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Sample records for nanophotonics active photonic

  1. Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Paras N.

    2004-03-01

    The only comprehensive treatment of nanophotonics currently available Photonics is an all-encompassing optical science and technology which has impacted a diverse range of fields, from information technology to health care. Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizes light-matter interactions on the nanoscale, where researchers are discovering new phenomena and developing technologies that go well beyond what is possible with conventional photonics and electronics. These new technologies could include efficient solar power generation, high-bandwidth and high-speed communications, high-capacity data storage, and flexible- and high-contrast displays. In addition, nanophotonics will continue to impact biomedical technologies by providing new and powerful diagnostic techniques, as well as light-guided and activated therapies. Nanophotonics provides the only available comprehensive treatment of this exciting, multidisciplinary field, offering a wide range of topics covering: * Foundations * Materials * Applications * Theory * Fabrication Nanophotonics introduces students to important and timely concepts and provides scientists and engineers with a cutting-edge reference. The book is intended for anyone who wishes to learn about light-matter interactions on the nanoscale, as well as applications of photonics for nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology. Written by an acknowledged leader in the field, this text provides an essential resource for those interested in the future of materials science and engineering, nanotechnology, and photonics.

  2. Nano-photonics: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    2010-04-01

    Nanotech is at the scale of 10-9 meters, located at the mesocopic transition phase, which can take both classical mechanics (CM) and quantum mechanics (QM) descriptions bridging ten orders of magnitude phenomena, between the microscopic world of a single atom at 10-10 meters with the macroscopic world at meters. However, QM principles aid the understanding of any unusual property at the nanotech level. The other major difference between nano-photonics and other forms of optics is that the nano-scale is not very 'hands on'. For the most part, we will not be able to see the components with our naked eyes, but will be required to use some nanotech imaging tools, as follows:

  3. Silicon and polymer nanophotonic devices based on photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Jiang, Yongqiang; Gu, Lanlan; Wang, Li; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Ray T.

    2006-02-01

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) provide a promising nanophotonic platform for developing novel optoelectronic devices with significantly reduced device size and power consumption. Silicon nanophotonics is anticipated to play a pivotal role in the future nano-system integration owing to the maturity of sub-micron silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An ultra-compact silicon modulator was experimentally demonstrated based on silicon photonic crystal waveguides. Modulation operation was achieved by carrier injection into an 80-micron-long silicon PhC waveguide of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) structure. The driving current to obtain a phase shift of pi across the active region was as low as 0.15 mA, owing to slow light group velocity in PhC waveguides. The modulation depth was 92%. The electrode between the two waveguide arms of the MZI structure was routed to the space outside the MZI. In real devices, this planarized routing design would be essential to integrating the silicon modulator with electrical driving circuitry on a single silicon chip. For laboratory test, this routing scheme also eliminated the need of placing a bulky pad between the two arms and gave our modulator a distinctive slim profile and a much smaller footprint. Polymeric photonic crystals were designed for superprism based laser beam steering applications, and were fabricated by nano-imprint and other techniques.

  4. Nano-photonic Light Trapping In Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Dennis M., Jr.

    Over the last several decades there have been significant advances in the study and understanding of light behavior in nanoscale geometries. Entire fields such as those based on photonic crystals, plasmonics and metamaterials have been developed, accelerating the growth of knowledge related to nanoscale light manipulation. Coupled with recent interest in cheap, reliable renewable energy, a new field has blossomed, that of nanophotonic solar cells. In this thesis, we examine important properties of thin-film solar cells from a nanophotonics perspective. We identify key differences between nanophotonic devices and traditional, thick solar cells. We propose a new way of understanding and describing limits to light trapping and show that certain nanophotonic solar cell designs can have light trapping limits above the so called ray-optic or ergodic limit. We propose that a necessary requisite to exceed the traditional light trapping limit is that the active region of the solar cell must possess a local density of optical states (LDOS) higher than that of the corresponding, bulk material. Additionally, we show that in addition to having an increased density of states, the absorber must have an appropriate incoupling mechanism to transfer light from free space into the optical modes of the device. We outline a portfolio of new solar cell designs that have potential to exceed the traditional light trapping limit and numerically validate our predictions for select cases. We emphasize the importance of thinking about light trapping in terms of maximizing the optical modes of the device and efficiently coupling light into them from free space. To further explore these two concepts, we optimize patterns of superlattices of air holes in thin slabs of Si and show that by adding a roughened incoupling layer the total absorbed current can be increased synergistically. We suggest that the addition of a random scattering surface to a periodic patterning can increase incoupling by

