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Sample records for nanoparticle pulmonary toxicity

  1. Nanoparticle-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jasmine Jia'en; Muralikrishnan, Sindu; Ng, Cheng-Teng; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2010-09-01

    In recent decades, advances in nanotechnology engineering have given rise to the rapid development of many novel applications in the biomedical field. However, studies into the health and safety of these nanomaterials are still lacking. The main concerns are the adverse effects to health caused by acute or chronic exposure to nanoparticles (NPs), especially in the workplace environment. The lung is one of the main routes of entry for NPs into the body and, hence, a likely site for accumulation of NPs. Once NPs enter the interstitial air spaces and are quickly taken up by alveolar cells, they are likely to induce toxic effects. In this review, we highlight the different aspects of lung toxicity resulting from NP exposure, such as generation of oxidative stress, DNA damage and inflammation leading to fibrosis and pneumoconiosis, and the underlying mechanisms causing pulmonary toxicity.

  2. Pulmonary applications and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Zeldin, Darryl C; Bonner, James C; Nestmann, Earle R

    2008-09-01

    Because of their unique physicochemical properties, engineered nanoparticles have the potential to significantly impact respiratory research and medicine by means of improving imaging capability and drug delivery, among other applications. These same properties, however, present potential safety concerns, and there is accumulating evidence to suggest that nanoparticles may exert adverse effects on pulmonary structure and function. The respiratory system is susceptible to injury resulting from inhalation of gases, aerosols, and particles, and also from systemic delivery of drugs, chemicals, and other compounds to the lungs via direct cardiac output to the pulmonary arteries. As such, it is a prime target for the possible toxic effects of engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the potential usefulness of nanoparticles and nanotechnology in respiratory research and medicine and to highlight important issues and recent data pertaining to nanoparticle-related pulmonary toxicity.

  3. Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, Brian Christopher

    that carbon blacks contain free radical and other surface functionality as manufactured, and that exposure to ozone further functionalizes the surface. Samples of carbon black that have been exposed to ozone react with their ambient environment so that acid anhydride and cyclic ether functionality hydrolyze to form carboxylic acid functionality, observable by transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Persistent free radical content, but not free radical content from ozone exposure, may mediate the toxic response of cells to carbon blacks in vitro. Results showed that macrophages exposed to carbon blacks that had been exposed to ozone were not less viable in vitro than macrophages exposed to carbon blacks as manufactured because the free radical content that resulted from ozone exposure was not persistent in an aqueous medium. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to ozonated carbon blacks and ozone was less lethal to macrophages than carbon black exposure alone, possibly because the ozone oxidatively preconditioned the macrophages to resist oxidative stress. The nature of redox-active iron species on the surface of iron-loaded synthetic carbon particles was explored. The particles had been shown in previous studies to provoke an inflammatory response involving the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, which was correlated with their production of hydroxyl free radicals via the Fenton reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. It was found that the source of bioavailable Fenton-active iron on the surfaces of the particles was fluoride species that were byproducts of a step in the synthetic process. Fluoride ligated the iron already on the surface, forming a complex that resisted precipitation in the biological medium and thus made the iron more bioavailable. The results of this thesis aim to clarify whether the size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles should be considered more closely as criteria with which to develop better environmental controls

  4. Pulmonary toxicity of ceria nanoparticles in mice after intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lingxi; He, Xiao; Li, Yuanyuan; Qu, Meihua; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2013-10-01

    Ceria nanoparticles (nano-ceria) are widely used for various applications such as catalytic converters for automobile exhaust, ultraviolet absorber, and electrolyte in fuel cells. Their potential impacts on the environment and human health have also drawn people's attention. The present study was designed to explore the pulmonary toxicity of nano-ceria in mice after an acute intratracheal instillation. CD-1 mice were exposed to 0.04, 0.4, 4 and 40 microg nano-ceria (corresponding to 10, 100, 1000 and 10000 times of the maximum exposure dose, respectively) and sacrificed at 1, 7, and 28 d post-exposure. Lung injury was assessed by bronchoalveolar ravage fluid (BALF) analysis, cell counts, biochemical analysis of lung homogenate, and histopathology. Cell differential analysis of the BALF show that the numbers of neutrophils and lymphocytes increased significantly in the mice exposed to 40 microg nano-ceria at 1 d after instillation, and returned to control levels by 7 d. The lactate dehydrogenate activity in the BALF from the 40 microg group increased significantly during the whole experimental period. Pathological changes were only found in the lung tissues from the mice of 40 microg nano-ceria group. The changes were most obvious by 7 d post-exposure, and returned to normal by 28 d. No other changes were found. The results of the present study suggest that exposure to nano-ceria at the current levels in the ambient air may not cause respiratory toxicity.

  5. Pulmonary surfactant mitigates silver nanoparticle toxicity in human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Leo, Bey Fen; Chen, Shu; Abraham-Thomas, Nisha; Thorley, Andrew J; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2016-09-01

    Accompanying increased commercial applications and production of silver nanomaterials is an increased probability of human exposure, with inhalation a key route. Nanomaterials that deposit in the pulmonary alveolar region following inhalation will interact firstly with pulmonary surfactant before they interact with the alveolar epithelium. It is therefore critical to understand the effects of human pulmonary surfactant when evaluating the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of AgNPs on human alveolar type-I-like epithelial (TT1) cells in the absence and presence of Curosurf(®) (a natural pulmonary surfactant substitute), hypothesising that the pulmonary surfactant would act to modify toxicity. We demonstrated that 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs induce toxicity in human alveolar type I-like epithelial cells and, in agreement with our hypothesis, that pulmonary surfactant acts to mitigate this toxicity, possibly through reducing AgNP dissolution into cytotoxic Ag(+) ions. For example, IL-6 and IL-8 release by TT1 cells significantly increased 10.7- and 35-fold, respectively (P<0.01), 24h after treatment with 25μg/ml AgNPs. In contrast, following pre-incubation of AgNPs with Curosurf(®), this effect was almost completely abolished. We further determined that the mechanism of this toxicity is likely associated with Ag(+) ion release and lysosomal disruption, but not with increased reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides a critical understanding of the toxicity of AgNPs in target human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells and the role of pulmonary surfactant in mitigating this toxicity. The observations reported have important implications for the manufacture and application of AgNPs, in particular for applications involving use of aerosolised AgNPs.

  6. Comparative pulmonary toxicity of inhaled nickel nanoparticles; role of deposited dose and solubility.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gi Soo; Gillespie, Patricia A; Gunnison, Albert; Rengifo, Hernan; Koberstein, Jeffrey; Chen, Lung-Chi

    2011-02-01

    In this pilot study, we investigated which physicochemical properties of nickel hydroxide nanoparticles (nano-NH) were mainly responsible in inducing pulmonary toxicity. First, we studied the role of nickel ions solubilized from nano-NH by comparing the toxic effects of nano-NH to those of readily soluble nickel sulfate nanoparticles (nano-NS). Additionally, to test whether there was a non-specific stress response due to particle morphology, we compared the toxicity of nano-NH with that of carbon nanoparticles (nano-C) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-Ti), both of which had similar physical properties such as particle size and shape, to nano-NH. We exposed mice to each type of nanoparticles for 4?h via a whole-body inhalation system and examined oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in the lung. We also determined the lung burden and clearance of Ni following nano-NH and nano-NS exposures. The results showed that lung deposition of nano-NH was significantly greater than that of nano-NS and nano-NH appeared to have stronger inflammogenic potential than nano-NS even when lung Ni burden taken into consideration. This suggests that the toxicity of nano-NH is not driven solely by released Ni ions from deposited nano-NH particles. However, it is unlikely that the greater toxic potential of nano-NH is attributable to a generic stress response from any nanoparticle exposure, since nano-C and nano-Ti did not elicit toxic responses similar to those of nano-NH. These results indicate that the observed pulmonary toxicity by inhaled nano-NH were chemical-specific and deposited dose and solubility are key factors to understand toxicity induced by nano-NH.

  7. Pulmonary toxicity of well-dispersed cerium oxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation and inhalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    We performed inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies of cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in order to investigate their pulmonary toxicity, and observed pulmonary inflammation not only in the acute and but also in the chronic phases. In the intratracheal instillation study, F344 rats were exposed to 0.2 mg or 1 mg of CeO2 nanoparticles. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed from 3 days to 6 months following the instillation. In the inhalation study, rats were exposed to the maximum concentration of inhaled CeO2 nanoparticles (2, 10 mg/m3, respectively) for 4 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The same endpoints as in the intratracheal instillation study were examined from 3 days to 3 months after the end of the exposure. The intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles caused a persistent increase in the total and neutrophil number in BALF and in the concentration of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2, chemokine for neutrophil, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker, in BALF during the observation time. The inhalation of CeO2 nanoparticles also induced a persistent influx of neutrophils and expression of CINC-1, CINC-2, and HO-1 in BALF. Pathological features revealed that inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, invaded the alveolar space in both studies. Taken together, the CeO2 nanoparticles induced not only acute but also chronic inflammation in the lung, suggesting that CeO2 nanoparticles have a pulmonary toxicity that can lead to irreversible lesions.

  8. Pulmonary toxicity of well-dispersed titanium dioxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiura, Yukiko; Izumi, Hiroto; Oyabu, Takako; Hashiba, Masayoshi; Kambara, Tatsunori; Mizuguchi, Yohei; Lee, Byeong Woo; Okada, Takami; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Myojo, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Horie, Masanori; Kuroda, Etsushi; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the pulmonary toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, we performed an intratracheal instillation study with rats of well-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles and examined the pulmonary inflammation and histopathological changes in the lung. Wistar Hannover rats were intratracheally administered 0.2 mg (0.66 mg/kg) and 1.0 mg (3.3 mg/kg) of well-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles (P90; diameter of agglomerates: 25 nm), then the pulmonary inflammation responses were examined from 3 days to 6 months after the instillation, and the pathological features were examined up to 24 months. Transient inflammation and the upregulation of chemokines in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid were observed for 1 month. No respiratory tumors or severe fibrosis were observed during the recovery time. These data suggest that transient inflammation induced by TiO2 may not lead to chronic, irreversible legions in the lung, and that TiO2 nanoparticles may not have a high potential for lung disorder.

  9. Assessment of pulmonary toxicity of MgO nanoparticles in rats.

    PubMed

    Gelli, Kiranmai; Porika, Mahendar; Anreddy, Rama Narsimha Reddy

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we have evaluated the pulmonary toxicity of MgO nanoparticles (MgO NPs) in rats following their exposure. NPs in phosphate buffered saline + 1% Tween 80 were exposed via intratracheal instillation at a doses of 1 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg into rat lungs and evaluated for various tissue damage markers like alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and histopathology of lungs at 1, 7, and 30 days of post-exposure intervals. A dose-dependant increase in ALP and LDH activity was observed in BAL fluids of rat lungs than sham control at all post-exposure periods (P <0.05), and a dose-dependant infiltration of interstitial lymphocytes, peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and dilated and/or congested vessels at 1 day post-exposure period, worsened at 1 week period, and were reduced at 1 month at histology, indicating the pulmonary toxicity of MgO NPs. In conclusion, MgO NPs exposure produced a dose-dependent pulmonary toxicity in rats and was comparable with that of Quartz particles.

  10. Evaluation of Pulmonary Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Following Inhalation and Intratracheal Instillation

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We conducted inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in order to examine their pulmonary toxicity. F344 rats were received intratracheal instillation at 0.2 or 1 mg of ZnO nanoparticles with a primary diameter of 35 nm that were well-dispersed in distilled water. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed at three days, one week, one month, three months, and six months after the instillation. As the inhalation study, rats were exposed to a concentration of inhaled ZnO nanoparticles (2 and 10 mg/m3) for four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The same endpoints as in the intratracheal instillation study were analyzed at three days, one month, and three months after the end of the exposure. In the intratracheal instillation study, both the 0.2 and the 1.0 mg ZnO groups had a transient increase in the total cell and neutrophil count in the BALF and in the expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2, chemokine for neutrophil, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker, in the BALF. In the inhalation study, transient increases in total cell and neutrophil count, CINC-1,-2 and HO-1 in the BALF were observed in the high concentration groups. Neither of the studies of ZnO nanoparticles showed persistent inflammation in the rat lung, suggesting that well-dispersed ZnO nanoparticles have low toxicity. PMID:27490535

  11. Pulmonary Toxicity of Instilled Silver Nanoparticles: Influence of Size, Coating and Rat Strain

    PubMed Central

    Seiffert, Joanna; Hussain, Farhana; Wiegman, Coen; Li, Feng; Bey, Leo; Baker, Warren; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary P.; Chang, Yan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhu, Jie; Tetley, Terry D.; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Particle size and surface chemistry are potential determinants of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) respiratory toxicity that may also depend on the lung inflammatory state. We compared the effects of intratracheally-administered AgNPs (20nm and 110nm; polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate-capped; 0.1 mg/Kg) in Brown-Norway (BN) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In BN rats, there was both a neutrophilic and eosinophilic response, while in SD rats, there was a neutrophilic response at day 1, greatest for the 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs. Eosinophilic cationic protein was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in BN and SD rats on day 1. BAL protein and malondialdehyde levels were increased in BN rats at 1 and 7 days, and BAL KC, CCL11 and IL-13 levels at day 1, with increased expression of CCL11 in lung tissue. Pulmonary resistance increased and compliance decreased at day 1, with persistence at day 7. The 20nm, but not the 110 nm, AgNPs increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness on day 1, which continued at day 7 for the citrate-capped AgNPs only. The 20nm versus the 110 nm size were more proinflammatory in terms of neutrophil influx, but there was little difference between the citrate-capped versus the PVP-capped AgNPs. AgNPs can induce pulmonary eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, features characteristic of asthma. PMID:25747867

  12. Pulmonary toxicity of instilled silver nanoparticles: influence of size, coating and rat strain.

    PubMed

    Seiffert, Joanna; Hussain, Farhana; Wiegman, Coen; Li, Feng; Bey, Leo; Baker, Warren; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary P; Chang, Yan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhu, Jie; Tetley, Terry D; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Particle size and surface chemistry are potential determinants of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) respiratory toxicity that may also depend on the lung inflammatory state. We compared the effects of intratracheally-administered AgNPs (20 nm and 110 nm; polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate-capped; 0.1 mg/Kg) in Brown-Norway (BN) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In BN rats, there was both a neutrophilic and eosinophilic response, while in SD rats, there was a neutrophilic response at day 1, greatest for the 20 nm citrate-capped AgNPs. Eosinophilic cationic protein was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in BN and SD rats on day 1. BAL protein and malondialdehyde levels were increased in BN rats at 1 and 7 days, and BAL KC, CCL11 and IL-13 levels at day 1, with increased expression of CCL11 in lung tissue. Pulmonary resistance increased and compliance decreased at day 1, with persistence at day 7. The 20 nm, but not the 110 nm, AgNPs increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness on day 1, which continued at day 7 for the citrate-capped AgNPs only. The 20 nm versus the 110 nm size were more proinflammatory in terms of neutrophil influx, but there was little difference between the citrate-capped versus the PVP-capped AgNPs. AgNPs can induce pulmonary eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, features characteristic of asthma.

  13. Acute and subacute pulmonary toxicity and mortality in mice after intratracheal instillation of ZnO nanoparticles in three laboratories.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Stoeger, Tobias; van den Brule, Sybille; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Beyerle, Andrea; Vietti, Giulia; Mortensen, Alicja; Szarek, Józef; Budtz, Hans Christian; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Banerjee, Atrayee; Ercal, Nuran; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Møller, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Inhalation is the main pathway of ZnO exposure in the occupational environment but only few studies have addressed toxic effects after pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles (NP). Here we present results from three studies of pulmonary exposure and toxicity of ZnO NP in mice. The studies were prematurely terminated because interim results unexpectedly showed severe pulmonary toxicity. High bolus doses of ZnO NP (25 up to 100 μg; ≥1.4 mg/kg) were clearly associated with a dose dependent mortality in the mice. Lower doses (≥6 μg; ≥0.3 mg/kg) elicited acute toxicity in terms of reduced weight gain, desquamation of epithelial cells with concomitantly increased barrier permeability of the alveolar/blood as well as DNA damage. Oxidative stress was shown via a strong increase in lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione in the pulmonary tissue. Two months post-exposure revealed no obvious toxicity for 12.5 and 25 μg on a range of parameters. However, mice that survived a high dose (50 μg; 2.7 mg/kg) had an increased pulmonary collagen accumulation (fibrosis) at a similar level as a high bolus dose of crystalline silica. The recovery from these toxicological effects appeared dose-dependent. The results indicate that alveolar deposition of ZnO NP may cause significant adverse health effects.

  14. Pulmonary toxicity and kinetic study of Cy5.5-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by optical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Park, Sue Nie; Yu, Mi Kyung; Jon, Sangyong; Jeong, Jayoung

    2009-08-15

    Recent advances in the development of nanotechnology and devices now make it possible to accurately deliver drugs or genes to the lung. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used as contrast agents, thermal therapy for cancer, and be made to concentrate to target sites through an external magnetic field. However, these advantages may also become problematic when taking into account safety and toxicological factors. This study demonstrated the pulmonary toxicity and kinetic profile of anti-biofouling polymer coated, Cy5.5-conjugated thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TCL-SPION) by optical imaging. Negatively charged, 36 nm-sized, Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was prepared for optical imaging probe. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was intratracheally instilled into the lung by a non-surgical method. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION slightly induced pulmonary inflammation. The instilled nanoparticles were distributed mainly in the lung and excreted in the urine via glomerular filtration. Urinary excretion was peaked at 3 h after instillation. No toxicity was found under the concentration of 1.8 mg/kg and the half-lives of nanoparticles in the lung and urine were estimated to be about 14.4 {+-} 0.54 h and 24.7 {+-} 1.02 h, respectively. Although further studies are required, our results showed that Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION can be a good candidate for use in pulmonary delivery vehicles and diagnostic probes.

  15. Comparative pulmonary toxicity of two ceria nanoparticles with the same primary size.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lu; He, Xiao; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Junzhe; Ma, Yuhui; Ding, Yayun; Wu, Zhenqiang; Chai, Zhifang; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-04-10

    Ceria nanoparticles (nano-ceria) have recently gained a wide range of applications, which might pose unwanted risks to both the environment and human health. The greatest potential for the environmental discharge of nano-ceria appears to be in their use as a diesel fuel additive. The present study was designed to explore the pulmonary toxicity of nano-ceria in mice after a single exposure via intratracheal instillation. Two types of nano-ceria with the same distribution of a primary size (3-5 nm), but different redox activity, were used: Ceria-p, synthesized by a precipitation route, and Ceria-h, synthesized by a hydrothermal route. Both Ceria-p and Ceria-h induced oxidative stress, inflammatory responses and cytotoxicity in mice, but their toxicological profiles were quite different. The mean size of Ceria-p agglomerates was much smaller compared to Ceria-h, thereby causing a more potent acute inflammation, due to their higher number concentration of agglomerates and higher deposition rate in the deep lung. Ceria-h had a higher reactivity to catalyzing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caused two waves of lung injury: bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammation and cytotoxicity in the early stage and redox-activity-evoked lipid peroxidation and pro-inflammation in the latter stage. Therefore, the size distribution of ceria-containing agglomerates in the exhaust, as well as their surface chemistry are essential characteristics to assess the potential risks of using nano-ceria as a fuel additive.

  16. COMPARATIVE IN VITRO PULMONARY TOXICITY OF ENGINEERED, MANUFACTURED, AND ENVIRONMENTAL NANOPARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials display many unique physicochemical properties for a variety of applications and due to their novel propertiesapplications may have unique routes of exposure and toxicity. This study examines the: 1) ability of the MTT assay to generate false positives or...

  17. Acute and subacute pulmonary toxicity caused by a single intratracheal instillation of colloidal silver nanoparticles in mice: pathobiological changes and metallothionein responses.

    PubMed

    Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth; Banlunara, Wijit; Maneewattanapinyo, Pattwat; Thammachareon, Chuchaat; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-01-01

    To study the acute and subacute pulmonary toxicity of colloidal silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs), 0 or 100 ppm of Ag-NPs were instilled intratracheally in mice. Cellular and biochemical parameters in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and histological alterations were determined 1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days after instillation. Ag-NPs induced moderate pulmonary inflammation and injury on BALF indices during the acute period; however, these changes gradually regressed in a time-dependent manner. Concomitant histopathological and laminin immunohistochemical findings generally correlated to BALF data. Superoxide dismutase and metallothionein expression occurred in particle-laden macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells, which correlated to lung lesions in mice treated with Ag-NPs. These findings suggest that instillation of Ag-NPs causes transient moderate acute lung inflammation and tissue damage. Oxidative stress may underlie the induction of injury to lung tissue. Moreover, the expression of metallothionein in tissues indicated the protective response to exposure to Ag-NPs.

  18. Nanoparticle toxicity and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevenslik, T.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have provided significant advancements in cancer treatment. But as in any technology, there is a darkside. Experiments have shown NPs in body fluids pose a health risk by causing DNA damage that in of itself may lead to cancer. To avoid the dilemma that NPs are toxic to both cancer cells and DNA alike, the mechanism of NP toxicity must be understood so that the safe use of NPs may go forward. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) of peroxide and hydroxyl radicals damage the DNA by chemical reaction, but require NPs provide energies of about 5 eV not possible by surface effects. Only electromagnetic (EM) radiations beyond ultraviolet (UV) levels may explain the toxicity of NPs. Indeed, experiments show DNA damage from <100 nm NPs mimic the same reaction pathways of conventional sources of ionizing radiation, Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize that NPs produce their own source of UV radiation, albeit at low intensity. Ionizing radiation from NPs at UV levels is consistent with the theory of QED induced EM radiation. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics. By this theory, fine < 100 nm NPs absorb low frequency thermal energy in the far infrared (FIR) from collisions with the water molecules in body fluids. Since quantum mechanics (QM) precludes NPs from having specific heat, absorbed EM collision energy cannot be conserved by an increase in temperature. But total internal reflection (TIR) momentarily confines the absorbed EM energy within the NP. Conservation proceeds by the creation of QED photons by frequency up-conversion of the absorbed EM energy to the TIR confinement frequency, typically beyond the UV. Subsequently, the QED photons upon scattering from atoms within the NP avoid TIR confinement and leak UV to the surroundings, thereby explaining the remarkable toxicity of NPs. But QED radiation need not be limited to natural or man-made NPs. Extensions suggest UV radiation is produced from biological NPs within the body, e.g., enzyme induced

  19. Pulmonary drug toxicity: radiologic and pathologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S E; Erasmus, J J; McAdams, H P; Sporn, T A; Goodman, P C

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary drug toxicity is increasingly being diagnosed as a cause of acute and chronic lung disease. Numerous agents including cytotoxic and noncytotoxic drugs have the potential to cause pulmonary toxicity. The clinical and radiologic manifestations of these drugs generally reflect the underlying histopathologic processes and include diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), eosinophilic pneumonia, obliterative bronchiolitis, pulmonary hemorrhage, edema, hypertension, or veno-occlusive disease. DAD is a common manifestation of pulmonary drug toxicity and is frequently caused by cytotoxic drugs, especially cyclophosphamide, bleomycin, and carmustine. It manifests radiographically as bilateral hetero- or homogeneous opacities usually in the mid and lower lungs and on high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) scans as scattered or diffuse areas of ground-glass opacity. NSIP occurs most commonly as a manifestation of carmustine toxicity or of toxicity from noncytotoxic drugs such as amidarone. At radiography, it appears as diffuse areas of heterogeneous opacity, whereas early CT scans show diffuse ground-glass opacity and late CT scans show fibrosis in a basal distribution. BOOP, which is commonly caused by bleomycin and cyclophosphamide (as well as gold salts and methotrexate), appears on radiographs as hetero- and homogeneous peripheral opacities in both upper and lower lobes and on CT scans as poorly defined nodular consolidation, centrilobular nodules, and bronchial dilatation. Knowledge of these manifestations and of the drugs most frequently involved can facilitate diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment.

  20. Nanoparticle Toxicity Mechanisms: Genotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Alain; Benameur, Laı̈la

    Despite the relatively small amount of convincing experimental data, the potentially genotoxic nature of certain nanoparticles seems plausible, owing in particular to the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as the superoxide anion O2 • - , the hydroxyl radical • OH, and singlet oxygen 1O2, and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitrogen monoxide NO, the peroxynitrite anion ONOO - , the peroxynitrite radical ONOO • , and dinitrogen trioxide N2O3, a powerful nitration agent.

  1. Nanoparticles: Is Toxicity a Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pragna

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology involving manipulation of atoms and molecules at the nanoscale is one of the frontier areas of research in modern science. During the last few years, nanotechnology has witnessed breakthroughs in the fields of medicine, environment, therapeutics, drug development and biotechnology. This is due to the unique properties of nanomaterials (e.g. chemical, mechanical, optical, magnetic, and biological) which make them desirable for commercial and medical applications. Considering the theory and practice of using nanoparticles, nanotechnology has a great potential in improving treatment of various disorders and in vitro diagnostics. However, there is not much information available on the toxicity of nanoparticles in relation to human health. Toxic effect of nanomaterials on humans is the primary concern of the health industry. Nanomaterials are able to cross biological membranes and access cells, tissues and organs that larger-sized particles normally cannot. Nanomaterials can gain access to the blood stream via inhalation or ingestion. This may lead to both genotoxicity and biochemical toxicity. In this review we try to show which types, sizes and concentrations of nanoparticles are safe for human use and this will help in developing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic models using nanoparticles. PMID:27683397

  2. Evaluation of the role of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the pulmonary and the hepatic toxicity induced by cerium oxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalabotu, Siva Krishna

    The field of nanotechnology is rapidly progressing with potential applications in the automobile, healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, textiles, information technology, and environmental sectors. Nanomaterials are engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nanometers or less. With increased applications of nanotechnology, there are increased chances of exposure to manufactured nanomaterials. Recent reports on the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials have given scientific and regulatory agencies concerns over the safety of nanomaterials. Specifically, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has identified fourteen high priority nanomaterials for study. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles are one among the high priority group. Recent data suggest that CeO2 nanoparticles may be toxic to lung cell lines in vitro and lung tissues in vivo. Other work has proposed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the toxicity; however, the exact mechanism of the toxicity, has to our knowledge, not been investigated. Similarly, it is not clear whether CeO2 nanoparticles exhibit systemic toxicity. Here, we investigate whether pulmonary exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles is associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the lungs and liver of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our data suggest that the intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles can cause an increased lung weight to body weight ratio. Changes in lung weights were associated with the accumulation of cerium in the lungs, elevations in serum inflammatory markers, an increased Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, elevated caspase-3 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and diminished phosphorylation of ERK1/2-MAPK. Our findings from the study evaluating the possible translocation of CeO2 nanoparticles from the lungs to the liver suggest that CeO 2 nanoparticle exposure was associated with increased liver ceria levels, elevations in serum alanine transaminase

  3. Right or Left: The Role of Nanoparticles in Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xuefei; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Chunying; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rapid development of the nanotechnology industry in the last decade, nanoparticles (NPs) are omnipresent in our everyday life today. Many nanomaterials have been engineered for medical purposes. These purposes include therapy for pulmonary diseases. On other hand, people are endeavoring to develop nanomaterials for improvement or replacement of traditional therapies. On the other hand, nanoparticles, as foreign material in human bodies, are reported to have potential adverse effects on the lung, including oxidase stress, inflammation, fibrosis and genotoxicity. Further, these damages could induce pulmonary diseases and even injuries in other tissues. It seems that nanoparticles may exert two-sided effects. Toxic effects of nanomaterials should be considered when their use is developed for therapies. Hence this review will attempt to summarize the two-side roles of nanoparticles in both therapies for pulmonary diseases and initiation of lung diseases and even secondary diseases caused by lung injuries. Determinants of these effects such as physicochemical properties of nanoparticles will also be discussed. PMID:25268624

  4. Novel Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Rachel Jennifer

    The lung is an important target for gene and drug therapy of many diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF), tubuerculosis (TB) and lung cancer. In fact, the pulmonary route has been employed as a means of delivering drugs for centuries, dating back 4000 years to India where inhaled vapors were used for medicinal purpose. Currently, pulmonary administration of small, hydrophobic drugs leads to rapid local and systemic absorption. However, delivery of large biomacromolecules, such as therapeutic genes, has not yet been accomplished. Here, I test the hypothesis that a rationally engineered nanoparticle (NP) vector can improve delivery of large biomacromolecules. . In this dissertation I tested this hypothesis using a hybrid NP delivery system consisting of a blend of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE), a cationic polymer that is particularly useful for delivery of nucleic acids.. PBAE/PLGA nanoparticles (15% PBAE) loaded with plasmid DNA were surface modified with cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) via a PEGylated phospholipid linker. This optimized NP formulation was able to induce substantial intracellular uptake and transfect lung epithelial cells in vitro while imparting minimal cellular toxicity. In order to determine the most effective method to deliver these NPs to the lung I used fluorescently labeled particles to study the biodistribution of particles after administration to the lung of mice via various administration routes. I determined that the intranasal route was most effective. I further investigated this route and determined that an average of 37.1 +/- 15.1 % of lung cells had NP association after 4hrs. I also investigated the association of particles with different lung cell types like macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells and determined that our best particle formulations associated with approximately 80% of both of these cell types. To demonstrate the ability of the

  5. TOXICITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES TO DAPHNIA MAGNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relatively little is known regarding toxicity of nanoparticles in the environment. It is widely assumed that the toxicity of nanoparticles will be less than that of their metallic ions. Also the effect of organics on metal toxicity is well established. Presented here are the resu...

  6. Polymeric nanoparticles in development for treatment of pulmonary infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Tiemann, Kristin M; Hunstad, David A; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L

    2016-11-01

    Serious lung infections, such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, and chronic obstructive cystic fibrosis-related bacterial diseases, are increasingly difficult to treat and can be life-threatening. Over the last decades, an array of therapeutics and/or diagnostics have been exploited for management of pulmonary infections, but the advent of drug-resistant bacteria and the adverse conditions experienced upon reaching the lung environment urge the development of more effective delivery vehicles. Nanotechnology is revolutionizing the approach to circumventing these barriers, enabling better management of pulmonary infectious diseases. In particular, polymeric nanoparticle-based therapeutics have emerged as promising candidates, allowing for programmed design of multi-functional nanodevices and, subsequently, improved pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficiency, as compared to conventional routes of delivery. Direct delivery to the lungs of such nanoparticles, loaded with appropriate antimicrobials and equipped with 'smart' features to overcome various mucosal and cellular barriers, is a promising approach to localize and concentrate therapeutics at the site of infection while minimizing systemic exposure to the therapeutic agents. The present review focuses on recent progress (2005-2015) important for the rational design of nanostructures, particularly polymeric nanoparticles, for the treatment of pulmonary infections with highlights on the influences of size, shape, composition, and surface characteristics of antimicrobial-bearing polymeric nanoparticles on their biodistribution, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:842-871. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1401 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  7. Liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating iloprost exhibit enhanced vasodilation in pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pritesh P; Leber, Regina; Nagaraj, Chandran; Leitinger, Gerd; Lehofer, Bernhard; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea; Prassl, Ruth; Marsh, Leigh M

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin analogues are standard therapeutic options for vasoconstrictive diseases, including pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud’s phenomenon. Although effective, these treatment strategies are expensive and have several side effects. To improve drug efficiency, we tested liposomal nanoparticles as carrier systems. In this study, we synthesized liposomal nanoparticles tailored for the prostacyclin analogue iloprost and evaluated their pharmacologic efficacy on mouse intrapulmonary arteries, using a wire myograph. The use of cationic lipids, stearylamine, or 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) in liposomes promoted iloprost encapsulation to at least 50%. The addition of cholesterol modestly reduced iloprost encapsulation. The liposomal nanoparticle formulations were tested for toxicity and pharmacologic efficacy in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. The liposomes did not affect the viability of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Compared with an equivalent concentration of free iloprost, four out of the six polymer-coated liposomal formulations exhibited significantly enhanced vasodilation of mouse pulmonary arteries. Iloprost that was encapsulated in liposomes containing the polymer polyethylene glycol exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation of arteries. Strikingly, half the concentration of iloprost in liposomes elicited similar pharmacologic efficacy as nonencapsulated iloprost. Cationic liposomes can encapsulate iloprost with high efficacy and can serve as potential iloprost carriers to improve its therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25045260

  8. Liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating iloprost exhibit enhanced vasodilation in pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pritesh P; Leber, Regina; Nagaraj, Chandran; Leitinger, Gerd; Lehofer, Bernhard; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea; Prassl, Ruth; Marsh, Leigh M

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin analogues are standard therapeutic options for vasoconstrictive diseases, including pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud's phenomenon. Although effective, these treatment strategies are expensive and have several side effects. To improve drug efficiency, we tested liposomal nanoparticles as carrier systems. In this study, we synthesized liposomal nanoparticles tailored for the prostacyclin analogue iloprost and evaluated their pharmacologic efficacy on mouse intrapulmonary arteries, using a wire myograph. The use of cationic lipids, stearylamine, or 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) in liposomes promoted iloprost encapsulation to at least 50%. The addition of cholesterol modestly reduced iloprost encapsulation. The liposomal nanoparticle formulations were tested for toxicity and pharmacologic efficacy in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. The liposomes did not affect the viability of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Compared with an equivalent concentration of free iloprost, four out of the six polymer-coated liposomal formulations exhibited significantly enhanced vasodilation of mouse pulmonary arteries. Iloprost that was encapsulated in liposomes containing the polymer polyethylene glycol exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation of arteries. Strikingly, half the concentration of iloprost in liposomes elicited similar pharmacologic efficacy as nonencapsulated iloprost. Cationic liposomes can encapsulate iloprost with high efficacy and can serve as potential iloprost carriers to improve its therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of toxicity of engineered nanoparticles to representatives of various trophic levels, including bacteria, plants, and multicellular aquatic/terrestrial organisms, to highlight important challenges within the field of econanotoxicity, challenges that analytical chemists are expertly poised to address. PMID:23427995

  10. Pulmonary toxicity of thioureas in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.M.; Powell, G.M.; Curtis, C.G. ); Upshall, D.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Administration of {alpha}-naphthylthiourea (ANTU) to rats causes damage to pulmonary endothelial cells and possibly mesothelial lining cells that together may account for the massive pleural effusion characteristic of thiourea toxicity. Using {sup 35}S-thiourea as a model compound, the extent of binding of {sup 35}S to lung proteins correlated well with the extent of edema, suggesting that the extent of binding of thiourea metabolites is a measure of lung toxicity. ANTU and phenylthiourea (PTU) compete for {sup 35}S binding to lung slices, suggesting that these toxins may act in a similar way. Binding of {sup 35}S in lung slices from resistant rats is much less than in controls, and resistance cannot be explained by differences in either whole body metabolism or redistribution of thiourea in vivo. Lung glutathione levels (in vitro and in vivo) in normal and resistant rats following thiourea administration were essentially the same. However, at doses of thiourea that cause pleural effusion, there was an increase in total lung glutathione.

  11. Nanoparticles, nanotechnology and pulmonary nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A J; Cemlyn-Jones, J; Robalo Cordeiro, C

    2013-01-01

    The recently emergent field of Nanotechnology involves the production and use of structures at the nanoscale. Research at atomic, molecular or macromolecular levels, has led to new materials, systems and structures on a scale consisting of particles less than 100 nm and showing unique and unusual physical, chemical and biological properties, which has enabled new applications in diverse fields, creating a multimillion-dollar high-tech industry. Nanotechnologies have a wide variety of uses from nanomedicine, consumer goods, electronics, communications and computing to environmental applications, efficient energy sources, agriculture, water purification, textiles, and aerospace industry, among many others. The different characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, chemical properties, solubility and degree of agglomeration will determine their effects on biological systems and human health, and the likelihood of respiratory hazards. There are a number of new studies about the potential occupational and environmental effects of nanoparticles and general precautionary measures are now fully justified. Adverse respiratory effects include multifocal granulomas, peribronchial inflammation, progressive interstitial fibrosis, chronic inflammatory responses, collagen deposition and oxidative stress. The authors present an overview of the most important studies about respiratory nanotoxicology and the effects of nanoparticles and engineered nanomaterials on the respiratory system.

  12. Some inferences from in vivo experiments with metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: the pulmonary phagocytosis response, subchronic systemic toxicity and genotoxicity, regulatory proposals, searching for bioprotectors (a self-overview)

    PubMed Central

    Katsnelson, Boris A; Privalova, Larisa I; Sutunkova, Marina P; Gurvich, Vladimir B; Loginova, Nadezhda V; Minigalieva, Ilzira A; Kireyeva, Ekaterina P; Shur, Vladimir Y; Shishkina, Ekaterina V; Beikin, Ya B; Makeyev, Oleg H; Valamina, Irene E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to overview and summarize previously published results of our experiments on white rats exposed to either a single intratracheal instillation or repeated intraperitoneal injections of silver, gold, iron oxide, copper oxide, nickel oxide, and manganese oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in stable water suspensions without any chemical additives. Based on these results and some corroborating data of other researchers we maintain that these NPs are much more noxious on both cellular and systemic levels as compared with their 1 μm or even submicron counterparts. However, within the nanometer range the dependence of systemic toxicity on particle size is intricate and non-unique due to complex and often contra-directional relationships between the intrinsic biological aggressiveness of the specific NPs, on the one hand, and complex mechanisms that control their biokinetics, on the other. Our data testify to the high activity of the pulmonary phagocytosis of NPs deposited in airways. This fact suggests that safe levels of exposure to airborne NPs are possible in principle. However, there are no reliable foundations for establishing different permissible exposure levels for particles of different size within the nanometric range. For workroom air, such permissible exposure levels of metallic NP can be proposed at this stage, even if tentatively, based on a sufficiently conservative approach of decreasing approximately tenfold the exposure limits officially established for respective micro-scale industrial aerosols. It was shown that against the background of adequately composed combinations of some bioactive agents (comprising pectin, multivitamin-multimineral preparations, some amino acids, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid) the systemic toxicity and even genotoxicity of metallic NPs could be markedly attenuated. Therefore we believe that, along with decreasing NP-exposures, enhancing organisms’ resistance to their adverse action with the help

  13. Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Protein and DNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Jyothi U.; Ravikumar, Priya; Pise, Amruta; Gyawali, Dipendra; Hsia, Connie C.W.; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are promising carriers of biological agents to lung due to advantages including biocompatibility, ease of surface modification, localized action and reduced systemic toxicity. However, there have been no studies extensively characterizing and comparing the behavior of polymeric NPs for pulmonary protein/DNA delivery both in vitro and in vivo. We screened six polymeric NPs: gelatin, chitosan, alginate, poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), PLGA-chitosan, and PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PEG), for inhalational protein/ DNA delivery. All NPs except PLGA-PEG and alginate were <300 nm in size with bi-phasic core compound release profile. Gelatin, PLGA NPs and PLGA-PEG NPs remained stable in deionized water, serum, saline and simulated lung fluid (Gamble’s solution) over 5 days. PLGA-based NPs and natural polymer NPs exhibited highest cytocompatibility and dose-dependent in vitro uptake respectively by human alveolar type-1 epithelial cells. Based on these profiles, gelatin and PLGA NPs were used to encapsulate a) plasmid DNA encoding yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) or b) rhodamine-conjugated erythropoietin (EPO) for inhalational delivery to rats. Following a single inhalation, widespread pulmonary EPO distribution persisted for up to 10 days while increasing YFP expression was observed for at least 7 days for both NPs. The overall results support both PLGA and gelatin NPs as promising carriers for pulmonary protein/DNA delivery. PMID:24512977

  14. Comparative toxicity of 24 manufactured nanoparticles in human alveolar epithelial and macrophage cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Lanone, Sophie; Rogerieux, Françoise; Geys, Jorina; Dupont, Aurélie; Maillot-Marechal, Emmanuelle; Boczkowski, Jorge; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Hoet, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background A critical issue with nanomaterials is the clear understanding of their potential toxicity. We evaluated the toxic effect of 24 nanoparticles of similar equivalent spherical diameter and various elemental compositions on 2 human pulmonary cell lines: A549 and THP-1. A secondary aim was to elaborate a generic experimental set-up that would allow the rapid screening of cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles. We therefore compared 2 cytotoxicity assays (MTT and Neutral Red) and analyzed 2 time points (3 and 24 hours) for each cell type and nanoparticle. When possible, TC50 (Toxic Concentration 50 i.e. nanoparticle concentration inducing 50% cell mortality) was calculated. Results The use of MTT assay on THP-1 cells exposed for 24 hours appears to be the most sensitive experimental design to assess the cytotoxic effect of one nanoparticle. With this experimental set-up, Copper- and Zinc-based nanoparticles appear to be the most toxic. Titania, Alumina, Ceria and Zirconia-based nanoparticles show moderate toxicity, and no toxicity was observed for Tungsten Carbide. No correlation between cytotoxicity and equivalent spherical diameter or specific surface area was found. Conclusion Our study clearly highlights the difference of sensitivity between cell types and cytotoxicity assays that has to be carefully taken into account when assessing nanoparticles toxicity. PMID:19405955

  15. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  16. Physiologically important metal nanoparticles and their toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Jayeeta; Ghosh, Sourav; Datta, Poulami; Gomes, Aparna; Gomes, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been setting benchmarks for the last two decades, but the origins of this technology reach back to ancient history. Today, nanoparticles of both metallic and non-metallic origin are under research and development for applications in various fields of biology/therapeutics. Physiologically important metals are of concern because they are compatible with the human system in terms of absorption, assimilation, excretion, and side effects. There are several physiologically inorganic metals that are present in the human body with a wide range of biological activities. Some of these metals are magnesium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum. These metals are synthesized in the form of nanoparticles by different physical and chemical methods. Physiologically important nanoparticles are currently under investigation for their bio-medical applications as well as for therapeutics. Along with the applicative aspects of nanoparticles, another domain that is of great concern is the risk assessment of these nanoparticles to avoid unnecessary hazards. It has been seen that these nanoparticles have been shown to possess toxicity in biological systems. Conventional physical and chemical methods of metal nanoparticle synthesis may be one possible reason for nanoparticle toxicity that can be overcome by synthesis of nanoparticles from biological sources. This review is an attempt to establish metal nanoparticles of physiological importance to be the best candidates for future nanotechnological tools and medicines, owing to the acceptability and safety in the human body. This can only be successful if these particles are synthesized with a better biocompatibility and low or no toxicity.

  17. Responsive Hydrogel Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Stocke, Nathanael A; Arnold, Susanne M; Hilt, J Zach

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles represent one of the most widely studied classes of advanced drug delivery platforms in recent years due to a wide range of unique properties and capabilities that can be utilized to improve upon traditional drug administration. Conversely, hydrogel nanoparticles (HNPs) - also called nanogels - represent a unique class of materials that combine the intrinsic advantages of nanotechnology with the inherent capabilities of hydrogels. Responsive hydrogels pose a particularly interesting class of materials that can sense and respond to external stimuli and previous reports of inhalable hydrogel particles have highlighted their potential in pulmonary delivery. Here, we synthesized two different pH-responsive HNPs, designated HNP120 and HNP270, by incorporating functional monomers with a common crosslinker and characterized their physicochemical properties. One of the HNP systems was selected for incorporation into a composite dry powder by spray drying, and the aerodynamic performance of the resulting powder was evaluated. The HNP120s displayed a hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 120 nm in their fully swollen state and a minimal diameter of around 80 nm while the HNP270s were approximately 270 nm and 115 nm, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed particle size- and morphological uniformity of the HNPs. The HNP120s were spray dried into composite dry powders for inhalation and cascade impaction studies showed good aerosol performance with a mass median aerosol diameter (MMAD) of 4.82 ± 0.37 and a fine particle fraction > 30%. The HNPs released from the spray dried composites retained their responsive behavior thereby illustrating the potential for these materials as intelligent drug delivery systems that combine the advantages of nanotechnology, lung targeting through pulmonary delivery, and stimuli-responsive hydrogels.

  18. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  19. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  20. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNps) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10-15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L-1, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L-1 as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag+. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L-1 as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. The current

  1. Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: sources and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Buzea, Cristina; Pacheco, Ivan I; Robbie, Kevin

    2007-12-01

    This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles, their origin,activity, and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public health concerns related to this sometimes-strange new science of "nano," while raising awareness of nanomaterials' toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them.We show that humans have always been exposed to tiny particles via dust storms, volcanic ash, and other natural processes, and that our bodily systems are well adapted to protect us from these potentially harmful intruders. There ticuloendothelial system, in particular, actively neutralizes and eliminates foreign matter in the body,including viruses and nonbiological particles. Particles originating from human activities have existed for millennia, e.g., smoke from combustion and lint from garments, but the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation has profoundly increased an thropogenic particulate pollution. Significantly, technological advancement has also changed the character of particulate pollution, increasing the proportion of nanometer-sized particles--"nanoparticles"--and expanding the variety of chemical compositions. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a strong correlation between particulate air pollution levels, respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, various cancers, and mortality. Adverse effects of nanoparticles on human health depend on individual factors such as genetics and existing disease, as well as exposure, and nanoparticle chemistry, size, shape,agglomeration state, and electromagnetic properties. Animal and human studies show that inhaled nanoparticles are less efficiently removed than larger particles by the macrophage clearance mechanisms in the lungs, causing lung damage, and that nanoparticles can translocate through the circulatory, lymphatic, and nervous systems to many tissues and organs, including the brain. The key to

  2. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish models.

    PubMed

    Asharani, P V; Lian Wu, Yi; Gong, Zhiyuan; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2008-06-25

    This study was initiated to enhance our insight on the health and environmental impact of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np). Using starch and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as capping agents, silver nanoparticles were synthesized to study their deleterious effects and distribution pattern in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). Toxicological endpoints like mortality, hatching, pericardial edema and heart rate were recorded. A concentration-dependent increase in mortality and hatching delay was observed in Ag-np treated embryos. Additionally, nanoparticle treatments resulted in concentration-dependent toxicity, typified by phenotypes that had abnormal body axes, twisted notochord, slow blood flow, pericardial edema and cardiac arrhythmia. Ag(+) ions and stabilizing agents showed no significant defects in developing embryos. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the embryos demonstrated that nanoparticles were distributed in the brain, heart, yolk and blood of embryos as evident from the electron-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS). Furthermore, the acridine orange staining showed an increased apoptosis in Ag-np treated embryos. These results suggest that silver nanoparticles induce a dose-dependent toxicity in embryos, which hinders normal development.

  3. Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: The Importance of Size, Shape, Chemical Composition, and Valence State in Determining Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnick, Katherine

    , cerium oxide nanoparticles were chemically modified using a process known as doping, to alter their valence state. The size and shape of the cerium oxide nanoparticles remained constant. Overall, results indicated that cerium oxide was not toxic in both RLE-6TN and NR8383 pulmonary rat cells, however, chemically modifying the valence state of the nanomaterial did affect the antioxidant potential. To determine if this trend was measureable in vivo, rats were exposed to various cerium oxide nanoparticles via intratracheal instillation and damage, changes in pulmonary cell differentials, and phagocytic cell activity were assessed. Results implicate that chemically modifying the nanoparticles had an effect on the overall damage induced by the material but did not dramatically affect inflammatory potential or phagocytic cell activity. Overall the data from these studies imply that size, shape, chemical composition, and valence state of nanomaterials can be manipulated to alter their toxicity.

  4. Pulmonary mass and multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung neoplasm as amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L.; García-Nieto, J C.; Ballesta, F; Prieto, E; Villanueva, M A.; Gallardo, J

    2001-07-01

    Amiodarone is an effective anti-arrhythmic agent. However, during long-term therapy, patients can develop severe adverse pulmonary reactions that are potentially life-threatening. A case of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is presented in a 78-year-old woman. She developed dyspnea and a pulmonary mass with associated multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung cancer following 5 years of treatment with amiodarone for atrial fibrillation. After drug withdrawal, and without any additional treatment, clinical and radiological improvement was observed, and radiological findings resolved completely within 6 months.

  5. Pulmonary toxicity of beryllium in albino rat

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, K.A.; Agrawal, V.P.; Garg, V.

    1980-01-01

    Arsenic compounds, if chronically exposed to human beings, significantly increase incidences of epidermoid carcinomas of the skin and lung. Nickel has been considered to be an important metallic carcinogen. Regarding beryllium, different opinions are held so far as its carcinogenic nature is concerned. While it is reported that there is an equivocal increase in the incidences of respiratory cancers in patients with chronic pulmonary berylliosis, investigation shows no increase in the incidence of respiratory cancer. Among experimental animals, intravenous injections of suspensions of beryllium salts to rabbits have been shown to induce osteogenic sarcomas. This abstract deals with the histopathological and enzymological study of lungs of albino rats after prolonged beryllium treatment.

  6. Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diversity of engineered-nanomaterials and their applications as well as potential unknown health effects of these novel materials are significant challenges to assessing the health risks of nanotechnology. An integrated multi-tier testing strategy (www.epa.gov/nanoscience/) ...

  7. Nanoparticles in the environment: stability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-A; Choi, Yoo Jin; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Lee, Byung-Tae; Ranville, James F

    2012-09-10

    With the increasing use and application of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in a number industries, ENPs, through their unique properties, have made their way into the environment. However, the environmental fate and behavior of ENPs are largely unknown. Laboratory studies have shown that some ENPs have the potential for toxicity, suggesting they may affect organisms in the environment. To fully assess the risk of ENPs, a better estimation of exposure concentrations is needed. This requires an understanding of the stability and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) in the environment. This review presents a brief overview of the fate, behavior, and ecotoxicity of NPs in the environment. The fate and transport of NPs, which can be affected by various environmental conditions like light, pH, ionic strength, and type and concentration of cations, are important for the examination of the life cycle of NPs.

  8. Consideration Of The Toxicity of Manufactured Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haasch, Mary L.; McClellan-Green, Patricia; Oberdörster, Eva

    2005-09-01

    Fullerene (C60 and single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, SWCNT and MWCNT, respectively) is engineered to be redox active and it is thought that the potential toxicity of fullerene exposure is related to the formation of reactive oxygen species. During manufacture, transport or during scientific investigation, there is a potential for human or environmental exposure to nanoparticles. Several studies regarding human exposure have indicated reasons for concern. There is a lack of studies addressing the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic species but one study using the fish, largemouth bass, exposed to fullerene has shown increased (10-17-fold) lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the brain. It is likely that repair enzymes or anti-oxidants may have been induced in gill and liver tissues that had reduced LPO compared to control tissues (Oberdörster, 2004). In support of that hypothesis, suppressive subtractive hybridization was used with liver tissue and the biotransformation enzyme, cytochrome P450, specifically CYP2K4, and other oxidoreductases related to metabolism, along with repair enzymes, were increased while proteins related to normal physiological homeostasis were decreased in fullerene-exposed fish. In a new study involving the exposure of a toxicological model fish species, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to water-soluble fullerene (nC60), uptake and distribution indicated that nC60 elevated LPO in the brain and induced expression of CYP2 family isozymes in the liver. In an in vitro study, BSA-coated SWCNT interfered with biotransformation enzyme activity. These studies taken together provide support to the hypothesis that the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles is related to oxidative stress and provide insight into possible mechanisms of toxicity as well as providing information for evaluating the risk to aquatic organisms exposed to manufactured nanoparticles.

  9. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Taylor, Larry

    2008-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. NASA established the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, LADTAG has recommended investigating its toxicity in the lungs of laboratory animals. After receiving this recommendation, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in exposed rodents. The rodent pulmonary toxicity studies proposed here are the same as those proposed by the LADTAG. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal instillation (ITI). This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. We succeeded in completing an ITI study on JSC-1 lunar dust simulant in mice (Lam et al., Inhalation Toxicology 14:901-916, 2002, and Inhalation Toxicology 14: 917-928, 2002), and have conducted a pilot ITI study to examine the acute toxicity of an Apollo lunar (highland) dust sample. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies have been planned to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The ITI results will also be

  10. Pulmonary toxicity of cytostatic drugs: cell kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Godfrey, G.; Frome, E.; Lindenschmidt, R.C.

    1987-02-01

    Mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of /sup 3/H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide-treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2-3 weeks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature whereas in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It is concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemicals designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid.

  11. A safety and tolerability study of differently-charged nanoparticles for local pulmonary drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Harush-Frenkel, Oshrat; Bivas-Benita, Maytal; Nassar, Taher; Springer, Chaim; Sherman, Yoav; Avital, Avraham; Altschuler, Yoram; Borlak, Jurgen; Benita, Simon

    2010-07-15

    Nanoparticle (NP) based drug delivery systems provide promising opportunities in the treatment of lung diseases. Here we examined the safety and tolerability of pulmonary delivered NPs consisting of PEG-PLA as a function of particle surface charge. The rationale for such a comparison should be attributed to the differential pulmonary toxicity of positively and negatively charged PEG-PLA NP. Thus, the local and systemic effects of pulmonary administered NPs were investigated following 5 days of daily endotracheal instillation to BALB/c mice that were euthanized on the eighth or nineteenth day of the experiment. We collected bronchoalveolar lavages and studied hematological as well as histochemistry parameters. Notably, the cationic stearylamine based PEG-PLA NPs elicited increased local and systemic toxic effects both on the eighth and nineteenth day. In contrast, anionic NPs of similar size were much better tolerated with local inflammatory effects observed only on the eighth experimental day after pulmonary instillation. No systemic toxicity effect was observed although a moderate change was noted in the platelet count that was not considered to be of clinical significance. No pathological observations were detected in the internal organs following instillation of anionic NPs. Overall these observations suggest that anionic PEG-PLA NPs are useful pulmonary drug carriers that should be considered as a promising therapeutic drug delivery system.

  12. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  13. Biological Mechanism of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Najealicka Nicole

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), like almost all nanoparticles, are potentially toxic beyond a certain concentration because the survival of the organism is compromised due to scores of pathophysiological abnormalities above that concentration. However, the mechanism of AgNP toxicity remains undetermined. Instead of applying a toxic dose, these investigations were attempted to monitor the effects of AgNPs at a non-lethal concentration on wild type Drosophila melanogaster by exposing them to nanoparticles throughout their development. All adult flies raised in AgNP doped food indicated that of not more than 50 mg/L had no negative influence on median survival; however, these flies appeared uniformly lighter in body color due to the loss of melanin pigments in their cuticle. Additionally, fertility and vertical movement ability were compromised after AgNP feeding. The determination of the amount of free ionic silver (Ag+) indicated that the observed biological effects had resulted from the AgNPs and not from Ag+. Biochemical analysis suggests that the activity of copper dependent enzymes, namely tyrosinase and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, were decreased significantly following the consumption of AgNPs, despite the constant level of copper present in the tissue. Furthermore, copper supplementation restored the loss of AgNP induced demelanization, and the reduction of functional Ctr1 in Ctr1 heterozygous mutants caused the flies to be resistant to demelanization. Consequently, these studies proposed a mechanism whereby consumption of excess AgNPs in association with membrane bound copper transporter proteins cause sequestration of copper, thus creating a condition that resembles copper starvation. This model also explained the cuticular demelanization effect resulting from AgNP since tyrosinase activity is essential for melanin biosynthesis. Finally, these investigations demonstrated that Drosophila, an established genetic model system, can be well utilized for further

  14. Pulmonary toxicity in mice following exposure to cerium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Yu, Xiaohong; Pan, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Lei; Sang, Xuezi; Lin, Anan; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yue; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-06-01

    The widespread application of lanthanoids (Lns) in manufacturing industries has raised occupational and environmental health concerns about the possible increased health risks to humans exposed to Lns in their working and living environments. Numerous studies have shown that exposures to Ln cause pulmonary injury in animals, but very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the pulmonary inflammation caused by cerium chloride (CeCl3) exposure. In this study, we evaluated the oxidative stress and molecular mechanism underlying with the pulmonary inflammation associated with chronic lung toxicity in mice treated with nasally instilled CeCl3 for 90 consecutive days. Our findings suggest that significant cerium accumulated in the lung, leading the obvious increase of the lung indices, significant increases in inflammatory cells and levels of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphate, and total protein, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and peroxidation of lipids, reduced antioxidant capacity, and pulmonary inflammation. CeCl3 exposure also activated nuclear factor κB, increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor α, cyclooxygenase-2, heme oxygenase 1, interleukin 2, interleukin 4, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, interleukin 10, interleukin 18, interleukin 1β, and CYP1A1. However, CeCl3 reduced the expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-inhibiting factor and heat shock protein 70. These findings suggest that the pulmonary inflammation caused by CeCl3 in mice is closely associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine expression.

  15. Toxicity and Biokinetics of Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Mi-Rae; Bae, Song-Hwa; Go, Mi-Ran; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Hwang, Yun-Gu; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) have promising potential for diverse biological application, but it has not been completely determined whether Au-NP has potential toxicity in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, toxicity of Au-NP was evaluated in human intestinal cells as well as in rats after 14-day repeated oral administration. Biokinetic study was also performed to assess oral absorption and tissue distribution. The results demonstrated that Au-NP did not cause cytotoxic effects on cells after 24 h exposure in terms of inhibition of cell proliferation, membrane damage, and oxidative stress. However, when a small number of cells were exposed to Au-NP for seven days, colony forming ability remarkably decreased by Au-NP treatment, suggesting its potential toxicity after long-term exposure at high concentration. Biokinetic study revealed that Au-NP slowly entered the blood stream and slightly accumulated only in kidney after oral administration to rats. Whereas, orally administered Au ions were rapidly absorbed, and then distributed in kidney, liver, lung, and spleen at high levels, suggesting that the biological fate of Au-NP is primarily in nanoparticulate form, not in ionic Au. Fourteen-day repeated oral toxicity evaluation showed that Au-NP did not cause severe toxicity in rats based on histopathological, hematological, and serum biochemical analysis.

  16. Pulmonary toxicity of printer toner following inhalation and intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Oyabu, Takako; Horie, Masanori; Kambara, Tatsunori; Izumi, Hiroto; Kuroda, Etsushi; Creutzenberg, Otto; Bellmann, Bernd; Pohlmann, Gerhard; Schuchardt, Sven; Hansen, Tanja; Ernst, Heinrich

    2013-10-01

    The pulmonary effects of a finished toner were evaluated in intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies, using toners with external additives (titanium dioxide nanoparticles and amorphous silica nanoparticles). Rats received an intratracheal dose of 1 mg or 2 mg of toner and were sacrificed at 3 days, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. The toner induced pulmonary inflammation, as evidenced by a transient neutrophil response in the low-dose groups and persistent neutrophil infiltration in the high-dose groups. There were increased concentrations of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as a marker of oxidative stress in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lung. In a 90-day inhalation study, rats were exposed to well-dispersed toner (mean of MMAD: 3.76 µm). The three mass concentrations of toner were 1, 4 and 16 mg/m(3) for 13 weeks, and the rats were sacrificed at 6 days and 91 days after the end of the exposure period. The low and medium concentrations did not induce neutrophil infiltration in the lung of statistical significance, but the high concentration did, and, in addition, upon histopathological examination not only showed findings of inflammation but also of fibrosis in the lung. Taken together, the results of our studies suggest that toners with external additives lead to pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis at lung burdens suggest beyond the overload. The changes observed in the pulmonary responses in this inhalation study indicate that the high concentration (16 mg/m(3)) is an LOAEL and that the medium concentration (4 mg/m(3)) is an NOAEL.

