleri. Small SiO(2) nano-particles exhibit stronger toxicity: 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) value for 5 nm = 0.8 +/- 0.6%, 26 nm = 7.1 +/- 2.8%, and 78 nm = 9.1 +/- 4.7%. Enlargement of the cell body was observed by flow cytometry, which is due to the presence of structures that obstructed cell division. Optical and transmission microscopes were used to observe coagulated cells with incomplete division. Although the physiological effect of SiO(2) nano-particles was not clear, SiO(2) nano-particles are toxic, at least for algae in aquatic media. Under the transmission electron microscope, several amorphous structures appeared in the cells that were exposed to 5-nm silica nano-particles. PMID:18584432

  14. Surface charge of gold nanoparticles mediates mechanism of toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeublin, Nicole M.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Schrand, Amanda M.; Miller, John M.; Hutchison, Jim; Schlager, John J.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-02-01

    Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the event that they come into contact with a biological system. In the present study, we have investigated whether modulating the surface charge of 1.5 nm Au NPs induced changes in cellular morphology, mitochondrial function, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular calcium levels, DNA damage-related gene expression, and of p53 and caspase-3 expression levels after exposure in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The evaluation of three different Au NPs (positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged) showed that cell morphology was disrupted by all three NPs and that they demonstrated a dose-dependent toxicity; the charged Au NPs displayed toxicity as low as 10 µg ml-1 and the neutral at 25 µg ml-1. Furthermore, there was significant mitochondrial stress (decreases in MMP and intracellular Ca2+ levels) following exposure to the charged Au NPs, but not the neutral Au NPs. In addition to the differences observed in the MMP and Ca2+ levels, up or down regulation of DNA damage related gene expression suggested a differential cell death mechanism based on whether or not the Au NPs were charged or neutral. Additionally, increased nuclear localization of p53 and caspase-3 expression was observed in cells exposed to the charged Au NPs, while the neutral Au NPs caused an increase in both nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 expression. In conclusion, these results indicate that surface charge is a major determinant of how Au NPs impact cellular processes, with the charged NPs inducing cell death through apoptosis and neutral NPs leading to necrosis.Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the

  15. Toxicity of zero-valent iron nanoparticles to a trichloroethylene-degrading groundwater microbial community.

    PubMed

    Zabetakis, Kara M; Niño de Guzmán, Gabriela T; Torrents, Alba; Yarwood, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The microbiological impact of zero-valent iron used in the remediation of groundwater was investigated by exposing a trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic microbial community to two types of iron nanoparticles. Changes in total bacterial and archaeal population numbers were analyzed using qPCR and were compared to results from a blank and negative control to assess for microbial toxicity. Additionally, the results were compared to those of samples exposed to silver nanoparticles and iron filings in an attempt to discern the source of toxicity. Statistical analysis revealed that the three different iron treatments were equally toxic to the total bacteria and archaea populations, as compared with the controls. Conversely, the silver nanoparticles had a limited statistical impact when compared to the controls and increased the microbial populations in some instances. Therefore, the findings suggest that zero-valent iron toxicity does not result from a unique nanoparticle-based effect. PMID:26030685

  16. Toxicity of zero-valent iron nanoparticles to a trichloroethylene-degrading groundwater microbial community.

    PubMed

    Zabetakis, Kara M; Niño de Guzmán, Gabriela T; Torrents, Alba; Yarwood, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The microbiological impact of zero-valent iron used in the remediation of groundwater was investigated by exposing a trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic microbial community to two types of iron nanoparticles. Changes in total bacterial and archaeal population numbers were analyzed using qPCR and were compared to results from a blank and negative control to assess for microbial toxicity. Additionally, the results were compared to those of samples exposed to silver nanoparticles and iron filings in an attempt to discern the source of toxicity. Statistical analysis revealed that the three different iron treatments were equally toxic to the total bacteria and archaea populations, as compared with the controls. Conversely, the silver nanoparticles had a limited statistical impact when compared to the controls and increased the microbial populations in some instances. Therefore, the findings suggest that zero-valent iron toxicity does not result from a unique nanoparticle-based effect.

  17. Use of Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Band Gap to Develop a Predictive Paradigm for Oxidative Stress and Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (Ec) levels with the cellular redox potential (−4.12 to −4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co3O4, Cr2O3, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of CB57 Bl/6 mice. Co3O4, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by Ec levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22502734

  18. Understanding the mutual impact of interaction between hydrophobic nanoparticles and pulmonary surfactant monolayer.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Amit K; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-26

    Interaction between hydrophobic nanoparticles (NPs) and a pulmonary surfactant (PS) film leads to a shift in molecular packing of surfactant molecules in the PS film around the interacting NPs. The resultant structural arrangement of surfactants around the NPs may be a potential structural factor responsible for their high retention ability within the film. Moreover, during this interaction, surfactant molecules coat the NPs and change their surface properties.

  19. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  20. Anisotropic gold nanoparticles: synthesis, properties, applications, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhao, Pengxiang; Astruc, Didier

    2014-02-10

    Anisotropic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have attracted the interest of scientists for over a century, but research in this field has considerably accelerated since 2000 with the synthesis of numerous 1D, 2D, and 3D shapes as well as hollow AuNP structures. The anisotropy of these nonspherical, hollow, and nanoshell AuNP structures is the source of the plasmon absorption in the visible region as well as in the near-infrared (NIR) region. This NIR absorption is especially sensitive to the AuNP shape and medium and can be shifted towards the part of the NIR region in which living tissue shows minimum absorption. This has led to crucial applications in medical diagnostics and therapy ("theranostics"), especially with Au nanoshells, nanorods, hollow nanospheres, and nanocubes. In addition, Au nanowires (AuNWs) can be synthesized with longitudinal dimensions of several tens of micrometers and can serve as plasmon waveguides for sophisticated optical devices. The application of anisotropic AuNPs has rapidly spread to optical, biomedical, and catalytic areas. In this Review, a brief historical survey is given, followed by a summary of the synthetic modes, variety of shapes, applications, and toxicity issues of this fast-growing class of nanomaterials. PMID:24421264

  1. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles.

    PubMed

    Roedel, Erik Q; Cafasso, Danielle E; Lee, Karen W M; Pierce, Lisa M

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. PMID:22198552

  2. Pulmonary Toxicity, Distribution, and Clearance of Intratracheally Instilled Silicon Nanowires in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jenny R.; Mercer, Robert R.; Chapman, Rebecca S.; Cohen, Guy M.; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James F.; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs) are being manufactured for use as sensors and transistors for circuit applications. The goal was to assess pulmonary toxicity and fate of Si NW using an in vivo experimental model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with 10, 25, 50, 100, or 250 μg of Si NW (~20–30 nm diameter; ~2–15 μm length). Lung damage and the pulmonary distribution and clearance of Si NW were assessed at 1, 3, 7, 28, and 91 days after-treatment. Si NW treatment resulted in dose-dependent increases in lung injury and inflammation that resolved over time. At day 91 after treatment with the highest doses, lung collagen was increased. Approximately 70% of deposited Si NW was cleared by 28 days with most of the Si NW localized exclusively in macrophages. In conclusion, Si NW induced transient lung toxicity which may be associated with an early rapid particle clearance; however, persistence of Si NW over time related to dose or wire length may lead to increased collagen deposition in the lung. PMID:26640479

  3. Development of screening assays for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in human blood: preliminary studies with charged Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Love, Sara A; Thompson, John W; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-09-01

    As nanoparticles have found increased use in both consumer and medical applications, corresponding increases in possible exposure to humans necessitate studies examining the impacts of these nanomaterials in biological systems. This article examines the effects of approximately 30-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles, with positively and negatively charged surface coatings in human blood. Here, we study the exposure effects, with up to 72 h of exposure to 5, 15, 25 and 50 µg/ml nanoparticles on hemolysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and platelet aggregation in subsets of cells from human blood. Assessing viability with hemolysis, results show significant changes in a concentration-dependent fashion. Rates of ROS generation were investigated using the dichlorofluorscein diacetate-based assay as ROS generation is a commonly suspected mechanism of nanoparticle toxicity; herein, ROS was not a significant factor. Optical monitoring of platelet aggregation revealed that none of the examined nanoparticles induced aggregation upon short-term exposure.

  4. Acute toxicity and pharmacokinetics of 13 nm-sized PEG-coated gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Cho, Minjung; Jeong, Jinyoung; Choi, Mina; Cho, Hea-Young; Han, Beom Seok; Kim, Sheen Hee; Kim, Hyoung Ook; Lim, Yong Taik; Chung, Bong Hyun Jeong, Jayoung

    2009-04-01

    In general, gold nanoparticles are recognized as being as nontoxic. Still, there have been some reports on their toxicity, which has been shown to depend on the physical dimension, surface chemistry, and shape of the nanoparticles. In this study, we carry out an in vivo toxicity study using 13 nm-sized gold nanoparticles coated with PEG (MW 5000). In our findings the 13 nm sized PEG-coated gold nanoparticles were seen to induce acute inflammation and apoptosis in the liver. These nanoparticles were found to accumulate in the liver and spleen for up to 7 days after injection and to have long blood circulation times. In addition, transmission electron microscopy showed that numerous cytoplasmic vesicles and lysosomes of liver Kupffer cells and spleen macrophages contained the PEG-coated gold nanoparticles. These findings of toxicity and kinetics of PEG-coated gold nanoparticles may have important clinical implications regarding the safety issue as PEG-coated gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications.

  5. Physicochemical characteristics of nanomaterials that affect pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The increasing manufacture and use of products based on nanotechnology raises concerns for both workers and consumers. Various studies report induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, which can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Each of these aspects can affect their toxicity, although it is largely unknown to what extent. The aim of the current review is to analyse published data on inhalation of nanoparticles to identify and evaluate the contribution of their physicochemical characteristics to the onset and development of pulmonary inflammation. Many physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles affect their lung deposition, clearance, and pulmonary response that, in combination, ultimately determine whether pulmonary inflammation will occur and to what extent. Lung deposition is mainly determined by the physical properties of the aerosol (size, density, shape, hygroscopicity) in relation to airflow and the anatomy of the respiratory system, whereas clearance and translocation of nanoparticles are mainly determined by their geometry and surface characteristics. Besides size and chemical composition, other physicochemical characteristics influence the induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation. As some nanoparticles dissolve, they can release toxic ions that can damage the lung tissue, making dissolution rate an important characteristic that affects lung inflammation. Fibre-shaped materials are more toxic to the lungs compared to spherical shaped nanoparticles of the same chemical composition. In general, cationic nanoparticles are more cytotoxic than neutral or anionic nanoparticles. Finally, surface reactivity correlates well with observed pulmonary inflammation. With all these characteristics affecting different stages of the events leading to pulmonary inflammation, no unifying dose metric could be identified to describe pulmonary

  6. Silver nanoparticles: mechanism of antimicrobial action, synthesis, medical applications, and toxicity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Sukumaran; Poulose, Eldho K.

    2012-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles are nanoparticles of silver which are in the range of 1 and 100 nm in size. Silver nanoparticles have unique properties which help in molecular diagnostics, in therapies, as well as in devices that are used in several medical procedures. The major methods used for silver nanoparticle synthesis are the physical and chemical methods. The problem with the chemical and physical methods is that the synthesis is expensive and can also have toxic substances absorbed onto them. To overcome this, the biological method provides a feasible alternative. The major biological systems involved in this are bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts. The major applications of silver nanoparticles in the medical field include diagnostic applications and therapeutic applications. In most of the therapeutic applications, it is the antimicrobial property that is being majorly explored, though the anti-inflammatory property has its fair share of applications. Though silver nanoparticles are rampantly used in many medical procedures and devices as well as in various biological fields, they have their drawbacks due to nanotoxicity. This review provides a comprehensive view on the mechanism of action, production, applications in the medical field, and the health and environmental concerns that are allegedly caused due to these nanoparticles. The focus is on effective and efficient synthesis of silver nanoparticles while exploring their various prospective applications besides trying to understand the current scenario in the debates on the toxicity concerns these nanoparticles pose.

  7. Toxicity of Nanoparticles Embedded in Paints Compared with Pristine Nanoparticles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smulders, Stijn; Luyts, Katrien; Brabants, Gert; Landuyt, Kirsten Van; Kirschhock, Christine; Smolders, Erik; Golanski, Luana; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter HM

    2014-01-01

    The unique physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials have led to their increased use in many industrial applications, including as a paint additive. For example, titanium dioxide (TiO2) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have well-established anti-UV, self-cleaning, and air purification effects. Silver (Ag) ENPs are renowned for their anti-microbial capabilities and silicon dioxide (SiO2) ENPs are used as fire retardants and anti-scratch coatings. In this study, the toxic effects and biodistribution of three pristine ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2), three aged paints containing ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2) along with control paints without ENPs were compared. BALB/c mice were oropharyngeally aspirated with ENPs or paint particles (20 μg/aspiration) once a week for 5 weeks and sacrificed either 2 or 28 days post final aspiration treatment. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and systemic blood toxicity was evaluated to ascertain cell counts, induction of inflammatory cytokines, and key blood parameters. In addition, the lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and heart were harvested and metal concentrations were determined. Exposure to pristine ENPs caused subtle effects in the lungs and negligible alterations in the blood. The most pronounced toxic effects were observed after Ag ENPs exposure; an increased neutrophil count and a twofold increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß)) were identified. The paint containing TiO2 ENPs did not modify macrophage and neutrophil counts, but mildly induced KC and IL-1ß. The paints containing Ag or SiO2 did not show significant toxicity. Biodistribution experiments showed distribution of Ag and Si outside the lung after aspiration to respectively pristine Ag or SiO2 ENPs. In conclusion, we demonstrated that even though direct exposure to ENPs induced some toxic effects, once they were embedded in a complex paint matrix little to no adverse toxicological effects were

  8. Toxicity of nanoparticles embedded in paints compared with pristine nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Stijn; Luyts, Katrien; Brabants, Gert; Landuyt, Kirsten Van; Kirschhock, Christine; Smolders, Erik; Golanski, Luana; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter H M

    2014-09-01

    The unique physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials have led to their increased use in many industrial applications, including as a paint additive. For example, titanium dioxide (TiO2) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have well-established anti-UV, self-cleaning, and air purification effects. Silver (Ag) ENPs are renowned for their anti-microbial capabilities and silicon dioxide (SiO2) ENPs are used as fire retardants and anti-scratch coatings. In this study, the toxic effects and biodistribution of three pristine ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2), three aged paints containing ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2) along with control paints without ENPs were compared. BALB/c mice were oropharyngeally aspirated with ENPs or paint particles (20 μg/aspiration) once a week for 5 weeks and sacrificed either 2 or 28 days post final aspiration treatment. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and systemic blood toxicity was evaluated to ascertain cell counts, induction of inflammatory cytokines, and key blood parameters. In addition, the lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and heart were harvested and metal concentrations were determined. Exposure to pristine ENPs caused subtle effects in the lungs and negligible alterations in the blood. The most pronounced toxic effects were observed after Ag ENPs exposure; an increased neutrophil count and a twofold increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß)) were identified. The paint containing TiO2 ENPs did not modify macrophage and neutrophil counts, but mildly induced KC and IL-1ß. The paints containing Ag or SiO2 did not show significant toxicity. Biodistribution experiments showed distribution of Ag and Si outside the lung after aspiration to respectively pristine Ag or SiO2 ENPs. In conclusion, we demonstrated that even though direct exposure to ENPs induced some toxic effects, once they were embedded in a complex paint matrix little to no adverse toxicological effects were

  9. Toxicity and developmental defects of different sizes and shape nickel nanoparticles in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ispas, Cristina; Andreescu, Daniel; Patel, Avni; Goia, Dan V.; Andreescu, Silvana; Wallace, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles such as nickel are used in catalytic, sensing and electronic applications, but health and environmental affects have not been fully investigated. While some metal nanoparticles result in toxicity, it is also important to determine whether nanoparticles of the same metal but of different size and shape changes toxicity. Three different size nickel nanoparticle (Ni NPs) of 30, 60, and 100 nm and larger particle clusters of aggregated 60 nm entities with a dendritic structure were synthesized and exposed to zebrafish embryos assessing mortality and developmental defects. Ni NPs exposure was compared to soluble nickel salts. All three 30, 60, and 100 nm Ni NPs are equal to or less toxic than soluble nickel while dendritic clusters were more toxic. With each Ni NP exposure, thinning of the intestinal epithelium first occurs around the LD10 continuing into the LD50. LD50 exposure also results in skeletal muscle fiber separation. Exposure to soluble nickel does not cause intestinal defects while skeletal muscle separation occurs at concentrations well over LD50. These results suggest that configuration of nanoparticles may affect toxicity more than size and defects from Ni NPs exposure occur by different biological mechanisms than soluble nickel. PMID:19746736

  10. Controlled analysis of nanoparticle charge on mucosal and systemic antibody responses following pulmonary immunization.

    PubMed

    Fromen, Catherine A; Robbins, Gregory R; Shen, Tammy W; Kai, Marc P; Ting, Jenny P Y; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-01-13

    Pulmonary immunization enhances local humoral and cell-mediated mucosal protection, which are critical for vaccination against lung-specific pathogens such as influenza or tuberculosis. A variety of nanoparticle (NP) formulations have been tested preclinically for pulmonary vaccine development, yet the role of NP surface charge on downstream immune responses remains poorly understood. We used the Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT) process to synthesize hydrogel NPs that varied only in surface charge and otherwise maintained constant size, shape, and antigen loading. Pulmonary immunization with ovalbumin (OVA)-conjugated cationic NPs led to enhanced systemic and lung antibody titers compared with anionic NPs. Increased antibody production correlated with robust germinal center B-cell expansion and increased activated CD4(+) T-cell populations in lung draining lymph nodes. Ex vivo treatment of dendritic cells (DCs) with OVA-conjugated cationic NPs induced robust antigen-specific T-cell proliferation with ∼ 100-fold more potency than soluble OVA alone. Enhanced T-cell expansion correlated with increased expression of surface MHCII, T-cell coactivating receptors, and key cytokines/chemokine expression by DCs treated with cationic NPs, which were not observed with anionic NPs or soluble OVA. Together, these studies highlight the importance of NP surface charge when designing pulmonary vaccines, and our findings support the notion that cationic NP platforms engender potent humoral and mucosal immune responses.

  11. Acute Amiodarone Pulmonary Toxicity after Drug Holiday: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Abuzaid, Ahmed; Saad, Marwan; Ayan, Mohamed; Kabach, Amjad; Mahfood Haddad, Toufik; Smer, Aiman; Arouni, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Amiodarone is reported to cause a wide continuum of serious clinical effects. It is often challenging to detect Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT). Typically, the diagnosis is made based on the clinical settings and may be supported by histopathology results, if available. We describe a 57-year-old patient who developed severe rapidly progressive respiratory failure secondary to AIPT with acute bilateral infiltrates and nodular opacities on chest imaging. Interestingly, Amiodarone was discontinued 3 weeks prior to his presentation. He had normal cardiac filling pressures confirmed by echocardiography. To our knowledge, this is the first case of isolated acute lung injury induced by Amiodarone, three weeks after therapy cessation, with adequate clinical improvement after supportive management and high dose steroid therapy. PMID:26075108

  12. Intracellular calcium levels as screening tool for nanoparticle toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Claudia; Kueznik, Tatjana; Bösch, Martina; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered nano-sized materials led to revolutionary developments in many industrial applications and in the medical field. These materials, however, also may cause cytotoxicity. In addition to size, surface properties and shape were identified as relevant parameters for cell damage. Cell damage may occur as disruption of membrane integrity, induction of apoptosis and by organelle damage. Generation of oxidative stress may serve as an indicator for cytotoxicity. Effects occurring upon short contact of particles with cells, for instance in the systemic blood circulation, could be identified according to increases of intracellular [Ca2+] levels, which are caused by variety of toxic stimuli. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane disruption, apoptosis, lysosome function, intracellular [Ca2+] levels and generation of oxidative stress. Silica particles served to test this hypothesis. Twenty nm polystyrene particles as well as 12 nm and 40 nm silica particles caused membrane damage and apoptosis with no preference of the surface charge. Only 20 nm plain and amine functionalized polystyrene particles cause oxidative stress and only the plain particles lysosomal damage. A potential role of surface charge was identified for 200 nm polystyrene particles, where only the amidine particles caused lysosomal damage. Increases in intracellular [Ca2+] levels and cytotoxicity after 24 h was often linked but determination of intracellular [Ca2+] levels could serve to characterize further the type of membrane damage. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Nano-sized materials may cause cytotoxicity. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes and silica nanoparticles were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane

  13. The pulmonary toxicity of talc and granite dust as estimated from an in vivo hamster bioassay.

    PubMed

    Beck, B D; Feldman, H A; Brain, J D; Smith, T J; Hallock, M; Gerson, B

    1987-02-01

    A short-term animal bioassay was used to assess the toxicity of occupational dusts. We quantified pulmonary responses in hamsters exposed to granite (12% quartz) and talc (quartz and asbestos-free) dust collected from worksites. Personal samples collected on workers showed similar quartz content and particle-size distributions to the high-volume samples collected for bioassays, thus demonstrating that the particulates were representative of worker exposure. We measured biochemical and cellular indicators of injury in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) of animals exposed to dust suspensions by intra-tracheal instillation. The assays measured release of cytoplasmic and lysosomal enzymes into the cell-free supernatant of BAL; levels of albumin and red blood cells; changes in macrophage and polymorphonuclear neutrophil cell numbers; and in situ macrophage phagocytosis. Dose-response (0.15, 0.75, and 3.75 mg/100 g body wt) and time-course (1-14 days postexposure) studies were performed. One day after exposure, both talc and granite dust resulted in elevated enzyme levels, pulmonary edema, and increased cell numbers in BAL. Macrophage phagocytosis was also inhibited. Based on earlier studies, response levels were either intermediate between nontoxic iron oxide and toxic alpha-quartz or comparable with alpha-quartz. The response to granite dust diminished fairly rapidly over time. By contrast, after talc exposure, there was a more persistent elevation in enzyme levels, and macrophage phagocytosis remained depressed. These results indicate that, when a similar mass was deposited in the lungs, talc caused more lung injury than did granite. Better estimates of exposure-dose relationships in talc and granite workers as well as longer-term animal studies are required to evaluate the harmfulness of these work environments at present-day exposure levels.

  14. Carbon Black and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Distinct Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Sonja; Hussain, Salik; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence link nanomaterials with adverse biological outcomes and due to the variety of applications and potential human exposures to nanoparticles it is thus important to evaluate their toxicity for the risk assessment of workers and consumers. It is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms of their toxicity as observation of similar effects after different nanomaterial exposures does not reflect similar intracellular processing and organelle interactions. A thorough understanding of mechanisms is not only needed for accurate prediction of potential toxicological impacts but also for the development of safer nanoapplications by modulating the physico-chemical characteristics. Furthermore biomedical applications may also take advantage of an in depth knowledge about the mode of action of nanotoxicity to design new nanoparticle-derived drugs. In the present manuscript we discuss the similarities and differences in molecular pathways of toxicity after carbon black and TiO2 nanoparticle exposures and identify the main toxicity mechanisms induced by these two nanoparticles which may also be indicative for the mode of action of other insoluble nanomaterials. We address the translocation, cell death induction, genotoxicity and inflammation induced by titanium dioxide and carbon black nanoparticles which depend on their internalisation, ROS production capacities and/or protein interactions. We summarise their distinct cellular mechanisms of toxicity and the crucial steps which may be targeted to avoid adverse effects or to induce them for nanomedical purposes. Several physico-chemical characteristics could influence these general toxicity pathways depicted here and the identification of common toxicity pathways could support the grouping of nanomaterials in terms of toxicity. PMID:25266826

  15. A meta-analysis of carbon nanotube pulmonary toxicity studies--how physical dimensions and impurities affect the toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gernand, Jeremy M; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a regression-tree-based meta-analysis of rodent pulmonary toxicity studies of uncoated, nonfunctionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) exposure. The resulting analysis provides quantitative estimates of the contribution of CNT attributes (impurities, physical dimensions, and aggregation) to pulmonary toxicity indicators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid: neutrophil and macrophage count, and lactate dehydrogenase and total protein concentrations. The method employs classification and regression tree (CART) models, techniques that are relatively insensitive to data defects that impair other types of regression analysis: high dimensionality, nonlinearity, correlated variables, and significant quantities of missing values. Three types of analysis are presented: the RT, the random forest (RF), and a random-forest-based dose-response model. The RT shows the best single model supported by all the data and typically contains a small number of variables. The RF shows how much variance reduction is associated with every variable in the data set. The dose-response model is used to isolate the effects of CNT attributes from the CNT dose, showing the shift in the dose-response caused by the attribute across the measured range of CNT doses. It was found that the CNT attributes that contribute the most to pulmonary toxicity were metallic impurities (cobalt significantly increased observed toxicity, while other impurities had mixed effects), CNT length (negatively correlated with most toxicity indicators), CNT diameter (significantly positively associated with toxicity), and aggregate size (negatively correlated with cell damage indicators and positively correlated with immune response indicators). Increasing CNT N2 -BET-specific surface area decreased toxicity indicators.

  16. Assessing toxicity of nanoparticles using Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Hicks, Daniel G

    2011-04-01

    Rotifers are major components of zooplankton in freshwater and coastal marine ecosystems throughout the world and could be useful indicator species, providing valuable insight into the effects of nanoparticles on microinvertebrate grazers. Here we report initial efforts to characterize the immediate and longer-term effects of nanoparticle exposure on the reproduction of the coastal marine and salt lake rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. We used chemically unreactive fluorescent nanoparticles to probe how size and concentration affects the mode of uptake, distribution within the rotifer body, reproductive rate, feeding behavior, and offspring fitness. Population growth rate (r) was depressed 50% in rotifer populations exposed to 0.30 μg mL(-1) of 37-nm particles, and 89% in populations exposed to 1.1 μg mL(-1). Larger particles of identical chemical composition, but with diameters up to 3000 nm, caused no reduction in population growth rate. These larger particles remain confined in the gut, implicating nanoparticle size as a critical factor in the ability to penetrate the gut wall and enter tissues. Transfer of the F1 offspring from nanoparticle exposed maternal females into nanoparticle-free media demonstrated that nanoparticles are rapidly cleared from the animals with no significant residual adverse effects.

  17. Interaction of silver nanoparticles with biological objects: antimicrobial properties and toxicity for the other living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, E. M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents several examples of the biological effects of small-sized silver nanoparticles (10.5±3.5nm) observed in experiments on bacteria, slim mold, unicellular alga and plant seeds. The nanoparticles were prepared by the biochemical synthesis, based on the reduction of metal ions in reverse vicelles by biological reductants - natural plant pigments (flavonoids). It is found that, except for the plant seeds, silver nanoparticles (SNP) act as a strong toxic agent, both in water solution and as part of liquid-phase material. It is shown also that the biological action of silver nanoparticles can not be reduced to the toxic action of silver ions in equivalent concentrations or to that of the surfactant (the SNP stabilizer) present in the SNP water solution. Possible SNP applications are suggested.

  18. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, Stefania; Carney, Randy P.; Brunetti, Virgilio; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Al-Juffali, Noura; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Janes, Sam M.; Bakr, Osman M.; Cingolani, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where particles are abundantly internalized - is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a ``lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect'' since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments.The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where

  19. In-vitro Cell Exposure Studies for the Assessment of Nanoparticle Toxicity in the Lung - A Dialogue between Aerosol Science and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hanns-Rudolf, Paur; Cassee, Flemming R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Fissan, Heinz; Diabate, Silvia; Aufderheide, M.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Hanninen, Otto; Kasper, G.; Riediker, Michael; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Schmid, Otmar

    2011-10-01

    The rapid introduction of engineered nanostructured materials into numerous industrial and consumer products will result in enhanced exposure to engineered nanoparticles. Workplace exposure has been identified as the most likely source of uncontrolled inhalation of engineered aerosolized nanoparticles, but release of engineered nanoparticles may occur at any stage of the lifecycle of consumer products. The dynamic development of new nanomaterials with possibly unknown toxicological effects poses a challenge for the assessment of nanoparticle induced toxicity and safety. In this consensus document from a workshop on in-vitro cell systems for nanotoxicity testing an overview is given of the main issues concerning inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, lung physiology, nanoparticle-related biological mechanisms, in-vitro cell exposure systems for nanoparticles and social aspects of nanotechnology. The workshop participants recognized the large potential of in-vitro cell exposure systems for reliable, high-throughput screening of nanotoxicity. For the investigation of pulmonary nanotoxicity, a strong preference was expressed for air-liquid interface (ALI) cell exposure systems (rather than submerged cell exposure systems) as they closely resemble in-vivo conditions in the lungs and they allow for unaltered and dosimetrically accurate delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles to the cells. The members of the workshop believe that further advances in in-vitro cell exposure studies would be greatly facilitated by a more active role of the aerosol scientists. The technical know-how for developing and running ALI in-vitro exposure systems is available in the aerosol community and at the same time biologists/toxicologists are required for proper assessment of the biological impact of nanoparticles.

  20. In Vitro Vascular Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are designed to possess unique physicochemical properties, but may also produce atypical and unforeseen exposure scenarios with adverse health effects. The ability ofNPs to translocate into systemic circulation following either inhalation or ingesti...

  1. Effect of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles on SERS spectral variance of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li; Chen, Shaode; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-02-01

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively utilized in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for bacterial identification. However, Ag NPs are toxic to bacteria. Whether such toxicity can affect SERS features of bacteria and interfere with bacterial identification is still unknown and needed to explore. Here, by carrying out a comparative study on non-toxic Au NPs with that on toxic Ag NPs, we investigated the influence of nanoparticle concentration and incubation time on bacterial SERS spectral variance, both of which were demonstrated to be closely related to the toxicity of Ag NPs. Sensitive spectral alterations were observed on Ag NPs with increase of NPs concentration or incubation time, accompanied with an obvious decrease in number of viable bacteria. In contrast, SERS spectra and viable bacterial number on Au NPs were rather constant under the same conditions. A further analysis on spectral changes demonstrated that it was cell response (i.e. metabolic activity or death) to the toxicity of Ag NPs causing spectral variance. However, biochemical responses to the toxicity of Ag were very different in different bacteria, indicating the complex toxic mechanism of Ag NPs. Ag NPs are toxic to a great variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa etc., therefore, this work will be helpful in guiding the future application of SERS technique in various complex biological systems.

  2. Effect of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles on SERS spectral variance of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Chen, Shaode; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-02-25

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively utilized in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for bacterial identification. However, Ag NPs are toxic to bacteria. Whether such toxicity can affect SERS features of bacteria and interfere with bacterial identification is still unknown and needed to explore. Here, by carrying out a comparative study on non-toxic Au NPs with that on toxic Ag NPs, we investigated the influence of nanoparticle concentration and incubation time on bacterial SERS spectral variance, both of which were demonstrated to be closely related to the toxicity of Ag NPs. Sensitive spectral alterations were observed on Ag NPs with increase of NPs concentration or incubation time, accompanied with an obvious decrease in number of viable bacteria. In contrast, SERS spectra and viable bacterial number on Au NPs were rather constant under the same conditions. A further analysis on spectral changes demonstrated that it was cell response (i.e. metabolic activity or death) to the toxicity of Ag NPs causing spectral variance. However, biochemical responses to the toxicity of Ag were very different in different bacteria, indicating the complex toxic mechanism of Ag NPs. Ag NPs are toxic to a great variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa etc., therefore, this work will be helpful in guiding the future application of SERS technique in various complex biological systems. PMID:25291503

  3. Chitosan coating of copper nanoparticles reduces in vitro toxicity and increases inflammation in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Kristan L.S.; Dodd, Andrea A.; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Joshi, Vijaya B.; Guymon, C. Allan; Spitz, Douglas R.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Thorne, Peter S.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their potential for a variety of applications, copper nanoparticles induce very strong inflammatory responses and cellular toxicity following aerosolized delivery. Coating metallic nanoparticles with polysaccharides, such as biocompatible and antimicrobial chitosan, has the potential to reduce this toxicity. In this study, copper nanoparticles were coated with chitosan using a newly developed and facile method. The presence of coating was confirmed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), rhodamine tagging of chitosan followed by confocal fluorescence imaging of coated particles, observed increases in particle size and zeta potential. Further physical and chemical characteristics were evaluated using dissolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The chitosan coating was shown to significantly reduce the toxicity of copper nanoparticles after 24 and 52 hours and the generation of reactive oxygen species as assayed by DHE oxidation after 24 hours in vitro. Conversely, inflammatory response, measured using the number of white blood cells, total protein, and cytokines/chemokines in the broncheoalveolar fluid of mice exposed to chitosan coated versus uncoated copper nanoparticles, was shown to increase, as was the concentration of copper ions. These results suggest that coating metal nanoparticles with mucoadhesive polysaccharides (e.g. chitosan) could increase their potential for use in controlled release of copper ions to cells, but will result in a higher inflammatory response if administered via the lung. PMID:24008224

  4. Chitosan coating of copper nanoparticles reduces in vitro toxicity and increases inflammation in the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Kristan L. S.; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Joshi, Vijaya B.; Guymon, C. Allan; Spitz, Douglas R.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Thorne, Peter S.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2013-10-01

    Despite their potential for a variety of applications, copper nanoparticles induce very strong inflammatory responses and cellular toxicity following aerosolized delivery. Coating metallic nanoparticles with polysaccharides, such as biocompatible and antimicrobial chitosan, has the potential to reduce this toxicity. In this study, copper nanoparticles were coated with chitosan using a newly developed and facile method. The presence of coating was confirmed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, rhodamine tagging of chitosan followed by confocal fluorescence imaging of coated particles and observed increases in particle size and zeta potential. Further physical and chemical characteristics were evaluated using dissolution and x-ray diffraction studies. The chitosan coating was shown to significantly reduce the toxicity of copper nanoparticles after 24 and 52 h and the generation of reactive oxygen species as assayed by DHE oxidation after 24 h in vitro. Conversely, inflammatory response, measured using the number of white blood cells, total protein, and cytokines/chemokines in the bronchoalveolar fluid of mice exposed to chitosan coated versus uncoated copper nanoparticles, was shown to increase, as was the concentration of copper ions. These results suggest that coating metal nanoparticles with mucoadhesive polysaccharides (e.g. chitosan) could increase their potential for use in controlled release of copper ions to cells, but will result in a higher inflammatory response if administered via the lung.

  5. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  6. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-20

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te ((particle)) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs' nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te ((particle)) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te ((ion)) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  7. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions. PMID:27094203

  8. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile.

  9. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems. PMID:27539747

  10. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems.