  5. Assembly of hybrid photonic architectures from nanophotonic constituents.

    PubMed

    Benson, Oliver

    2011-12-08

    The assembly of hybrid nanophotonic devices from different fundamental photonic entities--such as single molecules, nanocrystals, semiconductor quantum dots, nanowires and metal nanoparticles--can yield functionalities that exceed those of the individual subunits. Combining these photonic elements requires nanometre-scale fabrication precision and potentially involves a material diversity that is incompatible with standard nanotechnological processes. Although merging these different systems on a single hybrid platform is at present challenging, it promises improved performance and novel devices. Particularly rapid progress is seen in the combination of plasmonic-dielectric constituents with quantum emitters that can be assembled on demand into fundamental model systems for future optical elements.

  6. Manipulating spatial light fields for micro- and nano-photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiangsheng; Liu, Yikun; Zhang, Mudong; Zhou, Jianying; Wong, Kam Sing

    2012-04-01

    Spatial properties of a light field, including its amplitude, polarization and phase distribution, can be modulated via spatial light modulators, digital mirror devices, optical mask, waveplates or diffraction optic elements. In conjunction with additional optical components, e.g., optical lenses or imaging systems, rich micro- and nano-photonic applications can be demonstrated. This paper reviews various useful techniques applied for the spatial light field modulations. Important applications, most notably, optical lithography for the fabrication of functional photonic crystals, and light field conversion and transmission through material system, are discussed. Key issues in the control of optical field, including phase-locking, phase distribution regulation and adaptive optical field synthesizing, are described in detail. The applications of light field modulation to enhance light-matter interaction are demonstrated for some fundamental optical processes, such as light diffraction in liquid crystal, beam combining in nonlinear optical crystal and light field transmission through a tapered nano-tip. It is anticipated that the wide-spread application of light field modulation be expected in the near future, especially in view of a rapid advancement in the nano-photonic research and applications.

  7. Photon-based and classical descriptions in nanophotonics: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The centrality of the photon concept in modern physics is strongly evident in wide spheres of photonics and nanophotonics. Despite the resilience and persistence of earlier classical representations, there are numerous optical features and phenomena that only truly photon-based descriptions of theory can properly address. It is crucial to cast theory in terms of observables, and in this respect the quantum theory of light engages most directly and pragmatically with experiment. No other theory adequately reconciles the discreteness in energy of optical quanta, with their characteristic quantum mechanical delocalization in space. Examples of the distinctiveness of a photonic representation are to be found in nonclassical optical correlations; intensity fluctuations and phase; polarization, spin, and information content; measures of optical chirality; near-field interactions; and plasmonics. Increasingly, links between these fundamental properties and features are proving significant in the context of nanoscale interactions. Yet, even as new technologies are being built on the framework of modern photonics, a number of difficult questions surrounding the nature of the photon still remain. Both in its flourishing applications and in matters of fundamental entity, the photon is still a subject very much at the heart of current research.