  17. Pulmonary toxicity and fibrogenic response of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Manke, Amruta; Wang, Liying; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been a subject of intensive research for a wide range of applications. However, because of their extremely small size and light weight, CNTs are readily inhaled into human lungs resulting in increased rates of pulmonary disorders, most notably fibrosis. Several studies have demonstrated the fibrogenic effects of CNTs given their ability to translocate into the surrounding areas in the lung causing granulomatous lesions and interstitial and sub-pleural fibrosis. However, the mechanisms underlying the disease process remain obscure due to the lack of understanding of the cellular interactions and molecular targets involved. Interestingly, certain physicochemical properties of CNTs have been shown to affect their respiratory toxicity, thereby becoming significant determinants of fibrogenesis. CNT-induced fibrosis involves a multitude of cell types and is characterized by the early onset of inflammation, oxidative stress and accumulation of extracellular matrix. Increased reactive oxygen species activate various cytokine/growth factor signaling cascades resulting in increased expression of inflammatory and fibrotic genes. Profibrotic growth factors and cytokines contribute directly to fibroblast proliferation and collagen production. Given the role of multiple players during the pathogenesis of CNT-induced fibrosis, the objective of this review is to summarize the key findings and discuss major cellular and molecular events governing pulmonary fibrosis. We also discuss the physicochemical properties of CNTs and their effects on pulmonary toxicities as well as various biological factors contributing to the development of fibrosis. PMID:23194015

  18. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  19. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  20. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  1. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  2. Biodistribution of Amikacin Solid Lipid Nanoparticles after Pulmonary Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, J.; Ghaffari, S.; Mirshojaei, S. F.; Jafarian, A.; Atyabi, F.; Kobarfard, F.; Azarmi, S.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of the present work was studying the biodistribution of amikacin solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) after pulmonary delivery to increase its concentration in the lungs for treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections and also providing a new method for clinical application of amikacin. To achieve this aim, 99mTc labelled amikacin was loaded in cholesterol SLNs and after in vitro optimization, the desired SLNs and free drug were administered through pulmonary and i.v. routes to male rats and qualitative and biodistribution studies were done. Results showed that pulmonary delivery of SLNs of amikacin by microsprayer caused higher drug concentration in lungs than kidneys while i.v. administration of free drug caused reverse conditions. It seems that pulmonary delivery of SLNs may improve patients' compliance due to reduction of drug side effects in kidneys and elongation of drug dosing intervals due to the sustained drug release from SLNs. PMID:23984315

  3. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLC) for pulmonary application: a review of the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Zimmer, A; Pardeike, J

    2014-01-01

    Drug delivery by inhalation is a noninvasive means of administration that has following advantages for local treatment for airway diseases: reaching the epithelium directly, circumventing first pass metabolism and avoiding systemic toxicity. Moreover, from the physiological point of view, the lung provides advantages for systemic delivery of drugs including its large surface area, a thin alveolar epithelium and extensive vasculature which allow rapid and effective drug absorption. Therefore, pulmonary application is considered frequently for both, the local and the systemic delivery of drugs. Lipid nanoparticles - Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers - are nanosized carrier systems in which solid particles consisting of a lipid matrix are stabilized by surfactants in an aqueous phase. Advantages of lipid nanoparticles for the pulmonary application are the possibility of a deep lung deposition as they can be incorporated into respirables carriers due to their small size, prolonged release and low toxicity. This paper will give an overview of the existing literature about lipid nanoparticles for pulmonary application. Moreover, it will provide the reader with some background information for pulmonary drug delivery, i.e., anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system, formulation requirements, application forms, clearance from the lung, pharmacological benefits and nanotoxicity.

  4. Implication of oxidative stress in size-dependent toxicity of silica nanoparticles in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Passagne, Isabelle; Morille, Marie; Rousset, Marine; Pujalté, Igor; L'azou, Béatrice

    2012-09-28

    Silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO(2)) are one of the most popular nanomaterials used in industrial manufacturing, synthesis, engineering and medicine. While inhalation of nanoparticles causes pulmonary damage, nano-SiO(2) can be transported into the blood and deposit in target organs where they exert potential toxic effects. Kidney is considered as such a secondary target organ. However, toxicological information of their effect on renal cells and the mechanisms involved remain sparse. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of nano-SiO(2) of different sizes was investigated on two renal proximal tubular cell lines (human HK-2 and porcine LLC-PK(1)). The molecular pathways involved were studied with a focus on the involvement of oxidative stress. Nanoparticle characterization was performed (primary nanoparticle size, surface area, dispersion) in order to investigate a potential relationship between their physical properties and their toxic effects. Firstly, evidence of particle internalization was obtained by transmission electron microscopy and conventional flux cytometry techniques. The use of specific inhibitors of endocytosis pathways showed an internalization process by macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis for 100 nm nano-SiO(2) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were localized in vesicles. Toxicity was size- and time-dependent (24h, 48 h, 72 h). Indeed, it increased as nanoparticles became smaller. Secondly, analysis of oxidative stress based on the assessment of ROS (reactive oxygen species) production (DHE, dihydroethidium) or lipid peroxidation (MDA, malondialdehyde) clearly demonstrated the involvement of oxidative stress in the toxicity of 20 nm nano-SiO(2). The induction of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, GSTpi, thioredoxin reductase) could explain their lesser toxicity with 100 nm nano-SiO(2).

  5. Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity – A Frequently Missed Complication

    PubMed Central

    Sweidan, Alexander J.; Singh, Navneet K.; Dang, Natasha; Lam, Vinh; Datta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Amiodarone is often used in the suppression of tachyarrhythmias. One of the more serious adverse effects includes amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (APT). Several pulmonary diseases can manifest including interstitial pneumonitis, organizing pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, pulmonary nodules or masses, and pleural effusion. Incidence of APT varies from 5–15% and is correlated to dosage, age of the patient, and preexisting lung disease. DESCRIPTION A 56-year-old male with a past medical history of coronary artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was admitted for a coronary artery bypass graft. Post-operatively, the patient was admitted to the ICU for ventilator management and continued to receive his home dose of amiodarone 400 mg orally twice daily, which he had been taking for the past 3 months. The patient was found to be hypoxemic with a PaO2 52 mmHg and bilateral infiltrates on chest x-ray. Patient also complained of new onset dyspnea. Physical exam found bilateral rhonchi with bibasilar crackles and subcutaneous emphysema along the left anterior chest wall. Daily chest x-rays showed worsening of bilateral interstitial infiltrates and pleural effusions. A chest high-resolution computed tomography on post-operative day 3 showed extensive and severe bilateral ground glass opacities. APT was suspected and amiodarone was discontinued. A course of oral prednisone without antibiotics was initiated, and after one week of treatment the chest film cleared, the PaO2 value normalized and dyspnea resolved. DISCUSSION APT occurs via cytotoxic T cells and indirectly by immunological reaction. Typically the lungs manifest a diffuse interstitial pneumonitis with varying degrees of fibrosis. Infiltrates with a ‘ground-glass’ appearance appreciated on HRCT are more definitive than chest x-ray. Pulmonary nodules can be seen, frequently in the upper lobes. These are postulated to be accumulations of

  6. Relative toxicity of inhaled metal sulfate salts for pulmonary macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Skornik, W.A.; Brain, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    The effects of metal sulfate aerosols on respiratory defense mechanisms in hamsters were studied. Pulmonary macrophage phagocytic rates were measured by determining the in vivo uptake of radioactive colloidal gold (/sup 198/Au) 1, 24, or 48 h after a single 4-h exposure. The concentrations of sulfate aerosols causing a 50% inhibition in pulmonary macrophage endocytosis (EC/sub 50/) were determined. When hamsters were exposed for 4 h to cupric sulfate (greater than or equal to 4.8 mg/m/sup 3/), zinc sulfate (greater than or equal to 3.1 mg/m/sup 3/), ferric sulfate (greater than or equal to 7.8 mg/m/sup 3/), or zinc ammonium sulfate (greater than or equal to 10.0 mg/m/sup 3/), macrophage endocytosis was significantly reduced 1 h after exposure compared with that in unexposed control animals. Although the response was variable, 24 h after exposures to the higher sulfate concentrations the percent of gold ingested by pulmonary macrophages remained depressed. By 48 h, the rate of macrophage endocytosis in hamsters had returned to normal control values except in hamsters exposed to 4.8 mg/m/sup 3/ cupric sulfate or 9.8 mg/m/sup 3/ ferric sulfate. These hamsters showed significant increases in phagocytosis. The EC/sub 50/ values in milligrams of sulfate per cubic meter for cupric sulfate, zinc sulfate, ferric sulfate, and zinc ammonium sulfate were 2.7, 4.5, 7.5, and 17.9, respectively. These results are negatively correlated with the ranking of sulfates using the criteria of relative irritant potency, as measured by increases in pulmonary flow resistance. Thus, rankings of related chemical structures are not absolute. Their relative toxicities vary depending on the end point selected.

  7. Relative toxicity of inhaled metal sulfate salts for pulmonary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Skornik, W A; Brain, J D

    1983-08-01

    The effects of metal sulfate aerosols on respiratory defense mechanisms in hamsters were studied. Pulmonary macrophage phagocytic rates were measured by determining the in vivo uptake of radioactive colloidal gold (198Au) 1, 24, or 48 h after a single 4-h exposure. The concentrations of sulfate aerosols causing a 50% inhibition in pulmonary macrophage endocytosis (EC50) were determined. When hamsters were exposed for 4 h to cupric sulfate (greater than or equal to 4.8 mg/m3), zinc sulfate (greater than or equal to 3.1 mg/m3), ferric sulfate (greater than or equal to 7.8 mg/m3), or zinc ammonium sulfate (greater than or equal to 10.0 mg/m3), macrophage endocytosis was significantly reduced 1 h after exposure compared with that in unexposed control animals. Although the response was variable, 24 h after exposures to the higher sulfate concentrations the percent of gold ingested by pulmonary macrophages remained depressed. By 48 h, the rate of macrophage endocytosis in hamsters had returned to normal control values except in hamsters exposed to 4.8 mg/m3 cupric sulfate or 9.8 mg/m3 ferric sulfate. These hamsters showed significant increases in phagocytosis. The EC50 values in milligrams of sulfate per cubic meter for cupric sulfate, zinc sulfate, ferric sulfate, and zinc ammonium sulfate were 2.7, 4.5, 7.5, and 17.9, respectively. These results are negatively correlated with the ranking of sulfates using the criteria of relative irritant potency, as measured by increases in pulmonary flow resistance. Thus, rankings of related chemical structures are not absolute. Their relative toxicities vary depending on the end point selected.

  8. Release, transport and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soni, Deepika; Naoghare, Pravin K; Saravanadevi, Sivanesan; Pandey, Ram Avatar

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology have facilitated the synthesis of novel engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) that possess new and different physicochemical properties. These ENPs have been ex tensive ly used in various commercial sectors to achieve both social and economic benefits. However. the increasing production and consumption of ENPs by many different industries has raised concerns about their possible release and accumulation in the environment. Released EN Ps may either remain suspended in the atmosphere for several years or may accumulate and eventually be modified int o other substances. Settled nanoparticles can he easily washed away during ra in s. and therefore may easily enter the food chain via water and so il. Thus. EN Ps can contaminate air. water and soil and can subsequently pose adverse risks to the health of different organisms. Studies to date indicate that ENP transport to and within the ecosystem depend on their chemical and physical properties (viz .. size. shape and solubility) . Therefore. the EN Ps display variable behavior in the environment because of their individual properties th at affect their tendency for adsorption, absorption, diffusional and colloidal interaction. The transport of EN Ps also influences their fate and chemical transformation in ecosystems. The adsorption, absorption and colloidal interaction of ENPs affect their capacity to be degraded or transformed, whereas the tendency of ENPs to agglomerate fosters their sedimentation. How widely ENPs are transported and their environmental fate influence how tox ic they may become to environmental organisms. One barrier to fully understanding how EN Ps are transformed in the environment and how best to characterize their toxicity, is related to the nature of their ultrafine structure. Experiments with different animals, pl ants, and cell lines have revealed that ENPs induce toxicity via several cellular pathways that is linked to the size. shape. surface area

  9. Toxicity of food-relevant nanoparticles in intestinal epithelial models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Christie

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being incorporated into common consumer products, including in foods and food packaging, for their unique properties at the nanoscale. Food-grade silica and titania are used as anti-caking and whitening agents, respectively, and these particle size distributions are composed of approximately one-third nanoparticles. Zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles can be used for their antimicrobial properties. However, little is known about the interactions of nanoparticles in the body upon ingestion. This study was performed to investigate the role of nanoparticle characteristics including surface chemistry, dissolution, and material type on toxicity to the intestinal epithelium. Only mild acute toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was observed after 24-hour treatment of intestinal epithelial C2BBe1 cells based on the results of toxicity assays measuring necrosis, apoptosis, membrane damage, and mitochondrial activity. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were not observed to be toxic although all nanoparticles were internalized by cells. In vitro digestion of nanoparticles in solutions representing the stomach and intestines prior to treatment of cells did not alter nanoparticle toxicity. Long-term repeated treatment of cells weekly for 24 hours with nanoparticles did not change nanoparticle cytotoxicity or the growth rate of the treated cell populations. Thus, silica, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles were found to induce little toxicity in intestinal epithelial cells. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a model for silica used in foods that could be tracked in vitro and in vivo. To maintain an exterior of pure silica, a silica shell was hydrolyzed around a core particle of quantum dots or a fluorescent dye electrostatically associated with a commercial silica particle. The quantum dots used were optimized from a previously reported microwave quantum dot synthesis to a quantum yield of 40%. Characterization

  10. Acute toxicity of nickel nanoparticles in rats after intravenous injection

    PubMed Central

    Magaye, Ruth R; Yue, Xia; Zou, Baobo; Shi, Hongbo; Yu, Hongsheng; Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Xu, Jin; Yang, Cui; Wu, Aiguo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to add scientific data in regard to the use of metallic nanoparticles in nanomedicine. The acute toxicity of nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (50 nm), intravenously injected through the dorsal penile vein of Sprague Dawley rats was evaluated in this study. Fourteen days after injection, Ni nanoparticles induced liver and spleen injury, lung inflammation, and caused cardiac toxicity. These results indicate that precautionary measures should be taken with regard to the use of Ni nanoparticles or Ni compounds in nanomedicine. PMID:24648736

  11. Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Chris R.; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chino, Junzo P.; Craciunescu, Oana; Steffey, Beverly; Folz, Rodney J.; Chao, Nelson J.; Rizzieri, David A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

  12. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Taylor, L.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Astronauts on the Moon will go in and out of the base for various activities, and will inevitably bring some dust into the living quarters. Depressurizing the airlock so that astronauts can exit for outdoor activities could also bring dust inside the airlock to the habitable area. Concerned about the potential health effects on astronauts exposed to airborne lunar dust, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust. The toxicity data also will be needed by toxicologists to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts residing in the lunar habitat and by environmental engineers to design an appropriate dust mitigation strategy. We conducted a study to examine biomarkers of toxicity (inflammation and cytotoxicity) in lung lavage fluids from mice intrapharyngeally instilled with lunar dust samples; we also collected lung tissue from the mice for histopathological examination 3 months after the dust instillation. Reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) having known toxicities and industrial exposure limits were studied in parallel with lunar dust so that the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. A 6-month histopathology study has been planned. These instillation experiments will be followed by inhalation studies, which are more labor intensive and technologically difficult. The animal inhalation studies will be conducted first with an appropriate lunar dust simulant to ensure that the exposure techniques to be used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of these studies collectively will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and enable us to establish exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  13. Toxicity and bio-accumulation of inhaled cerium oxide nanoparticles in CD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Aalapati, Srinivas; Ganapathy, Selvam; Manapuram, Saikumar; Anumolu, Goparaju; Prakya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-11-01

    Male CD1 mice were subjected to nose-inhalation exposure of CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs) for 0, 7, 14 or 28 days with 14 or 28 days of recovery time at an aerosol concentration of 2 mg/m(3). Markers of lung injury and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), oxidative stress in lungs, bio-accumulation, and histopathology of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tissues were assessed. BALF analysis revealed the induction of pulmonary inflammation, as evident by an increase in the influx of neutrophils with a significant secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines that lead to generation of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, as is evident by induction of lipid peroxidation, depletion of glutathione and increased BALF lactate dehydrogenase and protein. The histopathological examination revealed that these inhaled CeO2 NPs were located all over the pulmonary parenchyma, inducing a severe, chronic, active inflammatory response characterised by necrosis, proteinosis, fibrosis and well-formed discrete granulomas in the pulmonary tissue and tubular degeneration leading to coagulative necrosis in kidneys. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer results showed a significant bio-accumulation of these particles in the pulmonary and extrapulmonary tissues, even after one month of post-inhalation exposure. Together, these findings suggest that inhalation exposure of CeO2 NPs can induce pulmonary and extrapulmonary toxicity.

  14. Budesonide-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery: preparation, optimization, and aerodynamic behavior.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Maryam; Aghajani, Mahdi; Abbasalipourkabir, Roghayeh; Amani, Amir

    2016-12-01

    Advantages of lipid nanoparticles for pulmonary applications are possibility of deep lung deposition with prolonged release and low toxicity. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of formulation and processing parameters on particle size of prepared SLNs. Budesonide-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (BUD-SLNs) were prepared with different values of drug content, ultrasonication amplitude, and homogenization time and the data were modeled using artificial neural networks (ANNs). Optimal conditions for fabrication of small-sized particles of 170-200 nm were found to be low drug content with high-amplitude and high-homogenization time. In vitro aerosolization performance of BUD-SLNs was then compared to that of commercial budesonide which indicated enhancement in fine particle fraction value.

  15. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure was investigated. Results from 7-d sediment toxicity tests indicate that Ag...

  16. In vitro toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2015-03-01

    The toxic effect of ZnO nanoparticles is due to their solubility. ZnO nanoparticles dissolve in the extracellular region, which in turn increases the intracellular [Zn2+] level. The mechanism for increased intracellular [Zn2+] level and ZnO nanoparticles dissolution in the medium is still unclear. Cytotoxicity, increased oxidative stress, increased intracellular [Ca2+] level, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and interleukin-8 productions occur in the BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells and A549 alveolar adenocarcinoma cells following the exposure of ZnO nanoparticles. Confluent C2C12 cells are more resistant to ZnO nanoparticles compared to the sparse monolayer. Loss of 3T3-L1 cell viability, membrane leakage, and morphological changes occurs due to exposure of ZnO nanoparticles. ZnO nanoparticle induces cytotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction in RKO colon carcinoma cells. The occurrence of apoptosis, increased ROS level, reduced mitochondrial activity and formation of tubular intracellular structures are reported following exposure of ZnO nanoparticles in skin cells. Macrophages, monocytes, and dendritic cells are affected by ZnO nanoparticles. In addition, genotoxicity is also induced. The present review summarizes the literature on in vitro toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles (10-100 nm) on various cell lines.

  17. Severe Acute Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Brentuximab in a Patient with Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Yasmin; Ramirez, Saul; Rosell Cespedes, Elizabeth; Rensoli Velasquez, Marimer; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Gaur, Sumit; Figueroa-Casas, Juan B.; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary toxicity associated with brentuximab appears to be a rare but serious adverse effect that can be potentially fatal. We report the case of a twenty-nine-year-old female with Hodgkin's lymphoma who was treated with brentuximab and later presented with severe acute pulmonary toxicity; she improved after the discontinuation of brentuximab and administration of antibiotics and glucocorticoid therapy. Currently there is very little data in the literature in regard to the clinical manifestations and characteristics of patients taking brentuximab and the potential development of acute severe pulmonary toxicity, as well as the appropriate therapeutic approach, making this particular case of successful treatment and resolution unique. PMID:27190667

  18. Assessment of toxicity of nanoparticles using insects as biological models.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Rocha, Aracely; Sanchez, Carlos J; Liang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials have become increasingly important in medicine, manufacturing, and consumer products. The fundamental understanding in effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on and their interactions with biomolecules and organismal systems have yet to be achieved. In this chapter, we firstly provide a brief review of the interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems. We will then provide an example by describing a novel method to assess the effects of NPs on biological systems, using insects as a model. Nanoparticles were injected into the central nervous system of the discoid cockroach (Blaberus discoidalis). It was found that insects became hyperactive compared to negative control (water injections). Our method could provide a generic method of assessing nanoparticles toxicity.

  19. Changing the dose metric for inhalation toxicity studies: short-term study in rats with engineered aerosolized amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sayes, Christie M; Reed, Kenneth L; Glover, Kyle P; Swain, Keith A; Ostraat, Michele L; Donner, E Maria; Warheit, David B

    2010-03-01

    Inhalation toxicity and exposure assessment studies for nonfibrous particulates have traditionally been conducted using particle mass measurements as the preferred dose metric (i.e., mg or microg/m(3)). However, currently there is a debate regarding the appropriate dose metric for nanoparticle exposure assessment studies in the workplace. The objectives of this study were to characterize aerosol exposures and toxicity in rats of freshly generated amorphous silica (AS) nanoparticles using particle number dose metrics (3.7 x 10(7) or 1.8 x 10(8) particles/cm(3)) for 1- or 3-day exposures. In addition, the role of particle size (d(50) = 37 or 83 nm) on pulmonary toxicity and genotoxicity endpoints was assessed at several postexposure time points. A nanoparticle reactor capable of producing, de novo synthesized, aerosolized amorphous silica nanoparticles for inhalation toxicity studies was developed for this study. SiO(2) aerosol nanoparticle synthesis occurred via thermal decomposition of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The reactor was designed to produce aerosolized nanoparticles at two different particle size ranges, namely d(50) = approximately 30 nm and d(50) = approximately 80 nm; at particle concentrations ranging from 10(7) to 10(8) particles/cm(3). AS particle aerosol concentrations were consistently generated by the reactor. One- or 3-day aerosol exposures produced no significant pulmonary inflammatory, genotoxic, or adverse lung histopathological effects in rats exposed to very high particle numbers corresponding to a range of mass concentrations (1.8 or 86 mg/m(3)). Although the present study was a short-term effort, the methodology described herein can be utilized for longer-term inhalation toxicity studies in rats such as 28-day or 90-day studies. The expansion of the concept to subchronic studies is practical, due, in part, to the consistency of the nanoparticle generation method.

  20. Lipid nanoparticle delivery of a microRNA-145 inhibitor improves experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McLendon, Jared M; Joshi, Sachindra R; Sparks, Jeff; Matar, Majed; Fewell, Jason G; Abe, Kohtaro; Oka, Masahiko; McMurtry, Ivan F; Gerthoffer, William T

    2015-07-28

    pathology, and histopathology and did not detect significant off-target effects. AntimiR-145 reduced the degree of pulmonary arteriopathy, reduced the severity of pulmonary hypertension, and reduced the degree of cardiac dysfunction. The results establish effective and low toxicity of lung delivery of a miRNA-145 inhibitor using functionalized cationic lipopolyamine nanoparticles to repair pulmonary arteriopathy and improve cardiac function in rats with severe PAH.

  1. Metal Nanoparticle Pollutants Interfere with Pulmonary Surfactant Function In Vitro☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Mandeep Singh; Zhao, Lin; Smith, Ronald; Possmayer, Fred; Petersen, Nils O.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reported associations between air pollution and pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases prompted studies on the effects of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) on pulmonary surfactant function. Low levels (3.7 mol % Au/lipid, 0.98% wt/wt) markedly inhibited adsorption of a semisynthetic pulmonary surfactant (dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol/surfactant protein B (SP-B); 70:30:1 wt %). Au NP also impeded the surfactant's ability to reduce surface tension (γ) to low levels during film compression and to respread during film expansion. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Au NP generated by a seed-growth method were spherical with diameters of ∼15 nm. Including palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol appeared to coat the NP with at least one lipid bilayer but did not affect NP shape or size. Similar overall observations occurred with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol was less effective in NP capping, although similar sized NP were formed. Including SP-B (1% wt/wt) appears to induce the formation of elongated strands of interacting threads with the fluid phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Including DPPC resulted in formation of aggregated, less spherical NP with a larger size distribution. With DPPC, strand formation due to SP-B was not observed. Agarose gel electrophoresis studies demonstrated that the aggregation induced by SP-B blocked migration of PG-coated NP. Migration was also influenced by the fluidity of the PGs. It is concluded that Au NP can interact with and sequester pulmonary surfactant phospholipids and, if inhaled from the atmosphere, could impede pulmonary surfactant function in the lung. PMID:17890383

  2. Relationship between chemical composition and pulmonary toxicity of source-specific ambient particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have reported incidence of cardio-pulmonary disease associated with increase in particulate matter (PM) exposure. In this study, the pulmonary toxicity potential of combustion and ambient PM were investigated using data from animal studies at the US EPA....

  3. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological

  4. Nanoparticle-Mediated Pulmonary Drug Delivery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Paranjpe, Mukta; Müller-Goymann, Christel C.

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated as drug carriers for the application of different drugs via different routes of administration. Systems, such as solid lipid nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, have been investigated for a long time for the treatment of various lung diseases. The pulmonary route, owing to a noninvasive method of drug administration, for both local and systemic delivery of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) forms an ideal environment for APIs acting on pulmonary diseases and disorders. Additionally, this route offers many advantages, such as a high surface area with rapid absorption due to high vascularization and circumvention of the first pass effect. Aerosolization or inhalation of colloidal systems is currently being extensively studied and has huge potential for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of various diseases. Furthermore, the surfactant-associated proteins present at the interface enhance the effect of these formulations by decreasing the surface tension and allowing the maximum effect. The most challenging part of developing a colloidal system for nebulization is to maintain the critical physicochemical parameters for successful inhalation. The following review focuses on the current status of different colloidal systems available for the treatment of various lung disorders along with their characterization. Additionally, different in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo cell models developed for the testing of these systems with studies involving cell culture analysis are also discussed. PMID:24717409

  5. Toxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles - the effect of nanoparticle properties.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yu Hang; Yung, Mana M N; Ng, Alan M C; Ma, Angel P Y; Wong, Stella W Y; Chan, Charis M N; Ng, Yip Hang; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Guo, Muyao; Wong, Mabel Ting; Leung, Frederick C C; Chan, Wai Kin; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Lee, Hung Kay

    2015-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the toxicity of CeO2 nanomaterials have been published in recent years, with some studies finding CeO2 nanoparticles to be toxic, while others found it to have protective effects against oxidative stress. To investigate the possible reasons for this, we have performed a comprehensive study on the physical and chemical properties of nanosized CeO2 from three different suppliers as well as CeO2 synthesized by us, and tested their toxicity. For toxicity tests, we have studied the effects of CeO2 nanoparticles on a Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli in the dark, under ambient and UV illuminations. We have also performed toxicity tests on the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum under ambient and UV illuminations. We found that the CeO2 nanoparticle samples exhibited significantly different toxicity, which could likely be attributed to the differences in interactions with cells, and possibly to differences in nanoparticle compositions. Our results also suggest that toxicity tests on bacteria may not be suitable for predicting the ecotoxicity of nanomaterials. The relationship between the toxicity and physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles is explicitly discussed in the light of the current results.

  6. Pulmonary administration of integrin-nanoparticles regenerates collapsed alveoli.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Michiko; Kojima, Hisako; Sakai, Hitomi; Kubo, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2014-08-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an intractable pulmonary disease, causes widespread and irreversible alveoli collapse. In search of a treatment target molecule, which is able to regenerate collapsed alveoli, we sought to identify a factor that induces differentiation in human alveolar epithelial stem cells using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), whose alveolar repair capacity has been reported in animal experiments. When human alveolar epithelial stem cells were exposed to ATRA at a concentration of 10μM for over seven days, approximately 20% of the cells differentiated into each of the type-I and type-II alveolar epithelial cells that constitute the alveoli. In a microarray analysis, integrin-α1 and integrin-β3 showed the largest variation in the ATRA-treated group compared with the controls. Furthermore, the effect of the induction of differentiation in human alveolar epithelial stem cells using ATRA was suppressed by approximately one-fourth by siRNA treatments with integrin α1 and integrin β3. These results suggested that integrin α1 and β3 are factors responsible for the induction of differentiation in human alveolar epithelial stem cells. We accordingly investigated whether integrin nanoparticles also had a regenerative effect in vivo. Elastase-induced COPD model mouse was produced, and the alveolar repair effect of pulmonary administration using nanoparticles of integrin protein was evaluated by X-ray CT scanning. Improvement in the CT value in comparison with an untreated group indicated that there was an alveolar repair effect. In this study, it was shown that the differentiation-inducing effect on human alveolar epithelial stem cells by ATRA was induced by increased expression of integrin, and that the induced integrin enhanced phosphorylation signaling of AKT, resulting in inducing differentiations. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that lung administration of nanoparticles with increased solubility and stability of integrin

  7. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles against bacteria, yeast, and algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorobantu, Loredana S.; Fallone, Clara; Noble, Adam J.; Veinot, Jonathan; Ma, Guibin; Goss, Greg G.; Burrell, Robert E.

    2015-04-01

    The toxicity mechanism employed by silver nanoparticles against microorganisms has captivated scientists for nearly a decade and remains a debatable issue. The question most frequently asked is whether silver nanoparticles exert specific effects on microorganisms beyond the well-documented antimicrobial activity of Ag+. Here, we study the effects of citrate- (d = 17.5 ± 9.4 nm) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (d = 38.8 ± 3.6 nm)-capped silver nanoparticles on microorganisms belonging to various genera. The antimicrobial effect of Ag+ was distinguished from that of nanosilver by monitoring microbial growth in the presence and absence of nanoparticles and by careful comparison of the responses of equimolar silver nitrate solution. The results show that when using equimolar silver solutions, silver nitrate has higher toxic potential on all microorganisms than both nanoparticles tested. Furthermore, some microorganisms are more susceptible to silver than others and the choice of capping agent is relevant in the toxicity. Atomic force microscopy disclosed that AgNO3 had a destructive effect on algae. The antimicrobial activity of nanosilver could be exploited to prevent microbial colonization of medical devices and to determine the fate of nanoparticles in the environment.

  8. TOXICITY OF AMORPHOUS SILICA NANOPARTICLES IN MOUSE KERATINOCYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Hussain, Saber

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the uptake, localization and the cytotoxic effects of well-dispersed amorphous silica nanoparticles in mouse keratinocytes (HEL-30). Mouse keratinocytes were exposed for 24h to various concentrations of amorphous silica nanoparticles in homogeneous suspensions of average size distribution (30, 48, 118 and 535 nm SiO2) then assessed for uptake and biochemical changes. Results of transmission electron microscopy revealed all sizes of silica were taken up into the cells and localized into the cytoplasm. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay shows LDH leakage was dose- and size-dependent with exposure to 30 and 48 nm nanoparticles. However, no LDH leakage was observed for either 118 or 535 nm nanoparticles. The mitochondrial viability assay (MTT) showed significant toxicity for 30 and 48 nm at high concentrations (100 g/mL) compare to the 118 and 535 nm particles. Further studies were carried out to investigate if cellular reduced GSH and mitochondria membrane potential are involved in the mechanism of SiO2 toxicity. The redox potential of cells (GSH) was reduced significantly at concentrations of 50, 100 and 200 g/mL at 30 nm nanoparticle exposures. However, silica nanoparticles larger than 30 nm showed no changes in GSH levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation did not show any significant change between controls and the exposed cells. In summary, amorphous silica nanoparticles below 100 nm induced cytotoxicity suggest size-of the particles is critical to produce biological effects.

  9. Pulmonary vascular lesions in the toxic oil syndrome in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Segoviano, P; Esteban, A; Martínez-Cabruja, R

    1983-01-01

    A histological study was made of pulmonary arteries at the necropsies of nine patients who died after the ingestion of denatured rapeseed oil during the epidemic which occurred in Spain in May 1981. Lesions found in the elastic pulmonary arteries were characterised by pronounced intimal proliferation of an oedematous nature, accumulation of large vacuolated cells within the media, and loss of vascular smooth muscle. In muscular pulmonary arteries there was pronounced medial hypertrophy and intimal proliferation, which was so severe in one case that it completely occluded the arterial lumen. Foamy cells were found in the intima. Muscularisation was seen in the walls of pulmonary arterioles. Images PMID:6648850

  10. Pulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and asbestos - similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig A; Murphy, Fiona A; MacFarlane, Marion; Chernova, Tatyana; Schinwald, Anja

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a valuable industrial product but there is potential for human pulmonary exposure during production and their fibrous shape raises the possibility that they may have effects like asbestos, which caused a worldwide pandemic of disease in the20th century that continues into present. CNT may exist as fibres or as more compact particles and the asbestos-type hazard only pertains to the fibrous forms of CNT. Exposure to asbestos causes asbestosis, bronchogenic carcinoma, mesothelioma, pleural fibrosis and pleural plaques indicating that both the lungs and the pleura are targets. The fibre pathogenicity paradigm was developed in the 1970s-80s and has a robust structure/toxicity relationship that enables the prediction of the pathogenicity of fibres depending on their length, thickness and biopersistence. Fibres that are sufficiently long and biopersistent and that deposit in the lungs can cause oxidative stress and inflammation. They may also translocate to the pleura where they can be retained depending on their length, and where they cause inflammation and oxidative stress in the pleural tissues. These pathobiological processes culminate in pathologic change - fibroplasia and neoplasia in the lungs and the pleura. There may also be direct genotoxic effects of fibres on epithelial cells and mesothelium, contributing to neoplasia. CNT show some of the properties of asbestos and other types of fibre in producing these types of effects and more research is needed. In terms of the molecular pathways involved in the interaction of long biopersistent fibres with target tissue the events leading to mesothelioma have been a particular area of interest. A variety of kinase pathways important in proliferation are activated by asbestos leading to pre-malignant states and investigations are under way to determine whether fibrous CNT also affects these molecular pathways. Current research suggests that fibrous CNT can elicit effects similar to asbestos but more

  11. Toxic effects of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Lawson, Rasheeda; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-sized gold, due to its beautiful and bountiful color and unique optical properties, is a versatile material for many industrial and societal applications. We have studied the effect of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 102. The gold nanoparticles in solution prepared using the citrate reduction method is found not to be toxic or mutagenic but photomutagenic to the bacteria; however, careful control experiments indicate that the photomutagenicity is due to the co-existing citrate and Au3+ ions, not due to the gold nanoparticle itself. Au3+ is also found to be photomutagenic to the bacteria at concentrations lower than 1 µM, but toxic at higher concentrations. The toxicity of Au3+ is enhanced by light irradiation. The photomutagenicity of both citrate and Au3+ is likely due to the formation of free radicals, as a result of light-induced citrate decarboxylation or Au3+ oxidation of co-existing molecules. Both processes can generate free radicals that may cause DNA damage and mutation. Studies of the interaction of gold nanoparticles with the bacteria indicate that gold nanoparticles can be absorbed onto the bacteria surface but not able to penetrate the bacteria wall to enter the bacteria. PMID:21415096

  12. A Review of Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Toxicity of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khalili Fard, Javad; Jafari, Samira; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the use of nanomaterials has received much attention in industrial and medical fields. However, some reports have mentioned adverse effects of these materials on the biological systems and cellular components. There are several major mechanisms for cytotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) such as physicochemical properties, contamination with toxic element, fibrous structure, high surface charge and radical species generation. In this review, a brief key mechanisms involved in toxic effect of NPs are given, followed by the in vitro toxicity assays of NPs and prooxidant effects of several NPs such as carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide NPs, quantum dots, gold NPs and silver NPs. PMID:26819915

  13. Nickel Nanoparticles Exposure and Reproductive Toxicity in Healthy Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lu; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Dayong; Hu, Ke; Lu, Weiqi; Wei, Chao; Liang, Geyu; Pu, Yuepu

    2014-01-01

    Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), and lowered etradiol (E2) serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T) diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions. PMID:25407529

  14. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure were investigated. Results from 7-d sedimen...

  15. Toxicity of combined mixtures of nanoparticles to plants.

    PubMed

    Jośko, Izabela; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Skwarek, Ewa

    2017-06-05

    An increasing production and using of nanoproducts results in releasing and dispersing nanoparticles (NPs) in the environment. Being released into various environment components, NPs may interact with numerous pollutants, including other NPs. This research aimed at assessing toxicity of combined binary mixtures of NPs. The study focused on assessing mixtures of NPs believed to be toxic (nano-ZnO+nano-CuO) and nano-ZnO/nano-CuO with the ones that are insignificantly toxic or non-toxic NPs (nano-TiO2/nano-Cr2O3/nano-Fe2O3). Toxicity of combined mixtures proved comparable to toxicity of individual mixtures of NPs (the sum of effects triggered by individual types of NPs comprising respective mixtures). Toxicity evaluation was based on two parameters: seed germination and inhibition of root growth with respect to four plant species: Lepidium sativum, Linum utisassimmum, Cucumis sativus and Triticum aestivum. The findings showed combined mixtures of NPs to be significantly less toxic in comparison to individual mixtures, irrespective of their components. Within the scope of concentrations used, greatest differences between the toxicity of mixtures were reported at the 100mgL(-1) concentration. Toxicity levels of combined and individual mixtures might have been determined by a lower total concentration of Zn and Cu metals and a greater aggregation of particles in combined mixtures than in individual mixtures.

  16. Comparative Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Toxicity Using Embryonic Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Wehmas, Leah C.; Anders, Catherine; Chess, Jordan; Punnoose, Alex; Pereira, Cliff B.; Greenwood, Juliet A.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs) are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L). This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (~22.7 fold) when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 hour toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample) were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity. PMID:26029632

  17. Inhaled diesel emissions generated with cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additive induce adverse pulmonary and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C; Thomas, Ronald F; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E; Elmore, Susan A; Morrison, James P; Johnson, Crystal L; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe.

  18. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Samantha J.; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B.; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P.; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P.; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E.; Elmore, Susan A.; Morrison, James P.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  19. Applications and toxicity of silver nanoparticles: a recent review.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stefania; Vlasceanu, George Mihail; Tiplea, Roxana Elena; Bucur, Ioana Raluca; Lemnaru, Madalina; Marin, Maria Minodora; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exhibit a consistent amount of flexible properties which endorse them for a larger spectrum of applications in biomedicine and related fields. Over the years, silver nanoparticles have been subjected to numerous in vitro and in vivo tests to provide information about their toxic behavior towards living tissues and organisms. Researchers showed that AgNPs have high antimicrobial efficacy against many bacteria species including Escherichia coli, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis and also viruses. Due to their novel properties, the incorporation of silver nanoparticles into different materials like textile fibers and wound dressings can extend their utility on the biomedical field while inhibiting infections and biofilm development. Among the noble metal nanoparticles, AgNPs present a series of features like simple synthesis routes, adequate and tunable morphology, and high surface to volume ratio, intracellular delivery system, a large plasmon field area recommending them as ideal biosensors, catalysts or photo-controlled delivery systems. In bioengineering, silver nanoparticles are considered potentially ideal gene delivery systems for tissue regeneration. The remote triggered detection and release of bioactive compounds of silver nanoparticles has proved their relevance also in forensic sciences. The authors report an up to date review related to the toxicity of AgNPs and their applications in antimicrobial activity and biosensors for gene therapy.

  20. Sulfidation of silver nanoparticles: natural antidote to their toxicity.

    PubMed

    Levard, Clement; Hotze, Ernest M; Colman, Benjamin P; Dale, Amy L; Truong, Lisa; Yang, X Y; Bone, Audrey J; Brown, Gordon E; Tanguay, Robert L; Di Giulio, Richard T; Bernhardt, Emily S; Meyer, Joel N; Wiesner, Mark R; Lowry, Gregory V

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials are highly dynamic in biological and environmental media. A critical need for advancing environmental health and safety research for nanomaterials is to identify physical and chemical transformations that affect the nanomaterial properties and their toxicity. Silver nanoparticles, one of the most toxic and well-studied nanomaterials, readily react with sulfide to form Ag(0)/Ag2S core-shell particles. Here, we show that sulfidation decreased silver nanoparticle toxicity to four diverse types of aquatic and terrestrial eukaryotic organisms (Danio rerio (zebrafish), Fundulus heteroclitus (killifish), Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode worm), and the aquatic plant Lemna minuta (least duckweed)). Toxicity reduction, which was dramatic in killifish and duckweed even for low extents of sulfidation (about 2 mol % S), is primarily associated with a decrease in Ag(+) concentration after sulfidation due to the lower solubility of Ag2S relative to elemental Ag (Ag(0)). These results suggest that even partial sulfidation of AgNP will decrease the toxicity of AgNPs relative to their pristine counterparts. We also show that, for a given organism, the presence of chloride in the exposure media strongly affects the toxicity results by affecting Ag speciation. These results highlight the need to consider environmental transformations of NPs in assessing their toxicity to accurately portray their potential environmental risks.

  1. ECMO for pulmonary rescue in an adult with amiodarone-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Filippo; Molardi, Alberto; Righi, Elena; Santangelo, Rosaria; Meli, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic agent. Unfortunately amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is described for medium-long term therapy. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man admitted to our department for breathlessness and with a history of recurrent episodes of atrial fibrillation for which he had been receiving amiodarone (200 mg/day) since 2008. Despite diuretic therapy, along with aspirin, statins and antibiotics the patient continued to complain of severe dyspnea and had a moderate fever. Thus, diagnostic hypotheses different from acute cardiac failure were considered, in particular non-cardiogenic causes of pulmonary infiltrates. Following suspicion of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity, the drug was discontinued and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Due to the deterioration of the clinical picture, we proceeded to intubation. After few hours from intubation we were forced to institute a veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation due to the worsening of pulmonary function. The patient's clinical condition improved which allowed us to remove the ECMO after 15 days of treatment. Indications for use of ECMO have expanded considerably. To our knowledge this is the first successful, reported article of a veno-venous ECMO used to treat amiodarone-induced toxicity in an adult. In patients with severe but potentially reversible pulmonary toxicity caused by amiodarone, extracorporeal life support can maintain pulmonary function and vital organ perfusion at the expense of low morbidity, while allowing time for drug clearance.

  2. Pulmonary drug delivery: a role for polymeric nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    d'Angelo, Ivana; Conte, Claudia; Miro, Agnese; Quaglia, Fabiana; Ungaro, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary drug delivery represents the best way of treating lung diseases, since it allows direct delivery of the drug to the site of action, with few systemic effects. Meanwhile, the lungs may be used as a portal of entry to the body, allowing systemic delivery of drugs via the airway surfaces into the bloodstream. In both cases, the therapeutic effect of the inhaled drug can be optimized by embedding it in appropriately engineered inhalable carriers, which can protect the drug against lung defense mechanisms and promote drug transport across the extracellular and cellular barriers. To this purpose, the attention has been very recently focused on polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). The aim of this review is to offer an overview on the recent advances in NPs for pulmonary drug delivery. After a description of the main challenges encountered in developing novel inhaled products, the design rules to engineer polymeric NPs for inhalation, and in so doing to overcome barriers imposed by the lungs anatomy and physiology, are described. Then, the state-of-art on inhalable biocompatible polymeric NPs based on enzymatically-degradable natural polymers and biodegradable poly(ester)s is presented, with a special focus on NP-based dry powders for inhalation. Finally, the in vitro/in vivo models useful to address the never-ending toxicological debate related to the use of NPs for inhalation are described.

  3. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  4. Toxicity assessment of zero valent iron nanoparticles on Artemia salina.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rajdeep; Parashar, Abhinav; Raichur, Ashok M; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Anita; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2017-01-19

    The present study deals with the toxicity assessment of two differently synthesized zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI, chemical and biological) as well as Fe(2+) ions on Artemia salina at three different initial concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of these particles. The assessment was done till 96 h at time intervals of 24 h. EC50 value was calculated to evaluate the 50% mortality of Artemia salina at all exposure time durations. Between chemically and biologically synthesized nZVI nanoparticles, insignificant differences in the level of mortality were demonstrated. At even 24 h, Fe(2+) ion imparted complete lethality at the highest exposure concentration (100 mg/L). To understand intracellular oxidative stress because of zero valent iron nanoparticles, ROS estimation, SOD activity, GSH activity, and catalase activity was performed which demonstrated that ionic form of iron is quite lethal at high concentrations as compared with the same concentration of nZVI exposure. Lower concentrations of nZVI were more toxic as compared with the ionic form and was in order of CS-nZVI > BS-nZVI > Fe(2+) . Cell membrane damage and bio-uptake of nanoparticles were also evaluated for all three concentrations of BS-nZVI, CS-nZVI, and Fe(2+) using adult Artemia salina in marine water; both of which supported the observations made in toxicity assessment. This study can be further explored to exploit Artemia salina as a model organism and a biomarker in an nZVI prone aquatic system to detect toxic levels of these nanoparticles.

  5. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheng, Lin; Huang, Yue-wern; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Ma, Yinfa

    2006-12-31

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    van Aerle, Ronny; Lange, Anke; Moorhouse, Alex; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Ball, Katie; Johnston, Blair D; de-Bastos, Eliane; Booth, Timothy; Tyler, Charles R; Santos, Eduarda M

    2013-07-16

    Silver nanoparticles cause toxicity in exposed organisms and are an environmental health concern. The mechanisms of silver nanoparticle toxicity, however, remain unclear. We examined the effects of exposure to silver in nano-, bulk-, and ionic forms on zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) using a Next Generation Sequencing approach in an Illumina platform (High-Throughput SuperSAGE). Significant alterations in gene expression were found for all treatments and many of the gene pathways affected, most notably those associated with oxidative phosphorylation and protein synthesis, overlapped strongly between the three treatments indicating similar mechanisms of toxicity for the three forms of silver studied. Changes in oxidative phosphorylation indicated a down-regulation of this pathway at 24 h of exposure, but with a recovery at 48 h. This finding was consistent with a dose-dependent decrease in oxygen consumption at 24 h, but not at 48 h, following exposure to silver ions. Overall, our data provide support for the hypothesis that the toxicity caused by silver nanoparticles is principally associated with bioavailable silver ions in exposed zebrafish embryos. These findings are important in the evaluation of the risk that silver particles may pose to exposed vertebrate organisms.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles cause toxicity in exposed organisms and are an environmental health concern. The mechanisms of silver nanoparticle toxicity, however, remain unclear. We examined the effects of exposure to silver in nano-, bulk-, and ionic forms on zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) using a Next Generation Sequencing approach in an Illumina platform (High-Throughput SuperSAGE). Significant alterations in gene expression were found for all treatments and many of the gene pathways affected, most notably those associated with oxidative phosphorylation and protein synthesis, overlapped strongly between the three treatments indicating similar mechanisms of toxicity for the three forms of silver studied. Changes in oxidative phosphorylation indicated a down-regulation of this pathway at 24 h of exposure, but with a recovery at 48 h. This finding was consistent with a dose-dependent decrease in oxygen consumption at 24 h, but not at 48 h, following exposure to silver ions. Overall, our data provide support for the hypothesis that the toxicity caused by silver nanoparticles is principally associated with bioavailable silver ions in exposed zebrafish embryos. These findings are important in the evaluation of the risk that silver particles may pose to exposed vertebrate organisms. PMID:23758687

  8. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity following pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Vogel, Ulla; Ladefoged, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan

    2009-01-01

    Background The toxic and inflammatory potential of 5 different types of nanoparticles were studied in a sensitive model for pulmonary effects in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE-/-). We studied the effects instillation or inhalation Printex 90 of carbon black (CB) and compared CB instillation in ApoE-/- and C57 mice. Three and 24 h after pulmonary exposure, inflammation was assessed by mRNA levels of cytokines in lung tissue, cell composition, genotoxicity, protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Results Firstly, we found that intratracheal instillation of CB caused far more pulmonary toxicity in ApoE-/- mice than in C57 mice. Secondly, we showed that instillation of CB was more toxic than inhalation of a presumed similar dose with respect to inflammation in the lungs of ApoE-/- mice. Thirdly, we compared effects of instillation in ApoE-/- mice of three carbonaceous particles; CB, fullerenes C60 (C60) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as gold particles and quantum dots (QDs). Characterization of the instillation media revealed that all particles were delivered as agglomerates and aggregates. Significant increases in Il-6, Mip-2 and Mcp-1 mRNA were detected in lung tissue, 3 h and 24 h following instillation of SWCNT, CB and QDs. DNA damage in BAL cells, the fraction of neutrophils in BAL cells and protein in BAL fluid increased statistically significantly. Gold and C60 particles caused much weaker inflammatory responses. Conclusion Our data suggest that ApoE-/- model is sensitive for evaluating particle induced inflammation. Overall QDs had greatest effects followed by CB and SWCNT with C60 and gold being least inflammatory and DNA-damaging. However the gold was used at a much lower mass dose than the other particles. The strong effects of QDs were likely due to Cd release. The surface area of the instilled dose correlated well the inflammatory response for low toxicity particles. PMID:19138394

  9. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Liau, Ian; Huang, G. Steve

    2009-08-01

    The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  10. Prolonged Hypocalcemic Effect by Pulmonary Delivery of Calcitonin Loaded Poly(Methyl Vinyl Ether Maleic Acid) Bioadhesive Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, J.; Minaiyan, M.; Forghanian, M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design a pulmonary controlled release system of salmon calcitonin (sCT). Therefore, poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) [P(MVEMA)] nanoparticles were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Fe2+ and Zn2+ ions. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The stability of sCT in the optimized nanoparticles was studied by electrophoretic gel method. Plasma calcium levels until 48 h were determined in rats as pulmonary-free sCT solution or nanoparticles (25 μg·kg−1), iv solution of sCT (5 μg·kg−1), and pulmonary blank nanoparticles. The drug remained stable during fabrication and tests on nanoparticles. The optimized nanoparticles showed proper physicochemical properties. Normalized reduction of plasma calcium levels was at least 2.76 times higher in pulmonary sCT nanoparticles compared to free solution. The duration of hypocalcemic effect of pulmonary sCT nanoparticles was 24 h, while it was just 1 h for the iv solution. There was not any significant difference between normalized blood calcium levels reduction in pulmonary drug solution and iv injection. Pharmacological activity of nanoparticles after pulmonary delivery was 65% of the iv route. Pulmonary delivery of P(MVEMA) nanoparticles of sCT enhanced and prolonged the hypocalcemic effect of the drug significantly. PMID:24701588

  11. Developmental toxicity of intravenously injected zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinsoo; Yu, Wook-Joon; Song, Jeongah; Sung, Changhyun; Jeong, Eun Ju; Han, Ji-Seok; Kim, Pilje; Jo, Eunhye; Eom, Ikchun; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Choi, Kyunghee; Choi, Jonghye; Kim, Heyjin; Lee, Handule; Park, Juyoung; Jin, Seon Mi; Park, Kwangsik

    2016-12-01

    Recent toxicity studies of zinc oxide nanoparticles by oral administration showed relatively low toxicity, which may be resulted from low bioavailability. So, the intrinsic toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles needs to be evaluated in the target organs by intravenous injection for full systemic concentration of the administered dosage. Although the exposure chance of injection route is low compared to oral and/or inhalation route, it is important to see the toxicity with different exposure routes to get better risk management tool. In this study, the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on dams and fetuses were investigated in rats after intravenous injection (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) from gestation day 6 to 20. Two of 20 dams in the 20 mg/kg treatment group died during the treatment period. Hematological examination and serum biochemistry showed dose-dependent toxicity in treated dams. Histopathological analysis of treated dams revealed multifocal mixed cell infiltration and thrombosis in lung, tubular dilation in kidneys, and extramedullary hemopoiesis in liver. Total dead fetuses (post-implantation loss) were increased and the body weight of fetus was decreased in the 20 mg/kg treatment group. Statistical differences in corpora lutea, resorption, placental weight, morphological alterations including external, visceral and skeletal malformations were not observed in treated groups. Based on the data, lowest observed adverse effect level of injection route was suggested to be 5 mg/kg in dams and no observed adverse effect level was suggested to be 10 mg/kg in fetal developmental toxicity.

  12. Toxicity of silver and gold nanoparticles on marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Pérez, Sara; Blasco, Julián

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of nanomaterials in several novel industrial applications during the last decade has led to a rise in concerns about the potential toxic effects of released engineered nanoparticles (NPs) into the environment, as their potential toxicity to aquatic organisms is just beginning to be recognised. Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles to aquatic organisms, including microalgae, seems to be related to their physical and chemical properties, as well as their behaviour in the aquatic media where processes of dissolution, aggregation and agglomeration can occur. Although the production of these particles has increased considerably in recent years, data on their toxicity on microalgae, especially those belonging to marine or estuarine environments remain scarce and scattered. The literature shows a wide variation of results on toxicity, mainly due to the different methodology used in bioassays involving microalgae. These can range for up to EC50 data, in the case of AgNPs, representing five orders of magnitude. The importance of initial cellular density is also addressed in the text, as well as the need for keeping test conditions as close as possible to environmental conditions, in order to increase their environmental relevance. This review focuses on the fate and toxicity of silver, gold, and gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on microalgae, as key organisms in aquatic ecosystems. It is prompted by their increased production and use, and taking into account that oceans and estuaries are the final sink for those NPs. The design of bioassays and further research in the field of microalgae nanoecotoxicology is discussed, with a brief survey on newly developed technology of green (algae mediated) production of Ag, Au and Ag-Au bimetallic NPs, as well as some final considerations about future research on this field.

  13. Size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Glyptotendipes tokunagai

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seona; Kim, Soyoun; Bae, Yeon-Jae; Park, June-Woo; Jung, Jinho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to evaluate the size-dependent toxicity of spherical silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to an endemic benthic organism, Glyptotendipes tokunagai. Methods Ag nanoparticles of three nominal sizes (50, 100, and 150 nm) capped with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP-Ag NPs) were used. Their physicochemical properties, acute toxicity (48 hours), and bioaccumulation were measured using third instar larvae of G. tokunagai. Results The aggregation and dissolution of PVP-Ag NPs increased with exposure time and concentration, respectively, particularly for 50 nm PVP-Ag NPs. However, the dissolved concentration of Ag ions was not significant compared with the median lethal concentration value for AgNO3 (3.51 mg/L). The acute toxicity of PVP-Ag NPs was highest for the smallest particles (50 nm), whereas bioaccumulation was greatest for the largest particles (150 nm). However, larger PVP-Ag NPs were absorbed and excreted rapidly, resulting in shorter stays in G. tokunagai than the smaller ones. Conclusions The size of PVP-Ag NPs significantly affects their acute toxicity to G. tokunagai. In particular, smaller PVP-Ag NPs have a higher solubility and stay longer in the body of G. tokunagai, resulting in higher toxicity than larger PVP-Ag NPs. PMID:26184045

  14. Central nervous system toxicity of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Jianfeng; Shao, Longquan; Wei, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are increasingly used for the therapy, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease- or drug-induced mechanisms in the human biological system. In view of their small size, after certain modifications, NMs have the capacity to bypass or cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnology is particularly advantageous in the field of neurology. Examples may include the utilization of nanoparticle (NP)-based drug carriers to readily cross the blood–brain barrier to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases, nanoscaffolds for axonal regeneration, nanoelectromechanical systems in neurological operations, and NPs in molecular imaging and CNS imaging. However, NPs can also be potentially hazardous to the CNS in terms of nano-neurotoxicity via several possible mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, autophagy, and lysosome dysfunction, and the activation of certain signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the dual effect of NMs on the CNS and the mechanisms involved. The limitations of the current research are also discussed. PMID:26170667

  15. Silver nanoparticle toxicity in sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Siller, Lidija; Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Piticharoenphun, Sunthon; Mendis, Budhika G; Horrocks, Benjamin R; Brümmer, Franz; Medaković, Davorin

    2013-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPS) are an important model system for studying potential environmental risks posed by the use of nanomaterials. So far there is no consensus as to whether toxicity is due to AgNPs themselves or Ag(+) ions leaching from their surfaces. In sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, AgNPs cause dose dependent developmental defects such as delayed development, bodily asymmetry and shortened or irregular arms, as well as behavioural changes, particularly in swimming patterns, at concentration ∼0.3 mg/L AgNPs. It has been observed that AgNPs are more toxic than their equivalent Ag(+) ion dose.

  16. Deglycosylated bleomycin has the antitumor activity of bleomycin without pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Burgy, Olivier; Wettstein, Guillaume; Bellaye, Pierre S; Decologne, Nathalie; Racoeur, Cindy; Goirand, Françoise; Beltramo, Guillaume; Hernandez, Jean-François; Kenani, Abderraouf; Camus, Philippe; Bettaieb, Ali; Garrido, Carmen; Bonniaud, Philippe

    2016-02-17

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a potent anticancer drug used to treat different malignancies, mainly lymphomas, germ cell tumors, and melanomas. Unfortunately, BLM has major, dose-dependent, pulmonary toxicity that affects 20% of treated individuals. The most severe form of BLM-induced pulmonary toxicity is lung fibrosis. Deglyco-BLM is a molecule derived from BLM in which the sugar residue d-mannosyl-l-glucose disaccharide has been deleted. The objective of this study was to assess the anticancer activity and lung toxicity of deglyco-BLM. We compared the antitumor activity and pulmonary toxicity of intraperitoneally administrated deglyco-BLM and BLM in three rodent models. Pulmonary toxicity was examined in depth after intratracheal administration of both chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of both drugs was further studied in epithelial alveolar cells in vitro. We demonstrated in rodent cancer models, including a human Hodgkin's lymphoma xenograft and a syngeneic melanoma model, that intraperitoneal deglyco-BLM is as effective as BLM in inducing tumor regression. Whereas the antitumor effect of BLM was accompanied by a loss of body weight and the development of pulmonary toxicity, deglyco-BLM did not affect body weight and did not engender lung injury. Both molecules induced lung epithelial cell apoptosis after intratracheal administration, but deglyco-BLM lost the ability to induce caspase-1 activation and the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species), transforming growth factor-β1, and other profibrotic and inflammatory cytokines in the lungs of mice and in vitro. Deglyco-BLM should be considered for clinical testing as a less toxic alternative to BLM in cancer therapy.

  17. In Vitro Toxicity of Aluminum Nanoparticles in Human Keratinocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    absorption of aluminum has been reported after application of underarm deodorant (Becaria, 2002:311). Two adult volunteers were dermally exposed to one...NPs can be classified as a sensitizer agent. Since sensitization has been identified in persons exposed to aluminum in deodorant , vaccines, and...IN VITRO TOXICITY OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLES IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES THESIS Stephanie McCormack-Brown, Major, USAF, BSC AFIT/GIH/ENV

  18. Nanoparticles: Their potential toxicity, waste and environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrzejewska-Piotrowska, Grazyna Golimowski, Jerzy; Urban, Pawel L.

    2009-09-15

    This literature review discusses specific issues related to handling of waste containing nanomaterials. The aims are (1) to highlight problems related to uncontrolled release of nanoparticles to the environment through waste disposal, and (2) to introduce the topics of nanowaste and nanotoxicology to the waste management community. Many nanoparticles used by industry contain heavy metals, thus toxicity and bioaccumulation of heavy metals contained in nanoparticles may become important environmental issues. Although bioavailability of heavy metals contained in nanoparticles can be lower than those present in soluble form, the toxicity resulting from their intrinsic nature (e.g. their size, shape or density) may be significant. An approach to the treatment of nanowaste requires understanding of all its properties - not only chemical, but also physical and biological. Progress in nanowaste management also requires studies of the environmental impact of the new materials. The authors believe Amara's law is applicable to the impact of nanotechnologies, and society might overestimate the short-term effects of these technologies, while underestimating the long-term effects. It is necessary to have basic information from companies about the level and nature of nanomaterials produced or emitted and about the expectation of the life cycle time of nanoproducts as a basis to estimate the level of nanowaste in the future. Without knowing how companies plan to use and store recycled and nonrecycled nanomaterials, development of regulations is difficult. Tagging of nanoproducts is proposed as a means to facilitate separation and recovery of nanomaterials.

  19. Role of Physicochemical Properties in Nanoparticle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seung Won; Song, In Hyun; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-01-01

    With the recent rapid growth of technological comprehension in nanoscience, researchers have aimed to adapt this knowledge to various research fields within engineering and applied science. Dramatic advances in nanomaterials marked a new epoch in biomedical engineering with the expectation that they would have huge contributions to healthcare. However, several questions regarding their safety and toxicity have arisen due to numerous novel properties. Here, recent studies of nanomaterial toxicology will be reviewed from several physiochemical perspectives. A variety of physiochemical properties such as size distribution, electrostatics, surface area, general morphology and aggregation may significantly affect physiological interactions between nanomaterials and target biological areas. Accordingly, it is very important to finely tune these properties in order to safely fulfill a bio-user’s purpose. PMID:28347068

  20. Chemical warfare agent and biological toxin-induced pulmonary toxicity: could stem cells provide potential therapies?

    PubMed

    Angelini, Daniel J; Dorsey, Russell M; Willis, Kristen L; Hong, Charles; Moyer, Robert A; Oyler, Jonathan; Jensen, Neil S; Salem, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWAs) as well as biological toxins present a significant inhalation injury risk to both deployed warfighters and civilian targets of terrorist attacks. Inhalation of many CWAs and biological toxins can induce severe pulmonary toxicity leading to the development of acute lung injury (ALI) as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The therapeutic options currently used to treat these conditions are very limited and mortality rates remain high. Recent evidence suggests that human stem cells may provide significant therapeutic options for ALI and ARDS in the near future. The threat posed by CWAs and biological toxins for both civilian populations and military personnel is growing, thus understanding the mechanisms of toxicity and potential therapies is critical. This review will outline the pulmonary toxic effects of some of the most common CWAs and biological toxins as well as the potential role of stem cells in treating these types of toxic lung injuries.