  11. Encapsulation of Aconitine in Self-Assembled Licorice Protein Nanoparticles Reduces the Toxicity In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Li-jing; Gao, Guan-zhen; Shen, Yong; Zhou, Jian-wu; Rao, Ping-fan

    2015-11-01

    Many herbal medicines and compositions are clinically effective but challenged by its safety risks, i.e., aconitine (AC) from aconite species. The combined use of Radix glycyrrhizae (licorice) with Radix aconite L. effectively eliminates toxicity of the later while increasing efficacy. In this study, a boiling-stable 31-kDa protein (namely GP) was purified from licorice and self-assembled into nanoparticles (206.2 ± 2.0 nm) at pH 5.0, 25 °C. The aconitine-encapsulated GP nanoparticles (238.2 ± 1.2 nm) were prepared following the same procedure and tested for its toxicity by intraperitoneal injection on ICR mouse ( n = 8). Injection of GP-AC nanoparticles and the mixed licorice-aconite decoction, respectively, caused mild recoverable toxic effects and no death, while the aconitine, particle-free GP-AC mixture and aconite decoction induced sever toxic effects and 100 % death. Encapsulation of poisonous alkaloids into self-assembled herbal protein nanoparticles contributes to toxicity attenuation of combined use of herbs, implying a prototype nanostructure and a universal principle for the safer clinical applications of herbal medicines.

  12. Effects from Filtration, Capping Agents, and Presence/Absence of Food on the Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles to Daphnia Magna

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relatively little is known regarding the behavior and toxicity of nanoparticles in the environment. The objectives of the work presented here include establishing the toxicity of a variety of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to Daphnia magna neonates, assessing the applicability of ...

  13. Exposure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionalized polystyrene latex nanoparticles: influence of surface charge on toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Jumpei; Miyamoto, Akihisa; Kuriyama, Yuta; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2013-04-01

    Novel nanoparticles with unique physicochemical characteristics are being developed with increasing frequency, leading to higher probability of nanoparticle release and environmental accumulation. Therefore, it is important to assess the potential environmental and biological adverse effects of nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the toxicity and behavior of surface-functionalized nanoparticles toward yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The colony count method and confocal microscopy were used to examine the cytotoxicity of manufactured polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticles with various functional groups (amine, carboxyl, sulfate, and nonmodified). S. cerevisiae were exposed to PSL nanoparticles (40 mg/L) dispersed in 5-154 mM NaCl solutions for 1 h. Negatively charged nanoparticles had little or no toxic effect. Interestingly, nanoparticles with positively charged amine groups (p-Amine) were not toxic in 154 mM NaCl, but highly toxic in 5 mM NaCl. Confocal microscopy indicated that in 154 mM NaCl, the p-Amine nanoparticles were internalized by endocytosis, whereas in 5 mM NaCl they covered the dead cell surfaces. This demonstrates that nanoparticle-induced cell death might to be related to their adhesion to cells rather than their internalization. Together, these findings identify important factors in determining nanoparticle toxicity that might affect their impact on the environment and human health.

  14. Exposure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionalized polystyrene latex nanoparticles: influence of surface charge on toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Jumpei; Miyamoto, Akihisa; Kuriyama, Yuta; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2013-04-01

    Novel nanoparticles with unique physicochemical characteristics are being developed with increasing frequency, leading to higher probability of nanoparticle release and environmental accumulation. Therefore, it is important to assess the potential environmental and biological adverse effects of nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the toxicity and behavior of surface-functionalized nanoparticles toward yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The colony count method and confocal microscopy were used to examine the cytotoxicity of manufactured polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticles with various functional groups (amine, carboxyl, sulfate, and nonmodified). S. cerevisiae were exposed to PSL nanoparticles (40 mg/L) dispersed in 5-154 mM NaCl solutions for 1 h. Negatively charged nanoparticles had little or no toxic effect. Interestingly, nanoparticles with positively charged amine groups (p-Amine) were not toxic in 154 mM NaCl, but highly toxic in 5 mM NaCl. Confocal microscopy indicated that in 154 mM NaCl, the p-Amine nanoparticles were internalized by endocytosis, whereas in 5 mM NaCl they covered the dead cell surfaces. This demonstrates that nanoparticle-induced cell death might to be related to their adhesion to cells rather than their internalization. Together, these findings identify important factors in determining nanoparticle toxicity that might affect their impact on the environment and human health. PMID:23448545

  15. Gold-magnetite nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates: Synthesis, properties and toxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariti, Akshay

    This thesis study focuses on synthesizing and characterizing gold-magnetite optically active magnetic nanoparticle and its conjugation with biomolecules for biomedical applications, especially magnetic fluid hyperthermia treatment for cancerous tissue. Gold nanoparticles have already displayed their potential in the biomedical field. They exhibit excellent optical properties and possess strong surface chemistry which renders them suitable for various biomolecule attachments. Studies have showed gold nanoparticles to be a perfect biocompatible vector. However, clinical trials for gold mediated drug delivery and treatment studied in rat models identified some problems. Of these problems, the low retention time in bloodstream and inability to maneuver externally has been the consequential. To further enhance their potential applications and overcome the problems faced in using gold nanoparticles alone, many researchers have synthesized multifunctional magnetic materials with gold at one terminal. Magnetite, among the investigated magnetic materials is a promising and reliable candidate because of its high magnetic saturation moment and low toxicity. This thesis showcases a simple and facile one pot synthesis of gold-magnetite nanoparticles with an average particle size of 80 nm through hot injection method. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, TEM, Mossbauer spectroscopy, SQUID and MTS toxicity studies. The superparamagnetism of the as-synthesized nanoparticles has an interestingly high saturation magnetization moment and low toxicity than the literature values reported earlier. L-cysteine and (-)-EGCG (epigallacatechin-3-gallate) were attached to this multifunctional nanoparticles through the gold terminal and characterized to show the particles applicability through Raman, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  16. Sub-chronic toxicity of gold nanoparticles in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Ajdary, Marziyeh; Ghahnavieh, Marziyeh Ziaee; Naghsh, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gold nanoparticles have many industrial applications; moreover, they are photothermic agents for clinical treatment of cancer. This study was provided to investigate the effects associated with different doses of applied gold nanoparticles by injection and contact procedures on the alterations of the serum levels and certain factors in male mice. Materials and Methods: 72 male mice were randomly assigned into two protocols in terms of touching and injection. The injection protocol was included of five groups: Sham, control, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. They received gold nanoparticles at 25, 50, and 100 ppm concentrations administered in form of 0.3 ml/day for the period of 14 days and that of touching protocol were received 0.2 ml/day gold nanoparticles. Blood sample of which was taken to measure the serum level of creatine kinase phosphate, fasting blood, creatinine, albumin, blood urea nitrogen and eventually, the kidney was dissected for the intent of pathological analysis. Results: The serum level of creatine kinase phosphate and fasting blood sugar at middle dose was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) in touching protocol. In both protocols, the serum level of creatinine in high and medium doses showed a significant difference (P < 0.05) associated with the treated group. In the touching method, in high and medium doses administered to the treated group, the alteration was significant (P ≤ 0.05). In the both protocols, the serum level of albumin in high and medium doses of the treated group showed significant difference (P < 0.05). Thus, the gold nanoparticles could result in undesirable effects upon kidney tissue. Conclusion: The result of this study indicated that the administration of gold nanoparticles by touching method was more effective on the serum levels of these factors than that of injection method. PMID:25878992

  17. Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingbo; Cao, Jianzhong; Yuan, Shuanghu; Arenberg, Douglas; Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

  18. Mechanistically Probing Lipid-siRNA Nanoparticle-associated Toxicities Identifies Jak Inhibitors Effective in Mitigating Multifaceted Toxic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; Mao, Xianzhi; Davide, Joseph P; Ng, Bruce; Cai, Mingmei; Burke, Paul A; Sachs, Alan B; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2011-01-01

    A major hurdle for harnessing small interfering RNA (siRNA) for therapeutic application is an effective and safe delivery of siRNA to target tissues and cells via systemic administration. While lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) composed of a cationic lipid, poly-(ethylene glycol) lipid and cholesterol, are effective in delivering siRNA to hepatocytes via systemic administration, they may induce multi-faceted toxicities in a dose-dependent manner, independently of target silencing. To understand the underlying mechanism of toxicities, pharmacological probes including anti-inflammation drugs and specific inhibitors blocking different pathways of innate immunity were evaluated for their abilities to mitigate LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities in rodents. Three categories of rescue effects were observed: (i) pretreatment with a Janus kinase (Jak) inhibitor or dexamethasone abrogated LNP-siRNA-mediated lethality and toxicities including cytokine induction, organ impairments, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy without affecting siRNA-mediated gene silencing; (ii) inhibitors of PI3K, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38 and IκB kinase (IKK)1/2 exhibited a partial alleviative effect; (iii) FK506 and etoricoxib displayed no protection. Furthermore, knockout of Jak3, tumor necrosis factor receptors (Tnfr)p55/p75, interleukin 6 (IL-6) or interferon (IFN)-γ alone was insufficient to alleviate LNP-siRNA-associated toxicities in mice. These indicate that activation of innate immune response is a primary trigger of systemic toxicities and that multiple innate immune pathways and cytokines can mediate toxic responses. Jak inhibitors are effective in mitigating LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities. PMID:21179008

  19. Toxicity assessment of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and applications of nanoparticles (NP) in diverse fields has steadily increased in recent decades; however, knowledge about risks of NP to human health and ecosystems is still scarce. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used engineere...

  20. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gunsolus, Ian L; Mousavi, Maral P S; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L

    2015-07-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag(+) influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM's chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution.

  1. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Mousavi, Maral P. S.; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag+ influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM’s chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution. PMID:26047330

  2. TLR4 signaling is involved in brain vascular toxicity of PCB153 bound to nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; Choi, Jeong June; Eum, Sung Yong; Daunert, Sylvia; Toborek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    PCBs bind to environmental particles; however, potential toxicity exhibited by such complexes is not well understood. The aim of the present study is to study the hypothesis that assembling onto nanoparticles can influence the PCB153-induced brain endothelial toxicity via interaction with the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To address this hypothesis, TLR4-deficient and wild type control mice (males, 10 week old) were exposed to PCB153 (5 ng/g body weight) bound to chemically inert silica nanoparticles (PCB153-NPs), PCB153 alone, silica nanoparticles (NPs; diameter, 20 nm), or vehicle. Selected animals were also subjected to 40 min ischemia, followed by a 24 h reperfusion. As compared to exposure to PCB153 alone, treatment with PCB153-NP potentiated the brain infarct volume in control mice. Importantly, this effect was attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice. Similarly, PCB153-NP-induced proinflammatory responses and disruption of tight junction integrity were less pronounced in TLR4-deficient mice as compared to control animals. Additional in vitro experiments revealed that TLR4 mediates toxicity of PCB153-NP via recruitment of tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). The results of current study indicate that binding to seemingly inert nanoparticles increase cerebrovascular toxicity of PCBs and suggest that targeting the TLR4/TRAF6 signaling may protect against these effects.

  3. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peetsch, Alexander; Greulich, Christina; Braun, Dieter; Stroetges, Christian; Rehage, Heinz; Siebers, Bettina; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Spherical silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized in a co-precipitation route from calcium nitrate/silver nitrate and ammonium phosphate in a continuous process and colloidally stabilized by carboxymethyl cellulose. Nanoparticles with 0.39 wt% silver content and a diameter of about 50-60 nm were obtained. The toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells were determined by viability tests and determination of the minimal inhibitory and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Three mammalian cells lines, i.e. human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocytes and T-lymphocytes), and two prokaryotic strains, i.e. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were used. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles and silver acetate showed similar effect toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells with toxic silver concentrations in the range of 1-3 μg mL(-1).

  4. Cardiovascular toxicity evaluation of silica nanoparticles in endothelial cells and zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-07-01

    Environmental exposure to nanomaterials is inevitable as nanomaterials become part of our daily life, and as a result, nanotoxicity research is gaining attention. However, most investigators focus on the evaluation of overall toxicity instead of a certain organism system. In this regard, the evaluation of cardiovascular effects of silica nanoparticles was preformed in vitro and in vivo. It's worth noting that silica nanoparticles induced cytotoxicity as well as oxidative stress and apoptosis. ROS and apoptosis were considered as major factor to endothelial cells dysfunction, involved in several molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases. In vivo study, mortality, malformation, heart rate and whole-embryo cellular death were measured in zebrafish embryos. Results showed that silica nanoparticles induced pericardia toxicity and caused bradycardia. We also examined the expression of cardiovascular-related proteins in embryos by western blot analysis. Silica nanoparticles inhibited the expression of p-VEGFR2 and p-ERK1/2 as well as the downregulation of MEF2C and NKX2.5, revealed that silica nanoparticles could inhibit the angiogenesis and disturb the heart formation and development. In summary, our results suggest that exposure to silica nanoparticles is a possible risk factor to cardiovascular system.

  5. Interference sources in ATP bioluminescence assay of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sibag, Mark; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Choah; Kim, Hee Jun; Cho, Jinwoo

    2015-06-01

    ATP measurement provides an overview of the general state of microbial activity, and thus it has proven useful for the evaluation of nanoparticle toxicity in activated sludge. ATP bioluminescence assay, however, is susceptible to interference by the components of activated sludge other than biomass. This paper presents the interference identified specific to the use of this assay after activated sludge respiration inhibition test of silica nanoparticles (OECD 209). We observed a high degree of interference (90%) in the presence of 100 mg/L silica nanoparticles and a low level of ATP being measured (0.01 μM); and 30% interference by the synthetic medium regardless of silica nanoparticle concentration and ATP level in the samples. ATP measurement in activated sludge with different MLSS concentrations revealed interference of high biomass content. In conclusion, silica nanoparticles, synthetic medium and activated sludge samples themselves interfere with ATP bioluminescence; this will need to be considered in the evaluation of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge when this type of assay is used. PMID:25892589

  6. Interference sources in ATP bioluminescence assay of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sibag, Mark; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Choah; Kim, Hee Jun; Cho, Jinwoo

    2015-06-01

    ATP measurement provides an overview of the general state of microbial activity, and thus it has proven useful for the evaluation of nanoparticle toxicity in activated sludge. ATP bioluminescence assay, however, is susceptible to interference by the components of activated sludge other than biomass. This paper presents the interference identified specific to the use of this assay after activated sludge respiration inhibition test of silica nanoparticles (OECD 209). We observed a high degree of interference (90%) in the presence of 100 mg/L silica nanoparticles and a low level of ATP being measured (0.01 μM); and 30% interference by the synthetic medium regardless of silica nanoparticle concentration and ATP level in the samples. ATP measurement in activated sludge with different MLSS concentrations revealed interference of high biomass content. In conclusion, silica nanoparticles, synthetic medium and activated sludge samples themselves interfere with ATP bioluminescence; this will need to be considered in the evaluation of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge when this type of assay is used.

  7. Neutral red retention time assay in determination of toxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wentao; Culloty, Sarah; Darmody, Grainne; Lynch, Sharon; Davenport, John; Ramirez-Garcia, Sonia; Dawson, Kenneth; Lynch, Iseult; Doyle, Hugh; Sheehan, David

    2015-10-01

    The neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay is useful for detecting decreased lysosomal membrane stability in haemocytes sampled from bivalves, a phenomenon often associated with exposure to environmental pollutants including nanomaterials. Bivalves are popular sentinel species in ecotoxicology and use of NRRT in study of species in the genus Mytilus is widespread in environmental monitoring. The NRRT assay has been used as an in vivo test for toxicity of carbon nanoparticles (Moore MN, Readman JAJ, Readman JW, Lowe DM, Frickers PE, Beesley A. 2009. Lysosomal cytotoxicity of carbon nanoparticles in cells of the molluscan immune system: An in vivo study. Nanotoxicology. 3 (1), 40-45). We here report application of this assay adapted to a microtitre plate format to a panel of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (2 ppm). This showed that copper, chromium and cobalt nanoparticles are toxic by this criterion while gold and titanium nanoparticles are not. As the former three nanoparticles are often reported to be cytotoxic while the latter two are thought to be non-cytotoxic, these data support use of NRRT as a general in vitro assay in nanotoxicology.

  8. Intratracheal instillation of cerium oxide nanoparticles induces hepatic toxicity in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Nalabotu, Siva K; Kolli, Madhukar B; Triest, William E; Ma, Jane Y; Manne, Nandini DPK; Katta, Anjaiah; Addagarla, Hari S; Rice, Kevin M; Blough, Eric R

    2011-01-01

    Background Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been posited to have both beneficial and toxic effects on biological systems. Herein, we examine if a single intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles is associated with systemic toxicity in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods and results Compared with control animals, CeO2 nanoparticle exposure was associated with increased liver ceria levels, elevations in serum alanine transaminase levels, reduced albumin levels, a diminished sodium-potassium ratio, and decreased serum triglyceride levels (P < 0.05). Consistent with these data, rats exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles also exhibited reductions in liver weight (P < 0.05) and dose-dependent hydropic degeneration, hepatocyte enlargement, sinusoidal dilatation, and accumulation of granular material. No histopathological alterations were observed in the kidney, spleen, and heart. Analysis of serum biomarkers suggested an elevation of acute phase reactants and markers of hepatocyte injury in the rats exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles can result in liver damage. PMID:22072870

  9. Neutral red retention time assay in determination of toxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wentao; Culloty, Sarah; Darmody, Grainne; Lynch, Sharon; Davenport, John; Ramirez-Garcia, Sonia; Dawson, Kenneth; Lynch, Iseult; Doyle, Hugh; Sheehan, David

    2015-10-01

    The neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay is useful for detecting decreased lysosomal membrane stability in haemocytes sampled from bivalves, a phenomenon often associated with exposure to environmental pollutants including nanomaterials. Bivalves are popular sentinel species in ecotoxicology and use of NRRT in study of species in the genus Mytilus is widespread in environmental monitoring. The NRRT assay has been used as an in vivo test for toxicity of carbon nanoparticles (Moore MN, Readman JAJ, Readman JW, Lowe DM, Frickers PE, Beesley A. 2009. Lysosomal cytotoxicity of carbon nanoparticles in cells of the molluscan immune system: An in vivo study. Nanotoxicology. 3 (1), 40-45). We here report application of this assay adapted to a microtitre plate format to a panel of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (2 ppm). This showed that copper, chromium and cobalt nanoparticles are toxic by this criterion while gold and titanium nanoparticles are not. As the former three nanoparticles are often reported to be cytotoxic while the latter two are thought to be non-cytotoxic, these data support use of NRRT as a general in vitro assay in nanotoxicology. PMID:26065811

  10. Toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Escherichia coli: mechanism and the influence of medium components.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Zhu, Lizhong; Lin, Daohui

    2011-03-01

    Water chemistry can be a major factor regulating the toxicity mechanism of ZnO nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) in water. The effect of five commonly used aqueous media with various chemical properties on the toxicity of nano-ZnO to Escherichia coli O111 (E. coli) was investigated, including ultrapure water, 0.85% NaCl, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), minimal Davis (MD), and Luria-Bertani (LB). Combined results of physicochemical characterization and antibacterial tests of nano-ZnO in the five media suggest that the toxicity of nano-ZnO is mainly due to the free zinc ions and labile zinc complexes. The toxicity of nano-ZnO in the five media deceased as follows: ultrapure water > NaCl > MD > LB > PBS. The generation of precipitates (Zn(3)(PO(4))(2) in PBS) and zinc complexes (of zinc with citrate and amino acids in MD and LB, respectively) dramatically decreased the concentration of Zn(2+) ions, resulting in the lower toxicity in these media. Additionally, the isotonic and rich nutrient conditions improved the tolerance of E. coli to toxicants. Considering the dramatic difference of the toxicity of nano-ZnO in various aqueous media, the effect of water chemistry on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles should be paid more attention in future nanotoxicity evaluations. PMID:21280647

  11. The role of chorion on toxicity of silver nanoparticles in the embryonic zebrafish assay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to investigate how the size- and surface coating-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is influenced by the presence and absence of the chorion in an embryonic zebrafish assay. Methods Normal and dechorinated embryos were exposed to four different AgNPs, 20 or 110 nm in size, with polypyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate surface coatings in a standard zebrafish embryo medium (EM). This was then compared to a 62.5 μM calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution where agglomeration was controlled. Results Embryonic toxicity in the absence of the chorion was greater than in its presence. The smaller 20 nm AgNPs were more toxic than the larger 110 nm AgNPs, regardless of the chorion and test media. However, surface coating affected toxicity, since PVPcoated AgNPs were more toxic than citrate-coated AgNPs; this was strongly affected by the presence of the chorion in both EM and CaCl2. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the permeability function of the chorion on the size- and surface coating-dependent toxicity of AgNPs. Thereafter, careful experiment should be conducted to assess nanoparticle toxicity in zebrafish embryos. PMID:25518841

  12. Aryl radical involvement in amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity: Investigation of protection by spin-trapping nitrones

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolescu, Adrian C.; Comeau, Jeannette L.; Hill, Bruce C.; Bedard, Leanne L.; Takahashi, Takashi; Brien, James F.; Racz, William J.; Massey, Thomas E. . E-mail: masseyt@post.queensu.ca

    2007-04-01

    Amiodarone (AM), an antidysrrhythmic drug, can produce serious adverse effects, including potentially fatal AM-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT). AM-induced cytotoxicity and pulmonary fibrosis are well recognized, but poorly understood mechanistically. The hypothesis of aryl radical involvement in AM toxicity was tested in non-biological and biological systems. Photolysis of anaerobic aqueous solutions of AM, or N-desethylamiodarone (DEA) resulted in the formation of an aryl radical, as determined by spin-trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy experiments. The non-iodinated AM analogue, didesiodoamiodarone (DDIA), did not form aryl radicals under identical conditions. The toxic susceptibility of human lung epithelioid HPL1A cells to AM, DEA, and DDIA showed time- and concentration-dependence. DEA had a more rapid and potent toxic effect (LC{sub 50} = 8 {mu}M) than AM (LC{sub 50} = 146 {mu}M), whereas DDIA cytotoxicity was intermediate (LC{sub 50} = 26 {mu}M) suggesting a minor contribution of the iodine atoms. Incubation of human lung epithelial cells with the spin-trapping nitrones {alpha}-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN, 10 mM) or {alpha}-(4-pyridyl N-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN, 5.0 mM) did not significantly protect against AM, DEA, or DDIA cytotoxicity. Intratracheal administration of AM to hamsters produced pulmonary fibrosis at day 21, which was not prevented by 4 days of treatment with 150 mg/kg/day PBN or 164 mg/kg/day POBN. However, the body weight loss in AM-treated animals was counteracted by PBN. These results suggest that, although AM can generate an aryl radical photochemically, its in vivo formation may not be a major contributor to AM toxicity, and that spin-trapping reagents do not halt the onset of AM toxicity.

  13. Pulmonary toxicity of perfluorinated silane-based nanofilm spray products: solvent dependency.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Asger W; Hansen, Jitka S; Sørli, Jorid B; Levin, Marcus; Wolkoff, Peder; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Larsen, Søren T

    2014-01-01

    A number of cases of pulmonary injury by use of aerosolized surface coating products have been reported worldwide. The aerosol from a commercial alcohol-based nanofilm product (NFP) for coating of nonabsorbing surfaces was found to induce severe lung damage in a recent mouse bioassay. The NFP contained a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl trialkoxysilane (POTS) and the effects were associated with the hydrolyzed forms of the silane; increase in hydrolyzation resulted in faster induction of compromised breathing and induction of lung damage. In this study, the impact of the solvent on the toxicity of POTS has been investigated. BALB/cA mice were exposed to aerosolized water-based NFPs containing POTS, and solutions of hydrolyzed POTS in methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol, respectively. No acute respiratory effect was observed at exposure concentrations up to 110 mg/m³ with an aqueous solution of POTS. However, exposure to POTS in methanol resulted in a decrease of the tidal volume--an effect that did not resolve within the recovery period. After 27 min of exposure, the tidal volume had decreased by 25%, indicating partial alveolar collapse. For POTS in ethanol and 2-propanol, a 25% reduction of the tidal volume was observed after 13 and 9 min, respectively; thus, the tidal volume was affected by increase of the chain length. This was confirmed in vitro by investigating lung surfactant function after addition of POTS in different solvents. The addition of vaporized methanol, 2-propanol, or acetone to aerosolized POTS in methanol further exacerbated the tidal volume reduction, demonstrating that the concentration of vaporized solvent participated in the toxicity of POTS.

  14. Irradiation with visible light enhances the antibacterial toxicity of silver nanoparticles produced by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, Matthew; Naddeo, J. J.; Tan, Yuying; Griepenburg, Julianne C.; Tomko, John; Trout, Cory; O'Malley, Sean M.; Bubb, Daniel M.; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-04-01

    The rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a rapidly growing global health concern. According to the Center for Disease Control, approximately 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths per year occur in the USA due to antibiotic resistance. In recent years, there has been a surge in the use of metal nanoparticles as coatings for orthopedic implants, wound dressings, and food packaging, due to their antimicrobial properties. In this report, we demonstrate that the antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is enhanced with exposure to light from the visible spectrum. We find that the increased toxicity is due to augmented silver ion release and bacterial uptake. Interestingly, silver ion toxicity does not appear to depend on the formation of reactive oxygen species. Our findings provide a novel paradigm for using light to regulate the toxicity of AgNPs which may have a significant impact in the development of new antimicrobial therapeutics.

  15. Glucoxylan-mediated green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles and their phyto-toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Iram, Fozia; Iqbal, Mohammad S; Athar, Muhammad M; Saeed, Muhammad Z; Yasmeen, Abida; Ahmad, Riaz

    2014-04-15

    A green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles having exceptional high stability is reported. The synthesis involves the use of glucoxylans isolated from seeds of Mimosa pudica and excludes the use of conventional reducing and capping agents. The average particle sizes were 40 and 6 nm for gold and silver, respectively. The size of gold particles obtained in this work is suitable for drug delivery as they are non-cytotoxic. In phyto-toxicity tests the gold and silver nanoparticles did not show any significant effect on germination of radish seeds, whereas in radish seedling root growth assay the two particles behaved differently. The silver nanoparticles exhibited a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect on root length, whereas the gold nanoparticles had no significant effect in this test. The likely mechanism of these effects is discussed. PMID:24607156

  16. Glucoxylan-mediated green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles and their phyto-toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Iram, Fozia; Iqbal, Mohammad S; Athar, Muhammad M; Saeed, Muhammad Z; Yasmeen, Abida; Ahmad, Riaz

    2014-04-15

    A green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles having exceptional high stability is reported. The synthesis involves the use of glucoxylans isolated from seeds of Mimosa pudica and excludes the use of conventional reducing and capping agents. The average particle sizes were 40 and 6 nm for gold and silver, respectively. The size of gold particles obtained in this work is suitable for drug delivery as they are non-cytotoxic. In phyto-toxicity tests the gold and silver nanoparticles did not show any significant effect on germination of radish seeds, whereas in radish seedling root growth assay the two particles behaved differently. The silver nanoparticles exhibited a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect on root length, whereas the gold nanoparticles had no significant effect in this test. The likely mechanism of these effects is discussed.

  17. Isotope effects on the metabolism and pulmonary toxicity of butylated hydroxytoluene in mice by deuteration of the 4-methyl group

    SciTech Connect

    Mizutani, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tajima, K.

    1983-06-30

    A comparative test in mice for pulmonary toxicity between butylated hydroxytoluene (2,6-di-tert.-butyl-4-methylphenol, BHT) and 2,6-di-tert.-butyl-4-(alpha, alpha, alpha-2H3)methylphenol (BHT-d3) showed a significantly lower toxic potency of the latter. The rate of in vitro BHT metabolism to 2,6-di-tert.-butyl-4-methylene-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-QM) was slowed by deuterating BHT in the 4-methyl group. On the other hand, the rate of in vitro metabolism to 2,6-di-tert.-butyl-4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OH) was increased with the deuteration. A similar isotope effect of the deuterium substitution on the in vivo metabolic rates of BHT was observed. These observations support the concept that the lung damage caused by BHT is mediated by BHT-QM. The pulmonary toxicity of 2-tert.-butyl-4-ethylphenol (4-EP) and their deuterated analogs was also compared. 2-tert.-Butyl-4-(1,1-2H2)ethylphenol (4-EP-d2) showed a significantly lower toxic potency than 4-EP, whereas 2-tert.-butyl-4-(2,2,2-2H3)ethylphenol (4-EP-d3) showed a toxic potency comparable to that of 4-EP. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that a quinone methide metabolite is responsible for the onset of lung damage produced by 4-EP as well as BHT.

  18. The pulmonary toxicity of an ash sample from the MT. St. Helens Volcano.

    PubMed

    Beck, B D; Brain, J D; Bohannon, D E

    1981-11-01

    Volcanic ash was collected from the Moses Lake region of Washington State after the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens. The ash was tested in a short-term bioassay system using hamsters exposed by intratracheal instillation. One day after exposure the lungs were lavaged and the fluid collected was characterized using several parameters that represent different manifestations of lung injury: (a) in situ phagocytic ability of pulmonary macrophages; (b) the inflammatory response, as shown by polymorphonuclear neutrophil numbers and albumin levels in lung lavage fluid; and (c) release of cytoplasmic and lysosomal enzymes into the cell-free supernatant of lung-lavage fluid. The response to volcanic ash was elevated compared to controls, but was similar to the response to Al2O3, a dust considered to be relatively inert. In contrast, the response to alpha-quartz, a highly toxic fibrogenic dust, was significantly greater than the response to either volcanic ash or Al2O3 for most parameters measured. PMID:7318780

  19. The pulmonary toxicity of an ash sample from the Mt. St. Helens Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, B.D.; Brain, J.D.; Bohannon, D.E.

    1981-11-01

    Volcanic ash was collected from the Moses Lake region of Washington State after the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens. The ash was tested in a short-term bioassay system using hamsters exposed by intratracheal instillation. One day after exposure the lungs were lavaged and the fluid collected was characterized using several parameters that represent different manifestations of lung injury: (a) in situ phagocytic ability of pulmonary macrophages; (b) the inflammatory response, as shown by polymorphonuclear neutrophil numbers and albumin levels in lung lavage fluid; and (c) release of cytoplasmic and lysosomal enzymes into the cell-free supernatant of lung-lavage fluid. The response to volcanic ash was elevated compared to controls, but was similar to the response to Al2O3, a dust considered to be relatively inert. In contrast, the response to alpha-quartz, a highly toxic fibrogenic dust, was significantly greater than the response to either volcanic ash or Al2O3 for most parameters measured.

  20. Formulation and Characterization of Pyrazinamide Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Efficiency for Alveolar Macrophage Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Varma, J. N. Ravi; Kumar, T. Santosh; Prasanthi, B.; Ratna, J. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide, a highly specific agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is used as first-line drug to treat tuberculosis. The current work aims to formulate polymeric nanoparticles based drug delivery system to sustain the release profile and reduce the dosing frequency of pyrazinamide. Further aim was to target the macrophages within body fluid. These polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by simultaneous double-emulsion (W/O/W) solvent evaporation/diffusion technique. The prepared dispersions were characterized for various biopharmaceutical parameters such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug loading capacity, entrapment efficiency and targeting to alveolar macrophages. The formulated polymeric nanoparticles were in the particle size range of 45.51 to 300.4 nm with a maximum drug entrapment efficiency of 80.9%. The stability study of optimized batch conducted at 40±2°/75±5% relative humidity showed no significant changes up to 90 days. X-Ray Diffraction spectrum exhibits the transformation of crystalline form of drug to amorphous in the formulation. Scanning Electron Microscope image showed nanoparticles spherical in shape with smooth surface. In vitro release profiles were biphasic in nature with burst release followed by controlled release over a period of 24 h obeying diffusion mechanism. In vivo and ex vivo studies results of the study show significant uptake of the nanoparticles by alveolar macrophages through fluorescent micrograph. Polymeric nanoparticles formulation of pyrazinamide could encompass significant uptake by alveolar macrophages, the high first-pass metabolism, sustain the release of drug leading to reduction in dose, toxicity and improvement of patient compliance. PMID:26180270

  1. The potentiation effect makes the difference: non-toxic concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles enhance Cu nanoparticle toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Fernández-Cruz, María Luisa; Connolly, Mona; Conde, Estefanía; Fernández, Marta; Schuster, Michael; Navas, José María

    2015-02-01

    Here we examined whether the addition of a non-toxic concentration (6.25 μg/mL) of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs: 19, 35 and 57 nm, respectively) modulates the cytotoxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs, 63 nm in size) in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. The cytotoxic effect of CuNPs on HepG2 cells was markedly enhanced by the ZnONPs, the largest ZnONPs causing the highest increase in toxicity. However, CuNPs cytotoxicity was not affected by co-incubation with medium containing only zinc ions, indicating the increase in toxicity might be attributed to the particle form of ZnONPs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of CuNPs and ZnONPs inside the cells co-exposed to both types of NP and outflow of cytoplasm through the damaged cell membrane. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) determined an increase in the concentration of zinc and a decrease in that of copper in co-exposed cells. On the basis of these results, we propose that accumulation of large numbers of ZnONPs in the cells alters cellular membranes and the cytotoxicity of CuNPs is increased.

  2. Pulmonary Toxicity Study of Lunar and Martian Dust Simulants Intratracheally Instilled in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.; Latch, John A.; Holian, A.; McCluskey, R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is contemplating sending humans to Mars and the Moon for further exploration. The properties of Hawaiian and Californian volcanic ashes allow them to be used to simulate Martian and lunar dusts, respectively. NASA laboratories use these dust simulants to test performance of hardware destined for Martian or lunar environments. Workers in these test facilities are exposed to low levels of these dusts. The present study was conducted to investigate the toxicity of these dust simulants. Particles of respirable-size ranges of lunar simulant (LS), Martian simulant (MS), TiO2 (negative control) and quartz (positive control) were each intratracheally instilled (saline as vehicle) to groups of 4 mice (C57BL, male, 2-3 month old) at a single treatment of 1 (Hi dose) or 0.1 (Lo dose) mg/mouse. The lungs were harvested at the end of 7 days or 90 days for histopathological examination. Lungs of the LS-Lo groups had no evidence of inflammation, edema or fibrosis. The LS-Hi-7d group had mild to moderate acute inflammation, and neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltration; the LS-Hi-90d group showed signs of chronic inflammation and some fibrosis. Lungs of the MS-Lo-7d group revealed mild inflammation and neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltration; the MS-Lo-90d group showed mild fibrosis and particle-laden macrophages (PLM). Lungs of the MS-Hi-7d group demonstrated mild to moderate inflammation and large foci of PLM; the MS-Hi-90d group showed chronic mild to moderate inflammation and fibrosis. To mimic the effects of the oxidative and reactive properties of Martian soil surface, groups of mice were exposed to ozone (3 hour at 0.5 ppm) prior to MS dust instillation. Lung lesions in the MS group were more severe with the pretreatment. The results for the negative and positive controls were consistent with the known pulmonary toxicity of these compounds. The overall severity of toxic insults to the lungs were TiO2

  3. Natural inorganic nanoparticles--formation, fate, and toxicity in the environment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Filip, Jan; Zboril, Radek; Varma, Rajender S

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis, stability, and toxicity of engineered metal nanoparticles (ENPs) have been extensively studied during the past two decades. In contrast, research on the formation, fate, and ecological effects of naturally-occurring nanoparticles (NNPs) has become a focus of attention only recently. The natural existence of metal nanoparticles and their oxides/sulfides in waters, wastewaters, ore deposits, mining regions, and hydrothermal vents, as exemplified by the formation of nanoparticles containing silver and gold (AgNPs and AuNPs), Fe, Mn, pyrite (FeS2), Ag2S, CuS, CdS, and ZnS, is dictated largely by environmental conditions (temperature, pH, oxic/anoxic, light, and concentration and characteristics of natural organic matter (NOM)). Examples include the formation of nanoparticles containing pyrite, Cu and Zn-containing pyrite, and iron in hydrothermal vent black smoker emissions. Metal sulfide nanoparticles can be formed directly from their precursor ions or indirectly by sulfide ion-assisted transformation of the corresponding metal oxides under anaerobic conditions. This tutorial focuses on the formation mechanisms, fate, and toxicity of natural metal nanoparticles. Natural waters containing Ag(I) and Au(III) ions in the presence of NOM generate AgNPs and AuNPs under thermal, non-thermal, and photochemical conditions. These processes are significantly accelerated by existing redox species of iron (Fe(II)/Fe(III)). NOM, metal-NOM complexes, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2˙(-), ˙OH, and H2O2 are largely responsible for the natural occurrence of nanoparticles. AgNPs and AuNPs emanating from Ag(I)/Au(III)-NOM reactions are stable for several months, thus indicating their potential to be transported over long distances from their point of origin. However, endogenous cations present in natural waters can destabilize the nanoparticles, with divalent cations (e.g., Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) being more influential than their monovalent equivalents (e.g., Na

  4. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the "liquid drop" approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-11-21

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the "liquid drop" model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.