  8. Photon manipulation in silicon nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaari, Ali Wanis

    2011-12-01

    CD8+ T cells are the branch of the adaptive immune system responsible for recognizing and killing tumor cells or cells infected with intracellular pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes (LM). However, when CD8+ T cells target our own tissues, they can cause autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis. For CD8+ T cells to fulfill these functions, the T cell receptors (TCRs) on CD8+ T cells must recognize pathogens or antigens presented on the surface of target cells. TCR ligation triggers multiple signaling pathways that lead to the activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The goal of our research is to define the TCR-proximal signaling events that regulate CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity. To accomplish this goal, we are focusing on an adaptor protein Gads, which is critical for optimal TCR-mediated calcium mobilization. We reported the first analysis of the function of Gads in peripheral naive CD8+ T cells. To examine the function of Gads in CD8+ T cell mediated immune responses, we crossed Gads-/- mice with mice expressing an MHC class I-restricted transgenic TCR recognizing ovalbumin (OVA). The transgenic mice are called ovalbumin-specific T cell receptor-major histocompatibility complex class I restricted (OT-I) mice. We investigated the effect of Gads on the proliferation of CD8+ T cells following stimulation with peptide antigen in vivo and in vitro. We stimulated splenocytes from Gads+/+ OT-I and Gads -/- OT-I mice with the peptide agonist. The experiments revealed that Gads is required for optimal proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The regulation of Gads is most evident at the early time points of proliferation. Then we demonstrated that Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have impaired TCR-mediated exit from G0 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have delayed expression of c-myc and the activation markers CD69 and CD25, upon stimulation with peptide antigen. Next, we investigated how Gads affects CD8+ T cell

  9. Photonic Crystals from Order to Disorder: Perturbative Methods in Nanophotonics

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Steven G. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric structures in which light can behave much differently than in a homogeneous medium. This talk gives an overview of some of the interesting properties and applications of these media, from switching in subwavelength microcavities to slow-light devices, to guiding light in air. However, some of the most interesting and challenging problems occur when the periodicity is disturbed, either by design or by inevitable fabrication imperfections. The talk focuses especially on small perturbations that have important effects, from slow-light tapers to surface roughness disorder, and will show that many classic perturbative approaches must be rethought for high-contrast nanophotonics. The combination of strong periodicity with large field discontinuities at interfaces causes standard methods to fail, but succumbs to new generalizations, while some problems remain open.

  10. Nanophotonics Based on Semiconductor-Photonic Crystal/Quantum Dot and Metal-/Semiconductor-Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Kiyoshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Ikeda, Naoki; Tsuya, Daiju; Koide, Yasuo; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Nobuhiko; Ohkouchi, Shunsuke; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Daisuke; Matsui, Takayuki; Miura, Atsushi; Fujikawa, Hisayoshi; Sato, Kazuo

    This paper reviews our recent activities on nanophotonics based on a photonic crystal (PC)/quantum dot (QD)-combined structure for an all-optical device and a metal/semiconductor composite structure using surface plasmon (SP) and negative refractive index material (NIM). The former structure contributes to an ultrafast signal processing component by virtue of new PC design and QD selective-area-growth technologies, while the latter provides a new RGB color filter with a high precision and optical beam-steering device with a wide steering angle.

  11. An inquiry-based course in nano-photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbridge, Christine; Calvert, Jodi; Donnelly, Judith; Garofano, Jacquelynn; Massa, Nicholas

    2010-08-01

    We developed a curriculum to introduce nanotechnology and photonics concepts to community college students enrolled in a program designed to attract and retain students in technology associate degree programs. Working with the Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, and the PHOTON projects, funded by the Advanced Technological Education program of NSF, we developed hands-on, inquiry-based activities to address the course goals: improve critical thinking, introduce science and technology concepts common to technology programs and provide opportunity to practice math skills in context.