  1. Evaluation of the Pulmonary Toxicity of Ambient Particulate Matter from Camp Victory, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    online DOI: 10.1080/15287394.2015.1072611 EVALUATION OF THE PULMONARY TOXICITY OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER FROM CAMP VICTORY, IRAQ K. L. Porter1, F. H. Y...studied. The relative toxicity of Camp Victory dust was evaluated by comparing it to particulate matter from northern Kuwait, a standard U.S. urban...the ubiquitous ambient particulate matter (PM). Airborne PM concentrations in SWA exceed environmental, occupational, and military exposure guidelines

  2. Interaction of engineered nanoparticles with toxic and essential elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumakova, A. A.; Gmoshinski, I. V.; Khotimchenko, S. A.; Trushina, E. N.

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of engineered nanoparticles with toxic and essential trace elements must be taken into consideration when estimating risks of NPs presented in the natural environment. The purpose of this work was to study the possible influence of silica, titanium dioxide (rutile) and fullerenol NPs on the toxicity of cadmium and to research the status of some trace elements and related indices of immune function in experiments on laboratory animals. Young male Wistar rats received cadmium salt (1 mg/kg b.w. Cd) orally for 28 days separately or in conjunction with the said kinds of NPs in different doses. A number of effects was observed as a result of combined action of Cd together with NPs, increase in bioaccumulation of this toxic trace element in the liver was most evident. The observed effects didn't show simple dose- dependence in respect to nanomaterials that should be taken into consideration when assessing the possible risks of joint action of nanoparticles and toxic elements existing in the environment in extremely low doses. Violation of microelement homeostasis caused by the combined action of Cd and NPs can have various adverse effects, such as inhibition of T-cell immunity induced by co-administration of Cd with rutile NPs.

  3. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    , but the polymer with a ratio of 75:25 had a continuous and longer release profile. Cytotoxicity studies showed that nanoparticles do not affect cell growth and were not toxic to cells. Conclusion In summary, α1AT-loaded nanoparticles may be considered as a novel formulation for efficient treatment of many pulmonary diseases. PMID:22607686

  4. The immune toxicity of titanium dioxide on primary pulmonary alveolar macrophages relies on their surface area and crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Yin, Li-hong; Pu, Yue-pu; Li, Yun-hui; Zhang, Xiao-qiang; Liang, Ge-yu; Li, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Juan; Li, Yan-fen; Zhang, Xue-yan

    2010-12-01

    Surface properties are critical to assess effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) primary nanoparticles on the immune function of pulmonary alveolar macrophage (PAMs). In this study the immune toxicity of TiO2 primary nanoparticles on PAMs relies on their surface area and crystal structure were determined. The primary PAMs of rats exposed to different sizes and crystal structure of TiO2 particles at different dosages for 24 hrs were evaluated for cytokines, phagocytosis, chemotaxis and surface molecules expression. Nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) level of PAMs significantly increased when exposed to TiO2 primary particles and there were significant association with the exposure total surface area and crystal structure of TiO2 particles in the former. TiO2 particles showed significant inhibiting effects on phagocytotic ability, chemotactic ability, Fc receptors and MHC-II molecular expression of macrophages compared with control. Exposure dosage and crystal structure of TiO2 particles play effects on phagocytotic ability and chemotactic ability of PAMs. These results suggested that TiO2 nanoparticles could induce the release of inflammatory mediators, initiate the inflammation development and inhibit the immune function of PAMs associated with non-specific immunity and specific immunity relies on surface area and crystal structure. NO activity might be a candidate marker indicating the TiO2 exposure burden and cell damage in PAMs.

  5. Pulmonary bioassay studies with nanoscale and fine-quartz particles in rats: toxicity is not dependent upon particle size but on surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Warheit, David B; Webb, Thomas R; Colvin, Vicki L; Reed, Kenneth L; Sayes, Christie M

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicology studies in rats demonstrate that nanoparticles are more toxic than fine-sized particles of similar chemistry. This study, however, provides evidence to contradict this theory. The aims of the study were (1) to compare the toxicity of synthetic 50 nm nanoquartz I particles versus (mined) Min-U-Sil quartz ( approximately 500 nm); the toxicity of synthetic 12 nm nanoquartz II particles versus (mined) Min-U-Sil ( approximately 500 nm) versus (synthetic) fine-quartz particles (300 nm); and (2) to evaluate the surface activities among the samples as they relate to toxicity. Well-characterized samples were tested for surface activity and hemolytic potential. In addition, groups of rats were instilled with either doses of 1 or 5 mg/kg of carbonyl iron (CI) or various alpha-quartz particle types in phosphate-buffered saline solution and subsequently assessed using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid biomarkers, cell proliferation, and histopathological evaluation of lung tissue at 24 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postexposure. Exposures to the various alpha-quartz particles produced differential degrees of pulmonary inflammation and cytotoxicity, which were not always consistent with particle size but correlated with surface activity, particularly hemolytic potential. Lung tissue evaluations of three of the quartz samples demonstrated "typical" quartz-related effects--dose-dependent lung inflammatory macrophage accumulation responses concomitant with early development of pulmonary fibrosis. The various alpha-quartz-related effects were similar qualitatively but with different potencies. The range of particle-related toxicities and histopathological effects in descending order were nanoscale quartz II = Min-U-Sil quartz > fine quartz > nanoscale quartz I > CI particles. The results demonstrate that the pulmonary toxicities of alpha-quartz particles appear to correlate better with surface activity than particle size and surface area.

  6. Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, Ingrid L.; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures. PMID:24228068

  7. Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Ingrid L; Witzmann, Frank A

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures.

  8. Pulmonary toxicity of cyclophosphamide: a 1-year study

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, C.C.; Sigler, C.; Lock, S.; Hakkinen, P.J.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The development of cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary lesions over a 1-year period was studied in mice. Male BALB/c mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Within 3 weeks there were scattered foci of intraalveolar foamy macrophages. With time, these foci increased in size and, 1 year later, occupied large areas in all lung lobes. There was also diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Chemical determination done 3, 12, 24, and 52 weeks after cyclophosphamide showed that lungs of animals treated with cyclophosphamide had significantly more hydroxyproline per lung than controls. One year after cyclophosphamide pressure - volume curves measured in vivo were shifted down and to the right and total lung volumes were decreased. A single injection of cyclophosphamide produced an irreversible and progressive pulmonary lesion. 16 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Toxicological Considerations, Toxicity Assessment, and Risk Management of Inhaled Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bakand, Shahnaz; Hayes, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Novel engineered nanoparticles (NPs), nanomaterial (NM) products and composites, are continually emerging worldwide. Many potential benefits are expected from their commercial applications; however, these benefits should always be balanced against risks. Potential toxic effects of NM exposure have been highlighted, but, as there is a lack of understanding about potential interactions of nanomaterials (NMs) with biological systems, these side effects are often ignored. NPs are able to translocate to the bloodstream, cross body membrane barriers effectively, and affect organs and tissues at cellular and molecular levels. NPs may pass the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and gain access to the brain. The interactions of NPs with biological milieu and resulted toxic effects are significantly associated with their small size distribution, large surface area to mass ratio (SA/MR), and surface characteristics. NMs are able to cross tissue and cell membranes, enter into cellular compartments, and cause cellular injury as well as toxicity. The extremely large SA/MR of NPs is also available to undergo reactions. An increased surface area of the identical chemical will increase surface reactivity, adsorption properties, and potential toxicity. This review explores biological pathways of NPs, their toxic potential, and underlying mechanisms responsible for such toxic effects. The necessity of toxicological risk assessment to human health should be emphasised as an integral part of NM design and manufacture. PMID:27314324

  10. Inhalation of Carbon Black Nanoparticles Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saputra, Devina; Yoon, Jin-ha; Park, Hyunju; Heo, Yongju; Yang, Hyoseon; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sangjin; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of recent studies have focused on the impact of particulate matter on human health. As a model for atmospheric particulate inhalation, we investigated the effects of inhaled carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) on mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The CNBPs were generated by a novel aerosolization process, and the mice were exposed to the aerosol for 4 hours. We found that CBNP inhalation exacerbated lung inflammation, as evidenced by histopathology analysis and by the expression levels of interleukin-6 protein, fibronectin, and interferon-γ mRNAs in lung tissues. Notably, fibronectin mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase in expression after CBNP exposure. These data suggest that the concentration of CBNPs delivered (calculated to be 12.5 μg/m3) can aggravate lung inflammation in mice. Our results also suggest that the inhalation of ultrafine particles like PM 2.5 is an impactful environmental risk factor for humans, particularly in susceptible populations with predisposing lung conditions. PMID:25071917

  11. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  12. Biodistribution and toxicity of spherical aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Gwang-Hee; Yoon, Cheolho; Jeong, Uiseok; Kim, Younghun; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Dong-Wan

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of the nano-industry, concerns about their potential adverse health effects have been raised. Thus, ranking accurately their toxicity and prioritizing for in vivo testing through in vitro toxicity test is needed. In this study, we used three types of synthesized aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlONPs): γ-aluminum oxide hydroxide nanoparticles (γ-AlOHNPs), γ- and α-AlONPs. All three AlONPs were spherical, and the surface area was the greatest for γ-AlONPs, followed by the α-AlONPs and γ-AlOHNPs. In mice, γ-AlOHNPs accumulated the most 24 h after a single oral dose. Additionally, the decreased number of white blood cells (WBC), the increased ratio of neutrophils and the enhanced secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 were observed in the blood of mice dosed with γ-AlOHNPs (10 mg kg(-1)). We also compared their toxicity using four different in vitro test methods using six cell lines, which were derived from their potential target organs, BEAS-2B (lung), Chang (liver), HACAT (skin), H9C2 (heart), T98G (brain) and HEK-293 (kidney). The results showed γ-AlOHNPs induced the greatest toxicity. Moreover, separation of particles was observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of cells treated with γ-AlOHNPs, but not γ-AlONPs or α-AlONPs. In conclusion, our results suggest that the accumulation and toxicity of AlONPs are stronger in γ-AlOHNPs compared with γ-AlONPs and α-AlONPs owing their low stability within biological system, and the presence of hydroxyl group may be an important factor in determining the distribution and toxicity of spherical AlONPs.

  13. Airway irritation, inflammation, and toxicity in mice following inhalation of metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Steen S.; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Keld A.; Wallin, Håkan; Nielsen, Gunnar D.; Koponen, Ismo K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metal oxide nanoparticles are used in a broad range of industrial processes and workers may be exposed to aerosols of the particles both during production and handling. Despite the widespread use of these particles, relatively few studies have been performed to investigate the toxicological effects in the airways following inhalation. In the present study, the acute (24 h) and persistent (13 weeks) effects in the airways after a single exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles were studied using a murine inhalation model. Mice were exposed 60 min to aerosols of either ZnO, TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 and the deposited doses in the upper and lower respiratory tracts were calculated. Endpoints were acute airway irritation, pulmonary inflammation based on analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell composition, DNA damage assessed by the comet assay and pulmonary toxicity assessed by protein level in BAL fluid and histology. All studied particles reduced the tidal volume in a concentration-dependent manner accompanied with an increase in the respiratory rate. In addition, ZnO and TiO2 induced nasal irritation. BAL cell analyses revealed both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation 24-h post-exposure to all particles except TiO2. The ranking of potency regarding induction of acute lung inflammation was Al2O3 = TiO2 < CeO2 ≪ ZnO. Exposure to CeO2 gave rise to a more persistent inflammation; both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation was seen 13 weeks after exposure. As the only particles, ZnO caused a significant toxic effect in the airways while TiO2 gave rise to DNA-strand break as shown by the comet assay. PMID:27323801

  14. Airway irritation, inflammation, and toxicity in mice following inhalation of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren T; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Steen S; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Keld A; Wallin, Håkan; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Koponen, Ismo K

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are used in a broad range of industrial processes and workers may be exposed to aerosols of the particles both during production and handling. Despite the widespread use of these particles, relatively few studies have been performed to investigate the toxicological effects in the airways following inhalation. In the present study, the acute (24 h) and persistent (13 weeks) effects in the airways after a single exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles were studied using a murine inhalation model. Mice were exposed 60 min to aerosols of either ZnO, TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 and the deposited doses in the upper and lower respiratory tracts were calculated. Endpoints were acute airway irritation, pulmonary inflammation based on analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell composition, DNA damage assessed by the comet assay and pulmonary toxicity assessed by protein level in BAL fluid and histology. All studied particles reduced the tidal volume in a concentration-dependent manner accompanied with an increase in the respiratory rate. In addition, ZnO and TiO2 induced nasal irritation. BAL cell analyses revealed both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation 24-h post-exposure to all particles except TiO2. The ranking of potency regarding induction of acute lung inflammation was Al2O3 = TiO2 < CeO2 ≪ ZnO. Exposure to CeO2 gave rise to a more persistent inflammation; both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation was seen 13 weeks after exposure. As the only particles, ZnO caused a significant toxic effect in the airways while TiO2 gave rise to DNA-strand break as shown by the comet assay.

  15. Natural inorganic nanoparticles – formation, fate, and toxicity in the environment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis, stability, and toxicity of engineered metal nanoparticles (ENPs) have been extensively studied during the past two decades. In contrast, research on the formation, fate and ecological effects of naturally occurring nanoparticles (NNPs) has become a focus of attent...

  16. Edible lipid nanoparticles: digestion, absorption, and potential toxicity.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian

    2013-10-01

    Food-grade nanoemulsions are being increasingly used in the food and beverage industry to encapsulate, protect, and deliver hydrophobic functional components, such as oil-soluble flavors, colors, preservatives, vitamins, and nutraceuticals. These nanoemulsions contain lipid nanoparticles (radius <100 nm) whose physicochemical characteristics (e.g., composition, dimensions, structure, charge, and physical state) can be controlled by selection of appropriate ingredients and fabrication techniques. Nanoemulsions have a number of potential advantages over conventional emulsions for applications within the food industry: higher stability to particle aggregation and gravitational separation; higher optical transparency; and, increased bioavailability of encapsulated components. On the other hand, there are also some risks associated with consumption of lipid nanoparticles that should be considered before they are widely utilized, such as their ability to alter the fate of bioactive components within the gastrointestinal tract and the potential toxicity of some of the components used in their fabrication (e.g., surfactants and organic solvents). This article provides an overview of the current status of the biological fate and potential toxicity of food-grade lipid nanoparticles suitable for utilization within the food and beverage industry.

  17. Toxicity effect of silver nanoparticles in brine shrimp Artemia.

    PubMed

    Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Jennifer, Samou Michael; Prabhu, Durai; Chandhirasekar, Devakumar

    2014-01-01

    The present study revealed the toxic effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in Artemia nauplii and evaluated the mortality rate, hatching percentage, and genotoxic effect in Artemia nauplii/cysts. The AgNPs were commercially purchased and characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were spherical in nature and with size range of 30-40 nm. Artemia cysts were collected from salt pan, processed, and hatched in sea water. Artemia nauplii (II instar) were treated using silver nanoparticles of various nanomolar concentrations and LC50 value (10 nM) and mortality rate (24 and 48 hours) was evaluated. Hatching percentage of decapsulated cysts treated with AgNPs was examined. Aggregation of AgNPs in the gut region of nauplii was studied using phase contrast microscope and apoptotic cells in nauplii stained with acridine orange were observed using fluorescence microscope. DNA damage of single cell of nauplii was determined by comet assay. This study showed that as the concentration of AgNPs increased, the mortality rate, aggregation in gut region, apoptotic cells, and DNA damage increased in nauplii, whereas the percentage of hatching in Artemia cysts decreased. Thus this study revealed that the nanomolar concentrations of AgNPs have toxic effect on both Artemia nauplii and cysts.

  18. Death by bleomycin pulmonary toxicity in ovarian dysgerminoma with pathologic complete response to chemotherapy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Calzas Rodríguez, Julia; Carmen Juarez Morales, María Del; Casero, Miguel Angel Racionero

    2016-01-01

    With cisplatin-based chemotherapy, most patients with ovarian dysgerminoma will survive long-term. Bleomycin is an important part of ovarian germ cell tumors (OGCT) treatment, and its dose-limiting toxicity is the development of pulmonary toxicity and it is increased in patients older than 40 years. We report the case of an elderly patient with an unresectable ovarian dysgerminoma who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and who developed fatal bleomycin pulmonary toxicity (BPT) after surgery. A monitoring of pulmonary function is not routinely recommended for detecting BPT, although together with carefully assessment for symptoms or signs suggestive of pulmonary toxicity is the best way to reduce the risk of BPT. The frequency of pulmonary events in older patients makes us to think about the possibility of either reduce the dose of bleomycin or removing it from the BEP in ovarian GCT.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation study of a pulmonary surfactant film interacting with a carbonaceous nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Choe, Seungho; Chang, Rakwoo; Jeon, Jonggu; Violi, Angela

    2008-11-01

    This article reports an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation to study a model pulmonary surfactant film interacting with a carbonaceous nanoparticle. The pulmonary surfactant is modeled as a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayer with a peptide consisting of the first 25 residues from surfactant protein B. The nanoparticle model with a chemical formula C188H53 was generated using a computational code for combustion conditions. The nanoparticle has a carbon cage structure reminiscent of the buckyballs with open ends. A series of molecular-scale structural and dynamical properties of the surfactant film in the absence and presence of nanoparticle are analyzed, including radial distribution functions, mean-square displacements of lipids and nanoparticle, chain tilt angle, and the surfactant protein B peptide helix tilt angle. The results show that the nanoparticle affects the structure and packing of the lipids and peptide in the film, and it appears that the nanoparticle and peptide repel each other. The ability of the nanoparticle to translocate the surfactant film is one of the most important predictions of this study. The potential of mean force for dragging the particle through the film provides such information. The reported potential of mean force suggests that the nanoparticle can easily penetrate the monolayer but further translocation to the water phase is energetically prohibitive. The implication is that nanoparticles can interact with the lung surfactant, as supported by recent experimental data by Bakshi et al.

  20. Polymeric nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugates can diminish the toxicity of mercury in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiangang; Tulsieram, Kurt Lomas; Zhou, Qixing; Mu, Li; Wen, Jianping

    2012-01-05

    Targeted delivery drugs by nanoparticles and aptamers is a hot issue; however, the application to ameliorate toxicity of toxicants is unknown, and the information about nanoparticle-aptamer toxicology and pharmacology is limited. In this work, nanoparticle-aptamer was synthesized and then its toxicological and pharmacological information was studied. Mercury was selected as a model toxicant and the antidote was entrapped by nanoparticle-aptamer. The nanoparticle-aptamer with a suitable size of 120 nm avoided aptamer biodegradation and achieved an effective release of antidote. Rats were orally administered mercury-contaminated rice and then nanoparticle-aptamer was intravenously injected. The nanoparticle-aptamer markedly reduced the quantity of mercury in both the brain and kidney, and enhanced the excretion of urinary mercury. Water Maze and Open Field tests showed that nanoparticle-aptamer ameliorated the neurotoxicity and improved the learning and memory of rats. The pharmacology of nanoparticle-aptamer involved slow antidote release, antidote-toxicant antagonism, enhancement of crucial enzymes activity and decreased lipid peroxidation. Toxicology of nanoparticle-aptamer was also studied by hematologic tests (creatinine, urea, red and white blood cell), and exhibited little toxicity. Nanoparticle-aptamer can diminish the toxicity of mercury in vivo with few adverse effects, and is a potential tool in reducing the hazards of toxicants to human health.

  1. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies. PMID:26286636

  2. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO{sub 2}-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO{sub 2} in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO{sub 2} exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO{sub 2} induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO{sub 2} and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO{sub 2} induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. -- Highlights: ► Cerium oxide exposure significantly affected the following parameters in the lung. ► Induced fibrotic cytokine OPN and TGF-β1 production and phospholipidosis. ► Caused imbalance of the MMP-9/ TIMP-1 ratio that favors fibrosis

  3. Role of oxidative stress in thuringiensin-induced pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.-F. . E-mail: sftsai@tactri.gov.tw; Yang Chi; Liu, B.-L.; Hwang, J.-S.; Ho, S.-P. . E-mail: spho@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2006-10-15

    To understand the effect of thuringiensin on the lungs tissues, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administrated with thuringiensin by intratracheal instillation at doses 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. The rats were sacrificed 4 h after treatment, and lungs were isolated and examined. Subsequently, an effective dose of 1.6 mg/kg was selected for the time course study (4, 8, 12, and 24 h). Intratracheal instillation of thuringiensin resulted in lung damage, as evidenced by increase in lung weight and decrease in alkaline phosphatase (10-54%), an enzyme localized primarily in pulmonary alveolar type II epithelial cells. Furthermore, the administration of thuringiensin caused increases in lipid peroxidation (21-105%), the indices of lung injury. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) activities of lung tissue extracts were measured to evaluate the effect of thuringiensin on antioxidant defense system. The SOD activity and GSH content in lung showed significant decreases in a dose-related manner with 11-21% and 15-37%, respectively. Those were further supported by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, as indicated by increases in IL-1{beta} (229-1017%) and TNF-{alpha} (234%) levels. Therefore, the results demonstrated that changes in the pulmonary oxidative-antioxidative status might play an important role in the thuringiensin-induced lung injury.

  4. Toxicity of Calcium Hydroxide Nanoparticles on Murine Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Azadnia, Sina; Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major contributing factors, which may cause failure of endodontic treatment, is the presence of residual microorganisms in the root canal system. For years, most dentists have been using calcium hydroxide (CH) as the intracanal medicament between treatment sessions to eliminate remnant microorganisms. Reducing the size of CH particles into nanoparticles enhances the penetration of this medicament into dentinal tubules and increases their antimicrobial efficacy. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles and conventional CH on fibroblast cell line using the Mosmann’s Tetrazolium Toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on L929 murine fibroblast cell line by cell culture and evaluation of the direct effect of materials on the cultured cells. Materials were evaluated in two groups of 10 samples each at 24, 48 and 72 h. At each time point, 10 samples along with 5 positive and 5 negative controls were evaluated. The samples were transferred into tubes and exposed to fibroblast cells. The viability of cells was then evaluated. The Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Cytotoxicity of both materials decreased over time and for conventional CH was lower than that of nanoparticles. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles was similar to that of conventional CH. PMID:25598810

  5. A Review on the Respiratory System Toxicity of Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pacurari, Maricica; Lowe, Kristine; Tchounwou, Paul B; Kafoury, Ramzi

    2016-03-15

    The respiratory system represents the main gateway for nanoparticles' entry into the human body. Although there is a myriad of engineered nanoparticles, carbon nanoparticles/nanotubes (CNPs/CNTs) have received much attention mainly due to their light weight, very high surface area, durability, and their diverse applications. Since their discovery and manufacture over two decades ago, much has been learned about nanoparticles' interactions with diverse biological system models. In particular, the respiratory system has been of great interest because various natural and man-made fibrous particles are known to be responsible for chronic and debilitating lung diseases. In this review, we present up-to-date the literature regarding the effects of CNTs or carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the human respiratory system with respect to respiratory toxicity pathways and associated pathologies. This article is intended to emphasize the potentially dangerous effects to the human respiratory system if inadequate measures are used in the manufacture, handling, and preparation and applications of CNP or CNP-based products.

  6. Silver nanoparticles: therapeutical uses, toxicity, and safety issues.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Carolina Alves; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Ingle, Avinash P; Gupta, Indarchand; Galdiero, Stefania; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Gade, Aniket; Rai, Mahendra

    2014-07-01

    The promises of nanotechnology have been realized to deliver the greatest scientific and technological advances in several areas. The biocidal activity of Metal nanoparticles in general and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) depends on several morphological and physicochemical characteristics of the particles. Many of the interactions of the AgNPs with the human body are still poorly understood; consequently, the most desirable characteristics for the AgNPs are not yet well established. Therefore, the development of nanoparticles with well-controlled morphological and physicochemical features for application in human body is still an active area of interdisciplinary research. Effects of the development of technology of nanostructured compounds seem to be so large and comprehensive that probably it will impact on all fields of science and technology. However, mechanisms of safety control in application, utilization, responsiveness, and disposal accumulation still need to be further studied in-depth to ensure that the advances provided by nanotechnology are real and liable to provide solid and consistent progress. This review aims to discuss AgNPs applied in biomedicine and as promising field for insertion and development of new compounds related to medical and pharmacy technology. The review also addresses drug delivery, toxicity issues, and the safety rules concerning biomedical applications of silver nanoparticles.

  7. Pulmonary extraction of propranolol in normal and oxygen-toxic sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.E.; Lanken, P.N.; Hansen-Flaschen, J.H.; Haselton, F.R.; Albelda, S.M.; Fishman, A.P.

    1989-07-01

    To help define the mechanisms involved in the handling of propranolol by normal and injured lungs, we studied the pulmonary extraction of (/sup 3/H)propranolol in 23 unanesthetized sheep. Extraction of propranolol by normal lungs during a single circulation was characterized by (1) subsequent back-diffusion and pulmonary retention of the drug, (2) no evidence of saturable uptake or binding, (3) no effect of isoproterenol or imipramine, and (4) no effect of increasing cardiac output by treadmill exercise. In lungs damaged by oxygen toxicity, (/sup 3/H)propranolol extraction decreased progressively to 63% of base line, paralleling progressive arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnia. In contrast, (/sup 14/C)serotonin extraction remained unchanged from base line. Our results suggest that in normal unanesthetized sheep, pulmonary extraction of propranolol occurs primarily by passive diffusion that is flow-limited. Also, lung injury induced by oxygen toxicity in sheep reduces the pulmonary extraction of propranolol. Indeed, in oxygen toxicity, the depressed extraction of propranolol is a more sensitive marker of lung injury than is serotonin extraction.

  8. Influence of silver nanoparticles on metabolism and toxicity of moulds.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Katarzyna; Twarużek, Magdalena; Czyżowska, Agata; Kosicki, Robert; Gutarowska, Beata

    2015-01-01

    The unique antimicrobial features of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are commonly applied in innumerable products. The lack of published studies on the mechanisms of AgNPs action on fungi resulted in identification of the aim of this study, which was: the determination of the influence of AgNPs on the mould cytotoxicity for swine kidney cells (MTT test) and the production of selected mycotoxins, organic acids, extracellular enzymes by moulds. The conducted study had shown that silver nanoparticles can change the metabolism and toxicity of moulds. AgNPs decrease the mycotoxin production of Aspergillus sp. (81-96%) and reduce mould cytotoxicity (50-75%). AgNPs influence the organic acid production of A. niger and P. chrysogenum by decreasing their concentration (especially of the oxalic and citric acid). Also, a change in the extracellular enzyme profile of A. niger and P. chrysogenum was observed, however, the total enzymatic activity was increased.

  9. Toxicity study of cerium oxide nanoparticles in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Monika; Singh, Shailendra Pratap; Chinde, Srinivas; Rahman, Mohammed Fazlur; Mahboob, Mohammed; Grover, Paramjit

    2014-01-01

    The present study consisted of cytotoxic, genotoxic, and oxidative stress responses of human neuroblastoma cell line (IMR32) following exposure to different doses of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs; nanoceria) and its microparticles (MPs) for 24 hours. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays whereas genotoxicity was assessed using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus and comet assays. A battery of assays including lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide, reduced glutathione, nitric oxide, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase were performed to test the hypothesis that ROS was responsible for the toxicity of nanoceria. The results showed that nanosized CeO2 was more toxic than cerium oxide MPs. Hence, further study on safety evaluation of CeO2 NPs on other models is recommended.

  10. Methods for nanoparticle labeling of ricin and effect on toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Alastair W.; Yu, Jun; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Nativo, Paola; Graham, Duncan

    2009-09-01

    The unique optical properties associated with nanostructured materials that support the excitation of surface plasmons offer many new opportunities for the enhanced optical investigation of biological materials that pose a security threat. In particular, ricin is considered a significant bioterrorism risk due to its high toxicity combined with its ready availability as a byproduct in castor oil production. Therefore, the development of optical techniques capable of rapid on-site toxin detection with high molecular specificity and sensitivity continues to be of significant importance. Furthermore, understanding of the ricin cell entry and intracellular pathways remains poor due to a lack of suitable bioanalytical techniques. Initial work aimed at simultaneously tackling both these issues is described where different approaches for the nanoparticle labeling of ricin are investigated along with changes in ricin toxicity associated with the labeling process.

  11. Toxicity of mycotoxins for the rat pulmonary macrophage in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, W.G.; Gerberick, G.F.; Lewis, D.M.; Castranova, V.

    1986-04-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in grains is well documented. Workers in grain handling occupations are commonly exposed to grain dust aerosols. Work in our laboratory has shown that T-2 toxin is highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro, causing loss of viability, release of radiolabeled chromium, inhibition of macromolecular synthesis, inhibition of phagocytosis, and inhibition of macrophage activation. Similarly, patulin caused a significant release of radiolabeled chromium, decrease in ATP levels, significant inhibition of protein and RNA synthesis, and inhibition of phagocytosis. The data show that both T-2 toxin and patulin are highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The data further suggest that the presence of these mycotoxins in airborne respirable dust might present a hazard to exposed workers.

  12. Toxicity of mycotoxins for the rat pulmonary macrophage in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, W G; Gerberick, G F; Lewis, D M; Castranova, V

    1986-01-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in grains is well documented. Workers in grain handling occupations are commonly exposed to grain dust aerosols. Work in our laboratory has shown that T-2 toxin is highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro, causing loss of viability, release of radiolabeled chromium, inhibition of macromolecular synthesis, inhibition of phagocytosis, and inhibition of macrophage activation. Similarly, patulin caused a significant release of radiolabeled chromium, decrease in ATP levels, significant inhibition of protein and RNA synthesis, and inhibition of phagocytosis. The data show that both T-2 toxin and patulin are highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The data further suggest that the presence of these mycotoxins in airborne respirable dust might present a hazard to exposed workers. PMID:2423320

  13. In Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a diversity of materials with unique physicochemical characteristics which raise concerns about their potential risk to human health. Rapid predictive testing methods are needed to characterize NMs health effects as well as to screen and prioritize N...

  14. Compared in vivo toxicity in mice of lung delivered biodegradable and non-biodegradable nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aragao-Santiago, Letícia; Hillaireau, Hervé; Grabowski, Nadège; Mura, Simona; Nascimento, Thais L; Dufort, Sandrine; Coll, Jean-Luc; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2016-01-01

    To design nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems for pulmonary administration, biodegradable materials are considered safe, but their potential toxicity is poorly explored. We here explore the lung toxicity in mice of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) and compare it to the toxicity of non-biodegradable ones. NP formulations of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coated with chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) or poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which renders 200 nm NPs of positive, negative or neutral surface charge respectively, were analyzed for their biodistribution by in vivo fluorescence imaging and their inflammatory potential after single lung nebulization in mice. After exposure, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell population, protein secretion and cytokine release as well as lung histology were carried out. The inflammatory response was compared to the one induced by non-biodegradable counterparts, namely, TiO2 of rutile and anatase crystal form and polystyrene (PS). PLGA NPs were mostly present in mice lungs, with little passage to other organs. An increase in neutrophil recruitment was observed in mice exposed to PS NPs 24 h after nebulization, which declined at 48 h. This result was supported by an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) in BAL supernatant at 24 h. TiO2 anatase NPs were still present in lung cells 48 h after nebulization and induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells to BAL. In contrast, regardless of their surface charge, PLGA NPs did not induce significant changes in the inflammation markers analyzed. In conclusion, these results point out to a safe use of PLGA NPs regardless of their surface coating compared to non-biodegradable ones.

  15. Comparative toxicity of silicon dioxide, silver and iron oxide nanoparticles after repeated oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Seung-Hyun; You, Ji-Ran; Kim, Woo Ho; Jang, Ja-June; Min, Seung-Kee; Kim, Hee Chan; Chung, Doo Hyun; Jeong, Jayoung; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Che, Jeong-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Although silicon dioxide (SiO2), silver (Ag) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles are widely used in diverse applications from food to biomedicine, in vivo toxicities of these nanoparticles exposed via the oral route remain highly controversial. To examine the systemic toxicity of these nanoparticles, well-dispersed nanoparticles were orally administered to Sprague-Dawley rats daily over a 13-week period. Based on the results of an acute toxicity and a 14-day repeated toxicity study, 975.9, 1030.5 and 1000 mg kg(-1) were selected as the highest dose of the SiO2 , Ag and Fe2O3 nanoparticles, respectively, for the 13-week repeated oral toxicity study. The SiO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not induce dose-related changes in a number of parameters associated with the systemic toxicity up to 975.9 and 1000 mg kg(-1) , respectively, whereas the Ag nanoparticles resulted in increases in serum alkaline phosphatase and calcium as well as lymphocyte infiltration in liver and kidney, raising the possibility of liver and kidney toxicity induced by the Ag nanoparticles. Compared with the SiO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles showing no systemic distribution in all tissues tested, the Ag concentration in sampled blood and organs in the Ag nanoparticle-treated group significantly increased with a positive and/or dose-related trend, meaning that the systemic toxicity of the Ag nanoparticles, including liver and kidney toxicity, might be explained by extensive systemic distribution of Ag originating from the Ag nanoparticles. Our current results suggest that further study is required to identify that Ag detected outside the gastrointestinal tract were indeed a nanoparticle form or ionized form.

  16. Pulmonary toxicity of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Conklin, A.W.; Gelman, R.A.; Adee, R.R.; Rhoads, K.

    1982-02-01

    The effects of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash, a sandy loam soil, and quartz particles on the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes of Fischer rats were studied at time intervals of up to 109 days after in tratracheal instillation of 40 mg ash, soil, or quartz in a single dose or after multiple doses of ash instilled in seven consecutive weekly doses for a total deposition of 77 mg. Quartz caused early granuloma formation, later fibrosis was also seen in lymph nodes. Volcanic ash caused an ill-defined inflammatory reaction with a few rats showing granuloma formulation, a very limited linear fibrosis, and a moderate lipoproteinosis, and lymph nodes were enlarged with numerous microgranulomas but without reticulin and collagen formation. Pulmonary reactions to soil particles were less intense but similar to those in ash- exposed animals; lymph nodes were not enlarged. No significant clearance of ash was found at 3 months after instillation. Volcanic ash produced a simple pneumoconiosis similar to what has been described for animals and humans living for prolonged periods of time in dusty desert areas of the United States.

  17. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  18. Suppressing iron oxide nanoparticle toxicity by vascular targeted antioxidant polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cochran, David B; Wattamwar, Paritosh P; Wydra, Robert; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W; Eitel, Richard E; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2013-12-01

    The biomedical use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been of continued interest in the literature and clinic. Their ability to be used as contrast agents for imaging and/or responsive agents for remote actuation makes them exciting materials for a wide range of clinical applications. Recently, however, concern has arisen regarding the potential health effects of these particles. Iron oxide toxicity has been demonstrated in in vivo and in vitro models, with oxidative stress being implicated as playing a key role in this pathology. One of the key cell types implicated in this injury is the vascular endothelial cells. Here, we report on the development of a targeted polymeric antioxidant, poly(trolox ester), nanoparticle that can suppress oxidative damage. As the polymer undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis, active trolox is locally released, providing a long term protection against pro-oxidant agents. In this work, poly(trolox) nanoparticles are targeted to platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecules (PECAM-1), which are able to bind to and internalize in endothelial cells and provide localized protection against the cytotoxicity caused by iron oxide nanoparticles. These results indicate the potential of using poly(trolox ester) as a means of mitigating iron oxide toxicity, potentially expanding the clinical use and relevance of these exciting systems.

  19. Pulmonary toxicity of components of textile paint linked to the Ardystil syndrome: intratracheal administration in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Clottens, F L; Verbeken, E K; Demedts, M; Nemery, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It was hypothesised from an epidemiological investigation that a formula change from Acramin FWR (a polyurea) to Acramin FWN (a polyamide-amine) had led to severe pulmonary disease in textile printing sprayers in SPAIN AND ALGERIA. To verify this, the pulmonary toxicity of the components of the paint systems involved was assessed in experimental animals. METHODS: Individual components and relevant mixtures, diluted in phosphate buttered saline, were given by intratracheal instillation of 2 ml/kg to hamsters. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed on days 3, 7, 14, 28, and 92 after a single intratracheal instillation, by histology and by measuring wet and dry lung weight, protein concentration, the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase, inflammatory cell number and distribution in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and hydroxyproline content in dried lung tissue. RESULTS: Based on the doses that killed 50% of the animals (LD50s), the various components were found to be 10 to 1250 times more toxic when given intratracheally than when given orally (according to reported oral LD50s in rats). Acramin FWN, Acramin FWR, Acrafix FHN, or their mixtures caused lung damage. Protein concentration, enzyme activities, total cell number, and percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils were increased in BALF during the first week after intratracheal instillation. Lung weights remained high for at least a month. Histology showed inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent fibrosis with collagen deposition. This finding was confirmed by an increased hydroxyproline content in dried lung tissue. Acramoll W did not show toxic effects. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that there is no major difference, in hamsters, between the acute intratracheal toxicity of Acramin FWR and that of Acramin FWN. Consequently, there is no simple toxicological explanation for the epidemiological hypothesis. However

  20. Pulmonary toxicity and metabolic activation of dauricine in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Dai, Jieyu; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jia; Zhong, Dafang; Gu, Yansong; Zheng, Jiang

    2010-03-01

    Dauricine is the major bioactive component isolated from the roots of Menispermum dauricum D.C. and has shown promising pharmacological activities with a great potential for clinic use. However, the adverse effects and toxicity of the alkaloid are unfortunately ignored. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the toxicity of dauricine in vitro and in vivo. Mice (CD-1) were treated intraperitoneally with dauricine at various doses, and sera and lung lavage fluids were collected after 24 h of treatment. No changes in serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and blood urea nitrogen were noticed, whereas a dose-dependent increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity was observed in lung lavage fluids. Ethidium-based staining studies showed that remarkable cells lost membrane integrity in the lungs of the animals treated with dauricine at 150 mg/kg. Histopathological evaluation of lungs of mice showed that dauricine at the same dose caused significant alveolar edema and hemorrhage. Exposure to dauricine at 40 muM for 24 h resulted in up to 60% cell death in human lung cell lines BEAS-2B, WI-38, and A549. Ketoconazole showed protective effect on the pulmonary injury in mice given dauricine. A quinone methide metabolite of dauricine was identified in mouse lung microsomal incubations, and the presence of ketoconazole in the microsomal incubations suppressed the formation of the quinone methide metabolite. In conclusion, dauricine produced pulmonary injury in CD-1 mice. The pulmonary toxicity appears to depend on the metabolism of dauricine mediated by CYP3A. The electrophilic quinone methide metabolite probably plays an important role in the pulmonary toxicity induced by dauricine.

  1. Pulmonary toxicity of indium-tin oxide production facility particles in rats.

    PubMed

    Badding, Melissa A; Fix, Natalie R; Orandle, Marlene S; Barger, Mark W; Dunnick, Katherine M; Cummings, Kristin J; Leonard, Stephen S

    2016-04-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. Occupational exposures to potentially toxic particles generated during ITO production have increased in recent years as the demand for consumer electronics continues to rise. Previous studies have demonstrated cytotoxicity in vitro and animal models have shown pulmonary inflammation and injury in response to various indium-containing particles. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which indium materials or specific processes in the workplace may be the most toxic to workers is unknown. Here we examined the pulmonary toxicity of three different particle samples that represent real-life worker exposures, as they were collected at various production stages throughout an ITO facility. Indium oxide (In2O3), sintered ITO (SITO) and ventilation dust (VD) particles each caused pulmonary inflammation and damage in rats over a time course (1, 7 and 90 days post-intratracheal instillation), but SITO and VD appeared to induce greater toxicity in rat lungs than In2O3 at a dose of 1 mg per rat. Downstream pathological changes such as PAP and fibrosis were observed in response to all three particles 90 days after treatment, with a trend towards greatest severity in animals exposed to VD when comparing animals that received the same dose. These findings may inform workplace exposure reduction efforts and provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of an emerging occupational health issue.

  2. ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESPIRABLE TIRE PARTICLES AND ASSESSMENT OF CARDIO-PULMONARY TOXICITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental Analysis of Respirable Tire Particles and Assessment of Cardio-pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    R.R. Gottipolu, PhD1, E. Landa, PhD2, J.K. McGee, MS1, M.C. Schladweiler, BS1, J.G. Wallenborn, MS3, A.D. Ledbetter, BS1, J.E. Richards, MS1 and U.P. Kodavanti, PhD1. 1NHEER...

  3. An evaluation of acute toxicity of colloidal silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maneewattanapinyo, Pattwat; Banlunara, Wijit; Thammacharoen, Chuchaat; Ekgasit, Sanong; Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth

    2011-11-01

    Tests for acute oral toxicity, eye irritation, corrosion and dermal toxicity of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were conducted in laboratory animals following OECD guidelines. Oral administration of AgNPs at a limited dose of 5,000 mg/kg produced neither mortality nor acute toxic signs throughout the observation period. Percentage of body weight gain of the mice showed no significant difference between control and treatment groups. In the hematological analysis, there was no significant difference between mice treated with AgNPs and controls. Blood chemistry analysis also showed no differences in any of the parameter examined. There was neither any gross lesion nor histopathological change observed in various organs. The results indicated that the LD(50) of colloidal AgNPs is greater than 5,000 mg/kg body weight. In acute eye irritation and corrosion study, no mortality and toxic signs were observed when various doses of colloidal AgNPs were instilled in guinea pig eyes during 72 hr observation period. However, the instillation of AgNPs at 5,000 ppm produced transient eye irritation during early 24 hr observation time. No any gross abnormality was noted in the skins of the guinea pigs exposed to various doses of colloidal AgNPs. In addition, no significant AgNPs exposure relating to dermal tissue changes was observed microscopically. In summary, these findings of all toxicity tests in this study suggest that colloidal AgNPs could be relatively safe when administered to oral, eye and skin of the animal models for short periods of time.

  4. Toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Nadine; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Kockentiedt, Sarah; Hintz, Werner; Tomas, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA NPs) are candidates for a drug delivery system, which can cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Because little is known about their toxicity, we exposed cells to PBCA NPs in vitro and in vivo and monitored their life and death assays. PBCA NPs were fabricated with different surfactants according to the mini-emulsion technique. Viabilities of HeLa and HEK293 cells after NP incubation were quantified by analysing cellular metabolic activity (MTT-test). We then repetitively injected i.v. rhodamine-labelled PBCA NP variations into rats and monitored the survival and morphology of retrogradely labelled neurons by in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) for five weeks. To test for carrier-efficacy and safety, PBCA NPs loaded with Kyotorphin were injected in rats, and a hot plate test was used to quantify analgesic effects. In vitro, we found dose-dependent cell death which was, however, only detectable at very high doses and mainly seen in the cultures incubated with NPs fabricated with the tensids SDS and Tween. However, the in vivo experiments did not show any NP-induced neuronal death, even with particles which were toxic at high dose in vitro, i.e. NPs with Tween and SDS. The increased pain threshold at the hot plate test demonstrated that PBCA NPs are able to cross the BBB and thus comprise a useful tool for drug delivery into the central nervous system (CNS). Our findings showing that different nanoparticle formulations are non-toxic have important implications for the value of NP engineering approaches in medicine. PMID:26420981

  5. Toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Nadine; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Kockentiedt, Sarah; Hintz, Werner; Tomas, Jürgen; Sabel, Bernhard A.

    2014-06-01

    Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA NPs) are candidates for a drug delivery system, which can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Because little is known about their toxicity, we exposed cells to PBCA NPs in vitro and in vivo and monitored their life and death assays. PBCA NPs were fabricated with different surfactants according to the mini-emulsion technique. Viabilities of HeLa and HEK293 cells after NP incubation were quantified by analysing cellular metabolic activity (MTT-test). We then repetitively injected i.v. rhodamine-labelled PBCA NP variations into rats and monitored the survival and morphology of retrogradely labelled neurons by in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) for five weeks. To test for carrier-efficacy and safety, PBCA NPs loaded with Kyotorphin were injected in rats, and a hot plate test was used to quantify analgesic effects. In vitro, we found dose-dependent cell death which was, however, only detectable at very high doses and mainly seen in the cultures incubated with NPs fabricated with the tensids SDS and Tween. However, the in vivo experiments did not show any NP-induced neuronal death, even with particles which were toxic at high dose in vitro, i.e. NPs with Tween and SDS. The increased pain threshold at the hot plate test demonstrated that PBCA NPs are able to cross the BBB and thus comprise a useful tool for drug delivery into the central nervous system (CNS). Our findings showing that different nanoparticle formulations are non-toxic have important implications for the value of NP engineering approaches in medicine.

  6. Toxic pulmonary effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luketich, James D.; Perry, Yaron; Wong, Hsien; Epperly, Michael W.

    2002-06-01

    A major limitation of PDT for Barrett's esophagus is the development of esophageal strictures. This report summarizes the effects of PDT delivered to mouse esophagus. Sixty-two C3H/Nsd mice were injected with Photofrin (2-10mg/Kg) intraperitoneally. Forty-eight hours later a 1 cm laser probe was passed orally to the mid-esophagus. Light energy (630nm) ranged from 0 to 400 Joules/cm (J). Animals were sacrificed if death was imminent, otherwise at 6 weeks and 3 months. Gross and microscopic exams were performed on paraffin embedded esophagus and lung specimens. Exposure to 400J as a single fraction, 125 X 3 or 150 X 3 fractions resulted in a lethal pulmonary injury in 90% of mice within 48 hours. There was no esophageal mucosal damage at this early time point. Lower doses caused minor pulmonary injury allowing long-term survival but no change in the esophageal endothelium and no stricture. In the mouse, this histopathologic study demonstrates that pulmonary toxicity is the limiting factor following esophageal PDT. At lower PDT doses, minimal pulmonary damage occurred but no effect was observed on the esophagus. We believe the 5 mm depth of PDT injury leads to lethal pulmonary damage preventing subsequent study of the effects on the esophagus.

  7. Understanding the toxicity of aggregated zero valent copper nanoparticles against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Fred; Angelov, Angel; Badia, Daniel; Kumar, Amit; Seal, Sudipta; Shah, Vishal

    2010-08-15

    Copper nanoparticles are used in wide variety of applications and in the current study we report the antimicrobial activity of these particles. Influence of pH, temperature, aeration rate, concentration of nanoparticles and concentration of bacteria on the toxicity of copper nanoparticles against Escherichia coli have been studied using a centroid mixture design of experiment. The linear and quadratic regression model shows that the toxicity of copper nanoparticles not only depends on the primary effect of the parameters tested (pH, temperature, aeration, concentration of E. coli and concentration of nanoparticles), but also on the interactive effect of these parameters.

  8. Toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticle suspensions to aquatic biota.

    PubMed

    Manusadžianas, Levonas; Caillet, Celine; Fachetti, Louis; Gylytė, Brigita; Grigutytė, Reda; Jurkonienė, Sigita; Karitonas, Rolandas; Sadauskas, Kazys; Thomas, Fabien; Vitkus, Rimantas; Férard, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity effects induced by nanosuspensions of CuO (<50 nm; Sigma-Aldrich) on macrophytic algae cells of Nitellopsis obtusa (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50]), microphytic algae Chlorella (30-min median inhibitory concentration [IC50]), shrimp Thamnocephalus platyurus (24-h LC50), and rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus (24-h LC50) were investigated. No substantial differences between the effects of nonsonicated and sonicated nCuO suspensions were observed. The particle size distribution analysis accomplished by the laser diffraction technique at suspension concentration from 3 to 100 mg/L revealed rapid (within 5 min) reagglomeration of the particles after the sonication. The observed adverse effects on N. obtusa cells may be attributed to nanoparticles per se, but not to ionic Cu, because neither chemical analysis nor biological testing (algae survival in the supernatants of suspensions) confirmed the presence of cupric ions in toxic amounts. Contrary to ionic Cu form, nCuO delayed the initial phase of N. obtusa cell membrane depolarization. Lethality tests with rewash demonstrated that the least used 5-min exposure in 100 mg/L nCuO sonicated suspension induced 70% mortality in charophyte cells after 8 d, whereas the rewash after a short exposure to a noticeably toxic concentration of Cu(2+) prevented cell mortality. The obtained data suggested the possible influence of a thick charophyte cell wall on the dynamics of nanotoxicity effects.

  9. Acute Toxicity of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles in Intravenously Exposed ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Jin, Minghua; Du, Zhongjun; Li, Yanbo; Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the acute toxicity of intravenously administrated amorphous silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in mice. The lethal dose, 50 (LD50), of intravenously administrated SNPs was calculated in mice using Dixon's up-and-down method (262.45±33.78 mg/kg). The acute toxicity was evaluated at 14 d after intravenous injection of SNPs at 29.5, 103.5 and 177.5 mg/kg in mice. A silicon content analysis using ICP-OES found that SNPs mainly distributed in the resident macrophages of the liver (10.24%ID/g), spleen (34.78%ID/g) and lung (1.96%ID/g). TEM imaging showed only a small amount in the hepatocytes of the liver and in the capillary endothelial cells of the lung and kidney. The levels of serum LDH, AST and ALT were all elevated in the SNP treated groups. A histological examination showed lymphocytic infiltration, granuloma formation, and hydropic degeneration in liver hepatocytes; megakaryocyte hyperplasia in the spleen; and pneumonemia and pulmonary interstitial thickening in the lung of the SNP treated groups. A CD68 immunohistochemistry stain indicated SNPs induced macrophage proliferation in the liver and spleen. The results suggest injuries induced by the SNPs in the liver, spleen and lungs. Mononuclear phagocytic cells played an important role in the injury process. PMID:23593469

  10. Pulmonary surfactant augments cytotoxicity of silica nanoparticles: Studies on an in vitro air-blood barrier model.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Feiden, Lisa; Hermanns, Maria I; Bantz, Christoph; Maskos, Michael; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-01-01

    The air-blood barrier is a very thin membrane of about 2.2 µm thickness and therefore represents an ideal portal of entry for nanoparticles to be used therapeutically in a regenerative medicine strategy. Until now, numerous studies using cellular airway models have been conducted in vitro in order to investigate the potential hazard of NPs. However, in most in vitro studies a crucial alveolar component has been neglected. Before aspirated NPs encounter the cellular air-blood barrier, they impinge on the alveolar surfactant layer (10-20 nm in thickness) that lines the entire alveolar surface. Thus, a prior interaction of NPs with pulmonary surfactant components will occur. In the present study we explored the impact of pulmonary surfactant on the cytotoxic potential of amorphous silica nanoparticles (aSNPs) using in vitro mono- and complex coculture models of the air-blood barrier. Furthermore, different surface functionalisations (plain-unmodified, amino, carboxylate) of the aSNPs were compared in order to study the impact of chemical surface properties on aSNP cytotoxicity in combination with lung surfactant. The alveolar epithelial cell line A549 was used in mono- and in coculture with the microvascular cell line ISO-HAS-1 in the form of different cytotoxicity assays (viability, membrane integrity, inflammatory responses such as IL-8 release). At a distinct concentration (100 µg/mL) aSNP-plain displayed the highest cytotoxicity and IL-8 release in monocultures of A549. aSNP-NH2 caused a slight toxic effect, whereas aSNP-COOH did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. In combination with lung surfactant, aSNP-plain revealed an increased cytotoxicity in monocultures of A549, aSNP-NH2 caused a slightly augmented toxic effect, whereas aSNP-COOH did not show any toxic alterations. A549 in coculture did not show any decreased toxicity (membrane integrity) for aSNP-plain in combination with lung surfactant. However, a significant augmented IL-8 release was observed, but no

  11. Toxicity assessment of zinc oxide nanoparticles using sub-acute and sub-chronic murine inhalation models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many commercial products and the potential for human exposure is increasing, few in vivo studies have addressed their possible toxic effects after inhalation. We sought to determine whether ZnO NPs induce pulmonary toxicity in mice following sub-acute or sub-chronic inhalation exposure to realistic exposure doses. Methods Mice (C57Bl/6) were exposed to well-characterized ZnO NPs (3.5 mg/m3, 4 hr/day) for 2 (sub-acute) or 13 (sub-chronic) weeks and necropsied immediately (0 wk) or 3 weeks (3 wks) post exposure. Toxicity was assessed by enumeration of total and differential cells, determination of total protein, lactate dehydrogenase activity and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid as well as measurements of pulmonary mechanics. Generation of reactive oxygen species was assessed in the lungs. Lungs were evaluated for histopathologic changes and Zn content. Zn concentration in blood, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, brain and BAL fluid was measured. Results An elevated concentration of Zn2+ was detected in BAL fluid immediately after exposures, but returned to baseline levels 3 wks post exposure. Dissolution studies showed that ZnO NPs readily dissolved in artificial lysosomal fluid (pH 4.5), but formed aggregates and precipitates in artificial interstitial fluid (pH 7.4). Sub-acute exposure to ZnO NPs caused an increase of macrophages in BAL fluid and a moderate increase in IL-12(p40) and MIP-1α, but no other inflammatory or toxic responses were observed. Following both sub-acute and sub-chronic exposures, pulmonary mechanics were no different than sham-exposed animals. Conclusions Our ZnO NP inhalation studies showed minimal pulmonary inflammation, cytotoxicity or lung histopathologic changes. An elevated concentration of Zn in the lung and BAL fluid indicates dissolution of ZnO NPs in the respiratory system after inhalation. Exposure concentration, exposure mode and time post

  12. Acute pulmonary toxicity of urban particulate matter and ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, R.; Bjarnason, S. G.; Adamson, I. Y.; Hedgecock, C.; Kumarathasan, P.; Guénette, J.; Potvin, M.; Goegan, P.; Bouthillier, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the acute lung toxicity of urban particulate matter in interaction with ozone. Rats were exposed for 4 hours to clean air, ozone (0.8 ppm), the urban dust EHC-93 (5 mg/m3 or 50 mg/m3), or ozone in combination with urban dust. The animals were returned to clean air for 32 hours and then injected (intraperitoneally) with [3H]thymidine to label proliferating cells and killed after 90 minutes. The lungs were fixed by inflation, embedded in glycol methacrylate, and processed for light microscopy autoradiography. Cell labeling was low in bronchioles (0.14 +/- 0.04%) and parenchyma (0.13 +/- 0.02%) of air control animals. Inhalation of EHC-93 alone did not induce cell labeling. Ozone alone increased (P < 0.05) cell labeling (bronchioles, 0.42 +/- 0.16%; parenchyma, 0.57 +/- 0.21%), in line with an acute reparative cell proliferation. The effects of ozone were clearly potentiated by co-exposure with either the low (3.31 +/- 0.31%; 0.99 +/- 0.18%) or the high (4.45 +/- 0.51%; 1.47 +/- 0.18%) concentrations of urban dust (ozone X EHC-93, P < 0.05). Cellular changes were most notable in the epithelia of terminal bronchioles and alveolar ducts and did not distribute to the distal parenchyma. Enhanced DNA synthesis indicates that particulate matter from ambient air can exacerbate epithelial lesions in the lungs. This may extend beyond air pollutant interactions, such as to effects of inhaled particles in the lungs of compromised individuals. Images Figure 1 PMID:9403707

  13. Pulmonary toxicity of dust generated during weaving of carpets.

    PubMed

    Ameen, M; Ahmad, I; Rahman, Q

    2002-12-01

    The dust generated during weaving (carpet dust) tibbati, knotted and tuffted carpets in carpet industry was studied for its toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Carpet dust (0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/1 x 10(6) cells) caused in vitro cytotoxicity in rat alveolar macrophages (AM) in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxic, inflammatory and oxidative responses were observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats at 1, 4, 8 and 16 days after exposure. Rats were intratracheally exposed at 5 mg/rat individually to all three types of carpet dust. All types of carpet dusts produced increased AM, lymphocytes (PMN) population in BALF suggesting their inflammatory reactions. Cytotoxic nature of carpet dust was shown by the increased activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and acid phosphatase (AP) in BALF. Increased AM population and in vitro cytotoxicity due to carpet dusts have shown some correlation with the levels of LDH and AP activities in BALF. The gradual enhanced profile of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) along with depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) in AM due to these carpet dusts are suggestive of their oxidant nature. The enzyme activities of both glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) in AM were marginally reduced in exposed rats. In conclusion, the data suggest the cytotoxic, inflammatory and oxidant nature of carpet dusts. It is extrapolated that health effects on carpet weavers would be associated with the concentration and nature of airborne dust generated during weaving of carpets.

  14. Toxicity of nanoparticle surface coating agents: Structure-cytotoxicity relationship.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Xiaoping; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-07-02

    Surface coating agents for metal nanoparticles, cationic alkyl ammonium bromides, and anionic alkyl sulfates were tested against human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and blood T lymphocytes (TIB-152). The surfactants of short chain (C8) are not cytotoxic, but as chain length increases, their cytotoxicity increases and levels off at C12 for cationic surfactants against both cell lines and for anionic surfactants against the TIB-152, but C14 for anionic surfactants against HaCaT. The cationic surfactants are more toxic than the anionic surfactants for HaCaT; while with similar cytotoxicity for TIB-152 cells. di- and tetra-Alkyl ammonium salts are more cytotoxic than the mono-substituted.

  15. Dose-Dependent Pulmonary Toxicity After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, David C. Smythe, W. Roy; Liao Zhongxing; Guerrero, Thomas; Chang, Joe Y.; McAleer, Mary F.; Jeter, Melenda D.; Correa, Arlene Ph.D.; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Liu, H. Helen; Komaki, Ritsuko; Forster, Kenneth M.; Stevens, Craig W.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of fatal pulmonary events after extrapleural pneumonectomy and hemithoracic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 63 consecutive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who underwent extrapleural pneumonectomy and IMRT at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The endpoints studied were pulmonary-related death (PRD) and non-cancer-related death within 6 months of IMRT. Results: Of the 63 patients, 23 (37%) had died within 6 months of IMRT (10 of recurrent cancer, 6 of pulmonary causes [pneumonia in 4 and pneumonitis in 2], and 7 of other noncancer causes [pulmonary embolus in 2, sepsis after bronchopleural fistula in 1, and cause unknown but without pulmonary symptoms or recurrent disease in 4]). On univariate analysis, the factors that predicted for PRD were a lower preoperative ejection fraction (p = 0.021), absolute volume of lung spared at 10 Gy (p = 0.025), percentage of lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}; p 0.002), and mean lung dose (p = 0.013). On multivariate analysis, only V{sub 20} was predictive of PRD (p = 0.017; odds ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.08) or non-cancer-related death (p = 0.033; odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.45). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that fatal pulmonary toxicities were associated with radiation to the contralateral lung. V{sub 20} was the only independent determinant for risk of PRD or non-cancer-related death. The mean V{sub 20} of the non-PRD patients was considerably lower than that accepted during standard thoracic radiotherapy, implying that the V{sub 20} should be kept as low as possible after extrapleural pneumonectomy.