  5. Studies on polymer-coated zinc oxide nanoparticles: UV-blocking efficacy and in vivo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Girigoswami, Koyeli; Viswanathan, Meenakshi; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Girigoswami, Agnishwar

    2015-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is explicitly used in sunscreens and cosmetic products; however, its effect in vivo is toxic in some cases. The UV blocking efficacy of ZnO nanoparticles is lost due to photocatalysis. To isolate a lower toxic species of sunblockers, ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized and coated with chitosan - a natural polymer (ZnO-CTS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) - a synthetic polymer (ZnO-PEG). Coating with CTS and PEG circumvented the photocatalytic activity, increased the stability and improved the UV absorption efficacy. The effect of ZnO, ZnO-CTS and ZnO-PEG nanoparticles in vivo on zebrafish embryo revealed lower deposition of ZnO-CTS and ZnO-PEG nanoparticles atop the eggs compared to ZnO. The survival of zebrafish embryos was always found to be higher in case of ZnO-CTS with respect to ZnO-treated ones. PEG coating exhibited better UV attenuation, but, in vivo it induced delayed hatching. Thus, one of the reasons for better survival could be attributed to lower aggregation of ZnO-CTS nanoparticles atop eggs thereby facilitating the breathing of embryos. PMID:26249620

  6. Toxicity, toxicokinetics and biodistribution of dextran stabilized Iron oxide Nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Remya, N S; Syama, S; Sabareeswaran, A; Mohanan, P V

    2016-09-10

    Advancement in the field of nanoscience and technology has alarmingly raised the call for comprehending the potential health effects caused by deliberate or unintentional exposure to nanoparticles. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have an increasing number of biomedical applications and hence a complete toxicological profile of the nanomaterial is therefore a mandatory requirement prior to its intended usage to ensure safety and to minimize potential health hazards upon its exposure. The present study elucidates the toxicity of in house synthesized Dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles (DINP) in a regulatory perspective through various routes of exposure, its associated molecular, immune, genotoxic, carcinogenic effects and bio distribution profile. Synthesized ferrite nanomaterials were successfully coated with dextran (<25nm) and were physicochemically characterized and subjected to in vitro and in vivo toxicity evaluations. The results suggest that surface coating of ferrite nanoparticles with dextran helps in improvising particle stability in biological environments. The nanoparticles do not seem to induce oxidative stress mediated toxicological effects, nor altered physiological process or behavior changes or visible pathological lesions. Furthermore no anticipated health hazards are likely to be associated with the use of DINP and could be concluded that the synthesized DINP is nontoxic/safe to be used for biomedical applications. PMID:27451271

  7. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Margriet V.D.Z. Annema, Wijtske; Salvati, Anna; Lesniak, Anna; Elsaesser, Andreas; Barnes, Clifford; McKerr, George; Howard, C. Vyvyan; Lynch, Iseult; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Jong, Wim H. de

    2009-10-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining their ability to inhibit differentiation of embryonic stem cells into spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes. Four well characterized silica nanoparticles of various sizes were used to investigate whether nanomaterials are capable of inhibition of differentiation in the embryonic stem cell test. Nanoparticle size distributions and dispersion characteristics were determined before and during incubation in the stem cell culture medium by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering. Mouse embryonic stem cells were exposed to silica nanoparticles at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 {mu}g/ml. The embryonic stem cell test detected a concentration dependent inhibition of differentiation of stem cells into contracting cardiomyocytes by two silica nanoparticles of primary size 10 (TEM 11) and 30 (TEM 34) nm while two other particles of primary size 80 (TEM 34) and 400 (TEM 248) nm had no effect up to the highest concentration tested. Inhibition of differentiation of stem cells occurred below cytotoxic concentrations, indicating a specific effect of the particles on the differentiation of the embryonic stem cells. The impaired differentiation of stem cells by such widely used particles warrants further investigation into the potential of these nanoparticles to migrate into the uterus, placenta and embryo and their possible effects on embryogenesis.

  8. Pulmonary Toxicity of Simulated Lunar and Martian Dusts Intratracheally Instilled into Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John; Holian, Andrij; Latch, Judith N.; Balis, John; Muro-Cacho, Carlos; Cowper, Shawn; McCluskey, Richard

    2000-01-01

    lymphocytic infiltration, and mild perivascular and peribronchiolar inflammation. The MSS-LD-90d group showed PLMs and scattered foci of mild fibrosis. The MSS-HD-7d group showed large foci of PLMs, intraalveolar debris, mild to moderate focal alveolitis, and mild to moderate perivascular and peribronchiolar inflammation. The MSS-HD-90d group showed focal chronic mild to moderate alveolitis and fibrosis. To mimic the oxidative and reactive properties of Martian surface dust in the test animals, groups of 4 mice were exposed to ozone (0.5 ppm for 3 hours) prior to instillation of the MSS. Lung lesions in the MSS groups were more severe with the ozone pretreatment. The O3-MSS-HD-90d group had wide spread intraalveolar debris, focal moderate alveolitis and fibrosis. The results for the titanium dioxide and quartz controls were consistent with the known pulmonary toxicity of these compounds. The overall severity of toxic injury to the lungs was TiO2toxic responses increased with the increase of dust burden in the lung. Except for TiO2, the increased duration of dust presence in the lung from 7 to 90 days transformed the acute inflammatory response to a chronic inflammatory lesion.

  9. A comparative study of hollow copper sulfide nanoparticles and hollow gold nanospheres on degradability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liangran; Panderi, Irene; Yan, Daisy D; Szulak, Kevin; Li, Yajuan; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Ma, Hang; Niesen, Daniel B; Seeram, Navindra; Ahmed, Aftab; Yan, Bingfang; Pantazatos, Dionysios; Lu, Wei

    2013-10-22

    Gold and copper nanoparticles have been widely investigated for photothermal therapy of cancer. However, degradability and toxicity of these nanoparticles remain concerns. Here, we compare hollow CuS nanoparticles (HCuSNPs) with hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) in similar particle sizes and morphology following intravenous administration to mice. The injected pegylated HCuSNPs (PEG-HCuSNPs) are eliminated through both hepatobiliary (67 percentage of injected dose, %ID) and renal (23 %ID) excretion within one month postinjection. By contrast, 3.98 %ID of Au is excreted from liver and kidney within one month after iv injection of pegylated HAuNS (PEG-HAuNS). Comparatively, PEG-HAuNS are almost nonmetabolizable, while PEG-HCuSNPs are considered biodegradable nanoparticles. PEG-HCuSNPs do not show significant toxicity by histological or blood chemistry analysis. Principal component analysis and 2-D peak distribution plots of data from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF IMS) of liver tissues demonstrated a reversible change in the proteomic profile in mice receiving PEG-HCuSNPs. This is attributed to slow dissociation of Cu ion from CuS nanoparticles along with effective Cu elimination for maintaining homeostasis. Nonetheless, an irreversible change in the proteomic profile is observed in the liver from mice receiving PEG-HAuNS by analysis of MALDI-TOF IMS data, probably due to the nonmetabolizability of Au. This finding correlates with the elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase at 3 months after PEG-HAuNS injection, indicating potential long-term toxicity. The comparative results between the two types of nanoparticles will advance the development of HCuSNPs as a new class of biodegradable inorganic nanomaterials for photothermal therapy.

  10. Silver nanoparticles: their potential toxic effects after oral exposure and underlying mechanisms--a review.

    PubMed

    Gaillet, Sylvie; Rouanet, Jean-Max

    2015-03-01

    Because of their antimicrobial properties, the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is increasing fast in industry, food, and medicine. In the food industry, nanoparticles are used in packaging to enable better conservation products such as sensors to track their lifetime, and as food additives, such as anti-caking agents and clarifying agents for fruit juices. Nanoemulsions, used to encapsulate, protect and deliver additives are also actively developed. Nanomaterials in foods will be ingested and passed through the digestive tract. Those incorporated in food packaging may also be released unintentionally into food, ending up in the gastrointestinal tract. It is therefore important to make a risk assessment of nanomaterials to the consumer. Thus, exposure to AgNPs is increasing in quantity and it is imperative to know their adverse effects in man. However, controversies still remain with respect to their toxic effects and their mechanisms. Understanding the toxic effects and the interactions of AgNPs with biological systems is necessary to handle these nanoparticles and their use. They usually generate reactive oxygen species resulting in increased pro-inflammatory reactions and oxidative stress via intracellular signalling pathways. Here, we mainly focus on the routes of exposure of AgNPs, toxic effects and the mechanisms underlying the induced toxicity.

  11. Visualization of custom-tailored iron oxide nanoparticles chemistry, uptake, and toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Kai; Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro; Ahlinder, Linnea; Guldevall, Karolin; Pazik, Robert; Kępiński, Leszek; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Butorin, Sergei M.; Brismar, Hjalmar; Önfelt, Björn; Österlund, Lars; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.; Kessler, Vadim G.

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide generated by wearing of vehicles have been modelled with a tailored solution of size-uniform engineered magnetite particles produced by the Bradley reaction, a solvothermal metal-organic approach rendering hydrophilic particles. The latter does not bear any pronounced surface charge in analogy with that originating from anthropogenic sources in the environment. Physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by a wide range of methods, including XPD, TEM, SEM, DLS and spectroscopic techniques. The magnetite nanoparticles were found to be sensitive for transformation into maghemite under ambient conditions. This process was clearly revealed by Raman spectroscopy for high surface energy magnetite particles containing minor impurities of the hydromaghemite phase and was followed by quantitative measurements with EXAFS spectroscopy. In order to assess the toxicological effects of the produced nanoparticles in humans, with and without surface modification with ATP (a model of bio-corona formed in alveolar liquid), a pathway of potential uptake and clearance was modelled with a sequence of in vitro studies using A549 lung epithelial cells, lymphocyte 221-B cells, and 293T embryonal kidney cells, respectively. Raman microscopy unambiguously showed that magnetite nanoparticles are internalized within the A549 cells after 24 h co-incubation, and that the ATP ligand is retained on the nanoparticles throughout the uptake process. The toxicity of the nanoparticles was estimated using confocal fluorescence microscopy and indicated no principal difference for unmodified and modified particles, but revealed considerably different biochemical responses. The IL-8 cytokine response was found to be significantly lower for the magnetite nanoparticles compared to TiO2, while an enhancement of ROS was observed, which was further increased for the ATP-modified nanoparticles, implicating involvement of the ATP signalling pathway in

  12. Investigation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toxicity and uptake by plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, C.; Khodja, H.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Brisset, F.; Flank, A. M.; Fayard, B.; Chaillou, S.; Carrière, M.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are introduced in a growing number of commercial products and their production may lead to their release in the environment. Plants may be a potential entry point for NP in the food chain. Up to now, results describing NP phytotoxical effects and plant accumulation are scarce and contradictory. To increase knowledge on titanium dioxide NP (TiO2-NPs) accumulation and impact on plants, we designed a study on three plant species, namely wheat (Triticum aestivum), oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants were exposed in hydroponics to a panel of well-characterized TiO2-NPs, with diameters ranging from 12 to 140 nm, either anatase or rutile. Their accumulation in plant tissues is currently being assessed by complementary imaging techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μ-XRF) imaging and micro-particle induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) imaging. Moreover, the impact of TiO2-NP exposure on germination rate, root elongation, dry biomass and evapotranspiration is evaluated. Preliminary results are presented here, with data collected on wheat plants exposed to 12 nm and 25 nm anatase TiO2-NPs. These results show that TiO2-NPs are taken up by plants, and do not significantly alter their germination and root elongation. These results underline the necessity of deeper evaluation of nanoparticle ecotoxicity, and particularly on their interaction with plants.

  13. Development of a pulmonary peptide delivery system using porous nanoparticle-aggregate particles for systemic application.

    PubMed

    Yang, Likai; Luo, Jing; Shi, Sanjun; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao

    2013-07-15

    As a non-invasive administration route, pulmonary peptide delivery for systemic application has shown great promise. However, many barriers exist that prevent effective peptide delivery. The use of porous nanoparticle-aggregate particles (PNAPs) is an excellent option because of their proper aerodynamic size and maximal deposition. However, in most cases, the spray drying heating process for PNAPs has been challenging in regard to maintaining peptide stability and activity. To overcome these issues, we developed a spray freeze-drying method for PNAP preparation. To solve the low entrapment efficiency problem of nanostructured lipid carriers, we used hydrophobic ion pair complexes to increase the lipophilicity of the peptide, thus increasing entrapment efficiency and drug loading. Here, we used a model peptide, octreotide acetate, for PNAP preparation, which has a high entrapment efficiency (>95%) and proper aerodynamic size (~3 μm). In addition, after intrapulmonary administration, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in a rat preventive hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury model. Our in vivo data showed significantly increased area under the curve and improved plasma aspartate aminotransferase levels for our PNAP intrapulmonary delivery system vs. the clinically used octreotide acetate delivery via subcutaneous injection. Together, PNAPs may have great potential for carrying peptide drugs for pulmonary delivery.

  14. Silver Nanoparticles: A study of dissolution, kinetics, and factors affecting pulmonary inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Eric L.

    The growing use of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NP) in consumer and industrial goods has led to an increase in interest in the health effects associated with exposure, both occupationally and environmentally. The aim of this research is to examine the contribution of size, shape, and dissolution of AgNP, with its corresponding effect on pulmonary inflammation and clearance. In addition this study looks at metallothionein (MT) and the role it plays as an inflammatory modulator. A nose only exposure method was used to expose three strains of mouse (two inbred, one knockout) to two different sizes of AgNP (˜25 nm and ˜100 nm). This research demonstrates that size, chemistry, and dissolution play key roles in NP deposition and inflammatory response, while no conclusions could be drawn about shape. Additionally, this study found that the main factors affecting the deposition of NP in mice both acutely and sub-chronically are particle size and mouse strain. The results of this study also indicate a relationship between MT2 and inflammation. It was found that the mRNA levels of MT2 were greatly up-regulated in the livers and lungs of mice exposed to AgNP, while MT protein levels were not significantly altered to correlate with the altered regulation of mRNA. Finally, this study showed that, for AgNP, the mechanisms of pulmonary clearance and dissolution happened rapidly and that they, combined, likely represent a major pathway of AgNP transport out of the lung. Taken as a whole, the data in this study show that dissolution, coupled with protein interaction, is a significant mediator of pulmonary inflammation and translocation of AgNP.

  15. Nano zerovalent iron particles induce pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicity in an in vitro human co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhelin; Yang, Lingyan; Chen, Ku-Fan; Chen, Guan-Wen; Peng, Yen-Ping; Chen, Jen-Kun; Suo, Guangli; Yu, Jiantao; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Despite promising environmental applications for nano zerovalent iron (nZVI), concerns remain about the potential accumulation and toxic effects of nZVI particles. Here, we use an alveolar-capillary co-culture model to investigate a possible link between low-level epithelial exposure to nZVI and pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicity. While nZVI was unable to pass through the epithelial barrier into the endothelium, nZVI exposure did cause oxidative and inflammatory responses in both epithelial and endothelial cells. Therefore, toxic effects induced by nZVI are not restricted to epithelial cells but can be transferred into the endothelium. Communication between A549 and EA.hy926 cells is responsible for amplification of nZVI-induced toxic responses. Decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance and zonula occludens proteins after epithelial exposure to nZVI impaired epithelial barrier integrity. Increases in oxidized α1-antitrypsin and oxidized low-density lipoprotein in the co-culture model suggest that nZVI exposure increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and atherosclerosis. Therefore, inhalation of nZVI has the potential to induce cardiovascular disease through oxidative and inflammatory mediators produced from the damaged lung epithelium in chronic lung diseases. PMID:26694701

  16. Long-term (30 days) toxicity of NiO nanoparticles for adult zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Kovrižnych, Jevgenij A.; Zeljenková, Dagmar; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Nickel oxide in the form of nanoparticles (NiO NPs) is extensively used in different industrial branches. In a test on adult zebrafish, the acute toxicity of NiO NPs was shown to be low, however longlasting contact with this compound can lead to its accumulation in the tissues and to increased toxicity. In this work we determined the 30-day toxicity of NiO NPs using a static test for zebrafish Danio rerio. We found the 30-day LC50 value to be 45.0 mg/L, LC100 (minimum concentration causing 100% mortality) was 100.0 mg/L, and LC0 (maximum concentration causing no mortality) was 6.25 mg/L for adult individuals of zebrafish. Considering a broad use of Ni in the industry, NiO NPs chronic toxicity may have a negative impact on the population of aquatic organisms and on food web dynamics in aquatic systems. PMID:26038672

  17. Some patterns of metallic nanoparticles' combined subchronic toxicity as exemplified by a combination of nickel and manganese oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, Boris A; Minigaliyeva, Ilzira A; Panov, Vladimir G; Privalova, Larisa I; Varaksin, Anatoly N; Gurvich, Vladimir B; Sutunkova, Marina P; Shur, Vladimir Ya; Shishkina, Ekaterina V; Valamina, Irene E; Makeyev, Oleg H

    2015-12-01

    Stable suspensions of NiO and/or Mn3O4 nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 16.7 ± 8.2 nm and 18.4 ± 5.4 nm, respectively, prepared by laser ablation of 99.99% pure metals in de-ionized water were repeatedly injected IP to rats at a dose of 0.50 mg or 0.25 mg 3 times a week up to 18 injections, either separately or in different combinations. Many functional indices as well as histological features of the liver, spleen, kidneys and brain were evaluated for signs of toxicity. The accumulation of Ni and Mn in these organs was measured with the help of AES and EPR methods. Both metallic nanoparticles proved adversely bio-active, but those of Mn3O4 were found to be more noxious in most of the non-specific toxicity manifestations. Moreover, they induced a more marked damaging effect in the neurons of the caudate nucleus and hippocampus which may be considered an experimental correlate of manganese-induced parkinsonism. Mathematical analysis based on the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) revealed a diversity of combined toxicity types depending not only on particular effects these types are assessed for but on their level as well. The prognostic power of the RSM model proved satisfactory.

  18. Particle-specific toxic effects of differently shaped zinc oxide nanoparticles to zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Vijver, Martina G; Richardson, Michael K; Ahmad, Farooq; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is proposed that allows for quantifying the relative toxic contribution of ions released from metallic nanoparticles and of the particles themselves, as exemplified for the case of differently shaped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) exposed to zebrafish embryos. First of all, the toxicity of suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles (NP(total))--nanospheres, nanosticks, cuboidal submicron particles (SMPs), and Zn(NO3)2--to the embryos was assessed. The observed toxicity of ZnO NP(total) is assumed to result from the combined effect of the particles present in the suspensions (NP(particle)) and of the dissolved Zn(2+) ions released from the particles (NP(ion)). Different addition models were used to explicitly account for the toxicity of NP(particle). The median lethal concentrations (LC50) of NP(particle) of nanospheres, nanosticks, and SMPs were found to range between 7.1 mg Zn/L and 11.9 mg Zn/L (i.e., to differ by a factor of 1.7). Behavioral performance showed no significant differences among all types of the NP(particle). The median effective concentrations (EC50) of the particles were found to range between 1.0 mg Zn/L and 2.2 mg Zn/L. At the LC50 of each particle suspension, the main contribution to lethality to zebrafish embryos was from the NP(particle) (52%-72%). For hatching inhibition, the NP(particle) was responsible for 38% to 83% of the adverse effects observed. The ZnO nanosticks were more toxic than any of the other NPs with regard to the endpoints mortality and hatching inhibition. The main contribution to toxicity to zebrafish embryos was from the NP(particle) at the LC50 and EC50 of each particle suspension.

  19. Acute toxicity of lead particulates on pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Ultrastructural and microanalytical studies

    SciTech Connect

    deVries, C.R.; Ingram, P.; Walker, S.R.; Linton, R.W.; Gutknecht, W.F.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Although it is well established that respiratory uptake of lead-containing particles plays a substantial role in the epidemiology of plumbism, relatively little is known about the role of the pulmonary alveolar macrophage in lead poisoning. An in vitro system was designed to investigate the effects of lead oxide particles of respirable size on the rabbit alveolar macrophage. The studies were concerned with the intracellular solubility of PbO and Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/ and changes in fine structure attributable to lead toxicity. The distribution of phagocytosed lead and its intracellular reprecipitation complexes was established by electron microprobe analysis and secondary ion mass spectroscopy in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and backscatter imaging. It was found that Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/, PbO and PbO-coated particles were ingested by the rabbit alveolar macrophages and that each of these lead oxide compounds produced similar damage to the fine structure of the cell. Swelling of the mitochondria, nuclear membrane, and endoplasmic reticulum was common, as well as were characteristic reprecipitation complexes of lead, phosphorous, and calcium within the nuclear heterochromatin and cytoplasm of the cell. The precipitation complexes were not seen in cells incubated with the particles if phagocytosis was blocked by 0.22-microns, membrane filters. It was concluded that phagocytosis of these lead oxide particles was necessary to produce the cytopathic changes. It is suggested that solubilization of lead from the ingested particles in phagosomes of macrophages results in the liberation of intracellular lead with the resultant formation of reprecipitation complexes.

  20. Acute pulmonary toxicity and inflammation induced by combined exposure to didecyldimethylammonium chloride and ethylene glycol in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do Young; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Eunji; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Kwon, Jung-Taek

    2016-02-01

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), an antimicrobial agent, has been reported to induce pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. DDAC is frequently used in spray-form household products in combination with ethylene glycol (EG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxic interaction between DDAC and EG in the lung. DDAC at a sub-toxic dose (100 μg/kg body weight) was mixed with a non-toxic dose of EG (100 or 200 μg/kg body weight), and was administrated to rats via intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were not changed by singly treated DDAC or EG, but significantly enhanced at 1 d after treatment with the mixture, with the effect dependent on the dose of EG. Total cell count in BALF was largely increased and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were predominantly recruited to the lung in rats administrated with the mixture. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 also appeared to be increased by the mixture of DDAC and EG (200 μg/kg body weight) at 1 d post-exposure, which might be associated with the increase in inflammatory cells in lung. BALF protein content and inflammatory cell recruitment in the lung still remained elevated at 7 d after the administration of DDAC with the higher dose of EG. These results suggest that the combination of DDAC and EG can synergistically induce pulmonary cytotoxicity and inflammation, and EG appears to amplify the harmful effects of DDAC on the lung. Therefore pulmonary exposure to these two chemicals commonly found in commercial products can be a potential hazard to human health. PMID:26763389

  1. Local delivery of biodegradable pirfenidone nanoparticles ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Ruchit; Redente, Elizabeth F.; Thakur, Ashish; Riches, David W. H.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-12-01

    Our purpose was to assess sustained delivery and enhanced efficacy of pirfenidone-loaded nanoparticles after intratracheal instillation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles containing pirfenidone (NPs) were prepared and characterized. Biodistribution of NPs and solution was assessed using LC-MS after intratracheal administration in C57Bl/6 mice at 3 and 24 h and 1 week post-administration. Efficacy was tested in C57Bl/6 mice in a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model. Mice received 10 μg pirfenidone intratracheally in solution or NPs, once a week, for 3 weeks after bleomycin administration. Drug effects were monitored on day 28. Lung hydroxyproline content, total number of cells, and numbers of macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were assessed. Numbers of macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils were assessed in the lung as well. NPs sustained significantly higher levels of pirfenidone in the lungs and BAL at 24 h and 1 week, compared to the solution group. Pirfenidone solution and NPs significantly reduced hydroxyproline levels by 57 and 81%, respectively, compared to bleomycin alone. At the end of 4 weeks, BAL cellularity was reduced by 25.4% and 56% with solution and NP treatment, respectively. The numbers of lymphocytes and neutrophils in the BAL were also reduced by 58.9 and 82.4% for solution and 74.5% and 89.7% for NPs, respectively. The number of inflammatory macrophages in the lung was reduced by 62.8% and the number of neutrophils was reduced by 59.1% in the NP group and by 37.7% and 44.5%, respectively, in the solution group, compared to bleomycin alone. In conclusion, nanoparticles sustain lung pirfenidone delivery and enhance its anti-fibrotic efficacy.

  2. Particulate nature of inhaled zinc oxide nanoparticles determines systemic effects and mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Kun; Ho, Chia-Chi; Chang, Han; Lin, Jing-Fang; Yang, Chung Shi; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Tsai, Hui-Ti; Lin, Pinpin

    2015-02-01

    Inhalation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP) has potential health impact. Because zinc ion may involve in the toxicity of ZnONP, we compared adverse effects of inhaled aerosolized ZnONP and zinc nitrate in mice. Aerosolized ZnONP and zinc nitrate were well-dispersed in the inhalation chamber. Inhalation of 0.86 mg/m(3) ZnONP or 1.98 mg/m(3) zinc nitrate for 5 h caused acute inflammation mainly at bronchioloalveolar junctions of lungs at 24-h post-exposure. Inhalation of ZnONP or zinc nitrate increased metallothionein expression in the epithelial cells of brochioloalveolar junction. While the effects on cytokines secretion in bronchoalveolar lavage were similar between ZnONP and zinc nitrate, only ZnONP increased lactate dehydrogenase activity. However, repeated exposure to 0.86 mg/m(3) ZnONP 5 h/day for 5 days failed to cause a similar adverse effect. Either single or repeated exposure to 0.86 mg/m(3) ZnONP increased activities of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase and creatine phosphokinase in blood. In contrast, exposure to zinc nitrate had no similar systemic effects. In human bronchial epithelial cells, ZnONP-induced interleukin-8 secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor. Furthermore, ZnONP-induced pulmonary inflammation was greater in wild-type mice than in TLR4-deficent mice. It appears that ZnONP-induced acute pulmonary inflammation partially depended on TLR4. In summary, we demonstrated the dose-responsive effects for inhalation of ZnONP and zinc nitrate in mice. The threshold of cytokines induction for inhalation of ZnONP for 5 h was 0.43 mg/m(3). The particulate characters of ZnONP might contribute to the systemic adverse effects and shall be evaluated for assessing its health impact in humans.

  3. Toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in mammals--does a risk of neurotoxicity exist?

    PubMed

    Skalska, Joanna; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, silver nanoparticles have become an important class of nanomaterials utilized in the development of new nanotechnologies. Despite the fact that nanosilver is used in many commercial applications, our knowledge about its associated risks is incomplete. Although a number of studies have been undertaken to better understand the impact of silver nanoparticles on the environment, aquatic organisms and cell lines, little is known about their side effects in mammalian organisms. This review summarizes relevant data and the current state of knowledge regarding toxicity of silver nanoparticles in mammals, as well as the accumulated evidence for potent neurotoxic effects. The influence of nanosilver on the central nervous system is significant because of evidence indicating that it accumulates in mammalian brain tissue. PMID:26785363

  4. Attenuated effects of chitosan-capped gold nanoparticles on LPS-induced toxicity in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Marius; Melnig, Viorel; Pricop, Daniela; Neagu, Anca; Mihasan, Marius; Tartau, Liliana; Hritcu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    The impact of nanoparticles in medicine and biology has increased rapidly in recent years. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have advantageous properties such as chemical stability, high electron density and affinity to biomolecules. However, the effects of AuNP on human body after repeated administration are still unclear. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of gold-11.68 nm (AuNP1, 9.8 μg) and gold-22.22 nm (AuNP2, 19.7 μg) nanoparticles capped with chitosan on brain and liver tissue reactivity in male Wistar rats exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Escherichia coli serotype 0111:B4, 250 μg) upon 8 daily sessions of intraperitoneal administration. Our results suggest that the smaller size of chitosan-capped AuNP shows the protective effects against LPS-induced toxicity, suggesting a very high potential for biomedical applications. PMID:25428109

  5. A novel approach reveals that zinc oxide nanoparticles are bioavailable and toxic after dietary exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Dybowska, A.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2011-01-01

    If engineered nanomaterials are released into the environment, some are likely to end up associated with the food of animals due to aggregation and sorption processes. However, few studies have considered dietary exposure of nanomaterials. Here we show that zinc (Zn) from isotopically modified 67ZnO particles is efficiently assimilated by freshwater snails when ingested with food. The 67Zn from nano-sized 67ZnO appears as bioavailable as 67Zn internalized by diatoms. Apparent agglomeration of the zinc oxide (ZnO) particles did not reduce bioavailability, nor preclude toxicity. In the diet, ZnO nanoparticles damage digestion: snails ate less, defecated less and inefficiently processed the ingested food when exposed to high concentrations of ZnO. It was not clear whether the toxicity was due to the high Zn dose achieved with nanoparticles or to the ZnO nanoparticles themselves. Further study of exposure from nanoparticles in food would greatly benefit assessment of ecological and human health risks. ?? 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  6. Visualization of Carbon Nanoparticles Within Cells and Implications for Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Alexandra; Gass, Mhairi

    Carbon nanostructures (CNS), such as C60, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) exhibit extraordinary properties and are one of the most commercially relevant class of NS. CNS have already found uses in high-performance sports equipment (nanotubes) and face cream (C60), whilst potential applications include optical and electronic materials and superconductors. Following the huge growth in these nanotechnology-related industries, significant concerns have arisen about their potential toxicity and impact on the environment. A lack in understanding of the interaction of such small structures with cellular material has resulted in concerns over their impact on human health. The potential toxicity of CNS and safety to human health requires an understanding of their interaction with cells and this in turn relies on the measurement of the pathways by which they enter the cell, their spatial distribution within and whether the CNS are transformed by the action of the cell; visualization of intracellular CNS is therefore imperative. However visualizing unlabelled CNS within cells is demanding because it is difficult to distinguish CNS from carbon-rich organelles given their similarity in composition and dimensions. In particular, the challenge lies in translating analytical imaging tools developed for inorganic systems to organic systems. This chapter describes how the state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, such as low-loss energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) can be employed to differentiate between unlabelled C60, SWNTs and the cell. Further, we demonstrate how these techniques can be used to trace the uptake of CNS into the cell and to assess their localized effects on cell structure.

  7. In Vivo Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Ions in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Bilberg, Katrine; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Besenbacher, Flemming; Baatrup, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The influence of water chemistry on characterised polyvinyl pyrrolidone- (PVP-) coated silver nanoparticles (81 nm) was investigated. NaCl solution series of 100–800 mg L−1 lead to initial and temporal increase in nanoparticles size, but agglomeration was limited. pH variation (5–8) had only minor influence on the hydrodynamic particle size. Acute toxicity of nanosivler to zebrafish (Danio rerio) was investigated in a 48-hour static renewal study and compared with the toxicity of silver ions (AgNO3). The nanosilver and silver ion 48-hour median lethal concentration (LC50) values were 84 μg L−1 and 25 μg L−1, respectively. To investigate exposure-related stress, the fish behaviour was observed visually after 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 27, 30, and 48 hours of both nanosilver and ionic silver treatments. These observations revealed increased rate of operculum movement and surface respiration after nanosilver exposure, suggesting respiratory toxicity. The present study demonstrates that silver nanoparticles are lethal to zebrafish. PMID:22174711

  8. In Vivo Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Ions in Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Bilberg, Katrine; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Besenbacher, Flemming; Baatrup, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The influence of water chemistry on characterised polyvinyl pyrrolidone- (PVP-) coated silver nanoparticles (81 nm) was investigated. NaCl solution series of 100-800 mg L(-1) lead to initial and temporal increase in nanoparticles size, but agglomeration was limited. pH variation (5-8) had only minor influence on the hydrodynamic particle size. Acute toxicity of nanosivler to zebrafish (Danio rerio) was investigated in a 48-hour static renewal study and compared with the toxicity of silver ions (AgNO(3)). The nanosilver and silver ion 48-hour median lethal concentration (LC(50)) values were 84 μg L(-1) and 25 μg L(-1), respectively. To investigate exposure-related stress, the fish behaviour was observed visually after 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 27, 30, and 48 hours of both nanosilver and ionic silver treatments. These observations revealed increased rate of operculum movement and surface respiration after nanosilver exposure, suggesting respiratory toxicity. The present study demonstrates that silver nanoparticles are lethal to zebrafish.

  9. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Molecular Responses of Mouse Macrophages to Titanium Dioxide and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Unravels Some Toxic Mechanisms for Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions. PMID:25902355

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  11. Proteomics study of silver nanoparticles toxicity on Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Mirzajani, Fateme; Askari, Hossein; Hamzelou, Sara; Schober, Yvonne; Römpp, Andreas; Ghassempour, Alireza; Spengler, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles, (AgNPs), will inevitably result in their release into the environment and thereby cause the exposure to plants. It was claimed that using AgNPs is a safe and efficient method to preserve and treat agents of disease in agriculture. This study tries to understand the protein populations and sub-populations and follow up environmental AgNPs stresses. To accomplish these, the action of homemade spherical AgNPs colloidal suspension against Oryza sativa L. was investigated by a proteomic approach (2-DE and NanoLC/FT-ICR MS identification). Twenty-eight responsive (decrement/increment in abundance) proteins were identified. Proteomic results revealed that an exposure of O. sativa L., root with different concentrations of AgNPs resulted in an accumulation of protein precursors, indicative of the dissipation of a proton motive force. The identified proteins are involved in oxidative stress tolerance, Ca(2+) regulation and signaling, transcription and protein degradation, cell wall and DNA/RNA/protein direct damage, cell division and apoptosis. The expression pattern of these proteins and their possible involvement in the nontoxicity mechanisms were discussed.