  12. Nanophotonic ensembles for targeted multi-photon photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Charles W.; Meng, Fanqing; Gong, Aijun; Drobizhev, Mikhail A.; Karotki, Aliaksandr; Rebane, Aleksander, II

    2004-06-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the application of new technologies for the treatment of cancerous tumors over the past decade, but for the most part, the treatment of most tumors still involves some combination of invasive surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which involves the activation of an administered compound with laser light followed by a series of events leading to programmed cell death of the tumor, has been proposed as a noninvasive alternative treatment to replace the standard surgery/chemotherapy/radiation protocol. However, currently approved PDT agents operate in the Visible portion of the spectrum, and laser light in this region cannot penetrate the skin more than a few millimeters. Two-photon irradiation using more highly penetrating Near-infrared (NIR) light in the tissue transparency window (700-1000 nm) has been proposed for the treatment of subcutaneous tumors, but most porphyrins exhibit extremely small two-photon cross-sections. Classical PDT also suffers from the lengthy time necessary for accumulation at the tumor site, a relative lack of discrimination between healthy and diseased tissue, particularly at the tumor margins, and difficulty in clearing from the system in a reasonable amount of time. We have recently discovered a new design paradigm for porphyrins with greatly enhanced two-photon cross-sections, and are now proposing a nano-ensemble that would also incorporate small molecule targeting agents, and possibly one-photon NIR imaging agents along with these porphyrins in one therapeutic agent. Thus these ensembles would incorporate targeting/imaging/PDT functions in one therapeutic agent, and hold the promise of single-session outpatient treatment of a large variety of subcutaneous tumors.

  13. Wide Bandgap III-Nitride Micro- and Nano-Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-05

    AND DATES COVERED Final Report 10/2003 – 10/2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Wide Bandgap III-Nitride Micro - and Nano -Photonics 5. FUNDING NUMBERS...device issues and to explore potential applications of III-nitrides for UV micro - and nano -photonic devices. The KSU team has achieved 1. n-type...Award No: DAAD19-03-1-0337 Project Title: Wide Bandgap III-Nitride Micro - and Nano -Photonics PI Name: Hongxing Jiang & Jingyu Lin PI Address

  14. Optical Assembly and Characterization System for Nano-Photonics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Unlimited Final Report: Optical Assembly and Characterization System for Nano -Photonics Research The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this...reviewed journals: Final Report: Optical Assembly and Characterization System for Nano -Photonics Research Report Title With this equipment funding support...Assembly and Characterization System for Nano -Photonics Research PI: Prof. Weidong Zhou, University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) 500 S. Cooper St

  15. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-11-09

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ~λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (<λ0/2.5). Our experiments show a transmission efficiency >–2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. In conclusion, the nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics.

  16. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ~λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (<λ0/2.5). Our experiments show a transmission efficiency >-2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. The nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics.

  17. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-11-09

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ∼λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (<λ0/2.5). Our experiments show a transmission efficiency >-2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. The nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics.

  18. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ∼λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (<λ0/2.5). Our experiments show a transmission efficiency >−2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. The nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics. PMID:27827391

  19. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking

    DOE PAGES

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-11-09

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ~λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (<λ0/2.5). Our experiments show a transmission efficiency >–2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better designmore » algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. In conclusion, the nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics.« less

  20. Tuning the photon statistics of a strongly coupled nanophotonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dory, Constantin; Fischer, Kevin A.; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Sarmiento, Tomas; Rundquist, Armand; Zhang, Jingyuan L.; Kelaita, Yousif; Sapra, Neil V.; Vučković, Jelena

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of single- and multiphoton emission from detuned strongly coupled systems based on the quantum-dot-photonic-crystal resonator platform. Transmitting light through such systems can generate a range of nonclassical states of light with tunable photon counting statistics due to the nonlinear ladder of hybridized light-matter states. By controlling the detuning between emitter and resonator, the transmission can be tuned to strongly enhance either single- or two-photon emission processes. Despite the strongly dissipative nature of these systems, we find that by utilizing a self-homodyne interference technique combined with frequency filtering we are able to find a strong two-photon component of the emission in the multiphoton regime. In order to explain our correlation measurements, we propose rate equation models that capture the dominant processes of emission in both the single- and multiphoton regimes. These models are then supported by quantum-optical simulations that fully capture the frequency filtering of emission from our solid-state system.

  1. 2D materials for photon conversion and nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.