  16. A Review on the Respiratory System Toxicity of Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Lowe, Kristine; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Kafoury, Ramzi

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory system represents the main gateway for nanoparticles’ entry into the human body. Although there is a myriad of engineered nanoparticles, carbon nanoparticles/nanotubes (CNPs/CNTs) have received much attention mainly due to their light weight, very high surface area, durability, and their diverse applications. Since their discovery and manufacture over two decades ago, much has been learned about nanoparticles’ interactions with diverse biological system models. In particular, the respiratory system has been of great interest because various natural and man-made fibrous particles are known to be responsible for chronic and debilitating lung diseases. In this review, we present up-to-date the literature regarding the effects of CNTs or carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the human respiratory system with respect to respiratory toxicity pathways and associated pathologies. This article is intended to emphasize the potentially dangerous effects to the human respiratory system if inadequate measures are used in the manufacture, handling, and preparation and applications of CNP or CNP-based products. PMID:26999172

  17. ROC curves and evaluation of radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Pehr A. . E-mail: Pehr.Lind@Karolinska.se; Wennberg, Berit M.Sc.; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Rosfors, Stefan; Blom-Goldman, Ulla; Lidestahl, Anders; Svane, Gunilla

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To study clinical, radiologic, and physiologic pulmonary toxicity in 128 women after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer in relation to dosimetric factors. Methods and Material: The patients underwent pulmonary function testing before and 5 months post-RT. Similarly, computer tomography of the chest was repeated 4 months post-RT and changes were scored with a semiquantitative system. Clinical symptoms were registered and scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria. All patients underwent three-dimensional dose planning, and the ipsilateral lung volume receiving {>=}13 Gy (V13), V20, and V30 were calculated. Multiple logistic or regression analyses were used for multivariate modeling. The relation between the dosimetric factors and side effects was also analyzed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: V20 was, according to multivariate modeling, the most important variable for the occurrence of the three studied side effects (p < 0.01). Age was also related to symptomatic and radiologic pneumonitis. Reduced pre-RT functional level was more common in patients developing symptomatic toxicity. The ROC areas for symptomatic pneumonitis in relation to V13, V20, and V30 were 0.69, 0.69, and 0.67, and for radiologic pneumonitis 0.85, 0.85, and 0.81. Conclusions: Our results support the use of three-dimensional planning aimed at minimizing the percent of incidentally irradiated lung volume to reduce pulmonary toxicity. Age was also correlated with post-RT side effects. According to ROC analysis, V20 could well predict the risk for radiologic pneumonitis for the studied semiquantitative model.

  18. Nanoparticle toxicity assessment using an in vitro 3-D kidney organoid culture model.

    PubMed

    Astashkina, Anna I; Jones, Clint F; Thiagarajan, Giridhar; Kurtzeborn, Kristen; Ghandehari, Hamid; Brooks, Benjamin D; Grainger, David W

    2014-08-01

    Nanocarriers and nanoparticles remain an intense pharmaceutical and medical imaging technology interest. Their entry into clinical use is hampered by the lack of reliable in vitro models that accurately predict in vivo toxicity. This study evaluates a 3-D kidney organoid proximal tubule culture to assess in vitro toxicity of the hydroxylated generation-5 PAMAM dendrimer (G5-OH) compared to previously published preclinical in vivo rodent nephrotoxicity data. 3-D kidney proximal tubule cultures were created using isolated murine proximal tubule fractions suspended in a biomedical grade hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel. Toxicity in these cultures to neutral G5-OH dendrimer nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles in vitro was assessed using clinical biomarker generation. Neutral PAMAM nanoparticle dendrimers elicit in vivo-relevant kidney biomarkers and cell viability in a 3-D kidney organoid culture that closely reflect toxicity markers reported in vivo in rodent nephrotoxicity models exposed to this same nanoparticle.

  19. Toxic Effects of Silica Nanoparticles on Zebrafish Embryos and Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huiqin; Tian, Linwei; Guo, Caixia; Huang, Peili; Zhou, Xianqing; Peng, Shuangqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been widely used in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Environmental exposure to nanomaterials is inevitable as they become part of our daily life. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the possible toxic effects of SiNPs exposure. In this study, zebrafish embryos were treated with SiNPs (25, 50, 100, 200 µg/mL) during 4–96 hours post fertilization (hpf). Mortality, hatching rate, malformation and whole-embryo cellular death were detected. We also measured the larval behavior to analyze whether SiNPs had adverse effects on larvae locomotor activity. The results showed that as the exposure dosages increasing, the hatching rate of zebrafish embryos was decreased while the mortality and cell death were increased. Exposure to SiNPs caused embryonic malformations, including pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, tail and head malformation. The larval behavior testing showed that the total swimming distance was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The lower dose (25 and 50 µg/mL SiNPs) produced substantial hyperactivity while the higher doses (100 and 200 µg/mL SiNPs) elicited remarkably hypoactivity in dark periods. In summary, our data indicated that SiNPs caused embryonic developmental toxicity, resulted in persistent effects on larval behavior. PMID:24058598

  20. Research of nickel nanoparticles toxicity with use of Aquatic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgaleva, T.; Morgalev, Yu; Gosteva, I.; Morgalev, S.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of nanoparticles with the particle size Δ50=5 nm on the test function of aquatic organisms was analyzed by means of biotesting methods with the use of a complex of test-organisms representing general trophic levels. The dependence of an infusoria Paramecium caudatum chemoattractant-elicited response, unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris Beijer growth rate, Daphnia magna Straus mortality and trophic activity and Danio rerio fish kill due to nNi disperse system concentration, is estimated. It is determined that the release of chlorella into cultivated environment including nNi as a feed for daphnias raises the death rate of entomostracans. The minimal concentration, whereby an organism response to the effect of nNi is registered, depends on the type of test organism and the analysed test function. L(E)C20 is determined for all the organisms used in bioassays. L(E)C50 is estimated for Paramecium caudatum (L(E)C50 = 0.0049 mg/l), for Chlorella vulgaris Beijer (L(E)C50 = 0.529 mg/l), for Daphnia m. S (L(E)C50 > 100 mg/l) and for fish Danio rerio (L(E)C50 > 100 mg/l). According to the Globally Harmonized System hazard substance evaluation criteria and Commission Directive 93/67/EEC, nNi belongs to the “acute toxicity 1” category of toxic substances.

  1. Mechanisms of Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liying

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has offered innovative discoveries in the medical, industrial, and consumer sectors. The unique physicochemical and electrical properties of engineered nanoparticles (NP) make them highly desirable in a variety of applications. However, these novel properties of NP are fraught with concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in structural and physicochemical properties of NP can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS generation, one of the most frequently reported NP-associated toxicities. Oxidative stress induced by engineered NP is due to acellular factors such as particle surface, size, composition, and presence of metals, while cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, NP-cell interaction, and immune cell activation are responsible for ROS-mediated damage. NP-induced oxidative stress responses are torch bearers for further pathophysiological effects including genotoxicity, inflammation, and fibrosis as demonstrated by activation of associated cell signaling pathways. Since oxidative stress is a key determinant of NP-induced injury, it is necessary to characterize the ROS response resulting from NP. Through physicochemical characterization and understanding of the multiple signaling cascades activated by NP-induced ROS, a systemic toxicity screen with oxidative stress as a predictive model for NP-induced injury can be developed. PMID:24027766

  2. Aquatic Toxicity Comparison of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Eun Kyung; Johari, Seyed Ali; Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Ellen; Lee, Ji Hyun; Chung, Young Shin; Yu, Il Je

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impact of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) released into freshwater environments, the toxicities of these nanomaterials were assessed and compared using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guidelines, including a "Daphnia sp., acute immobilization test," "Fish, acute toxicity test," and "freshwater alga and cyanobacteria, growth inhibition test." Based on the estimated median lethal/effective concentrations of AgNPs and AgNWs, the susceptibility to the nanomaterials was different among test organisms (daphnia > algae > fish), suggesting that the AgNPs are classified as "category acute 1" for Daphnia magna, "category acute 2" for Oryzias latipes, and "category acute 1" for Raphidocelis subcapitata, while the AgNWs are classified as "category acute 1" for Daphnia magna, "category acute 2" for Oryzias latipes, and "category acute 2" for Raphidocelis subcapitata, according to the GHS (Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals). In conclusion, the present results suggest that more attention should be paid to prevent the accidental or intentional release of silver nanomaterials into freshwater aquatic environments.

  3. Toxicity, distribution, and accumulation of silver nanoparticles in Wistar rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Cristobal, L. F.; Martinez-Castañon, G. A.; Loyola-Rodriguez, J. P.; Patiño-Marin, N.; Reyes-Macías, J. F.; Vargas-Morales, J. M.; Ruiz, Facundo

    2013-06-01

    The bactericidal effect of silver nanoparticles (SNP) has lead to their application in several products mainly in the medicine field. This study analyzed the distribution, accumulation, and toxicity in principal organs of Wistar rats exposed to SNP suspensions by oral administration. Two sizes of washed SNP (14 and 36 nm) were prepared, characterized, and redispersed in deionized water. Each suspension was administrated to Wistar rats by oral way for 55 days; after finishing this treatment time, rats were sacrificed by anesthesia overdose. Organs were collected, processed, and prepared; then, accumulation and concentrations of SNP were obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Toxicity was determined by clinical chemistry and hematology from blood samples in three different periods; light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to evaluate histopathology in tissues. Silver concentrations were higher in small intestine, followed by kidney, liver, and brain. Clinical chemistry and hematology showed altered values in blood urea nitrogen, total proteins, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, concentration values had statistical difference in both groups (14 and 36 nm) ( p < 0.05). LM, SEM, ICP-MS, clinical chemistry, and hematology tests suggest that the administration way, concentration, shape, size, presentation, administration time of SNP used in this study, do not change significantly these values.

  4. Validation of an LDH Assay for Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xianglu; Gelein, Robert; Corson, Nancy; Wade-Mercer, Pamela; Jiang, Jingkun; Biswas, Pratim; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Elder, Alison; Oberdörster, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Studies showed that certain cytotoxicity assays were not suitable for assessing nanoparticle (NP) toxicity. We evaluated a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for assessing copper (Cu-40, 40 nm), silver (Ag-35, 35 nm; Ag-40, 40 nm), and titanium dioxide (TiO2-25, 25 nm) NPs by examining their potential to inactivate LDH and interference with β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), a substrate for the assay. We also performed a dissolution assay for some of the NPs. We found that the copper NPs, because of their high dissolution rate, could interfere with the LDH assay by inactivating LDH. Ag-35 could also inactivate LDH probably because of the carbon matrix used to cage the particles during synthesis. TiO2-25 NPs were found to adsorb LDH molecules. In conclusion, NP interference with the LDH assay depends on the type of NPs and the suitability of the assay for assessing NP toxicity should be examined case by case. PMID:21722700

  5. Environmental transformations of silver nanoparticles: impact on stability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Levard, Clément; Hotze, E Matt; Lowry, Gregory V; Brown, Gordon E

    2012-07-03

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) readily transform in the environment, which modifies their properties and alters their transport, fate, and toxicity. It is essential to consider such transformations when assessing the potential environmental impact of Ag-NPs. This review discusses the major transformation processes of Ag-NPs in various aqueous environments, particularly transformations of the metallic Ag cores caused by reactions with (in)organic ligands, and the effects of such transformations on physical and chemical stability and toxicity. Thermodynamic arguments are used to predict what forms of oxidized silver will predominate in various environmental scenarios. Silver binds strongly to sulfur (both organic and inorganic) in natural systems (fresh and sea waters) as well as in wastewater treatment plants, where most Ag-NPs are expected to be concentrated and then released. Sulfidation of Ag-NPs results in a significant decrease in their toxicity due to the lower solubility of silver sulfide, potentially limiting their short-term environmental impact. This review also discusses some of the major unanswered questions about Ag-NPs, which, when answered, will improve predictions about their potential environmental impacts. Research needed to address these questions includes fundamental molecular-level studies of Ag-NPs and their transformation products, particularly Ag(2)S-NPs, in simplified model systems containing common (in)organic ligands, as well as under more realistic environmental conditions using microcosm/mesocosm-type experiments. Toxicology studies of Ag-NP transformation products, including different states of aggregation and sulfidation, are also required. In addition, there is the need to characterize the surface structures, compositions, and morphologies of Ag-NPs and Ag(2)S-NPs to the extent possible because they control properties such as solubility and reactivity.

  6. Size effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on in vivo and in vitro pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Katsuhide; Fukuda, Makiko; Endoh, Shigehisa; Maru, Junko; Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Shinohara, Naohide; Uchino, Kanako; Honda, Kazumasa

    2015-03-01

    To elucidate the effect of size on the pulmonary toxicity of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we prepared two types of dispersed SWCNTs, namely relatively thin bundles with short linear shapes (CNT-1) and thick bundles with long linear shapes (CNT-2), and conducted rat intratracheal instillation tests and in vitro cell-based assays using NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages. Total protein levels, MIP-1α expression, cell counts in BALF, and histopathological examinations revealed that CNT-1 caused pulmonary inflammation and slower recovery and that CNT-2 elicited acute lung inflammation shortly after their instillation. Comprehensive gene expression analysis confirmed that CNT-1-induced genes were strongly associated with inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, and immune system processes at 7 or 30 d post-instillation. Numerous genes were significantly upregulated or downregulated by CNT-2 at 1 d post-instillation. In vitro assays demonstrated that CNT-1 and CNT-2 SWCNTs were phagocytized by NR8383 cells. CNT-2 treatment induced cell growth inhibition, reactive oxygen species production, MIP-1α expression, and several genes involved in response to stimulus, whereas CNT-1 treatment did not exert a significant impact in these regards. These results suggest that SWCNTs formed as relatively thin bundles with short linear shapes elicited delayed pulmonary inflammation with slower recovery. In contrast, SWCNTs with a relatively thick bundle and long linear shapes sensitively induced cellular responses in alveolar macrophages and elicited acute lung inflammation shortly after inhalation. We conclude that the pulmonary toxicity of SWCNTs is closely associated with the size of the bundles. These physical parameters are useful for risk assessment and management of SWCNTs.

  7. Size effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on in vivo and in vitro pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Katsuhide; Fukuda, Makiko; Endoh, Shigehisa; Maru, Junko; Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Shinohara, Naohide; Uchino, Kanako; Honda, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To elucidate the effect of size on the pulmonary toxicity of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we prepared two types of dispersed SWCNTs, namely relatively thin bundles with short linear shapes (CNT-1) and thick bundles with long linear shapes (CNT-2), and conducted rat intratracheal instillation tests and in vitro cell-based assays using NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages. Total protein levels, MIP-1α expression, cell counts in BALF, and histopathological examinations revealed that CNT-1 caused pulmonary inflammation and slower recovery and that CNT-2 elicited acute lung inflammation shortly after their instillation. Comprehensive gene expression analysis confirmed that CNT-1-induced genes were strongly associated with inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, and immune system processes at 7 or 30 d post-instillation. Numerous genes were significantly upregulated or downregulated by CNT-2 at 1 d post-instillation. In vitro assays demonstrated that CNT-1 and CNT-2 SWCNTs were phagocytized by NR8383 cells. CNT-2 treatment induced cell growth inhibition, reactive oxygen species production, MIP-1α expression, and several genes involved in response to stimulus, whereas CNT-1 treatment did not exert a significant impact in these regards. These results suggest that SWCNTs formed as relatively thin bundles with short linear shapes elicited delayed pulmonary inflammation with slower recovery. In contrast, SWCNTs with a relatively thick bundle and long linear shapes sensitively induced cellular responses in alveolar macrophages and elicited acute lung inflammation shortly after inhalation. We conclude that the pulmonary toxicity of SWCNTs is closely associated with the size of the bundles. These physical parameters are useful for risk assessment and management of SWCNTs. PMID:25865113

  8. EVALUATION OF THE PULMONARY TOXICITY OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER FROM CAMP VICTORY, IRAQ

    PubMed Central

    Porter, K. L.; Green, F. H. Y.; Harley, R. A.; Vallyathan, V.; Castranova, V.; Waldron, N. R.; Leonard, S. S.; Nelson, D. E.; Lewis, J. A.; Jackson, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal reports in the press and epidemiological studies suggest that deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan may be associated with respiratory diseases and symptoms in U.S. military personnel and veterans. Exposures during military operations were complex, but virtually all service members were exposed to high levels of respirable, geogenic dust. Inhalation of other dusts has been shown to be associated with adverse health effects, but the pulmonary toxicity of ambient dust from Iraq has not been previously studied. The relative toxicity of Camp Victory dust was evaluated by comparing it to particulate matter from northern Kuwait, a standard U.S. urban dust, and crystalline silica using a single intratracheal instillation in rats. Lung histology, protein levels, and cell counts were evaluated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 1–150 d later. The Iraq dust provoked an early significant, acute inflammatory response. However, the level of inflammation in response to the Iraq dust, U.S. urban dust, and Kuwait dust rapidly declined and was nearly at control levels by the end of the study At later times, animals exposed to the Iraq, U.S. urban, or Kuwait dusts showed increased small airway remodeling and emphysema compared to silica-exposed and control animals without evidence of fibrosis or premalignant changes. The severity and persistence of pulmonary toxicity of these three dusts from the Middle East resemble those of a U.S. urban dust and are less than those of silica. Therefore, Iraq dust exposure is not highly toxic, but similar to other poorly soluble low-toxicity dusts. PMID:26594896

  9. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Erik Q.; Cafasso, Danielle E.; Lee, Karen W.M.; Pierce, Lisa M.

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ► Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ► W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ► W

  10. Sample characterization of automobile and forklift diesel exhaust particles and comparative pulmonary toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pramila; DeMarini, David M; Dick, Colin A J; Tabor, Dennis G; Ryan, Jeff V; Linak, William P; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Gilmour, M Ian

    2004-06-01

    Two samples of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) predominate in health effects research: an automobile-derived DEP (A-DEP) sample and the National Institute of Standards Technology standard reference material (SRM 2975) generated from a forklift engine. A-DEPs have been tested extensively for their effects on pulmonary inflammation and exacerbation of allergic asthmalike responses. In contrast, SRM 2975 has been tested thoroughly for its genotoxicity. In the present study, we combined physical and chemical analyses of both DEP samples with pulmonary toxicity testing in CD-1 mice to compare the two materials and to make associations between their physicochemical properties and their biologic effects. A-DEPs had more than 10 times the amount of extractable organic material and less than one-sixth the amount of elemental carbon compared with SRM 2975. Aspiration of 100 micro g of either DEP sample in saline produced mild acute lung injury; however, A-DEPs induced macrophage influx and activation, whereas SRM 2975 enhanced polymorphonuclear cell inflammation. A-DEPs stimulated an increase in interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inhibitory protein-2, and the TH2 cytokine IL-5, whereas SRM 2975 only induced significant levels of IL-6. Fractionated organic extracts of the same quantity of DEPs (100 micro g) did not have a discernable effect on lung responses and will require further study. The disparate results obtained highlight the need for chemical, physical, and source characterization of particle samples under investigation. Multidisciplinary toxicity testing of diesel emissions derived from a variety of generation and collection conditions is required to meaningfully assess the health hazards associated with exposures to DEPs. Key words: automobile, diesel exhaust particles, forklift, mice, pulmonary toxicity, SRM 2975.

  11. Toxicity of various silver nanoparticles compared to silver ions in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impacts of silver nanoparticles released into freshwater environments, the Daphnia magna 48-hour immobilization test was used. Methods The toxicities of silver nitrate, two types of colloidal silver nanoparticles, and a suspension of silver nanoparticles were assessed and compared using standard OECD guidelines. Also, the swimming behavior and visible uptake of the nanoparticles by Daphnia were investigated and compared. The particle suspension and colloids used in the toxicity tests were well-characterized. Results The results obtained from the exposure studies showed that the toxicity of all the silver species tested was dose and composition dependent. Plus, the silver nanoparticle powders subsequently suspended in the exposure water were much less toxic than the previously prepared silver nanoparticle colloids, whereas the colloidal silver nanoparticles and AgNO3 were almost similar in terms of mortality. The silver nanoparticles were ingested by the Daphnia and accumulated under the carapace, on the external body surface, and connected to the appendages. All the silver species in this study caused abnormal swimming by the D. magna. Conclusion According to the present results, silver nanoparticles should be classified according to GHS (Globally Harmonized System of classification and labeling of chemicals) as "category acute 1" to Daphnia neonates, suggesting that the release of nanosilver into the environment should be carefully considered. PMID:22472056

  12. Comparison of toxicity of uncoated and coated silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, K. C.; Seligy, V. L.; Massarsky, A.; Moon, T. W.; Rippstein, P.; Tan, J.; Tayabali, A. F.

    2013-04-01

    This study compares toxic effects of uncoated (20, 40, 60 and 80 nm) and OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) standard citrate- and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated (10, 50, and 75 nm) silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in J774A. 1 macrophage and HT29 epithelial cells. The cells were exposed to different concentrations (silver content) of Ag-NPs for 24 h. Analysis showed that uncoated Ag-NPs, at a concentration of 1 μg/ml, decreased cell viability by 20-40% and that 20 and 40 nm particles were 10% more cytotoxic than the 60 and 80 nm particles. In exposures to coated Ag-NPs, cell viability dropped at 25 μg/ml or higher concentrations, and the effects were also size-dependent. PVP-coated particles induced greater cytotoxicity than citrate-coated particles. Changes in sub-cellular architecture were observed in J774A. 1 cells upon exposure to test Ag-NPs. Furthermore, uncoated Ag-NPs (1 μg/mL) decreased the expression of selected cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-12 (p70) in J774A. 1 and IL-8 in HT29 cells. In contrast, both citrate- and PVP-coated Ag-NPs increased the expression of these cytokines at higher concentrations (25 μg/ml), and PVP-coated particles elevated cytokine levels the most. Moreover, while uncoated Ag-NPs resulted in decreased glutathione (GSH) content and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in test cells in a size-dependent manner at 1 μg/ml, coated Ag-NPs caused non-significant changes in GSH and SOD, even at the highest test concentrations. Lastly, uncoated (20 and 40 nm) at 1 μg/ml and coated Ag-NPs (10 nm PVP) at 50 μg/ml slightly increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our data showed that uncoated Ag-NPs are more toxic than coated Ag-NPs. While uncoated Ag-NPs appear to suppress inflammatory responses and enhance oxidative stress in the test cells, coated Ag-NPs induce toxic effects through up-regulation of cytokines. Our findings support the toxicity of Ag-NPs as being size

  13. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Gil-Jong; Maeng, Eun-Ho; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnOSM20(+) NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm) on pregnant dams and embryo–fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5–19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnOSM20(+) NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%); resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. Morphological examinations of the fetuses demonstrated significant differences in incidences of abnormalities in the group administered 400mg/kg/day. Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Zn content of fetal tissue between the control and high-dose groups. These results showed that oral doses for the study with 15-days repeated of ZnOSM20(+) NPs were maternotoxic in the 200 mg/kg/day group, and embryotoxic in the 400 mg/kg/day group. PMID:25565834

  14. Toxicity of zero-valent iron nanoparticles to a trichloroethylene-degrading groundwater microbial community.

    PubMed

    Zabetakis, Kara M; Niño de Guzmán, Gabriela T; Torrents, Alba; Yarwood, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The microbiological impact of zero-valent iron used in the remediation of groundwater was investigated by exposing a trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic microbial community to two types of iron nanoparticles. Changes in total bacterial and archaeal population numbers were analyzed using qPCR and were compared to results from a blank and negative control to assess for microbial toxicity. Additionally, the results were compared to those of samples exposed to silver nanoparticles and iron filings in an attempt to discern the source of toxicity. Statistical analysis revealed that the three different iron treatments were equally toxic to the total bacteria and archaea populations, as compared with the controls. Conversely, the silver nanoparticles had a limited statistical impact when compared to the controls and increased the microbial populations in some instances. Therefore, the findings suggest that zero-valent iron toxicity does not result from a unique nanoparticle-based effect.

  15. Surface charge of gold nanoparticles mediates mechanism of toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeublin, Nicole M.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Schrand, Amanda M.; Miller, John M.; Hutchison, Jim; Schlager, John J.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-02-01

    Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the event that they come into contact with a biological system. In the present study, we have investigated whether modulating the surface charge of 1.5 nm Au NPs induced changes in cellular morphology, mitochondrial function, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular calcium levels, DNA damage-related gene expression, and of p53 and caspase-3 expression levels after exposure in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The evaluation of three different Au NPs (positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged) showed that cell morphology was disrupted by all three NPs and that they demonstrated a dose-dependent toxicity; the charged Au NPs displayed toxicity as low as 10 µg ml-1 and the neutral at 25 µg ml-1. Furthermore, there was significant mitochondrial stress (decreases in MMP and intracellular Ca2+ levels) following exposure to the charged Au NPs, but not the neutral Au NPs. In addition to the differences observed in the MMP and Ca2+ levels, up or down regulation of DNA damage related gene expression suggested a differential cell death mechanism based on whether or not the Au NPs were charged or neutral. Additionally, increased nuclear localization of p53 and caspase-3 expression was observed in cells exposed to the charged Au NPs, while the neutral Au NPs caused an increase in both nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 expression. In conclusion, these results indicate that surface charge is a major determinant of how Au NPs impact cellular processes, with the charged NPs inducing cell death through apoptosis and neutral NPs leading to necrosis.Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the

  16. Use of Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Band Gap to Develop a Predictive Paradigm for Oxidative Stress and Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (Ec) levels with the cellular redox potential (−4.12 to −4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co3O4, Cr2O3, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of CB57 Bl/6 mice. Co3O4, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by Ec levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22502734

  17. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles.

    PubMed

    Roedel, Erik Q; Cafasso, Danielle E; Lee, Karen W M; Pierce, Lisa M

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals.

  18. Evaluation of nano-specific toxicity of zinc oxide, copper oxide, and silver nanoparticles through toxic ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weicheng; Liu, Xiawei; Bao, Shaopan; Xiao, Bangding; Fang, Tao

    2016-12-01

    For safety and environmental risk assessments of nanomaterials (NMs) and to provide essential toxicity data, nano-specific toxicities, or excess toxicities, of ZnO, CuO, and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) (20, 20, and 30 nm, respectively) to Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in short-term (6 h) and long-term (48 h) bioassays were quantified based on a toxic ratio. ZnO NPs exhibited no nano-specific toxicities, reflecting similar toxicities as ZnO bulk particles (BPs) (as well as zinc salt). However, CuO and Ag NPs yielded distinctly nano-specific toxicities when compared with their BPs. According to their nano-specific toxicities, the capability of these NPs in eliciting hazardous effects on humans and the environment was as follows: CuO > Ag > ZnO NPs. Moreover, long-term bioassays were more sensitive to nano-specific toxicity than short-term bioassays. Overall, nano-specific toxicity is a meaningful measurement to evaluate the environmental risk of NPs. The log T e particle value is a useful parameter for quantifying NP nano-specific toxicity and enabling comparisons of international toxicological data. Furthermore, this value could be used to determine the environmental risk of NPs.

  19. Assessment of Pulmonary Toxicity Induced by Inhaled Toner with External Additives.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Taisuke; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Myojo, Toshihiko; Oyabu, Takako; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Okada, Takami; Li, Yunshan; Kawai, Kazuaki; Higashi, Toshiaki; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the harmful effects of exposure to a toner with external additives by a long-term inhalation study using rats, examining pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and histopathological changes in the lung. Wistar rats were exposed to a well-dispersed toner (mean of MMAD: 2.1 μm) at three mass concentrations of 1, 4, and 16 mg/m(3) for 22.5 months, and the rats were sacrificed after 6 months, 12 months, and 22.5 months of exposure. The low and medium concentrations did not induce statistically significant pulmonary inflammation, but the high concentration did, and, in addition, a histopathological examination showed fibrosis in the lung. Although lung tumor was observed in one sample of high exposure for 22.5 months, the cause was not statistically significant. On the other hand, a persistent increase in 8-OHdG was observed in the high exposure group, indicating that DNA damage by oxidative stress with persistent inflammation leads to the formation of tumorigenesis. The results of our studies show that toners with external additives lead to pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis only at lung burdens beyond overload. These data suggest that toners with external additives may have low toxicity in the lung.

  20. Assessment of Pulmonary Toxicity Induced by Inhaled Toner with External Additives

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiura, Yukiko; Myojo, Toshihiko; Oyabu, Takako; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Okada, Takami; Li, Yunshan; Higashi, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the harmful effects of exposure to a toner with external additives by a long-term inhalation study using rats, examining pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and histopathological changes in the lung. Wistar rats were exposed to a well-dispersed toner (mean of MMAD: 2.1 μm) at three mass concentrations of 1, 4, and 16 mg/m3 for 22.5 months, and the rats were sacrificed after 6 months, 12 months, and 22.5 months of exposure. The low and medium concentrations did not induce statistically significant pulmonary inflammation, but the high concentration did, and, in addition, a histopathological examination showed fibrosis in the lung. Although lung tumor was observed in one sample of high exposure for 22.5 months, the cause was not statistically significant. On the other hand, a persistent increase in 8-OHdG was observed in the high exposure group, indicating that DNA damage by oxidative stress with persistent inflammation leads to the formation of tumorigenesis. The results of our studies show that toners with external additives lead to pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis only at lung burdens beyond overload. These data suggest that toners with external additives may have low toxicity in the lung. PMID:28191462

  1. Development of a biopolymer nanoparticle-based method of oral toxicity testing in aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Gott, Ryan C; Luo, Yangchao; Wang, Qin; Lamp, William O

    2014-06-01

    Aquatic toxicity testing generally focuses on the water absorption/dermal route of exposure to potential toxic chemicals, while much less work has been done on the oral route of exposure. This is due in part to the difficulties of applying traditional oral toxicity testing to aquatic environments, including the tendency for test chemicals to dissolve into water. The use of biopolymer nanoparticles to encapsulate test chemicals onto food to prevent dissolution is one solution presented herein. The biopolymers zein and chitosan were explored for their previously known nanoparticle-forming abilities. Nanoparticles containing the test chemical rhodamine B were formed, applied as films to coat food, and then fed to the test organism, the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. In feeding trials both zein and chitosan nanoparticles showed a significantly lower release rate of rhodamine B into water than food dyed with rhodamine B without biopolymer nanoparticles. Zein nanoparticles also showed better retention ability than chitosan nanoparticles. Both kinds of nanoparticles showed no significant effect on the survival, growth, or feeding behavior of H. azteca. Thus these biopolymers may be an effective system to encapsulate and deliver chemicals to aquatic invertebrates without interfering with common toxicity assessment endpoints like survival and growth.

  2. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  3. Bivalve molluscs as a unique target group for nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Canesi, Laura; Ciacci, Caterina; Fabbri, Rita; Marcomini, Antonio; Pojana, Giulio; Gallo, Gabriella

    2012-05-01

    Due to the continuous development and production of manufactured nanomaterials or nanoparticles (NPs), their uptake and effects in the aquatic biota represent a major concern. Estuarine and coastal environments are expected to represent the ultimate sink for NPs, where their chemical behavior (aggregation/agglomeration) and consequent fate may be critical in determining the biological impact. Bivalve mollusks are abundant from freshwater to marine ecosystems, where they are widely utilized in biomonitoring of environmental perturbations. As suspension-feeders, they have highly developed processes for cellular internalization of nano- and micro-scale particles (endo- and phagocytosis), integral to key physiological functions such as intra-cellular digestion and cellular immunity. Here we will summarise available information on the effects of different types of NPs in different bivalve species, in particular Mytilus spp. Data on the effects and modes of action of different NPs on mussel hemocytes in vitro demonstrate that cell-mediated immunity represents a significant target for NPs. Moreover, in vivo exposure to NPs indicates that, due to the physiological mechanisms involved in the feeding process, NP agglomerates/aggregates taken up by the gills are directed to the digestive gland, where intra-cellular uptake of nanosized materials induces lysosomal perturbations and oxidative stress. Overall, bivalves represent a particularly suitable model for investigating the effects and mechanisms of action underlying the potential toxicity of NPs in marine invertebrates.

  4. Pulmonary Toxicity, Distribution, and Clearance of Intratracheally Instilled Silicon Nanowires in Rats.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jenny R; Mercer, Robert R; Chapman, Rebecca S; Cohen, Guy M; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James F; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M; Leonard, Stephen S

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs) are being manufactured for use as sensors and transistors for circuit applications. The goal was to assess pulmonary toxicity and fate of Si NW using an in vivo experimental model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with 10, 25, 50, 100, or 250 μg of Si NW (~20-30 nm diameter; ~2-15 μm length). Lung damage and the pulmonary distribution and clearance of Si NW were assessed at 1, 3, 7, 28, and 91 days after-treatment. Si NW treatment resulted in dose-dependent increases in lung injury and inflammation that resolved over time. At day 91 after treatment with the highest doses, lung collagen was increased. Approximately 70% of deposited Si NW was cleared by 28 days with most of the Si NW localized exclusively in macrophages. In conclusion, Si NW induced transient lung toxicity which may be associated with an early rapid particle clearance; however, persistence of Si NW over time related to dose or wire length may lead to increased collagen deposition in the lung.

  5. Pulmonary oxygen toxicity in rats treated with cytochrome P-450 inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, R.E.; Barlow, R.L.; Gregory, E.M.

    1987-05-01

    Pulmonary oxygen toxicity is assumed to result from damage caused by superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) and/or hydroxyl radical (OH) produced by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen (O/sub 2/). The microsomal cytochrome P-450 (P-450) monooxygenase system is known to produce O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. They have studied the influence of monooxygenase induction using phenobarbital (PB) and ..beta..-naphthoflavone (..beta..-NF) on O/sub 2/ toxicity in the rat. PB- or ..beta..-NF induce hepatic P-450 but only ..beta..-NF induces pulmonary P-450. Pulmonary microsomes produced O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at rates (expressed per mg microsomal protein) which did not vary as a function of pretreatment. Rats were exposed to 100% O/sub 2/ for up to 3 days. After 3 days of O/sub 2/, lung weights were about 50% above controls regardless of pretreatment. The microsomal monooxygenase enzymes (P-450, b/sub 5/ and NADPH P-450 reductase) were quantified in liver and lung. Lung microsomal P-450 was reduced after 3 days of O/sub 2/ exposure regardless of pretreatment. The protective enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) peroxidase) and non-protein sulfhydryl groups (NPSH) were also quantified in lung and liver samples. Lung NPSH and GSH peroxidase were increased after 3 days of O/sub 2/ exposure regardless of pretreatment while SOD was increased in controls and PB- but not ..beta..-NF-treated rats. Three of 14 ..beta..-NF-treated rats died during O/sub 2/ exposure while no animals in the control or PB-treated groups died.

  6. Silver nanoparticle toxicity to Daphnia magna is a function of dissolved silver concentration.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kim M; Puppala, Hema L; Kitchens, Christopher L; Colvin, Vicki L; Klaine, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    The most persistent question regarding the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is whether this toxicity is due to the nanoparticles themselves or the silver ions (Ag(+)) they release. The present study investigates the role of surface coating and the presence of dissolved organic carbon on the toxicity of AgNPs to Daphnia magna and tests the hypothesis that the acute toxicity of AgNPs is a function of dissolved Ag produced by nanoparticle dissolution. Toxicity of silver nitrate (AgNO3) and AgNPs with surface coatings-gum arabic (AgGA), polyethylene glycol (AgPEG), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (AgPVP)-at 48 h was assessed in US Environmental Protection Agency moderately hard reconstituted water alone and augmented with Suwannee River dissolved organic carbon (DOC). As expected, AgNO3 was the most toxic to D. magna and AgPVPs were the least toxic. In general, Suwannee River DOC presence reduced the toxicity of AgNO3, AgGAs, and AgPEG, while the toxicity of AgPVPs was unaffected. The measured dissolved Ag concentrations for all AgNPs and AgNO3 at the 48-h median lethal concentration in moderately hard reconstituted water were similar. The presence of Suwannee River DOC decreased the ratio of measured dissolved Ag to measured total Ag concentration. These results support the hypothesis that toxicity of AgNPs to D. magna is a function of dissolved Ag concentration from these particles.

  7. Acute pulmonary toxicity following inhalation exposure to aerosolized VX in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinqi; Perkins, Michael W; Simons, Jannitt; Witriol, Alicia M; Rodriguez, Ashley M; Benjamin, Brittany M; Devorak, Jennifer; Sciuto, Alfred M

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated acute toxicity and pulmonary injury in rats at 3, 6 and 24 h after an inhalation exposure to aerosolized O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX). Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were incubated with a glass endotracheal tube and exposed to saline or VX (171, 343 and 514 mg×min/m³ or 0.2, 0.5 and 0.8 LCt₅₀, respectively) for 10 min. VX was delivered by a small animal ventilator at a volume of 2.5 ml × 70 breaths/minute. All VX-exposed animals experienced a significant loss in percentage body weight at 3, 6, and 24 h post-exposure. In comparison to controls, animals exposed to 514 mg×min/m³ of VX had significant increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein concentrations at 6 and 24 h post-exposure. Blood acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was inhibited dose dependently at each of the times points for all VX-exposed groups. AChE activity in lung homogenates was significantly inhibited in all VX-exposed groups at each time point. All VX-exposed animals assessed at 20 min and 3, 6 and 24 h post-exposure showed increases in lung resistance, which was prominent at 20 min and 3 h post-exposure. Histopathologic evaluation of lung tissue of the 514 mg×min/m³ VX-exposed animals at 3, 6 and 24 h indicated morphological changes, including perivascular inflammation, alveolar exudate and histiocytosis, alveolar septal inflammation and edema, alveolar epithelial necrosis, and bronchiolar inflammatory infiltrates, in comparison to controls. These results suggest that aerosolization of the highly toxic, persistent chemical warfare nerve agent VX results in acute pulmonary toxicity and lung injury in rats.

  8. Pulmonary toxicity screening studies in male rats with M5 respirable fibers and particulates.

    PubMed

    Warheit, David B; Webb, Thomas R; Reed, Kenneth L

    2007-09-01

    M5 fiber is a high-strength, high-performance organic fiber type that is a rigid rod material and composed of heterocyclic polymer fibers of type PIPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute lung toxicity of intratracheally instilled M5 respirable fibers and particulates in rats. Using a pulmonary bioassay and bridging methodology, the acute lung toxicity of intratracheally instilled M5 particulates and that of its fibers were compared with a positive control particle type, quartz, as well as a negative control particle type, carbonyl iron particles. Moreover, the results of these instillation studies were bridged with data previously generated from inhalation studies with quartz and carbonyl iron particles, using the quartz and iron particles as the inhalation/instillation bridge material. For the bioassay experimental design, in the bronchoalveolar lavage studies, the lungs of rats were intratracheally instilled with 0.5 or 0.75 mg/kg of M5 particulate or 1 or 5 mg/kg of the following control or particle types: (1) M5 long fiber preparation, (2) silica-quartz particles, and (3) carbonyl iron particles. Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-instilled rats served as additional controls. Following exposures, the lungs of PBS and particle-exposed rats were assessed using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid biomarkers, cell proliferation methods, and histopathological evaluation of lung tissue at 24 h, 1 wk, 1 mo and 3 mo post instillation exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage results demonstrated that lung exposures to quartz particles, at both concentrations but particularly at the higher dose, produced significant increases vs. controls in pulmonary inflammation and cytotoxicity indices. Exposures to M5 particulate and M5 long fiber preparation produced transient inflammatory and cell injury effects at 24 h postexposure (pe) as well as at 24 h and 1 wk pe, respectively, but these effects were not sustained when compared to quartz-silica effects. Exposures to

  9. Physicochemical characteristics of nanomaterials that affect pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The increasing manufacture and use of products based on nanotechnology raises concerns for both workers and consumers. Various studies report induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, which can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Each of these aspects can affect their toxicity, although it is largely unknown to what extent. The aim of the current review is to analyse published data on inhalation of nanoparticles to identify and evaluate the contribution of their physicochemical characteristics to the onset and development of pulmonary inflammation. Many physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles affect their lung deposition, clearance, and pulmonary response that, in combination, ultimately determine whether pulmonary inflammation will occur and to what extent. Lung deposition is mainly determined by the physical properties of the aerosol (size, density, shape, hygroscopicity) in relation to airflow and the anatomy of the respiratory system, whereas clearance and translocation of nanoparticles are mainly determined by their geometry and surface characteristics. Besides size and chemical composition, other physicochemical characteristics influence the induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation. As some nanoparticles dissolve, they can release toxic ions that can damage the lung tissue, making dissolution rate an important characteristic that affects lung inflammation. Fibre-shaped materials are more toxic to the lungs compared to spherical shaped nanoparticles of the same chemical composition. In general, cationic nanoparticles are more cytotoxic than neutral or anionic nanoparticles. Finally, surface reactivity correlates well with observed pulmonary inflammation. With all these characteristics affecting different stages of the events leading to pulmonary inflammation, no unifying dose metric could be identified to describe pulmonary

  10. Photoinduced toxicity of PrF3 and LaF3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudovkin, M. S.; Zelenikhin, P. V.; Krasheninnikova, A. O.; Korableva, S. L.; Nizamutdinov, A. S.; Alakshin, E. M.; Semashko, V. V.; Safiullin, R. A.; Kadirov, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    PrF3 and LaF3 nanoparticles were synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The size distribution of these nanoparticles in the colloidal solution produced was studied by photon correlation spectroscopy. The mean diameter of the nanoparticles was 42 ± 1 nm. During the study of the toxicity of the nanoparticles, the mixture of a colloidal solution of the nanoparticles with cells to be studied was irradiated by 30-mW continuous lasers at wavelengths of 532 and 473 nm. The concentration of salmonella cells in normal saline was 106 cell/mL, while that of nanoparticles was 0.1 g/L. The cell survival percentage was 39, 34, and 20% for the irradiation times of 5, 10, and 15 min, respectively, at an optimal laser radiation power density of 0.4 W/cm at a wavelength of 532 nm. It was ascertained that LaF3 nanoparticles do not possess the property of photoinduced toxicity and the apoptosing effect. Moreover, the property of photoinduced toxicity is not shared by microparticles, in contrast to nanoparticles.

  11. Development of screening assays for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in human blood: preliminary studies with charged Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Love, Sara A; Thompson, John W; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-09-01

    As nanoparticles have found increased use in both consumer and medical applications, corresponding increases in possible exposure to humans necessitate studies examining the impacts of these nanomaterials in biological systems. This article examines the effects of approximately 30-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles, with positively and negatively charged surface coatings in human blood. Here, we study the exposure effects, with up to 72 h of exposure to 5, 15, 25 and 50 µg/ml nanoparticles on hemolysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and platelet aggregation in subsets of cells from human blood. Assessing viability with hemolysis, results show significant changes in a concentration-dependent fashion. Rates of ROS generation were investigated using the dichlorofluorscein diacetate-based assay as ROS generation is a commonly suspected mechanism of nanoparticle toxicity; herein, ROS was not a significant factor. Optical monitoring of platelet aggregation revealed that none of the examined nanoparticles induced aggregation upon short-term exposure.

  12. Comparison of the toxicity of silver, gold and platinum nanoparticles in developing zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Asharani, P V; Lianwu, Yi; Gong, Zhiyuan; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2011-03-01

    Nanoparticles have diverse applications in electronics, medical devices, therapeutic agents and cosmetics. While the commercialization of nanoparticles is rapidly expanding, their health and environmental impact is not well understood. Toxicity assays of silver, gold, and platinum nanoparticles, using zebrafish embryos to study their developmental effects were carried out. Gold (Au-NP, 15-35 nm), silver (Ag-NP, 5-35 nm) and platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NP, 3-10 nm) were synthesized using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a capping agent. Toxicity was recorded in terms of mortality, hatching delay, phenotypic defects and metal accumulation. The addition of Ag-NP resulted in a concentration-dependant increase in mortality rate. Both Ag-NP and Pt-NP induced hatching delays, as well as a concentration dependant drop in heart rate, touch response and axis curvatures. Ag-NP also induced other significant phenotypic changes including pericardial effusion, abnormal cardiac morphology, circulatory defects and absence or malformation of the eyes. In contrast, Au-NP did not show any indication of toxicity. Uptake and accumulation of nanoparticles in embryos was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), which revealed detectable levels in embryos within 72 hpf. Ag-NP and Au-NP were taken up by the embryos in relatively equal amounts whereas lower Pt concentrations were observed in embryos exposed to Pt-NP. This was probably due to the small size of the Pt nanoparticles compared to Ag-NP and Au-NP, thus resulting in fewer metal atoms being retained in the embryos. Among the nanoparticles studied, Ag-NPs were found to be the most toxic and Au-NPs the non-toxic. The toxic effects exhibited by the zebrafish embryos as a consequence of nanoparticle exposure, accompanied by the accumulation of metals inside the body calls for urgent further investigations in this field.

  13. Overview on cardiac, pulmonary and cutaneous toxicity in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Guenzi, Marina; Fozza, Alessandra; Vidali, Cristiana; Rovea, Paolo; Meacci, Fiammetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Conservative management of breast cancer represents the standard treatment for early disease. Breast conserving surgery associated with radiotherapy for stage I-II has been proven to be as equally effective as mastectomy in term of local control, distant disease, and overall survival. The growing minimal invasive surgical approach on the axillary region, and the new breast reconstructive techniques, will probably lead to a significant decrease of the rate of side-effects related to mastectomy. Therefore, the adverse events caused by adjuvant radiation still remain a challenge. Cutaneous, pulmonary and cardiac toxicity represent the main toxicities of adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Safety profile of radiation is strongly dependent on the multidisciplinary management of the single case (systemic treatment, endocrine therapy, surgery), individual characteristics (i.e., co-morbidities, age, habits), and radiation-related aspects. Radiation techniques development, and facilities implementation concerning organs-at-risk sparing systems (i.e., image-guided radiotherapy, tracking systems, respiratory gating), represent brand new tools for the clinical oncologist, that would certainly minimize toxicity profile in the next future. However, data reported from published literature will greatly help physicians, to give to the patients appropriate counseling regarding the efficacy and potential adverse events of treatments, thus optimizing the informed decision-making process.

  14. Fate and toxicity of metallic and metal-containing nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Feng; Chen, Chunying

    2011-11-04

    It is important to obtain a better understanding of the uptake, trafficking, pharmacokinetics, clearance, and role of nanomaterials in biological systems, so that their possible undesirable effects can be avoided. A number of metallic or metal-containing nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles and nanorods, quantum dots, iron oxides nanoparticles, and endohedral metallofullerenes, have already been or will soon become very promising for biomedical applications. This review presents a summary of currently available data on the fate and toxicity of these metallic or metal-containing nanoparticles based on animal studies. Several issues regarding the nanotoxicity assessment and future directions on the study of the fate of these nanoparticles are also proposed.

  15. Silver nanoparticles: mechanism of antimicrobial action, synthesis, medical applications, and toxicity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Sukumaran; Poulose, Eldho K.

    2012-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles are nanoparticles of silver which are in the range of 1 and 100 nm in size. Silver nanoparticles have unique properties which help in molecular diagnostics, in therapies, as well as in devices that are used in several medical procedures. The major methods used for silver nanoparticle synthesis are the physical and chemical methods. The problem with the chemical and physical methods is that the synthesis is expensive and can also have toxic substances absorbed onto them. To overcome this, the biological method provides a feasible alternative. The major biological systems involved in this are bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts. The major applications of silver nanoparticles in the medical field include diagnostic applications and therapeutic applications. In most of the therapeutic applications, it is the antimicrobial property that is being majorly explored, though the anti-inflammatory property has its fair share of applications. Though silver nanoparticles are rampantly used in many medical procedures and devices as well as in various biological fields, they have their drawbacks due to nanotoxicity. This review provides a comprehensive view on the mechanism of action, production, applications in the medical field, and the health and environmental concerns that are allegedly caused due to these nanoparticles. The focus is on effective and efficient synthesis of silver nanoparticles while exploring their various prospective applications besides trying to understand the current scenario in the debates on the toxicity concerns these nanoparticles pose.

  16. Toxicity of nanoparticles embedded in paints compared with pristine nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Stijn; Luyts, Katrien; Brabants, Gert; Landuyt, Kirsten Van; Kirschhock, Christine; Smolders, Erik; Golanski, Luana; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter H M

    2014-09-01

    The unique physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials have led to their increased use in many industrial applications, including as a paint additive. For example, titanium dioxide (TiO2) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have well-established anti-UV, self-cleaning, and air purification effects. Silver (Ag) ENPs are renowned for their anti-microbial capabilities and silicon dioxide (SiO2) ENPs are used as fire retardants and anti-scratch coatings. In this study, the toxic effects and biodistribution of three pristine ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2), three aged paints containing ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2) along with control paints without ENPs were compared. BALB/c mice were oropharyngeally aspirated with ENPs or paint particles (20 μg/aspiration) once a week for 5 weeks and sacrificed either 2 or 28 days post final aspiration treatment. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and systemic blood toxicity was evaluated to ascertain cell counts, induction of inflammatory cytokines, and key blood parameters. In addition, the lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and heart were harvested and metal concentrations were determined. Exposure to pristine ENPs caused subtle effects in the lungs and negligible alterations in the blood. The most pronounced toxic effects were observed after Ag ENPs exposure; an increased neutrophil count and a twofold increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß)) were identified. The paint containing TiO2 ENPs did not modify macrophage and neutrophil counts, but mildly induced KC and IL-1ß. The paints containing Ag or SiO2 did not show significant toxicity. Biodistribution experiments showed distribution of Ag and Si outside the lung after aspiration to respectively pristine Ag or SiO2 ENPs. In conclusion, we demonstrated that even though direct exposure to ENPs induced some toxic effects, once they were embedded in a complex paint matrix little to no adverse toxicological effects were

  17. Toxicity of Nanoparticles Embedded in Paints Compared with Pristine Nanoparticles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smulders, Stijn; Luyts, Katrien; Brabants, Gert; Landuyt, Kirsten Van; Kirschhock, Christine; Smolders, Erik; Golanski, Luana; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter HM

    2014-01-01

    The unique physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials have led to their increased use in many industrial applications, including as a paint additive. For example, titanium dioxide (TiO2) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have well-established anti-UV, self-cleaning, and air purification effects. Silver (Ag) ENPs are renowned for their anti-microbial capabilities and silicon dioxide (SiO2) ENPs are used as fire retardants and anti-scratch coatings. In this study, the toxic effects and biodistribution of three pristine ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2), three aged paints containing ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2) along with control paints without ENPs were compared. BALB/c mice were oropharyngeally aspirated with ENPs or paint particles (20 μg/aspiration) once a week for 5 weeks and sacrificed either 2 or 28 days post final aspiration treatment. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and systemic blood toxicity was evaluated to ascertain cell counts, induction of inflammatory cytokines, and key blood parameters. In addition, the lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and heart were harvested and metal concentrations were determined. Exposure to pristine ENPs caused subtle effects in the lungs and negligible alterations in the blood. The most pronounced toxic effects were observed after Ag ENPs exposure; an increased neutrophil count and a twofold increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß)) were identified. The paint containing TiO2 ENPs did not modify macrophage and neutrophil counts, but mildly induced KC and IL-1ß. The paints containing Ag or SiO2 did not show significant toxicity. Biodistribution experiments showed distribution of Ag and Si outside the lung after aspiration to respectively pristine Ag or SiO2 ENPs. In conclusion, we demonstrated that even though direct exposure to ENPs induced some toxic effects, once they were embedded in a complex paint matrix little to no adverse toxicological effects were

  18. Relationship of pulmonary toxicity and carcinogenicity of fine and ultrafine granular dusts in a rat bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Kolling, Angelika; Ernst, Heinrich; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Heinrich, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The current carcinogenicity study with female rats focused on the toxicity and carcinogenicity of intratracheally instilled fine and ultrafine granular dusts. The positive control, crystalline silica, elicited the greatest magnitude and progression of pulmonary inflammatory reactions, fibrosis and the highest incidence of primary lung tumors (39.6%). Addition of poly-2-vinylpyridine-N-oxide decreased inflammatory responses, fibrosis, and the incidence of pulmonary tumors induced by crystalline quartz to 21.4%. After repeated instillation of soluble, ultrafine amorphous silica (15 mg) a statistically significant tumor response (9.4%) was observed, although, the inflammatory response in the lung was not as persistently severe as in rats treated with carbon black. Instillation of ultrafine carbon black (5 mg) caused a lung tumor incidence of 15%. In contrast to a preceding study using a dose of 66 mg coal dust, lung tumors were not detected after exposure to the same coal dust at a dose of 10 mg in this study. Pulmonary inflammatory responses to coal dust were very low indicating a mechanistic threshold for the development of lung tumors connected with particle related chronic inflammation. The animals treated with ultrafine carbon black and ultrafine amorphous silica showed significantly more severe lesions in non-cancerous endpoints when compared to animals treated with fine coal dust. Furthermore, carbon black treated rats showed more severe non-cancerous lung lesions than amorphous silica treated rats. Our data show a relationship between tumor frequencies and increasing scores when using a qualitative scoring system for specific non-cancerous endpoints such as inflammation, fibrosis, epithelial hyperplasia, and squamous metaplasia. PMID:21819261

  19. The pulmonary toxicity of talc and granite dust as estimated from an in vivo hamster bioassay.

    PubMed

    Beck, B D; Feldman, H A; Brain, J D; Smith, T J; Hallock, M; Gerson, B

    1987-02-01

    A short-term animal bioassay was used to assess the toxicity of occupational dusts. We quantified pulmonary responses in hamsters exposed to granite (12% quartz) and talc (quartz and asbestos-free) dust collected from worksites. Personal samples collected on workers showed similar quartz content and particle-size distributions to the high-volume samples collected for bioassays, thus demonstrating that the particulates were representative of worker exposure. We measured biochemical and cellular indicators of injury in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) of animals exposed to dust suspensions by intra-tracheal instillation. The assays measured release of cytoplasmic and lysosomal enzymes into the cell-free supernatant of BAL; levels of albumin and red blood cells; changes in macrophage and polymorphonuclear neutrophil cell numbers; and in situ macrophage phagocytosis. Dose-response (0.15, 0.75, and 3.75 mg/100 g body wt) and time-course (1-14 days postexposure) studies were performed. One day after exposure, both talc and granite dust resulted in elevated enzyme levels, pulmonary edema, and increased cell numbers in BAL. Macrophage phagocytosis was also inhibited. Based on earlier studies, response levels were either intermediate between nontoxic iron oxide and toxic alpha-quartz or comparable with alpha-quartz. The response to granite dust diminished fairly rapidly over time. By contrast, after talc exposure, there was a more persistent elevation in enzyme levels, and macrophage phagocytosis remained depressed. These results indicate that, when a similar mass was deposited in the lungs, talc caused more lung injury than did granite. Better estimates of exposure-dose relationships in talc and granite workers as well as longer-term animal studies are required to evaluate the harmfulness of these work environments at present-day exposure levels.

  20. Ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to aquatic invertebrates: a brief review and recommendations for future toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Baun, A; Hartmann, N B; Grieger, K; Kusk, K O

    2008-07-01

    Based on a literature review and an overview of toxic effects of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic invertebrates, this paper proposes a number of recommendations for the developing field of nanoecotoxicology by highlighting the importance of invertebrates as sensitive and relevant test organisms. Results show that there is a pronounced lack of data in this field (less than 20 peer-reviewed papers are published so far), and the most frequently tested engineered nanoparticles in invertebrate tests are C(60), carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide. In addition, the majority of the studies have used Daphnia magna as the test organism. To date, the limited number of studies has indicated acute toxicity in the low mg l(-1) range and higher of engineered nanoparticles to aquatic invertebrates, although some indications of chronic toxicity and behavioral changes have also been described at concentrations in the high microg l(-1) range. Nanoparticles have also been found to act as contaminant carriers of co-existing contaminants and this interaction has altered the toxicity of specific chemicals towards D. magna. We recommend that invertebrate testing is used to advance the level of knowledge in nanoecotoxicology through standardized short-term (lethality) tests with invertebrates as a basis for investigating behaviour and bioavailability of engineered nanoparticles in the aquatic environment. Based on this literature review, we further recommend that research is directed towards invertebrate tests employing long-term low exposure with chronic endpoints along with more research in bioaccumulation of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic invertebrates.

  1. A meta-analysis of carbon nanotube pulmonary toxicity studies--how physical dimensions and impurities affect the toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gernand, Jeremy M; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a regression-tree-based meta-analysis of rodent pulmonary toxicity studies of uncoated, nonfunctionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) exposure. The resulting analysis provides quantitative estimates of the contribution of CNT attributes (impurities, physical dimensions, and aggregation) to pulmonary toxicity indicators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid: neutrophil and macrophage count, and lactate dehydrogenase and total protein concentrations. The method employs classification and regression tree (CART) models, techniques that are relatively insensitive to data defects that impair other types of regression analysis: high dimensionality, nonlinearity, correlated variables, and significant quantities of missing values. Three types of analysis are presented: the RT, the random forest (RF), and a random-forest-based dose-response model. The RT shows the best single model supported by all the data and typically contains a small number of variables. The RF shows how much variance reduction is associated with every variable in the data set. The dose-response model is used to isolate the effects of CNT attributes from the CNT dose, showing the shift in the dose-response caused by the attribute across the measured range of CNT doses. It was found that the CNT attributes that contribute the most to pulmonary toxicity were metallic impurities (cobalt significantly increased observed toxicity, while other impurities had mixed effects), CNT length (negatively correlated with most toxicity indicators), CNT diameter (significantly positively associated with toxicity), and aggregate size (negatively correlated with cell damage indicators and positively correlated with immune response indicators). Increasing CNT N2 -BET-specific surface area decreased toxicity indicators.

  2. Cell uptake and in vitro toxicity of magnetic nanoparticles suitable for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Häfeli, Urs O; Riffle, Judy S; Harris-Shekhawat, Linda; Carmichael-Baranauskas, Anita; Mark, Framin; Dailey, James P; Bardenstein, David

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic targeting is useful for intravascular or intracavitary drug delivery, including tumor chemotherapy or intraocular antiangiogenic therapy. For all such in vivo applications, the magnetic drug carrier must be biocompatible and nontoxic. In this work, we investigated the toxic properties of magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyethylenoxide (PEO) triblock copolymers. Such coatings prevent the aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles and guarantee consistent magnetic and nonmagnetic flow properties. It was found that the PEO tail block length inversely correlates with toxicity. The nanoparticles with the shortest 0.75 kDa PEO tails were the most toxic, while particles coated with the 15 kDa PEO tail block copolymers were the least toxic. Toxicity responses of the tested prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and C4-2), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEs) were similar. Furthermore, all cell types took up the coated magnetic nanoparticles. It is concluded that magnetite nanoparticles coated with triblock copolymers containing PEO tail lengths of above 2 kDa are biocompatible and appropriate for in vivo application.

  3. Toxicity and developmental defects of different sizes and shape nickel nanoparticles in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ispas, Cristina; Andreescu, Daniel; Patel, Avni; Goia, Dan V.; Andreescu, Silvana; Wallace, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles such as nickel are used in catalytic, sensing and electronic applications, but health and environmental affects have not been fully investigated. While some metal nanoparticles result in toxicity, it is also important to determine whether nanoparticles of the same metal but of different size and shape changes toxicity. Three different size nickel nanoparticle (Ni NPs) of 30, 60, and 100 nm and larger particle clusters of aggregated 60 nm entities with a dendritic structure were synthesized and exposed to zebrafish embryos assessing mortality and developmental defects. Ni NPs exposure was compared to soluble nickel salts. All three 30, 60, and 100 nm Ni NPs are equal to or less toxic than soluble nickel while dendritic clusters were more toxic. With each Ni NP exposure, thinning of the intestinal epithelium first occurs around the LD10 continuing into the LD50. LD50 exposure also results in skeletal muscle fiber separation. Exposure to soluble nickel does not cause intestinal defects while skeletal muscle separation occurs at concentrations well over LD50. These results suggest that configuration of nanoparticles may affect toxicity more than size and defects from Ni NPs exposure occur by different biological mechanisms than soluble nickel. PMID:19746736

  4. Biogenic silver nanoparticles based on trichoderma harzianum: synthesis, characterization, toxicity evaluation and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Guilger, Mariana; Pasquoto-Stigliani, Tatiane; Bilesky-Jose, Natália; Grillo, Renato; Abhilash, P. C.; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Lima, Renata de

    2017-01-01

    White mold is an agricultural disease caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, which affects important crops. There are different ways of controlling this organism, but none provides inhibition of its resistance structures (sclerotia). Nanotechnology offers promising applications in agricultural area. Here, silver nanoparticles were biogenically synthesized using the fungus Trichoderma harzianum and characterized. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated, and the nanoparticles were initially tested against white mold sclerotia. Their effects on soybean were also investigated with no effects observed. The nanoparticles showed potential against S. sclerotiorum, inhibiting sclerotia germination and mycelial growth. Nanoparticle characterization data indicated spherical morphology, satisfactory polydispersity and size distribution. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that the nanoparticles caused both the effects, although, the most toxic concentrations were above those applied for white mold control. Given the potential of the nanoparticles against S. sclerotiorum, we conclude that this study presents a first step for a new alternative in white mold control. PMID:28300141

  5. Biogenic silver nanoparticles based on trichoderma harzianum: synthesis, characterization, toxicity evaluation and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilger, Mariana; Pasquoto-Stigliani, Tatiane; Bilesky-Jose, Natália; Grillo, Renato; Abhilash, P. C.; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Lima, Renata De

    2017-03-01

    White mold is an agricultural disease caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, which affects important crops. There are different ways of controlling this organism, but none provides inhibition of its resistance structures (sclerotia). Nanotechnology offers promising applications in agricultural area. Here, silver nanoparticles were biogenically synthesized using the fungus Trichoderma harzianum and characterized. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated, and the nanoparticles were initially tested against white mold sclerotia. Their effects on soybean were also investigated with no effects observed. The nanoparticles showed potential against S. sclerotiorum, inhibiting sclerotia germination and mycelial growth. Nanoparticle characterization data indicated spherical morphology, satisfactory polydispersity and size distribution. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that the nanoparticles caused both the effects, although, the most toxic concentrations were above those applied for white mold control. Given the potential of the nanoparticles against S. sclerotiorum, we conclude that this study presents a first step for a new alternative in white mold control.