  12. Potential Toxicity of Up-Converting Nanoparticles Encapsulated with a Bilayer Formed by Ligand Attraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cellular toxicity of nanoparticles that were capped with a bilayered ligand was studied using an up-converting (UC) phosphor material as a representative nanoparticle (NP). The results indicate that although UC NPs are known to be nontoxic, the toxicity of the NPs depends strongly on ligand coordination conditions, in addition to the other commonly known parameters such as size, structure, surface charge etc. Oleate-capped hydrophobic NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs were surface modified to yield three extreme conditions: bare particles that were stripped of the oleate ligands; particles with covalently bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ligands; and particles with an bilayer of PEG-oleate ligands using the oleate surface group that was remained after synthesis. It was found that the bare particles and the covalent PEG NPs induced little toxicity. However, particles that were rendered biocompatible by forming a bilayer with an amphiphilic ligand (i.e., PEG-oleate) resulted in significant cell toxicity. These findings strongly suggest that the PEG-oleate group dissociated from the bilayered oleate-capped NPs, resulting in significant toxicity by exposing the hydrophobic oleate-capped NPs to the cell. Based on results with bare particles, the NaLnF4:Yb,Er (Ln = Y, Gd) up-converting phosphors are essentially less-toxic. Capping and functionalizing these particles with ligand intercalation may, however, not be a suitable method for rendering the NPs suitable for bioapplication as the ligand can potentially dissociate upon cellular interaction, leading to significant toxicity. PMID:24971524

  13. Behavior and chronic toxicity of two differently stabilized silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sakka, Yvonne; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Mackevica, Aiga; Filser, Juliane; Baun, Anders

    2016-08-01

    While differences in silver nanoparticle (AgNP) colloidal stability, surface potential, or acute aquatic toxicity for differently stabilized AgNP have often been reported, these have rarely been studied in long-term ecotoxicity tests. In the current study, we investigated the chronic toxicity of AgNP to Daphnia magna over a 21-day period with two different stabilizers (citrate and detergent), representative for charge and sterical stabilizers, respectively. This was coupled with a series of short-term experiments, such as mass balance and uptake/depuration testing, to investigate the behavior of both types of AgNP during a typical media exchange period in the D. magna test for chronic toxicity. As expected, the sterically stabilized AgNP was more stable in the test medium, also in the presence of food; however, a higher uptake of silver after 24h exposure of the charge stabilized AgNP was found compared to the detergent-stabilized AgNP (0.046±0.006μgAgμgDW(-1) and 0.023±0.005μgAgμgDW(-1), respectively). In accordance with this, the higher reproductive effects and mortality were found for the charge-stabilized than for the sterically-stabilized silver nanoparticles in 21-d tests for chronic toxicity. LOEC was 19.2μgAgL(-1) for both endpoints for citrate-coated AgNP and >27.5μgAgL(-1) (highest tested concentration for detergent-stabilized AgNP). This indicates a link between uptake and toxicity. The inclusion of additional short-term experiments on uptake and depuration is recommended when longer-term chronic experiments with nanoparticles are conducted. PMID:27449283

  14. Behavior and chronic toxicity of two differently stabilized silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sakka, Yvonne; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Mackevica, Aiga; Filser, Juliane; Baun, Anders

    2016-08-01

    While differences in silver nanoparticle (AgNP) colloidal stability, surface potential, or acute aquatic toxicity for differently stabilized AgNP have often been reported, these have rarely been studied in long-term ecotoxicity tests. In the current study, we investigated the chronic toxicity of AgNP to Daphnia magna over a 21-day period with two different stabilizers (citrate and detergent), representative for charge and sterical stabilizers, respectively. This was coupled with a series of short-term experiments, such as mass balance and uptake/depuration testing, to investigate the behavior of both types of AgNP during a typical media exchange period in the D. magna test for chronic toxicity. As expected, the sterically stabilized AgNP was more stable in the test medium, also in the presence of food; however, a higher uptake of silver after 24h exposure of the charge stabilized AgNP was found compared to the detergent-stabilized AgNP (0.046±0.006μgAgμgDW(-1) and 0.023±0.005μgAgμgDW(-1), respectively). In accordance with this, the higher reproductive effects and mortality were found for the charge-stabilized than for the sterically-stabilized silver nanoparticles in 21-d tests for chronic toxicity. LOEC was 19.2μgAgL(-1) for both endpoints for citrate-coated AgNP and >27.5μgAgL(-1) (highest tested concentration for detergent-stabilized AgNP). This indicates a link between uptake and toxicity. The inclusion of additional short-term experiments on uptake and depuration is recommended when longer-term chronic experiments with nanoparticles are conducted.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Rifampin Loaded Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as a Potential System for Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Meysam; Gilani, Kambiz; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of loading rifampin into mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Rifampin was selected as a model lipophilic molecule since it is a well-documented and much used anti tuberculosis drug. The mesoporous silica nanoparticles were prepared by using tetraethyl ortho silicate and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (as surfactant). The prepared nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their particle size measurement and porosimetry. The results showed that the particle size is 218 ± 46 nm (mean ± SD) and surface area is 816 m2g-1. In order to load rifampin within the mesopores, adsorption experiments using three different solvents (methanol, water and dimethyl sulfoxide) were carried out. The loading procedure resulted in a significant improvement in the amount of rifampin loaded into mesoporous silica nanoparticles and methanol was found to be a suitable solvent, providing a drug entrapment efficiency of 52 %. Rifampin loaded nanoparticles underwent different in-vitro tests including, SEM and drug release. The in-vitro drug release was investigated using buffer phosphate (pH=7.4). Regarding the drug release study, a biphasic pattern of release was observed. The drug-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles were capable of releasing 95% of their drug content after 24 h, following a faster release in the first four hours. The prepared rifampin loaded nanoparticles seem to have potential for use as a pulmonary drug delivery. PMID:25561909

  16. Toxicity Study of Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized from Suaeda monoica on Hep-2 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Satyavani, Kaliyamurthi; Gurudeeban, Selvaraj; Ramanathan, Thiruganasambandam; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2012-01-01

    Recently there has been fabulous excitement in the nano-biotechnological area for the study of nanoparticles synthesis using some natural biological system, which has led the growth advanced nanomaterials. This intention made us to assess the biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles from the leaf of Suaeda monoica (S.monoica) using 1 mM silver nitrate. The leaf extract of S.monoica incubated with 1 mM silver nitrate solution and characterized by UV- spectrometer and AFM. The effect of synthesized silver nanoparticles on Human Epidermoid Larynx Carcinoma cell line was evaluated by the MTT colorimetric technique. As a result we observed gradual change in the colour of extract from greenish to brown. The synthesized silver nanoparticles confirmed by UV at 430 nm and spherical shape identified in the range of 31 nm under AFM. The effect of silver nanoparticles on Human Epidermoid Larynx Carcinoma cell line exhibits a dose-dependent toxicity for the cell tested and the viability of Hep-2 cells decreased to 50 % (IC(50)) at the concentration of 500 nM. Further findings will be determined the exact mechanisms of this cost effective Nano-treatments.

  17. Omeprazole does not Potentiate Acute Oxygen Toxicity in Fetal Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Exposed to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ananddeep; Zhang, Shaojie; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the pathogenesis of broncho-pulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is a developmental lung disease of premature infants that is characterized by an interruption of lung alveolar and pulmonary vascular development. Omeprazole (OM) is a proton pump inhibitor that is used to treat humans with gastric acid related disorders. Earlier we observed that OM-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation attenuates acute hyperoxic lung injury in adult mice and oxygen toxicity in adult human lung cells. However, our later studies in newborn mice demonstrated that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced developmental lung injury. Whether OM exerts a similar toxicity in primary human fetal lung cells is unknown. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced cytotoxicity and ROS generation in the human fetal lung derived primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). OM activated AhR as evident by a dose-dependent increase in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 mRNA levels in OM-treated cells. Furthermore, OM at a concentration of 100 μM (OM 100) increased NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression. Surprisingly, hyperoxia decreased rather than increase the NQO1 protein levels in OM 100-treated cells. Exposure to hyperoxia increased cytotoxicity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Interestingly, OM 100-treated cells exposed to air had increased H2O2 levels. However, hyperoxia did not further augment H2O2 levels in OM 100-treated cells. Additionally, hyperoxia-mediated oxygen toxicity was similar in both vehicle- and OM-treated cells. These findings contradict our hypothesis and support the hypothesis that OM does not potentiate acute hyperoxic injury in HPMEC in vitro. PMID:26779382

  18. Comparative toxicity of several metal oxide nanoparticle aqueous suspensions to Zebrafish (Danio rerio) early developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Lin; Duan, Zhenghua; Qi, Ruiqi; Li, Yan; Lang, Yupeng

    2008-02-15

    With the emergence of manufactured nanomaterials, it is urgent to carry out researches on their potential environmental impacts and biological effects. To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impacts of metal oxide nanoparticles released to aquatic environments, the zebrafish 96-h embryo-larval bioassay was used to assess and compare the developmental toxicities of nanoscale zinc oxide (nZnO), titanium dioxide (nTiO(2)) and alumina (nAl(2)O(3)) aqueous suspensions. Toxicological endpoints such as zebrafish embryos or larvae survival, hatching rate and malformation were noted and described within 96 h of exposure. Meanwhile, a comparative experiment with their bulk counterparts (i.e., ZnO/bulk, TiO(2)/bulk and Al(2)O(3)/bulk) was conducted to understand the effect of particle size on their toxicities. The results showed that: (i) both nZnO and ZnO/bulk aqueous suspensions delayed zebrafish embryo and larva development, decreased their survival and hatching rates, and caused tissue damage. The 96-h LC(50) of nZnO and ZnO/bulk aqueous suspensions on the zebrafish survival are 1.793 mg/L and 1.550 mg/L respectively; and the 84-h EC(50) on the zebrafish embryo hatching rate are 2.065 mg/L and 2.066 mg/L respectively. Serious tissue ulceration was found on zebrafish larvae exposed to nZnO and ZnO/bulk aqueous suspensions. (ii) In contrast, neither nTiO(2) and TiO(2)/bulk nor nAl(2)O(3) and Al(2)O(3)/bulk showed any toxicity to zebrafish embryos and larvae under the same experimental condition. It revealed that the metal oxide nanoparticles with different chemical composition have different zebrafish developmental toxicities. (iii) Exposures of nTiO(2), nZnO and nAl(2)O(3) produced toxic effects on zebrafish embryos and larvae, which was not different from the effects caused by exposing to their bulk counterparts. This is the first study about the developmental toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles, and the results demonstrate that nZnO is very toxic to

  19. In Vitro/In Vivo Toxicity Evaluation and Quantification of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ujwal S.; Adireddy, Shiva; Jaiswal, Ashvin; Mandava, Sree; Lee, Benjamin R.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing biomedical applications of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in academic and commercial settings have alarmed the scientific community about the safety and assessment of toxicity profiles of IONPs. The great amount of diversity found in the cytotoxic measurements of IONPs points toward the necessity of careful characterization and quantification of IONPs. The present document discusses the major developments related to in vitro and in vivo toxicity assessment of IONPs and its relationship with the physicochemical parameters of IONPs. Major discussion is included on the current spectrophotometric and imaging based techniques used for quantifying, and studying the clearance and biodistribution of IONPs. Several invasive and non-invasive quantification techniques along with the pitfalls are discussed in detail. Finally, critical guidelines are provided to optimize the design of IONPs to minimize the toxicity. PMID:26501258

  20. In vivo toxicity of orally administrated silicon dioxide nanoparticles in healthy adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hassankhani, Ramin; Esmaeillou, Mohammad; Tehrani, Ali Asghar; Nasirzadeh, Keyvan; Khadir, Fatemeh; Maadi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) in various applications including industrial, agriculture, and medicine has raised concerns about their potential risks to human health. Various nanotoxicity researches have been done on the assessment of SiNPs' toxic effects; however, a few in vivo investigations exist. In this investigation, an in vivo study was done in order to evaluate the oral toxicity of SiNPs. The biochemical levels of 19 different serum parameters were assessed. Moreover, the histopathological changes have been examined as well. We showed that SiNPs with diameters of 10-15 nm in size can cause significant changes in albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, total protein, urea, HDL, and LDL as well as in alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase activity. In addition, histopathological examinations demonstrated that SiNPs have toxic effects on various tissues including liver, kidney, lung, and testis.

  1. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  2. The toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles to Lemna minor (L.) is predominantly caused by dissolved Zn.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; O'Halloran, John; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2016-05-01

    Nano-ZnO particles have been reported to be toxic to many aquatic organisms, although it is debated whether this is caused by nanoparticles per sé, or rather dissolved Zn. This study investigated the role of dissolved Zn in nano-ZnO toxicity to Lemna minor. The technical approach was based on modulating nano-ZnO dissolution by either modifying the pH of the growth medium and/or surface coating of nano-ZnO, and measuring resulting impacts on L. minor growth and physiology. Results show rapid and total dissolution of nano-ZnO in the medium (pH 4.5). Quantitatively similar toxic effects were found when L. minor was exposed to nano-ZnO or the "dissolved Zn equivalent of dissolved nano-ZnO". The conclusion that nano-ZnO toxicity is primarily caused by dissolved Zn was further supported by the observation that phytotoxicity was absent on medium with higher pH-values (>7), where dissolution of nano-ZnO almost ceased. Similarly, the reduced toxicity of coated nano-ZnO, which displays a slower Zn dissolution, is also consistent with a major role for dissolved Zn in nano-ZnO toxicity.

  3. Enhanced toxicity of silver nanoparticles in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans expressing amyloidogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Soria, Cristina; Coccini, Teresa; De Simone, Uliana; Marchese, Loredana; Zorzoli, Irene; Giorgetti, Sofia; Raimondi, Sara; Mangione, P Patrizia; Ramat, Stefano; Bellotti, Vittorio; Manzo, Luigi; Stoppini, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of applications of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) prompted us to assess their toxicity in vivo. We have investigated their effects on wild type and transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) strains expressing two prototypic amyloidogenic proteins: β2-microglobulin and Aβ peptide3-42. The use of C. elegans allowed us to highlight AgNP toxicity in the early phase of the worm's life cycle (LC50 survival, 0.9 µg/ml). A comparative analysis of LC50 values revealed that our nematode strains were more sensitive to assess AgNP toxicity than the cell lines, classically used in toxicity tests. Movement and superoxide production in the adult population were significantly affected by exposure to AgNP; the transgenic strains were more affected than the wild type worms. Our screening approach could be applied to other types of nanomaterials that can enter the body and express any nanostructure-related bioactivities. We propose that C. elegans reproducing the molecular events associated with protein misfolding diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's disease and systemic amyloidosis, may help to investigate the specific toxicity of a range of potentially harmful molecules. Our study suggests that transgenic C. elegans may be used to predict the effect of chemicals in a "fragile population", where an underlying pathologic state may amplify their toxicity.

  4. The toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles to Lemna minor (L.) is predominantly caused by dissolved Zn.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; O'Halloran, John; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2016-05-01

    Nano-ZnO particles have been reported to be toxic to many aquatic organisms, although it is debated whether this is caused by nanoparticles per sé, or rather dissolved Zn. This study investigated the role of dissolved Zn in nano-ZnO toxicity to Lemna minor. The technical approach was based on modulating nano-ZnO dissolution by either modifying the pH of the growth medium and/or surface coating of nano-ZnO, and measuring resulting impacts on L. minor growth and physiology. Results show rapid and total dissolution of nano-ZnO in the medium (pH 4.5). Quantitatively similar toxic effects were found when L. minor was exposed to nano-ZnO or the "dissolved Zn equivalent of dissolved nano-ZnO". The conclusion that nano-ZnO toxicity is primarily caused by dissolved Zn was further supported by the observation that phytotoxicity was absent on medium with higher pH-values (>7), where dissolution of nano-ZnO almost ceased. Similarly, the reduced toxicity of coated nano-ZnO, which displays a slower Zn dissolution, is also consistent with a major role for dissolved Zn in nano-ZnO toxicity. PMID:26918949

  5. Extrapolating between toxicity endpoints of metal oxide nanoparticles: Predicting toxicity to Escherichia coli and human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) with Nano-QTTR.

    PubMed

    Kar, Supratik; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Roy, Kunal; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of novel nanoparticles should always be accompanied by a comprehensive assessment of risk to human health and to ecosystem. Application of in silico models is encouraged by regulatory authorities to fill the data gaps related to the properties of nanoparticles affecting the environment and human health. Interspecies toxicity correlations provide a tool for estimation of contaminant's sensitivity with known levels of uncertainty for a diverse pool of species. We propose here first interspecies cytotoxicity correlation models between Escherichia coli (prokaryotic system) and human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) (eukaryotic system) to assess the discriminatory features for cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles. The nano-QTTR models can be employed for extrapolating cytotoxicity to E. coli and human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) for metal nanoparticles when the data for the other species are available. Informative illustrations of the contributing mechanisms of toxic action of the metal oxide nanoparticles to the HaCaT cell line as well as to the E. coli are identified from the developed nano quantitative toxicity-toxicity relationship (nano-QTTR) models.

  6. Investigating the environmental factors affecting the toxicity of silver nanoparticles in Escherichia coli with dual fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Li, Luzhi; Liang, Junting; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Xuanyu; Xu, Shengmin; Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Guoping; Xu, An; Chen, Shaopeng

    2016-07-01

    Flow cytometric investigation of the toxic effects of nanoparticles on bacteria is highly challenging and not sensitive due to the interference of aggregated nanoparticles: aggregated nanoparticles and bacteria are similar in size. In this study, an optimized dual fluorescence flow cytometric analysis was developed using PI-Lac::GFP (propidium iodide stained Escherichia coli (lac::GFP)) to monitor the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). As compared with single fluorescence analysis, the dual fluorescence analysis enabled more accurate evaluation of the toxic effects of AgNPs. We used this dual fluorescence analysis to investigate how AgNPs toxicity was affected by two typical environmental factors, divalent metal ions and surfactants. Our data revealed that Cu(2+) and SDS significantly enhanced the toxicity of AgNPs in a dose-dependent manner. SDS enhanced the toxicity of both AgNPs and Ag(+) ions, whereas Cu(2+) increased the toxicity of AgNPs but not dissolved Ag(+) ions. Our results suggest that this dual fluorescence analysis can be used to evaluate the toxicity of AgNPs accurately and sensitively.

  7. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y.C.; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO2 on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO2 induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO2 and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO2, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP + CeO2 were significantly larger than CeO2 or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP + CeO2 reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO2-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO2 induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO2 in the combined exposure. Using CeO2 as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns. PMID:24793434

  8. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jane Y C; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K; Castranova, Vincent

    2014-07-15

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO2 on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO2 induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO2 and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ, respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO2, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP+CeO2 were significantly larger than CeO2 or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP+CeO2 reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO2-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO2 induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO2 in the combined exposure. Using CeO2 as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns.

  9. A review of nanoparticle functionality and toxicity on the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z.; Liu, Z. W.; Allaker, R. P.; Reip, P.; Oxford, J.; Ahmad, Z.; Ren, G.

    2010-01-01

    Although nanoparticles have tremendous potential for a host of applications, their adverse effects on living cells have raised serious concerns recently for their use in the healthcare and consumer sectors. As regards the central nervous system (CNS), research data on nanoparticle interaction with neurons has provided evidence of both negative and positive effects. Maximal application dosage of nanoparticles in materials to provide applications such as antibacterial and antiviral functions is approximately 0.1–1.0 wt%. This concentration can be converted into a liquid phase release rate (leaching rate) depending upon the host or base materials used. For example, nanoparticulate silver (Ag) or copper oxide (CuO)-filled epoxy resin demonstrates much reduced release of the metal ions (Ag+ or Cu2+) into their surrounding environment unless they are mechanically removed or aggravated. Subsequent to leaching effects and entry into living systems, nanoparticles can also cross through many other barriers, such as skin and the blood–brain barrier (BBB), and may also reach bodily organs. In such cases, their concentration or dosage in body fluids is considered to be well below the maximum drug toxicity test limit (10−5 g ml−1) as determined in artificial cerebrospinal solution. As this is a rapidly evolving area and the use of such materials will continue to mature, so will their exposure to members of society. Hence, neurologists have equal interests in nanoparticle effects (positive functionality and negative toxicity) on human neuronal cells within the CNS, where the current research in this field will be highlighted and reviewed. PMID:20519209

  10. Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles toxic potency on different microalgae species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravantinou, Andriana F.; Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Dailianis, Stefanos; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles are widely used in many products such as cosmetics, material coatings, and pigments and they are released into enviroment. Recently, nanoparticles have been found in municipal wastewater and wastewater treatment plants, which are consequently discharged to receiving bodies. Since their versatile use and application is increasing, their environmental impact is of great concern and needs to be clarified. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on aquatic species, such as unicellular microalgae. This is considered as a necessary step in order to assess their impact on coastal food chain and the ecosystems that they support as well as on natural wastewater treatment systems. More specifically, the potential toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on three aquatic organisms, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Tetraselmis suesica, and Chlorococcum sp. were investigated. The microalgae species exposed to different periods of time (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) and different concentrations of ZnO NPs (1 to 100 μM, 1 to10 mM), and showed significant differences on their growth rates. Algae exposed to ZnO NPs concentrations from 1 to 100 μΜ exhibited increased levels of the half maximum inhibitory concentration values (IC50) in all cases, while at higher concentrations (from 1 to 10 mM) algae showed excessive lysis, probably due to disturbances occurred in cellular structure and function. According to the results of the present study, ZnO nanoparticles appeared to have toxic effects on all species tested, showing type- and time-dependent alterations.

  11. Controlling silver nanoparticle exposure in algal toxicity testing – A matter of timing

    PubMed Central

    Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanoparticles is complicated by unstable exposure conditions resulting from various transformation processes of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions. In this study, we investigated the influence of exposure timing on the algal test response to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), by reducing the incubation time and by aging the AgNPs in algal medium prior to testing. The freshwater green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were exposed to AgNO3, NM-300 K (a representative AgNP) and citrate stabilized AgNPs from two different manufacturers (AgNP1 and AgNP2) in a standard algal growth inhibition test (ISO 8692:2004) for 48 h and a short-term (2 h) 14C-assimilation test. For AgNO3, similar responses were obtained in the two tests, whereas freshly prepared suspensions of citrate stabilized AgNPs were less toxic in the 2-h tests compared to the 48-h tests. The 2-h test was found applicable for dissolved silver, but yielded non-monotonous concentration–response relationships and poor reproducibility for freshly prepared AgNP suspensions. However, when aging AgNPs in algal medium 24 h prior to testing, clear concentration–response patterns emerged and reproducibility increased. Prolonged aging to 48 h increased toxicity in the 2-h tests whereas aging beyond 48 h reduced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that the outcome of algal toxicity testing of AgNPs is highly influenced not only by the test duration, but also by the time passed from the moment AgNPs are added to the test medium. This time-dependency should be considered when nanomaterial dispersion protocols for ecotoxicity testing are developed. PMID:24842597

  12. A nanoparticle formulation reduces the corneal toxicity of indomethacin eye drops and enhances its corneal permeability.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Norio; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2014-05-01

    Indomethacin (IMC) has been shown to reduce post-operative inflammation and to decrease intraocular irritation after cataract extraction and in cystoid macular edema; however, the clinical use of its most commonly used eye drops is limited due to topical side-effects that include burning sensation, irritation and epithelial keratitis. It is known that decreasing direct cell stimulation and reducing the amount applied via increasing bioavailability are useful for improving these issues. In this study, we designed ophthalmic formulations containing 0.5% IMC nanoparticles using zirconia beads and Bead Smash 12 (IMCnano eye drops; particle size 76 ± 59 nm, mean ± S.D.), and investigated the corneal toxicity of these IMCnano eye drops. IMCnano eye drops are tolerated better by a human cornea epithelial cell line (HCE-T) than commercially available NDSAIDs preparations (IMC, pranoprofen, diclofenac, bromfenac and nepafenac eye drops), and corneal wound healing in rat eyes with debrided corneal epithelium instilled with IMCnano eye drops is significantly better than that of eyes instilled with commercially available IMC eye drops. In addition, the accumulation of IMC in HCE-T cells treated with the IMCnano eye drops for 30 min was 19.9% that of the accumulation from commercially available IMC eye drops. On the other hand, the corneal penetration of IMC from IMCnano eye drops was significantly greater than in the case of the commercially available IMC eye drops in both in vivo and in vitro studies using rabbit corneas. Taken together, we hypothesize that a nanoparticle formulation reduces the corneal toxicity of IMC eye drops, probably because the accumulation of IMC from IMCnano eye drops in the eye is lower than that from commercially available IMC eye drops. In addition, the nanoparticle formulation may allow a decrease in the amount of IMC used due to the increase in bioavailability, resulting in reduced drug toxicity. These findings provide significant information

  13. Different behavior of Staphylococcus epidermidis in intracellular biosynthesis of silver and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles: more stability and lower toxicity of extracted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rezvani Amin, Zohreh; Khashyarmanesh, Zahra; Fazly Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh

    2016-09-01

    Chemical reagents that are used for synthesis of nanoparticles are often toxic, while biological reagents are safer and cost-effective. Here, the behavior of Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228) was evaluated for biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-NPs) using TEM images intra- and extracellularly. The bacteria only biosynthesized the nanoparticles intracellularly and distributed Ag-NPs throughout the cytoplasm and on outside surface of cell walls, while CdS-NPs only formed in cytoplasm near the cell wall. A new method for purification of the nanoparticles was used. TEM images of pure CdS-NPs confirmed biosynthesis of agglomerated nanoparticles. Biosynthetic Ag-NPs were more stable against bright light and aggregation reaction than synthetic Ag-NPs (prepared chemically) also biosynthetic Ag-NPs displayed lower toxicity in in vitro assays. CdS-NPs indicated no toxicity in in vitro assays. Biosynthetic nanoparticles as product of the detoxification pathway may be safer and more stable for biosensors. PMID:27430507

  14. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the ``liquid drop'' approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-10-01

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the ``liquid drop'' model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were

  15. Toxicity of copper nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under different exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yinlong; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Chen, Guangchao; Vijver, Martina G

    2016-09-01

    Although the risks of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) to aquatic organisms have already been studied for >10years, our understanding of the link between the fate of particles in exposure medium and their toxicity is still in its infancy. Moreover, most of the earlier studies did not distinguish the contribution of particles and soluble ions to the toxic effects caused by suspensions of metallic NPs. In this study, the toxicity of CuNPs to Daphnia magna upon modification of the exposure conditions, achieved by aging the suspensions of CuNPs and by altering water chemistry parameters like the pH and levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), was investigated. The LC50 values for CuNPs exposure decreased by about 30% after 7days of aging. The LC50 values increased >12-fold upon addition of DOC at concentrations ranging from 0 to 10mg/L to the exposure medium. Changing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 resulted in a 3-fold higher LC50 value. Furthermore, it was found that during 7days of aging of the exposure medium (without addition of DOC and at pH7.8), the toxicity could be mostly ascribed to the particles present in the suspension (around 70%). However, adding DOC or decreasing the pH of the exposure medium reduced the contribution of the particles to the observed toxicity. We thus found that the effective concentration regarding the toxicity was mainly driven by the contribution of the soluble ions in the presence of DOC or at pH6.5. Our results suggest that the toxicity results of CuNPs obtained from laboratory tests may overestimate the risk of the particles in polluted waters due to the common absence of DOC in laboratory test solutions. Moreover, the role of the ions shedding from CuNPs is very important in explaining the toxicity in natural waters. PMID:27135569

  16. Toxicity of copper nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under different exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yinlong; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Chen, Guangchao; Vijver, Martina G

    2016-09-01

    Although the risks of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) to aquatic organisms have already been studied for >10years, our understanding of the link between the fate of particles in exposure medium and their toxicity is still in its infancy. Moreover, most of the earlier studies did not distinguish the contribution of particles and soluble ions to the toxic effects caused by suspensions of metallic NPs. In this study, the toxicity of CuNPs to Daphnia magna upon modification of the exposure conditions, achieved by aging the suspensions of CuNPs and by altering water chemistry parameters like the pH and levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), was investigated. The LC50 values for CuNPs exposure decreased by about 30% after 7days of aging. The LC50 values increased >12-fold upon addition of DOC at concentrations ranging from 0 to 10mg/L to the exposure medium. Changing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 resulted in a 3-fold higher LC50 value. Furthermore, it was found that during 7days of aging of the exposure medium (without addition of DOC and at pH7.8), the toxicity could be mostly ascribed to the particles present in the suspension (around 70%). However, adding DOC or decreasing the pH of the exposure medium reduced the contribution of the particles to the observed toxicity. We thus found that the effective concentration regarding the toxicity was mainly driven by the contribution of the soluble ions in the presence of DOC or at pH6.5. Our results suggest that the toxicity results of CuNPs obtained from laboratory tests may overestimate the risk of the particles in polluted waters due to the common absence of DOC in laboratory test solutions. Moreover, the role of the ions shedding from CuNPs is very important in explaining the toxicity in natural waters.

  17. Macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of indium-containing particles as in vitro correlates to pulmonary toxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, William M; Qu, Wei; Bousquet, Ronald W; Price, Herman; Shines, Cassandra J; Taylor, Genie J; Waalkes, Michael P; Morgan, Daniel L

    2015-03-01

    Macrophage-solubilized indium-containing particles (ICPs) were previously shown in vitro to be cytotoxic. In this study, we compared macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of indium phosphide (InP) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) with similar particle diameters (∼ 1.5 µm) and then determined if relative differences in these in vitro parameters correlated with pulmonary toxicity in vivo. RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with InP or ITO particles and cytotoxicity was assayed at 24 h. Ionic indium was measured in 24 h culture supernatants. Macrophage cytotoxicity and particle solubilization in vitro were much greater for InP compared with ITO. To correlate changes in vivo, B6C3F1 mice were treated with InP or ITO by oropharyngeal aspiration. On Days 14 and 28, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and pleural lavage (PL) fluids were collected and assayed for total leukocytes. Cell differentials, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and protein levels were also measured in BAL. All lavage parameters were greatly increased in mice treated with InP compared with ITO. These data suggest that macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of some ICPs in vitro are capable of predicting pulmonary toxicity in vivo. In addition, these differences in toxicity were observed despite the two particulate compounds containing similar amounts of indium suggesting that solubilization, not total indium content, better reflects the toxic potential of some ICPs. Soluble InCl3 was shown to be more cytotoxic than InP to macrophages and lung epithelial cells in vitro further suggesting that ionic indium is the primary cytotoxic component of InP.

  18. Macrophage Solubilization and Cytotoxicity of Indium-Containing Particles as in vitro Correlates to Pulmonary Toxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gwinn, William M.; Qu, Wei; Bousquet, Ronald W.; Price, Herman; Shines, Cassandra J.; Taylor, Genie J.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Morgan, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-solubilized indium-containing particles (ICPs) were previously shown in vitro to be cytotoxic. In this study, we compared macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of indium phosphide (InP) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) with similar particle diameters (∼1.5 µm) and then determined if relative differences in these in vitro parameters correlated with pulmonary toxicity in vivo. RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with InP or ITO particles and cytotoxicity was assayed at 24 h. Ionic indium was measured in 24 h culture supernatants. Macrophage cytotoxicity and particle solubilization in vitro were much greater for InP compared with ITO. To correlate changes in vivo, B6C3F1 mice were treated with InP or ITO by oropharyngeal aspiration. On Days 14 and 28, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and pleural lavage (PL) fluids were collected and assayed for total leukocytes. Cell differentials, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and protein levels were also measured in BAL. All lavage parameters were greatly increased in mice treated with InP compared with ITO. These data suggest that macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of some ICPs in vitro are capable of predicting pulmonary toxicity in vivo. In addition, these differences in toxicity were observed despite the two particulate compounds containing similar amounts of indium suggesting that solubilization, not total indium content, better reflects the toxic potential of some ICPs. Soluble InCl3 was shown to be more cytotoxic than InP to macrophages and lung epithelial cells in vitro further suggesting that ionic indium is the primary cytotoxic component of InP. PMID:25527823

  19. Accumulation and Toxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Cells and Experimental Animals.

    PubMed

    Jarockyte, Greta; Daugelaite, Egle; Stasys, Marius; Statkute, Urte; Poderys, Vilius; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2016-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of negatively charged superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe₃O₄) nanoparticles (SPIONs) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH3T3, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal influenced by SPIONs injected into experimental animals, were visualized and investigated. Cellular uptake and distribution of the SPIONs in NIH3T3 after staining with Prussian Blue were investigated by a bright-field microscope equipped with digital color camera. SPIONs were localized in vesicles, mostly placed near the nucleus. Toxicity of SPION nanoparticles tested with cell viability assay (XTT) was estimated. The viability of NIH3T3 cells remains approximately 95% within 3-24 h of incubation, and only a slight decrease of viability was observed after 48 h of incubation. MRI studies on Wistar rats using a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner were showing that SPIONs give a negative contrast in the MRI. The dynamic MRI measurements of the SPION clearance from the injection site shows that SPIONs slowly disappear from injection sites and only a low concentration of nanoparticles was completely eliminated within three weeks. No functionalized SPIONs accumulate in cells by endocytic mechanism, none accumulate in the nucleus, and none are toxic at a desirable concentration. Therefore, they could be used as a dual imaging agent: as contrast agents for MRI and for traditional optical biopsy by using Prussian Blue staining. PMID:27548152

  20. Curcumin encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles: a novel strategy for the treatment of arsenic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Abhishek; Lomash, Vinay; Samim, M; Flora, Swaran J S

    2012-07-30

    Water-soluble nanoparticles of curcumin were synthesized, characterized and applied as a stable detoxifying agent for arsenic poisoning. Chitosan nanoparticles of less than 50 nm in diameter containing curcumin were prepared. The particles were characterized by TEM, DLS and FT-IR. The therapeutic efficacy of the encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (ECNPs) against arsenic-induced toxicity in rats was investigated. Sodium arsenite (2mg/kg) and ECNPs (1.5 or 15 mg/kg) were orally administered to male Wistar rats for 4 weeks to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ECNPs in blood and soft tissues. Arsenic significantly decreased blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased blood reactive oxygen species (ROS). These changes were accompanied by increases in hepatic total ROS, oxidized glutathione, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels. By contrast, hepatic GSH, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities significantly decreased on arsenic exposure, indicative of oxidative stress. Brain biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine) levels also showed significant changes on arsenic exposure. Co-administration of ECNPs provided pronounced beneficial effects on the adverse changes in oxidative stress parameters induced by arsenic. The results indicate that ECNPs have better antioxidant and chelating potential (even at the lower dose of 1.5 mg/kg) compared to free curcumin at 15 mg/kg. The significant neurochemical and immunohistochemical protection afforded by ECNPs indicates their neuroprotective efficacy. The formulation provides a novel therapeutic regime for preventing arsenic toxicity.