    2015-09-01

    The field of two-dimensional (2D) materials has the potential to enable unique applications across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. While 2D-layered materials hold promise for next-generation photon-conversion intrinsic limitations and challenges exist that shall be overcome. Here we discuss the intrinsic limitations as well as application opportunities of this new class of materials, and is sponsored by the NSF program Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program, which links to the President's Materials Genome Initiative. We present general material-related details for photon conversion, and show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling MoS2/graphene/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for solar absorption up to 90%.

  2. A novel nano-photonics biosensor concept for rapid molecular diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klunder, Dion J. W.; van Herpen, Maarten M. J. W.; Kolesnychenko, Aleksey; Hornix, Eefje; Kahya, Nicoletta; de Boer, Ruth; Stapert, Henk

    2008-04-01

    We present a novel nano-photonics biosensor concept that offers an ultra-high surface specificity and excellent suppression of background signals due to the sample fluid on top of the biosensor. In our contribution, we will briefly discuss the operation principle and fabrication of the biosensor, followed by a more detailed discussion on the experimentally determined performance parameters. Recent results on detection of fluorescently labeled molecules in a highly fluorescent background will be shown, and we will give an outlook on real-time detection of bio-molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

  3. Nano-photonic chemical sensor using rare-earth upconversion phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Darayas N.; Blockmon, Avery; Ochieng, Vanesa; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Darwish, Abdalla M.; Sarkisov, Avedik S.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the paper was to demonstrate feasibility of a chemical (ammonia) sensor using dye-doped polymer nanocomposite with upconversion phosphor nano-particles. The micro-crystalline powder of upconversion rare-earth phosphor NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ was synthesized using a simple wet process followed up by baking in open air. The powder was reduced into nano-colloid with 100-nm nano-particles using the ball milling process. The nano-colloid was added to the solution of polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) known as PMMA. Additionally, a pH indicator dye (Phenol Red or Bromothymol Blue) was dissolved in polymer solution. The dye-doped polymer nanocomposite films were deposited on substrates using the dipping process followed by baking in order to evaporate the solvent. The deposited nano-photonic sensor film had bright green upconversion fluorescence with a spectral peak at 540 nm attributed to the nano-photonic rare-earth phosphor pumped with a 980 nm infrared diode laser. The spectrum of green emission matched the absorption band of the indicator dye exposed to ammonia. When the film was exposed to ammonia, it demonstrated an optical response in the form of the drop of intensity of green radiation measured with a silicon photodiode power meter. The sensitivity of the developed chemical sensor was close to 0.4% ammonia in air, and the response time was close to 5 minutes.

  4. Quantum state-controlled directional spontaneous emission of photons into a nanophotonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Mitsch, R.; Sayrin, C.; Albrecht, B.; Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2014-01-01

    The spin of light in subwavelength-diameter waveguides can be orthogonal to the propagation direction of the photons because of the strong transverse confinement. This transverse spin changes sign when the direction of propagation is reversed. Using this effect, we demonstrate the directional spontaneous emission of photons by laser-trapped caesium atoms into an optical nanofibre and control their propagation direction by the excited state of the atomic emitters. In particular, we tune the spontaneous emission into the counter-propagating guided modes from symmetric to strongly asymmetric, where more than % of the optical power is launched into one or the other direction. We expect our results to have important implications for research in quantum nanophotonics and for implementations of integrated optical signal processing in the quantum regime. PMID:25502565

  5. Nano-photonic light trapping near the Lambertian limit in organic solar cell architectures.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Rana; Timmons, Erik

    2013-09-09

    A critical step to achieving higher efficiency solar cells is the broad band harvesting of solar photons. Although considerable progress has recently been achieved in improving the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells, these cells still do not absorb upto ~50% of the solar spectrum. We have designed and developed an organic solar cell architecture that can boost the absorption of photons by 40% and the photo-current by 50% for organic P3HT-PCBM absorber layers of typical device thicknesses. Our solar cell architecture is based on all layers of the solar cell being patterned in a conformal two-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal architecture. This results in very strong diffraction of photons- that increases the photon path length in the absorber layer, and plasmonic light concentration near the patterned organic-metal cathode interface. The absorption approaches the Lambertian limit. The simulations utilize a rigorous scattering matrix approach and provide bounds of the fundamental limits of nano-photonic light absorption in periodically textured organic solar cells. This solar cell architecture has the potential to increase the power conversion efficiency to 10% for single band gap organic solar cells utilizing long-wavelength absorbers.