  6. Impact of cerium oxide nanoparticles shape on their in vitro cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Forest, Valérie; Leclerc, Lara; Hochepied, Jean-François; Trouvé, Adeline; Sarry, Gwendoline; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2017-02-01

    Cerium oxides (CeO2) nanoparticles, also referred to as nanoceria, are extensively used with a wide range of applications. However, their impact on human health and on the environment is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the CeO2 nanoparticles morphology on their in vitro toxicity. CeO2 nanoparticles of similar chemical composition and crystallinity were synthesized, only the shape varied (rods or octahedrons/cubes). Macrophages from the RAW264.7 cell line were exposed to these different samples and the toxicity was evaluated in terms of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Results showed no ROS production, whatever the nanoparticle shape. The LDH release and the TNF-α production were significantly and dose-dependently enhanced by rod-like nanoparticles, whereas they did not vary with cubic/octahedral nanoparticles. In conclusion, a strong impact of CeO2 nanoparticle morphology on their in vitro toxicity was clearly demonstrated, underscoring that nanoceria shape should be carefully taken in consideration, especially in a "safer by design" context.

  7. Intracellular calcium levels as screening tool for nanoparticle toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Claudia; Kueznik, Tatjana; Bösch, Martina; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered nano-sized materials led to revolutionary developments in many industrial applications and in the medical field. These materials, however, also may cause cytotoxicity. In addition to size, surface properties and shape were identified as relevant parameters for cell damage. Cell damage may occur as disruption of membrane integrity, induction of apoptosis and by organelle damage. Generation of oxidative stress may serve as an indicator for cytotoxicity. Effects occurring upon short contact of particles with cells, for instance in the systemic blood circulation, could be identified according to increases of intracellular [Ca2+] levels, which are caused by variety of toxic stimuli. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane disruption, apoptosis, lysosome function, intracellular [Ca2+] levels and generation of oxidative stress. Silica particles served to test this hypothesis. Twenty nm polystyrene particles as well as 12 nm and 40 nm silica particles caused membrane damage and apoptosis with no preference of the surface charge. Only 20 nm plain and amine functionalized polystyrene particles cause oxidative stress and only the plain particles lysosomal damage. A potential role of surface charge was identified for 200 nm polystyrene particles, where only the amidine particles caused lysosomal damage. Increases in intracellular [Ca2+] levels and cytotoxicity after 24 h was often linked but determination of intracellular [Ca2+] levels could serve to characterize further the type of membrane damage. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Nano-sized materials may cause cytotoxicity. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes and silica nanoparticles were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane

  8. Carbon Black and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Distinct Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Sonja; Hussain, Salik; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence link nanomaterials with adverse biological outcomes and due to the variety of applications and potential human exposures to nanoparticles it is thus important to evaluate their toxicity for the risk assessment of workers and consumers. It is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms of their toxicity as observation of similar effects after different nanomaterial exposures does not reflect similar intracellular processing and organelle interactions. A thorough understanding of mechanisms is not only needed for accurate prediction of potential toxicological impacts but also for the development of safer nanoapplications by modulating the physico-chemical characteristics. Furthermore biomedical applications may also take advantage of an in depth knowledge about the mode of action of nanotoxicity to design new nanoparticle-derived drugs. In the present manuscript we discuss the similarities and differences in molecular pathways of toxicity after carbon black and TiO2 nanoparticle exposures and identify the main toxicity mechanisms induced by these two nanoparticles which may also be indicative for the mode of action of other insoluble nanomaterials. We address the translocation, cell death induction, genotoxicity and inflammation induced by titanium dioxide and carbon black nanoparticles which depend on their internalisation, ROS production capacities and/or protein interactions. We summarise their distinct cellular mechanisms of toxicity and the crucial steps which may be targeted to avoid adverse effects or to induce them for nanomedical purposes. Several physico-chemical characteristics could influence these general toxicity pathways depicted here and the identification of common toxicity pathways could support the grouping of nanomaterials in terms of toxicity. PMID:25266826

  9. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, Stefania; Carney, Randy P.; Brunetti, Virgilio; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Al-Juffali, Noura; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Janes, Sam M.; Bakr, Osman M.; Cingolani, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where particles are abundantly internalized - is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a ``lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect'' since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments.The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where

  10. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile.

  11. Interaction of silver nanoparticles with biological objects: antimicrobial properties and toxicity for the other living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, E. M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents several examples of the biological effects of small-sized silver nanoparticles (10.5±3.5nm) observed in experiments on bacteria, slim mold, unicellular alga and plant seeds. The nanoparticles were prepared by the biochemical synthesis, based on the reduction of metal ions in reverse vicelles by biological reductants - natural plant pigments (flavonoids). It is found that, except for the plant seeds, silver nanoparticles (SNP) act as a strong toxic agent, both in water solution and as part of liquid-phase material. It is shown also that the biological action of silver nanoparticles can not be reduced to the toxic action of silver ions in equivalent concentrations or to that of the surfactant (the SNP stabilizer) present in the SNP water solution. Possible SNP applications are suggested.

  12. In-vitro Cell Exposure Studies for the Assessment of Nanoparticle Toxicity in the Lung - A Dialogue between Aerosol Science and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hanns-Rudolf, Paur; Cassee, Flemming R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Fissan, Heinz; Diabate, Silvia; Aufderheide, M.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Hanninen, Otto; Kasper, G.; Riediker, Michael; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Schmid, Otmar

    2011-10-01

    The rapid introduction of engineered nanostructured materials into numerous industrial and consumer products will result in enhanced exposure to engineered nanoparticles. Workplace exposure has been identified as the most likely source of uncontrolled inhalation of engineered aerosolized nanoparticles, but release of engineered nanoparticles may occur at any stage of the lifecycle of consumer products. The dynamic development of new nanomaterials with possibly unknown toxicological effects poses a challenge for the assessment of nanoparticle induced toxicity and safety. In this consensus document from a workshop on in-vitro cell systems for nanotoxicity testing an overview is given of the main issues concerning inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, lung physiology, nanoparticle-related biological mechanisms, in-vitro cell exposure systems for nanoparticles and social aspects of nanotechnology. The workshop participants recognized the large potential of in-vitro cell exposure systems for reliable, high-throughput screening of nanotoxicity. For the investigation of pulmonary nanotoxicity, a strong preference was expressed for air-liquid interface (ALI) cell exposure systems (rather than submerged cell exposure systems) as they closely resemble in-vivo conditions in the lungs and they allow for unaltered and dosimetrically accurate delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles to the cells. The members of the workshop believe that further advances in in-vitro cell exposure studies would be greatly facilitated by a more active role of the aerosol scientists. The technical know-how for developing and running ALI in-vitro exposure systems is available in the aerosol community and at the same time biologists/toxicologists are required for proper assessment of the biological impact of nanoparticles.

  13. Investigation of the toxicity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles in various cell lines.

    PubMed

    Abudayyak, Mahmoud; Öztaş, Ezgi; Arici, Merve; Özhan, Gül

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles have been drawn attention in various fields ranging from medicine to industry because of their physicochemical properties and functions, which lead to extensive human exposure to nanoparticles. Bismuth (Bi)-based compounds have been commonly used in the industrial, cosmetic and medical applications. Although the toxicity of Bi-based compounds was studied for years, there is a serious lack of information concerning their toxicity and effects in the nanoscale on human health and environment. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the toxic effects of Bi (III) oxide (Bi2O3) nanoparticles in liver (HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cell), kidney (NRK-52E kidney epithelial cell), intestine (Caco-2 colorectal adenocarcinoma cell), and lung (A549 lung carcinoma cell) cell cultures. Bi2O3 nanoparticles (∼149.1 nm) were easily taken by all cells and showed cyto- and genotoxic effects. It was observed that the main cell death pathways were apoptosis in HepG2 and NRK-52E cells and necrosis in A549 and Caco-2 cells exposed to Bi2O3 nanoparticles. Also, the glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanine (8-OHdG) levels were significantly changed in HepG2, NRK-52E, and Caco-2 cells, except A549 cell. The present study is the first to evaluate the toxicity of Bi2O3 nanoparticles in mammalian cells. Bi2O3 nanoparticles should be thoroughly assessed for their potential hazardous effects to human health and the results should be supported with in vivo studies to fully understand the mechanism of their toxicity.

  14. Toxicity Testing of Pristine and Aged Silver Nanoparticles in Real Wastewaters Using Bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Mallevre, Florian; Alba, Camille; Milne, Craig; Gillespie, Simon; Fernandes, Teresa F.; Aspray, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Impact of aging on nanoparticle toxicity in real matrices is scarcely investigated due to a lack of suitable methodologies. Herein, the toxicity of pristine and aged silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to a bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida bioreporter was measured in spiked crude and final wastewater samples (CWs and FWs, respectively) collected from four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Results showed lower toxicity of pristine Ag NPs in CWs than in FWs. The effect of the matrix on the eventual Ag NP toxicity was related to multiple physico-chemical parameters (biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS) pH, ammonia, sulfide and chloride) based on a multivariate analysis. However, no collection site effect was concluded. Aged Ag NPs (up to eight weeks) were found less toxic than pristine Ag NPs in CWs; evident increased aggregation and decreased dissolution were associated with aging. However, Ag NPs exhibited consistent toxicity in FWs despite aging; comparable results were obtained in artificial wastewater (AW) simulating effluent. The study demonstrates the potency of performing nanoparticle acute toxicity testing in real and complex matrices such as wastewaters using relevant bacterial bioreporters. PMID:28344306

  15. Effect of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles on SERS spectral variance of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li; Chen, Shaode; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-02-01

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively utilized in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for bacterial identification. However, Ag NPs are toxic to bacteria. Whether such toxicity can affect SERS features of bacteria and interfere with bacterial identification is still unknown and needed to explore. Here, by carrying out a comparative study on non-toxic Au NPs with that on toxic Ag NPs, we investigated the influence of nanoparticle concentration and incubation time on bacterial SERS spectral variance, both of which were demonstrated to be closely related to the toxicity of Ag NPs. Sensitive spectral alterations were observed on Ag NPs with increase of NPs concentration or incubation time, accompanied with an obvious decrease in number of viable bacteria. In contrast, SERS spectra and viable bacterial number on Au NPs were rather constant under the same conditions. A further analysis on spectral changes demonstrated that it was cell response (i.e. metabolic activity or death) to the toxicity of Ag NPs causing spectral variance. However, biochemical responses to the toxicity of Ag were very different in different bacteria, indicating the complex toxic mechanism of Ag NPs. Ag NPs are toxic to a great variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa etc., therefore, this work will be helpful in guiding the future application of SERS technique in various complex biological systems.

  16. In Vitro Vascular Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are designed to possess unique physicochemical properties, but may also produce atypical and unforeseen exposure scenarios with adverse health effects. The ability ofNPs to translocate into systemic circulation following either inhalation or ingesti...

  17. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  18. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-20

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te ((particle)) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs' nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te ((particle)) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te ((ion)) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  19. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions. PMID:27094203

  20. Chitosan coating of copper nanoparticles reduces in vitro toxicity and increases inflammation in the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Kristan L. S.; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Joshi, Vijaya B.; Guymon, C. Allan; Spitz, Douglas R.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Thorne, Peter S.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2013-10-01

    Despite their potential for a variety of applications, copper nanoparticles induce very strong inflammatory responses and cellular toxicity following aerosolized delivery. Coating metallic nanoparticles with polysaccharides, such as biocompatible and antimicrobial chitosan, has the potential to reduce this toxicity. In this study, copper nanoparticles were coated with chitosan using a newly developed and facile method. The presence of coating was confirmed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, rhodamine tagging of chitosan followed by confocal fluorescence imaging of coated particles and observed increases in particle size and zeta potential. Further physical and chemical characteristics were evaluated using dissolution and x-ray diffraction studies. The chitosan coating was shown to significantly reduce the toxicity of copper nanoparticles after 24 and 52 h and the generation of reactive oxygen species as assayed by DHE oxidation after 24 h in vitro. Conversely, inflammatory response, measured using the number of white blood cells, total protein, and cytokines/chemokines in the bronchoalveolar fluid of mice exposed to chitosan coated versus uncoated copper nanoparticles, was shown to increase, as was the concentration of copper ions. These results suggest that coating metal nanoparticles with mucoadhesive polysaccharides (e.g. chitosan) could increase their potential for use in controlled release of copper ions to cells, but will result in a higher inflammatory response if administered via the lung.

  1. Encapsulation of Aconitine in Self-Assembled Licorice Protein Nanoparticles Reduces the Toxicity In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Li-jing; Gao, Guan-zhen; Shen, Yong; Zhou, Jian-wu; Rao, Ping-fan

    2015-11-01

    Many herbal medicines and compositions are clinically effective but challenged by its safety risks, i.e., aconitine (AC) from aconite species. The combined use of Radix glycyrrhizae (licorice) with Radix aconite L. effectively eliminates toxicity of the later while increasing efficacy. In this study, a boiling-stable 31-kDa protein (namely GP) was purified from licorice and self-assembled into nanoparticles (206.2 ± 2.0 nm) at pH 5.0, 25 °C. The aconitine-encapsulated GP nanoparticles (238.2 ± 1.2 nm) were prepared following the same procedure and tested for its toxicity by intraperitoneal injection on ICR mouse ( n = 8). Injection of GP-AC nanoparticles and the mixed licorice-aconite decoction, respectively, caused mild recoverable toxic effects and no death, while the aconitine, particle-free GP-AC mixture and aconite decoction induced sever toxic effects and 100 % death. Encapsulation of poisonous alkaloids into self-assembled herbal protein nanoparticles contributes to toxicity attenuation of combined use of herbs, implying a prototype nanostructure and a universal principle for the safer clinical applications of herbal medicines.

  2. Effects from Filtration, Capping Agents, and Presence/Absence of Food on the Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles to Daphnia Magna

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relatively little is known regarding the behavior and toxicity of nanoparticles in the environment. The objectives of the work presented here include establishing the toxicity of a variety of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to Daphnia magna neonates, assessing the applicability of ...

  3. Analysis of copper nanoparticles toxicity based on a stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Lei, Chunyang; Shen, Qinpeng; Li, Lijun; Wang, Ming; Guo, Manli; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2012-12-01

    The rapid development in nanoparticle production and application during the past decade requires an easy, rapid, and predictive screening method for nanoparticles toxicity assay. In this study, the toxicological effects and the source of toxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) are investigated based on a stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array. According to the responses of the biosensing strains, it is found that CuNPs induce not only oxidative stress in E. coli, but also protein damage, DNA damage, and cell membrane damage, and ultimately cause cell growth inhibition. Through enzyme detoxification analysis, the toxicological effects of CuNPs are traced to H2O2 generation from CuNPs. Rapid copper release from CuNPs and Cu(i) production are observed. The oxidation of the released Cu(i) has a close relation to H2O2 production, as tris-(hydroxypropyltriazolylmethyl) amine, the specific Cu(i) chelator, can largely protect the cells from the toxicity of CuNPs. In addition, the TEM study shows that CuNPs can be adsorbed and incepted fast by the cells. Comparatively, copper microparticles are relatively stable in the system and practically non-toxic, which indicates the importance of toxic estimation of materials at the nanoscale. In addition, the Cu(ii) ion can induce protein damage, membrane damage, and slight DNA damage only at a relatively high concentration. The current study reveals the preliminary mechanism of toxicity of CuNPs, and suggests that the stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array can be used as a simple and promising tool for rapid screening in vitro toxicity of nanoparticles and studying the primary mechanism of the toxicity.The rapid development in nanoparticle production and application during the past decade requires an easy, rapid, and predictive screening method for nanoparticles toxicity assay. In this study, the toxicological effects and the source of toxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) are investigated based on a stress

  4. In vivo toxicity of enoxaparin encapsulated in mucoadhesive nanoparticles: Topical application in a wound healing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, S. C.; Marcato, P. D.; Barbosa, R. M.; Duran, N.; Annichino-Bizzacchi, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Wound healing comprises four distinct phases and involves many cell events and biologic markers. The use of nanoparticles for topical application has gaining attention due to its deeper penetration in the skin and the retention capacity of the drug in the site of application. In this study the effect and toxicity of mucoadhesive polymeric nanoparticles loaded with enoxaparin was evaluated in in vivo model of skin ulcer. Our results showed an interesting formulation based on mucoadhesive nanoparticles with enoxaparin that improved wound healing without cytotoxicity in vitro in all endpoint evaluated. Then, this semi-solid formulation is a promising option for skin ulcer treatment.

  5. Oxidative Dissolution of Silver Nanoparticles by Chlorine: Implications to Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shikha; Rong, Hongyan; Miller, Christopher J; Waite, T David

    2016-04-05

    The kinetics of oxidative dissolution of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by chlorine is investigated in this work, with results showing that AgNPs are oxidized in the presence of chlorine at a much faster rate than observed in the presence of dioxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation of AgNPs by chlorine occurs in air-saturated solution in stoichiometric amounts with 2 mol of AgNPs oxidized for each mole of chlorine added. Dioxygen plays an important role in OCl(-)-mediated AgNP oxidation, especially at lower OCl(-) concentrations, with the mechanism shifting from stoichiometric oxidation of AgNPs by OCl(-) in the presence of dioxygen to catalytic removal of OCl(-) by AgNPs in the absence of dioxygen. These results suggest that the presence of chlorine will mitigate AgNP toxicity by forming less-reactive AgCl(s) following AgNP oxidation, although the disinfection efficiency of OCl(-) may not be significantly impacted by the presence of AgNPs because a chlorine-containing species is formed on OCl(-) decay that has significant oxidizing capacity. Our results further suggest that the antibacterial efficacy of nanosilver particles embedded on fabrics may be negated when treated with detergents containing strong oxidants, such as chlorine.

  6. Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingbo; Cao, Jianzhong; Yuan, Shuanghu; Arenberg, Douglas; Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

  7. Analysis of copper nanoparticles toxicity based on a stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array.

    PubMed

    Li, Fenfang; Lei, Chunyang; Shen, Qinpeng; Li, Lijun; Wang, Ming; Guo, Manli; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-01-21

    The rapid development in nanoparticle production and application during the past decade requires an easy, rapid, and predictive screening method for nanoparticles toxicity assay. In this study, the toxicological effects and the source of toxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) are investigated based on a stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array. According to the responses of the biosensing strains, it is found that CuNPs induce not only oxidative stress in E. coli, but also protein damage, DNA damage, and cell membrane damage, and ultimately cause cell growth inhibition. Through enzyme detoxification analysis, the toxicological effects of CuNPs are traced to H(2)O(2) generation from CuNPs. Rapid copper release from CuNPs and Cu(I) production are observed. The oxidation of the released Cu(I) has a close relation to H(2)O(2) production, as tris-(hydroxypropyltriazolylmethyl) amine, the specific Cu(I) chelator, can largely protect the cells from the toxicity of CuNPs. In addition, the TEM study shows that CuNPs can be adsorbed and incepted fast by the cells. Comparatively, copper microparticles are relatively stable in the system and practically non-toxic, which indicates the importance of toxic estimation of materials at the nanoscale. In addition, the Cu(II) ion can induce protein damage, membrane damage, and slight DNA damage only at a relatively high concentration. The current study reveals the preliminary mechanism of toxicity of CuNPs, and suggests that the stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array can be used as a simple and promising tool for rapid screening in vitro toxicity of nanoparticles and studying the primary mechanism of the toxicity.

  8. Biotic and abiotic interactions in aquatic microcosms determine fate and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles: part 2-toxicity and Ag speciation.

    PubMed

    Bone, Audrey J; Colman, Benjamin P; Gondikas, Andreas P; Newton, Kim M; Harrold, Katherine H; Cory, Rose M; Unrine, Jason M; Klaine, Stephen J; Matson, Cole W; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2012-07-03

    To study the effects of complex environmental media on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity, AgNPs were added to microcosms with freshwater sediments and two species of aquatic plants (Potamogeton diversifolius and Egeria densa), followed by toxicity testing with microcosm surface water. Microcosms were designed with four environmental matrices in order to determine the contribution of each environmental compartment to changes in toxicity: water only (W), water + sediment (WS), water + plants (WP), and water + plants + sediment (WPS). Silver treatments included AgNPs with two different coatings, gum arabic (GA-AgNPs) or polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP-AgNPs), as well as AgNO(3). Water samples taken from the microcosms at 24 h postdosing were used in acute toxicity tests with two standard model organisms, early life stage zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Daphnia magna. Speciation of Ag in these samples was analyzed using Ag L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Silver speciation patterns for the nanoparticle treatments varied significantly by coating type. While PVP-AgNPs were quite stable and resisted transformation across all matrices (>92.4% Ag(0)), GA-AgNP speciation patterns suggest significantly higher transformation rates, especially in treatments with plants (<69.2% and <58.8% Ag(0) in WP and WPS, respectively) and moderately increased transformation with sediments (<85.6% Ag(0)). Additionally, the presence of plants in the microcosms (with and without sediments) reduced both the concentration of Ag in the water column and toxicity for all Ag treatments. Reductions in toxicity may have been related to decreased water column concentrations as well as changes in the surface chemistry of the particles induced by organic substances released from the plants.

  9. Silver nanoparticle toxicity is related to coating materials and disruption of sodium concentration regulation.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Kevin W H; Dong, Wu; Marinakos, Stella M; Liu, Jie; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wiesner, Mark R; Chernick, Melissa; Hinton, David E

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been increasingly commercialized and their release into the environment is imminent. Toxicity of AgNP has been studied with a wide spectrum of organisms, yet the mechanism of toxicity remains largely unknown. This study systematically compared toxicity of 10 AgNPs of different particle diameters and coatings to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) larvae to understand how characteristics of AgNP relate to toxicity. Dissolution of AgNPs was largely dependent on particle size, but their aggregation behavior and toxicity were more dependent on coating materials. 96 h lethal concentration 50% (LC50) values correlated with AgNP aggregate size rather than size of individual nanoparticles. Of the AgNPs studied, the dissolved Ag concentration in the test suspensions did not account for all of the observed toxicity, indicating the role of NP-specific characteristics in resultant toxicity. Exposure to AgNP led to decrease of sodium concentration in the tissue and increased expression of Na(+)/K(+ )ATPase. Gene expression patterns also suggested that toxicity was related to disruption of sodium regulation and not to oxidative stress.

  10. Reduced in vivo toxicity of doxorubicin by encapsulation in cholesterol-containing self-assembled nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fajardo, Laura; Mahajan, Lalit H; Ndaya, Dennis; Hargrove, Derek; Manautou, José E; Liang, Bruce T; Chen, Ming-Hui; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Lu, Xiuling

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported the development of an amphiphilic brush-like block copolymer composed of polynorbornene-cholesterol/polyethylene glycol (P(NBCh9-b-NBPEG)) that self-assembles in aqueous media to form long circulating nanostructures capable of encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX-NPs). Biodistribution studies showed that this formulation preferentially accumulates in tumor tissue with markedly reduced accumulation in the heart and other major organs. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the in vivo efficacy and toxicity of DOX containing self-assembled polymer nanoparticles in a mouse xenograft tumor model and compare its effects with the hydrochloride non-encapsulated form (free DOX). DOX-NPs significantly reduced the growth of tumors without inducing any apparent toxicity. Conversely, mice treated with free DOX exhibited significant weight loss, early toxic cardiomyopathy, acute toxic hepatopathy, reduced hematopoiesis and fatal toxicity. The improved safety profile of the polymeric DOX-NPs can be explained by the low circulating concentration of non-nanoparticle-associated drug as well as the reduced accumulation of DOX in non-target organs. These findings support the use of P(NBCh9-b-NBPEG) nanoparticles as delivery platforms for hydrophobic anticancer drugs intended to reduce the toxicity of conventional treatments.

  11. A novel method for assessing the toxicity of silver nanoparticles in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xun; Xu, Shengmin; Yang, Yaning; Zhang, Yajun; Wang, Shunchang; Chen, Shaopeng; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2017-02-01

    At present, nanotechnology has been producing nanoscale materials with unprecedented speed. Nanomaterials could be inevitably released into the environment owing to their widespread use, and their potential toxicity has caused a great concern. With regard to assessment of nanomaterial toxicity, many studies probably don't truly reflect their toxicity, because the nanoparticles were not stable and uniformly dispersed in the medium. In the present study, the semi-fluid nematode growth gelrite medium (NGG) was used to achieve better distribution of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). We aimed to evaluate the toxicity of AgNPs in three different culture methods, such as the NGG, nematode growth medium (NGM) and K-medium (KM). Our transmission electron microscopy, hydrodynamic diameter, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry results demonstrated that AgNPs homogeneously and stably dispersed in NGG compared to that in liquid KM. Furthermore, the conventional toxicity end points, such as body length, fecundity, lifespan, population growth, germline cell apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial membrane potential were used to assess the toxicity of AgNPs to Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) in NGG, NGM and KM. Our results showed that the toxicity of AgNPs obtained in the NGG test medium was much higher than that in the standard NGM and KM. In addition to the improved dispersion of nanoparticles, NGG also offered advantages for long-term studies and likely provided a convenient nematode toxicity testing method. These results revealed that the NGG test medium was a suitable and sensitive culture method for the evaluation of AgNPs toxicity using C. elegans.

  12. Mechanistically Probing Lipid-siRNA Nanoparticle-associated Toxicities Identifies Jak Inhibitors Effective in Mitigating Multifaceted Toxic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; Mao, Xianzhi; Davide, Joseph P; Ng, Bruce; Cai, Mingmei; Burke, Paul A; Sachs, Alan B; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2011-01-01

    A major hurdle for harnessing small interfering RNA (siRNA) for therapeutic application is an effective and safe delivery of siRNA to target tissues and cells via systemic administration. While lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) composed of a cationic lipid, poly-(ethylene glycol) lipid and cholesterol, are effective in delivering siRNA to hepatocytes via systemic administration, they may induce multi-faceted toxicities in a dose-dependent manner, independently of target silencing. To understand the underlying mechanism of toxicities, pharmacological probes including anti-inflammation drugs and specific inhibitors blocking different pathways of innate immunity were evaluated for their abilities to mitigate LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities in rodents. Three categories of rescue effects were observed: (i) pretreatment with a Janus kinase (Jak) inhibitor or dexamethasone abrogated LNP-siRNA-mediated lethality and toxicities including cytokine induction, organ impairments, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy without affecting siRNA-mediated gene silencing; (ii) inhibitors of PI3K, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38 and IκB kinase (IKK)1/2 exhibited a partial alleviative effect; (iii) FK506 and etoricoxib displayed no protection. Furthermore, knockout of Jak3, tumor necrosis factor receptors (Tnfr)p55/p75, interleukin 6 (IL-6) or interferon (IFN)-γ alone was insufficient to alleviate LNP-siRNA-associated toxicities in mice. These indicate that activation of innate immune response is a primary trigger of systemic toxicities and that multiple innate immune pathways and cytokines can mediate toxic responses. Jak inhibitors are effective in mitigating LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities. PMID:21179008

  13. Mechanistically probing lipid-siRNA nanoparticle-associated toxicities identifies Jak inhibitors effective in mitigating multifaceted toxic responses.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weikang; Mao, Xianzhi; Davide, Joseph P; Ng, Bruce; Cai, Mingmei; Burke, Paul A; Sachs, Alan B; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2011-03-01

    A major hurdle for harnessing small interfering RNA (siRNA) for therapeutic application is an effective and safe delivery of siRNA to target tissues and cells via systemic administration. While lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) composed of a cationic lipid, poly-(ethylene glycol) lipid and cholesterol, are effective in delivering siRNA to hepatocytes via systemic administration, they may induce multi-faceted toxicities in a dose-dependent manner, independently of target silencing. To understand the underlying mechanism of toxicities, pharmacological probes including anti-inflammation drugs and specific inhibitors blocking different pathways of innate immunity were evaluated for their abilities to mitigate LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities in rodents. Three categories of rescue effects were observed: (i) pretreatment with a Janus kinase (Jak) inhibitor or dexamethasone abrogated LNP-siRNA-mediated lethality and toxicities including cytokine induction, organ impairments, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy without affecting siRNA-mediated gene silencing; (ii) inhibitors of PI3K, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38 and IκB kinase (IKK)1/2 exhibited a partial alleviative effect; (iii) FK506 and etoricoxib displayed no protection. Furthermore, knockout of Jak3, tumor necrosis factor receptors (Tnfr)p55/p75, interleukin 6 (IL-6) or interferon (IFN)-γ alone was insufficient to alleviate LNP-siRNA-associated toxicities in mice. These indicate that activation of innate immune response is a primary trigger of systemic toxicities and that multiple innate immune pathways and cytokines can mediate toxic responses. Jak inhibitors are effective in mitigating LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities.

  14. Aryl radical involvement in amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity: Investigation of protection by spin-trapping nitrones

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolescu, Adrian C.; Comeau, Jeannette L.; Hill, Bruce C.; Bedard, Leanne L.; Takahashi, Takashi; Brien, James F.; Racz, William J.; Massey, Thomas E. . E-mail: masseyt@post.queensu.ca

    2007-04-01

    Amiodarone (AM), an antidysrrhythmic drug, can produce serious adverse effects, including potentially fatal AM-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT). AM-induced cytotoxicity and pulmonary fibrosis are well recognized, but poorly understood mechanistically. The hypothesis of aryl radical involvement in AM toxicity was tested in non-biological and biological systems. Photolysis of anaerobic aqueous solutions of AM, or N-desethylamiodarone (DEA) resulted in the formation of an aryl radical, as determined by spin-trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy experiments. The non-iodinated AM analogue, didesiodoamiodarone (DDIA), did not form aryl radicals under identical conditions. The toxic susceptibility of human lung epithelioid HPL1A cells to AM, DEA, and DDIA showed time- and concentration-dependence. DEA had a more rapid and potent toxic effect (LC{sub 50} = 8 {mu}M) than AM (LC{sub 50} = 146 {mu}M), whereas DDIA cytotoxicity was intermediate (LC{sub 50} = 26 {mu}M) suggesting a minor contribution of the iodine atoms. Incubation of human lung epithelial cells with the spin-trapping nitrones {alpha}-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN, 10 mM) or {alpha}-(4-pyridyl N-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN, 5.0 mM) did not significantly protect against AM, DEA, or DDIA cytotoxicity. Intratracheal administration of AM to hamsters produced pulmonary fibrosis at day 21, which was not prevented by 4 days of treatment with 150 mg/kg/day PBN or 164 mg/kg/day POBN. However, the body weight loss in AM-treated animals was counteracted by PBN. These results suggest that, although AM can generate an aryl radical photochemically, its in vivo formation may not be a major contributor to AM toxicity, and that spin-trapping reagents do not halt the onset of AM toxicity.

  15. Toxicity assessment of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and applications of nanoparticles (NP) in diverse fields has steadily increased in recent decades; however, knowledge about risks of NP to human health and ecosystems is still scarce. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used engineere...

  16. TLR4 Signaling Is Involved in Brain Vascular Toxicity of PCB153 Bound to Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Choi, Jeong June; Eum, Sung Yong; Daunert, Sylvia; Toborek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    PCBs bind to environmental particles; however, potential toxicity exhibited by such complexes is not well understood. The aim of the present study is to study the hypothesis that assembling onto nanoparticles can influence the PCB153-induced brain endothelial toxicity via interaction with the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To address this hypothesis, TLR4-deficient and wild type control mice (males, 10 week old) were exposed to PCB153 (5 ng/g body weight) bound to chemically inert silica nanoparticles (PCB153-NPs), PCB153 alone, silica nanoparticles (NPs; diameter, 20 nm), or vehicle. Selected animals were also subjected to 40 min ischemia, followed by a 24 h reperfusion. As compared to exposure to PCB153 alone, treatment with PCB153-NP potentiated the brain infarct volume in control mice. Importantly, this effect was attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice. Similarly, PCB153-NP-induced proinflammatory responses and disruption of tight junction integrity were less pronounced in TLR4-deficient mice as compared to control animals. Additional in vitro experiments revealed that TLR4 mediates toxicity of PCB153-NP via recruitment of tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). The results of current study indicate that binding to seemingly inert nanoparticles increase cerebrovascular toxicity of PCBs and suggest that targeting the TLR4/TRAF6 signaling may protect against these effects. PMID:23690990

  17. Toxicity of bare and surfaced functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles towards microalgae.

    PubMed

    Toh, Pey Yi; Tai, Wan Yii; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Lim, Jit Kang; Chan, Derek Juinn Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the toxicity of bare iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and surface functionalization iron oxide nanoparticles (SF-IONPs) to the growth of freshwater microalgae Chlorella sp. This study is important due to the increased interest on the application of the magnetic responsive IONPs in various fields, such as biomedical, wastewater treatment, and microalgae harvesting. This study demonstrated that the toxicity of IONPs was mainly contributed by the indirect light shading effect from the suspending nanoparticles which is nanoparticles concentration-dependent, direct light shading effect caused by the attachment of IONPs on cell and the cell aggregation, and the oxidative stress from the internalization of IONPs into the cells. The results showed that the layer of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) tended to mask the IONPs and hence eliminated oxidative stress toward the protein yield but it in turn tended to enhance the toxicity of IONPs by enabling the IONPs to attach on cell surfaces and cause cell aggregation. Therefore, the choice of the polymer that used for surface functionalize the IONPs is the key factor to determine the toxicity of the IONPs.

  18. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Mousavi, Maral P. S.; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag+ influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM’s chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution. PMID:26047330

  19. Improved corneal toxicity and permeability of tranilast by the preparation of ophthalmic formulations containing its nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ono, Hikaru; Hashino, Miho; Ito, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Norio; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    We prepared ophthalmic formulations containing 0.5% tranilast (TL) nanoparticles using 0.005% benzalkonium chloride (BAC), 0.5% D-mannitol, and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), and investigated their usefulness in the ophthalmologic field by evaluating corneal toxicity and permeability. TL nanoparticles were prepared using zirconia beads and Bead Smash 12, which allowed the preparation of high quality dispersions containing 0.5% TL nanoparticles (particle size, 34 ± 20 nm, means ± S.D.). Dispersions containing TL nanoparticles are tolerated better by human corneal epithelium cells than a commercially available 0.5% TL preparation (RIZABEN(®) eye drops). In addition, the addition of TL nanoparticles to the dispersions does not affect the antimicrobial activity of BAC against Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739), and the corneal penetration of TL from dispersions containing TL nanoparticles was significantly higher than in the case of the commercially available 0.5% TL eye drops. It is possible that dispersions containing TL nanoparticles will show increased effectiveness against ocular inflammation, and that ocular drug delivery systems using drug nanoparticles may lead to an expansion of their usefulness for therapy in the ophthalmologic field.

  20. In Vitro Toxicity of Aluminum Nanoparticles in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    the vehicle ( Palaszewski , 2003). "* The US Army Research Lab is investigating metallic nanopowders e.g., Aluminum nanoparticles in explosives (Miziolek... Palaszewski B. (2002) Nanotechnology Investigated for Future Gelled and Metallized Gell Fuels. Acquired from http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/RT2002/5000

  1. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peetsch, Alexander; Greulich, Christina; Braun, Dieter; Stroetges, Christian; Rehage, Heinz; Siebers, Bettina; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Spherical silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized in a co-precipitation route from calcium nitrate/silver nitrate and ammonium phosphate in a continuous process and colloidally stabilized by carboxymethyl cellulose. Nanoparticles with 0.39 wt% silver content and a diameter of about 50-60 nm were obtained. The toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells were determined by viability tests and determination of the minimal inhibitory and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Three mammalian cells lines, i.e. human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocytes and T-lymphocytes), and two prokaryotic strains, i.e. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were used. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles and silver acetate showed similar effect toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells with toxic silver concentrations in the range of 1-3 μg mL(-1).

  2. Lung toxicities of core–shell nanoparticles composed of carbon, cobalt, and silica

    PubMed Central

    Al Samri, Mohammed T; Silva, Rafael; Almarzooqi, Saeeda; Albawardi, Alia; Othman, Aws Rashad Diab; Al Hanjeri, Ruqayya SMS; Al Dawaar, Shaikha KM; Tariq, Saeed; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Asefa, Tewodros

    2013-01-01

    We present here comparative assessments of murine lung toxicity (biocompatibility) after in vitro and in vivo exposures to carbon (C–SiO2-etched), carbon–silica (C–SiO2), carbon–cobalt–silica (C–Co–SiO2), and carbon–cobalt oxide–silica (C–Co3O4–SiO2) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles have potential applications in clinical medicine and bioimaging, and thus their possible adverse events require thorough investigation. The primary aim of this work was to explore whether the nanoparticles are biocompatible with pneumatocyte bioenergetics (cellular respiration and adenosine triphosphate content). Other objectives included assessments of caspase activity, lung structure, and cellular organelles. Pneumatocyte bioenergetics of murine lung remained preserved after treatment with C–SiO2-etched or C–SiO2 nanoparticles. C–SiO2-etched nanoparticles, however, increased caspase activity and altered lung structure more than C–SiO2 did. Consistent with the known mitochondrial toxicity of cobalt, both C–Co–SiO2 and C–Co3O4–SiO2 impaired lung tissue bioenergetics. C–Co–SiO2, however, increased caspase activity and altered lung structure more than C–Co3O4–SiO2. The results indicate that silica shell is essential for biocompatibility. Furthermore, cobalt oxide is the preferred phase over the zerovalent Co(0) phase to impart biocompatibility to cobalt-based nanoparticles. PMID:23658487

  3. Neutral red retention time assay in determination of toxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wentao; Culloty, Sarah; Darmody, Grainne; Lynch, Sharon; Davenport, John; Ramirez-Garcia, Sonia; Dawson, Kenneth; Lynch, Iseult; Doyle, Hugh; Sheehan, David

    2015-10-01

    The neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay is useful for detecting decreased lysosomal membrane stability in haemocytes sampled from bivalves, a phenomenon often associated with exposure to environmental pollutants including nanomaterials. Bivalves are popular sentinel species in ecotoxicology and use of NRRT in study of species in the genus Mytilus is widespread in environmental monitoring. The NRRT assay has been used as an in vivo test for toxicity of carbon nanoparticles (Moore MN, Readman JAJ, Readman JW, Lowe DM, Frickers PE, Beesley A. 2009. Lysosomal cytotoxicity of carbon nanoparticles in cells of the molluscan immune system: An in vivo study. Nanotoxicology. 3 (1), 40-45). We here report application of this assay adapted to a microtitre plate format to a panel of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (2 ppm). This showed that copper, chromium and cobalt nanoparticles are toxic by this criterion while gold and titanium nanoparticles are not. As the former three nanoparticles are often reported to be cytotoxic while the latter two are thought to be non-cytotoxic, these data support use of NRRT as a general in vitro assay in nanotoxicology.

  4. Interference sources in ATP bioluminescence assay of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sibag, Mark; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Choah; Kim, Hee Jun; Cho, Jinwoo

    2015-06-01

    ATP measurement provides an overview of the general state of microbial activity, and thus it has proven useful for the evaluation of nanoparticle toxicity in activated sludge. ATP bioluminescence assay, however, is susceptible to interference by the components of activated sludge other than biomass. This paper presents the interference identified specific to the use of this assay after activated sludge respiration inhibition test of silica nanoparticles (OECD 209). We observed a high degree of interference (90%) in the presence of 100 mg/L silica nanoparticles and a low level of ATP being measured (0.01 μM); and 30% interference by the synthetic medium regardless of silica nanoparticle concentration and ATP level in the samples. ATP measurement in activated sludge with different MLSS concentrations revealed interference of high biomass content. In conclusion, silica nanoparticles, synthetic medium and activated sludge samples themselves interfere with ATP bioluminescence; this will need to be considered in the evaluation of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge when this type of assay is used.

  5. Toxicity of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles differs according to method of suspension preparation.

    PubMed

    Park, June-Woo; Oh, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Woo-Keun; Lee, Sung-Kyu

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate substance toxicity, it is critical to maintain specific concentrations of test substances throughout the exposure period. During the last decade, the need to improve methods for nanoparticle (NP) suspension preparations has gained attention because many published results on NPs toxicity have been inconsistent. Here, we compared the toxicity of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) suspended by two different methods (fractionated vs. colloidal) in freshwater organisms (daphnia and medaka). Analytical methods (ICP-OES, DLS and UV absorbance) were employed to characterize behavior of AgNPs in suspension. Results showed that fractionated (stirred and settled) solution was less toxic to daphnia (13.8 µg/L) than colloidal solution (6.1 µg/L), suggesting that method of preparation was a critical factor that affected toxicity. However, differences in toxicity caused by suspension methods were not observed in medaka. Results indicate that the method used to prepare suspensions of NPs can affect toxicity, and that differences can exist among test organisms.

  6. Transport across the cell-membrane dictates nanoparticle fate and toxicity: a new paradigm in nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Sabella, Stefania; Muscetti, Ornella; Belli, Valentina; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Fusco, Sabato; de Luca, Elisa; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2014-08-01

    The toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been fully ascertained, but the mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity remain still largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of MNPs is strictly reliant on the pathway of cellular internalization. In particular, if otherwise toxic gold, silver, and iron oxide NPs are forced through the cell membrane bypassing any form of active mechanism (e.g., endocytosis), no significant cytotoxic effect is registered. Pneumatically driven NPs across the cell membrane show a different distribution within the cytosol compared to NPs entering the cell by active endocytosis. Specifically, they exhibit free random Brownian motions within the cytosol and do not accumulate in lysosomes. Results suggest that intracellular accumulation of metallic nanoparticles into endo-lysosomal compartments is the leading cause of nanotoxicity, due to consequent nanoparticle degradation and in situ release of metal ions.The toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been fully ascertained, but the mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity remain still largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of MNPs is strictly reliant on the pathway of cellular internalization. In particular, if otherwise toxic gold, silver, and iron oxide NPs are forced through the cell membrane bypassing any form of active mechanism (e.g., endocytosis), no significant cytotoxic effect is registered. Pneumatically driven NPs across the cell membrane show a different distribution within the cytosol compared to NPs entering the cell by active endocytosis. Specifically, they exhibit free random Brownian motions within the cytosol and do not accumulate in lysosomes. Results suggest that intracellular accumulation of metallic nanoparticles into endo-lysosomal compartments is the leading cause of nanotoxicity, due to consequent nanoparticle degradation and in situ release of metal ions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI

  7. Pulmonary Toxicity Study of Lunar and Martian Dust Simulants Intratracheally Instilled in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.; Latch, John A.; Holian, A.; McCluskey, R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is contemplating sending humans to Mars and the Moon for further exploration. The properties of Hawaiian and Californian volcanic ashes allow them to be used to simulate Martian and lunar dusts, respectively. NASA laboratories use these dust simulants to test performance of hardware destined for Martian or lunar environments. Workers in these test facilities are exposed to low levels of these dusts. The present study was conducted to investigate the toxicity of these dust simulants. Particles of respirable-size ranges of lunar simulant (LS), Martian simulant (MS), TiO2 (negative control) and quartz (positive control) were each intratracheally instilled (saline as vehicle) to groups of 4 mice (C57BL, male, 2-3 month old) at a single treatment of 1 (Hi dose) or 0.1 (Lo dose) mg/mouse. The lungs were harvested at the end of 7 days or 90 days for histopathological examination. Lungs of the LS-Lo groups had no evidence of inflammation, edema or fibrosis. The LS-Hi-7d group had mild to moderate acute inflammation, and neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltration; the LS-Hi-90d group showed signs of chronic inflammation and some fibrosis. Lungs of the MS-Lo-7d group revealed mild inflammation and neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltration; the MS-Lo-90d group showed mild fibrosis and particle-laden macrophages (PLM). Lungs of the MS-Hi-7d group demonstrated mild to moderate inflammation and large foci of PLM; the MS-Hi-90d group showed chronic mild to moderate inflammation and fibrosis. To mimic the effects of the oxidative and reactive properties of Martian soil surface, groups of mice were exposed to ozone (3 hour at 0.5 ppm) prior to MS dust instillation. Lung lesions in the MS group were more severe with the pretreatment. The results for the negative and positive controls were consistent with the known pulmonary toxicity of these compounds. The overall severity of toxic insults to the lungs were TiO2

  8. Irradiation with visible light enhances the antibacterial toxicity of silver nanoparticles produced by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, Matthew; Naddeo, J. J.; Tan, Yuying; Griepenburg, Julianne C.; Tomko, John; Trout, Cory; O'Malley, Sean M.; Bubb, Daniel M.; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-04-01

    The rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a rapidly growing global health concern. According to the Center for Disease Control, approximately 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths per year occur in the USA due to antibiotic resistance. In recent years, there has been a surge in the use of metal nanoparticles as coatings for orthopedic implants, wound dressings, and food packaging, due to their antimicrobial properties. In this report, we demonstrate that the antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is enhanced with exposure to light from the visible spectrum. We find that the increased toxicity is due to augmented silver ion release and bacterial uptake. Interestingly, silver ion toxicity does not appear to depend on the formation of reactive oxygen species. Our findings provide a novel paradigm for using light to regulate the toxicity of AgNPs which may have a significant impact in the development of new antimicrobial therapeutics.

  9. Toxicity and cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles: what we have learned so far?

    PubMed Central

    Alkilany, Alaaldin M.

    2010-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted enormous scientific and technological interest due to their ease of synthesis, chemical stability, and unique optical properties. Proof-of-concept studies demonstrate their biomedical applications in chemical sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery, and cancer treatment. Knowledge about their potential toxicity and health impact is essential before these nanomaterials can be used in real clinical settings. Furthermore, the underlying interactions of these nanomaterials with physiological fluids is a key feature of understanding their biological impact, and these interactions can perhaps be exploited to mitigate unwanted toxic effects. In this Perspective we discuss recent results that address the toxicity of gold nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo, and we provide some experimental recommendations for future research at the interface of nanotechnology and biological systems. PMID:21170131

  10. Toxicity mechanism of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles against food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubbu, G Devanand; Baskar, R; Anusuya, T; Seshan, C Arun; Chelliah, Ramachandran

    2016-12-01

    Food preservation is an important field of research. It extends the shelf life of major food products. Our current study is based on food preservation through TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles. TiO2 and ZnO are biocompatible nanomaterial. The biocompatibility of the materials were established through toxicity studies on cell lines. Titanium dioxide and Zinc Oxide nanoparticle were synthesized by wet chemical process. They are characterized by X-Ray diffraction and TEM. The antibacterial activities of both the materials were analysed to ensure their effectiveness as food preservative against Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Shigella flexneri. The results indicates that TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticle inhibits Salmonella, Klebsiella and Shigella. The mode of action is by the generation of ROS in cases of Salmonella, Klebsiella. Mode of action in Shigella is still unclear. It was also proved that TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticle are biocompatible materials.

  11. In vitro toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticle: oxidative damages on Hep G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Leila; Tanwir, Farzeen; Yousefi Babadi, Vahid

    2015-02-01

    During the past years many studies have been done highlighting the great need for a more thorough understanding of cell-iron oxide nanoparticle interactions. To improve our knowledge in this field, there is a great need for standardized protocols that would allow to comparing the cytotoxic potential of any Fe2O3-NP type with previously studied particles. Several approaches are reported that several parameters which are of great importance for Fe2O3 nanoparticle induced toxicity. Nanoparticles because of their very small size can pass through the cell membrane and can make oxidative damage in all parts of the cells such as mitochondria, membrane, DNA due to high surface area. This study focuses on acute cytotoxicity of reactive oxygen species and DNA damaging effects of mentioned nanoparticles. Results showed increase of the oxidative damage leads cells to the apoptosis, therefore reduced cell viability. It is interesting that all of the results are concentration and time dependent.

  12. Mechanisms of pulmonary toxicity and medical applications of carbon nanotubes: Two faces of Janus?

    PubMed

    Shvedova, A A; Kisin, E R; Porter, D; Schulte, P; Kagan, V E; Fadeel, B; Castranova, V

    2009-02-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging science involving manipulation of materials at the nanometer scale. There are several exciting prospects for the application of engineered nanomaterials in medicine. However, concerns over adverse and unanticipated effects on human health have also been raised. In fact, the same properties that make engineered nanomaterials attractive from a technological and biomedical perspective could also make these novel materials harmful to human health and the environment. Carbon nanotubes are cylinders of one or several coaxial graphite layer(s) with a diameter in the order of nanometers, and serve as an instructive example of the Janus-like properties of nanomaterials. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that carbon nanotubes and/or associated contaminants or catalytic materials that arise during the production process may induce oxidative stress and prominent pulmonary inflammation. Recent studies also suggest some similarities between the pathogenic properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and those of asbestos fibers. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes can be readily functionalized and several studies on the use of carbon nanotubes as versatile excipients for drug delivery and imaging of disease processes have been reported, suggesting that carbon nanotubes may have a place in the armamentarium for treatment and monitoring of cancer, infection, and other disease conditions. Nanomedicine is an emerging field that holds great promise; however, close attention to safety issues is required to ensure that the opportunities that carbon nanotubes and other engineered nanoparticles offer can be translated into feasible and safe constructs for the treatment of human disease.

  13. Interaction of New-Developed TiO2-Based Photocatalytic Nanoparticles with Pathogenic Microorganisms and Human Dermal and Pulmonary Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nica, Ionela Cristina; Stan, Miruna Silvia; Popa, Marcela; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Lazar, Veronica; Pircalabioru, Gratiela G.; Dumitrescu, Iuliana; Ignat, Madalina; Feder, Marcel; Tanase, Liviu Cristian; Mercioniu, Ionel; Diamandescu, Lucian; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2017-01-01

    TiO2-based photocatalysts were obtained during previous years in order to limit pollution and to ease human daily living conditions due to their special properties. However, obtaining biocompatible photocatalysts is still a key problem, and the mechanism of their toxicity recently received increased attention. Two types of TiO2 nanoparticles co-doped with 1% of iron and nitrogen (TiO2-1% Fe–N) atoms were synthesized in hydrothermal conditions at pH of 8.5 (HT1) and 5.5 (HT2), and their antimicrobial activity and cytotoxic effects exerted on human pulmonary and dermal fibroblasts were assessed. These particles exhibited significant microbicidal and anti-biofilm activity, suggesting their potential application for microbial decontamination of different environments. In addition, our results demonstrated the biocompatibility of TiO2-1% Fe–N nanoparticles at low doses on lung and dermal cells, which may initiate oxidative stress through dose accumulation. Although no significant changes were observed between the two tested photocatalysts, the biological response was cell type specific and time- and dose-dependent; the lung cells proved to be more sensitive to nanoparticle exposure. Taken together, these experimental data provide useful information for future photocatalytic applications in the industrial, food, pharmaceutical, and medical fields. PMID:28125053

  14. Pulmonary Toxicity of Simulated Lunar and Martian Dusts Intratracheally Instilled into Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John; Holian, Andrij; Latch, Judith N.; Balis, John; Muro-Cacho, Carlos; Cowper, Shawn; McCluskey, Richard

    2000-01-01

    lymphocytic infiltration, and mild perivascular and peribronchiolar inflammation. The MSS-LD-90d group showed PLMs and scattered foci of mild fibrosis. The MSS-HD-7d group showed large foci of PLMs, intraalveolar debris, mild to moderate focal alveolitis, and mild to moderate perivascular and peribronchiolar inflammation. The MSS-HD-90d group showed focal chronic mild to moderate alveolitis and fibrosis. To mimic the oxidative and reactive properties of Martian surface dust in the test animals, groups of 4 mice were exposed to ozone (0.5 ppm for 3 hours) prior to instillation of the MSS. Lung lesions in the MSS groups were more severe with the ozone pretreatment. The O3-MSS-HD-90d group had wide spread intraalveolar debris, focal moderate alveolitis and fibrosis. The results for the titanium dioxide and quartz controls were consistent with the known pulmonary toxicity of these compounds. The overall severity of toxic injury to the lungs was TiO2toxic responses increased with the increase of dust burden in the lung. Except for TiO2, the increased duration of dust presence in the lung from 7 to 90 days transformed the acute inflammatory response to a chronic inflammatory lesion.

  15. Citrate coated silver nanoparticles change heavy metal toxicities and bioaccumulation of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Kim, Injeong; Lee, Byung-Tae; Kim, Hyun-A; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Sang Don; Hwang, Yu-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Citrate-coated AgNPs (c-AgNPs) have negatively charged surfaces and their surface interactions with heavy metals can affect metal toxicity in aquatic environments. This study used Daphnia magna to compare the acute toxicities and bioaccumulation of As(V), Cd, and Cu when they interact with c-AgNPs. The 24-h acute toxicities of As(V) and Cu were not affected by the addition of c-AgNPs, while bioaccumulation significantly decreased in the presence of c-AgNPs. In contrast, both the 24-h acute toxicity and bioaccumulation of Cd increased in the presence of c-AgNPs. These toxicity and bioaccumulation trends can be attributed to the interactions between the AgNP surface and the heavy metals. As(V) and c-AgNPs compete by negative charge, decreasing As(V) toxicity. Copper adheres readily to c-AgNP citrate, decreasing Cu bioavailability, and thus reducing Cu toxicity and bioaccumulation. Citrate complexes with divalent cations such as Ca and Mg reduce the competition between divalent cations and Cd on biotic ligand, increasing toxicity and bioaccumulation of Cd. This study shows that surface properties determine the effect of c-AgNPs on heavy metal toxicities and bioaccumulations; hence, further studies on the effect of nanoparticle by it surface properties are warranted.

  16. The potentiation effect makes the difference: non-toxic concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles enhance Cu nanoparticle toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Fernández-Cruz, María Luisa; Connolly, Mona; Conde, Estefanía; Fernández, Marta; Schuster, Michael; Navas, José María

    2015-02-01

    Here we examined whether the addition of a non-toxic concentration (6.25 μg/mL) of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs: 19, 35 and 57 nm, respectively) modulates the cytotoxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs, 63 nm in size) in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. The cytotoxic effect of CuNPs on HepG2 cells was markedly enhanced by the ZnONPs, the largest ZnONPs causing the highest increase in toxicity. However, CuNPs cytotoxicity was not affected by co-incubation with medium containing only zinc ions, indicating the increase in toxicity might be attributed to the particle form of ZnONPs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of CuNPs and ZnONPs inside the cells co-exposed to both types of NP and outflow of cytoplasm through the damaged cell membrane. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) determined an increase in the concentration of zinc and a decrease in that of copper in co-exposed cells. On the basis of these results, we propose that accumulation of large numbers of ZnONPs in the cells alters cellular membranes and the cytotoxicity of CuNPs is increased.

  17. Toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles to grass litter decomposition in a sandy soil

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Shahzad, Tanvir; Shahid, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Dhavamani, Jeyakumar; Ismail, Iqbal M. I.; Basahi, Jalal M.; Almeelbi, Talal

    2017-01-01

    We examined time-dependent effect of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) at a rate of 2000 mg kg−1 soil on Cynodon dactylon litter (3 g kg−1) decomposition in an arid sandy soil. Overall, heterotrophic cultivable bacterial and fungal colonies, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly decreased in litter-amended soil by the application of nanoparticles after 90 and 180 days of incubation. Time dependent effect of nanoparticles was significant for microbial biomass in litter-amended soil where nanoparticles decreased this variable from 27% after 90 days to 49% after 180 days. IONPs decreased CO2 emission by 28 and 30% from litter-amended soil after 90 and 180 days, respectively. These observations indicated that time-dependent effect was not significant on grass-litter carbon mineralization efficiency. Alternatively, nanoparticles application significantly reduced mineral nitrogen content in litter-amended soil in both time intervals. Therefore, nitrogen mineralization efficiency was decreased to 60% after 180 days compared to that after 90 days in nanoparticles grass-litter amended soil. These effects can be explained by the presence of labile Fe in microbial biomass after 180 days in nanoparticles amendment. Hence, our results suggest that toxicity of IONPs to soil functioning should consider before recommending their use in agro-ecosystems. PMID:28155886

  18. Toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles to grass litter decomposition in a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Shahzad, Tanvir; Shahid, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Dhavamani, Jeyakumar; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Basahi, Jalal M; Almeelbi, Talal

    2017-02-03

    We examined time-dependent effect of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) at a rate of 2000 mg kg(-1) soil on Cynodon dactylon litter (3 g kg(-1)) decomposition in an arid sandy soil. Overall, heterotrophic cultivable bacterial and fungal colonies, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly decreased in litter-amended soil by the application of nanoparticles after 90 and 180 days of incubation. Time dependent effect of nanoparticles was significant for microbial biomass in litter-amended soil where nanoparticles decreased this variable from 27% after 90 days to 49% after 180 days. IONPs decreased CO2 emission by 28 and 30% from litter-amended soil after 90 and 180 days, respectively. These observations indicated that time-dependent effect was not significant on grass-litter carbon mineralization efficiency. Alternatively, nanoparticles application significantly reduced mineral nitrogen content in litter-amended soil in both time intervals. Therefore, nitrogen mineralization efficiency was decreased to 60% after 180 days compared to that after 90 days in nanoparticles grass-litter amended soil. These effects can be explained by the presence of labile Fe in microbial biomass after 180 days in nanoparticles amendment. Hence, our results suggest that toxicity of IONPs to soil functioning should consider before recommending their use in agro-ecosystems.

  19. Toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles to grass litter decomposition in a sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Shahzad, Tanvir; Shahid, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Dhavamani, Jeyakumar; Ismail, Iqbal M. I.; Basahi, Jalal M.; Almeelbi, Talal

    2017-02-01

    We examined time-dependent effect of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) at a rate of 2000 mg kg‑1 soil on Cynodon dactylon litter (3 g kg‑1) decomposition in an arid sandy soil. Overall, heterotrophic cultivable bacterial and fungal colonies, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly decreased in litter-amended soil by the application of nanoparticles after 90 and 180 days of incubation. Time dependent effect of nanoparticles was significant for microbial biomass in litter-amended soil where nanoparticles decreased this variable from 27% after 90 days to 49% after 180 days. IONPs decreased CO2 emission by 28 and 30% from litter-amended soil after 90 and 180 days, respectively. These observations indicated that time-dependent effect was not significant on grass-litter carbon mineralization efficiency. Alternatively, nanoparticles application significantly reduced mineral nitrogen content in litter-amended soil in both time intervals. Therefore, nitrogen mineralization efficiency was decreased to 60% after 180 days compared to that after 90 days in nanoparticles grass-litter amended soil. These effects can be explained by the presence of labile Fe in microbial biomass after 180 days in nanoparticles amendment. Hence, our results suggest that toxicity of IONPs to soil functioning should consider before recommending their use in agro-ecosystems.

  20. Impacts of select organic ligands on the colloidal stability, dissolution dynamics, and toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Lok R; Dubey, Brajesh; Scheuerman, Phillip R

    2013-11-19

    Key understanding of potential transformations that may occur on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) surface upon interaction with naturally ubiquitous organic ligands (e.g., -SH (thoil), humic acid, or -COO (carboxylate)) is limited. Herein we investigated how dissolved organic carbon (DOC), -SH (in cysteine, a well-known Ag(+) chelating agent), and -COO (in trolox, a well-known antioxidant) could alter the colloidal stability, dissolution rate, and toxicity of citrate-functionalized AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs) against a keystone crustacean Daphnia magna. Cysteine, DOC, or trolox amendment of citrate-AgNPs differentially modified particle size, surface properties (charge, plasmonic spectra), and ion release dynamics, thereby attenuating (with cysteine or trolox) or promoting (with DOC) AgNP toxicity. Except with DOC amendment, the combined toxicity of AgNPs and released Ag under cysteine or trolox amendment was lower than of AgNO3 alone. The results of this study show that citrate-AgNP toxicity can be associated with oxidative stress, ion release, and the organism biology. Our evidence suggests that specific organic ligands available in the receiving waters can differentially surface modify AgNPs and alter their environmental persistence (changing dissolution dynamics) and subsequently the toxicity; hence, we caveat to generalize that surface modified nanoparticles upon environmental release may not be toxic to receptor organisms.