  1. Montmorillonite clay alters toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleutheroembryo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2016-11-01

    An exponential development in the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products has accelerated their release in aquatic environment. As the AgNPs enters into the aquatic systems, their fate may change due to interactions with abiotic (e.g. clay particles) or biotic factors. The abundantly present clay particles are expected to more prone for interaction with nanoparticles in aquatic systems. In the present study, it is demonstrated that AgNPs interacts with clay particles and forms heteroagglomerates. Furthermore, an impact on toxicity potential of AgNPs after interactions with clay particles was assessed by using zebrafish eleutheroembryos (72 h post hatching) as an in vivo model. The mortality rate of zebrafish eleutheroembryos was higher in case of exposure to AgNPs-clay complexes (pH 4.0 and 7.0) as compared to bare AgNPs. In addition, at earlier time points, the eleutheroembryos expressed higher levels of morphological changes in tail, yolk and pericardia, but the edema in yolk sac was followed by cell death. It can be concluded from the observations made in the present study that the inorganic colloids in the aquatic matrices can alter the fate and toxicity potential of nanoparticles. PMID:27537402

  2. Accumulation and Toxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Cells and Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Jarockyte, Greta; Daugelaite, Egle; Stasys, Marius; Statkute, Urte; Poderys, Vilius; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2016-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of negatively charged superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH3T3, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal influenced by SPIONs injected into experimental animals, were visualized and investigated. Cellular uptake and distribution of the SPIONs in NIH3T3 after staining with Prussian Blue were investigated by a bright-field microscope equipped with digital color camera. SPIONs were localized in vesicles, mostly placed near the nucleus. Toxicity of SPION nanoparticles tested with cell viability assay (XTT) was estimated. The viability of NIH3T3 cells remains approximately 95% within 3–24 h of incubation, and only a slight decrease of viability was observed after 48 h of incubation. MRI studies on Wistar rats using a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner were showing that SPIONs give a negative contrast in the MRI. The dynamic MRI measurements of the SPION clearance from the injection site shows that SPIONs slowly disappear from injection sites and only a low concentration of nanoparticles was completely eliminated within three weeks. No functionalized SPIONs accumulate in cells by endocytic mechanism, none accumulate in the nucleus, and none are toxic at a desirable concentration. Therefore, they could be used as a dual imaging agent: as contrast agents for MRI and for traditional optical biopsy by using Prussian Blue staining. PMID:27548152

  3. Toxicity of magnetic chitosan micro and nanoparticles as carriers for biologically active substances.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Maja; Heržič, Katja; Podrepšek, Gordana Hojnik; Hojski, Aljaž; Crnjac, Anton; Knez, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of inorganic magnetic core surrounded by layers of functional coatings are potential representatives of nanostructures for immobilization of bio-substances. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are often bound in aggregates due to a strong magnetic dipole, which has a lot of advantages, such as large surface area for binding biologically active substances. Chitosan is a polysaccharide polymer that is non-toxic, hydrophilic, biocompatible and has hydroxy and amino groups in its structure. Because of these chemical and biological properties it is a desirable bio-product for immobilization of enzymes and for binding of other biologically active substances. Magnetic micro and nanoparticles were synthesized with chitosan by three different methods; microemulsion process, suspension cross-linking technique and covalent binding of chitosan. Toxic effect of the prepared magnetic particles was determined as well and was examined on five different bacterial cultures; Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis and Klebsiella pneumoniae. At concentrations of 10-30 mg of magnetic particles per 0.5 McFarland Standard solution of E. coli and per 400 CFU of S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. faecalis in K. pneumonia, no inhibition on the chosen bacterial cultures was detected. PMID:24664338

  4. Montmorillonite clay alters toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleutheroembryo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2016-11-01

    An exponential development in the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products has accelerated their release in aquatic environment. As the AgNPs enters into the aquatic systems, their fate may change due to interactions with abiotic (e.g. clay particles) or biotic factors. The abundantly present clay particles are expected to more prone for interaction with nanoparticles in aquatic systems. In the present study, it is demonstrated that AgNPs interacts with clay particles and forms heteroagglomerates. Furthermore, an impact on toxicity potential of AgNPs after interactions with clay particles was assessed by using zebrafish eleutheroembryos (72 h post hatching) as an in vivo model. The mortality rate of zebrafish eleutheroembryos was higher in case of exposure to AgNPs-clay complexes (pH 4.0 and 7.0) as compared to bare AgNPs. In addition, at earlier time points, the eleutheroembryos expressed higher levels of morphological changes in tail, yolk and pericardia, but the edema in yolk sac was followed by cell death. It can be concluded from the observations made in the present study that the inorganic colloids in the aquatic matrices can alter the fate and toxicity potential of nanoparticles.

  5. Gene transcription patterns and energy reserves in Daphnia magna show no nanoparticle specific toxicity when exposed to ZnO and CuO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nathalie; Vergauwen, Lucia; Blust, Ronny; Knapen, Dries

    2015-04-01

    There is still a lot of contradiction on whether metal ions are solely responsible for the observed toxicity of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles to aquatic species. While most experiments have studied nanoparticle effects at organismal levels (e.g. mortality, reproduction), effects at lower levels of biological organization may clarify the role of metal ions, nanoparticles and nanoparticle aggregates. In this study, the effect of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles was tested at two lower levels: energy reserves and gene transcription and compared with zinc and copper salts. Daphnia magna was exposed during 96h to 10% immobilization concentrations of all chemicals, after which daphnids were sampled for determination of glycogen, lipid and protein concentration and for a differential gene transcription analysis using microarray. The dissolved, nanoparticle and aggregated fraction in the medium was characterized. The results showed that ZnO nanoparticles had largely dissolved directly after addition to the test medium. The CuO nanoparticles mostly formed aggregates, while only a small fraction dissolved. The exposure to zinc (both nano and metal salt) had no effect on the available energy reserves. However, in the copper exposure, the glycogen, lipid and protein concentration in the exposed daphnids was lower than in the unexposed ones. When comparing the nanoparticle (ZnO or CuO) exposed daphnids to the metal salt (zinc or copper salt) exposed daphnids, the microarray results showed no significantly differentially transcribed gene fragments. The results indicate that under the current exposure conditions the toxicity of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles to D. magna is solely caused by toxic metal ions.

  6. Assessment of the Toxicity of CuO Nanoparticles by Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants with Multiple Genes Deleted

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Shaopan; Lu, Qicong; Dai, Heping; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    To develop applicable and susceptible models to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles, the antimicrobial effects of CuO nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) on various Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) strains (wild type, single-gene-deleted mutants, and multiple-gene-deleted mutants) were determined and compared. Further experiments were also conducted to analyze the mechanisms associated with toxicity using copper salt, bulk CuO (bCuO), carbon-shelled copper nanoparticles (C/Cu-NPs), and carbon nanoparticles (C-NPs) for comparisons. The results indicated that the growth inhibition rates of CuO-NPs for the wild-type and the single-gene-deleted strains were comparable, while for the multiple-gene deletion mutant, significantly higher toxicity was observed (P < 0.05). When the toxicity of the CuO-NPs to yeast cells was compared with the toxicities of copper salt and bCuO, we concluded that the toxicity of CuO-NPs should be attributed to soluble copper rather than to the nanoparticles. The striking difference in adverse effects of C-NPs and C/Cu-NPs with equivalent surface areas also proved this. A toxicity assay revealed that the multiple-gene-deleted mutant was significantly more sensitive to CuO-NPs than the wild type. Specifically, compared with the wild-type strain, copper was readily taken up by mutant strains when cell permeability genes were knocked out, and the mutants with deletions of genes regulated under oxidative stress (OS) were likely producing more reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, as mechanism-based gene inactivation could increase the susceptibility of yeast, the multiple-gene-deleted mutants should be improved model organisms to investigate the toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26386067

  7. The fate and toxicity of Raman-active silica-gold nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Luong, Richard; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Lin, Frank I; Kempen, Paul; Zavaleta, Cristina; Chu, Pauline; Massoud, Tarik F; Sinclair, Robert; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2011-04-20

    Raman spectroscopy is an optical imaging method that is based on the Raman effect, the inelastic scattering of a photon when energy is absorbed from light by a surface. Although Raman spectroscopy is widely used for chemical and molecular analysis, its clinical application has been hindered by the inherently weak nature of the Raman effect. Raman-silica-gold-nanoparticles (R-Si-Au-NPs) overcome this limitation by producing larger Raman signals through surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Because we are developing these particles for use as targeted molecular imaging agents, we examined the acute toxicity and biodistribution of core polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated R-Si-Au-NPs after different routes of administration in mice. After intravenous administration, PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs were removed from the circulation by macrophages in the liver and spleen (that is, the reticuloendothelial system). At 24 hours, PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs elicited a mild inflammatory response and an increase in oxidative stress in the liver, which subsided by 2 weeks after administration. No evidence of significant toxicity was observed by measuring clinical, histological, biochemical, or cardiovascular parameters for 2 weeks. Because we are designing targeted PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs (for example, PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs labeled with an affibody that binds specifically to the epidermal growth factor receptor) to detect colorectal cancer after administration into the bowel lumen, we tested the toxicity of the core nanoparticle after administration per rectum. We observed no significant bowel or systemic toxicity, and no PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs were detected systemically. Although additional studies are required to investigate the long-term effects of PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs and their toxicity when carrying the targeting moiety, the results presented here support the idea that PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs can be safely used in living subjects, especially when administered rectally.

  8. The Effect of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Valence State on Reactive Oxygen Species and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, Katherine M; Pillai, Rajalekshmi; Pisane, Kelly L; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Sabolsky, Edward M; Leonard, Stephen S

    2015-07-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles, which are used in a variety of products including solar cells, gas sensors, and catalysts, are expected to increase in industrial use. This will subsequently lead to additional occupational exposures, making toxicology screenings crucial. Previous toxicology studies have presented conflicting results as to the extent of CeO2 toxicity, which is hypothesized to be due to the ability of Ce to exist in both a +3 and +4 valence state. Thus, to study whether valence state and oxygen vacancy concentration are important in CeO2 toxicity, CeO2 nanoparticles were doped with gadolinium to adjust the cation (Ce, Gd) and anion (O) defect states. The hypothesis that doping would increase toxicity and decrease antioxidant abilities as a result of increased oxygen vacancies and inhibition of +3 to +4 transition was tested. Differences in toxicity and reactivity based on valence state were determined in RLE-6TN rat alveolar epithelial and NR8383 rat alveolar macrophage cells using enhanced dark field microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and annexin V/propidium iodide cell viability stain. Results from EPR indicated that as doping increased, antioxidant potential decreased. Alternatively, doping had no effect on toxicity at 24 h. The present results imply that as doping increases, thus subsequently increasing the Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) ratio, antioxidant potential decreases, suggesting that differences in reactivity of CeO2 are due to the ability of Ce to transition between the two valence states and the presence of increased oxygen vacancies, rather than dependent on a specific valence state.

  9. Salinity-dependent toxicities of zinc oxide nanoparticles to the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Yung, Mana M N; Wong, Stella W Y; Kwok, Kevin W H; Liu, F Z; Leung, Y H; Chan, W T; Li, X Y; Djurišić, A B; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2015-08-01

    This study comprehensively investigated the influences of salinity, exposure concentration and time on the aggregate size, surface charge and dissolution of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs; 20nm) in seawater, and examined the interacting effect of salinity and waterborne exposure of ZnO-NPs on the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana for 96h. We found that aggregate sizes of ZnO-NPs significantly increased with increasing salinity, but generally decreased with increasing exposure concentration. Ion release decreased with increasing salinity, whereas the surface charge of the particles was not affected by salinity. The increased aggregate size and decreased ion release with increasing salinity, and consequently lower concentration of bioavailable zinc ions, resulted in decreased toxicity of ZnO-NPs at higher salinity in general in terms of growth inhibition (IC50) and chlorophyll fluorescence (EC50 - ФPo and EC50 - Ф2). However, IC50s and EC50s of ZnO-NPs were smaller than those of Zn(2+) (from ZnO-NPs ultrafiltrate and ZnCl2), indicating that dissolved Zn(2+) can only partially explain the toxicity of ZnO-NPs. SEM images showed that ZnO-NPs attached on the diatom frustule surface, suggesting that the interaction between the nanoparticles and the cell surface may acerbate the toxicity of ZnO-NPs. Our results linked the physicochemical characteristics of ZnO-NPs in seawater with their toxicities to the marine diatom and highlighted the importance of salinity as an influential environmental factor governing the aggregation, dissolution and the toxicity of ZnO-NPs.

  10. Comparison of cell counting methods in rodent pulmonary toxicity studies: automated and manual protocols and considerations for experimental design.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M; Meighan, Terence G; Young, Shih-Houng; Eye, Tracy J; Hammer, Mary Ann; Erdely, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary toxicity studies often use bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to investigate potential adverse lung responses to a particulate exposure. The BAL cellular fraction is counted, using automated (i.e. Coulter Counter®), flow cytometry or manual (i.e. hemocytometer) methods, to determine inflammatory cell influx. The goal of the study was to compare the different counting methods to determine which is optimal for examining BAL cell influx after exposure by inhalation or intratracheal instillation (ITI) to different particles with varying inherent pulmonary toxicities in both rat and mouse models. General findings indicate that total BAL cell counts using the automated and manual methods tended to agree after inhalation or ITI exposure to particle samples that are relatively nontoxic or at later time points after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle when the response resolves. However, when the initial lung inflammation and cytotoxicity was high after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle, significant differences were observed when comparing cell counts from the automated, flow cytometry and manual methods. When using total BAL cell count for differential calculations from the automated method, depending on the cell diameter size range cutoff, the data suggest that the number of lung polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) varies. Importantly, the automated counts, regardless of the size cutoff, still indicated a greater number of total lung PMN when compared with the manual method, which agreed more closely with flow cytometry. The results suggest that either the manual method or flow cytometry would be better suited for BAL studies where cytotoxicity is an unknown variable.

  11. Intracellular trafficking pathways in silver nanoparticle uptake and toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Laura L; Yang, Xinyu; Schindler, Adam J; Taggart, Ross K; Jiang, Chuanjia; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Sherwood, David R; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    We used the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to study the roles of endocytosis and lysosomal function in uptake and subsequent toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in vivo. To focus on AgNP uptake and effects rather than silver ion (AgNO3) effects, we used a minimally dissolvable AgNP, citrate-coated AgNPs (CIT-AgNPs). We found that the clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor chlorpromazine reduced the toxicity of CIT-AgNPs but not AgNO3. We also tested the sensitivity of three endocytosis-deficient mutants (rme-1, rme-6 and rme-8) and two lysosomal function deficient mutants (cup-5 and glo-1) as compared to wild-type (N2 strain). One of the endocytosis-deficient mutants (rme-6) took up less silver and was resistant to the acute toxicity of CIT-AgNPs compared to N2s. None of those mutants showed altered sensitivity to AgNO3. Lysosome and lysosome-related organelle mutants were more sensitive to the growth-inhibiting effects of both CIT-AgNPs and AgNO3. Our study provides mechanistic evidence suggesting that early endosome formation is necessary for AgNP-induced toxicity in vivo, as rme-6 mutants were less sensitive to the toxic effects of AgNPs than C. elegans with mutations involved in later steps in the endocytic process.

  12. Toxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Barhoumi, Lotfi

    2013-01-01

    Toxicity of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) was investigated on Chlorella vulgaris cells exposed during 72 hours to Fe3O4 (SPION-1), Co0.2Zn0.8Fe2O4 (SPION-2), or Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 (SPION-3) to a range of concentrations from 12.5 to 400 μg mL−1. Under these treatments, toxicity impact was indicated by the deterioration of photochemical activities of photosynthesis, the induction of oxidative stress, and the inhibition of cell division rate. In comparison to SPION-2 and -3, exposure to SPION-1 caused the highest toxic effects on cellular division due to a stronger production of reactive oxygen species and deterioration of photochemical activity of Photosystem II. This study showed the potential source of toxicity for three SPION suspensions, having different chemical compositions, estimated by the change of different biomarkers. In this toxicological investigation, algal model C. vulgaris demonstrated to be a valuable bioindicator of SPION toxicity. PMID:24369015

  13. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated silver nanoparticles in the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yi; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Forbes, Valery E

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the toxicities of sediment-associated silver added to sediment as commercially available silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20 and 80 nm) and aqueous Ag (AgNO3) to the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor, were investigated for both individual and subcellular endpoints after 10 d of exposure. Both Ag NP types were characterized in parallel to the toxicity studies and found to be polydispersed and overlapping in size. Burrowing activity decreased (marginally) with increasing Ag concentration and depended on the form of Ag added to sediment. All worms accumulated Ag regardless of the form in which it was added to the sediment, and worm size (expressed as dry weight) was found to significantly affect bioaccumulation such that smaller worms accumulated more Ag per body weight than larger worms. Lysosomal membrane permeability (neutral red retention time, NRRT) and DNA damage (comet assay tail moment and tail DNA intensity %) of Nereis coelomocytes increased in a concentration-dependent manner in all three Ag treatments. Ag NP treatments were more toxic than aqueous Ag for all toxicity endpoints, even though bioaccumulation did not differ significantly among Ag forms. No significant difference in toxicity was observed between the two Ag NP treatments which was attributed to their overlap in particle size.

  14. Surfactants present complex joint effects on the toxicities of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-08-01

    The potential toxicities of nanoparticles (NPs) have been intensively discussed over the past decade. In addition to their single toxicities, NPs can interact with other environmental chemicals and thereby exert joint effects on biological systems and the environment. The present study investigated the combined toxicities of NPs and surfactants, which are among the chemicals that most likely coexist with NPs. Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed as the model organism. The results indicate that surfactants with different ion types can alter the properties of NPs (i.e., particle size and surface charge) in different ways and present complex joint effects on NP toxicities. Mixtures of different NPs and surfactants exhibited antagonistic, synergistic, and additive effects. In particular, the toxicity of ZnO was observed to result from its dissolved Zn(2+); thus, the joint effects of the ZnO NPs and surfactants can be explained by the interactions between the Zn ions and the surfactants. Our study suggests that the potential hazards caused by mixtures of NPs and surfactants are different from those caused by single NPs. Because surfactants are extensively used in the field of nanotechnology and are likely to coexist with NPs in natural waters, the ecological risk assessments of NPs should consider the impacts of surfactants.

  15. Toxic Effects of Nickel Oxide Bulk and Nanoparticles on the Aquatic Plant Lemna gibba L.

    PubMed Central

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Barhoumi, Lotfi; Samadani, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) and nickel(II) oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk). Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0–1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L). These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing. PMID:26075242

  16. Calcium ions rescue human lung epithelial cells from the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hanagata, Nobutaka; Morita, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Contradictory results have been reported for in vitro evaluations of whether zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are cytotoxic. Though there have been reports of ZnO NPs cytotoxicity due to Zn ions released from the nanoparticles, there have also been reports concluding that Zn ions are not cytotoxic. This inconsistency is mostly attributed to the types of cells used. In this research, we investigated the difference in the level of ZnO NPs cytotoxicity due to culturing conditions. The sensitivity of human lung epithelial cells to ZnO NPs cytotoxicity differed depending on the dispersing medium, physiological state of the cells resulting from their growth stage, and composition of the medium. Further, with regard to the toxicity of ZnO NPs, NPs internalized into cells had a greater cytotoxic effect than Zn ions released from ZnO NPs. Instead of inducing cell death, ZnO NPs internalized into cells slowed the rate of cell proliferation. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs depended greatly on the concentration of calcium ions (Ca2+) in the medium. When the concentration of Ca2+ was low, the cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs increased markedly. However, the toxicity of ZnO NPs was mitigated by the addition of CaCl2 to the medium. Global gene expression analysis revealed that Ca2+ -induced upregulation of cell cycle functions could be attributable to the mitigation of ZnO NP toxicity by Ca2+.

  17. In vitro toxicity of different-sized ZnO nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tianshu; Guan, Rongfa; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Song, Yijuan; Jiang, Han; Zhao, Jin

    2013-11-01

    There has been rapid growth in nanotechnology in both the public and private sectors worldwide, but concern about nanosafety exists. To assess size-dependent cytotoxicity on human cancer cells, we studied the cytotoxic effect of three kinds of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, distribution, and intensity. Multiple assays have been adopted to measure the cell activity and oxidative stress. The cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs was time dependent and dose dependent. The 24-h exposure was chosen to confirm the viability and accessibility of the cells and taken as the appropriate time for the following test system. The IC50 value was found at a low concentration. The oxidative stress elicited a significant reduction in glutathione with increase in reactive oxygen species and lactate dehydrogenase. The toxicity resulted in a deletion of cells in the G1 phase and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. One type of metallic oxide (ZnO) exerted different cytotoxic effects according to different particle sizes. Data from the previous experiments showed that 26-nm ZnO NPs appeared to have the highest toxicity to Caco-2 cells. The study demonstrated the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 cells and the impact of particle size, which could be useful in the medical applications.

  18. Toxic effects of nickel oxide bulk and nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Lemna gibba L.

    PubMed

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Barhoumi, Lotfi; Samadani, Mahshid; Dewez, David

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) and nickel(II) oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk). Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0-1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L). These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing.

  19. Toxic effects of nickel oxide bulk and nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Lemna gibba L.

    PubMed

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Barhoumi, Lotfi; Samadani, Mahshid; Dewez, David

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) and nickel(II) oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk). Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0-1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L). These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing. PMID:26075242

  20. Effects of iron oxide nanoparticles: cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, developmental toxicity, and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Kiliç, Gözde; Costa, Carla; Fernández-Bertólez, Natalia; Pásaro, Eduardo; Teixeira, João Paulo; Laffon, Blanca

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (ION) with superparamagnetic properties hold great promise for use in various biomedical applications; specific examples include use as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, in targeted drug delivery, and for induced hyperthermia cancer treatments. Increasing potential applications raise concerns over their potential effects on human health. Nevertheless, very little is currently known about the toxicity associated with exposure to these nanoparticles at different levels of biological organization. This article provides an overview of recent studies evaluating ION cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity. Although the results of these studies are sometimes controversial, they generally indicate that surface coatings and particle size seem to be crucial for the observed ION-induced effects, as they are critical determinants of cellular responses and intensity of effects, and influence potential mechanisms of toxicity. The studies also suggest that some ION are safe for certain biomedical applications, while other uses need to be considered more carefully. Overall, the available studies provide insufficient evidence to fully assess the potential risks for human health related to ION exposure. Additional research in this area is required including studies on potential long-term effects. PMID:25209650

  1. Aerosolized Silver Nanoparticles in the Rat Lung and Pulmonary Responses over Time.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rona M; Anderson, Donald S; Peake, Janice; Edwards, Patricia C; Patchin, Esther S; Guo, Ting; Gordon, Terry; Chen, Lung Chi; Sun, Xiaolin; Van Winkle, Laura S; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2016-07-01

    Silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) production methods are being developed and refined to produce more uniform Ag NPs through chemical reactions involving silver salt solutions, solvents, and capping agents to control particle formation. These chemical reactants are often present as contaminants and/or coatings on the Ag NPs, which could alter their interactions in vivo. To determine pulmonary effects of citrate-coated Ag NPs, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed once nose-only to aerosolized Ag NPs (20 nm [C20] or 110 nm [C110] Ag NPs) for 6 hr. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained at 1, 7, 21, and 56 days postexposure for analyses. Inhalation of Ag NPs, versus citrate buffer control, produced significant inflammatory and cytotoxic responses that were measured in BALF cells and supernatant. At day 7, total cells, protein, and lactate dehydrogenase were significantly elevated in BALF, and peak histopathology was noted after C20 or C110 exposure versus control. At day 21, BALF polymorphonuclear cells and tissue inflammation were significantly greater after C20 versus C110 exposure. By day 56, inflammation was resolved in Ag NP-exposed animals. Overall, results suggest delayed, short-lived inflammatory and cytotoxic effects following C20 or C110 inhalation and potential for greater responses following C20 exposure. PMID:27025955

  2. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  3. Characterization, Quantification, and Determination of the Toxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to the Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Jong-Seok; Shin, Sung Jae; Ko, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been used to develop iron supplements for improving the bioavailability of iron in patients with iron deficiency, which is one of the most serious nutritional deficiencies in the world. Accurate information about the characteristics, concentration, and cytotoxicity of IONPs to the developmental and reproductive cells enables safe use of IONPs in the supplement industry. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of IONPs in bone marrow cells. We prepared three different types of iron samples (surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs), IONPs, and iron citrate) and analyzed their physicochemical properties such as particle size distribution, zeta potential, and morphology. In addition, we examined the cytotoxicity of the IONPs in various kinds of bone marrow cells. We analyzed particle size distribution, zeta potential, iron levels, and subcellular localization of the iron samples in bone marrow cells. Our results showed that the iron samples were not cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells and did not affect the expression of cell surface markers and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced the secretion of cytokines by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Our results may be used to investigate the interactions between nanoparticles and cells and tissues and the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26389886

  4. Characterization, Quantification, and Determination of the Toxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to the Bone Marrow Cells.

    PubMed

    Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Jong-Seok; Shin, Sung Jae; Ko, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been used to develop iron supplements for improving the bioavailability of iron in patients with iron deficiency, which is one of the most serious nutritional deficiencies in the world. Accurate information about the characteristics, concentration, and cytotoxicity of IONPs to the developmental and reproductive cells enables safe use of IONPs in the supplement industry. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of IONPs in bone marrow cells. We prepared three different types of iron samples (surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs), IONPs, and iron citrate) and analyzed their physicochemical properties such as particle size distribution, zeta potential, and morphology. In addition, we examined the cytotoxicity of the IONPs in various kinds of bone marrow cells. We analyzed particle size distribution, zeta potential, iron levels, and subcellular localization of the iron samples in bone marrow cells. Our results showed that the iron samples were not cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells and did not affect the expression of cell surface markers and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced the secretion of cytokines by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Our results may be used to investigate the interactions between nanoparticles and cells and tissues and the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  5. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-08-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.

  6. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-12-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas. PMID:27530743

  7. Pulmonary Codelivery of Doxorubicin and siRNA by pH-Sensitive Nanoparticles for Therapy of Metastatic Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Caina; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Jingpeng; Tian, Huayu; Park, Kinam; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-09-01

    A pulmonary codelivery system that can simultaneously deliver doxorubicin (DOX) and Bcl2 siRNA to the lungs provides a promising local treatment strategy for lung cancers. In this study, DOX is conjugated onto polyethylenimine (PEI) by using cis-aconitic anhydride (CA, a pH-sensitive linker) to obtain PEI-CA-DOX conjugates. The PEI-CA-DOX/siRNA complex nanoparticles are formed spontaneously via electrostatic interaction between cationic PEI-CA-DOX and anionic siRNA. The drug release experiment shows that DOX releases faster at acidic pH than at pH 7.4. Moreover, PEI-CA-DOX/Bcl2 siRNA complex nanoparticles show higher cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction in B16F10 cells than those treated with either DOX or Bcl2 siRNA alone. When the codelivery systems are directly sprayed into the lungs of B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice, the PEI-CA-DOX/Bcl2 siRNA complex nanoparticles exhibit enhanced antitumor efficacy compared with the single delivery of DOX or Bcl2 siRNA. Compared with systemic delivery, most drug and siRNA show a long-term retention in the lungs via pulmonary delivery, and a considerable number of the drug and siRNA accumulate in tumor tissues of lungs, but rarely in normal lung tissues. The PEI-CA-DOX/Bcl2 siRNA complex nanoparticles are promising for the treatment of metastatic lung cancer by pulmonary delivery with low side effects on the normal tissues.

  8. Cancer targeted metallic nanoparticle: targeting overview, recent advancement and toxicity concern.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Sohail; Ahmad, Zaki; Singh, Anjali; Ahmad, Iqbal; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Anwar, Mohammad; Jain, Gaurav Kumar; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Khar, Roop Krishen

    2011-01-01

    The targeted delivery of theranostic agents to the cancer cells is one of the major challenges and an active field of research in the development of cancer chemotherapeutic approaches. Theranostic metallic nanoparticles (TMNPs) have garnered increasing attention in recent years as a novel tool for theranostic application such as imaging, diagnosis, and therapeutic delivery of active agents to tumour specific cells. This paper attempts to unveil the multidimensional theranostic aspects of multifunctional metallic nanoparticles (MNPs)including passive and active targeting (HER2, Folate, Angiogenesis etc.) as well as the RES escaping approach. Special attention is given to the theranostic application of MNPs in oncology. Patents issued by the US office in this nanotechnological arena are also included emphasising the importance of MNPs in current cancer treatment/imaging research scenario. Keeping in mind the blooming research in clinical application directed nanotechnology; toxicity concerns related with MNPs are. also discussed, in element.

  9. Comparative Cytogenetic Study on the Toxicity of Magnetite and Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles in Sunflower Root Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Capraru, Gabriela; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-01

    In this experimental study the authors present their results regarding the cellular division rate and the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in the root meristematic cells of Helianthus annuus cultivated in the presence of different volume fractions of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, ranging between 20 and 100 microl/l. The aqueous magnetic colloids were prepared from chemically co-precipitated ferrites coated in sodium oleate. Tissue samples from the root meristeme of 2-3 day old germinated seeds were taken to prepare microscope slides following Squash method combined with Fuelgen techniques. Microscope investigation (cytogenetic tests) has resulted in the evaluation of mitotic index and chromosomal aberration index that appeared diminished and respectively increased following the addition of magnetic nanoparticles in the culture medium of the young seedlings. Zinc ferrite toxic influence appeared to be higher than that of magnetite, according to both cytogenetic parameters.

  10. Behavioural toxicity assessment of silver ions and nanoparticles on zebrafish using a locomotion profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Ašmonaitė, Giedrė; Boyer, Scott; Souza, Karine Bresolin de; Wassmur, Britt; Sturve, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is not only a widely used species in the Fish Embryo Toxicity (FET) test but also an emerging model in behavioural ecotoxicology. By using automatic behaviour tracking technology, locomotion of developing zebrafish (ZF) larvae can be accurately recorded and potentially used in an ecotoxicological context to detect toxicant-induced behavioural alterations. In this study, we explored if and how quantitative locomotion data can be used for sub-lethal toxicity testing within the FET framework. We exposed ZF embryos to silver ions and nanoparticles, which previously have been reported to cause neurodevelopmental toxicity and behavioural retardation in early-life stages of ZF. Exposure to a broad range of silver (Ag(+) and AgNPs) concentrations was conducted, and developmental toxicity was assessed using FET criteria. For behavioural toxicity assessment, locomotion of exposed ZF eleutheroembryos (120hpf) was quantified according to a customised behavioural assay in an automatic video tracking system. A set of repeated episodes of dark/light stimulation were used to artificially stress ZF and evoke photo-motor responses, which were consequently utilized for locomotion profiling. Our locomotion-based behaviour profiling approach consisted of (1) dose-response ranking for multiple and single locomotion variables; (2) quantitative assessment of locomotion structure; and (3) analysis of ZF responsiveness to darkness stimulation. We documented that both silver forms caused adverse effects on development and inhibited hatchability and, most importantly, altered locomotion. High Ag(+) and AgNPs exposures significantly suppressed locomotion and a clear shift in locomotion towards inactivity was reported. Additionally, we noted that low, environmentally relevant Ag(+) concentrations may cause subordinate locomotive changes (hyperactivity) in developing fish. Overall, it was concluded that our locomotion-based behaviour-testing scheme can be used jointly

  11. An experimental assessment of toxic potential of nanoparticle preparation of heavy metals in streptozotocin induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sonia; Srinivasan, B P; Akarte, Atul Sureshrao

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals have attracted enormous scientific and technological interest. Biologically produced nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals are elaborately described in traditional texts and being widely prescribed. The underlying interactions of nano preparations within the physiological fluids are key feature to understand their biological impact. In this perspective, we performed an experimental assessment of the toxicity potential of a marketed metallic preparation named Vasant Kusumakar Ras (VKR), wherein different heavy metals in composite form are reduced to nanoparticle size to produce the desired effect in diabetes and its complications. VKR (50mg/kg) was administered to Albino Wistar rats rendered diabetic using streptozotocin (90mg/kg) in 2 days old neonates. Anti-hyperglycemic effect was observed with VKR along with increased levels of plasma insulin. Renal variables including total proteins and albumin along with glomerular filtration rate were found to improve biochemically. The results were supplemented by effects on different inflammatory and growth factors like TNF-α, nitric oxide, TGF-β and VEGF. However, the results observed in kidney histopathology were not in accordance with the biochemical parameters. Inflammation observed in kidney was confirmed by immunostaining metallothionein, which was due to the accumulation of heavy metals. Furthermore, mercury accumulation in kidney further confirmed by autometallography, which activated mononuclear phagocyte system, which generated an immune response. This was further supported by increase in the extent of apoptosis in kidney tissues. In conclusion, nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals can be toxic to kidney if it is not regulated with respect to its surface chemistry and dosage.

  12. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of −31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  13. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of -31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  14. Development and Evaluation of Lipid Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Study of Toxicity In, Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Winter, Evelyn; Dal Pizzol, Carine; Locatelli, Claudriana; Crezkynski-Pasa, Tânia Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Lipid nanoparticles have received considerable attention in the field of drug delivery, due their ability to incorporate lipophilic drugs and to allow controlled drug release. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), and nanoemulsion (NE) are three different lipid nanostructured systems presenting intrinsically physical properties, which have been widely studied in recent years. Despite the extensive applicability of lipid nanoparticles, the toxicity of these systems has not been sufficiently investigated thus far. It is generally believed that lipids are biocompatible. However, it is known that materials structured in nanoscale might have their intrinsic physicochemical properties modified. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of these three nanoparticle systems. To this end, in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies were carried out. Our results indicate that nanoparticles containing the solid lipid GMS (SLN and NLC) induced an important cytotoxicity in vitro, but showed minimal toxicity in vivo--evidenced by the body weight analysis. The NE did not induce in vitro toxicity and did not induce body weight alteration. On the contrary, the SLN and NLC possibly induce an inflammatory process in vivo. All nanoparticle systems induced lipid peroxidation in the animals' livers, but only SLN and NLC induced a decrease of antioxidant defences indicating that the main mechanism of toxicity is the induction of oxidative stress in liver. The higher toxicity induced by SLN and NLC indicates that the solid lipid GMS could be the responsible for this effect. Nevertheless, this study provides important insights for toxicological studies of different lipid nanoparticles systems. PMID:27433582

  15. Development and Evaluation of Lipid Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Study of Toxicity In, Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Winter, Evelyn; Dal Pizzol, Carine; Locatelli, Claudriana; Crezkynski-Pasa, Tânia Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Lipid nanoparticles have received considerable attention in the field of drug delivery, due their ability to incorporate lipophilic drugs and to allow controlled drug release. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), and nanoemulsion (NE) are three different lipid nanostructured systems presenting intrinsically physical properties, which have been widely studied in recent years. Despite the extensive applicability of lipid nanoparticles, the toxicity of these systems has not been sufficiently investigated thus far. It is generally believed that lipids are biocompatible. However, it is known that materials structured in nanoscale might have their intrinsic physicochemical properties modified. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of these three nanoparticle systems. To this end, in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies were carried out. Our results indicate that nanoparticles containing the solid lipid GMS (SLN and NLC) induced an important cytotoxicity in vitro, but showed minimal toxicity in vivo--evidenced by the body weight analysis. The NE did not induce in vitro toxicity and did not induce body weight alteration. On the contrary, the SLN and NLC possibly induce an inflammatory process in vivo. All nanoparticle systems induced lipid peroxidation in the animals' livers, but only SLN and NLC induced a decrease of antioxidant defences indicating that the main mechanism of toxicity is the induction of oxidative stress in liver. The higher toxicity induced by SLN and NLC indicates that the solid lipid GMS could be the responsible for this effect. Nevertheless, this study provides important insights for toxicological studies of different lipid nanoparticles systems.