  6. Ultracompact photonic-waveguide circuits in Si-pillar photonic-crystal structures for integrated nanophotonic switches.

    PubMed

    Tokushima, Masatoshi; Olmos, J J Vegas; Kitayama, Ken-Ichi

    2010-03-01

    Highly integrated optical device technology based on square-lattice Si-pillar photonic-crystal-(PC) waveguides is described. The Si-pillar PC waveguides are now ready to use, since efficient optical coupling structures to Si-wire waveguides have been devised. Nanophotonic switches using the Si-pillar-PC waveguides were experimentally demonstrated. The nanophotonic switches make use of two of the features of Si-pillar photonic crystal waveguides. One is the property of slow-light and the other is the usability of zero-radius 90 degrees bends, both of which enable waveguide-based optical devices to be greatly miniaturized. Even apart from the cut-off wavelength, the group index of the pillar-PC waveguides was about 7.8, which was about twice that of a Si-wire waveguide for the entire C-band of telecommunications wavelengths. The 3-dB couplers we fabricated were only 3.2-microm long thanks to the 90 degrees sharp bends, and they operated throughout the entire C-band. Waveguide-cross operation was also demonstrated in the entire C-band. Asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs) were configured by using the 3-dB couplers in an area of 13.2 x 37.2 microm. An MZI with a Si-wire heater successfully operated with an extinction ratio of about 20 dB at a heating power of 17 mW. It is strongly suggested that Si-pillar PC photonic-waveguide technology should help us to achieve densely integrated optical-matrix switches demanded for future photonic-telecommunication systems.

  7. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W.H.P.; Schuck, C.; Minaeva, O.; Li, M.; Goltsman, G.N.; Sergienko, A.V.; Tang, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  8. Atomic-scale photonic hybrids for mid-infrared and terahertz nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Tischler, Joseph G.; Glembocki, Orest J.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.; Reinecke, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The field of nanophotonics focuses on the ability to confine light to nanoscale dimensions, typically much smaller than the wavelength of light. The goal is to develop light-based technologies that are impossible with traditional optics. Subdiffractional confinement can be achieved using either surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) or surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). SPPs can provide a gate-tunable, broad-bandwidth response, but suffer from high optical losses; whereas SPhPs offer a relatively low-loss, crystal-dependent optical response, but only over a narrow spectral range, with limited opportunities for active tunability. Here, motivated by the recent results from monolayer graphene and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures, we discuss the potential of electromagnetic hybrids -- materials incorporating mixtures of SPPs and SPhPs -- for overcoming the limitations of the individual polaritons. Furthermore, we also propose a new type of atomic-scale hybrid the crystalline hybrid -- where mixtures of two or more atomic-scale (~3 nm or less) polar dielectric materials lead to the creation of a new material resulting from hybridized optic phonon behaviour of the constituents, potentially allowing direct control over the dielectric function. These atomic-scale hybrids expand the toolkit of materials for mid-infrared to terahertz nanophotonics and could enable the creation of novel actively tunable, yet low-loss optics at the nanoscale.

  9. Photonic Band Gap Structures as a Gateway to Nano-Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    FRITZ, IAN J.; GOURLEY, PAUL L.; HAMMONS, G.; HIETALA, VINCENT M.; JONES, ERIC D.; KLEM, JOHN F.; KURTZ, SHARON L.; LIN, SHAWN-YU; LYO, SUNGKWUN K.; VAWTER, GREGORY A.; WENDT, JOEL R.