  1. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the "liquid drop" approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-11-21

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the "liquid drop" model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.

  2. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Margriet V.D.Z. Annema, Wijtske; Salvati, Anna; Lesniak, Anna; Elsaesser, Andreas; Barnes, Clifford; McKerr, George; Howard, C. Vyvyan; Lynch, Iseult; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Jong, Wim H. de

    2009-10-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining their ability to inhibit differentiation of embryonic stem cells into spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes. Four well characterized silica nanoparticles of various sizes were used to investigate whether nanomaterials are capable of inhibition of differentiation in the embryonic stem cell test. Nanoparticle size distributions and dispersion characteristics were determined before and during incubation in the stem cell culture medium by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering. Mouse embryonic stem cells were exposed to silica nanoparticles at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 {mu}g/ml. The embryonic stem cell test detected a concentration dependent inhibition of differentiation of stem cells into contracting cardiomyocytes by two silica nanoparticles of primary size 10 (TEM 11) and 30 (TEM 34) nm while two other particles of primary size 80 (TEM 34) and 400 (TEM 248) nm had no effect up to the highest concentration tested. Inhibition of differentiation of stem cells occurred below cytotoxic concentrations, indicating a specific effect of the particles on the differentiation of the embryonic stem cells. The impaired differentiation of stem cells by such widely used particles warrants further investigation into the potential of these nanoparticles to migrate into the uterus, placenta and embryo and their possible effects on embryogenesis.

  3. Comparative toxicity of silver nanoparticles on oxidative stress and DNA damage in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong-Min; Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Yang, Xinyu; Meyer, Joel N; Choi, Jinhee

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) surface coating and size on the organismal and molecular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. The toxicity of bare AgNPs and 8 and 38 nm PVP-coated AgNPs (PVP8-AgNPs, PVP38-AgNPs) were compared. The toxicity of AgNO3 was also tested because ion dissolution and particle-specific effects are often important characteristics determining Ag nanotoxicity. Comparative toxicity across AgNO3 and the three different types of AgNPs was first evaluated using a C. elegans mortality test by a direct comparison of the LC50 values. Subsequently, mutant screening followed by oxidative stress, mitochondrial toxicity and DNA damage assays were carried out at equitoxic (LC10 and LC50) concentrations to further assess the toxicity mechanism of AgNO3 and AgNPs. AgNO3 and bare AgNPs had similar toxicities, whereas PVP coating reduced the toxicity of the AgNPs significantly. Of the PVP-AgNPs, the smaller NPs were more toxic. Different groups of mutants responded differently to AgNO3 and AgNPs, which indicates that their toxicity mechanism might be different. AgNO3 and bare AgNPs induced mitochondrial membrane damage. None of the silver materials tested caused detectable polymerase-inhibiting DNA lesions in either the nucleus or mitochondria as measured by a quantitative PCR assay, but AgNO3, bare AgNPs and PVP8-AgNPs induced oxidative DNA damage. These results show that coatings on the AgNPs surface and the particle size make a clear contribution to the toxicity of the AgNPs, and oxidative stress-related mitochondrial and DNA damage appear to be potential mechanisms of toxicity.

  4. A comparative study of hollow copper sulfide nanoparticles and hollow gold nanospheres on degradability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liangran; Panderi, Irene; Yan, Daisy D; Szulak, Kevin; Li, Yajuan; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Ma, Hang; Niesen, Daniel B; Seeram, Navindra; Ahmed, Aftab; Yan, Bingfang; Pantazatos, Dionysios; Lu, Wei

    2013-10-22

    Gold and copper nanoparticles have been widely investigated for photothermal therapy of cancer. However, degradability and toxicity of these nanoparticles remain concerns. Here, we compare hollow CuS nanoparticles (HCuSNPs) with hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) in similar particle sizes and morphology following intravenous administration to mice. The injected pegylated HCuSNPs (PEG-HCuSNPs) are eliminated through both hepatobiliary (67 percentage of injected dose, %ID) and renal (23 %ID) excretion within one month postinjection. By contrast, 3.98 %ID of Au is excreted from liver and kidney within one month after iv injection of pegylated HAuNS (PEG-HAuNS). Comparatively, PEG-HAuNS are almost nonmetabolizable, while PEG-HCuSNPs are considered biodegradable nanoparticles. PEG-HCuSNPs do not show significant toxicity by histological or blood chemistry analysis. Principal component analysis and 2-D peak distribution plots of data from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF IMS) of liver tissues demonstrated a reversible change in the proteomic profile in mice receiving PEG-HCuSNPs. This is attributed to slow dissociation of Cu ion from CuS nanoparticles along with effective Cu elimination for maintaining homeostasis. Nonetheless, an irreversible change in the proteomic profile is observed in the liver from mice receiving PEG-HAuNS by analysis of MALDI-TOF IMS data, probably due to the nonmetabolizability of Au. This finding correlates with the elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase at 3 months after PEG-HAuNS injection, indicating potential long-term toxicity. The comparative results between the two types of nanoparticles will advance the development of HCuSNPs as a new class of biodegradable inorganic nanomaterials for photothermal therapy.

  5. Visualization of custom-tailored iron oxide nanoparticles chemistry, uptake, and toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Kai; Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro; Ahlinder, Linnea; Guldevall, Karolin; Pazik, Robert; Kępiński, Leszek; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Butorin, Sergei M.; Brismar, Hjalmar; Önfelt, Björn; Österlund, Lars; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.; Kessler, Vadim G.

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide generated by wearing of vehicles have been modelled with a tailored solution of size-uniform engineered magnetite particles produced by the Bradley reaction, a solvothermal metal-organic approach rendering hydrophilic particles. The latter does not bear any pronounced surface charge in analogy with that originating from anthropogenic sources in the environment. Physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by a wide range of methods, including XPD, TEM, SEM, DLS and spectroscopic techniques. The magnetite nanoparticles were found to be sensitive for transformation into maghemite under ambient conditions. This process was clearly revealed by Raman spectroscopy for high surface energy magnetite particles containing minor impurities of the hydromaghemite phase and was followed by quantitative measurements with EXAFS spectroscopy. In order to assess the toxicological effects of the produced nanoparticles in humans, with and without surface modification with ATP (a model of bio-corona formed in alveolar liquid), a pathway of potential uptake and clearance was modelled with a sequence of in vitro studies using A549 lung epithelial cells, lymphocyte 221-B cells, and 293T embryonal kidney cells, respectively. Raman microscopy unambiguously showed that magnetite nanoparticles are internalized within the A549 cells after 24 h co-incubation, and that the ATP ligand is retained on the nanoparticles throughout the uptake process. The toxicity of the nanoparticles was estimated using confocal fluorescence microscopy and indicated no principal difference for unmodified and modified particles, but revealed considerably different biochemical responses. The IL-8 cytokine response was found to be significantly lower for the magnetite nanoparticles compared to TiO2, while an enhancement of ROS was observed, which was further increased for the ATP-modified nanoparticles, implicating involvement of the ATP signalling pathway in

  6. Physicochemical characterization of sildenafil-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle dispersions (SLN) for pulmonary application.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, M; Finke, J H; Richter, C; Gothsch, T; Kwade, A; Büttgenbach, S; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2014-12-10

    For the development of any colloidal system, thorough characterization is extremely essential. This article discusses the physicochemical characterization of sildenafil-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle dispersions (SLN) including stability analysis over 6 months time period for possible pulmonary administration for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). SLN consisting of phospholipid and triglycerides were manufactured using a novel microchannel homogenization method. These sildenafil-loaded SLN were then subjected to physicochemical characterization namely, particle size and distribution over shelf life, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and analysis of nebulization performance of these SLN by the means of next generation impactor (NGI). Additionally, the morphology of nebulized particles was assessed by transmission electron microscopy using negative staining technique. The solubility of sildenafil citrate and base in the lipid matrix was determined and was 0.1% w/w and 1% w/w, respectively. From the particle size measurements, it was observed that SLN without sildenafil demonstrated consistent particle sizes over 6 months. For the sildenafil-loaded SLN, increased particle sizes were found after manufacturing and further increased within weeks. From WAXD studies, after 6 months high intensity reflections corresponding to the stable β modification were observed. From DSC results, the peak minimum temperatures increased upon storage, hinting at a transformation to the stable β modification of triglycerides in the case of sildenafil-loaded SLN. Hence, it can be concluded that even small drug concentration influences particle size and stability.

  7. Pulmonary Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles Exposure Differentially Impairs Coronary and Mesenteric Arteriolar Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Minarchick, Valerie C; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Porter, Dale W; Wolfarth, Michael G; Çiftyürek, Engin; Barger, Mark; Sabolsky, Edward M.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are an engineered nanomaterial that possesses unique catalytic, oxidative and reductive properties. Currently, CeO2 NPs are being used as a fuel catalyst but these properties are also utilized in the development of potential drug treatments for radiation and stroke protection. These uses of CeO2 NPs present a risk for human exposure; however, to date no studies have investigated the effects of CeO2 NPs on the microcirculation following pulmonary exposure. Previous studies in our laboratory with other nanomaterials have shown impairments in normal microvascular function after pulmonary exposures. Therefore, we predicted that CeO2 NP exposure would cause microvascular dysfunction that is dependent on the tissue bed and dose. Twenty-four hour post exposure to CeO2 NPs (0–400 μg), mesenteric and coronary arterioles were isolated and microvascular function was assessed. Our results provided evidence that pulmonary CeO2 NP exposure impairs endothelium-dependent and -independent arteriolar dilation in a dose-dependent manner. The CeO2 NP exposure dose which causes a 50% impairment in arteriolar function (EC50) was calculated and ranged from 15 – 100 μg depending on the chemical agonist and microvascular bed. Microvascular assessments with acetylcholine revealed a 33–75% reduction in function following exposure. Additionally, there was a greater sensitivity to CeO2 NP exposure in the mesenteric microvasculature due to the 40% decrease in the calculated EC50 compared to the coronary microvasculature EC50. CeO2 NP exposure increased mean arterial pressure in some groups. Taken together these observed microvascular changes may likely have detrimental effects on local blood flow regulation and contribute to cardiovascular dysfunction associated with particle exposure. PMID:23645470

  8. Immunization of guinea pigs with novel hepatitis B antigen as nanoparticle aggregate powders administered by the pulmonary route.

    PubMed

    Muttil, Pavan; Prego, Cecilia; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Pulliam, Brian; Fallon, John Kevin; Wang, Chenchen; Hickey, Anthony James; Edwards, David

    2010-09-01

    Novel nanoparticle-aggregate formulations containing recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (rHBsAg) were administered to the lungs of guinea pigs and antibodies generated to this antigen evaluated. Preparations of dry powders of: (a) rHBsAg encapsulated within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanoparticles (antigen nanoparticles, AgN(SD)), (b) rHBsAg in a physical mixture with blank PLGA/PEG nanoparticles (antigen nanoparticle admixture (AgNA(SD)), and (c) rHBsAg encapsulated in PLGA/PEG nanoparticles plus free rHBsAg (antigen nanoparticles and free antigen), were generated by spray drying with leucine. Control groups consisted of alum with adsorbed rHBsAg (AlumAg); reconstituted suspensions of spray-dried rHBsAg-loaded PLGA/PEG nanoparticles with leucine; and rHBsAg-loaded PLGA/PEG nanoparticles (AgN). Control preparations were administered by intramuscular injection; AgN was also spray instilled into the lungs. The IgG titers were measured in the serum for 24 weeks after the initial immunization; IgA titers were measured in the bronchio-alveolar lavage fluid. While the highest titer of serum IgG antibody was observed in guinea pigs immunized with AlumAg administered by the IM route, animals immunized with powder formulations via the pulmonary route exhibited high IgA titers. In addition, guinea pigs immunized with AgNA(SD) via the pulmonary route exhibited IgG titers above 1,000 mIU/ml in the serum (IgG titers above 10 mIU/ml is considered protective). Thus, the disadvantages observed with the existing hepatitis B vaccine administered by the parenteral route may be overcome by administering them as novel dry powders to the lungs. In addition, these powders have the advantage of eliciting a high mucosal immune response in the lungs without traditional adjuvants.

  9. Acute pulmonary toxicity and inflammation induced by combined exposure to didecyldimethylammonium chloride and ethylene glycol in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do Young; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Eunji; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Kwon, Jung-Taek

    2016-02-01

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), an antimicrobial agent, has been reported to induce pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. DDAC is frequently used in spray-form household products in combination with ethylene glycol (EG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxic interaction between DDAC and EG in the lung. DDAC at a sub-toxic dose (100 μg/kg body weight) was mixed with a non-toxic dose of EG (100 or 200 μg/kg body weight), and was administrated to rats via intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were not changed by singly treated DDAC or EG, but significantly enhanced at 1 d after treatment with the mixture, with the effect dependent on the dose of EG. Total cell count in BALF was largely increased and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were predominantly recruited to the lung in rats administrated with the mixture. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 also appeared to be increased by the mixture of DDAC and EG (200 μg/kg body weight) at 1 d post-exposure, which might be associated with the increase in inflammatory cells in lung. BALF protein content and inflammatory cell recruitment in the lung still remained elevated at 7 d after the administration of DDAC with the higher dose of EG. These results suggest that the combination of DDAC and EG can synergistically induce pulmonary cytotoxicity and inflammation, and EG appears to amplify the harmful effects of DDAC on the lung. Therefore pulmonary exposure to these two chemicals commonly found in commercial products can be a potential hazard to human health.

  10. Investigation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toxicity and uptake by plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, C.; Khodja, H.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Brisset, F.; Flank, A. M.; Fayard, B.; Chaillou, S.; Carrière, M.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are introduced in a growing number of commercial products and their production may lead to their release in the environment. Plants may be a potential entry point for NP in the food chain. Up to now, results describing NP phytotoxical effects and plant accumulation are scarce and contradictory. To increase knowledge on titanium dioxide NP (TiO2-NPs) accumulation and impact on plants, we designed a study on three plant species, namely wheat (Triticum aestivum), oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants were exposed in hydroponics to a panel of well-characterized TiO2-NPs, with diameters ranging from 12 to 140 nm, either anatase or rutile. Their accumulation in plant tissues is currently being assessed by complementary imaging techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μ-XRF) imaging and micro-particle induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) imaging. Moreover, the impact of TiO2-NP exposure on germination rate, root elongation, dry biomass and evapotranspiration is evaluated. Preliminary results are presented here, with data collected on wheat plants exposed to 12 nm and 25 nm anatase TiO2-NPs. These results show that TiO2-NPs are taken up by plants, and do not significantly alter their germination and root elongation. These results underline the necessity of deeper evaluation of nanoparticle ecotoxicity, and particularly on their interaction with plants.

  11. A review of reproductive and developmental toxicity of silver nanoparticles in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Okuda, Hirokazu; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2017-01-01

    We summarized significant effects reported in the literature on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in laboratory animals. AgNPs showed testicular/sperm toxicity in males and ovarian and embryonic toxicity in females. Maternal injection of AgNPs delayed physical development and impaired cognitive behavior in offspring. Ag was accumulated in the testes after administration of AgNPs. AgNPs were identified in the visceral yolk sac after administration during early gestation in mice. Radiolabeled AgNPs were detected in placenta, breast milk, and pre- and postnatal offspring after injection during late gestation in rats. Ag in the ionic form, and possibly also particles, was suggested to be bioavailable. Although this review provides initial information on the potential reproductive and developmental toxicity of AgNPs, data is still very limited. Further studies using state-of-the-art methodologies and the relevant routes and doses for human exposure are required.

  12. Polyanions protect against the in vitro pulmonary toxicity of polycationic paint components associated with the Ardystil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoet, P H; Gilissen, L; Nemery, B

    2001-09-01

    The polycationic paint components of the Acramin F system have led to severe pulmonary disease in textile printing sprayers in Spain and Algeria (Ardystil syndrome). In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the toxicity of these nitrogen-containing polymeric paint components, Acramin FWR (FWR), Acramin FWN (FWN), and Acrafix FHN (FHN), we have studied the effect of coincubation with polyanionic compounds, Sulodexide (heparin-like substance), DNA and poly-l-glutamic acid (of different lengths) in different pulmonary cell types. This study shows that the cytotoxicity of the three polycationic paint components FWR (a polyurea), FWN (a polyamide-amine), and FHN (a polyamine) is markedly decreased in the presence of the polyanions. It is concluded that the paint components FWR, FWN, and FHN execute their cytotoxicity at least partly by the abundant positive charges these molecules carry at physiological pH.

  13. Flame synthesis and in vitro biocompatibility assessment of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: cellular uptake, toxicity and proliferation studies.

    PubMed

    Buyukhatipoglu, K; Miller, T A; Clyne, A Morss

    2009-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in diverse applications, such as targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermic malignant cell therapy. In the current work, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were produced by flame synthesis, which has improved nanoparticle property control and is capable of commercial production rates with minimal post-processing. The iron oxide nanoparticle material characteristics were analyzed by electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Finally, flame synthesized iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with endothelial cells was compared to commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles. Flame synthesis produced a heterogeneous mixture of 6-12 nm diameter hematite and magnetite nanoparticles with superparamagnetic properties. Endothelial cell scanning electron microscopy, confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, demonstrated that flame synthesized nanoparticles are ingested into cells in a similar manner to commercially available nanoparticles. The flame synthesized particles showed no statistically significant toxicity difference from commercially available nanoparticles, as measured by Live/Dead assay, Alamar blue, and lactase dehydrogenase release. Neither type of nanoparticle affected cell proliferation induced by fibroblast growth factor-2. These data suggest that combustion synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to commercially available nanoparticles for biological applications, yet flame synthesis is a simpler process with higher purity products and lower manufacturing costs. Future work will include functionalizing nanoparticles for specific cell targeting and bioactive factor delivery.

  14. Local delivery of biodegradable pirfenidone nanoparticles ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Ruchit; Redente, Elizabeth F.; Thakur, Ashish; Riches, David W. H.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-12-01

    Our purpose was to assess sustained delivery and enhanced efficacy of pirfenidone-loaded nanoparticles after intratracheal instillation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles containing pirfenidone (NPs) were prepared and characterized. Biodistribution of NPs and solution was assessed using LC-MS after intratracheal administration in C57Bl/6 mice at 3 and 24 h and 1 week post-administration. Efficacy was tested in C57Bl/6 mice in a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model. Mice received 10 μg pirfenidone intratracheally in solution or NPs, once a week, for 3 weeks after bleomycin administration. Drug effects were monitored on day 28. Lung hydroxyproline content, total number of cells, and numbers of macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were assessed. Numbers of macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils were assessed in the lung as well. NPs sustained significantly higher levels of pirfenidone in the lungs and BAL at 24 h and 1 week, compared to the solution group. Pirfenidone solution and NPs significantly reduced hydroxyproline levels by 57 and 81%, respectively, compared to bleomycin alone. At the end of 4 weeks, BAL cellularity was reduced by 25.4% and 56% with solution and NP treatment, respectively. The numbers of lymphocytes and neutrophils in the BAL were also reduced by 58.9 and 82.4% for solution and 74.5% and 89.7% for NPs, respectively. The number of inflammatory macrophages in the lung was reduced by 62.8% and the number of neutrophils was reduced by 59.1% in the NP group and by 37.7% and 44.5%, respectively, in the solution group, compared to bleomycin alone. In conclusion, nanoparticles sustain lung pirfenidone delivery and enhance its anti-fibrotic efficacy.

  15. Influence of bovine serum albumin and alginate on silver nanoparticle dissolution and toxicity to Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Ostermeyer, Ann-Kathrin; Kostigen Mumuper, Cameron; Semprini, Lewis; Radniecki, Tyler

    2013-12-17

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, reduced the toxicity of 20 nm citrate silver nanoparticles (AgNP) toward Nitrosomonas europaea, a model ammonia oxidizing bacteria, through a dual-mode protection mechanism. BSA reduced AgNP toxicity by chelating the silver ions (Ag(+)) released from the AgNPs. BSA further reduced AgNP toxicity by binding to the AgNP surface thus preventing NH3-dependent dissolution from occurring. Due to BSA's affinity toward Ag(+) chemisorbed on the AgNP surface, increased concentrations of BSA lead to increased AgNP dissolution rates. This, however, did not increase AgNP toxicity as the dissolved Ag(+) were adsorbed onto the BSA molecules. Alginate, a model extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), lacks strong Ag(+) ligands and was unable to protect N. europaea from Ag(+) toxicity. However, at high concentrations, alginate reduced AgNP toxicity by binding to the AgNP surface and reducing AgNP dissolution rates. Unlike BSA, alginate only weakly interacted with the AgNP surface and was unable to completely prevent NH3-dependent AgNP dissolution from occurring. Based on these results, AgNP toxicity in high protein environments (e.g., wastewater) is expected to be muted while the EPS layers of wastewater biofilms may provide additional protection from AgNPs, but not from Ag(+) that have already been released.

  16. Toxicity of two types of silver nanoparticles to aquatic crustaceans Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus.

    PubMed

    Blinova, Irina; Niskanen, Jukka; Kajankari, Paula; Kanarbik, Liina; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Tenhu, Heikki; Penttinen, Olli-Pekka; Kahru, Anne

    2013-05-01

    Although silver nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used in various consumer products and produced in industrial scale, information on harmful effects of nanosilver to environmentally relevant organisms is still scarce. This paper studies the adverse effects of silver NPs to two aquatic crustaceans, Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus. For that, silver NPs were synthesized where Ag is covalently attached to poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). In parallel, the toxicity of collargol (protein-coated nanosilver) and AgNO₃ was analyzed. Both types of silver NPs were highly toxic to both crustaceans: the EC50 values in artificial freshwater were 15-17 ppb for D. magna and 20-27 ppb for T. platyurus. The natural water (five different waters with dissolved organic carbon from 5 to 35 mg C/L were studied) mitigated the toxic effect of studied silver compounds up to 8-fold compared with artificial freshwater. The toxicity of silver NPs in all test media was up to 10-fold lower than that of soluble silver salt, AgNO₃. The pattern of the toxic response of both crustacean species to the silver compounds was almost similar in artificial freshwater and in natural waters. The chronic 21-day toxicity of silver NPs to D. magna in natural water was at the part-per-billion level, and adult mortality was more sensitive toxicity test endpoint than the reproduction (the number of offspring per adult).

  17. Acute and subchronic toxicity analysis of surface modified paclitaxel attached hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubbu, Gopinath Devanand; Ramasamy, S; Gaddam, Pramod Reddy; Kumar, J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are widely used for targeted drug delivery applications. Surface modification with appropriate polymer and ligands is carried out to target the drug to the affected area. Toxicity analysis is carried out to evaluate the safety of the surface modified nanoparticles. In this study, paclitaxel attached, folic acid functionalized, polyethylene glycol modified hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were used for targeted drug delivery system. The toxicological behavior of the system was studied in vivo in rats and mice. Acute and subchronic studies were carried out. Biochemical, hematological, and histopathological analysis was also done. There were no significant alterations in the biochemical parameters at a low dosage. There was a small change in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level at a high dosage. The results indicate a safe toxicological profile.

  18. TBHQ Alleviated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress by PERK-Nrf2 Crosstalk in Methamphetamine-Induced Chronic Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yu-Han; Liu, Ming; Bai, Yang; Liang, Li-Ye; Wang, Huai-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) leads to cardiac and pulmonary toxicity expressed as increases in inflammatory responses and oxidative stress. However, some interactions may exist between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). The current study is designed to investigate if both oxidative stress and ERS are involved in MA-induced chronic pulmonary toxicity and if antioxidant tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) alleviated ERS-apoptosis and oxidative stress by PERK-Nrf2 crosstalk. In this study, the rats were randomly divided into control group, MA-treated group (MA), and MA plus TBHQ-treated group (MA + TBHQ). Chronic exposure to MA resulted in slower growth of weight and pulmonary toxicity of the rats by increasing the pulmonary arterial pressure, promoting the hypertrophy of right ventricle and the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MA inhibited the Nrf2-mediated antioxidative stress by downregulation of Nrf2, GCS, and HO-1 and upregulation of SOD2. MA increased GRP78 to induce ERS. Overexpression and phosphorylation of PERK rapidly phosphorylated eIF2α, increased ATF4, CHOP, bax, caspase 3, and caspase 12, and decreased bcl-2. These changes can be reversed by antioxidant TBHQ through upregulating expression of Nrf2. The above results indicated that TBHQ can alleviate MA-induced oxidative stress which can accelerate ERS to initiate PERK-dependent apoptosis and that PERK/Nrf2 is likely to be the key crosstalk between oxidative stress and ERS in MA-induced chronic pulmonary toxicity. PMID:28303170

  19. TBHQ Alleviated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress by PERK-Nrf2 Crosstalk in Methamphetamine-Induced Chronic Pulmonary Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Gu, Yu-Han; Liu, Ming; Bai, Yang; Liang, Li-Ye; Wang, Huai-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) leads to cardiac and pulmonary toxicity expressed as increases in inflammatory responses and oxidative stress. However, some interactions may exist between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). The current study is designed to investigate if both oxidative stress and ERS are involved in MA-induced chronic pulmonary toxicity and if antioxidant tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) alleviated ERS-apoptosis and oxidative stress by PERK-Nrf2 crosstalk. In this study, the rats were randomly divided into control group, MA-treated group (MA), and MA plus TBHQ-treated group (MA + TBHQ). Chronic exposure to MA resulted in slower growth of weight and pulmonary toxicity of the rats by increasing the pulmonary arterial pressure, promoting the hypertrophy of right ventricle and the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MA inhibited the Nrf2-mediated antioxidative stress by downregulation of Nrf2, GCS, and HO-1 and upregulation of SOD2. MA increased GRP78 to induce ERS. Overexpression and phosphorylation of PERK rapidly phosphorylated eIF2α, increased ATF4, CHOP, bax, caspase 3, and caspase 12, and decreased bcl-2. These changes can be reversed by antioxidant TBHQ through upregulating expression of Nrf2. The above results indicated that TBHQ can alleviate MA-induced oxidative stress which can accelerate ERS to initiate PERK-dependent apoptosis and that PERK/Nrf2 is likely to be the key crosstalk between oxidative stress and ERS in MA-induced chronic pulmonary toxicity.

  20. A novel approach reveals that zinc oxide nanoparticles are bioavailable and toxic after dietary exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Dybowska, A.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2011-01-01

    If engineered nanomaterials are released into the environment, some are likely to end up associated with the food of animals due to aggregation and sorption processes. However, few studies have considered dietary exposure of nanomaterials. Here we show that zinc (Zn) from isotopically modified 67ZnO particles is efficiently assimilated by freshwater snails when ingested with food. The 67Zn from nano-sized 67ZnO appears as bioavailable as 67Zn internalized by diatoms. Apparent agglomeration of the zinc oxide (ZnO) particles did not reduce bioavailability, nor preclude toxicity. In the diet, ZnO nanoparticles damage digestion: snails ate less, defecated less and inefficiently processed the ingested food when exposed to high concentrations of ZnO. It was not clear whether the toxicity was due to the high Zn dose achieved with nanoparticles or to the ZnO nanoparticles themselves. Further study of exposure from nanoparticles in food would greatly benefit assessment of ecological and human health risks. ?? 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  1. Role of electrostatic interactions in the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toward Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pagnout, Christophe; Jomini, Stéphane; Dadhwal, Mandeep; Caillet, Céline; Thomas, Fabien; Bauda, Pascale

    2012-04-01

    The increasing production and use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NP-TiO(2)) has led to concerns about their possible impact on the environment. Bacteria play crucial roles in ecosystem processes and may be subject to the toxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we showed that at low ionic strength, the cell viability of Escherichia coli was more severely affected at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.0 and pH 9.5. At pH 5.5, nanoparticles (positively charged) strongly interacted with the bacterial cells (negatively charged) and accumulated on their surfaces. This phenomenon was observed in a much lower degree at pH 7.0 (NP-TiO(2) neutrally charged and cells negatively charged) and pH 9.5 (both NP-TiO(2) and cells negatively charged). It was also shown that the addition of electrolytes (NaCl, CaCl(2), Na(2)SO(4)) resulted in a gradual reduction of the NP-TiO(2) toxicity at pH 5.5 and an increase in this toxicity at pH 9.5, which was closely related to the reduction of the NP-TiO(2) and bacterial cell electrostatic charges.

  2. In Vivo Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Ions in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Bilberg, Katrine; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Besenbacher, Flemming; Baatrup, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The influence of water chemistry on characterised polyvinyl pyrrolidone- (PVP-) coated silver nanoparticles (81 nm) was investigated. NaCl solution series of 100–800 mg L−1 lead to initial and temporal increase in nanoparticles size, but agglomeration was limited. pH variation (5–8) had only minor influence on the hydrodynamic particle size. Acute toxicity of nanosivler to zebrafish (Danio rerio) was investigated in a 48-hour static renewal study and compared with the toxicity of silver ions (AgNO3). The nanosilver and silver ion 48-hour median lethal concentration (LC50) values were 84 μg L−1 and 25 μg L−1, respectively. To investigate exposure-related stress, the fish behaviour was observed visually after 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 27, 30, and 48 hours of both nanosilver and ionic silver treatments. These observations revealed increased rate of operculum movement and surface respiration after nanosilver exposure, suggesting respiratory toxicity. The present study demonstrates that silver nanoparticles are lethal to zebrafish. PMID:22174711

  3. Comparative in vivo assessment of the subacute toxicity of gold and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, Mansee; Mohanty, Ipseeta Ray; Maheswari, Ujjwala; Dayal, Navami; Suman, Rajesh; Joshi, D. S.

    2014-04-01

    In spite of the projected therapeutic potentials of gold nanoparticles (GNP) and silver nanoparticles (SNP), very limited data are available on the interaction of nanoparticles with the biological systems. The present investigation was designed to evaluate as well as compare the subacute toxicity of GNP and SNP. Stable suspensions of GNP and SNP with mean particle diameter 10 and 25 nm, respectively, were prepared. Wistar rats were orally fed SNP (3 mg/kg) or GNP (20 μg/kg), once a day for 21 days. Biochemical indices (creatinine phosphokinase-MB, urea, blood urea nitrogen, aspartate transaminase, alkaline alanine transferase) and histopathological features of the liver, heart, brain, lungs, and kidney were evaluated for signs of toxicity. A significant decline in hepatic and renal function in the GNP treated group was observed as compared to SNP. GNP was found to be relatively more toxic on the lungs and SNP on the myocardial tissue as compared to SNP and GNP treatments, respectively. Interestingly, neither SNP nor GNP adversely affected the basal architecture of the brain as compared to sham. The present study demonstrated that GNP was significantly more noxious on the liver and kidney as compared with SNP.

  4. Potential Toxicity of Up-Converting Nanoparticles Encapsulated with a Bilayer Formed by Ligand Attraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cellular toxicity of nanoparticles that were capped with a bilayered ligand was studied using an up-converting (UC) phosphor material as a representative nanoparticle (NP). The results indicate that although UC NPs are known to be nontoxic, the toxicity of the NPs depends strongly on ligand coordination conditions, in addition to the other commonly known parameters such as size, structure, surface charge etc. Oleate-capped hydrophobic NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs were surface modified to yield three extreme conditions: bare particles that were stripped of the oleate ligands; particles with covalently bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ligands; and particles with an bilayer of PEG-oleate ligands using the oleate surface group that was remained after synthesis. It was found that the bare particles and the covalent PEG NPs induced little toxicity. However, particles that were rendered biocompatible by forming a bilayer with an amphiphilic ligand (i.e., PEG-oleate) resulted in significant cell toxicity. These findings strongly suggest that the PEG-oleate group dissociated from the bilayered oleate-capped NPs, resulting in significant toxicity by exposing the hydrophobic oleate-capped NPs to the cell. Based on results with bare particles, the NaLnF4:Yb,Er (Ln = Y, Gd) up-converting phosphors are essentially less-toxic. Capping and functionalizing these particles with ligand intercalation may, however, not be a suitable method for rendering the NPs suitable for bioapplication as the ligand can potentially dissociate upon cellular interaction, leading to significant toxicity. PMID:24971524

  5. Visualization of Carbon Nanoparticles Within Cells and Implications for Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Alexandra; Gass, Mhairi

    Carbon nanostructures (CNS), such as C60, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) exhibit extraordinary properties and are one of the most commercially relevant class of NS. CNS have already found uses in high-performance sports equipment (nanotubes) and face cream (C60), whilst potential applications include optical and electronic materials and superconductors. Following the huge growth in these nanotechnology-related industries, significant concerns have arisen about their potential toxicity and impact on the environment. A lack in understanding of the interaction of such small structures with cellular material has resulted in concerns over their impact on human health. The potential toxicity of CNS and safety to human health requires an understanding of their interaction with cells and this in turn relies on the measurement of the pathways by which they enter the cell, their spatial distribution within and whether the CNS are transformed by the action of the cell; visualization of intracellular CNS is therefore imperative. However visualizing unlabelled CNS within cells is demanding because it is difficult to distinguish CNS from carbon-rich organelles given their similarity in composition and dimensions. In particular, the challenge lies in translating analytical imaging tools developed for inorganic systems to organic systems. This chapter describes how the state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, such as low-loss energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) can be employed to differentiate between unlabelled C60, SWNTs and the cell. Further, we demonstrate how these techniques can be used to trace the uptake of CNS into the cell and to assess their localized effects on cell structure.

  6. Development of Comparative Toxicity Potentials of TiO2 Nanoparticles for Use in Life Cycle Assessment.

    PubMed

    Ettrup, Kim; Kounina, Anna; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Meesters, Johannes A J; Vea, Eldbjørg B; Laurent, Alexis

    2017-03-20

    Studies have shown that releases of nanoparticles may take place through the life cycle of products embedding nanomaterials, thus resulting in potential impacts on ecosystems and human health. While several life cycle assessment (LCA) studies have assessed such products, only a few of them have quantitatively addressed the toxic impacts caused by released nanoparticles, thus leading to potential biases in their conclusions. Here, we address this gap and aim to provide a framework for calculating characterization factors or comparative toxicity potentials (CTP) for nanoparticles and derive CTP values for TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) for use in LCA. We adapted the USEtox 2.0 consensus model to integrate the SimpleBox4Nano fate model, and we populated the resulting model with TiO2-NP specific data. We thus calculated CTP values for TiO2 nanoparticles for air, water, and soil emission compartments for freshwater ecotoxicity and human toxicity, both cancer effects and noncancer effects. Our results appeared plausible after benchmarking with CTPs for other nanoparticles and substances present in the USEtox database, while large differences were observed with CTP values for TiO2 nanoparticles published in earlier studies. Assumptions, which were performed in those previous studies because of lack of data and knowledge at the time they were made, primarily explain such discrepancies. For future assessment of potential toxic impacts of TiO2 nanoparticles in LCA studies, we therefore recommend the use of our calculated CTP.

  7. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Molecular Responses of Mouse Macrophages to Titanium Dioxide and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Unravels Some Toxic Mechanisms for Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions. PMID:25902355

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  9. Behavior and chronic toxicity of two differently stabilized silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sakka, Yvonne; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Mackevica, Aiga; Filser, Juliane; Baun, Anders

    2016-08-01

    While differences in silver nanoparticle (AgNP) colloidal stability, surface potential, or acute aquatic toxicity for differently stabilized AgNP have often been reported, these have rarely been studied in long-term ecotoxicity tests. In the current study, we investigated the chronic toxicity of AgNP to Daphnia magna over a 21-day period with two different stabilizers (citrate and detergent), representative for charge and sterical stabilizers, respectively. This was coupled with a series of short-term experiments, such as mass balance and uptake/depuration testing, to investigate the behavior of both types of AgNP during a typical media exchange period in the D. magna test for chronic toxicity. As expected, the sterically stabilized AgNP was more stable in the test medium, also in the presence of food; however, a higher uptake of silver after 24h exposure of the charge stabilized AgNP was found compared to the detergent-stabilized AgNP (0.046±0.006μgAgμgDW(-1) and 0.023±0.005μgAgμgDW(-1), respectively). In accordance with this, the higher reproductive effects and mortality were found for the charge-stabilized than for the sterically-stabilized silver nanoparticles in 21-d tests for chronic toxicity. LOEC was 19.2μgAgL(-1) for both endpoints for citrate-coated AgNP and >27.5μgAgL(-1) (highest tested concentration for detergent-stabilized AgNP). This indicates a link between uptake and toxicity. The inclusion of additional short-term experiments on uptake and depuration is recommended when longer-term chronic experiments with nanoparticles are conducted.

  10. Pulmonary toxicity in hamsters of smoke particles from Kuwaiti oil fires.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, J D; Long, N C; Wolfthal, S F; Dumyahn, T; Dockery, D W

    1998-01-01

    The Kuwaiti oil wells set on fire by retreating Iraqi troops at the end of the Persian Gulf War released complex particles, inorganic and organic gases, and hydrocarbons into the atmosphere, damaging the environment where many people live and work. In this study, we assessed the health effects of particles from the Kuwaiti oil fires by instilling hamsters intratracheally with particles (<3.5 microM in size) collected in Ahmadi, a residential area in Kuwait located downwind of hundreds of oil fires. Twenty-four hours after instillation, we performed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to assess various indicators of pulmonary inflammation, including neutrophil and macrophage numbers; albumin, an index of air-blood barrier permeability; and activities of three enzymes: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; an indicator of cell injury), myeloperoxidase (MPO; which indicates activation of neutrophils), and ss-N-acetylglucosaminidase (GLN; which is indicative of damage to macrophages or neutrophils). We compared the response of hamsters instilled with particles from Ahmadi to animals instilled with urban particles collected in St. Louis, Missouri. We also compared the Ahmadi particles against a highly fibrogenic positive control ([alpha]-quartz) and a relatively nontoxic negative control (iron oxide). When compared to hamsters instilled with particles from St. Louis, the animals treated with the Ahmadi particles had between 1.4- and 2.2-fold more neutrophils in their BAL fluids. The Ahmadi hamsters had more macrophages and lower MPO and LDH activities, but comparable albumin levels and GLN activities. Thus, the acute toxicity of the Ahmadi particles was roughly similar to that of urban particles collected in the United States, when identical masses were compared. However, the relatively higher concentrations of particles measured in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia during the oil fires (at times more than 16 times higher than the EPA standard) is of particular concern. In addition, since the

  11. Where does the toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles come from: The nanoparticles, the ions, or a combination of both?

    PubMed

    Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; Wang, Ting; Yao, Zhifeng; Qin, Mengnan; Zheng, Shourong; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-05

    The toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) has aroused great concern over the past few years. However, there still remains the question whether the toxicity of the metal oxide NPs originates from the released ions or the NPs themselves. In this study, the metal ion release of CuO, Fe2O3, ZnO, Co3O4, Cr2O3, and NiO NPs in aqueous media was investigated, and their contributions to the metal oxide NPs' inhibition on the bioluminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum were studied. It was found that the ions release of the metal oxide NPs in aqueous media was complex, depending on both the dissolution and adsorption processes of the metal oxide NPs. The relationships between the metal oxide NPs' antibacterial effects and their released metal ions could be divided into three categories: (1) the ZnO NPs' antibacterial effect was due solely to the released Zn(2+); (2) the CuO NPs' antibacterial effect originated from both the released Cu(2+),and the CuO particles; and (3) the antibacterial effects of Fe2O3, Co3O4, Cr2O3, and NiO NPs were caused by the NPs themselves. Our findings suggest that the ions release and their contributions to the NPs' toxicity should be considered in the toxicity evaluations of the metal oxide NPs.

  12. Effect of chloride on the dissolution rate of silver nanoparticles and toxicity to E. coli.

    PubMed

    Levard, Clément; Mitra, Sumit; Yang, Tiffany; Jew, Adam D; Badireddy, Appala Raju; Lowry, Gregory V; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-06-04

    Pristine silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are not chemically stable in the environment and react strongly with inorganic ligands such as sulfide and chloride once the silver is oxidized. Understanding the environmental transformations of AgNPs in the presence of specific inorganic ligands is crucial to determining their fate and toxicity in the environment. Chloride (Cl(-)) is a ubiquitous ligand with a strong affinity for oxidized silver and is often present in natural waters and in bacterial growth media. Though chloride can strongly affect toxicity results for AgNPs, their interaction is rarely considered and is challenging to study because of the numerous soluble and solid Ag-Cl species that can form depending on the Cl/Ag ratio. Consequently, little is known about the stability and dissolution kinetics of AgNPs in the presence of chloride ions. Our study focuses on the dissolution behavior of AgNPs in chloride-containing systems and also investigates the effect of chloride on the growth inhibition of E.coli (ATCC strain 33876) caused by Ag toxicity. Our results suggest that the kinetics of dissolution are strongly dependent on the Cl/Ag ratio and can be interpreted using the thermodynamically expected speciation of Ag in the presence of chloride. We also show that the toxicity of AgNPs to E.coli at various Cl(-) concentrations is governed by the amount of dissolved AgCl(x)((x-1)-) species suggesting an ion effect rather than a nanoparticle effect.

  13. CEREBROVASCULAR TOXICITY OF PCB153 IS ENHANCED BY BINDING TO SILICA NANOPARTICLES

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Chen, Lei; Choi, Jeong June; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Environmental polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are frequently bound onto nanoparticles (NPs). However, the toxicity and health effects of PCBs assembled onto nanoparticles are unknown. The aim of this study was to study the hypothesis that binding PCBs to silica NPs potentiates PCB-induced cerebrovascular toxicity and brain damage in an experimental stroke model. Mice (C57BL/6, males, 12-week-old) were exposed to PCB153 bound to NPs (PCB153-NPs), PCB153, or vehicle. PCB153 was administered in the amount of 5 ng/g body weight. A group of treated animals was subjected to a 40 min ischemia, followed by a 24 h reperfusion. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, brain infarct volume, expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, and inflammatory mediators were assessed. As compared to controls, a 24 h exposure to PCB153-NPs injected into cerebral vasculature resulted in significant elevation of the BBB permeability, disruption of TJ protein expression, increased proinflammatory responses, and enhanced monocyte transmigration in mouse brain capillaries. Importantly, exposure to PCB153-NPs increased stroke volume and potentiated brain damage in mice subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. A long-term (30 days) oral exposure to PCB153-NPs resulted in a higher PCB153 content in the abdominal adipose tissue and amplified adhesion of leukocytes to the brain endothelium as compared to treatment with PCB153 alone. This study provides the first evidence that binding to NPs increases cerebrovascular toxicity of environmental toxicants, such as PCB153. PMID:23081707

  14. Comparative toxicity of several metal oxide nanoparticle aqueous suspensions to Zebrafish (Danio rerio) early developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Lin; Duan, Zhenghua; Qi, Ruiqi; Li, Yan; Lang, Yupeng

    2008-02-15

    With the emergence of manufactured nanomaterials, it is urgent to carry out researches on their potential environmental impacts and biological effects. To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impacts of metal oxide nanoparticles released to aquatic environments, the zebrafish 96-h embryo-larval bioassay was used to assess and compare the developmental toxicities of nanoscale zinc oxide (nZnO), titanium dioxide (nTiO(2)) and alumina (nAl(2)O(3)) aqueous suspensions. Toxicological endpoints such as zebrafish embryos or larvae survival, hatching rate and malformation were noted and described within 96 h of exposure. Meanwhile, a comparative experiment with their bulk counterparts (i.e., ZnO/bulk, TiO(2)/bulk and Al(2)O(3)/bulk) was conducted to understand the effect of particle size on their toxicities. The results showed that: (i) both nZnO and ZnO/bulk aqueous suspensions delayed zebrafish embryo and larva development, decreased their survival and hatching rates, and caused tissue damage. The 96-h LC(50) of nZnO and ZnO/bulk aqueous suspensions on the zebrafish survival are 1.793 mg/L and 1.550 mg/L respectively; and the 84-h EC(50) on the zebrafish embryo hatching rate are 2.065 mg/L and 2.066 mg/L respectively. Serious tissue ulceration was found on zebrafish larvae exposed to nZnO and ZnO/bulk aqueous suspensions. (ii) In contrast, neither nTiO(2) and TiO(2)/bulk nor nAl(2)O(3) and Al(2)O(3)/bulk showed any toxicity to zebrafish embryos and larvae under the same experimental condition. It revealed that the metal oxide nanoparticles with different chemical composition have different zebrafish developmental toxicities. (iii) Exposures of nTiO(2), nZnO and nAl(2)O(3) produced toxic effects on zebrafish embryos and larvae, which was not different from the effects caused by exposing to their bulk counterparts. This is the first study about the developmental toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles, and the results demonstrate that nZnO is very toxic to

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles: an update of application for drug delivery and possible toxic effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ji-Young; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a subclass within the overall category of nanomaterials and are widely used in many applications, particularly in the biomedical sciences such as targeted delivery of drugs or genes, in magnetic resonance imaging, and in hyperthermia (treating tumors with heat). Although the potential benefits of MNPs are considerable, there is a distinct need to identify any potential toxicity associated with these MNPs. The potential of MNPs in drug delivery stems from the intrinsic properties of the magnetic core combined with their drug loading capability and the biomedical properties of MNPs generated by different surface coatings. These surface modifications alter the particokinetics and toxicity of MNPs by changing protein-MNP or cell-MNP interactions. This review contains current advances in MNPs for drug delivery and their possible organ toxicities associated with disturbance in body iron homeostasis. The importance of protein-MNP interactions and various safety considerations relating to MNP exposure are also addressed.

  16. In vivo toxicity of orally administrated silicon dioxide nanoparticles in healthy adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hassankhani, Ramin; Esmaeillou, Mohammad; Tehrani, Ali Asghar; Nasirzadeh, Keyvan; Khadir, Fatemeh; Maadi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) in various applications including industrial, agriculture, and medicine has raised concerns about their potential risks to human health. Various nanotoxicity researches have been done on the assessment of SiNPs' toxic effects; however, a few in vivo investigations exist. In this investigation, an in vivo study was done in order to evaluate the oral toxicity of SiNPs. The biochemical levels of 19 different serum parameters were assessed. Moreover, the histopathological changes have been examined as well. We showed that SiNPs with diameters of 10-15 nm in size can cause significant changes in albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, total protein, urea, HDL, and LDL as well as in alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase activity. In addition, histopathological examinations demonstrated that SiNPs have toxic effects on various tissues including liver, kidney, lung, and testis.

  17. In Vitro/In Vivo Toxicity Evaluation and Quantification of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ujwal S.; Adireddy, Shiva; Jaiswal, Ashvin; Mandava, Sree; Lee, Benjamin R.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing biomedical applications of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in academic and commercial settings have alarmed the scientific community about the safety and assessment of toxicity profiles of IONPs. The great amount of diversity found in the cytotoxic measurements of IONPs points toward the necessity of careful characterization and quantification of IONPs. The present document discusses the major developments related to in vitro and in vivo toxicity assessment of IONPs and its relationship with the physicochemical parameters of IONPs. Major discussion is included on the current spectrophotometric and imaging based techniques used for quantifying, and studying the clearance and biodistribution of IONPs. Several invasive and non-invasive quantification techniques along with the pitfalls are discussed in detail. Finally, critical guidelines are provided to optimize the design of IONPs to minimize the toxicity. PMID:26501258

  18. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  19. In vivo biodistribution and synergistic toxicity of silica nanoparticles and cadmium chloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingchun; Xu, Xiaolong; Yan, Xincheng; Wang, Shasha; Gao, Shang; Zhu, Shanshan

    2013-09-15

    Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) are now in daily use due to their low intrinsic toxicity. Cadmium is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. In spite of real risk of humans' co-exposure to SiNPs and cadmium, their synergistic toxicity is still unclear. Here, we report the synergistic effects of SiNPs and CdCl₂ on their biodistribution and subacute toxicity in mice. The biodistributions, histopathological changes, serum biochemical parameters and oxidative stress responses were determined after intraperitoneal injection of SiNPs and/or CdCl₂ to mice. SiNPs and CdCl₂ have a positive synergistic toxicity in mice. Although SiNPs were low toxic to mice, co-exposure of SiNPs and CdCl₂ significantly enhanced CdCl₂-induced oxidative damage in the liver as indicated by the severe liver dysfunction and histopathological abnormalities. Co-exposure to SiNPs and CdCl₂ markedly increased the cadmium accumulation in the liver, which induced significant hepatic oxidative stress. In vitro binding assays indicated that serum albumin and Cd(2+) mutually enhanced the binding of each other to SiNPs via the interaction of serum albumin and Cd(2+). The uptake of serum albumin- and Cd(2+)-bound SiNPs by the macrophages significantly increased cadmium accumulation in mice. These results demonstrate that serum albumins play an important role in the positive synergistic toxicity of SiNPs and CdCl₂.

  20. Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity in the Embryonic Zebrafish is Governed by Particle Dispersion and Ionic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wehmas, Leah; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of action of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is unclear due to the particles’ strong tendency to agglomerate. Preventing agglomeration could offer precise control of the physicochemical properties that drive biological response to AgNPs. In an attempt to control agglomeration, we exposed zebrafish embryos to AgNPs of 20 or 110 nm core size, and polypyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate surface coatings in media of varying ionic strength. AgNPs remained unagglomerated in 62.5 μM CaCl2 (CaCl2) and ultrapure water (UP), but not in standard zebrafish embryo medium (EM). Zebrafish embryos developed normally in the low ionic strength environments of CaCl2 and UP. Exposure of embryos to AgNPs suspended in UP and CaCl2 resulted in higher toxicity than suspensions in EM. 20 nm AgNPs were more toxic than 110 nm AgNPs, and the PVP coating was more toxic than the citrate coating at the same particle core size. The silver tissue burden correlated well with observed toxicity but only for those exposures where the AgNPs remained unagglomerated. Our results demonstrate that size- and surface coating-dependent toxicity is a result of AgNPs remaining unagglomerated, and thus a critical-design consideration for experiments to offer meaningful evaluations of AgNP toxicity. PMID:23449170

  1. Contribution of oxidative stress to TiO2 nanoparticle-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Song, Bin; Zhou, Ting; Yang, WenLong; Liu, Jia; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-12-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used in many fields. People in such workplaces or researchers in laboratories are at a higher risk of being exposed to TNPs, so are the consumers. Moreover, increasing evidence revealed that the concentrations of TNPs are elevated in animal organs after systematic exposure and such accumulated TNPs could induce organ dysfunction. Although cellular responses such as oxidative stress, inflammatory response, apoptosis, autophagy, signaling pathways, and genotoxic effects contribute to the toxicity of TNPs, the interrelationship among them remains obscure. Given the pivotal role of oxidative stress, we summarized relevant articles covering the involvement of oxidative stress in TNPs' toxicity and found that TNP-induced oxidative stress might play a central role in toxic mechanisms. However, available data are far from being conclusive and more investigations should be performed to further confirm whether the toxicity of TNPs might be attributed in part to the cascades of oxidative stress. Tackling this uncertain issue may help us to comprehensively understand the interrelationship among toxic cellular responses induced by TNPs and might shed some light on methods to alleviate toxicity of TNPs.

  2. Role of biogenic sulfide in attenuating zinc oxide and copper nanoparticle toxicity to acetoclastic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Puyol, Daniel; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2015-01-01

    Soluble ions released by zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper (Cu(0)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been associated with toxicity to methanogens. This study evaluated the role of biogenic sulfide in attenuating ZnO and Cu(0) NP toxicity to methanogens. Short- and long-term batch experiments were conducted to explore ZnO and Cu(0) NPs toxicity to acetoclastic methanogens in sulfate-containing (0.4mM) and sulfate-free conditions. ZnO and Cu(0) were respectively 14 and 7-fold less toxic in sulfate-containing than in sulfate-free assays as indicated by inhibitory constants (Ki). The Ki with respect to residual soluble metal indicated that soluble metal was well correlated with toxicity irrespective of the metal ion source or presence of biogenic sulfide. Long-term assays indicated that ZnO and Cu(0) NPs caused different effects on methanogens. ZnO NPs without protection of sulfide caused a chronic effect, whereas Cu(0) NPs caused an acute effect and recovered. This study confirms that biogenic sulfide effectively attenuates ZnO and Cu(0) NPs toxicity to methanogens by the formation of metal sulfides.

  3. The toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles to Lemna minor (L.) is predominantly caused by dissolved Zn.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; O'Halloran, John; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2016-05-01

    Nano-ZnO particles have been reported to be toxic to many aquatic organisms, although it is debated whether this is caused by nanoparticles per sé, or rather dissolved Zn. This study investigated the role of dissolved Zn in nano-ZnO toxicity to Lemna minor. The technical approach was based on modulating nano-ZnO dissolution by either modifying the pH of the growth medium and/or surface coating of nano-ZnO, and measuring resulting impacts on L. minor growth and physiology. Results show rapid and total dissolution of nano-ZnO in the medium (pH 4.5). Quantitatively similar toxic effects were found when L. minor was exposed to nano-ZnO or the "dissolved Zn equivalent of dissolved nano-ZnO". The conclusion that nano-ZnO toxicity is primarily caused by dissolved Zn was further supported by the observation that phytotoxicity was absent on medium with higher pH-values (>7), where dissolution of nano-ZnO almost ceased. Similarly, the reduced toxicity of coated nano-ZnO, which displays a slower Zn dissolution, is also consistent with a major role for dissolved Zn in nano-ZnO toxicity.

  4. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jane Y C; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K; Castranova, Vincent

    2014-07-15

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO2 on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO2 induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO2 and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ, respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO2, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP+CeO2 were significantly larger than CeO2 or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP+CeO2 reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO2-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO2 induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO2 in the combined exposure. Using CeO2 as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns.

  5. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y.C.; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO2 on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO2 induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO2 and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO2, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP + CeO2 were significantly larger than CeO2 or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP + CeO2 reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO2-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO2 induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO2 in the combined exposure. Using CeO2 as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns. PMID:24793434

  6. Macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of indium-containing particles as in vitro correlates to pulmonary toxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, William M; Qu, Wei; Bousquet, Ronald W; Price, Herman; Shines, Cassandra J; Taylor, Genie J; Waalkes, Michael P; Morgan, Daniel L

    2015-03-01

    Macrophage-solubilized indium-containing particles (ICPs) were previously shown in vitro to be cytotoxic. In this study, we compared macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of indium phosphide (InP) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) with similar particle diameters (∼ 1.5 µm) and then determined if relative differences in these in vitro parameters correlated with pulmonary toxicity in vivo. RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with InP or ITO particles and cytotoxicity was assayed at 24 h. Ionic indium was measured in 24 h culture supernatants. Macrophage cytotoxicity and particle solubilization in vitro were much greater for InP compared with ITO. To correlate changes in vivo, B6C3F1 mice were treated with InP or ITO by oropharyngeal aspiration. On Days 14 and 28, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and pleural lavage (PL) fluids were collected and assayed for total leukocytes. Cell differentials, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and protein levels were also measured in BAL. All lavage parameters were greatly increased in mice treated with InP compared with ITO. These data suggest that macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of some ICPs in vitro are capable of predicting pulmonary toxicity in vivo. In addition, these differences in toxicity were observed despite the two particulate compounds containing similar amounts of indium suggesting that solubilization, not total indium content, better reflects the toxic potential of some ICPs. Soluble InCl3 was shown to be more cytotoxic than InP to macrophages and lung epithelial cells in vitro further suggesting that ionic indium is the primary cytotoxic component of InP.

  7. Macrophage Solubilization and Cytotoxicity of Indium-Containing Particles as in vitro Correlates to Pulmonary Toxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gwinn, William M.; Qu, Wei; Bousquet, Ronald W.; Price, Herman; Shines, Cassandra J.; Taylor, Genie J.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Morgan, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-solubilized indium-containing particles (ICPs) were previously shown in vitro to be cytotoxic. In this study, we compared macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of indium phosphide (InP) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) with similar particle diameters (∼1.5 µm) and then determined if relative differences in these in vitro parameters correlated with pulmonary toxicity in vivo. RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with InP or ITO particles and cytotoxicity was assayed at 24 h. Ionic indium was measured in 24 h culture supernatants. Macrophage cytotoxicity and particle solubilization in vitro were much greater for InP compared with ITO. To correlate changes in vivo, B6C3F1 mice were treated with InP or ITO by oropharyngeal aspiration. On Days 14 and 28, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and pleural lavage (PL) fluids were collected and assayed for total leukocytes. Cell differentials, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and protein levels were also measured in BAL. All lavage parameters were greatly increased in mice treated with InP compared with ITO. These data suggest that macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of some ICPs in vitro are capable of predicting pulmonary toxicity in vivo. In addition, these differences in toxicity were observed despite the two particulate compounds containing similar amounts of indium suggesting that solubilization, not total indium content, better reflects the toxic potential of some ICPs. Soluble InCl3 was shown to be more cytotoxic than InP to macrophages and lung epithelial cells in vitro further suggesting that ionic indium is the primary cytotoxic component of InP. PMID:25527823

  8. Plant Mediated Green Synthesis of CuO Nanoparticles: Comparison of Toxicity of Engineered and Plant Mediated CuO Nanoparticles towards Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Sadia; Tahir, Arifa; Asim, Tayyaba; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Research on green production methods for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is growing, with the objective to overcome the potential hazards of these chemicals for a safer environment. In this study, facile, ecofriendly synthesis of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles was successfully achieved using aqueous extract of Pterospermum acerifolium leaves. P. acerifolium-fabricated CuO nanoparticles were further characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Plant-mediated CuO nanoparticles were found to be oval shaped and well dispersed in suspension. XPS confirmed the elemental composition of P. acerifolium-mediated copper nanoparticles as comprised purely of copper and oxygen. DLS measurements and ion release profile showed that P. acerifolium-mediated copper nanoparticles were more stable than the engineered CuO NPs. Copper oxide nanoparticles are used in many applications; therefore, their potential toxicity cannot be ignored. A comparative study was performed to investigate the bio-toxic impacts of plant-synthesized and engineered CuO nanoparticles on water flea Daphnia. Experiments were conducted to investigate the 48-h acute toxicity of engineered CuO NPs and plant-synthesized nanoparticles. Lower EC50 value 0.102 ± 0.019 mg/L was observed for engineered CuO NPs, while 0.69 ± 0.226 mg/L was observed for plant-synthesized CuO NPs. Additionally, ion release from CuO nanoparticles and 48-h accumulation of these nano CuOs in daphnids were also calculated. Our findings thus suggest that the contribution of released ions from nanoparticles and particles/ions accumulation in Daphnia needs to be interpreted with care. PMID:28335333

  9. Surface modification does not influence the genotoxic and inflammatory effects of TiO2 nanoparticles after pulmonary exposure by instillation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Håkan; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Poulsen, Sarah S.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.; Bengtson, Stefan; Jackson, Petra; Vogel, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    The influence of surface charge of nanomaterials on toxicological effects is not yet fully understood. We investigated the inflammatory response, the acute phase response and the genotoxic effect of two different titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) following a single intratracheal instillation. NRCWE-001 was unmodified rutile TiO2 with endogenous negative surface charge, whereas NRCWE-002 was surface modified to be positively charged. C57BL/6J BomTac mice received 18, 54 and 162 µg/mouse and were humanely killed 1, 3 and 28 days post-exposure. Vehicle controls were tested alongside for comparison. The cellular composition and protein concentration were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid as markers for an inflammatory response. Pulmonary and systemic genotoxicity was analysed by the alkaline comet assay as DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung and liver tissue. The pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was analysed by Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue or Saa1 mRNA levels in liver tissue by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Instillation of NRCWE-001 and -002 both induced a dose-dependent neutrophil influx into the lung lining fluid and Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue at all assessed time points. There was no statistically significant difference between NRCWE-001 and NRCWE-002. Exposure to both TiO2 NPs induced increased levels of DNA strand breaks in lung tissue at all doses 1 and 28 days post-exposure and NRCWE-002 at the low and middle dose 3 days post-exposure. The DNA strand break levels were statistically significantly different for NRCWE-001 and -002 for liver and for BAL cells, but no consistent pattern was observed. In conclusion, functionalisation of reactive negatively charged rutile TiO2 to positively charged did not consistently influence pulmonary toxicity of the studied TiO2 NPs. PMID:27658823

  10. A review of nanoparticle functionality and toxicity on the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z.; Liu, Z. W.; Allaker, R. P.; Reip, P.; Oxford, J.; Ahmad, Z.; Ren, G.