  16. Ceriodaphnia dubia as a Potential Bio-Indicator for Assessing Acute Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticle Toxicity in Fresh Water Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Humayun, Ahmed; Chakravarty, Sujay; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Growing nanomaterials based consumer applications have raised concerns about their potential release into the aquatic ecosystems and the consequent toxicological impacts. So environmental monitoring of the nanomaterials in aqueous systems becomes imperative. The current study reveals the potential of Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) as a bio-indicator for aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water aquatic ecosystem where it occupies an important ecological niche as a primary consumer. This study aims to investigate the aluminium oxide nanoparticle induced acute toxicity on Ceriodaphnia dubia in a freshwater system. The bioavailability of the aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been studied with respect to their aggregation behavior in the system and correlated with the toxicity endpoints. The oxidative stress generated by the particles contributed greatly toward their toxicity. The crucial role of leached aluminium ion mediated toxicity in the later phases (48 h and 72 h) in conjunction with the effects from the nano-sized particles in the initial phases (24 h) puts forth the dynamics of nanotoxicity in the test system. The internalization of nanoparticles (both gross and systemic uptake) as substantiated through the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectral (ICP-OES) analysis was another major contributor toward acute toxicity. Concluding the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia can be a promising candidate for bio-monitoring the aluminium oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water system. PMID:24040143

  17. Ceriodaphnia dubia as a potential bio-indicator for assessing acute aluminum oxide nanoparticle toxicity in fresh water environment.

    PubMed

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Humayun, Ahmed; Chakravarty, Sujay; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Growing nanomaterials based consumer applications have raised concerns about their potential release into the aquatic ecosystems and the consequent toxicological impacts. So environmental monitoring of the nanomaterials in aqueous systems becomes imperative. The current study reveals the potential of Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) as a bio-indicator for aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water aquatic ecosystem where it occupies an important ecological niche as a primary consumer. This study aims to investigate the aluminium oxide nanoparticle induced acute toxicity on Ceriodaphnia dubia in a freshwater system. The bioavailability of the aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been studied with respect to their aggregation behavior in the system and correlated with the toxicity endpoints. The oxidative stress generated by the particles contributed greatly toward their toxicity. The crucial role of leached aluminium ion mediated toxicity in the later phases (48 h and 72 h) in conjunction with the effects from the nano-sized particles in the initial phases (24 h) puts forth the dynamics of nanotoxicity in the test system. The internalization of nanoparticles (both gross and systemic uptake) as substantiated through the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectral (ICP-OES) analysis was another major contributor toward acute toxicity. Concluding the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia can be a promising candidate for bio-monitoring the aluminium oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water system.

  18. Investigation into the potential toxicity of zero-valent iron nanoparticles to a trichloroethylene-degrading groundwater microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabetakis, Kara M.

    The microbiological impact of zero-valent iron remediation of groundwater was investigated by exposing a trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic microbial community to bare and coated iron nanoparticles. Changes in population numbers and metabolic activity were analyzed using qPCR and were compared to those of a blank, negative, and positive control to assess for microbial toxicity. Additionally, these results were compared to those of samples exposed to an equal concentration of iron filings in an attempt to discern the source of toxicity. Statistical analysis revealed that the three iron treatments were equally toxic to total Bacteria and Archaea populations, as compared with the controls. Therefore, toxicity appears to result either from the release of iron ions and the generation of reactive oxygen species, or from alteration of the redox system and the disruption of microbial metabolisms. There does not appear to be a unique nanoparticle-based toxicity.

  19. Long term biotransformation and toxicity of dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles support their use in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Mejías, Raquel; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Salas, Gorka; Pérez-Yagüe, Sonia; Zotes, Teresa M; Lázaro, Francisco J; Morales, María P; Barber, Domingo F

    2013-10-28

    Although iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) have been proposed for numerous biomedical applications, little is known about their biotransformation and long-term toxicity in the body. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated magnetic nanoparticles have been proven efficient for in vivo drug delivery, but these results must nonetheless be sustained by comprehensive studies of long-term distribution, degradation and toxicity. We studied DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticle effects in vitro on NCTC 1469 non-parenchymal hepatocytes, and analyzed their biodistribution and biotransformation in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. Our results indicate that DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles have little effect on cell viability, oxidative stress, cell cycle or apoptosis on NCTC 1469 cells in vitro. In vivo distribution and transformation were studied by alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements, a technique that permits distinction of MNP from other iron species. Our results show that DMSA-coated MNP accumulate in spleen, liver and lung tissues for extended periods of time, in which nanoparticles undergo a process of conversion from superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to other non-superparamagnetic iron forms, with no significant signs of toxicity. This work provides the first evidence of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticle biotransformation in vivo.

  20. Toxic effect of environmentally relevant concentration of silver nanoparticles on environmentally beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Khan, S Sudheer; Ghouse, Syed Shabin; Chandran, Preethy

    2015-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are being increasingly used in many consumer products owing to their excellent antimicrobial properties. The continuous use of Ag NPs in consumer products will lead to environmental release. The present study evaluated the toxic effects and the possible underlying mechanism of Ag NPs on Pseudomonas putida. Ag NP exposure inhibited growth of the cells. Increased lipid peroxidation occurred coincident with suppression of the antioxidant defense system. Ag NP exposure caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione depletion and inactivation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase. The addition of superoxide dismutase or pretreatment of P. putida with N-acetyl cysteine that quenches ROS reduced toxicity of the NPs. PMID:25627470

  1. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-04-21

    It is known that what the cell actually "sees" at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of 'protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.

  2. Pulmonary clearance and toxicity of respirable gallium arsenide particulates intratracheally instilled into rats

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.R.; Wilson, S.E.; Carter, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is an intermetallic compound that is recognized as a potential toxicological risk to workers occupationally exposed to its dust. Previous results have shown that rats intratracheally instilled with a fraction of GaAs particulates, characterized with a mean count diameter of 8.30 ..mu..m and a mean volume diameter of 12.67 ..mu..m, developed signs of systemic arsenic intoxication, pulmonary inflammation, and pneumocyte hyperplasia. The results of the present study confirm these findings and also show that a significantly smaller fraction of GaAs is a relatively more severe pneumotoxicant. Decreasing the particle mean count and mean volume diameter to 1.63 ..mu..m and 5.82 ..mu..m, respectively, increased in vivo dissolution rate of GaAs, increased the severity of pulmonary lesions previously associated with GaAs exposure, and resulted in unique pathological sequalae in affected lung tissue. Pulmonary fibrosis, as indicated by analysis of lung 4-hydroxyproline content, was not considered statistically significant although histological examination of lung tissue revealed a mild fibrotic response. These results provide additional evidence that pulmonary exposure to respirable GaAs particulates is a potential health hazard in the semiconductor industry.

  3. Toxicity assessment of TiO₂ nanoparticles in zebrafish embryos under different exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Z; Castro, V L S S; Moura, M A M; Jonsson, C M; Fraceto, L F

    2014-02-01

    The popularity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) lies in their wide range of nanotechnological applications, together with low toxicity. Meanwhile, recent studies have shown that the photocatalytic properties of this material can result in alterations in their behavior in the environment, causing effects that have not yet been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of two formulations of nano-TiO2 under different illumination conditions, using an experimental model coherent with the principle of the three Rs of alternative animal experimentation (reduction, refinement, and replacement). Embryos of the fish Danio rerio were exposed for 96h to different concentrations of nano-TiO2 in the form of anatase (TA) or an anatase/rutile mixture (TM), under either visible light or a combination of visible and ultraviolet light (UV). The acute toxicity and sublethal parameters evaluated included survival rates, malformation, hatching, equilibrium, and overall length of the larvae, together with biochemical biomarkers (specific activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and acid phosphatase (AP)). Both TA and TM caused accelerated hatching of the larvae. Under UV irradiation, there was greater mortality of the larvae of the groups exposed to TM, compared to those exposed to TA. Exposure to TM under UV irradiation altered the equilibrium of the larvae. Alterations in the activities of CAT and GST were indicative of oxidative stress, although no clear dose-response relationship was observed. The effects of nano-TiO2 appeared to depend on both the type of formulation and the illumination condition. The findings contribute to elucidation of the factors involved in the toxicity of these nanoparticles, as well as to the establishment of protocols for risk assessments of nanotechnology. PMID:24418748

  4. Surface capping and size-dependent toxicity of gold nanoparticles on different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Iswarya, V; Manivannan, J; De, Arpita; Paul, Subhabrata; Roy, Rajdeep; Johnson, J B; Kundu, Rita; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Anita; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the toxicity of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) was evaluated on various trophic organisms. Bacteria, algae, cell line, and mice were used as models representing different trophic levels. Two different sizes (CIT30 and CIT40) and surface-capped (CIT30-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)-capped) Au NPs were selected. CIT30 Au NP aggregated more rapidly than CIT40 Au NP, while an additional capping of PVP (CIT30-PVP capped Au NP) was found to enhance its stability in sterile lake water medium. Interestingly, all the forms of NPs evaluated were stable in the cell culture medium during the exposure period. Size- and dose-dependent cytotoxicities were observed in both bacteria and algae, with a strong dependence on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. CIT30-PVP capped Au NP showed a significant decrease in toxicity compared to CIT30 Au NP in bacteria and algae. In the SiHa cell line, dose- and exposure-dependent decline in cell viability were noted for all three types of Au NPs. In mice, the induction of DNA damage was size and dose dependent, and surface functionalization with PVP reduced the toxic effects of CIT30 Au NP. The exposure to CIT30, CIT40, and CIT30-PVP capped Au NPs caused an alteration of the oxidative stress-related endpoints in mice hepatocytes. The toxic effects of the gold nanoparticles were found to vary in diverse test systems, accentuating the importance of size and surface functionalization at different trophic levels.

  5. The chronic toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles and ZnCl2 to Daphnia magna and the use of different methods to assess nanoparticle aggregation and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nathalie; Schmitt, Claudia; Galceran, Josep; Companys, Encarna; Vakurov, Alexander; Wallace, Rachel; Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the effect of ZnO nanoparticles and ZnCl2 on growth, reproduction and accumulation of zinc in Daphnia magna was determined in a 21-day chronic toxicity test. A variety of techniques were used to distinguish the free zinc ion, dissolved, nanoparticle and aggregated zinc fraction in the Daphnia test medium. The results showed similar chronic effects on growth, reproduction and accumulation for the ZnO nanoparticles (EC10, 20, 50 reproduction: 0.030, 0.049, 0.112 mg Zn/l) and the ZnCl2 (EC10, 20, 50 reproduction: 0.014, 0.027, 0.082 mg Zn/l). A large fraction of the nanoparticles rapidly dissolved after introduction in the exposure medium. Aggregation of nanoparticles was also observed but within 48 h of exposure most of these ZnO aggregates were dissolved. Based on the combined dissolution kinetics and toxicity results, it can be concluded that the toxicological effects of ZnO nanoparticles at the chronic level can be largely attributed to the dissolved fraction rather than the nanoparticles or initially formed aggregates.

  6. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-11-01

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L-1, or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L-1, there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L-1 of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L-1 of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the

  7. Toxic effect of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells through DNA damage response via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Li, Yanbo; Zhou, Xianqing; Huang, Peili; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles have become promising carriers for drug delivery or gene therapy. Endothelial cells could be directly exposed to silica nanoparticles by intravenous administration. However, the underlying toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells are still poorly understood. In order to clarify the cytotoxicity of endothelial cells induced by silica nanoparticles and its mechanisms, cellular morphology, cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as assessing cytotoxicity, resulted in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Silica nanoparticles-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation caused oxidative damage followed by the production of malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Both necrosis and apoptosis were increased significantly after 24 h exposure. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decreased obviously in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of DNA damage including the percentage of tail DNA, tail length and Olive tail moment (OTM) were markedly aggravated. Silica nanoparticles also induced G2/M arrest through the upregulation of Chk1 and the downregulation of Cdc25C, cyclin B1/Cdc2. In summary, our data indicated that the toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells was through DNA damage response (DDR) via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint signaling pathway, suggesting that exposure to silica nanoparticles could be a potential hazards for the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. In Vitro Uptake of Silver Nanoparticles and Their Toxicity in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Liu, Xujie; Kienzle, Arne; Müller, Werner E G; Feng, Qingling

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the usage of silver nanoparticles in biomedical fields has increased rapidly, mainly due to their excellent antibacterial effects. They are used in many medical products such as wound dressings, catheters, bone cement and artificial cardiac valves. In tissue engineering, silver nanoparticles are often loaded as a filler for fabrication of nanocomposite scaffolds which subsequently are seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, possible adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on human stem cells should be investigated carefully to ensure a safe usage. In this study, silver nanoparticles with a mean diameter of ~30 nm were prepared and their toxicity in human mesenchymal stem cells was investigated. Transmission electron microscopic images reveal the uptake and localization of the silver nanoparticles in the cytoplasm. Upon internalization of Ag NPs inside the cells, an increase in the release of lactate dehydrogenase and the production of reactive oxygen species was quantified. Furthermore, they caused a reduction in both cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining implied that silver nanoparticles did not only induce apoptosis but also cause necrosis. Based on cell cycle analysis, G2/M arrest was detected in cells treated with silver nanoparticles, implicating DNA damage. The high level of reactive oxygen species induced by nanoparticles is considered to be the main cause of their toxicity.

  9. In Vitro Uptake of Silver Nanoparticles and Their Toxicity in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Liu, Xujie; Kienzle, Arne; Müller, Werner E G; Feng, Qingling

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the usage of silver nanoparticles in biomedical fields has increased rapidly, mainly due to their excellent antibacterial effects. They are used in many medical products such as wound dressings, catheters, bone cement and artificial cardiac valves. In tissue engineering, silver nanoparticles are often loaded as a filler for fabrication of nanocomposite scaffolds which subsequently are seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, possible adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on human stem cells should be investigated carefully to ensure a safe usage. In this study, silver nanoparticles with a mean diameter of ~30 nm were prepared and their toxicity in human mesenchymal stem cells was investigated. Transmission electron microscopic images reveal the uptake and localization of the silver nanoparticles in the cytoplasm. Upon internalization of Ag NPs inside the cells, an increase in the release of lactate dehydrogenase and the production of reactive oxygen species was quantified. Furthermore, they caused a reduction in both cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining implied that silver nanoparticles did not only induce apoptosis but also cause necrosis. Based on cell cycle analysis, G2/M arrest was detected in cells treated with silver nanoparticles, implicating DNA damage. The high level of reactive oxygen species induced by nanoparticles is considered to be the main cause of their toxicity. PMID:27398448

  10. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jane Y.C.; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2014-07-15

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO{sub 2} on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO{sub 2} induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO{sub 2} and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ, respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2}, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP + CeO{sub 2} were significantly larger than CeO{sub 2} or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP + CeO{sub 2} reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO{sub 2}-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO{sub 2} induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2} in the combined exposure. Using CeO{sub 2} as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns. - Highlights: • DEP induced acute lung inflammation and switched immune response from Th1 to Th2. • DEP induced lung granulomas were not affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2}. • CeO{sub 2} induced sustained lung

  11. Comparative study of respiratory tract immune toxicity induced by three sterilisation nanoparticles: silver, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanliang; Yang, Danfeng; Yang, Honglian; Zhang, Huashan; Zhang, Wei; Fang, Yanjun; Lin, Zhiqing; Tian, Lei; Lin, Bencheng; Yan, Jun; Xi, Zhuge

    2013-03-15

    Silver, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used as sterilisation materials to enhance the performance of disinfectants. We investigated the respiratory tract immune toxicity ("immunotoxicity") of these nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro, and we explored the relationships between particle size, particle shape, chemical composition, chemical stability and the toxicological effects of these typical nanoparticles in rats. In vivo, the rats were exposed to nanoparticles by intratracheal instillation. Exposure to nanoparticles caused an increase in oxidative injury to the lungs and disorders in regulating the cytokine network, which were detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, suggesting that oxidative stress might be important for inducing the respiratory immunotoxicity of nanoparticles. In vitro, the phagocytic function of alveolar macrophages (AMs) was dose-dependently reduced by nanoparticles, and ZnO nanoparticles induced greater cytotoxicity than the silver and titanium-dioxide nanoparticles, which were coincident with the results of multiple measurements, such as a cell viability assay by WST-8 and LDH measurements. Comparative analyses demonstrated that particle composition and chemical stability most likely had a primary role in the biological effects of different nanoparticles.

  12. Silver nanoparticle-algae interactions: oxidative dissolution, reactive oxygen species generation and synergistic toxic effects.

    PubMed

    He, Di; Dorantes-Aranda, Juan José; Waite, T David

    2012-08-21

    The short-term toxicity of citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and ionic silver Ag(I) to the ichthyotoxic marine raphidophyte Chattonella marina has been examined using the fluorometric indicator alamarBlue. Aggregation and dissolution of AgNPs occurred after addition to GSe medium while uptake of dissolved Ag(I) occurred in the presence of C. marina. Based on total silver mass, toxicity was much higher for Ag(I) than for AgNPs. Cysteine, a strong Ag(I) ligand, completely removed the inhibitory effects of Ag(I) and AgNPs on the metabolic activity of C. marina, suggesting that the toxicity of AgNPs was due to the release of Ag(I). Synergistic toxic effects of AgNPs/Ag(I) and C. marina to fish gill cells were observed with these effects possibly attributable to enhancement in the generation of reactive oxygen species by C. marina on exposure of the organism to silver.

  13. Toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in Escherichia coli correlates with conduction band and hydration energies.

    PubMed

    Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Ivask, Angela; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Low-Kam, Cecile; Fischer, Heidi; Ji, Zhaoxia; Pokhrel, Suman; Cohen, Yoram; Telesca, Donatello; Zink, Jeffrey; Mädler, Lutz; Holden, Patricia A; Nel, Andre; Godwin, Hilary

    2015-01-20

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx NPs) are used for a host of applications, such as electronics, cosmetics, construction, and medicine, and as a result, the safety of these materials to humans and the environment is of considerable interest. A prior study of 24 MOx NPs in mammalian cells revealed that some of these materials show hazard potential. Here, we report the growth inhibitory effects of the same series of MOx NPs in the bacterium Escherichia coli and show that toxicity trends observed in E. coli parallel those seen previously in mammalian cells. Of the 24 materials studied, only ZnO, CuO, CoO, Mn2O3, Co3O4, Ni2O3, and Cr2O3 were found to exert significant growth inhibitory effects; these effects were found to relate to membrane damage and oxidative stress responses in minimal trophic media. A correlation of the toxicological data with physicochemical parameters of MOx NPs revealed that the probability of a MOx NP being toxic increases as the hydration enthalpy becomes less negative and as the conduction band energy approaches those of biological molecules. These observations are consistent with prior results observed in mammalian cells, revealing that mechanisms of toxicity of MOx NPs are consistent across two very different taxa. These results suggest that studying nanotoxicity in E. coli may help to predict toxicity patterns in higher organisms. PMID:25563693

  14. Toxicity Assessment of Silica Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Biocompatibility Improvement by Surface Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Malvindi, Maria Ada; De Matteis, Valeria; Galeone, Antonio; Brunetti, Virgilio; Anyfantis, George C.; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Cingolani, Roberto; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We have studied in vitro toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) coated with a thin silica shell (Fe3O4/SiO2 NPs) on A549 and HeLa cells. We compared bare and surface passivated Fe3O4/SiO2 NPs to evaluate the effects of the coating on the particle stability and toxicity. NPs cytotoxicity was investigated by cell viability, membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, and their genotoxicity by comet assay. Our results show that NPs surface passivation reduces the oxidative stress and alteration of iron homeostasis and, consequently, the overall toxicity, despite bare and passivated NPs show similar cell internalization efficiency. We found that the higher toxicity of bare NPs is due to their stronger in-situ degradation, with larger intracellular release of iron ions, as compared to surface passivated NPs. Our results indicate that surface engineering of Fe3O4/SiO2 NPs plays a key role in improving particles stability in biological environments reducing both cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. PMID:24465736

  15. Comparison of in vitro toxicity of silver ions and silver nanoparticles on human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vrček, Ivana Vinković; Žuntar, Irena; Petlevski, Roberta; Pavičić, Ivan; Dutour Sikirić, Maja; Ćurlin, Marija; Goessler, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Scientific information on the potential harmful effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on human health severely lags behind their exponentially growing applications in consumer products. In assessing the toxic risk of AgNP usage, liver, as a detoxifying organ, is particularly important. The aim of this study was to explore the toxicity mechanisms of nano and ionic forms of silver on human hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells. The results showed that silver ions and citrate-coated AgNPs reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 values of silver ions and citrate-coated AgNPs were 0.5 and 50 mg L(-1) , respectively. The LDH leakage and inhibition of albumin synthesis, along with decreased ALT activity, indicated that treatment with either AgNP or Ag ions resulted in membrane damage and reduced the cell function of human liver cells. Evaluation of oxidative stress markers demonstrating depletion of GSH, increased ROS production, and increased SOD activity, indicated that oxidative stress might contribute to the toxicity effects of nano and ionic forms of silver. The observed toxic effect of AgNP on HepG2 cells was substantially weaker than that caused by ionic silver, while the uptake of nano and ionic forms of silver by HepG2 cells was nearly the same. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 679-692, 2016. PMID:25448069

  16. Mitigation of Fe(0) nanoparticles toxicity to Trichosporon cutaneum by humic substances.

    PubMed

    Pádrová, Karolína; Maťátková, Olga; Šiková, Michaela; Füzik, Tibor; Masák, Jan; Čejková, Alena; Jirků, Vladimír

    2016-01-25

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) are a relatively new option for the treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater. However, because of their apparent toxicity, nZVI in high concentrations are known to interfere with many autochthonous microorganisms and, thus, impact their participation in the remediation process. The effect of two commercially available nZVI products, Nanofer 25 (non-stabilized) and Nanofer 25S (stabilized), was examined. Considerable toxicity to the soil yeast Trichosporon cutaneum was observed. Two chemically different humic substances (HSs) were studied as a possible protection agent that mitigates nZVI toxicity: oxidized oxyhumolite X6 and humic acid X3A. The effect of addition of HSs was studied in different phases of the experiment to establish the effect on cells and nZVI. SEM and TEM images revealed an ability of both types of nZVI and HSs to adsorb on surface of the cells. Changes in cell surface properties were also observed by zeta potential measurements. Our results indicate that HSs can act as an electrosteric barrier, which hinders mutual interaction between nZVI and treated cell. Thus, the application of HS seems to be a promising solution to mitigating the toxic action of nZVI.

  17. Pulmonary toxicity study in rats with PM 10 and PM 2.5: Differential responses related to scale and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lei, Tian; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Zhang, Hua-Shan; Yang, Dan-Feng; Xi, Zhu-Ge; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wang, Wei

    2011-02-01

    ObjectionTo study the pollution of atmospheric particles at winter in Beijing and compare the lung toxicity which induced by particle samples from different sampling sites. MethodWe collected samples from two sampling points during the winter for toxicity testing and chemical analysis. Wistar rats were administered with particles by intratracheal instillation. After exposure, biochemically index, esimmunity indexes, histopathology and DNA damage were detected in rat pulmonary cells. ResultThe elements with enrichment factors (EF) larger than 10 were As, Cd, Cu, Zn, S and Pb in the four experiment groups. The priority control of the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 and PM 2.5 of Near-traffic source was much higher than that of Far-traffic source, it demonstrated that near the traffic source of PAHs pollution was heavier than that of Far-traffic source, as it was close to main roads Beiyuan Road, motor vehicle emissions were much higher. The pathology of lung showed that the degree of inflammation was increased with the particle diameter minished, it was the same as the detection of biochemical parameters such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Total antioxidant status(T-AOC) and total protein (TP) in BALF and inflammation cytokine(interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) in lung homogenate. The indexes of DNA damage including the content of DNA and Olive empennage of PM 2.5 were significant higher than that of PM 10 at the same surveillance point ( P < 0.05), near-traffic particles were higher than the far-traffic particles at the same diameter, ( P < 0.05). ConclusionNear-traffic area particles had certain pollution at winter in Beijing. Meanwhile, atmospheric particulate matters on lung toxicity were related to the particles size and distance related sites which were exposed: smaller size, more toxicity; nearer from traffic, more toxicity.

  18. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-12-21

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L(-1), or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L(-1), there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L(-1) of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L(-1) of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.

  19. Physicochemical transformation and algal toxicity of engineered nanoparticles in surface water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqing; Li, Jingyi; Yang, Kun; Liu, Jingfu; Lin, Daohui

    2016-04-01

    Most studies on the behavior and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have been conducted in artificial water with well-controlled conditions, which are dramatically different from natural waters with complex compositions. To better understand the fate and toxicity of NPs in the natural water environment, physicochemical transformations of four NPs (TiO2, ZnO, Ag, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) and their toxicities towards a unicellular green alga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) in four fresh water and one seawater sample were investigated. Results indicated that water chemistry had profound effects on aggregation, dissolution, and algal toxicity of the NPs. The strongest homoaggregation of the NPs was associated with the highest ionic strength, but no obvious correlation was observed between the homoaggregation of NPs and pH or dissolved organic matter content of the water samples. The greatest dissolution of ZnO NPs also occurred in seawater with the highest ionic strength, while the dissolution of Ag NPs varied differently from ZnO NPs. The released Zn(2+) and especially Ag(+) mainly accounted for the algal toxicity of ZnO and Ag NPs, respectively. The NP-cell heteroagglomeration occurred generally for CNTs and Ag NPs, which contributed to the observed nanotoxicity. However, there was no significant correlation between the observed nanotoxicity and the type of NP or the water chemistry. It was thus concluded that the physicochemical transformations and algal toxicities of NPs in the natural water samples were caused by the combined effects of complex water quality parameters rather than any single influencing factor alone. These results will increase our knowledge on the fate and effects of NPs in the aquatic environment.

  20. Processing pathway dependence of amorphous silica nanoparticle toxicity - colloidal versus pyrolytic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Dunphy, Darren R.; Jiang, Xingmao; Meng, Huan; Sun, Bingbing; Tarn, Derrick; Xue, Min; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Sijie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Li, Ruibin; Garcia, Fred L.; Yang, Jing; Kirk, Martin L.; Xia, Tian; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, Andre; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We have developed structure/toxicity relationships for amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized through low temperature, colloidal (e.g. Stöber silica) or high temperature pyrolysis (e.g. fumed silica) routes. Through combined spectroscopic and physical analyses, we have determined the state of aggregation, hydroxyl concentration, relative proportion of strained and unstrained siloxane rings, and potential to generate hydroxyl radicals for Stöber and fumed silica NPs with comparable primary particle sizes (16-nm in diameter). Based on erythrocyte hemolytic assays and assessment of the viability and ATP levels in epithelial and macrophage cells, we discovered for fumed silica an important toxicity relationship to post-synthesis thermal annealing or environmental exposure, whereas colloidal silicas were essentially non-toxic under identical treatment conditions. Specifically, we find for fumed silica a positive correlation of toxicity with hydroxyl concentration and its potential to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause red blood cell hemolysis. We propose fumed silica toxicity stems from its intrinsic population of strained three-membered rings (3MRs) along with its chain-like aggregation and hydroxyl content. Hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions of the silanol surfaces of fumed silica aggregates with the extracellular plasma membrane cause membrane perturbations sensed by the Nalp3 inflammasome, whose subsequent activation leads to secretion of the cytokine IL-1β. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the strained 3MRs in fumed silica but largely absent in colloidal silicas may contribute to the inflammasome activation. Formation of colloidal silica into aggregates mimicking those of fumed silica had no effect on cell viability or hemolysis. This study emphasizes that not all amorphous silica is created equal and that the unusual toxicity of fumed silica compared to colloidal silica derives from its framework and surface chemistry along

  1. Toxicity of 11 Metal Oxide Nanoparticles to Three Mammalian Cell Types In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Angela; Titma, Tiina; Visnapuu, Meeri; Vija, Heiki; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Sihtmae, Mariliis; Pokhrel, Suman; Madler, Lutz; Heinlaan, Margit; Kisand, Vambola; Shimmo, Ruth; Kahru, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge on potential harmful effects of metallic nanomaterials lags behind their increased use in consumer products and therefore, the safety data on various nanomaterials applicable for risk assessment are urgently needed. In this study, 11 metal oxide nanoparticles (MeOx NPs) prepared using flame pyrolysis method were analyzed for their toxicity against human alveolar epithelial cells A549, human epithelial colorectal cells Caco2 and murine fibroblast cell line Balb/c 3T3. The cell lines were exposed for 24 h to suspensions of 3-100 μg/mL MeOx NPs and cellular viability was evaluated using. Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay. In parallel to NPs, toxicity of soluble salts of respective metals was analyzed, to reveal the possible cellular effects of metal ions shedding from the NPs. The potency of MeOx to produce reactive oxygen species was evaluated in the cell-free assay. The used three cell lines showed comparable toxicity responses to NPs and their metal ion counterparts in the current test setting. Six MeOx NPs (Al2O3, Fe3O4, MgO, SiO2, TiO2, WO3) did not show toxic effects below 100 µg/mL. For five MeOx NPs, the averaged 24 h IC50 values for the three mammalian cell lines were 16.4 µg/mL for CuO, 22.4 µg/mL for ZnO, 57.3 µg/mL for Sb2O3, 132.3 µg/mL for Mn3O4 and 129 µg/mL for Co3O4. Comparison of the dissolution level of MeOx and the toxicity of soluble salts allowed to conclude that the toxicity of CuO, ZnO and Sb2O3 NPs was driven by release of metal ions. The toxic effects of Mn3O4 and Co3O4 could be attributed to the ROS-inducing ability of these NPs. All the NPs were internalized by the cells according to light microscopy studies but also proven by TEM, and internalization of Co3O4 NPs seemed to be most prominent in this aspect. In conclusion, this work provides valuable toxicological data for a library of 11 MeOx NPs. Combining the knowledge on toxic or non-toxic nature of nanomaterials may be used for safe-by-design approach.

  2. Synthesis of fluorophore encapsulated silica nanoparticles for the evaluation of the biological fate and toxicity of food relevant nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zane, Andrew Paul

    We show that commercially available TiO2, SiO2, and ZnO nanoparticles are all internalized by C2BBe1 intestinal epithelial cells, but do not appear to be toxic, even after long term repeat-exposures. When particles were exposed to a simulated digestion protocol mimicking the stomach and intestinal environment, TiO2 particles did show mild toxicity by MTT assay, indicating a decrease in metabolic activity. IR spectra of these particles indicate presence of material from the digestion media, and these absorbed species may be responsible for the effects noted. Though the three particles were not significantly toxic, we note internalization by the intestinal epithelial cells, opening a possibility for absorption into circulation where they may localize in organs throughout the body. This will be observed by functionalizing the particles with fluorophores, after which they can be measured via fluorescence. To optimize the quantum yield efficiency, and thus the brightness, of one such fluorophore, we seek to improve a microwave synthesis of CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots our lab has previously reported. By coupling the microwave reactor to a fluorescence spectrometer via fiber optic cables, we were able to monitor the development of the particles throughout the microwave heating. Time-dependent fluorescence shows the development of an early fluorescence peak at 502 nm attributed to CdSe cores. We then note two isosbestic points which we attribute to the development of CdS layer around CdSe cores, and eventually the formation of outer ZnS shell. We utilize this in situ monitoring along with a study of various nucleation temperatures ranging from 0 to 100°C, and pre-and-post microwave heating UV exposure treatments to obtain optimized CdSe/CdS/ZnS particles with a QY of 40%. This is an improvement over our previous particles' 13% QY, and the highest yet reported for an aqueous synthesis of CdSe/ZnS type particles. Finally, we incorporate these QDs as well as two organic

  3. Engineered Nanoparticles as Potential Food Contaminants and Their Toxicity to Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaomo; Nguyen, Trang H D; Lin, Mengshi; Mustapha, Azlin

    2016-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), such as metallic or metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs), have gained much attention in recent years. Increasing use of ENPs in various areas may lead to the release of ENPs into the environment and cause the contamination of agricultural and food products by ENPs. In this study, we selected two important ENPs (zinc oxide [ZnO] and silver [Ag] NPs) as potential food contaminants and investigated their toxicity via an in vitro model using Caco-2 cells. The physical properties of ENPs and their effects on Caco-2 cells were characterized by electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) techniques. Results demonstrate that a significant inhibition of cell viability was observed after a 24-h of exposure of Caco-2 cells to 3-, 6-, and 12-mM ZnO NPs or 0.5-, 1.5-, and 3-mM Ag NPs. The noticeable changes of cells include the alteration in cell shape, abnormal nuclear structure, membrane blebbing, and cytoplasmic deterioration. The toxicity of ZnO NPs, but not that of Ag NPs after exposure to simulated gastric fluid, significantly decreased. Scanning transmission electron microscopy shows that ZnO and Ag NPs penetrated the membrane of Caco-2 cells. EDS results also confirm the presence of NPs in the cytoplasm of the cells. This study demonstrates that ZnO and Ag NPs have cytotoxic effects and can inhibit the growth of Caco-2 cells.