    2010-01-01

    Although nanoparticles have tremendous potential for a host of applications, their adverse effects on living cells have raised serious concerns recently for their use in the healthcare and consumer sectors. As regards the central nervous system (CNS), research data on nanoparticle interaction with neurons has provided evidence of both negative and positive effects. Maximal application dosage of nanoparticles in materials to provide applications such as antibacterial and antiviral functions is approximately 0.1–1.0 wt%. This concentration can be converted into a liquid phase release rate (leaching rate) depending upon the host or base materials used. For example, nanoparticulate silver (Ag) or copper oxide (CuO)-filled epoxy resin demonstrates much reduced release of the metal ions (Ag+ or Cu2+) into their surrounding environment unless they are mechanically removed or aggravated. Subsequent to leaching effects and entry into living systems, nanoparticles can also cross through many other barriers, such as skin and the blood–brain barrier (BBB), and may also reach bodily organs. In such cases, their concentration or dosage in body fluids is considered to be well below the maximum drug toxicity test limit (10−5 g ml−1) as determined in artificial cerebrospinal solution. As this is a rapidly evolving area and the use of such materials will continue to mature, so will their exposure to members of society. Hence, neurologists have equal interests in nanoparticle effects (positive functionality and negative toxicity) on human neuronal cells within the CNS, where the current research in this field will be highlighted and reviewed. PMID:20519209

  11. Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles toxic potency on different microalgae species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravantinou, Andriana F.; Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Dailianis, Stefanos; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles are widely used in many products such as cosmetics, material coatings, and pigments and they are released into enviroment. Recently, nanoparticles have been found in municipal wastewater and wastewater treatment plants, which are consequently discharged to receiving bodies. Since their versatile use and application is increasing, their environmental impact is of great concern and needs to be clarified. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on aquatic species, such as unicellular microalgae. This is considered as a necessary step in order to assess their impact on coastal food chain and the ecosystems that they support as well as on natural wastewater treatment systems. More specifically, the potential toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on three aquatic organisms, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Tetraselmis suesica, and Chlorococcum sp. were investigated. The microalgae species exposed to different periods of time (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) and different concentrations of ZnO NPs (1 to 100 μM, 1 to10 mM), and showed significant differences on their growth rates. Algae exposed to ZnO NPs concentrations from 1 to 100 μΜ exhibited increased levels of the half maximum inhibitory concentration values (IC50) in all cases, while at higher concentrations (from 1 to 10 mM) algae showed excessive lysis, probably due to disturbances occurred in cellular structure and function. According to the results of the present study, ZnO nanoparticles appeared to have toxic effects on all species tested, showing type- and time-dependent alterations.

  12. Controlling silver nanoparticle exposure in algal toxicity testing – A matter of timing

    PubMed Central

    Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanoparticles is complicated by unstable exposure conditions resulting from various transformation processes of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions. In this study, we investigated the influence of exposure timing on the algal test response to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), by reducing the incubation time and by aging the AgNPs in algal medium prior to testing. The freshwater green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were exposed to AgNO3, NM-300 K (a representative AgNP) and citrate stabilized AgNPs from two different manufacturers (AgNP1 and AgNP2) in a standard algal growth inhibition test (ISO 8692:2004) for 48 h and a short-term (2 h) 14C-assimilation test. For AgNO3, similar responses were obtained in the two tests, whereas freshly prepared suspensions of citrate stabilized AgNPs were less toxic in the 2-h tests compared to the 48-h tests. The 2-h test was found applicable for dissolved silver, but yielded non-monotonous concentration–response relationships and poor reproducibility for freshly prepared AgNP suspensions. However, when aging AgNPs in algal medium 24 h prior to testing, clear concentration–response patterns emerged and reproducibility increased. Prolonged aging to 48 h increased toxicity in the 2-h tests whereas aging beyond 48 h reduced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that the outcome of algal toxicity testing of AgNPs is highly influenced not only by the test duration, but also by the time passed from the moment AgNPs are added to the test medium. This time-dependency should be considered when nanomaterial dispersion protocols for ecotoxicity testing are developed. PMID:24842597

  13. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the ``liquid drop'' approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-10-01

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the ``liquid drop'' model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were

  14. Toxicity of copper nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under different exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yinlong; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Chen, Guangchao; Vijver, Martina G

    2016-09-01

    Although the risks of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) to aquatic organisms have already been studied for >10years, our understanding of the link between the fate of particles in exposure medium and their toxicity is still in its infancy. Moreover, most of the earlier studies did not distinguish the contribution of particles and soluble ions to the toxic effects caused by suspensions of metallic NPs. In this study, the toxicity of CuNPs to Daphnia magna upon modification of the exposure conditions, achieved by aging the suspensions of CuNPs and by altering water chemistry parameters like the pH and levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), was investigated. The LC50 values for CuNPs exposure decreased by about 30% after 7days of aging. The LC50 values increased >12-fold upon addition of DOC at concentrations ranging from 0 to 10mg/L to the exposure medium. Changing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 resulted in a 3-fold higher LC50 value. Furthermore, it was found that during 7days of aging of the exposure medium (without addition of DOC and at pH7.8), the toxicity could be mostly ascribed to the particles present in the suspension (around 70%). However, adding DOC or decreasing the pH of the exposure medium reduced the contribution of the particles to the observed toxicity. We thus found that the effective concentration regarding the toxicity was mainly driven by the contribution of the soluble ions in the presence of DOC or at pH6.5. Our results suggest that the toxicity results of CuNPs obtained from laboratory tests may overestimate the risk of the particles in polluted waters due to the common absence of DOC in laboratory test solutions. Moreover, the role of the ions shedding from CuNPs is very important in explaining the toxicity in natural waters.

  15. Silver nanoparticles: in vivo toxicity in zebrafish embryos and a comparison to silver nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosselhy, Dina A.; He, Wei; Li, Dan; Meng, Yaping; Feng, Qingling

    2016-08-01

    The wide antimicrobial administration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has raised the risks associated with their exposure. However, there is lack of robust toxicological data for the applied AgNPs to be in line with their wide antimicrobial applications. This study therefore set out to assess the in vivo toxicity of two different sizes of AgNPs using zebrafish embryos ( Danio rerio) as a brilliant in vivo model. The pivotal role of size of AgNPs in the toxicity was highlighted, wherein the smaller AgNPs (Ag-9 nm) exhibited more embryo toxicities than the larger particles (Ag-30 nm). Much uncertainty still exists about whether the cause of in vivo toxicity of AgNPs is the physicochemical properties of AgNPs or the released silver ions (Ag+). Therefore, another purpose of this study is to compare the toxicity of AgNPs with silver nitrate (AgNO3) in terms of mortality, hatchability and cardiac rates, and a series of phenotypic endpoints of zebrafish embryos. Collectively, the present results point towards the remarkable size-dependent toxicity of AgNPs. Wherein, the smaller AgNPs (9 ± 2 nm) induce increased mortality rates and decreased hatchability rates than the larger particles (30 ± 5 nm) in a dose-dependent manner. Besides, AgNPs and AgNO3 induce holistic different toxic mortality and hatchability rates. We have also found striking discrepancies in the phenotypic defects that were induced by AgNPs and AgNO3. The significant phenotypic defect induced by AgNPs is the axial deformity, while it is the deposition of Ag+ on the embryonic chorion for AgNO3. Therefore, it is proposed that AgNPs and AgNO3 induce different in vivo toxicities.

  16. Different behavior of Staphylococcus epidermidis in intracellular biosynthesis of silver and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles: more stability and lower toxicity of extracted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rezvani Amin, Zohreh; Khashyarmanesh, Zahra; Fazly Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh

    2016-09-01

    Chemical reagents that are used for synthesis of nanoparticles are often toxic, while biological reagents are safer and cost-effective. Here, the behavior of Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228) was evaluated for biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-NPs) using TEM images intra- and extracellularly. The bacteria only biosynthesized the nanoparticles intracellularly and distributed Ag-NPs throughout the cytoplasm and on outside surface of cell walls, while CdS-NPs only formed in cytoplasm near the cell wall. A new method for purification of the nanoparticles was used. TEM images of pure CdS-NPs confirmed biosynthesis of agglomerated nanoparticles. Biosynthetic Ag-NPs were more stable against bright light and aggregation reaction than synthetic Ag-NPs (prepared chemically) also biosynthetic Ag-NPs displayed lower toxicity in in vitro assays. CdS-NPs indicated no toxicity in in vitro assays. Biosynthetic nanoparticles as product of the detoxification pathway may be safer and more stable for biosensors.

  17. Accumulation and Toxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Cells and Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Jarockyte, Greta; Daugelaite, Egle; Stasys, Marius; Statkute, Urte; Poderys, Vilius; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2016-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of negatively charged superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH3T3, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal influenced by SPIONs injected into experimental animals, were visualized and investigated. Cellular uptake and distribution of the SPIONs in NIH3T3 after staining with Prussian Blue were investigated by a bright-field microscope equipped with digital color camera. SPIONs were localized in vesicles, mostly placed near the nucleus. Toxicity of SPION nanoparticles tested with cell viability assay (XTT) was estimated. The viability of NIH3T3 cells remains approximately 95% within 3–24 h of incubation, and only a slight decrease of viability was observed after 48 h of incubation. MRI studies on Wistar rats using a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner were showing that SPIONs give a negative contrast in the MRI. The dynamic MRI measurements of the SPION clearance from the injection site shows that SPIONs slowly disappear from injection sites and only a low concentration of nanoparticles was completely eliminated within three weeks. No functionalized SPIONs accumulate in cells by endocytic mechanism, none accumulate in the nucleus, and none are toxic at a desirable concentration. Therefore, they could be used as a dual imaging agent: as contrast agents for MRI and for traditional optical biopsy by using Prussian Blue staining. PMID:27548152

  18. Montmorillonite clay alters toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleutheroembryo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2016-11-01

    An exponential development in the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products has accelerated their release in aquatic environment. As the AgNPs enters into the aquatic systems, their fate may change due to interactions with abiotic (e.g. clay particles) or biotic factors. The abundantly present clay particles are expected to more prone for interaction with nanoparticles in aquatic systems. In the present study, it is demonstrated that AgNPs interacts with clay particles and forms heteroagglomerates. Furthermore, an impact on toxicity potential of AgNPs after interactions with clay particles was assessed by using zebrafish eleutheroembryos (72 h post hatching) as an in vivo model. The mortality rate of zebrafish eleutheroembryos was higher in case of exposure to AgNPs-clay complexes (pH 4.0 and 7.0) as compared to bare AgNPs. In addition, at earlier time points, the eleutheroembryos expressed higher levels of morphological changes in tail, yolk and pericardia, but the edema in yolk sac was followed by cell death. It can be concluded from the observations made in the present study that the inorganic colloids in the aquatic matrices can alter the fate and toxicity potential of nanoparticles.

  19. Gene transcription patterns and energy reserves in Daphnia magna show no nanoparticle specific toxicity when exposed to ZnO and CuO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nathalie; Vergauwen, Lucia; Blust, Ronny; Knapen, Dries

    2015-04-01

    There is still a lot of contradiction on whether metal ions are solely responsible for the observed toxicity of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles to aquatic species. While most experiments have studied nanoparticle effects at organismal levels (e.g. mortality, reproduction), effects at lower levels of biological organization may clarify the role of metal ions, nanoparticles and nanoparticle aggregates. In this study, the effect of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles was tested at two lower levels: energy reserves and gene transcription and compared with zinc and copper salts. Daphnia magna was exposed during 96h to 10% immobilization concentrations of all chemicals, after which daphnids were sampled for determination of glycogen, lipid and protein concentration and for a differential gene transcription analysis using microarray. The dissolved, nanoparticle and aggregated fraction in the medium was characterized. The results showed that ZnO nanoparticles had largely dissolved directly after addition to the test medium. The CuO nanoparticles mostly formed aggregates, while only a small fraction dissolved. The exposure to zinc (both nano and metal salt) had no effect on the available energy reserves. However, in the copper exposure, the glycogen, lipid and protein concentration in the exposed daphnids was lower than in the unexposed ones. When comparing the nanoparticle (ZnO or CuO) exposed daphnids to the metal salt (zinc or copper salt) exposed daphnids, the microarray results showed no significantly differentially transcribed gene fragments. The results indicate that under the current exposure conditions the toxicity of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles to D. magna is solely caused by toxic metal ions.

  20. Accumulation and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in a soft-sediment estuarine amphipod.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Shannon K; Miller, Robert J; Zhou, Dongxu; Keller, Arturo A; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2013-10-15

    Estuarine and marine sediments are a probable end point for many engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) due to enhanced aggregation and sedimentation in marine waters, as well as uptake and deposition by suspension-feeding organisms on the seafloor. Benthic infaunal organisms living in sediments encounter relatively high concentrations of pollutants and may also suffer toxic effects of ENPs. We tested whether three heavily used metal oxide ENPs, zinc oxide (ZnO), copper oxide (CuO), and nickel oxide (NiO) were toxic to an estuarine amphipod, Leptocheirus plumulosus. We used results from 10-day laboratory bioassays to estimate potential demographic impacts of ENP exposure. We also evaluated fate and transport pathways of the ENPs in the experiments to elucidate routes of uptake and exposure. Dissolved Zn was found in sediment pore water and overlying water samples at 10 fold the concentrations of Cu or Ni, a pattern indicative of the relatively high dissolution rate of ZnO ENPs compared with CuO and NiO ENPs. Accumulation of metals in amphipod tissues increased with exposure concentrations for all three ENPs, suggesting possible exposure pathways to higher taxa. Amphipods accumulated ≤600 μg Zn and Cu g(-1) and 1000 μg Ni g(-1). Amphipod mortality increased with ZnO and CuO concentrations, but showed no significant increase with NiO to concentrations as high as 2000 μg g(-1). The median lethal concentration in sediment (LC50) of ZnO was 763 μg g(-1) and 868 μg g(-1) for CuO ENPs. Our results indicate that ZnO and CuO ENPs, but not NiO ENPs, are toxic to L. plumulosus and that ZnO toxicity primarily results from Zn ion exposure while CuO toxicity is due to nanoparticle exposure.

  1. Toxicity evaluation of high-fluorescent rare-earth metal nanoparticles for bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Adame, Luis; Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; Portales-Pérez, Diana P; Castillo, Claudia; Zhao, Wayne; Juarez, Zaida N; Hernandez, Luis R; Bach, Horacio; Palestino, Gabriela

    2017-04-01

    Research on nanometer-sized luminescent semiconductors and their biological applications in detectors and contrasting agents is an emergent field in nanotechnology. When new nanosize technologies are developed for human health applications, their interaction with biological systems should be studied in depth. Rare-earth elements are used in medical and industrial applications, but their toxic effects are not known. In this work, the biological interaction between terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide nanoparticles (GOSNPs) with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), human-derived macrophages (THP-1), and human cervical carcinoma cell (HeLa) were evaluated. The GOSNPs were synthetized using a hydrothermal method to obtain monodisperse nanoparticles with an average size of 91 ± 9 nm. Characterization techniques showed the hexagonal phase of the Gd2 O2 S:Tb(3+) free of impurities, and a strong green emission at λemi  = 544 nm produced by Tb(3+) was observed. Toxic effects of GOSNPs were evaluated using cell viability, apoptosis, cell-cycle progression, and immunological response techniques. In addition, an Artemia model was used to assess the toxicity in vivo. Results indicated cell apoptosis in both types of cells with less sensitivity for PBMC cells compared to HeLa cells. In addition, no toxic effects were observed in the in vivo model of Artemia. Moreover, GOSNPs significantly reduced the activation and cell-cycle progression of PBMC and HeLa cells, respectively. Interestingly, an increase in proinflammatory cytokines was not observed. Our data suggest that fluorescence applications of GOSNPs for biolabeling are not toxic in primary immune cells and they may have an immunomodulatory effect. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 605-615, 2017.

  2. Salinity-dependent toxicities of zinc oxide nanoparticles to the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Yung, Mana M N; Wong, Stella W Y; Kwok, Kevin W H; Liu, F Z; Leung, Y H; Chan, W T; Li, X Y; Djurišić, A B; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2015-08-01

    This study comprehensively investigated the influences of salinity, exposure concentration and time on the aggregate size, surface charge and dissolution of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs; 20nm) in seawater, and examined the interacting effect of salinity and waterborne exposure of ZnO-NPs on the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana for 96h. We found that aggregate sizes of ZnO-NPs significantly increased with increasing salinity, but generally decreased with increasing exposure concentration. Ion release decreased with increasing salinity, whereas the surface charge of the particles was not affected by salinity. The increased aggregate size and decreased ion release with increasing salinity, and consequently lower concentration of bioavailable zinc ions, resulted in decreased toxicity of ZnO-NPs at higher salinity in general in terms of growth inhibition (IC50) and chlorophyll fluorescence (EC50 - ФPo and EC50 - Ф2). However, IC50s and EC50s of ZnO-NPs were smaller than those of Zn(2+) (from ZnO-NPs ultrafiltrate and ZnCl2), indicating that dissolved Zn(2+) can only partially explain the toxicity of ZnO-NPs. SEM images showed that ZnO-NPs attached on the diatom frustule surface, suggesting that the interaction between the nanoparticles and the cell surface may acerbate the toxicity of ZnO-NPs. Our results linked the physicochemical characteristics of ZnO-NPs in seawater with their toxicities to the marine diatom and highlighted the importance of salinity as an influential environmental factor governing the aggregation, dissolution and the toxicity of ZnO-NPs.

  3. Influence of ammonia on silver nanoparticle dissolution and toxicity to Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Kostigen Mumper, Cameron; Ostermeyer, Ann-Kathrin; Semprini, Lewis; Radniecki, Tyler S

    2013-11-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea, a model ammonia oxidizing bacterium, was sensitive to both ionic silver (Ag(+)) and 20 nm citrate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). AgNP toxicity has been previously shown to be primarily due to the dissolution of Ag(+). The rate of AgNP dissolution dramatically increased in test medium containing ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) and HEPES buffer compared to test medium containing either deionized water or HEPES buffer alone. The AgNP dissolution rates accelerated with increases in ammonia (NH3) concentrations either through increases in pH or through higher (NH4)2SO4 concentrations. Ammonia likely participated in the oxidation of the AgNP to form [Formula: see text] in solution leading to the observed increase in AgNP dissolution rates. AgNP toxicity was enhanced as NH3 concentrations increased. However, Ag(+) toxicity was constant at all NH3 concentrations tested. Therefore, it can be concluded that the increased AgNP toxicity was due to increased Ag(+) release and not due to a synergistic effect between NH3 and Ag(+). The results of this study may provide insights in the fate and toxicity of AgNPs in high NH3 environments including wastewater treatment plants, eutrophic waterways and alkaline environments.

  4. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated silver nanoparticles in the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yi; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Forbes, Valery E

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the toxicities of sediment-associated silver added to sediment as commercially available silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20 and 80 nm) and aqueous Ag (AgNO3) to the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor, were investigated for both individual and subcellular endpoints after 10 d of exposure. Both Ag NP types were characterized in parallel to the toxicity studies and found to be polydispersed and overlapping in size. Burrowing activity decreased (marginally) with increasing Ag concentration and depended on the form of Ag added to sediment. All worms accumulated Ag regardless of the form in which it was added to the sediment, and worm size (expressed as dry weight) was found to significantly affect bioaccumulation such that smaller worms accumulated more Ag per body weight than larger worms. Lysosomal membrane permeability (neutral red retention time, NRRT) and DNA damage (comet assay tail moment and tail DNA intensity %) of Nereis coelomocytes increased in a concentration-dependent manner in all three Ag treatments. Ag NP treatments were more toxic than aqueous Ag for all toxicity endpoints, even though bioaccumulation did not differ significantly among Ag forms. No significant difference in toxicity was observed between the two Ag NP treatments which was attributed to their overlap in particle size.

  5. Surfactants present complex joint effects on the toxicities of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-08-01

    The potential toxicities of nanoparticles (NPs) have been intensively discussed over the past decade. In addition to their single toxicities, NPs can interact with other environmental chemicals and thereby exert joint effects on biological systems and the environment. The present study investigated the combined toxicities of NPs and surfactants, which are among the chemicals that most likely coexist with NPs. Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed as the model organism. The results indicate that surfactants with different ion types can alter the properties of NPs (i.e., particle size and surface charge) in different ways and present complex joint effects on NP toxicities. Mixtures of different NPs and surfactants exhibited antagonistic, synergistic, and additive effects. In particular, the toxicity of ZnO was observed to result from its dissolved Zn(2+); thus, the joint effects of the ZnO NPs and surfactants can be explained by the interactions between the Zn ions and the surfactants. Our study suggests that the potential hazards caused by mixtures of NPs and surfactants are different from those caused by single NPs. Because surfactants are extensively used in the field of nanotechnology and are likely to coexist with NPs in natural waters, the ecological risk assessments of NPs should consider the impacts of surfactants.

  6. Toxicity of silver ions and differently coated silver nanoparticles in Allium cepa roots.

    PubMed

    Cvjetko, Petra; Milošić, Anita; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Tolić, Sonja; Peharec Štefanić, Petra; Letofsky-Papst, Ilse; Tkalec, Mirta; Balen, Biljana

    2017-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are the dominating nanomaterial in consumer products due to their well-known antibacterial and antifungal properties. To enhance their properties, different surface coatings may be used, which affect physico-chemical properties of AgNPs. Due to their wide application, there has been concern about possible environmental and health consequences. Since plants play a significant role in accumulation and biodistribution of many environmentally released substances, they are also very likely to be influenced by AgNPs. In this study we investigated the toxicity of AgNO3 and three types of laboratory-synthesized AgNPs with different surface coatings [citrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)] on Allium cepa roots. Ionic form of Ag was confirmed to be more toxic than any of the AgNPs applied. All tested AgNPs caused oxidative stress and exhibited toxicity only when applied in higher concentrations. The highest toxicity was recorded for AgNPs-CTAB, which resulted with increased Ag uptake in the roots, consequently leading to strong reduction of the root growth and oxidative damage. The weakest impact was found for AgNPs-citrate, much bigger, negatively charged NPs, which also aggregated to larger particles. Therefore, we can conclude that the toxicity of AgNPs is directly correlated with their size, overall surface charge and/or surface coating.

  7. Evaluation of silica nanoparticle toxicity after topical exposure for 90 days

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seong, Nak-won; So, Byoung Joon; Seo, Heung-sik; Kim, Jun-ho; Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Seo, Mu Yeb; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Maeng, Eun Ho; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Silica is a very common material that can be found in both crystalline and amorphous forms. Well-known toxicities of the lung can occur after exposure to the crystalline form of silica. However, the toxicities of the amorphous form of silica have not been thoroughly studied. The majority of in vivo studies of amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) were performed using an inhalation exposure method. Since silica NPs can be commonly administered through the skin, a study of dermal silica toxicity was necessary to determine any harmful effects from dermal exposures. The present study focused on the results of systemic toxicity after applying 20 nm colloidal silica NPs on rat skin for 90 days, in accordance with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guideline 411 with a good laboratory practice system. Unlike the inhalation route or gastrointestinal route, the contact of silica NPs through skin did not result in any toxicity or any change in internal organs up to a dose of 2,000 mg/kg in rats. PMID:25565831

  8. Therapeutic advantage of inhaled tacrolimus-bound albumin nanoparticles in a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jisoo; Lee, Changkyu; Hwang, Ha Shin; Kim, Bomi; Thao, Le Quang; Lee, Eun Seong; Oh, Kyung Taek; Lim, Jong-Lae; Choi, Han-Gon; Youn, Yu Seok

    2016-02-01

    Tacrolimus (Tac) is an immunosuppressant that inhibits translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells and has therapeutic potential for pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of a sustained-release type inhaled Tac formulation for treating bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Inhalation has many meaningful advantages over injections, such as improved patient compliance, safety, and therapeutic effect. To this end, we fabricated inhalable albumin nanoparticles with bound Tac (Tac Alb-NPs) at a daily therapeutic dose (60 μg/mouse) using a high-pressure homogenizer via nanoparticle albumin-bound technology. The Tac Alb-NPs were spherical, ∼ 182.1 ± 28.5 nm in size, with a zeta potential of -34.5 ± 0.3 mV, and the Tac incorporation efficiency was as high as ∼ 85.3%. The bound tacrolimus was released gradually from Tac Alb-NPs for ∼ 24 h, which was sufficient time for pulmonary delivery. Most of all, the inhaled Tac Alb-NPs displayed remarkable anti-fibrotic efficacy in mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, which was much better than the efficacy resulting from intraperitoneal administration of Tac (60 μg/mouse) based on histopathological results (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining). Furthermore, the inhaled Cy5.5-labelled Tac Alb-NPs were visualized throughout the lungs of mice for ∼ 48 h, indicating direct exposure to fibrotic tissues in lung lesions. In conclusion, Tac Alb-NPs offer great potential as an inhalation delivery formulation for treating pulmonary fibrosis. Additionally, these NPs would be particularly useful as an effective and safe prototype for delivering practically insoluble therapeutic agents into the lungs.

  9. Toxic effects of nickel oxide bulk and nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Lemna gibba L.

    PubMed

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Barhoumi, Lotfi; Samadani, Mahshid; Dewez, David

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) and nickel(II) oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk). Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0-1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L). These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing.

  10. In vitro toxicity of different-sized ZnO nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tianshu; Guan, Rongfa; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Song, Yijuan; Jiang, Han; Zhao, Jin

    2013-11-01

    There has been rapid growth in nanotechnology in both the public and private sectors worldwide, but concern about nanosafety exists. To assess size-dependent cytotoxicity on human cancer cells, we studied the cytotoxic effect of three kinds of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, distribution, and intensity. Multiple assays have been adopted to measure the cell activity and oxidative stress. The cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs was time dependent and dose dependent. The 24-h exposure was chosen to confirm the viability and accessibility of the cells and taken as the appropriate time for the following test system. The IC50 value was found at a low concentration. The oxidative stress elicited a significant reduction in glutathione with increase in reactive oxygen species and lactate dehydrogenase. The toxicity resulted in a deletion of cells in the G1 phase and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. One type of metallic oxide (ZnO) exerted different cytotoxic effects according to different particle sizes. Data from the previous experiments showed that 26-nm ZnO NPs appeared to have the highest toxicity to Caco-2 cells. The study demonstrated the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 cells and the impact of particle size, which could be useful in the medical applications.

  11. In vitro toxicity of different-sized ZnO nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in nanotechnology in both the public and private sectors worldwide, but concern about nanosafety exists. To assess size-dependent cytotoxicity on human cancer cells, we studied the cytotoxic effect of three kinds of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, distribution, and intensity. Multiple assays have been adopted to measure the cell activity and oxidative stress. The cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs was time dependent and dose dependent. The 24-h exposure was chosen to confirm the viability and accessibility of the cells and taken as the appropriate time for the following test system. The IC50 value was found at a low concentration. The oxidative stress elicited a significant reduction in glutathione with increase in reactive oxygen species and lactate dehydrogenase. The toxicity resulted in a deletion of cells in the G1 phase and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. One type of metallic oxide (ZnO) exerted different cytotoxic effects according to different particle sizes. Data from the previous experiments showed that 26-nm ZnO NPs appeared to have the highest toxicity to Caco-2 cells. The study demonstrated the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 cells and the impact of particle size, which could be useful in the medical applications. PMID:24261419

  12. Toxic Effects of Nickel Oxide Bulk and Nanoparticles on the Aquatic Plant Lemna gibba L.

    PubMed Central

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Barhoumi, Lotfi; Samadani, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) and nickel(II) oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk). Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0–1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L). These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing. PMID:26075242

  13. Characterization, Quantification, and Determination of the Toxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to the Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Jong-Seok; Shin, Sung Jae; Ko, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been used to develop iron supplements for improving the bioavailability of iron in patients with iron deficiency, which is one of the most serious nutritional deficiencies in the world. Accurate information about the characteristics, concentration, and cytotoxicity of IONPs to the developmental and reproductive cells enables safe use of IONPs in the supplement industry. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of IONPs in bone marrow cells. We prepared three different types of iron samples (surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs), IONPs, and iron citrate) and analyzed their physicochemical properties such as particle size distribution, zeta potential, and morphology. In addition, we examined the cytotoxicity of the IONPs in various kinds of bone marrow cells. We analyzed particle size distribution, zeta potential, iron levels, and subcellular localization of the iron samples in bone marrow cells. Our results showed that the iron samples were not cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells and did not affect the expression of cell surface markers and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced the secretion of cytokines by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Our results may be used to investigate the interactions between nanoparticles and cells and tissues and the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26389886

  14. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-12-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.

  15. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-08-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.

  16. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles to a fish gill cell line: role of medium composition.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yang; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura; Fernández Freire, Paloma; Pillai, Smitha; Schirmer, Kristin

    2015-02-01

    In aqueous solutions, silver nanoparticle (AgNP) behavior is affected by a variety of factors which lead to altered AgNP size and toxicity. Our research aims to explore the effect of media composition on citrate-coated AgNP (cit-AgNP) behavior and toxicity to the cell line from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill, RTgill-W1. Three different exposure media (L15/ex, L15/ex w/o Cl and d-L15/ex) were used. These were characterized by varying ionic strength and chloride content, both of which had a dominant effect on the behaviour of cit-AgNP. Comparing the behaviour and toxicity of cit-AgNP in the different media, stronger agglomeration of cit-AgNP correlated with higher toxicity. Deposition of cit-AgNP on cells might explain the higher toxicity of agglomerated cit-AgNP compared to that of suspended cit-AgNP. The cit-AgNP concentration-response curves as a function of dissolved silver ions, and the limited prevention of toxicity by silver ligands, indicated that cit-AgNP elicited a particle-specific effect on the cells. Furthermore, the lysosomal membrane integrity was significantly more sensitive to cit-AgNP exposure than cellular metabolic activity or cell membrane integrity and showed the weakest protection by silver ligands. This revealed that cit-AgNP toxicity seems to particularly act on RTgill-W1 cell lysosomes. The newly developed low ionic strength medium, d-L15/ex, which can stabilize cit-AgNP and better mimic the freshwater environment, offers an excellent exposure solution to study cellular and molecular effects of NP to gill cells.

  17. Variable toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna: effects of algal particles and animal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Conine, Andrea L; Frost, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic environments vary widely in aspects other than their physicochemical properties that could alter the toxicity of novel contaminants. One factor that could affect chemical toxicity to aquatic consumers is their nutritional environment as it can strongly affect their physiology and life history. Nutrition has the potential to alter an organism's response to the toxin or how the toxin interacts with the consumer through its food. Here we determined how growth and survival responses of Daphnia to an emerging contaminant, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are affected by the presence of food and its stoichiometric food quality. We used a series of survival tests, each slightly modified, to determine whether variable toxicity in different nutritional environments resulted from algal sequestration of AgNPs in a nontoxic form or from changes to the nutritional status of the test animals. We found that the presence of algae, of good or poor quality, reduced the toxicity of AgNPs on animal growth and survival. However, the decrease in AgNP toxicity was greater for animals consuming P-rich compared to P-poor food. We found evidence that this effect of food quality was due to greater algal uptake of AgNPs by P-rich than by P-stressed algae. However, we also found animal nutrition, in the absence of algal AgNP binding, could affect toxicity with P-nourished animals surviving slightly better when exposed to AgNPs compared to their P-stressed counterparts. Our results show an important role for algal particles and their P content in determining the toxicity of AgNPs in natural waters primarily due to their binding and uptake abilities and, less so, to their effects on animal nutrition.

  18. Size effect of SnO2 nanoparticles on bacteria toxicity and their membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Calderón, Adriana; Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Orrantia-Borunda, Erasmo; Luna-Velasco, Antonia

    2016-12-01

    Semiconductor SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are being exploited for various applications, including those in the environmental context. However, toxicity studies of SnO2 NPs are very limited. This study evaluated the toxic effect of two sizes of spherical SnO2 NPs (2 and 40 nm) and one size of flower-like SnO2 NPs (800 nm) towards the environmental bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. SnO2 NPs were synthesized using a hydrothermal or calcination method and they were well characterized prior to toxicity assessment. To evaluate toxicity, cell viability and membrane damage were determined in cells (1 × 10(9) CFU mL(-1)) exposed to up to 1000 mg L(-1) of NPs, using the plate counting method and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Spherical NPs of smaller primary size (E2) had the lowest hydrodynamic size (226 ± 96 nm) and highest negative charge (-30.3 ± 10.1 mV). Smaller spherical NPs also showed greatest effect on viability (IC50 > 500 mg L(-1)) and membrane damage of B. subtilis, whereas E. coli was unaffected. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the membrane damage of exposed B. subtilis and also exhibited the attachment of E2 NPs to the cell surface, as well as the elongation of cells. It was also apparent that toxicity was caused solely by NPs, as released Sn(4+) was not toxic to B. subtilis. Thus, surface charge interaction between negatively charged SnO2 NPs and positively charged molecules on the membrane of the Gram positive B. subtilis was indicated as the key mechanism related to toxicity of NPs.

  19. Behavioural toxicity assessment of silver ions and nanoparticles on zebrafish using a locomotion profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Ašmonaitė, Giedrė; Boyer, Scott; Souza, Karine Bresolin de; Wassmur, Britt; Sturve, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is not only a widely used species in the Fish Embryo Toxicity (FET) test but also an emerging model in behavioural ecotoxicology. By using automatic behaviour tracking technology, locomotion of developing zebrafish (ZF) larvae can be accurately recorded and potentially used in an ecotoxicological context to detect toxicant-induced behavioural alterations. In this study, we explored if and how quantitative locomotion data can be used for sub-lethal toxicity testing within the FET framework. We exposed ZF embryos to silver ions and nanoparticles, which previously have been reported to cause neurodevelopmental toxicity and behavioural retardation in early-life stages of ZF. Exposure to a broad range of silver (Ag(+) and AgNPs) concentrations was conducted, and developmental toxicity was assessed using FET criteria. For behavioural toxicity assessment, locomotion of exposed ZF eleutheroembryos (120hpf) was quantified according to a customised behavioural assay in an automatic video tracking system. A set of repeated episodes of dark/light stimulation were used to artificially stress ZF and evoke photo-motor responses, which were consequently utilized for locomotion profiling. Our locomotion-based behaviour profiling approach consisted of (1) dose-response ranking for multiple and single locomotion variables; (2) quantitative assessment of locomotion structure; and (3) analysis of ZF responsiveness to darkness stimulation. We documented that both silver forms caused adverse effects on development and inhibited hatchability and, most importantly, altered locomotion. High Ag(+) and AgNPs exposures significantly suppressed locomotion and a clear shift in locomotion towards inactivity was reported. Additionally, we noted that low, environmentally relevant Ag(+) concentrations may cause subordinate locomotive changes (hyperactivity) in developing fish. Overall, it was concluded that our locomotion-based behaviour-testing scheme can be used jointly

  20. Proteomic evaluation of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles toxicity in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Rainville, Louis-Charles; Carolan, Darragh; Varela, Ana Coelho; Doyle, Hugh; Sheehan, David

    2014-04-07

    Recent decades have seen a strong increase in the promise and uses of nanotechnology. This is correlated with their growing release in the environment and there is concern that nanomaterials may endanger ecosystems. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have some of the most varied applications, making their release into the environment unavoidable. In order to assess their potential toxicity in aquatic environments, the acute toxicity of citrate-coated AgNPs to Daphnia magna was measured and compared to that of AgNO3. AgNPs were found to be ten times less toxic by mass than silver ions, and most of this toxicity was removed by ultracentrifuging. At the protein level, the two forms of silver had different impacts. Both increased protein thiol content, while only AgNP increased carbonyl levels. In 2DE of samples labelled for carbonyls, no feature was significantly affected by both compounds, indicating different modes of toxicity. Identified proteins showed functional overlap between the two compounds: vitellogenins (vtg) were present in most features identified, indicating their role as a general stress sensor. In addition to vtg, hemoglobin levels were increased by the AgNP exposure while 14-3-3 protein (a regulatory protein) carbonylation levels were reduced by AgNO3. Overall, this study confirms the previously observed lower acute toxicity of AgNPs, while demonstrating that the toxicity of both forms of silver follow somewhat different biologic pathways, potentially leading to different interactions with natural compounds or pollutants in the aquatic environment.

  1. Toxic effects of magnesium oxide nanoparticles on early developmental and larval stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ghobadian, Mehdi; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Parivar, Kazem; Fathi, Mojtaba; Pazooki, Jamileh

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgONPs) are used in medicine, manufacturing and food industries. Because of their extensive application in our daily lives, environmental exposure to these nanoparticles is inevitable. The present study examined the effects of MgONPs on zebrafish (Danio rerio) early developmental stages. The results showed that, at different concentrations, MgONPs induced cellular apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species. The hatching rate and survival of embryos decreased in a dose dependent manner. The 96-h LC50 value of MgONPs on zebrafish survival was 428 mg/l and the 48-h EC50 value of MgONPs on zebrafish embryo hatching rate was 175 mg/l. Moreover different types of malformation were observed in exposed embryos. The results demonstrate the toxic effects of MgONPs on zebrafish embryos and emphasize the need for further studies.

  2. Comparative Cytogenetic Study on the Toxicity of Magnetite and Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles in Sunflower Root Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Capraru, Gabriela; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-01

    In this experimental study the authors present their results regarding the cellular division rate and the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in the root meristematic cells of Helianthus annuus cultivated in the presence of different volume fractions of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, ranging between 20 and 100 microl/l. The aqueous magnetic colloids were prepared from chemically co-precipitated ferrites coated in sodium oleate. Tissue samples from the root meristeme of 2-3 day old germinated seeds were taken to prepare microscope slides following Squash method combined with Fuelgen techniques. Microscope investigation (cytogenetic tests) has resulted in the evaluation of mitotic index and chromosomal aberration index that appeared diminished and respectively increased following the addition of magnetic nanoparticles in the culture medium of the young seedlings. Zinc ferrite toxic influence appeared to be higher than that of magnetite, according to both cytogenetic parameters.

  3. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of -31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  4. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of −31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  5. An experimental assessment of toxic potential of nanoparticle preparation of heavy metals in streptozotocin induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sonia; Srinivasan, B P; Akarte, Atul Sureshrao

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals have attracted enormous scientific and technological interest. Biologically produced nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals are elaborately described in traditional texts and being widely prescribed. The underlying interactions of nano preparations within the physiological fluids are key feature to understand their biological impact. In this perspective, we performed an experimental assessment of the toxicity potential of a marketed metallic preparation named Vasant Kusumakar Ras (VKR), wherein different heavy metals in composite form are reduced to nanoparticle size to produce the desired effect in diabetes and its complications. VKR (50mg/kg) was administered to Albino Wistar rats rendered diabetic using streptozotocin (90mg/kg) in 2 days old neonates. Anti-hyperglycemic effect was observed with VKR along with increased levels of plasma insulin. Renal variables including total proteins and albumin along with glomerular filtration rate were found to improve biochemically. The results were supplemented by effects on different inflammatory and growth factors like TNF-α, nitric oxide, TGF-β and VEGF. However, the results observed in kidney histopathology were not in accordance with the biochemical parameters. Inflammation observed in kidney was confirmed by immunostaining metallothionein, which was due to the accumulation of heavy metals. Furthermore, mercury accumulation in kidney further confirmed by autometallography, which activated mononuclear phagocyte system, which generated an immune response. This was further supported by increase in the extent of apoptosis in kidney tissues. In conclusion, nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals can be toxic to kidney if it is not regulated with respect to its surface chemistry and dosage.

  6. Investigation into the potential toxicity of zero-valent iron nanoparticles to a trichloroethylene-degrading groundwater microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabetakis, Kara M.

    The microbiological impact of zero-valent iron remediation of groundwater was investigated by exposing a trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic microbial community to bare and coated iron nanoparticles. Changes in population numbers and metabolic activity were analyzed using qPCR and were compared to those of a blank, negative, and positive control to assess for microbial toxicity. Additionally, these results were compared to those of samples exposed to an equal concentration of iron filings in an attempt to discern the source of toxicity. Statistical analysis revealed that the three iron treatments were equally toxic to total Bacteria and Archaea populations, as compared with the controls. Therefore, toxicity appears to result either from the release of iron ions and the generation of reactive oxygen species, or from alteration of the redox system and the disruption of microbial metabolisms. There does not appear to be a unique nanoparticle-based toxicity.

  7. Development and Evaluation of Lipid Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Study of Toxicity In, Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Winter, Evelyn; Dal Pizzol, Carine; Locatelli, Claudriana; Crezkynski-Pasa, Tânia Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Lipid nanoparticles have received considerable attention in the field of drug delivery, due their ability to incorporate lipophilic drugs and to allow controlled drug release. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), and nanoemulsion (NE) are three different lipid nanostructured systems presenting intrinsically physical properties, which have been widely studied in recent years. Despite the extensive applicability of lipid nanoparticles, the toxicity of these systems has not been sufficiently investigated thus far. It is generally believed that lipids are biocompatible. However, it is known that materials structured in nanoscale might have their intrinsic physicochemical properties modified. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of these three nanoparticle systems. To this end, in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies were carried out. Our results indicate that nanoparticles containing the solid lipid GMS (SLN and NLC) induced an important cytotoxicity in vitro, but showed minimal toxicity in vivo--evidenced by the body weight analysis. The NE did not induce in vitro toxicity and did not induce body weight alteration. On the contrary, the SLN and NLC possibly induce an inflammatory process in vivo. All nanoparticle systems induced lipid peroxidation in the animals' livers, but only SLN and NLC induced a decrease of antioxidant defences indicating that the main mechanism of toxicity is the induction of oxidative stress in liver. The higher toxicity induced by SLN and NLC indicates that the solid lipid GMS could be the responsible for this effect. Nevertheless, this study provides important insights for toxicological studies of different lipid nanoparticles systems.

  8. Ceriodaphnia dubia as a Potential Bio-Indicator for Assessing Acute Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticle Toxicity in Fresh Water Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Humayun, Ahmed; Chakravarty, Sujay; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Growing nanomaterials based consumer applications have raised concerns about their potential release into the aquatic ecosystems and the consequent toxicological impacts. So environmental monitoring of the nanomaterials in aqueous systems becomes imperative. The current study reveals the potential of Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) as a bio-indicator for aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water aquatic ecosystem where it occupies an important ecological niche as a primary consumer. This study aims to investigate the aluminium oxide nanoparticle induced acute toxicity on Ceriodaphnia dubia in a freshwater system. The bioavailability of the aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been studied with respect to their aggregation behavior in the system and correlated with the toxicity endpoints. The oxidative stress generated by the particles contributed greatly toward their toxicity. The crucial role of leached aluminium ion mediated toxicity in the later phases (48 h and 72 h) in conjunction with the effects from the nano-sized particles in the initial phases (24 h) puts forth the dynamics of nanotoxicity in the test system. The internalization of nanoparticles (both gross and systemic uptake) as substantiated through the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectral (ICP-OES) analysis was another major contributor toward acute toxicity. Concluding the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia can be a promising candidate for bio-monitoring the aluminium oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water system. PMID:24040143

  9. Ceriodaphnia dubia as a potential bio-indicator for assessing acute aluminum oxide nanoparticle toxicity in fresh water environment.

    PubMed

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Humayun, Ahmed; Chakravarty, Sujay; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Growing nanomaterials based consumer applications have raised concerns about their potential release into the aquatic ecosystems and the consequent toxicological impacts. So environmental monitoring of the nanomaterials in aqueous systems becomes imperative. The current study reveals the potential of Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) as a bio-indicator for aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water aquatic ecosystem where it occupies an important ecological niche as a primary consumer. This study aims to investigate the aluminium oxide nanoparticle induced acute toxicity on Ceriodaphnia dubia in a freshwater system. The bioavailability of the aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been studied with respect to their aggregation behavior in the system and correlated with the toxicity endpoints. The oxidative stress generated by the particles contributed greatly toward their toxicity. The crucial role of leached aluminium ion mediated toxicity in the later phases (48 h and 72 h) in conjunction with the effects from the nano-sized particles in the initial phases (24 h) puts forth the dynamics of nanotoxicity in the test system. The internalization of nanoparticles (both gross and systemic uptake) as substantiated through the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectral (ICP-OES) analysis was another major contributor toward acute toxicity. Concluding the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia can be a promising candidate for bio-monitoring the aluminium oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water system.

  10. Pulmonary toxicity study in rats with PM 10 and PM 2.5: Differential responses related to scale and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lei, Tian; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Zhang, Hua-Shan; Yang, Dan-Feng; Xi, Zhu-Ge; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wang, Wei

    2011-02-01

    ObjectionTo study the pollution of atmospheric particles at winter in Beijing and compare the lung toxicity which induced by particle samples from different sampling sites. MethodWe collected samples from two sampling points during the winter for toxicity testing and chemical analysis. Wistar rats were administered with particles by intratracheal instillation. After exposure, biochemically index, esimmunity indexes, histopathology and DNA damage were detected in rat pulmonary cells. ResultThe elements with enrichment factors (EF) larger than 10 were As, Cd, Cu, Zn, S and Pb in the four experiment groups. The priority control of the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 and PM 2.5 of Near-traffic source was much higher than that of Far-traffic source, it demonstrated that near the traffic source of PAHs pollution was heavier than that of Far-traffic source, as it was close to main roads Beiyuan Road, motor vehicle emissions were much higher. The pathology of lung showed that the degree of inflammation was increased with the particle diameter minished, it was the same as the detection of biochemical parameters such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Total antioxidant status(T-AOC) and total protein (TP) in BALF and inflammation cytokine(interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) in lung homogenate. The indexes of DNA damage including the content of DNA and Olive empennage of PM 2.5 were significant higher than that of PM 10 at the same surveillance point ( P < 0.05), near-traffic particles were higher than the far-traffic particles at the same diameter, ( P < 0.05). ConclusionNear-traffic area particles had certain pollution at winter in Beijing. Meanwhile, atmospheric particulate matters on lung toxicity were related to the particles size and distance related sites which were exposed: smaller size, more toxicity; nearer from traffic, more toxicity.

  11. Differential toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles toward phagocytic and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malugin, Alexander; Herd, Heather; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of size and surface functionality of amorphous silica nanoparticles (SNPs) on their interaction with cultured cells. The intracellular uptake, phagocytic activity, and possible mechanisms of toxicity induced by SNPs were studied on murine alveolar macrophages and two epithelial cancer cell lines. It was found that phagocytic cells are more susceptible to amorphous SNPs than epithelial cells. SNPs with functionalized surfaces were capable to induce the formation of apoptotic cells to a higher extent than plain particles. Plain SNPs induced plasma membrane damage in phagocytic cells to a higher extent and caused cell death in a shorter period of time than surface-functionalized SNPs. The prevalence of necrotic mode of cell death was observed after treatment with plain SNPs. In the range studied surface functionality played an important role in SNPs toxicity.

  12. Transformation of crystalline starch nanoparticles into highly luminescent carbon nanodots: Toxicity studies and their applications.

    PubMed

    Sonthanasamy, Regina Sisika A; Ahmad, Wan Yaacob Wan; Fazry, Shazrul; Hassan, Nurul I; Lazim, Azwan Mat

    2016-02-10

    Being abundant in many tropical part of the world, Dioscorea sp. as food is limited due to its toxicity. However polysaccharides derive from these tubers could be important for other applications. Here we developed a Highly Luminescent Carbon Nanodots (C-dots) via acid hydrolysis of Gadong starch (GS). The hydrolysis rate of GS increased from 49% to 86% within 7 days while the X-ray diffraction showed the native GS particle is a C-crystalline type. The GS particles were either round or oval with diameters ranging from 50-90 nm. Further acid dehydration and surface oxidation reduced the size of GS nanoparticles to 6-25 nm. The C-dots produced a fluorescent emission at wavelength 441 nm. Toxicity tests demonstrate that zebrafish embryo were able to tolerate the C-dots for 48 h after exposure. This study has successfully demonstrated a novel approach of converting GS into excellent fluorescent C-dot.

  13. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jane Y.C.; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2014-07-15

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO{sub 2} on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO{sub 2} induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO{sub 2} and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ, respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2}, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP + CeO{sub 2} were significantly larger than CeO{sub 2} or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP + CeO{sub 2} reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO{sub 2}-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO{sub 2} induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2} in the combined exposure. Using CeO{sub 2} as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns. - Highlights: • DEP induced acute lung inflammation and switched immune response from Th1 to Th2. • DEP induced lung granulomas were not affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2}. • CeO{sub 2} induced sustained lung

  14. The Impact of Silica Nanoparticle Design on Cellular Toxicity and Hemolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Malugin, Alexander; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the toxicity of silica nanoparticles (SiO2) on the cellular level is crucial for rational design of these nanomaterials for biomedical applications. Herein, we explore the impacts of geometry, porosity and surface charge of SiO2 on cellular toxicity and hemolytic activity. Nonporous Stöber silica nanospheres (115 nm diameter), mesoporous silica nanospheres (120 nm diameter, aspect ratio 1), mesoporous silica nanorods with aspect ratio of 2, 4 and 8 (width by length 80 × 200 nm, 150 × 600 nm, 130 × 1000 nm) as well as their cationic counterparts were evaluated on macrophages, lung carcinoma cells, and human erythrocytes. It was shown that the toxicity of SiO2 is cell-type dependent and that surface charge and pore size govern cellular toxicity. Using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, the cellular association of SiO2 was quantitated with the association amount increasing in the following order: mesoporous SiO2 (aspect ratio 1, 2, 4, 8) < amine-modified mesoporous SiO2 (aspect ratio 1, 2, 4, 8) < amine-modified nonporous Stöber SiO2 < nonporous Stöber SiO2. Geometry did not seem to influence the extent of SiO2 association at early or extended time points. The level of cellular association of the nanoparticles was directly linked to the extent of plasma membrane damage, suggesting a biological cause-and-effect relationship. Hemolysis assay showed that the hemolytic activity was porosity- and geometry- dependent for bare SiO2 and surface charge-dependent for amine-modified SiO2. A good correlation between hemolytic activity and cellular association was found on a similar dosage basis. These results can provide useful guidelines for the rational design of SiO2 in nanomedicine. PMID:21630682

  15. Uptake and Toxicity of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in C6 Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Arundhati; Rastedt, Wiebke; Faber, Kathrin; Schultz, Aaron G; Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2016-11-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) are frequently used for many technical applications, but are also known for their cell toxic potential. In order to investigate a potential use of CuO-NPs as a therapeutic drug for glioma treatment, we have investigated the consequences of an application of CuO-NPs on the cellular copper content and cell viability of C6 glioma cells. CuO-NPs were synthesized by a wet-chemical method and were coated with dimercaptosuccinic acid and bovine serum albumin to improve colloidal stability in physiological media. Application of these protein-coated nanoparticles (pCuO-NPs) to C6 cells caused a strong time-, concentration- and temperature-dependent copper accumulation and severe cell death. The observed loss in cellular MTT-reduction capacity, the loss in cellular LDH activity and the increase in the number of propidium iodide-positive cells correlated well with the specific cellular copper content. C6 glioma cells were less vulnerable to pCuO-NPs compared to primary astrocytes and toxicity of pCuO-NPs to C6 cells was only observed for incubation conditions that increased specific cellular copper contents above 20 nmol copper per mg protein. Both cellular copper accumulation as well as the pCuO-NP-induced toxicity in C6 cells were prevented by application of copper chelators, but not by endocytosis inhibitors, suggesting that liberation of copper ions from the pCuO-NPs is the first step leading to the observed toxicity of pCuO-NP-treated glioma cells.

  16. Onset of alveolar recirculation in the developing lungs and its consequence on nanoparticle deposition in the pulmonary acinus

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Frank S.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the gas exchange region of the human lung (the pulmonary acinus) undergoes profound change in the first few years of life. In this paper, we investigate numerically how the change in alveolar shape with time affects the rate of nanoparticle deposition deep in the lung during postnatal development. As human infant data is unavailable, we use a rat model of lung development. The process of postnatal lung development in the rat is remarkably similar to that of the human, and the structure of the rat acinus is indistinguishable from that of the human acinus. The current numerical predictions support our group's recent in vivo findings, which were also obtained by using growing rat lung models, that nanoparticle deposition in infants is strongly affected by the change in the structure of the pulmonary acinus. In humans, this major structural change occurs over the first 2 yr of life. Our current predictions would suggest that human infants at the age of ∼2 yr might be most at risk to the harmful effects of air pollution. Our results also suggest that dose estimates for inhalation therapies using nanoparticles, based on fully developed adult lungs with simple body weight scaling, are likely to overestimate deposition by up to 55% for newborns and underestimate deposition by up to 17% for 2-yr-old infants. PMID:26494453

  17. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-11-01

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L-1, or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L-1, there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L-1 of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L-1 of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the

  18. Chronic toxicity effects of ZnSO4 and ZnO nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bacchetta, Renato; Santo, Nadia; Marelli, Marcello; Nosengo, Greta; Tremolada, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The chronic toxicity of ZnSO4 and ZnO nanoparticles has been studied in Daphnia magna also considering the life cycle parameters beyond the standard 21-day exposure time. Specimens have been individually followed until the natural end of their life, and some of them sampled for microscopic analyses at 48h, 9 and 21 days. Despite the low level of exposure (0.3mg Zn/L), ultrastructural analyses of the midgut epithelial cells revealed efficient internalization of nanoparticles between 48h and 9d, and translocation to other tissues as well. At 21d, the most affected fields have been recorded for both compounds; in particular samples exposed to ZnO nanoparticles showed swelling of mitochondria, while those exposed to ZnSO4 had a great number of autophagy vacuoles. The life cycle parameters resulted altered as well, with a significant inhibition of reproduction in both groups, when compared to controls. After the 21-day exposure, some interesting results were obtained: animals, previously exposed to nanoZnO at low concentrations, showed a complete recovery of the full reproduction potential, while those previously exposed to ZnSO4 presented a dose-dependent and compound-specific reduction in lifespan. Based on the results from the present research and the effects of the same chemicals at higher doses, it can be concluded that the soluble form plays a key role in ZnO nanoparticle cytotoxicity, and that the nanoparticulate form is able to locally increase the amount of Zn inside the cell, even within the ovary. It's worth noting that ZnO nanoparticles have been internalized despite the very low concentration used: this raises concern about the possible environmental implications which may derive from their use, and which in turn must be carefully considered.

  19. Nanoparticle conjugation and pulmonary delivery enhance the protective efficacy of Ag85B and CpG against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Marie; Nembrini, Chiara; Dhar, Neeraj; de Titta, Alexandre; de Piano, Cyntia; Pasquier, Miriella; Simeoni, Eleonora; van der Vlies, André J; McKinney, John D; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Swartz, Melody A

    2011-09-16

    Vaccines that drive robust T-cell immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are needed both for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. We have recently developed a synthetic vaccine delivery platform with Pluronic-stabilized polypropylene sulfide nanoparticles (NPs), which target lymphoid tissues by their small size (∼ 30 nm) and which activate the complement cascade by their surface chemistry. Here we conjugated the tuberculosis antigen Ag85B to the NPs (NP-Ag85B) and compared their efficacy in eliciting relevant immune responses in mice after intradermal or pulmonary administration. Pulmonary administration of NP-Ag85B with the adjuvant CpG led to enhanced induction of antigen-specific polyfunctional Th1 responses in the spleen, the lung and lung-draining lymph nodes as compared to soluble Ag85B with CpG and to the intradermally-delivered formulations. Mucosal and systemic Th17 responses were also observed with this adjuvanted NP formulation and vaccination route, especially in the lung. We then evaluated protection induced by the adjuvanted NP formulation following a Mtb aerosol challenge and found that vaccination with NP-Ag85B and CpG via the pulmonary route displayed a substantial reduction of the lung bacterial burden, both compared to soluble Ag85B with CpG and to the corresponding intradermally delivered formulations. These findings highlight the potential of administrating NP-based formulations by the pulmonary route for TB vaccination.

  20. Delivery of imatinib-incorporated nanoparticles into lungs suppresses the development of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Miura, Daiji; Saito, Yukihiro; Matsubara, Hiromi; Ogawa, Aiko; Matoba, Tetsuya; Egashira, Kensuke; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-05-13

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Imatinib, a PDGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved hemodynamics, but serious side effects and drug discontinuation are common when treating PAH. A drug delivery system using nanoparticles (NPs) enables the reduction of side effects while maintaining the effects of the drug. We examined the efficacy of imatinib-incorporated NPs (Ima-NPs) in a rat model and in human PAH-pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Rats received a single intratracheal administration of PBS, FITC-NPs, or Ima-NPs immediately after monocrotaline injection. Three weeks after monocrotaline injection, intratracheal administration of Ima-NPs suppressed the development of pulmonary hypertension, small pulmonary artery remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy in the rat model of monocrotaline-induced PAH. We also examined the effects of imatinib and Ima-NPs on PDGF-induced proliferation of human PAH-PASMCs by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Imatinib and Ima-NPs significantly inhibited proliferation after 24 hours of treatment. Ima-NPs significantly inhibited proliferation compared with imatinib at 24 hours after removal of these drugs. Delivery of Ima-NPs into lungs suppressed the development of MCT-induced PAH by sustained antiproliferative effects on PAS-MCs.

  1. In Vitro Uptake of Silver Nanoparticles and Their Toxicity in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Liu, Xujie; Kienzle, Arne; Müller, Werner E G; Feng, Qingling

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the usage of silver nanoparticles in biomedical fields has increased rapidly, mainly due to their excellent antibacterial effects. They are used in many medical products such as wound dressings, catheters, bone cement and artificial cardiac valves. In tissue engineering, silver nanoparticles are often loaded as a filler for fabrication of nanocomposite scaffolds which subsequently are seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, possible adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on human stem cells should be investigated carefully to ensure a safe usage. In this study, silver nanoparticles with a mean diameter of ~30 nm were prepared and their toxicity in human mesenchymal stem cells was investigated. Transmission electron microscopic images reveal the uptake and localization of the silver nanoparticles in the cytoplasm. Upon internalization of Ag NPs inside the cells, an increase in the release of lactate dehydrogenase and the production of reactive oxygen species was quantified. Furthermore, they caused a reduction in both cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining implied that silver nanoparticles did not only induce apoptosis but also cause necrosis. Based on cell cycle analysis, G2/M arrest was detected in cells treated with silver nanoparticles, implicating DNA damage. The high level of reactive oxygen species induced by nanoparticles is considered to be the main cause of their toxicity.

  2. Toxic Effect of Silica Nanoparticles on Endothelial Cells through DNA Damage Response via Chk1-Dependent G2/M Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Li, Yanbo; Zhou, Xianqing; Huang, Peili; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles have become promising carriers for drug delivery or gene therapy. Endothelial cells could be directly exposed to silica nanoparticles by intravenous administration. However, the underlying toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells are still poorly understood. In order to clarify the cytotoxicity of endothelial cells induced by silica nanoparticles and its mechanisms, cellular morphology, cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as assessing cytotoxicity, resulted in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Silica nanoparticles-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation caused oxidative damage followed by the production of malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Both necrosis and apoptosis were increased significantly after 24 h exposure. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decreased obviously in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of DNA damage including the percentage of tail DNA, tail length and Olive tail moment (OTM) were markedly aggravated. Silica nanoparticles also induced G2/M arrest through the upregulation of Chk1 and the downregulation of Cdc25C, cyclin B1/Cdc2. In summary, our data indicated that the toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells was through DNA damage response (DDR) via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint signaling pathway, suggesting that exposure to silica nanoparticles could be a potential hazards for the development of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23620807

  3. The chronic toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles and ZnCl2 to Daphnia magna and the use of different methods to assess nanoparticle aggregation and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nathalie; Schmitt, Claudia; Galceran, Josep; Companys, Encarna; Vakurov, Alexander; Wallace, Rachel; Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the effect of ZnO nanoparticles and ZnCl2 on growth, reproduction and accumulation of zinc in Daphnia magna was determined in a 21-day chronic toxicity test. A variety of techniques were used to distinguish the free zinc ion, dissolved, nanoparticle and aggregated zinc fraction in the Daphnia test medium. The results showed similar chronic effects on growth, reproduction and accumulation for the ZnO nanoparticles (EC10, 20, 50 reproduction: 0.030, 0.049, 0.112 mg Zn/l) and the ZnCl2 (EC10, 20, 50 reproduction: 0.014, 0.027, 0.082 mg Zn/l). A large fraction of the nanoparticles rapidly dissolved after introduction in the exposure medium. Aggregation of nanoparticles was also observed but within 48 h of exposure most of these ZnO aggregates were dissolved. Based on the combined dissolution kinetics and toxicity results, it can be concluded that the toxicological effects of ZnO nanoparticles at the chronic level can be largely attributed to the dissolved fraction rather than the nanoparticles or initially formed aggregates.

  4. The role of oxidative stress in ambient particulate matter-induced lung diseases and its implications in the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Xia, Tian; Nel, Andre E

    2008-05-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) is an environmental factor that has been associated with increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The major effect of ambient PM on the pulmonary system is the exacerbation of inflammation, especially in susceptible people. One of the mechanisms by which ambient PM exerts its proinflammatory effects is the generation of oxidative stress by its chemical compounds and metals. Cellular responses to PM-induced oxidative stress include activation of antioxidant defense, inflammation, and toxicity. The proinflammatory effect of PM in the lung is characterized by increased cytokine/chemokine production and adhesion molecule expression. Moreover, there is evidence that ambient PM can act as an adjuvant for allergic sensitization, which raises the possibility that long-term PM exposure may lead to increased prevalence of asthma. In addition to ambient PM, rapid expansion of nanotechnology has introduced the potential that engineered nanoparticles (NP) may also become airborne and may contribute to pulmonary diseases by novel mechanisms that could include oxidant injury. Currently, little is known about the potential adverse health effects of these particles. In this communication, the mechanisms by which particulate pollutants, including ambient PM and engineered NP, exert their adverse effects through the generation of oxidative stress and the impacts of oxidant injury in the respiratory tract will be reviewed. The importance of cellular antioxidant and detoxification pathways in protecting against particle-induced lung damage will also be discussed.

  5. Effects of chloride and ionic strength on physical morphology, dissolution, and bacterial toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Bryant A; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Bae, Sungwoo; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn; Saleh, Navid B; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we comprehensively evaluate chloride- and ionic-strength-mediated changes in the physical morphology, dissolution, and bacterial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which are one of the most-used nanomaterials. The findings isolate the impact of ionic strength from that of chloride concentration. As ionic strength increases, AgNP aggregation likewise increases (such that the hydrodynamic radius [HR] increases), fractal dimension (Df) strongly decreases (providing increased available surface relative to suspensions with higher Df), and the release of Ag(aq) increases. With increased Ag(+) in solution, Escherichia coli demonstrates reduced tolerance to AgNP exposure (i.e., toxicity increases) under higher ionic strength conditions. As chloride concentration increases, aggregates are formed (HR increases) but are dominated by AgCl(0)(s) bridging of AgNPs; relatedly, Df increases. Furthermore, AgNP dissolution strongly increases under increased chloride conditions, but the dominant, theoretical, equilibrium aqueous silver species shift to negatively charged AgClx((x-1)-) species, which appear to be less toxic to E. coli. Thus, E. coli demonstrates increased tolerance to AgNP exposure under higher chloride conditions (i.e., toxicity decreases). Expression measurements of katE, a gene involved in catalase production to alleviate oxidative stress, support oxidative stress in E. coli as a result of Ag(+) exposure. Overall, our work indicates that the environmental impacts of AgNPs must be evaluated under relevant water chemistry conditions.

  6. Oral Toxicity and Intestinal Transport Mechanism of Colloidal Gold Nanoparticle-Treated Red Ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Song-Hwa; Yu, Jin; Go, Mi-Ran; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Hwang, Yun-Gu; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Application of nanotechnology or nanomaterials in agricultural food crops has attracted increasing attention with regard to improving crop production, quality, and nutrient utilization. Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) have been reported to enhance seed yield, germination rate, and anti-oxidant potential in food crops, raising concerns about their toxicity potential. In this study, we evaluated the oral toxicity of red ginseng exposed to colloidal Au-NPs during cultivation (G-red ginseng) in rats and their intestinal transport mechanism. (2) Methods: 14-day repeated oral administration of G-red ginseng extract to rats was performed, and body weight, hematological, serum biochemical, and histopathological values were analyzed. An in vitro model of human intestinal follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) and an intestinal epithelial monolayer system were used for intestinal transport mechanistic study. (3) Results: No remarkable oral toxicity of G-red ginseng extract in rats was found, and Au-NPs did not accumulate in any organ, although Au-NP transfer to G-red ginseng and some increased saponin levels were confirmed. Au-NPs were transcytozed by microfold (M) cells, but not by a paracellular pathway in the intestinal epithelium. (4) Conclusion: These findings suggest great potential of Au-NPs for agricultural food crops at safe levels. Further study is required to elucidate the functional effects of Au-NPs on ginseng and long-term toxicity. PMID:28335336

  7. Silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate induce high toxicity to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Daphnia magna and Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fabianne; Gallego-Urrea, Julián Alberto; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Crossley, Alison; Hassellöv, Martin; Taylor, Cameron; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have gained attention over the years due to the antimicrobial function of silver, which has been exploited industrially to produce consumer goods that vary in type and application. Undoubtedly the increase of production and consumption of these silver-containing products will lead to the entry of silver compounds into the environment. In this study we have used Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Daphnia magna and Danio rerio as model organisms to investigate the toxicity of AgNP and AgNO₃ by assessing different biological endpoints and exposure periods. Organisms were exposed following specific and standardized protocols for each species/endpoints, with modifications when necessary. AgNP were characterized in each test-media by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and experiments were performed by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) to investigate the aggregation and agglomeration behavior of AgNP under different media chemical composition and test-period. TEM images of AgNP in the different test-media showed dissimilar patterns of agglomeration, with some agglomerates inside an organic layer, some loosely associated particles and also the presence of some individual particles. The toxicity of both AgNO₃ and AgNP differ significantly based on the test species: we found no differences in toxicity for algae, a small difference for zebrafish and a major difference in toxicity for Daphnia magna.

  8. Effect of natural organic matter on the photo-induced toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wormington, Alexis M; Coral, Jason; Alloy, Matthew M; Damarè, Carmen L; Mansfield, Charles M; Klaine, Stephen J; Bisesi, Joseph H; Roberts, Aaron P

    2016-12-07

    Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) is the most widely used form of nanoparticles in commercial industry and comes in 2 main configurations: rutile and anatase. Rutile TiO2 is used in ultraviolet (UV) screening applications, whereas anatase TiO2 crystals have a surface defect that makes them photoreactive. There are numerous reports in the literature of photo-induced toxicity to aquatic organisms following coexposure to anatase nano-TiO2 and UV. All natural freshwater contains varying amounts of natural organic matter (NOM), which can drive UV attenuation and quench reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aquatic ecosystems. The present research examined how NOM alters the photo-induced toxicity of anatase nano-TiO2 . Daphnia magna neonates were coexposed to NOM and photoexcited anatase nano-TiO2 for 48 h. Natural organic matter concentrations as low as 4 mg/L reduced anatase nano-TiO2 toxicity by nearly 100%. These concentrations of NOM attenuated UV by <10% in the exposure system. However, ROS production measured using a fluorescence assay was significantly reduced in a NOM concentration--dependent manner. Taken together, these data suggest that NOM reduces anatase nano-TiO2 toxicity via an ROS quenching mechanism and not by attenuation of UV. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-6. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. Effects of water chemistry and surface contact on the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jun; Cheng, Jinping

    2017-04-04

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has created concerns about its potential impacts on natural microbial communities. In this study, the physicochemical properties of AgNPs and its toxicity on natural bacteria Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) were investigated in aqueous conditions. The characterization data showed that AgNPs highly aggregated in aqueous conditions, and the hydrodynamic diameter of AgNPs in aqueous conditions was larger than its primary size. The studied AgNPs was less toxic to B. subtilis in estuarine water as compared to that in Milli-Q water and artificial seawater, which might be due to the observed enhanced aggregation of AgNPs in estuarine water. The toxicity of AgNPs to B. subtilis was greatly reduced when their surface contact was blocked by a dialysis membrane. Scanning electron microscope images showed that exposure contact to AgNPs resulted in damage of the microbial cell wall and enhanced formation of fibrillar structures. These results suggest that particle-cell contact is largely responsible for the observed toxicity of AgNPs in B. subtilis. This study can help to understand the potential impacts of AgNPs to natural microbes, especially in the complex aquatic environments.

  10. Comparison of in vitro toxicity of silver ions and silver nanoparticles on human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vrček, Ivana Vinković; Žuntar, Irena; Petlevski, Roberta; Pavičić, Ivan; Dutour Sikirić, Maja; Ćurlin, Marija; Goessler, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Scientific information on the potential harmful effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on human health severely lags behind their exponentially growing applications in consumer products. In assessing the toxic risk of AgNP usage, liver, as a detoxifying organ, is particularly important. The aim of this study was to explore the toxicity mechanisms of nano and ionic forms of silver on human hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells. The results showed that silver ions and citrate-coated AgNPs reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 values of silver ions and citrate-coated AgNPs were 0.5 and 50 mg L(-1) , respectively. The LDH leakage and inhibition of albumin synthesis, along with decreased ALT activity, indicated that treatment with either AgNP or Ag ions resulted in membrane damage and reduced the cell function of human liver cells. Evaluation of oxidative stress markers demonstrating depletion of GSH, increased ROS production, and increased SOD activity, indicated that oxidative stress might contribute to the toxicity effects of nano and ionic forms of silver. The observed toxic effect of AgNP on HepG2 cells was substantially weaker than that caused by ionic silver, while the uptake of nano and ionic forms of silver by HepG2 cells was nearly the same. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 679-692, 2016.

  11. Toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in Escherichia coli correlates with conduction band and hydration energies.

    PubMed

    Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Ivask, Angela; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Low-Kam, Cecile; Fischer, Heidi; Ji, Zhaoxia; Pokhrel, Suman; Cohen, Yoram; Telesca, Donatello; Zink, Jeffrey; Mädler, Lutz; Holden, Patricia A; Nel, Andre; Godwin, Hilary

    2015-01-20

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx NPs) are used for a host of applications, such as electronics, cosmetics, construction, and medicine, and as a result, the safety of these materials to humans and the environment is of considerable interest. A prior study of 24 MOx NPs in mammalian cells revealed that some of these materials show hazard potential. Here, we report the growth inhibitory effects of the same series of MOx NPs in the bacterium Escherichia coli and show that toxicity trends observed in E. coli parallel those seen previously in mammalian cells. Of the 24 materials studied, only ZnO, CuO, CoO, Mn2O3, Co3O4, Ni2O3, and Cr2O3 were found to exert significant growth inhibitory effects; these effects were found to relate to membrane damage and oxidative stress responses in minimal trophic media. A correlation of the toxicological data with physicochemical parameters of MOx NPs revealed that the probability of a MOx NP being toxic increases as the hydration enthalpy becomes less negative and as the conduction band energy approaches those of biological molecules. These observations are consistent with prior results observed in mammalian cells, revealing that mechanisms of toxicity of MOx NPs are consistent across two very different taxa. These results suggest that studying nanotoxicity in E. coli may help to predict toxicity patterns in higher organisms.

  12. Bioavailability, toxicity, and bioaccumulation of quantum dot nanoparticles to the amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Brian P.; Bugge, Deenie; Ranville, James F.; Chen, Celia Y.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relative toxicities of different modes of nanoparticle exposure as compared with their dissolved metal ions are emerging areas in ecotoxicology. Here we report on bioavailability, toxicity, and bioaccumulation of carboxyl-functionalized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) to the amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus exposed to equivalent Cd concentrations via dissolved Cd, QDs in water or QDs in algal food. Both modes of QD exposure were accumulated to greater extent than dissolved Cd. Exposure to QDs via algae resulted in high amphipod mortality. Cadmium and Se in amphipods exposed to QDs in water were highly correlated and spatially localized within the amphipod. In contrast, when exposed to QDs via algae the metals were more disperse and not highly correlated suggesting QD dissolution and resultant metal ion toxicity. This study suggests QDs are accumulated to a greater extent than the dissolved ion and could lead to trophic transfer. QDs ingested with algae are bioavailable and result in toxicity which is not observed in the absence of algae. PMID:22471552

  13. Sub-chronic Dermal Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in Guinea Pig: Special Emphasis to Heart, Bone and Kidney Toxicities.

    PubMed

    Korani, Mitra; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Arbabi Bidgoli, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been widely used as new potent antimicrobial agents in cosmetic and hygienic products. Present study compares the tissue levels of Ag NPs in different organs of Guiana Pigs quantitatively after dermal application and analysis the morphological changes and pathological abnormalities on the basis of the Ag NPs tissue levels. Before toxicological assessments,the size of colloidal nanosilver was recorded by X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscope tests and the sizes of samples were recorded in sizes less than 100 nm. For toxicological evaluation, male guinea pigs were exposed to three concentrations of Ag NPs (100, 1000 and 10000 ppm) according to acute pretests for further assessments in subchronic model in a period of 13 weeks . A close correlation between dermal exposure and tissue levels of Ag NPs was found (p < 0.05) and tissue uptakes happened in dose dependent manner with the following ranking: ki dney>muscle>bone>skin>liver>heart >spleen. In histopathological studies, severe proximal convoluted tubule degeneration and distal convoluted tubule were seen in the kidneys of the middle and high-dose animals. Separated lines and marrow space narrow were determined as two major signs of bone toxicities which observed in three different dose levels of Ag NPs. Increased dermal dose of Ag NPs caused cardiocyte deformity, congestion and inflammation. The three different Ag NPs concentration gave comparable results for several endpoints measured in heart, bone and kidney, but differed in tissue concentrations and the extent of histopathological changes. It seems that Ag ions could be detected in different organs after dermal exposure ,which has the potential to provide target organ toxicities in a time and dose dependent manner.

  14. Processing pathway dependence of amorphous silica nanoparticle toxicity - colloidal versus pyrolytic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Dunphy, Darren R.; Jiang, Xingmao; Meng, Huan; Sun, Bingbing; Tarn, Derrick; Xue, Min; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Sijie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Li, Ruibin; Garcia, Fred L.; Yang, Jing; Kirk, Martin L.; Xia, Tian; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, Andre; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We have developed structure/toxicity relationships for amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized through low temperature, colloidal (e.g. Stöber silica) or high temperature pyrolysis (e.g. fumed silica) routes. Through combined spectroscopic and physical analyses, we have determined the state of aggregation, hydroxyl concentration, relative proportion of strained and unstrained siloxane rings, and potential to generate hydroxyl radicals for Stöber and fumed silica NPs with comparable primary particle sizes (16-nm in diameter). Based on erythrocyte hemolytic assays and assessment of the viability and ATP levels in epithelial and macrophage cells, we discovered for fumed silica an important toxicity relationship to post-synthesis thermal annealing or environmental exposure, whereas colloidal silicas were essentially non-toxic under identical treatment conditions. Specifically, we find for fumed silica a positive correlation of toxicity with hydroxyl concentration and its potential to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause red blood cell hemolysis. We propose fumed silica toxicity stems from its intrinsic population of strained three-membered rings (3MRs) along with its chain-like aggregation and hydroxyl content. Hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions of the silanol surfaces of fumed silica aggregates with the extracellular plasma membrane cause membrane perturbations sensed by the Nalp3 inflammasome, whose subsequent activation leads to secretion of the cytokine IL-1β. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the strained 3MRs in fumed silica but largely absent in colloidal silicas may contribute to the inflammasome activation. Formation of colloidal silica into aggregates mimicking those of fumed silica had no effect on cell viability or hemolysis. This study emphasizes that not all amorphous silica is created equal and that the unusual toxicity of fumed silica compared to colloidal silica derives from its framework and surface chemistry along

  15. Mercury sensing and toxicity studies of novel latex fabricated silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Borase, Hemant P; Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Salunkhe, Rahul B; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2014-11-01

    Safe and eco-friendly alternatives to currently used hazardous chemico-physical methods of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesis are need of time. Rapid, low cost, selective detection of toxic metals in environmental sample is important to take safety action. Toxicity assessment of engineered AgNPs is essential to avoid its side effects on human and non-target organisms. In the present study, biologically active latex from Euphorbia heterophylla (Poinsettia) was utilized for synthesis of AgNPs. AgNPs was of spherical shape and narrow size range (20-50 nm). Occurrence of elemental silver and crystalline nature of AgNPs was analyzed. Role of latex metabolites in reduction and stabilization of AgNPs was analyzed by FT-IR, protein coagulation test and phytochemical analysis. Latex-synthesized AgNPs showed potential in selective and sensitive detection of toxic mercury ions (Hg(2+)) with limit of detection around 100 ppb. Addition of Hg(2+) showed marked deviation in color and surface plasmon resonance spectra of AgNPs. Toxicity studies on aquatic non-target species Daphnia magna showed that latex-synthesized AgNPs (20.66 ± 1.52% immobilization) were comparatively very less toxic than chemically synthesized AgNPs (51.66 ± 1.52% immobilization). Similarly, comparative toxicity study on human red blood cells showed lower hemolysis (4.46 ± 0.01%) by latex-synthesized AgNPs as compared to chemically synthesized AgNPs causing 6.14 ± 0.01% hemolysis.

  16. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-12-21

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L(-1), or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L(-1), there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L(-1) of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L(-1) of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.

  17. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe; Mariani, Valentina; Cohen, Dror; Madi, Lea; Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo; Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella; Garanger, Elisabeth; Rossi, François; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam; Korenstein, Rafi; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Ponti, Jessica; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)- block-poly( l-glutamic acid) (PTMC- b-PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)- block-poly( γ-benzyl- l-glutamate) (PEG- b-PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood-serum-protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC- b-PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG- b-PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  18. Radiotherapy Does Not Influence the Severe Pulmonary Toxicity Observed With the Administration of Gemcitabine and Bleomycin in Patients With Advanced-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With the BAGCOPP Regimen: A Report by the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Macann, Andrew; Bredenfeld, Henning; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on the severe pulmonary toxicity observed in the pilot study of BAGCOPP (bleomycin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, and gemcitabine) for advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV Hodgkin's lymphoma or Stage IIB with risk factors participated in this single-arm, multicenter pilot study. Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled on the study before its premature closure as a result of the development of serious pulmonary toxicity in 8 patients. The pulmonary toxicity occurred either during or immediately after the BAGCOPP chemotherapy course. Pulmonary toxicity contributed to one early fatality but resolved in the other 7 patients after cessation of gemcitabine and bleomycin, allowing continuation of therapy. Fifteen patients received consolidative radiotherapy, including 4 who previously had pulmonary toxicity. There were no reported cases of radiation pneumonitis and no exacerbation of pulmonary symptoms in the 4 patients who had had previous pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions: The severe pulmonary toxicity observed in this study has been attributed to an interaction between gemcitabine and bleomycin. Gemcitabine (when administered without bleomycin) remains of interest in Hodgkin's lymphoma and is being incorporated into a new German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group protocol that also includes consolidative radiotherapy. This study supports the concept of the integration of radiotherapy in gemcitabine-containing regimens in Hodgkin's lymphoma if there is an interval of at least 4 weeks between the two modalities and with a schedule whereby radiotherapy follows the chemotherapy.

  19. Toxicity of 11 Metal Oxide Nanoparticles to Three Mammalian Cell Types In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Angela; Titma, Tiina; Visnapuu, Meeri; Vija, Heiki; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Sihtmae, Mariliis; Pokhrel, Suman; Madler, Lutz; Heinlaan, Margit; Kisand, Vambola; Shimmo, Ruth; Kahru, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge on potential harmful effects of metallic nanomaterials lags behind their increased use in consumer products and therefore, the safety data on various nanomaterials applicable for risk assessment are urgently needed. In this study, 11 metal oxide nanoparticles (MeOx NPs) prepared using flame pyrolysis method were analyzed for their toxicity against human alveolar epithelial cells A549, human epithelial colorectal cells Caco2 and murine fibroblast cell line Balb/c 3T3. The cell lines were exposed for 24 h to suspensions of 3-100 μg/mL MeOx NPs and cellular viability was evaluated using. Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay. In parallel to NPs, toxicity of soluble salts of respective metals was analyzed, to reveal the possible cellular effects of metal ions shedding from the NPs. The potency of MeOx to produce reactive oxygen species was evaluated in the cell-free assay. The used three cell lines showed comparable toxicity responses to NPs and their metal ion counterparts in the current test setting. Six MeOx NPs (Al2O3, Fe3O4, MgO, SiO2, TiO2, WO3) did not show toxic effects below 100 µg/mL. For five MeOx NPs, the averaged 24 h IC50 values for the three mammalian cell lines were 16.4 µg/mL for CuO, 22.4 µg/mL for ZnO, 57.3 µg/mL for Sb2O3, 132.3 µg/mL for Mn3O4 and 129 µg/mL for Co3O4. Comparison of the dissolution level of MeOx and the toxicity of soluble salts allowed to conclude that the toxicity of CuO, ZnO and Sb2O3 NPs was driven by release of metal ions. The toxic effects of Mn3O4 and Co3O4 could be attributed to the ROS-inducing ability of these NPs. All the NPs were internalized by the cells according to light microscopy studies but also proven by TEM, and internalization of Co3O4 NPs seemed to be most prominent in this aspect. In conclusion, this work provides valuable toxicological data for a library of 11 MeOx NPs. Combining the knowledge on toxic or non-toxic nature of nanomaterials may be used for safe-by-design approach.

  20. Toxicity Testing of Silver Nanoparticles in Artificial and Natural Sediments Using the Benthic Organism Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Juho Elias; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Vehniäinen, Eeva-Riikka; Väisänen, Ari; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck James; Akkanen, Jarkko; Kukkonen, Jussi Vilho Kalevi

    2016-10-01

    The increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in industrial and consumer products worldwide has resulted in their release to aquatic environments. Previous studies have mainly focused on the effects of AgNP on pelagic species, whereas few studies have assessed the risks to benthic invertebrates despite the fact that the sediments act as a large potential sink for NPs. In this study, the toxicity of sediment-associated AgNP was evaluated using the standard sediment toxicity test for chemicals provided by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development. The freshwater benthic oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed to sediment-associated AgNP in artificial and natural sediments at concentrations ranging from 91 to 1098 mg Ag/kg sediment dry weight. Silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as a reference compound for Ag toxicity. The measured end points of toxicity were mortality, reproduction, and total biomass. In addition, the impact of sediment-associated AgNP on the feeding rate of L. variegatus was studied in a similar test set-up as mentioned previously. The addition of AgNP into the sediment significantly affected the feeding rate and reproduction of the test species only at the highest concentration (1098 mg/kg) of Ag in the natural sediment with the lowest pH. In comparison, the addition of AgNO3 resulted in reproductive toxicity in every tested sediment, and Ag was more toxic when spiked as AgNO3 than AgNP. In general, sediments were observed to have a high capacity to eliminate the AgNP-derived toxicity. However, the capacity of sediments to eliminate the toxicity of Ag follows a different pattern when spiked as AgNP than AgNO3. The results of this study emphasize the importance of sediment-toxicity testing and the role of sediment properties when evaluating the environmental effects and behavior of AgNP in sediments.

  1. The applicability of conventional cytotoxicity assays to predict safety/toxicity of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, silver and gold nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mannerström, Marika; Zou, Jing; Toimela, Tarja; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Heinonen, Tuula

    2016-12-01

    Developing new, validated methods for screening of the effects of nanomaterials is a huge and expensive task. It is therefore necessary to try to employ already existing and validated methods, developed for chemicals. In the present study cytotoxicity of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NP), two different mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNP), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were investigated in BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts, NR8383 macrophages, and U937 monocytes using standard assays, namely WST-1 and NRU. In addition, preliminary attempts were made to investigate ENM-mediated effects on cell motility as a potential end point for NP toxicity. AgNPs were most toxic to BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts while other ENMs were insignificantly toxic. NR8383 macrophages were most sensitive cells, as in addition to AgNPs, also MWCNTs were toxic to NR8383 cells. AgNP was toxic also to U937 cells, other ENMs had minor effect. Different media resulted in different-sized aggregates of the same ENMs. AgNP inhibited BALB/c motility most, whereas NR8383 motility was inhibited most by MWCNTs. In conclusion, conventional cytotoxicity assays are better suited to rank the order of toxicity of different nanoparticles instead of producing accurate IC50 data. Moreover, using immune cells, especially macrophages together with fibroblasts, would bring more relevant predictions of ENM cytotoxicity as immune cells may discover cytotoxicity that is not captured by BALB/c 3T3 cells alone.

  2. Suspension medium influences interaction of mesenchymal stromal cells with endothelium and pulmonary toxicity after transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Deak, Erika; Rüster, Brigitte; Keller, Lisa; Eckert, Klaus; Fichtner, Iduna; Seifried, Erhard; Henschler, Reinhard

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) transplantation and subsequent homing of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) may be adversely influenced by their relatively high adhesion capacity and their tendency to aggregate, leading to clogging of capillaries especially in the lungs. We evaluated the ability of murine MSC suspended in EDTA or heparin in buffered saline solution on their spontaneous adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro, under shear stress and their in vivo tolerability after i.v. injection. We show that suspension of MSC in heparin was highly beneficial, avoiding clinical symptoms in 95% of mice, whereas application of MSC suspended in PBS/EDTA or control buffer caused severe pulmonary reactions and partly, death. In vitro studies using parallel plate flow chambers revealed increased adhesion of MSC suspended in PBS/EDTA to endothelial cells compared with MSC in PBS/heparin. These data provide a means to predict and to interfere with toxicity of i.v. transplanted MSC.

  3. Comparison of cell counting methods in rodent pulmonary toxicity studies: automated and manual protocols and considerations for experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Antonini, James M.; Meighan, Terence G.; Young, Shih-Houng; Eye, Tracy J.; Hammer, Mary Ann; Erdely, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity studies often use bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to investigate potential adverse lung responses to a particulate exposure. The BAL cellular fraction is counted, using automated (i.e. Coulter Counter®), flow cytometry or manual (i.e. hemocytometer) methods, to determine inflammatory cell influx. The goal of the study was to compare the different counting methods to determine which is optimal for examining BAL cell influx after exposure by inhalation or intratracheal instillation (ITI) to different particles with varying inherent pulmonary toxicities in both rat and mouse models. General findings indicate that total BAL cell counts using the automated and manual methods tended to agree after inhalation or ITI exposure to particle samples that are relatively nontoxic or at later time points after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle when the response resolves. However, when the initial lung inflammation and cytotoxicity was high after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle, significant differences were observed when comparing cell counts from the automated, flow cytometry and manual methods. When using total BAL cell count for differential calculations from the automated method, depending on the cell diameter size range cutoff, the data suggest that the number of lung polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) varies. Importantly, the automated counts, regardless of the size cutoff, still indicated a greater number of total lung PMN when compared with the manual method, which agreed more closely with flow cytometry. The results suggest that either the manual method or flow cytometry would be better suited for BAL studies where cytotoxicity is an unknown variable. PMID:27251196

  4. Uptake, Accumulation and Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticle in Autotrophic Plants, and Heterotrophic Microbes: A Concentric Review.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Durgesh K; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Shweta; Singh, Swati; Singh, Yashwant; Vishwakarma, Kanchan; Yadav, Gaurav; Sharma, Shivesh; Singh, Vivek K; Mishra, Rohit K; Upadhyay, R G; Dubey, Nawal K; Lee, Yonghoon; Chauhan, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a cutting-edge field of science with the potential to revolutionize today's technological advances including industrial applications. It is being utilized for the welfare of mankind; but at the same time, the unprecedented use and uncontrolled release of nanomaterials into the environment poses enormous threat to living organisms. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in several industries and its continuous release may hamper many physiological and biochemical processes in the living organisms including autotrophs and heterotrophs. The present review gives a concentric know-how of the effects of AgNPs on the lower and higher autotrophic plants as well as on heterotrophic microbes so as to have better understanding of the differences in effects among these two groups. It also focuses on the mechanism of uptake, translocation, accumulation in the plants and microbes, and resulting toxicity as well as tolerance mechanisms by which these microorganisms are able to survive and reduce the effects of AgNPs. This review differentiates the impact of silver nanoparticles at various levels between autotrophs and heterotrophs and signifies the prevailing tolerance mechanisms. With this background, a comprehensive idea can be made with respect to the influence of AgNPs on lower and higher autotrophic plants together with heterotrophic microbes and new insights can be generated for the researchers to understand the toxicity and tolerance mechanisms of AgNPs in plants and microbes.

  5. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles with potent antibacterial activity and reduced toxicity for pharmaceutical preparations

    PubMed Central

    Salvioni, Lucia; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Collico, Veronica; Alessio, Giulia; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Corsi, Fabio; Tortora, Paolo; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Background The discovery of new solutions with antibacterial activity as efficient and safe alternatives to common preservatives (such as parabens) and to combat emerging infections and drug-resistant bacterial pathogens is highly expected in cosmetics and pharmaceutics. Colloidal silver nanoparticles (NPs) are attracting interest as novel effective antimicrobial agents for the prevention of several infectious diseases. Methods Water-soluble, negatively charged silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized by reduction with citric and tannic acid and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, differential centrifuge sedimentation, and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. AgNPs were tested with model Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in comparison to two different kinds of commercially available AgNPs. Results In this work, AgNPs with higher antibacterial activity compared to the commercially available colloidal silver solutions were prepared and investigated. Bacteria were plated and the antibacterial activity was tested at the same concentration of silver ions in all samples. The AgNPs did not show any significant reduction in the antibacterial activity for an acceptable time period. In addition, AgNPs were transferred to organic phase and retained their antibacterial efficacy in both aqueous and nonaqueous media and exhibited no toxicity in eukaryotic cells. Conclusion We developed AgNPs with a 20 nm diameter and negative zeta potential with powerful antibacterial activity and low toxicity compared to currently available colloidal silver, suitable for cosmetic preservatives and pharmaceutical preparations administrable to humans and/or animals as needed.

  6. Uptake, Accumulation and Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticle in Autotrophic Plants, and Heterotrophic Microbes: A Concentric Review

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Shweta; Singh, Swati; Singh, Yashwant; Vishwakarma, Kanchan; Yadav, Gaurav; Sharma, Shivesh; Singh, Vivek K.; Mishra, Rohit K.; Upadhyay, R. G.; Dubey, Nawal K.; Lee, Yonghoon; Chauhan, Devendra K.

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a cutting-edge field of science with the potential to revolutionize today’s technological advances including industrial applications. It is being utilized for the welfare of mankind; but at the same time, the unprecedented use and uncontrolled release of nanomaterials into the environment poses enormous threat to living organisms. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in several industries and its continuous release may hamper many physiological and biochemical processes in the living organisms including autotrophs and heterotrophs. The present review gives a concentric know-how of the effects of AgNPs on the lower and higher autotrophic plants as well as on heterotrophic microbes so as to have better understanding of the differences in effects among these two groups. It also focuses on the mechanism of uptake, translocation, accumulation in the plants and microbes, and resulting toxicity as well as tolerance mechanisms by which these microorganisms are able to survive and reduce the effects of AgNPs. This review differentiates the impact of silver nanoparticles at various levels between autotrophs and heterotrophs and signifies the prevailing tolerance mechanisms. With this background, a comprehensive idea can be made with respect to the influence of AgNPs on lower and higher autotrophic plants together with heterotrophic microbes and new insights can be generated for the researchers to understand the toxicity and tolerance mechanisms of AgNPs in plants and microbes. PMID:28184215

  7. Pulmonary toxicity of single-wall carbon nanotubes in mice 7 and 90 days after intratracheal instillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.; McCluskey, Richard; Hunter, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Nanomaterials are part of an industrial revolution to develop lightweight but strong materials for a variety of purposes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes are an important member of this class of materials. They structurally resemble rolled-up graphite sheets, usually with one end capped; individually they are about 1 nm in diameter and several microns long, but they often pack tightly together to form rods or ropes of microscopic sizes. Carbon nanotubes possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties and have many potential applications in the electronics, computer, and aerospace industries. Unprocessed nanotubes are very light and could become airborne and potentially reach the lungs. Because the toxicity of nanotubes in the lung is not known, their pulmonary toxicity was investigated. The three products studied were made by different methods and contained different types and amounts of residual catalytic metals. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 0, 0.1, or 0.5 mg of carbon nanotubes, a carbon black negative control, or a quartz positive control and euthanized 7 d or 90 d after the single treatment for histopathological study of the lungs. All nanotube products induced dose-dependent epithelioid granulomas and, in some cases, interstitial inflammation in the animals of the 7-d groups. These lesions persisted and were more pronounced in the 90-d groups; the lungs of some animals also revealed peribronchial inflammation and necrosis that had extended into the alveolar septa. The lungs of mice treated with carbon black were normal, whereas those treated with high-dose quartz revealed mild to moderate inflammation. These results show that, for the test conditions described here and on an equal-weight basis, if carbon nanotubes reach the lungs, they are much more toxic than carbon black and can be more toxic than quartz, which is considered a serious occupational health hazard in chronic inhalation exposures.

  8. Synthesis of fluorophore encapsulated silica nanoparticles for the evaluation of the biological fate and toxicity of food relevant nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zane, Andrew Paul

    We show that commercially available TiO2, SiO2, and ZnO nanoparticles are all internalized by C2BBe1 intestinal epithelial cells, but do not appear to be toxic, even after long term repeat-exposures. When particles were exposed to a simulated digestion protocol mimicking the stomach and intestinal environment, TiO2 particles did show mild toxicity by MTT assay, indicating a decrease in metabolic activity. IR spectra of these particles indicate presence of material from the digestion media, and these absorbed species may be responsible for the effects noted. Though the three particles were not significantly toxic, we note internalization by the intestinal epithelial cells, opening a possibility for absorption into circulation where they may localize in organs throughout the body. This will be observed by functionalizing the particles with fluorophores, after which they can be measured via fluorescence. To optimize the quantum yield efficiency, and thus the brightness, of one such fluorophore, we seek to improve a microwave synthesis of CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots our lab has previously reported. By coupling the microwave reactor to a fluorescence spectrometer via fiber optic cables, we were able to monitor the development of the particles throughout the microwave heating. Time-dependent fluorescence shows the development of an early fluorescence peak at 502 nm attributed to CdSe cores. We then note two isosbestic points which we attribute to the development of CdS layer around CdSe cores, and eventually the formation of outer ZnS shell. We utilize this in situ monitoring along with a study of various nucleation temperatures ranging from 0 to 100°C, and pre-and-post microwave heating UV exposure treatments to obtain optimized CdSe/CdS/ZnS particles with a QY of 40%. This is an improvement over our previous particles' 13% QY, and the highest yet reported for an aqueous synthesis of CdSe/ZnS type particles. Finally, we incorporate these QDs as well as two organic

  9. Uptake route and resulting toxicity of silver nanoparticles in Eisenia fetida earthworm exposed through Standard OECD Tests.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Velasco, Nerea; Gandariasbeitia, Maite; Irizar, Amaia; Soto, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the increasing interest in silver nanoparticles toxicity still few works dealt with the hazards of nanosized Ag in soils (either dissolved in pore water or coupled to colloids) although disposal of biosolids in landfills has been reported as the major source of silver nanoparticles in terrestrial environments. Presently, Eisenia fetida was used to assess the toxicity of 5 nm sized PVP-PEI coated silver nanoparticles in soil through the implementation of different exposure media Standard Toxicity Tests (Paper Contact and Artificial Soil -OECD-207- and Reproduction -OECD-222- Tests) together with cellular biomarkers measured in extruded coelomocytes. In order to decipher the mode of action of silver nanoparticles in soil and the uptake routes in earthworms, special attention was given to the Ag accumulation and distribution in tissues. High Ag accumulation rates, weight loss, and mortality due to the disruption of the tegument could be the result of a dermal absorption of Ag ions released from silver nanoparticles (Paper Contact Test). However, autometallography showed metals mainly localized in the digestive tract after Artificial Soil Test, suggesting that Ag uptake occurred mostly through soil ingestion. That is, silver nanoparticles attached to soil colloids seemed to be internalized in earthworms after ingestion of soil and transferred to the digestive gut epithelium where at high doses they have triggered severe effects at different levels of biological complexity.

  10. Photochemically-assisted synthesis of non-toxic and biocompatible gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Priscila R; Santos, Mayara S C; Silva, Ana Luísa G; Báo, Sônia N; Azevedo, Ricardo B; Sales, Maria José A; Paterno, Leonardo G

    2016-12-01

    This contribution describes the photochemically-assisted synthesis of aqueous colloidal suspensions of non-toxic and biocompatible spherical gold nanoparticles stabilized by branched polyethylenimine, or else Au-np-PEI. The method consists on 30min of photoexcitation (254nm, 16W) at room temperature of an aqueous diluted solution of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) containing PEI. While the UV irradiation forms the [Au((3+))Cl4(-)]* excited species that succesively transforms into zero valent Au, PEI controls the nucleation step of nanoparticles formation. Varying the PEI to Au molar ratio permits one to tune the size of nanoparticles between 100nm to 8nm. The obtained colloidal suspensions display an intense plasmonic absorption band at 520-530nm and positive zeta potentials greater than +20mV. The cells viability for in vitro tests performed with human connective tissues and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell lines is over 80% and 90%, respectively, when they are incubated with Au-np-PEI formulations (25μgmL(-1)). The present photochemically-assisted synthesis is advantageous because it is fast and does not require for either hazardous or cytotoxic reductant agents and additional purification procedures.

  11. A 13-week repeated-dose oral toxicity and bioaccumulation of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Sim, Jaehoon; Kim, Younghun; Han, Beom Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Lee, Somin; Cho, Myung-Haing; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Because of an increase in the commercial applications of manufactured nanoparticles, the issue of potential adverse health effects of nanoparticles following intended or unintended exposure is rapidly gaining attention. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlNPs, rod-type, 1.5, 3, and 6 mg/kg) after oral administration to mice for 13 weeks. Compared with the control group, the consumption of diet and drinking water and body weight gain decreased in the group treated with AlNPs. The group treated with 6 mg/kg AlNPs also showed a marked elevation in the count of white blood cells that associated with a significant decrease and increase to the proportion of eosinophils and lymphocytes, respectively. In addition, the secretion of IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased in a dose-dependent manner in the treated groups. Furthermore, AlNPs showed the highest accumulation in the liver and kidneys compared with the control group, increased the lactate dehydrogenase level in the blood, and induced the development of a pathological lesion in the liver and kidneys. Taken together, we suggest that the target organs of rod-type AlNPs may be the liver, kidneys and the immune system, and the not-observed adverse effect level may be lower than 6 mg/kg.

  12. Examining mechanism of toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashock, Michael J.

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are an up and coming technology increasingly being used in industrial and consumer applications and thus may pose risk to humans and the environment. In the present study, the toxic effects of CuO NPs were studied with two model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans. The role of released Cu ions during dissolution of CuO NPs in growth media were studied with freshly suspended, aged NPs, and the released Cu 2+ fraction. Exposures to the different Cu treatments showed significant inhibition of S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. Inhibition from the NPs was inversely proportional to size and was not fully explained by the released Cu ions. S. cerevisiae cultures grown under respiring conditions demonstrated greater metabolic sensitivity when exposed to CuO NPs compared to cultures undergoing fermentation. The cellular response to both CuO NPs and released Cu ions on gene expression was analyzed via microarray analysis after an acute exposure. It was observed that both copper exposures resulted in an increase in carbohydrate storage, a decrease in protein production, protein misfolding, increased membrane permeability, and cell cycle arrest. Cells exposed to NPs up-regulated genes related to oxidative phosphorylation but also may be inducing cell cycle arrest by a different mechanism than that observed with released Cu ions. The effect of CuO NPs on C. elegans was examined by using several toxicological endpoints. The CuO NPs displayed a more inhibitory effect, compared to copper sulfate, on nematode reproduction, feeding, and development. We investigated the effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper sulfate on neuronal health, a known tissue vulnerable to heavy metal toxicity. In transgenic C. eleganswith neurons expressing a green fluorescent protein reporter, neuronal degeneration was observed in up to 10% of the population after copper oxide nanoparticle exposure. Additionally, nematode

  13. Comparison of In vitro Nanoparticles Uptake in Various Cell Lines and In vivo Pulmonary Cellular Transport in Intratracheally Dosed Rat Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yurong; Chiang, Po-Chang; Blom, Jason D.; Li, Na; Shevlin, Kimberly; Brayman, Timothy G.; Hu, Yiding; Selbo, Jon G.; Hu, Liangbiao George

    2008-09-01

    In present study, the potential drug delivery of nanoformulations was validated via the comparison of cellular uptake of nanoparticles in various cell lines and in vivo pulmonary cellular uptake in intratracheally (IT) dosed rat model. Nanoparticles were prepared by a bench scale wet milling device and incubated with a series of cell lines, including Caco-2, RAW, MDCK and MDCK transfected MDR1 cells. IT dosed rats were examined for the pulmonary cellular uptake of nanoparticles. The processes of nanoparticle preparation did not alter the crystalline state of the material. The uptake of nanoparticles was observed most extensively in RAW cells and the least in Caco-2 cells. Efflux transporter P-gp did not prevent cell from nanoparticles uptake. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was also confirmed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cells and in bronchiolar epithelial cells, type II alveolar epithelial cells in the intratracheally administrated rats. The nanoparticles uptake in MDCK, RAW cells and in vivo lung epithelial cells indicated the potential applications of nanoformulation for poorly soluble compounds. The observed limited direct uptake of nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells suggests that the improvement in oral bioavailability by particle size reduction is via increased dissolution rate rather than direct uptake.

  14. Compilation of Data and Modelling of Nanoparticle Interactions and Toxicity in the NanoPUZZLES Project.

    PubMed

    Richarz, Andrea-Nicole; Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Benfenati, Emilio; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Golbamaki Bakhtyari, Nazanin; Leonis, Georgios; Marchese Robinson, Richard L; Papadopoulos, Manthos G; Cronin, Mark Td; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    The particular properties of nanomaterials have led to their rapidly increasing use in diverse fields of application. However, safety assessment is not keeping pace and there are still gaps in the understanding of their hazards. Computational models predicting nanotoxicity, such as (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ((Q)SARs), can contribute to safety evaluation, in line with general efforts to apply alternative methods in chemical risk assessment. Their development is highly dependent on the availability of reliable and high quality experimental data, both regarding the compounds' properties as well as the measured toxic effects. In particular, "nano-QSARs" should take the nano-specific characteristics into account. The information compiled needs to be well organized, quality controlled and standardized. Integrating the data in an overarching, structured data collection aims to (a) organize the data in a way to support modelling, (b) make (meta)data necessary for modelling available, and (c) add value by making a comparison between data from different sources possible.Based on the available data, specific descriptors can be derived to parameterize the nanomaterial-specific structure and physico-chemical properties appropriately. Furthermore, the interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems as well as small molecules, which can lead to modifications of the structure of the active nanoparticles, need to be described and taken into account in the development of models to predict the biological activity and toxicity of nanoparticles. The EU NanoPUZZLES project was part of a global cooperative effort to advance data availability and modelling approaches supporting the characterization and evaluation of nanomaterials.

  15. Negligible particle-specific toxicity mechanism of silver nanoparticles: the role of Ag+ ion release in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Valeria; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Galeone, Antonio; Brunetti, Virgilio; De Luca, Elisa; Kote, Sachin; Kshirsagar, Prakash; Sabella, Stefania; Bardi, Giuseppe; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is supported by many observations in literature, but no mechanism details have been proved yet. Here we confirm and quantify the toxic potential of fully characterized AgNPs in HeLa and A549 cells. Notably, through a specific fluorescent probe, we demonstrate the intracellular release of Ag(+) ions in living cells after nanoparticle internalization, showing that in-situ particle degradation is promoted by the acidic lysosomal environment. The activation of metallothioneins in response to AgNPs and the possibility to reverse the main toxic pathway by Ag(+) chelating agents demonstrate a cause/effect relationship between ions and cell death. We propose that endocytosed AgNPs are degraded in the lysosomes and the release of Ag(+) ions in the cytosol induces cell damages, while ions released in the cell culture medium play a negligible effect. These findings will be useful to develop safer-by-design nanoparticles and proper regulatory guidelines of AgNPs. From the clinical editor: The authors describe the toxic potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in human cancer cell lines. Cell death following the application of AgNPs is dose-dependent, and it is mostly due to Ag+ ions. Further in vivo studies should be performed to gain a comprehensive picture of AgNP-toxicity in mammals.

  16. Impact of solar UV radiation on toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles through photocatalytic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and photo-induced dissolution

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study investigated the impact of solar UV radiation on ZnO nanoparticle toxicity through photocatalytic ROS generation and photo-induced dissolution. Toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Daphnia magna was examined under laboratory light versus simulated solar UV radiatio...

  17. The Developmental Toxicity of Complex Silica-Embedded Nickel Nanoparticles Is Determined by Their Physicochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Sharlee; Najera, Michelle; Bai, Qing; Burton, Edward A.; Veser, Götz

    2016-01-01

    Complex engineered nanomaterials (CENs) are a rapidly developing class of structurally and compositionally complex materials that are expected to dominate the next generation of functional nanomaterials. The development of methods enabling rapid assessment of the toxicity risk associated with this type of nanomaterial is therefore critically important. We evaluated the toxicity of three differently structured nickel-silica nanomaterials as prototypical CENs: simple, surface-deposited Ni-SiO2 and hollow and non-hollow core-shell Ni@SiO2 materials (i.e., ~1–2 nm Ni nanoparticles embedded into porous silica shells with and without a central cavity, respectively). Zebrafish embryos were exposed to these CENs, and morphological (survival and malformations) and physiological (larval motility) endpoints were coupled with thorough characterization of physiochemical characteristics (including agglomeration, settling and nickel ion dissolution) to determine how toxicity differed between these CENs and equivalent quantities of Ni2+ salt (based on total Ni). Exposure to Ni2+ ions strongly compromised zebrafish larva viability, and surviving larvae showed severe malformations. In contrast, exposure to the equivalent amount of Ni CEN did not result in these abnormalities. Interestingly, exposure to Ni-SiO2 and hollow Ni@SiO2 provoked abnormalities of zebrafish larval motor function, indicating developmental toxicity, while non-hollow Ni@SiO2 showed no toxicity. Correlating these observations with physicochemical characterization of the CENs suggests that the toxicity of the Ni-SiO2 and hollow Ni@SiO2 material may result partly from an increased effective exposure at the bottom of the well due to rapid settling. Overall, our data suggest that embedding nickel NPs in a porous silica matrix may be a straightforward way to mitigate their toxicity without compromising their functional properties. At the same time, our results also indicate that it is critical to consider

  18. Toxicity of binary mixtures of metal oxide nanoparticles to Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ran; Wu, Junkang; Liu, Meiting; Zhu, Guangcan; Chen, Lianghui; Chang, Yan; Lu, Huijie

    2016-06-01

    Although the widely used metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) titanium dioxide NPs (n-TiO2), cerium dioxide NPs (n-CeO2), and zinc oxide NPs (n-ZnO) have been well known for their potential cytotoxicities to environmental organisms, their combined effects have seldom been investigated. In this study, the short-term binary effect of n-CeO2 and n-TiO2 or n-ZnO on a model ammonia oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosomonas europaea were evaluated based on the examinations of cells' physiological, metabolic, and transcriptional responses. The addition of n-TiO2 mitigated the negative effect of more toxic n-CeO2 and the binary toxicity (antagonistic toxicity) of n-TiO2 and n-CeO2 was generally lower than the single NPs induced one. While the n-CeO2/n-ZnO mixture exerted higher cytotoxicity (synergistic cytotoxicity) than that from single NPs. The increased addition of the less toxic n-CeO2 exaggerated the binary toxicity of n-CeO2/n-ZnO mixture although the solubility of n-ZnO was not significantly affected, which excluded the contribution of the dissolved Zn ions to the enhancement of the combined cytotoxicity. The cell membrane disturbances and NP internalizations were detected for all the NP impacted cultures and the electrostatic interactions among the two distinct NPs and the cells were expected to play a key role in mediating their direct contacts and the eventual binary nanotoxicity to the cells.

  19. Elemental copper nanoparticle toxicity to different trophic groups involved in anaerobic and anoxic wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Puyol, Daniel; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2015-04-15

    Elemental copper nanoparticles (Cu(0) NPs) are potentially inhibitory to the different key microbial trophic groups involved in biological wastewater treatment processes. Cu-based NPs are known to be toxic to methanogens at low concentrations. However, very little is known about the toxic effect of Cu(0) NPs on other microbial groups involved in either upper trophic levels of anaerobic digestion or anoxic nitrogen removal processes. This study evaluated the toxicity of Cu(0) NPs to glucose fermentation, syntrophic propionate oxidation and denitrification in shaken batch bioassays with soluble substrates. Batch experiments were also supplemented with CuCl2 to evaluate the inhibitory impact of soluble Cu(II) ions. Syntrophic propionate oxidation and glucose fermentation were the least and most inhibited processes with inhibition constant (Ki) values of 0.202 and 0.047 mM of added Cu(0) NPs, respectively. Further analyses revealed that the Ki values calculated as a function of the free soluble Cu concentration were <0.003 mM for every biological process tested and most of these Ki values were similar in order of magnitude regardless of whether the Cu source was CuCl2 or Cu(0) NPs. The results taken as a whole indicate that Cu(0) NPs are toxic to all the microbial processes studied. Therefore, Cu(0) NPs can potentially be an important inhibitor of anaerobic wastewater treatment processes that rely on these trophic groups. The evidence suggests that the inhibitory impact of Cu(0) NPs was mainly due to the release of toxic Cu(II) ions originating from the corrosion and dissolution of Cu(0) NPs.

  20. Evaluation of Alpha and Gamma Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticle Accumulation, Toxicity and Depuration in Artemia Salina Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Mehmet; Demir, Veysel; Arslan, Zikri; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O.; Bogatu, Corneliu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Artemia salina (crustacean filter feeders) larvae were used as a test model to investigate the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) on marine microorganisms. The uptake, toxicity and elimination of α-Al2O3 (50 nm and 3.5 μm) and γ-Al2O3 (5 nm and 0.4 μm) NPs were studied. Twenty-four and ninety-six hour exposures of different concentrations of Al2O3 NPs to Artemia larvae were conducted in a seawater medium. When suspended in water, Al2O3 NPs aggregated substantially with the sizes ranging from 6.3 nm to > 0.3 μm for spherical NPs, and from 250 to 756 nm for rod-shaped NPs. The phase contrast microscope images revealed that NPs deposited inside the guts as aggregates. ICP-MS analysis showed that large particles (3.5 μm α-Al2O3) were not taken up by Artemia, while fine NPs (0.4 μm γ-Al2O3) and ultra-fine NPs (5 nm γ-Al2O3 and 50 nm α-Al2O3) accumulated substantially. Differences in toxicity were detected as changing with NP size and morphology. The malondialdehyde (MDA) levels indicated that smaller γ-Al2O3 (5 nm) NPs were more toxic than larger γ-Al2O3 (0.4 μm) particulates in 96 h. The highest mortality was measured as 34% in 96 h for γ-Al2O3 NPs (5 nm) at 100 mg/L (LC50 > 100 mg/L). γ-Al2O3 NPs were more toxic than α-Al2O3 NPs at in all conditions. PMID:24753078

  1. Evaluation of alpha and gamma aluminum oxide nanoparticle accumulation, toxicity, and depuration in Artemia salina larvae.

    PubMed

    Ates, Mehmet; Demir, Veysel; Arslan, Zikri; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O; Bogatu, Corneliu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Artemia salina (crustacean filter feeders) larvae were used as a test model to investigate the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) on marine microorganisms. The uptake, toxicity, and elimination of α-Al2O3 (50 nm and 3.5 μm) and γ-Al2O3 (5 nm and 0.4 μm) NPs were studied. Twenty-four and ninety-six hour exposures of different concentrations of Al2O3 NPs to Artemia larvae were conducted in a seawater medium. When suspended in water, Al2O3 NPs aggregated substantially with the sizes ranging from 6.3 nm to >0.3 µm for spherical NPs and from 250 to 756 nm for rod-shaped NPs. The phase contrast microscope images showed that NPs deposited inside the guts as aggregates. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis showed that large particles (3.5 μm α-Al2O3) were not taken up by Artemia, whereas fine NPs (0.4 μm γ-Al2O3) and ultra-fine NPs (5 nm γ-Al2O3 and 50 nm α-Al2O3) accumulated substantially. Differences in toxicity were detected as changing with NP size and morphology. The malondialdehyde levels indicated that smaller γ-Al2O3 (5 nm) NPs were more toxic than larger γ-Al2O3 (0.4 µm) particulates in 96 h. The highest mortality was measured as 34% in 96 h for γ-Al2O3 NPs (5 nm) at 100 mg/L (LC50 > 100 mg/L). γ-Al2O3 NPs were more toxic than α-Al2O3 NPs at all conditions.

  2. Photo-induced toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under natural sunlight.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, C M; Alloy, M M; Hamilton, J; Verbeck, G F; Newton, K; Klaine, S J; Roberts, A P

    2015-02-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NP) are one of the most abundantly utilized nanoparticles in the world. Studies have demonstrated the ability of the anatase crystal of TiO2 NP to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a co-exposure likely to occur in aquatic ecosystems. The goal of this study was to examine the photo-induced toxicity of anatase TiO2 NP under natural sunlight to Daphnia magna. D. magna were exposed to a range of UVR intensities and anatase TiO2 concentrations in an outdoor exposure system using the sun as the source of UVR. Different UVR intensities were achieved using UVR opaque and transparent plastics. AnataseTiO2-NP demonstrated the reciprocal relationship seen in other phototoxic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at higher UVR treatments. The calculated 8h LC50 of anatase TiO2 NP was 139 ppb under full intensity ambient natural sunlight, 778 ppb under 50% natural sunlight, and >500 ppm under 10% natural sunlight. Mortality was also compared between animals allowed to accumulate a body burden of anatase TiO2 for 1h and organisms whose first exposure to anatase TiO2 aqueous suspensions occurred under UVR. A significantly greater toxic effect was observed in aqueous, low body burden suspensions than that of TiO2 1h body burdens, which is dissimilar from the model presented in PAHs. Anatase TiO2 presents a unique photo-induced toxic model that is different than that of established phototoxic compounds.

  3. The protein corona protects against size- and dose-dependent toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Docter, Dominic; Bantz, Christoph; Westmeier, Dana; Galla, Hajo J; Wang, Qiangbin; Kirkpatrick, James C; Nielsen, Peter; Maskos, Michael; Stauber, Roland H

    2014-01-01

    Besides the lung and skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the main targets for accidental exposure or biomedical applications of nanoparticles (NP). Biological responses to NP, including nanotoxicology, are caused by the interaction of the NP with cellular membranes and/or cellular entry. Here, the physico-chemical characteristics of NP are widely discussed as critical determinants, albeit the exact mechanisms remain to be resolved. Moreover, proteins associate with NP in physiological fluids, forming the protein corona potentially transforming the biological identity of the particle and thus, adding an additional level of complexity for the bio-nano responses. Here, we employed amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASP) and epithelial GI tract Caco-2 cells as a model to study the biological impact of particle size as well as of the protein corona. Caco-2 or mucus-producing HT-29 cells were exposed to thoroughly characterized, negatively charged ASP of different size in the absence or presence of proteins. Comprehensive experimental approaches, such as quantifying cellular metabolic activity, microscopic observation of cell morphology, and high-throughput cell analysis revealed a dose- and time-dependent toxicity primarily upon exposure with ASP30 (Ø = 30 nm). Albeit smaller (ASP20, Ø = 20 nm) or larger particles (ASP100; Ø = 100 nm) showed a similar zeta potential, they both displayed only low toxicity. Importantly, the adverse effects triggered by ASP30/ASP30L were significantly ameliorated upon formation of the protein corona, which we found was efficiently established on all ASP studied. As a potential explanation, corona formation reduced ASP30 cellular uptake, which was however not significantly affected by ASP surface charge in our model. Collectively, our study uncovers an impact of ASP size as well as of the protein corona on cellular toxicity, which might be relevant for processes at the nano-bio interface in general.

  4. The protein corona protects against size- and dose-dependent toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bantz, Christoph; Westmeier, Dana; Galla, Hajo J; Wang, Qiangbin; Kirkpatrick, James C; Nielsen, Peter; Maskos, Michael; Stauber, Roland H

    2014-01-01

    Summary Besides the lung and skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the main targets for accidental exposure or biomedical applications of nanoparticles (NP). Biological responses to NP, including nanotoxicology, are caused by the interaction of the NP with cellular membranes and/or cellular entry. Here, the physico-chemical characteristics of NP are widely discussed as critical determinants, albeit the exact mechanisms remain to be resolved. Moreover, proteins associate with NP in physiological fluids, forming the protein corona potentially transforming the biological identity of the particle and thus, adding an additional level of complexity for the bio–nano responses. Here, we employed amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASP) and epithelial GI tract Caco-2 cells as a model to study the biological impact of particle size as well as of the protein corona. Caco-2 or mucus-producing HT-29 cells were exposed to thoroughly characterized, negatively charged ASP of different size in the absence or presence of proteins. Comprehensive experimental approaches, such as quantifying cellular metabolic activity, microscopic observation of cell morphology, and high-throughput cell analysis revealed a dose- and time-dependent toxicity primarily upon exposure with ASP30 (Ø = 30 nm). Albeit smaller (ASP20, Ø = 20 nm) or larger particles (ASP100; Ø = 100 nm) showed a similar zeta potential, they both displayed only low toxicity. Importantly, the adverse effects triggered by ASP30/ASP30L were significantly ameliorated upon formation of the protein corona, which we found was efficiently established on all ASP studied. As a potential explanation, corona formation reduced ASP30 cellular uptake, which was however not significantly affected by ASP surface charge in our model. Collectively, our study uncovers an impact of ASP size as well as of the protein corona on cellular toxicity, which might be relevant for processes at the nano–bio interface in general. PMID:25247121

  5. Evaluation of drug loading, pharmacokinetic behavior, and toxicity of a cisplatin-containing hydrogel nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Marc P.; Keeler, Amanda W.; Perry, Jillian L.; Reuter, Kevin G.; Luft, J. Christopher; O’Neal, Sara K.; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a cytotoxic drug used as a first-line therapy for a wide variety of cancers. However, significant renal and neurological toxicities limits it clinical use. It has been documented that drug toxicities can be mitigated through nanoparticle formulation, while simultaneously increasing tumor accumulation through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Circulation persistence is a key characteristic for exploiting this effect, and to that end we have developed long-circulating, PEGylated, polymeric hydrogels using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®) platform and complexed cisplatin into the particles (PRINT-Platin). Sustained release was demonstrated, and drug loading correlated to surface PEG density. A PEG Mushroom conformation showed the best compromise between particle pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and drug loading (16 wt %). While the PK profile of PEG Brush was superior, the loading was poor (2 wt %). Conversely, the drug loading in non-PEGylated particles was better (20 wt %), but the PK was not desirable. We also showed comparable cytotoxicity to cisplatin in several cancer cell lines (non-small cell lung, A549; ovarian, SKOV-3; breast, MDA-MB-468) and a higher MTD in mice (10 mg/kg versus 5 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic profiles of drug in plasma, tumor, and kidney indicate improved exposure in the blood and tumor accumulation, with concurrent renal protection, when cisplatin was formulated in a nanoparticle. PK parameters were markedly improved: a 16.4-times higher area-under-the-curve (AUC), a reduction in clearance (CL) by a factor of 11.2, and a 4.20-times increase in the volume of distribution (Vd). Additionally, non-small cell lung and ovarian tumor AUC was at least twice that of cisplatin in both models. These findings suggest the potential for PRINT-Platin to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity compared to current cisplatin therapies. PMID:25744827

  6. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: some aspects of toxicity/focus on the development.

    PubMed

    Rollerova, E; Tulinska, J; Liskova, A; Kuricova, M; Kovriznych, J; Mlynarcikova, A; Kiss, A; Scsukova, S

    2015-04-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles belong to the most widely manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) on a global scale because of their photocatalytic properties and the related surface effects. TiO2 NPs are in the top five NPs used in consumer products. Ultrafi