  4. Redox nanoparticle increases the chemotherapeutic efficiency of pioglitazone and suppresses its toxic side effects.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Sindhu; Yoshitomi, Toru; Sakharkar, Meena Kishore; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-08-01

    Pioglitazone is a widely used anti-diabetic drug that induces cytotoxicity in cancer cells; however, its clinical use is questioned due to its associated liver toxicity caused by increased oxidative stress. We therefore employed nitroxide-radical containing nanoparticle, termed redox nanoparticle (RNP(N)) which is an effective scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a drug carrier. RNP(N) encapsulation increased pioglitazone solubility, thus increasing cellular uptake of encapsulated pioglitazone which reduced the dose required to induce toxicity in prostate cancer cell lines. Investigation of in vitro molecular mechanism of pioglitazone revealed that both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were involved in tumor cell death. In addition, intravenously administered pioglitazone-loaded RNP(N) produced significant tumor volume reduction in vivo due to enhanced permeation and retention effect. Most importantly, oxidative damage caused by pioglitazone in the liver was significantly suppressed by pioglitazone-loaded RNP(N) due to the presence of nitroxide radicals. It is interesting to note that oral administration of encapsulated pioglitazone, and co-administration of RNP(N) and pioglitazone, i.e., no encapsulation of pioglitazone in RNP(N) also significantly contributed to suppression of the liver injury. Therefore, use of RNP(N) either as an adjuvant or as a carrier for drugs with severe side effects is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27235996

  5. Engineered Nanoparticles as Potential Food Contaminants and Their Toxicity to Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaomo; Nguyen, Trang H D; Lin, Mengshi; Mustapha, Azlin

    2016-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), such as metallic or metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs), have gained much attention in recent years. Increasing use of ENPs in various areas may lead to the release of ENPs into the environment and cause the contamination of agricultural and food products by ENPs. In this study, we selected two important ENPs (zinc oxide [ZnO] and silver [Ag] NPs) as potential food contaminants and investigated their toxicity via an in vitro model using Caco-2 cells. The physical properties of ENPs and their effects on Caco-2 cells were characterized by electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) techniques. Results demonstrate that a significant inhibition of cell viability was observed after a 24-h of exposure of Caco-2 cells to 3-, 6-, and 12-mM ZnO NPs or 0.5-, 1.5-, and 3-mM Ag NPs. The noticeable changes of cells include the alteration in cell shape, abnormal nuclear structure, membrane blebbing, and cytoplasmic deterioration. The toxicity of ZnO NPs, but not that of Ag NPs after exposure to simulated gastric fluid, significantly decreased. Scanning transmission electron microscopy shows that ZnO and Ag NPs penetrated the membrane of Caco-2 cells. EDS results also confirm the presence of NPs in the cytoplasm of the cells. This study demonstrates that ZnO and Ag NPs have cytotoxic effects and can inhibit the growth of Caco-2 cells. PMID:27505352

  6. Antioxidant Potential and Toxicity Study of the Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Microwave-Mediated Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Soren, Siba; Jena, Soumya Ranjan; Samanta, Luna; Parhi, Purnendu

    2015-09-01

    Monodispersed cerium oxide nanoparticle has been synthesized by microwave-mediated hydrothermal as well as microwave-mediated solvothermal synthesis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data shows that the synthesized particles are single phase. SEM and TEM analysis suggest that particle synthesized by microwave-mediated solvothermal method are less agglomerated. In vitro toxicology study of the synthesized nanoceria particles has shown good free radical scavenging activity for NO and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical assayed except superoxide radical within a concentration range of 25 to 75 ng ml(-1). Nanoceria particle also showed inhibition of Fe-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation (LPx) in chick liver mitochondrial fractions. Solvothermally synthesized nanoceria showed better protection against Fe-ascorbate-induced LPx than the hydrothermal one while the hydrothermally synthesized nanoceria showed better DPPH and NO scavenging activity. The ceria nanoparticles also prevented Fe-ascorbate-H2O2-induced carbonylation of bovine serum albumin in a dose-dependent manner. At higher concentration, i.e., 100 ng ml(-1), the synthesized nanoparticles showed a reverse trend in all the parameters measured indicating its toxicity at higher doses.

  7. Influence of humic acid on the stability and bacterial toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles in water.

    PubMed

    Akhil, K; Chandran, Preethy; Sudheer Khan, S

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the stability of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) by the adsorption of humic acid (HA) and the mechanism of adsorption. The effect of humic acid on NP toxicity was determined by Escherichia coli (ATCC 13534), E. coli (ATCC 25922), and Pseudomonas putida (MTCC 4910). The nanoparticles showed low zeta potential and were least stable in the absence of HA. However, the negative surface charge of the particles increased in the presence of HA (0-50mg/L) that reduced the propensity of nanoparticles to aggregate in water. A decrease in absorbance of ZnO NPs at 375 nm (plasmon peak) was noted in the presence of HA by UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis. A blue shift towards 370 nm was noted when the concentration of HA was above 20mg/L. The HA adsorbed ZnO NPs showed higher zeta potential (>-30 mV) and were highly stable. HA reduced the photocatalytic activity of ZnO and at the same time increased the photostability of ZnO.

  8. A 13-week repeated-dose oral toxicity and bioaccumulation of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Sim, Jaehoon; Kim, Younghun; Han, Beom Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Lee, Somin; Cho, Myung-Haing; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Because of an increase in the commercial applications of manufactured nanoparticles, the issue of potential adverse health effects of nanoparticles following intended or unintended exposure is rapidly gaining attention. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlNPs, rod-type, 1.5, 3, and 6 mg/kg) after oral administration to mice for 13 weeks. Compared with the control group, the consumption of diet and drinking water and body weight gain decreased in the group treated with AlNPs. The group treated with 6 mg/kg AlNPs also showed a marked elevation in the count of white blood cells that associated with a significant decrease and increase to the proportion of eosinophils and lymphocytes, respectively. In addition, the secretion of IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased in a dose-dependent manner in the treated groups. Furthermore, AlNPs showed the highest accumulation in the liver and kidneys compared with the control group, increased the lactate dehydrogenase level in the blood, and induced the development of a pathological lesion in the liver and kidneys. Taken together, we suggest that the target organs of rod-type AlNPs may be the liver, kidneys and the immune system, and the not-observed adverse effect level may be lower than 6 mg/kg.

  9. Radiotherapy Does Not Influence the Severe Pulmonary Toxicity Observed With the Administration of Gemcitabine and Bleomycin in Patients With Advanced-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With the BAGCOPP Regimen: A Report by the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Macann, Andrew; Bredenfeld, Henning; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on the severe pulmonary toxicity observed in the pilot study of BAGCOPP (bleomycin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, and gemcitabine) for advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV Hodgkin's lymphoma or Stage IIB with risk factors participated in this single-arm, multicenter pilot study. Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled on the study before its premature closure as a result of the development of serious pulmonary toxicity in 8 patients. The pulmonary toxicity occurred either during or immediately after the BAGCOPP chemotherapy course. Pulmonary toxicity contributed to one early fatality but resolved in the other 7 patients after cessation of gemcitabine and bleomycin, allowing continuation of therapy. Fifteen patients received consolidative radiotherapy, including 4 who previously had pulmonary toxicity. There were no reported cases of radiation pneumonitis and no exacerbation of pulmonary symptoms in the 4 patients who had had previous pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions: The severe pulmonary toxicity observed in this study has been attributed to an interaction between gemcitabine and bleomycin. Gemcitabine (when administered without bleomycin) remains of interest in Hodgkin's lymphoma and is being incorporated into a new German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group protocol that also includes consolidative radiotherapy. This study supports the concept of the integration of radiotherapy in gemcitabine-containing regimens in Hodgkin's lymphoma if there is an interval of at least 4 weeks between the two modalities and with a schedule whereby radiotherapy follows the chemotherapy.

  10. Examining mechanism of toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashock, Michael J.

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are an up and coming technology increasingly being used in industrial and consumer applications and thus may pose risk to humans and the environment. In the present study, the toxic effects of CuO NPs were studied with two model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans. The role of released Cu ions during dissolution of CuO NPs in growth media were studied with freshly suspended, aged NPs, and the released Cu 2+ fraction. Exposures to the different Cu treatments showed significant inhibition of S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. Inhibition from the NPs was inversely proportional to size and was not fully explained by the released Cu ions. S. cerevisiae cultures grown under respiring conditions demonstrated greater metabolic sensitivity when exposed to CuO NPs compared to cultures undergoing fermentation. The cellular response to both CuO NPs and released Cu ions on gene expression was analyzed via microarray analysis after an acute exposure. It was observed that both copper exposures resulted in an increase in carbohydrate storage, a decrease in protein production, protein misfolding, increased membrane permeability, and cell cycle arrest. Cells exposed to NPs up-regulated genes related to oxidative phosphorylation but also may be inducing cell cycle arrest by a different mechanism than that observed with released Cu ions. The effect of CuO NPs on C. elegans was examined by using several toxicological endpoints. The CuO NPs displayed a more inhibitory effect, compared to copper sulfate, on nematode reproduction, feeding, and development. We investigated the effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper sulfate on neuronal health, a known tissue vulnerable to heavy metal toxicity. In transgenic C. eleganswith neurons expressing a green fluorescent protein reporter, neuronal degeneration was observed in up to 10% of the population after copper oxide nanoparticle exposure. Additionally, nematode

  11. Aggregation and dispersion of silver nanoparticles in exposure media for aquatic toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Römer, Isabella; White, Thomas A; Baalousha, Mohammed; Chipman, Kevin; Viant, Mark R; Lead, Jamie R

    2011-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are currently being very widely used in industry, mainly because of their anti-bacterial properties, with applications in many areas. Once released into the environment, the mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity of AgNPs in any ecosystem are dominated by colloidal stability. There have been studies on the stability or the aggregation of various nanoparticles (NPs) under a range of environmental conditions, but there is little information on fully characterised AgNPs in media used in (eco)toxicity studies. In this study, monodisperse 7, 10 and 20 nm citrate-stabilised AgNPs were synthesised, characterised and then fractionated and sized by flow field-flow fractionation (FFF) and measured with dynamic light scattering (DLS) in different dilutions of the media recommended by OECD for Daphnia magna (water flea) toxicity testing. Stability of NPs was assessed over 24 h, and less so over 21 days, similar time periods to the OECD acute and chronic toxicity tests for D. magna. All particles aggregated quickly in the media with high ionic strength (media1), resulting in a loss of colour from the solution. The size of particles could be measured by DLS in most cases after 24h, although a fractogram by FFF could not be obtained due to aggregation and polydispersity of the sample. After diluting the media by a factor of 2, 5 or 10, aggregation was reduced, although the smallest NPs were unstable under all media conditions. Media diluted up to 10-fold in the absence of AgNPs did not induce any loss of mobility or fecundity in D. magna. These results confirm that standard OECD media causes aggregation of AgNPs, which result in changes in organism exposure levels and the nature of the exposed particles compared to exposure to fully dispersed particles. Setting aside questions of dose metrics, significant and substantial reduction in concentration over exposure period suggests that literature data are in the main improperly interpreted and

  12. Toxicity and biotransformation of uncoated and coated nickel hydroxide nanoparticles on mesquite plants.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jason G; Lopez, Martha L; Gonzalez, Christina M; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2010-05-01

    Nanomaterials are of particular interest in environmental chemistry due to their unknown toxicity to living organisms. Reports indicate that nanoparticles (NPs) affect seed germination, but the uptake and biotransformation of metal nanoparticles is not well understood. The present study investigated the toxicity and biotransformation of Ni(OH)2 NPs by mesquite plants (Prosopis sp.). Three sets of plants were treated for four weeks with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.10 g of either uncoated or sodium citrate coated NPs before and after synthesis. Nickel concentrations in plants were determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and the form and oxidation state of Ni was determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Results showed that uncoated NPs had an average size of 8.7 nm, whereas coated NPs before and after synthesis had an average of 2.5 and 0.9 nm, respectively. The ICP-OES results showed that plants treated with 0.10 g of uncoated and coated NPs before and after synthesis had 803, 764, and 400 mg Ni kg dry weight, in the leaves, respectively. The XAS analyses showed Ni NPs in roots and shoots of plants treated with uncoated NPs, whereas leaves showed a Ni(II)-organic acid type complex. However, plants treated with coated NPs before or after synthesis showed Ni NPs only in roots and a Ni(II)-organic acid complex in shoots and leaves. Results also showed that none of the treatments reduced plant size or chlorophyll production. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that the biotransformation of nanoparticles by a plant system is reported.

  13. Alteration in cellular and biochemical markers of pulmonary toxicity in rat lung exposed to carpet dusts.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Mohamed; Musthapa, Syed; Ahmad, Iqbal; Ansari, Furquan Ahmad; Baig, Masroor Alam; Rahman, Qamar

    2003-09-15

    Epidemiological studies of workers in weaving units in carpet industries have shown relationships between the airborne dust concentrations and pulmonary ill health. Therefore, to predict the health risk of carpet weavers, this preliminary experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of carpet dust (knotted, tufted) on cellular and biochemical mediators considered as potential biological markers of lung injury. Lung cytoplasmic (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), lysosomal (acid phosphatase, ACP), type II (alkaline phoshatase, ALP) and Clara-cell marker enzymes (gamma-glutamyl transferase, GGT) were monitored in rat cell-free lung lavage (BAL) during postexposure days 1, 4, 8, and 16. Furthermore, lung microsomal cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) and Clara-cell secretory protein (CC16) content in BAL was also evaluated. These pulmonary marker enzymes were significantly elevated during the postexposure period over the respective untreated control; however, tufted carpet dust shows more responses than knotted carpet dust. Lung CYP450 content was reduced significantly at early days; the pattern shows the reoccurrence of CYP450 content in the later stage of postexposure to carpet dust. Clara-cell secretory protein in BAL shows decline in the carpet-treated group; however, tufted carpet shows more decline than knotted carpet. Thus, reduction in CC16 level may have important implication in the development of chronic lung inflammation and diseases. Present investigation found that modulation of these cellular marker enzymes is clear evidence of pulmonary damage caused by exposure to carpet dust.

  14. Pulmonary toxicity of well-dispersed multi-wall carbon nanotubes following inhalation and intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Hirohashi, Masami; Ogami, Akira; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Todoroki, Motoi; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hashiba, Masayoshi; Mizuguchi, Yohei; Lee, Byeong Woo; Kuroda, Etsushi; Shimada, Manabu; Wang, Wei-Ning; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Katsuhide; Endoh, Shigehisa; Uchida, Kunio; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Mizuno, Kohei; Inada, Masaharu; Tao, Hiroaki; Nakazato, Tetsuya; Nakanishi, Junko; Tanaka, Isamu

    2012-09-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), dispersed in suspensions consisting mainly of individual tubes, were used for intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies. Rats intratracheally received a dose of 0.2 mg, or 1 mg of MWCNTs and were sacrificed from 3 days to 6 months. MWCNTs induced a pulmonary inflammation, as evidenced by a transient neutrophil response in the low-dose groups, and presence of small granulomatous lesion and persistent neutrophil infiltration in the high-dose groups. In the inhalation study, rats were exposed to 0.37 mg/m(3) aerosols of well-dispersed MWCNTs (>70% of MWCNTs were individual fibers) for 4 weeks, and were sacrificed at 3 days, 1 month, and 3 months after the end of exposure. The inhalation exposures delivered less amounts of MWCNTs into the lungs, and therefore less pulmonary inflammation responses was observed, as compared to intratracheal instillation. The results of our study show that well-dispersed MWCNT can produce pulmonary lesions, including inflammation.

  15. Comparison of In vitro Nanoparticles Uptake in Various Cell Lines and In vivo Pulmonary Cellular Transport in Intratracheally Dosed Rat Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yurong; Chiang, Po-Chang; Blom, Jason D.; Li, Na; Shevlin, Kimberly; Brayman, Timothy G.; Hu, Yiding; Selbo, Jon G.; Hu, Liangbiao George

    2008-09-01

    In present study, the potential drug delivery of nanoformulations was validated via the comparison of cellular uptake of nanoparticles in various cell lines and in vivo pulmonary cellular uptake in intratracheally (IT) dosed rat model. Nanoparticles were prepared by a bench scale wet milling device and incubated with a series of cell lines, including Caco-2, RAW, MDCK and MDCK transfected MDR1 cells. IT dosed rats were examined for the pulmonary cellular uptake of nanoparticles. The processes of nanoparticle preparation did not alter the crystalline state of the material. The uptake of nanoparticles was observed most extensively in RAW cells and the least in Caco-2 cells. Efflux transporter P-gp did not prevent cell from nanoparticles uptake. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was also confirmed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cells and in bronchiolar epithelial cells, type II alveolar epithelial cells in the intratracheally administrated rats. The nanoparticles uptake in MDCK, RAW cells and in vivo lung epithelial cells indicated the potential applications of nanoformulation for poorly soluble compounds. The observed limited direct uptake of nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells suggests that the improvement in oral bioavailability by particle size reduction is via increased dissolution rate rather than direct uptake.

  16. Functional expression of the transient receptor potential channel TRPA1, a sensor for toxic lung inhalants, in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Büch, Thomas Robert Heinrich; Schäfer, Eva Anna Maria; Demmel, Maria-Theresia; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Thiermann, Horst; Gudermann, Thomas; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-01

    The cation channel TRPA1 functions as a chemosensory protein and is directly activated by a number of noxious inhalants. A pulmonary expression of TRPA1 has been described in sensory nerve endings and its stimulation leads to the acceleration of inflammatory responses in the lung. Whereas the function of TRPA1 in neuronal cells is well defined, only few reports exist suggesting a role in epithelial cells. The aim of the present study was therefore (1) to evaluate the expression of TRPA1 in pulmonary epithelial cell lines, (2) to characterize TRPA1-promoted signaling in these cells, and (3) to study the extra-neuronal expression of this channel in lung tissue sections. Our results revealed that the widely used alveolar type II cell line A549 expresses TRPA1 at the mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, stimulating A549 cells with known TRPA1 activators (i.e., allyl isothiocyanate) led to an increase in intracellular calcium levels, which was sensitive to the TRPA1 blocker ruthenium red. Investigating TRPA1 coupled downstream signaling cascades it was found that TRPA1 activation elicited a stimulation of ERK1/2 whereas other MAP kinases were not affected. Finally, using epithelial as well as neuronal markers in immunohistochemical approaches, a non-neuronal TRPA1 protein expression was detected in distal parts of the porcine lung epithelium, which was also found examining human lung sections. TRPA1-positive staining co-localized with both epithelial and neuronal markers underlining the observed epithelial expression pattern. Our findings of a functional expression of TRPA1 in pulmonary epithelial cells provide causal evidence for a non-neuronal TRPA1-mediated control of inflammatory responses elicited upon TRPA1-mediated registration of toxic inhalants in vivo. PMID:23994502

  17. Photothermal effects and toxicity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles via near infrared laser irradiation for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Andrew W; Ehsan, Sadat M; Mast, David; Pauletti, Giovanni M; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Jiaming; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu

    2015-01-01

    The photothermal effect of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles was characterized by photonic absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region. Upon laser irradiation at 785 nm, the Fe3O4 nanoparticles generate localized hyperthermia in tumorous lesions, which is an effective strategy for cancer therapy; however, uncoated magnetite possesses an innate toxicity which can lead to drawbacks in the clinical setting. To reduce innate toxicity, a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) coating on the nanoparticles was investigated in order to determine the alterations to stability and the degree of toxicity in an attempt to create a higher utility vector. It was found that the PAA coating significantly reduced the innate toxicity of the uncoated magnetite. Furthermore, the efficacy of PAA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (PAA-Fe3O4) was investigated for treating MDA-MB-231 (human mammary gland adenocarcinoma) cultures in viable concentration ranges (0.1-0.5mg/ml). An appropriate PAA-Fe3O4 concentration range was then established for inducing significant cell death by hyperthermic ablation, but not through innate toxicity.

  18. Impact of solar UV radiation on toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles through photocatalytic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and photo-induced dissolution

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study investigated the impact of solar UV radiation on ZnO nanoparticle toxicity through photocatalytic ROS generation and photo-induced dissolution. Toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Daphnia magna was examined under laboratory light versus simulated solar UV radiatio...

  19. The Developmental Toxicity of Complex Silica-Embedded Nickel Nanoparticles Is Determined by Their Physicochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Sharlee; Najera, Michelle; Bai, Qing; Burton, Edward A.; Veser, Götz

    2016-01-01

    Complex engineered nanomaterials (CENs) are a rapidly developing class of structurally and compositionally complex materials that are expected to dominate the next generation of functional nanomaterials. The development of methods enabling rapid assessment of the toxicity risk associated with this type of nanomaterial is therefore critically important. We evaluated the toxicity of three differently structured nickel-silica nanomaterials as prototypical CENs: simple, surface-deposited Ni-SiO2 and hollow and non-hollow core-shell Ni@SiO2 materials (i.e., ~1–2 nm Ni nanoparticles embedded into porous silica shells with and without a central cavity, respectively). Zebrafish embryos were exposed to these CENs, and morphological (survival and malformations) and physiological (larval motility) endpoints were coupled with thorough characterization of physiochemical characteristics (including agglomeration, settling and nickel ion dissolution) to determine how toxicity differed between these CENs and equivalent quantities of Ni2+ salt (based on total Ni). Exposure to Ni2+ ions strongly compromised zebrafish larva viability, and surviving larvae showed severe malformations. In contrast, exposure to the equivalent amount of Ni CEN did not result in these abnormalities. Interestingly, exposure to Ni-SiO2 and hollow Ni@SiO2 provoked abnormalities of zebrafish larval motor function, indicating developmental toxicity, while non-hollow Ni@SiO2 showed no toxicity. Correlating these observations with physicochemical characterization of the CENs suggests that the toxicity of the Ni-SiO2 and hollow Ni@SiO2 material may result partly from an increased effective exposure at the bottom of the well due to rapid settling. Overall, our data suggest that embedding nickel NPs in a porous silica matrix may be a straightforward way to mitigate their toxicity without compromising their functional properties. At the same time, our results also indicate that it is critical to consider

  20. The Developmental Toxicity of Complex Silica-Embedded Nickel Nanoparticles Is Determined by Their Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Sharlee; Najera, Michelle; Bai, Qing; Burton, Edward A; Veser, Götz

    2016-01-01

    Complex engineered nanomaterials (CENs) are a rapidly developing class of structurally and compositionally complex materials that are expected to dominate the next generation of functional nanomaterials. The development of methods enabling rapid assessment of the toxicity risk associated with this type of nanomaterial is therefore critically important. We evaluated the toxicity of three differently structured nickel-silica nanomaterials as prototypical CENs: simple, surface-deposited Ni-SiO2 and hollow and non-hollow core-shell Ni@SiO2 materials (i.e., ~1-2 nm Ni nanoparticles embedded into porous silica shells with and without a central cavity, respectively). Zebrafish embryos were exposed to these CENs, and morphological (survival and malformations) and physiological (larval motility) endpoints were coupled with thorough characterization of physiochemical characteristics (including agglomeration, settling and nickel ion dissolution) to determine how toxicity differed between these CENs and equivalent quantities of Ni2+ salt (based on total Ni). Exposure to Ni2+ ions strongly compromised zebrafish larva viability, and surviving larvae showed severe malformations. In contrast, exposure to the equivalent amount of Ni CEN did not result in these abnormalities. Interestingly, exposure to Ni-SiO2 and hollow Ni@SiO2 provoked abnormalities of zebrafish larval motor function, indicating developmental toxicity, while non-hollow Ni@SiO2 showed no toxicity. Correlating these observations with physicochemical characterization of the CENs suggests that the toxicity of the Ni-SiO2 and hollow Ni@SiO2 material may result partly from an increased effective exposure at the bottom of the well due to rapid settling. Overall, our data suggest that embedding nickel NPs in a porous silica matrix may be a straightforward way to mitigate their toxicity without compromising their functional properties. At the same time, our results also indicate that it is critical to consider modification

  1. In vitro assessment of Ag2O nanoparticles toxicity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Negi, Harshita; Rathinavelu Saravanan, Palaniyandi; Agarwal, Tithi; Ghulam Haider Zaidi, Mohd; Goel, Reeta

    2013-01-01

    In view of antibiotic resistance among pathogens, the present study is to address the toxicity of Ag2O nanoparticles against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria through in vitro assays. The preliminary screening by agar diffusion assay confirms the antibacterial activity of Ag2O nanoparticles against all the test bacteria. Comparative antibacterial activity of Ag2O nanoparticles and respective antibiotics reveals their broad range of activity and lower inhibitory dose against the used bacterial strains. Further, they can inhibit E. coli with an effective dose of 0.036 mg/ml within 1 h of exposure time as determined by luciferin based ATP assay. Moreover, the Ag2O nanoparticles exhibit higher antibacterial efficacy against Gram-negative bacteria than Gram-positive bacteria, as revealed by their MIC & MBC values. Therefore, Ag2O nanoparticles pave the way for a new generation of antibacterial agents against the emerging multidrug resistant pathogens.

  2. Controlled delivery of hollow corn protein nanoparticles via non-toxic crosslinking: in vivo and drug loading study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Helan; Shen, Li; Xu, Lan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-02-01

    In this research, controlled delivery of hollow nanoparticles from zein, the corn storage protein, to different organs of mice was achieved via crosslinking using citric acid, a non-toxic polycarboxylic acid derived from starch. Besides, crosslinking significantly enhanced water stability of nanoparticles while preserving their drug loading efficiency. Protein nanoparticles have been widely investigated as vehicles for delivery of therapeutics. However, protein nanoparticles were not stable in physiological conditions, easily cleared by mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), and thus mainly accumulated and degraded in spleen and liver, the major MPS organs. Effective delivery to major non-MPS organs, such as kidney, was usually difficult to achieve, as well as long resident time of nanoparticles. In this research, hollow zein nanoparticles were chemically crosslinked with citric acid. Controlled delivery and prolonged accumulation of the nanoparticles in kidney, one major non-MPS organ, were achieved. The nanoparticles showed improved stability in aqueous environment at pH 7.4 without affecting the adsorption of 5-FU, a common anticancer drug. In summary, citric acid crosslinked hollow zein nanoparticles could be potential vehicles for controllable delivery of anticancer therapeutics.

  3. Toxic effects of nanoparticles on bioluminescence activity, seed germination, and gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Kong, In Chul

    2014-04-01

    The potential environmental toxicities of several metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs; CuO, TiO2, NiO, Fe2O3, ZnO, and Co3O4) were evaluated in the context of bioluminescence activity, seed germination, and bacterial gene mutation. The bioassays exhibited different sensitivities, i.e., each kind of NP exhibited a different level of toxicity in each of the bioassays. However, with a few exceptions, CuO and ZnO NPs had most toxic for germination of Lactuca seed (EC50 0.46 mg CuO/l) and bioluminescence (EC50 1.05 mg ZnO/l). Three NPs (Co3O4, TiO2, and Fe2O3) among all tested concentrations (max. 1,000 mg/l) showed no inhibitory effects on the tested organisms, except for Co3O4 NPs on bioluminescence activity (EC50 62.04 mg/l). The sensitivity of Lactuca seeds was greater than that of Raphanus seeds (EC50 0.46 mg CuO/l versus 26.84 mg CuO /l ). The ranking of metal toxicity levels on bioluminescence was in the order of ZnO > CuO > Co3O4 > NiO > Fe2O3, TiO2, while CuO > ZnO > NiO > Co3O4, Fe2O3, TiO2 on germination. No revertant mutagenic ratio (greater than 2.0) of Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 was observed under any tested condition. These findings demonstrate that several bioassays, as opposed to any single one, are needed for the accurate assessment of NP toxicity on ecosystems. PMID:24297479

  4. Toxic effects of nanoparticles on bioluminescence activity, seed germination, and gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Kong, In Chul

    2014-04-01

    The potential environmental toxicities of several metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs; CuO, TiO2, NiO, Fe2O3, ZnO, and Co3O4) were evaluated in the context of bioluminescence activity, seed germination, and bacterial gene mutation. The bioassays exhibited different sensitivities, i.e., each kind of NP exhibited a different level of toxicity in each of the bioassays. However, with a few exceptions, CuO and ZnO NPs had most toxic for germination of Lactuca seed (EC50 0.46 mg CuO/l) and bioluminescence (EC50 1.05 mg ZnO/l). Three NPs (Co3O4, TiO2, and Fe2O3) among all tested concentrations (max. 1,000 mg/l) showed no inhibitory effects on the tested organisms, except for Co3O4 NPs on bioluminescence activity (EC50 62.04 mg/l). The sensitivity of Lactuca seeds was greater than that of Raphanus seeds (EC50 0.46 mg CuO/l versus 26.84 mg CuO /l ). The ranking of metal toxicity levels on bioluminescence was in the order of ZnO > CuO > Co3O4 > NiO > Fe2O3, TiO2, while CuO > ZnO > NiO > Co3O4, Fe2O3, TiO2 on germination. No revertant mutagenic ratio (greater than 2.0) of Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 was observed under any tested condition. These findings demonstrate that several bioassays, as opposed to any single one, are needed for the accurate assessment of NP toxicity on ecosystems.

  5. Evaluation of Alpha and Gamma Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticle Accumulation, Toxicity and Depuration in Artemia Salina Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Mehmet; Demir, Veysel; Arslan, Zikri; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O.; Bogatu, Corneliu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Artemia salina (crustacean filter feeders) larvae were used as a test model to investigate the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) on marine microorganisms. The uptake, toxicity and elimination of α-Al2O3 (50 nm and 3.5 μm) and γ-Al2O3 (5 nm and 0.4 μm) NPs were studied. Twenty-four and ninety-six hour exposures of different concentrations of Al2O3 NPs to Artemia larvae were conducted in a seawater medium. When suspended in water, Al2O3 NPs aggregated substantially with the sizes ranging from 6.3 nm to > 0.3 μm for spherical NPs, and from 250 to 756 nm for rod-shaped NPs. The phase contrast microscope images revealed that NPs deposited inside the guts as aggregates. ICP-MS analysis showed that large particles (3.5 μm α-Al2O3) were not taken up by Artemia, while fine NPs (0.4 μm γ-Al2O3) and ultra-fine NPs (5 nm γ-Al2O3 and 50 nm α-Al2O3) accumulated substantially. Differences in toxicity were detected as changing with NP size and morphology. The malondialdehyde (MDA) levels indicated that smaller γ-Al2O3 (5 nm) NPs were more toxic than larger γ-Al2O3 (0.4 μm) particulates in 96 h. The highest mortality was measured as 34% in 96 h for γ-Al2O3 NPs (5 nm) at 100 mg/L (LC50 > 100 mg/L). γ-Al2O3 NPs were more toxic than α-Al2O3 NPs at in all conditions. PMID:24753078

  6. Docetaxel-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles suppress breast cancer cells growth with reduced myelosuppression toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing; Han, Jing; Cong, Wenshu; Ge, Ying; Ma, Dandan; Dai, Zhaoxia; Li, Yaping; Bi, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Docetaxel is an adjuvant chemotherapy drug widely used to treat multiple solid tumors; however, its toxicity and side effects limit its clinical efficacy. Herein, docetaxel-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (DSNs) were developed to reduce systemic toxicity of docetaxel while still keeping its anticancer activity. To evaluate its anticancer activity and toxicity, and to understand the molecular mechanisms of DSNs, different cellular, molecular, and whole genome transcription analysis approaches were utilized. The DSNs showed lower cytotoxicity compared with the commercial formulation of docetaxel (Taxotere®) and induced more apoptosis at 24 hours after treatment in vitro. DSNs can cause the treated cancer cells to arrest in the G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner similar to Taxotere. They can also suppress tumor growth very effectively in a mice model with human xenograft breast cancer. Systemic analysis of gene expression profiles by microarray and subsequent verification experiments suggested that both DSNs and Taxotere regulate gene expression and gene function, including DNA replication, DNA damage response, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. Some of these genes expressed differentially at the protein level although their messenger RNA expression level was similar under Taxotere and DSN treatment. Moreover, DSNs improved the main side effect of Taxotere by greatly lowering myelosuppression toxicity to bone marrow cells from mice. Taken together, these results expound the antitumor efficacy and the potential working mechanisms of DSNs in its anticancer activity and toxicity, which provide a theoretical foundation to develop and apply a more efficient docetaxel formulation to treat cancer patients. PMID:25378924

  7. Evaluation of alpha and gamma aluminum oxide nanoparticle accumulation, toxicity, and depuration in Artemia salina larvae.

    PubMed

    Ates, Mehmet; Demir, Veysel; Arslan, Zikri; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O; Bogatu, Corneliu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Artemia salina (crustacean filter feeders) larvae were used as a test model to investigate the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) on marine microorganisms. The uptake, toxicity, and elimination of α-Al2O3 (50 nm and 3.5 μm) and γ-Al2O3 (5 nm and 0.4 μm) NPs were studied. Twenty-four and ninety-six hour exposures of different concentrations of Al2O3 NPs to Artemia larvae were conducted in a seawater medium. When suspended in water, Al2O3 NPs aggregated substantially with the sizes ranging from 6.3 nm to >0.3 µm for spherical NPs and from 250 to 756 nm for rod-shaped NPs. The phase contrast microscope images showed that NPs deposited inside the guts as aggregates. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis showed that large particles (3.5 μm α-Al2O3) were not taken up by Artemia, whereas fine NPs (0.4 μm γ-Al2O3) and ultra-fine NPs (5 nm γ-Al2O3 and 50 nm α-Al2O3) accumulated substantially. Differences in toxicity were detected as changing with NP size and morphology. The malondialdehyde levels indicated that smaller γ-Al2O3 (5 nm) NPs were more toxic than larger γ-Al2O3 (0.4 µm) particulates in 96 h. The highest mortality was measured as 34% in 96 h for γ-Al2O3 NPs (5 nm) at 100 mg/L (LC50 > 100 mg/L). γ-Al2O3 NPs were more toxic than α-Al2O3 NPs at all conditions.

  8. Comparison of cell counting methods in rodent pulmonary toxicity studies: automated and manual protocols and considerations for experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Antonini, James M.; Meighan, Terence G.; Young, Shih-Houng; Eye, Tracy J.; Hammer, Mary Ann; Erdely, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity studies often use bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to investigate potential adverse lung responses to a particulate exposure. The BAL cellular fraction is counted, using automated (i.e. Coulter Counter®), flow cytometry or manual (i.e. hemocytometer) methods, to determine inflammatory cell influx. The goal of the study was to compare the different counting methods to determine which is optimal for examining BAL cell influx after exposure by inhalation or intratracheal instillation (ITI) to different particles with varying inherent pulmonary toxicities in both rat and mouse models. General findings indicate that total BAL cell counts using the automated and manual methods tended to agree after inhalation or ITI exposure to particle samples that are relatively nontoxic or at later time points after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle when the response resolves. However, when the initial lung inflammation and cytotoxicity was high after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle, significant differences were observed when comparing cell counts from the automated, flow cytometry and manual methods. When using total BAL cell count for differential calculations from the automated method, depending on the cell diameter size range cutoff, the data suggest that the number of lung polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) varies. Importantly, the automated counts, regardless of the size cutoff, still indicated a greater number of total lung PMN when compared with the manual method, which agreed more closely with flow cytometry. The results suggest that either the manual method or flow cytometry would be better suited for BAL studies where cytotoxicity is an unknown variable. PMID:27251196

  9. Comparison of cell counting methods in rodent pulmonary toxicity studies: automated and manual protocols and considerations for experimental design.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M; Meighan, Terence G; Young, Shih-Houng; Eye, Tracy J; Hammer, Mary Ann; Erdely, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary toxicity studies often use bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to investigate potential adverse lung responses to a particulate exposure. The BAL cellular fraction is counted, using automated (i.e. Coulter Counter®), flow cytometry or manual (i.e. hemocytometer) methods, to determine inflammatory cell influx. The goal of the study was to compare the different counting methods to determine which is optimal for examining BAL cell influx after exposure by inhalation or intratracheal instillation (ITI) to different particles with varying inherent pulmonary toxicities in both rat and mouse models. General findings indicate that total BAL cell counts using the automated and manual methods tended to agree after inhalation or ITI exposure to particle samples that are relatively nontoxic or at later time points after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle when the response resolves. However, when the initial lung inflammation and cytotoxicity was high after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle, significant differences were observed when comparing cell counts from the automated, flow cytometry and manual methods. When using total BAL cell count for differential calculations from the automated method, depending on the cell diameter size range cutoff, the data suggest that the number of lung polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) varies. Importantly, the automated counts, regardless of the size cutoff, still indicated a greater number of total lung PMN when compared with the manual method, which agreed more closely with flow cytometry. The results suggest that either the manual method or flow cytometry would be better suited for BAL studies where cytotoxicity is an unknown variable. PMID:27251196

  10. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: some aspects of toxicity/focus on the development.

    PubMed

    Rollerova, E; Tulinska, J; Liskova, A; Kuricova, M; Kovriznych, J; Mlynarcikova, A; Kiss, A; Scsukova, S

    2015-04-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles belong to the most widely manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) on a global scale because of their photocatalytic properties and the related surface effects. TiO2 NPs are in the top five NPs used in consumer products. Ultrafine TiO2 is widely used in the number of applications, including white pigment in paint, ceramics, food additive, food packaging material, sunscreens, cosmetic creams, and, component of surgical implants. Data evidencing rapid distribution, slow or ineffective elimination, and potential long-time tissue accumulation are especially important for the human risk assessment of ultrafine TiO2 and represent new challenges to more responsibly investigate potential adverse effects by the action of TiO2 NPs considering their ubiquitous exposure in various doses. Transport of ultrafine TiO2 particles in systemic circulation and further transition through barriers, especially the placental and blood-brain ones, are well documented. Therefore, from the developmental point of view, there is a raising concern in the exposure to TiO2 NPs during critical windows, in the pregnancy or the lactation period, and the fact that human mothers, women and men in fertile age and last but not least children may be exposed to high cumulative doses. In this review, toxicokinetics and particularly toxicity of TiO2 NPs in relation to the developing processes, oriented mainly on the development of the central nervous system, are discussed Keywords: nanoparticles, nanotoxicity, nanomaterials, titanium dioxide, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, blood brain barrier, placental barrier. PMID:25960011

  11. Evaluation of drug loading, pharmacokinetic behavior, and toxicity of a cisplatin-containing hydrogel nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Marc P.; Keeler, Amanda W.; Perry, Jillian L.; Reuter, Kevin G.; Luft, J. Christopher; O’Neal, Sara K.; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a cytotoxic drug used as a first-line therapy for a wide variety of cancers. However, significant renal and neurological toxicities limits it clinical use. It has been documented that drug toxicities can be mitigated through nanoparticle formulation, while simultaneously increasing tumor accumulation through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Circulation persistence is a key characteristic for exploiting this effect, and to that end we have developed long-circulating, PEGylated, polymeric hydrogels using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®) platform and complexed cisplatin into the particles (PRINT-Platin). Sustained release was demonstrated, and drug loading correlated to surface PEG density. A PEG Mushroom conformation showed the best compromise between particle pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and drug loading (16 wt %). While the PK profile of PEG Brush was superior, the loading was poor (2 wt %). Conversely, the drug loading in non-PEGylated particles was better (20 wt %), but the PK was not desirable. We also showed comparable cytotoxicity to cisplatin in several cancer cell lines (non-small cell lung, A549; ovarian, SKOV-3; breast, MDA-MB-468) and a higher MTD in mice (10 mg/kg versus 5 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic profiles of drug in plasma, tumor, and kidney indicate improved exposure in the blood and tumor accumulation, with concurrent renal protection, when cisplatin was formulated in a nanoparticle. PK parameters were markedly improved: a 16.4-times higher area-under-the-curve (AUC), a reduction in clearance (CL) by a factor of 11.2, and a 4.20-times increase in the volume of distribution (Vd). Additionally, non-small cell lung and ovarian tumor AUC was at least twice that of cisplatin in both models. These findings suggest the potential for PRINT-Platin to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity compared to current cisplatin therapies. PMID:25744827

  12. Toxicity of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticle suspensions to the aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Das, Pranab; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the 48 h acute toxicity of capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), and capped and uncapped titanium dioxide (nTiO₂) to Daphnia magna neonates. In addition, a 24 days chronic toxicity study was performed for D. magna exposed to uncapped nTiO₂ to evaluate effects on growth, reproduction and survival. The 48 h median lethal concentrations (LC₅₀) for carboxy-functionalized capped AgNPs and uncapped nTiO₂ were 2.75 μg/L and 7.75 mg/L, respectively. In contrast, no mortalities were observed for Daphnia exposed to carboxy-functionalized capped nTiO₂ at concentrations up to 30 mg/L. In the chronic toxicity experiment with uncapped nTiO₂, the growth, reproduction and survival of D. magna were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced at concentrations ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 mg/L. Growth and reproduction were reduced by 35 % and 93 %, respectively in the treatments at the highest uncapped nTiO₂ concentration (7.5 mg/L). Time to first reproduction was delayed by 2-3 days in D. magna and the test organisms produced only 1-2 broods over 24 days exposure to the highest concentration of uncapped nTiO₂. Overall, the results from the present study indicate that exposures of aquatic invertebrates to nanoparticles could have important ecological effects on lower trophic levels in aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: some aspects of toxicity/focus on the development.

    PubMed

    Rollerova, E; Tulinska, J; Liskova, A; Kuricova, M; Kovriznych, J; Mlynarcikova, A; Kiss, A; Scsukova, S

    2015-04-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles belong to the most widely manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) on a global scale because of their photocatalytic properties and the related surface effects. TiO2 NPs are in the top five NPs used in consumer products. Ultrafine TiO2 is widely used in the number of applications, including white pigment in paint, ceramics, food additive, food packaging material, sunscreens, cosmetic creams, and, component of surgical implants. Data evidencing rapid distribution, slow or ineffective elimination, and potential long-time tissue accumulation are especially important for the human risk assessment of ultrafine TiO2 and represent new challenges to more responsibly investigate potential adverse effects by the action of TiO2 NPs considering their ubiquitous exposure in various doses. Transport of ultrafine TiO2 particles in systemic circulation and further transition through barriers, especially the placental and blood-brain ones, are well documented. Therefore, from the developmental point of view, there is a raising concern in the exposure to TiO2 NPs during critical windows, in the pregnancy or the lactation period, and the fact that human mothers, women and men in fertile age and last but not least children may be exposed to high cumulative doses. In this review, toxicokinetics and particularly toxicity of TiO2 NPs in relation to the developing processes, oriented mainly on the development of the central nervous system, are discussed Keywords: nanoparticles, nanotoxicity, nanomaterials, titanium dioxide, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, blood brain barrier, placental barrier.

  14. Photo-induced toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under natural sunlight.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, C M; Alloy, M M; Hamilton, J; Verbeck, G F; Newton, K; Klaine, S J; Roberts, A P

    2015-02-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NP) are one of the most abundantly utilized nanoparticles in the world. Studies have demonstrated the ability of the anatase crystal of TiO2 NP to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a co-exposure likely to occur in aquatic ecosystems. The goal of this study was to examine the photo-induced toxicity of anatase TiO2 NP under natural sunlight to Daphnia magna. D. magna were exposed to a range of UVR intensities and anatase TiO2 concentrations in an outdoor exposure system using the sun as the source of UVR. Different UVR intensities were achieved using UVR opaque and transparent plastics. AnataseTiO2-NP demonstrated the reciprocal relationship seen in other phototoxic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at higher UVR treatments. The calculated 8h LC50 of anatase TiO2 NP was 139 ppb under full intensity ambient natural sunlight, 778 ppb under 50% natural sunlight, and >500 ppm under 10% natural sunlight. Mortality was also compared between animals allowed to accumulate a body burden of anatase TiO2 for 1h and organisms whose first exposure to anatase TiO2 aqueous suspensions occurred under UVR. A significantly greater toxic effect was observed in aqueous, low body burden suspensions than that of TiO2 1h body burdens, which is dissimilar from the model presented in PAHs. Anatase TiO2 presents a unique photo-induced toxic model that is different than that of established phototoxic compounds.

  15. Pulmonary toxicity of single-wall carbon nanotubes in mice 7 and 90 days after intratracheal instillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.; McCluskey, Richard; Hunter, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Nanomaterials are part of an industrial revolution to develop lightweight but strong materials for a variety of purposes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes are an important member of this class of materials. They structurally resemble rolled-up graphite sheets, usually with one end capped; individually they are about 1 nm in diameter and several microns long, but they often pack tightly together to form rods or ropes of microscopic sizes. Carbon nanotubes possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties and have many potential applications in the electronics, computer, and aerospace industries. Unprocessed nanotubes are very light and could become airborne and potentially reach the lungs. Because the toxicity of nanotubes in the lung is not known, their pulmonary toxicity was investigated. The three products studied were made by different methods and contained different types and amounts of residual catalytic metals. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 0, 0.1, or 0.5 mg of carbon nanotubes, a carbon black negative control, or a quartz positive control and euthanized 7 d or 90 d after the single treatment for histopathological study of the lungs. All nanotube products induced dose-dependent epithelioid granulomas and, in some cases, interstitial inflammation in the animals of the 7-d groups. These lesions persisted and were more pronounced in the 90-d groups; the lungs of some animals also revealed peribronchial inflammation and necrosis that had extended into the alveolar septa. The lungs of mice treated with carbon black were normal, whereas those treated with high-dose quartz revealed mild to moderate inflammation. These results show that, for the test conditions described here and on an equal-weight basis, if carbon nanotubes reach the lungs, they are much more toxic than carbon black and can be more toxic than quartz, which is considered a serious occupational health hazard in chronic inhalation exposures.

  16. Magnetite nanoparticles induced adaptive mechanisms counteract cell death in human pulmonary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Radu, Mihaela; Dinu, Diana; Sima, Cornelia; Burlacu, Radu; Hermenean, Anca; Ardelean, Aurel; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-10-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) have attracted great interest for biomedical applications due to their unique chemical and physical properties, but the MNP impact on human health is not fully known. Consequently, our study proposes to highlight the biochemical mechanisms that underline the toxic effects of MNP on a human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). The cytotoxicity generated by MNP in MRC-5 cells was dose and time-dependent. MNP-treated MRC-5 cells accumulated large amount of iron and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exhibited elevated antioxidant scavenger enzymes. Reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion and enhanced lipid peroxidation (LPO) processes were also observed. The cellular capacity to counteract the oxidative damage was sustained by high levels of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a protein that confers resistance against ROS attack and inhibition of cell death. While significant augmentations in nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandine E2 (PGE2) levels were detected after 72 h of MNP-exposure only, caspase-1 was activated earlier starting with 24h post-treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that MRC-5 cells have the capacity to develop cell protection mechanisms against MNP. Detailed knowledge of the mechanisms induced by MNP in cell culture could be essential for their prospective use in various in vivo biochemical applications. PMID:26065626

  17. Chitosan nanoparticles loaded the herbicide paraquat: the influence of the aquatic humic substances on the colloidal stability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Renato; Clemente, Zaira; de Oliveira, Jhones Luis; Campos, Estefânia Vangelie Ramos; Chalupe, Victor C; Jonsson, Claudio M; de Lima, Renata; Sanches, Gabriela; Nishisaka, Caroline S; Rosa, André H; Oehlke, Kathleen; Greiner, Ralf; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2015-04-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles have been developed for several applications, among them as carrier system of pesticides. However, few studies have investigated the fate of these materials in the environment in relation to colloidal stability and toxicity. In nature, humic substances are the main agents responsible for complexation with metals and organic compounds, as well as responsible for the dynamics of these nanoparticles in aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this context, the evaluation of the influence of aquatic humic substances (AHS) on the colloidal stability and toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles of chitosan/tripolyphosphate with or without paraquat was performed. In this study, the nanoparticles were prepared by the ionic gelation method and characterized by size distribution measurements (DLS and NTA), zeta potential, infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Allium cepa genotoxicity studies and ecotoxicity assays with the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were used to investigate the effect of aquatic humic substances (AHS) on the toxicity of this delivery system. No changes were observed in the physical-chemical stability of the nanoparticles due to the presence of AHS using DLS and NTA techniques. However some evidence of interaction between the nanoparticles and AHS was observed by infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies. The ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that humic substances can decrease the toxic effects of nanoparticles containing paraquat. These results are interesting because they are important for understanding the interaction of these nanostructured carrier systems with species present in aquatic ecosystems such as humic substances, and in this way, opening new perspectives for studies on the dynamics of these carrier systems in the ecosystem. PMID:25636059

  18. Drug Delivery Nanoparticles: Toxicity Comparison in Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haijiang; Yue, Yueran; Maidana, Daniel E; Bouzika, Peggy; Atik, Alp; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Miller, Joan W; Vavvas, Demetrios G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used as drug delivery systems. However, their toxicity to the retinal pigment epithelium and retinal endothelium remains unclear. In this study, we analyze the cytotoxic effects of three different kinds of NPs, made of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and PEGylated PLGA (PEG-PLGA), in a retinal pigment epithelium cell line (ARPE-19) and in primary human retinal vascular endothelial cells (RVEC). PEG-PLGA NPs presented the lowest cytotoxicity on ARPE-19 cells and RVEC as assessed by MTT viability assay. While PLGA and PCL exhibited variable amounts of toxicity, no significant toxicity was observed when incubating cells with high PEG-PLGA concentrations (100 µg/ml), for up to 6 days. On both transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, Rhodamine 6G-loaded PEG-PLGA NPs were observed intracellularly in multiple subcellular organelles. PEG-PLGA NPs are a potentially viable option for the treatment of eye diseases.

  19. Chronic toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under different feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    Mackevica, Aiga; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Gergs, Andre; Palmqvist, Annemette; Baun, Anders

    2015-04-01

    Despite substantial information on the acute toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) to aquatic organisms, little is known about their potential chronic effects and the applicability of current test guidelines for testing nanomaterials. The purpose of this study was to study the influence of food availability on toxicity. This was done through a series of Daphnia magna 21-day reproduction tests (OECD 211) using 30 nm citric acid stabilized AgNP aimed at studying the influence of food abundance on the reproductive toxicity of AgNP in D. magna. The experiments were carried out as static renewal tests with exposure concentrations from 10 to 50 μg Ag/L, and test animals were fed green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata in low and high food treatments. The endpoints recorded were survival, growth of parent animals and number of live neonates produced. Detrimental effects of AgNP on survival, growth and reproduction were observed in concentrations higher than 10 μg Ag/L, whereas the animals exposed to 10 μg Ag/L had larger body length and produced more offspring than controls at both food treatments. High food treatment resulted in higher animal survival, growth and reproduction compared to result found for low food treatment. PMID:25661705

  20. Interactions of CuO nanoparticles with the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa: adhesion, uptake, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Cao, Xuesong; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Chenchen; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-11-01

    The potential adverse effects of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) have increasingly attracted attention. Combining electron microscopic and toxicological investigations, we determined the adhesion, uptake, and toxicity of CuO NPs to eukaryotic alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. CuO NPs were toxic to C. pyrenoidosa, with a 72 h EC50 of 45.7 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy showed that CuO NPs were attached onto the surface of the algal cells and interacted with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excreted by the organisms. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that EPS layer of algae was thickened by nearly 4-fold after CuO NPs exposure, suggesting a possible protective mechanism. In spite of the thickening of EPS layer, CuO NPs were still internalized by endocytosis and were stored in algal vacuoles. TEM and electron diffraction analysis confirmed that the internalized CuO NPs were transformed to Cu2O NPs (d-spacing, ∼0.213 nm) with an average size approximately 5 nm. The toxicity investigation demonstrated that severe membrane damage was observed after attachment of CuO NPs with algae. Reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial depolarization were also noted upon exposure to CuO NPs. This work provides useful information on understanding the role of NPs-algae physical interactions in nanotoxicity.

  1. The role of exopolymeric substances in the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles to algae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kaijun; Hu, Yi; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2016-01-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) have an important role in bioaccumulation and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) to algae, which warrants specific studies. The interaction of EPS with citrate and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs (C-AgNPs and P-AgNPs, respectively) and its roles in bioaccumulation and toxicity of the AgNPs to Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated. The amino and aromatic carboxylic groups in the EPS were involved in the EPS-AgNP interactions. Compared with Ag(+), C-AgNPs had comparable total bioaccumulation but greater absorption by intact algae with EPS; P-AgNPs had the smallest total bioaccumulation and were mainly adsorbed on algal surfaces. With EPS removed, the total bioaccumulations and surface adsorptions for the three Ag species decreased but the cell internalizations increased; the 96 h half growth inhibition concentrations decreased, indicating EPS alleviated the algal toxicity of Ag. The cell-internalized but not the adsorbed AgNPs could contribute to the nanotoxicity. The EPS could bind both AgNPs and Ag(+), and thus inhibited the cell internalization and the nanotoxicity. However, the EPS-bound Ag on the cell surfaces would migrate along with the algae and be biologically amplified in the aquatic food chains, presenting ecological risks. These results are helpful for understanding the fate and ecological effects of NPs. PMID:27615743

  2. The role of exopolymeric substances in the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles to algae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kaijun; Hu, Yi; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2016-01-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) have an important role in bioaccumulation and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) to algae, which warrants specific studies. The interaction of EPS with citrate and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs (C-AgNPs and P-AgNPs, respectively) and its roles in bioaccumulation and toxicity of the AgNPs to Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated. The amino and aromatic carboxylic groups in the EPS were involved in the EPS-AgNP interactions. Compared with Ag+, C-AgNPs had comparable total bioaccumulation but greater absorption by intact algae with EPS; P-AgNPs had the smallest total bioaccumulation and were mainly adsorbed on algal surfaces. With EPS removed, the total bioaccumulations and surface adsorptions for the three Ag species decreased but the cell internalizations increased; the 96 h half growth inhibition concentrations decreased, indicating EPS alleviated the algal toxicity of Ag. The cell-internalized but not the adsorbed AgNPs could contribute to the nanotoxicity. The EPS could bind both AgNPs and Ag+, and thus inhibited the cell internalization and the nanotoxicity. However, the EPS-bound Ag on the cell surfaces would migrate along with the algae and be biologically amplified in the aquatic food chains, presenting ecological risks. These results are helpful for understanding the fate and ecological effects of NPs. PMID:27615743

  3. Drug Delivery Nanoparticles: Toxicity Comparison in Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haijiang; Yue, Yueran; Maidana, Daniel E; Bouzika, Peggy; Atik, Alp; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Miller, Joan W; Vavvas, Demetrios G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used as drug delivery systems. However, their toxicity to the retinal pigment epithelium and retinal endothelium remains unclear. In this study, we analyze the cytotoxic effects of three different kinds of NPs, made of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and PEGylated PLGA (PEG-PLGA), in a retinal pigment epithelium cell line (ARPE-19) and in primary human retinal vascular endothelial cells (RVEC). PEG-PLGA NPs presented the lowest cytotoxicity on ARPE-19 cells and RVEC as assessed by MTT viability assay. While PLGA and PCL exhibited variable amounts of toxicity, no significant toxicity was observed when incubating cells with high PEG-PLGA concentrations (100 µg/ml), for up to 6 days. On both transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, Rhodamine 6G-loaded PEG-PLGA NPs were observed intracellularly in multiple subcellular organelles. PEG-PLGA NPs are a potentially viable option for the treatment of eye diseases. PMID:26959123

  4. Combined toxicity of silica nanoparticles and methylmercury on cardiovascular system in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junchao; Hu, Hejing; Li, Qiuling; Jiang, Lizhen; Zou, Yang; Wang, Yapei; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-06-01

    This study was to investigate the combined toxicity of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) and methylmercury (MeHg) on cardiovascular system in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Ultraviolet absorption analysis showed that the co-exposure system had high absorption and stability. The dosages used in this study were based on the NOAEL level. Zebrafish embryos exposed to the co-exposure of SiNPs and MeHg did not show any cardiovascular malformation or atrioventricular block, but had an inhibition effect on bradycardia. Using o-Dianisidine for erythrocyte staining, the cardiac output of zebrafish embryos was decreased gradually in SiNPs, MeHg, co-exposure groups, respectively. Co-exposure of SiNPs and MeHg enhanced the vascular endothelial damage in Tg(fli-1:EGFP) transgenic zebrafish line. Moreover, the co-exposure significantly activated the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in neutrophils-specific Tg(mpo:GFP) transgenic zebrafish line. This study suggested that the combined toxic effects of SiNPs and MeHg on cardiovascular system had more severe toxicity than the single exposure alone.

  5. Bioaccumulation and Subchronic Toxicity of 14 nm Gold Nanoparticles in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rambanapasi, Clinton; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn; Buntting, Hylton; Bester, Cornelius; Kotze, Deon; Hayeshi, Rose; Grobler, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of 14 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were repeatedly administered intravenously at three dose levels (0.9, 9 and 90 µg) to male Sprague Dawley rats weekly for 7 weeks, followed by a 14-day washout period. After sacrificing, the amount of gold was quantified in the liver, lungs, spleen, skeleton and carcass using neutron activation analysis (NAA). During the study, pre- and post (24 h) administration blood samples were collected from both the test and control groups, the latter which received an equal injection volume of normal saline. General health indicators were monitored together with markers of kidney and liver damage for acute and subchronic toxicity assessment. Histopathological assessments were done on the heart, kidneys, liver, lungs and spleen to assess any morphological changes as a result of the exposure to AuNPs. The mass measurements of all the groups showed a steady increase with no signs of overt toxicity. The liver had the highest amount of gold (µg) per gram of tissue after 56 days followed by the spleen, lungs, skeleton and carcass. Markers of kidney and liver damage showed similar trends between the pre and post samples within each group and across groups. The histopathological examination also showed no hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. There was accumulation of Au in tissues after repeated dosing, albeit with no observable overt toxicity, kidney or liver damage.

  6. Interactions of CuO nanoparticles with the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa: adhesion, uptake, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Cao, Xuesong; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Chenchen; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-11-01

    The potential adverse effects of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) have increasingly attracted attention. Combining electron microscopic and toxicological investigations, we determined the adhesion, uptake, and toxicity of CuO NPs to eukaryotic alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. CuO NPs were toxic to C. pyrenoidosa, with a 72 h EC50 of 45.7 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy showed that CuO NPs were attached onto the surface of the algal cells and interacted with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excreted by the organisms. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that EPS layer of algae was thickened by nearly 4-fold after CuO NPs exposure, suggesting a possible protective mechanism. In spite of the thickening of EPS layer, CuO NPs were still internalized by endocytosis and were stored in algal vacuoles. TEM and electron diffraction analysis confirmed that the internalized CuO NPs were transformed to Cu2O NPs (d-spacing, ∼0.213 nm) with an average size approximately 5 nm. The toxicity investigation demonstrated that severe membrane damage was observed after attachment of CuO NPs with algae. Reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial depolarization were also noted upon exposure to CuO NPs. This work provides useful information on understanding the role of NPs-algae physical interactions in nanotoxicity. PMID:27345461

  7. The role of exopolymeric substances in the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles to algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kaijun; Hu, Yi; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2016-09-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) have an important role in bioaccumulation and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) to algae, which warrants specific studies. The interaction of EPS with citrate and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs (C-AgNPs and P-AgNPs, respectively) and its roles in bioaccumulation and toxicity of the AgNPs to Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated. The amino and aromatic carboxylic groups in the EPS were involved in the EPS-AgNP interactions. Compared with Ag+, C-AgNPs had comparable total bioaccumulation but greater absorption by intact algae with EPS; P-AgNPs had the smallest total bioaccumulation and were mainly adsorbed on algal surfaces. With EPS removed, the total bioaccumulations and surface adsorptions for the three Ag species decreased but the cell internalizations increased; the 96 h half growth inhibition concentrations decreased, indicating EPS alleviated the algal toxicity of Ag. The cell-internalized but not the adsorbed AgNPs could contribute to the nanotoxicity. The EPS could bind both AgNPs and Ag+, and thus inhibited the cell internalization and the nanotoxicity. However, the EPS-bound Ag on the cell surfaces would migrate along with the algae and be biologically amplified in the aquatic food chains, presenting ecological risks. These results are helpful for understanding the fate and ecological effects of NPs.

  8. Effect of culture medium on toxic effect of ZnO nanoparticles to freshwater microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravantinou, Andriana F.; Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Dailianis, Stefanos; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2014-05-01

    The widely use of nanoparticles (NPs) in many products, is increasing over time. The release of NPs into the environment may affect ecosystems, and therefore it is essential to study their impact on aquatic organisms. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs on microalgae, cultured in different mediums. Chlorococcum sp. and Scenedesmus rubescens were used as freshwater microalgae model species in order to investigate the toxic effects of ZnO NPs. Microalgae species exposed to ZnO NPs concentrations varying from 0.081 to 810 mg/L for different periods of time (24 to 96 h) and two different culture mediums. The aggregation level and particle size distribution of NPs were also determined during the experiments. The experimental results revealed significant differences on algae growth rates depending on the selected culture medium. Specifically, the toxic effect of ZnO NPs in Chlorococcum sp. was higher in cultures with 1/3N BG-11 medium than in BBM medium, despite the fact that the dissolved zinc concentration was higher in BBM medium. On the other hand, Scenedesmus rubescens exhibited the exact opposite behavior, with the highest toxic effect in cultures with BBM medium. Both species growth was significantly affected by the exposure time, the NPs concentrations, and mainly the culture medium.

  9. Toxicity of TiO(2) nanoparticles to cladocerans, algae, rotifers and plants - effects of size and crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Clément, Laura; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials. However, the data on the potential environmental effects of nanoparticles are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of particle size and crystal structure (anatase and rutile) of titanium dioxide on their toxicity. Thus, acute and chronic toxicity tests included a modified acute test (72 h) using daphnies and algae, rotifers and plants as model organisms. Gradient of toxicity varied with the tested biological organisms. Our results revealed that TiO(2) nanoparticles in anatase crystal structure are toxic in the entire set of tests conducted. However, at highconcentration, through their antimicrobial properties, they significantly promoted growth of roots. Because of its lipophilicity, the rutile crystalline structure of TiO(2) NPs form larger aggregates in aqueous medium; then they have less effect on biological organisms, and thus a lower toxicity than the anatase crystalline form of TiO(2). We also demonstrated that exposure duration, aggregation and concentrations are contributing factors in nanoparticles-mediated toxicity.

  10. Role of (18)F-FDG PET-CT in Monitoring the Cyclophosphamide Induced Pulmonary Toxicity in Patients with Breast Cancer - 2 Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Taywade, Sameer Kamalakar; Kumar, Rakesh; Bhethanabhotla, Sainath; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-09-01

    Drug induced pulmonary toxicity is not uncommon with the use of various chemotherapeutic agents. Cyclophosphamide is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of breast cancer. Although rare, lung toxicity has been reported with cyclophosphamide use. Detection of bleomycin induced pulmonary toxicity and pattern of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake in lungs on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET-CT) has been elicited in literature in relation to lymphoma. However, limited data is available regarding the role of (18)F-FDG PET-CT in monitoring drug induced pulmonary toxicity in breast cancer. We here present two cases of cyclophosphamide induced drug toxicity. Interim (18)F-FDG PET-CT demonstrated diffusely increased tracer uptake in bilateral lung fields in both these patients. Subsequently there was resolution of lung uptake on (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan post completion of chemotherapy. These patients did not develop significant respiratory symptoms during chemotherapy treatment and in follow up. PMID:27540432

  11. Dynamic development of the protein corona on silica nanoparticles: composition and role in toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Ninell P.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Wang, Wei; Foster, Carmen M.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2013-06-01

    The formation and composition of the protein corona on silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NP) with different surface chemistries was evaluated over time. Native SiO2, amine (-NH2) and carboxy (-COO-) modified NP were examined following incubation in mammalian growth media containing fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 1, 4, 24 and 48 hours. The protein corona transition from its early dynamic state to the later more stable corona was evaluated using mass spectrometry. The NP diameter was 22.4 +/- 2.2 nm measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Changes in hydrodynamic diameter and agglomeration kinetics were studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The initial surface chemistry of the NP played an important role in the development and final composition of the protein corona, impacting agglomeration kinetics and NP toxicity. Particle toxicity, indicated by changes in membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity, was measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and tetrazolium reduction (MTT), respectively, in mouse alveolar macrophages (RAW264.7) and mouse lung epithelial cells (C10). SiO2-COO- NP had a slower agglomeration rate, formed smaller aggregates, and exhibited lower cytotoxicity compared to SiO2 and SiO2-NH2. Composition of the protein corona for each of the three NP was unique, indicating a strong dependence of corona development on NP surface chemistry. This work underscores the need to understand all aspects of NP toxicity, particularly the influence of agglomeration on effective dose and particle size. Furthermore, the interplay between materials and local biological environment is emphasized and highlights the need to conduct toxicity profiling under physiologically relevant conditions that provide an appropriate estimation of material modifications that occur during exposure in natural environments.The formation and composition of the protein corona on silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NP) with different surface chemistries was evaluated

  12. *Evaluating the toxicity of airborne particulate matter and nanoparticles by measuring oxidative strett potential - A workshop report and consensus statement

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: There is a strong need for laboratory in vitro test systems for the toxicity of airborne particulate matter and nanoparticles. The measurement of oxidative stress potential offers a promising way forward. OBJECTIVES: A workshop was convened involving leading workers f...

  13. Unique Nanoparticle Optical Properties Confound Fluorescent Based Assays Widely Employed in Their In Vitro Toxicity Screening and Ranking

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are novel materials having at least one dimension less than 100 nm and display unique physicochemical properties due to their nanoscale size. An emphasis has been placed on developing high throughput screening (HTS) assays to characterize and rank the toxiciti...

  14. Individual and binary toxicity of anatase and rutile nanoparticles towards Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Iswarya, V; Bhuvaneshwari, M; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2016-09-01

    Increasing usage of engineered nanoparticles, especially Titanium dioxide (TiO2) in various commercial products has necessitated their toxicity evaluation and risk assessment, especially in the aquatic ecosystem. In the present study, a comprehensive toxicity assessment of anatase and rutile NPs (individual as well as a binary mixture) has been carried out in a freshwater matrix on Ceriodaphnia dubia under different irradiation conditions viz., visible and UV-A. Anatase and rutile NPs produced an LC50 of about 37.04 and 48mg/L, respectively, under visible irradiation. However, lesser LC50 values of about 22.56 (anatase) and 23.76 (rutile) mg/L were noted under UV-A irradiation. A toxic unit (TU) approach was followed to determine the concentrations of binary mixtures of anatase and rutile. The binary mixture resulted in an antagonistic and additive effect under visible and UV-A irradiation, respectively. Among the two different modeling approaches used in the study, Marking-Dawson model was noted to be a more appropriate model than Abbott model for the toxicity evaluation of binary mixtures. The agglomeration of NPs played a significant role in the induction of antagonistic and additive effects by the mixture based on the irradiation applied. TEM and zeta potential analysis confirmed the surface interactions between anatase and rutile NPs in the mixture. Maximum uptake was noticed at 0.25 total TU of the binary mixture under visible irradiation and 1 TU of anatase NPs for UV-A irradiation. Individual NPs showed highest uptake under UV-A than visible irradiation. In contrast, binary mixture showed a difference in the uptake pattern based on the type of irradiation exposed. PMID:27522033

  15. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity. PMID:25562807

  16. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  17. TECHNICAL CHALLENGES ASSOCIATED WITH ASSESSING THE IN VITRO PULMONARY TOXICITY OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanotechnology continues to produce a large number of diverse engineered nanomaterials (NMs) with novel physicochemical properties for a variety of applications. Test methods that accurately assess/predict the toxicity of NMs are critically needed and it is unclear whether curren...

  18. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-03-01

    It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular

  19. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M.; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15 mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1 day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5 mg/kg) treatment at 28 days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3 days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  20. Bacterial polysaccharide levan as stabilizing, non-toxic and functional coating material for microelement-nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Olesja M; Ivask, Angela; Kahru, Anne; Vija, Heiki; Titma, Tiina; Visnapuu, Meeri; Joost, Urmas; Pudova, Ksenia; Adamberg, Signe; Visnapuu, Triinu; Alamäe, Tiina

    2016-01-20

    Levan, fructose-composed biopolymer of bacterial origin, has potential in biotechnology due to its prebiotic and immunostimulatory properties. In this study levan synthesized by levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae was thoroughly characterized and used as multifunctional biocompatible coating material for microelement-nanoparticles (NPs) of selenium, iron and cobalt. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), hydrodynamic size measurements (DLS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed the interaction of levan with NPs. Levan stabilized the dispersions of NPs, decreased their toxicity and had protective effect on human intestinal cells Caco-2. In addition, levan attached to cobalt NPs remained accessible as a substrate for the colon bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. We suggest that the combination of levan and nutritionally important microelements in the form of NPs serves as a first step towards a novel "2 in 1" approach for food supplements to provide safe and efficient delivery of microelements for humans and support beneficial gut microbiota with nutritional oligosaccharides. PMID:26572404

  1. Bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles for selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial studies.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, V; Anbarasan, S; Christena, Lawrence Rene; SaiSubramanian, Nagarajan; Philip Anthony, Savarimuthu

    2014-08-14

    Hibiscus Sabdariffa (Gongura) plant extracts (leaves (HL) and stem (HS)) were used for the first time in the green synthesis of bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The bio-functionality of AgNPs has been successfully utilized for selective colorimetric sensing of potentially health and environmentally hazardous Hg(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) metal ions at ppm level in aqueous solution. Importantly, clearly distinguishable colour for all three metal ions was observed. The influence of extract preparation condition and pH were also explored on the formation of AgNPs. Both selectivity and sensitivity differed for AgNPs synthesized from different parts of the plant. Direct correlation between the stability of green synthesized AgNPs at different pH and its antibacterial effects has been established. The selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial effect of green synthesized AgNPs demonstrated the multifunctional applications of green nanotechnology. PMID:24717716

  2. Bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles for selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod Kumar, V.; Anbarasan, S.; Christena, Lawrence Rene; SaiSubramanian, Nagarajan; Philip Anthony, Savarimuthu

    2014-08-01

    Hibiscus Sabdariffa (Gongura) plant extracts (leaves (HL) and stem (HS) were used for the first time in the green synthesis of bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The bio-functionality of AgNPs has been successfully utilized for selective colorimetric sensing of potentially health and environmentally hazardous Hg2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ metal ions at ppm level in aqueous solution. Importantly, clearly distinguishable colour for all three metal ions was observed. The influence of extract preparation condition and pH were also explored on the formation of AgNPs. Both selectivity and sensitivity differed for AgNPs synthesized from different parts of the plant. Direct correlation between the stability of green synthesized AgNPs at different pH and its antibacterial effects has been established. The selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial effect of green synthesized AgNPs demonstrated the multifunctional applications of green nanotechnology.

  3. Bacterial toxicity of oxide nanoparticles and their ef