    1999-08-01

    This LDRD project explored the fundamental physics of a new class of photonic materials, photonic bandgap structures (PBG), and examine its unique properties for the design and implementation of photonic devices on a nano-meter length scale for the control and confinement of light. The low loss, highly reflective and quantum interference nature of a PBG material makes it one of the most promising candidates for realizing an extremely high-Q resonant cavity, >10,000, for optoelectronic applications and for the exploration of novel photonic physics, such as photonic localization, tunneling and modification of spontaneous emission rate. Moreover, the photonic bandgap concept affords us with a new opportunity to design and tailor photonic properties in very much the same way we manipulate, or bandgap engineer, electronic properties through modern epitaxy.

  10. Nanophotonic force microscopy: Characterizing particle–surface interactions using near-field photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Schein, Perry; Kang, Pilgyu; O’Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-01-27

    Direct measurements of particle–surface interactions are important for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-Newton scale interaction forces on submicrometer particles due to signal detection limits and thermal noise. In this paper, we present a new technique for making measurements in this regime, which we refer to as nanophotonic force microscopy. Using a photonic crystal resonator, we generate a strongly localized region of exponentially decaying, near-field light that allows us to confine small particles close to a surface. From the statistical distribution of the light intensity scattered by the particle we are able to map out the potential well of the trap and directly quantify the repulsive force between the nanoparticle and the surface. Finally, as shown in this Letter, our technique is not limited by thermal noise, and therefore, we are able to resolve interaction forces smaller than 1 pN on dielectric particles as small as 100 nm in diameter.

  11. Nanophotonic force microscopy: Characterizing particle–surface interactions using near-field photonics

    DOE PAGES

    Schein, Perry; Kang, Pilgyu; O’Dell, Dakota; ...

    2015-01-27

    Direct measurements of particle–surface interactions are important for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-Newton scale interaction forces on submicrometer particles due to signal detection limits and thermal noise. In this paper, we present a new technique for making measurements in this regime, which we refer to as nanophotonic force microscopy. Using a photonic crystal resonator, we generate a strongly localized region of exponentially decaying, near-field light that allows us to confine small particles close to a surface. From the statistical distribution of the light intensity scatteredmore » by the particle we are able to map out the potential well of the trap and directly quantify the repulsive force between the nanoparticle and the surface. Finally, as shown in this Letter, our technique is not limited by thermal noise, and therefore, we are able to resolve interaction forces smaller than 1 pN on dielectric particles as small as 100 nm in diameter.« less

  12. LSI On-Chip Optical Interconnection with Si Nano-Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikata, Junichi; Nishi, Kenichi; Gomyo, Akiko; Ushida, Jun; Ishi, Tsutomu; Yukawa, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Daisuke; Nakada, Masafumi; Shimizu, Takanori; Kinoshita, Masao; Nose, Koichi; Mizuno, Masayuki; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Yamada, Koji; Itabashi, Seiichi; Ohashi, Keishi

    LSI on-chip optical interconnections are discussed from the viewpoint of a comparison between optical and electrical interconnections. Based on a practical prediction of our optical device development, optical interconnects will have an advantage over electrical interconnects within a chip that has an interconnect length less than about 10mm at the hp32-22nm technology node. Fundamental optical devices and components used in interconnections have also been introduced that are small enough to be placed on top of a Si LSI and that can be fabricated using methods compatible with CMOS processes. A SiON waveguide showed a low propagation loss around 0.3dB/cm at a wavelength of 850nm, and excellent branching characteristics were achieved for MMI (multimode interference) branch structures. A Si nano-photodiode showed highly enhanced speed and efficiency with a surface plasmon antenna. By combining our Si nano-photonic devices with the advanced TIA-less optical clock distribution circuits, clock distribution above 10GHz can be achieved with a small footprint on an LSI chip.

  13. Efficient and low-noise single-photon-level frequency conversion interfaces using silicon nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Davanço, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-06-01

    Optical frequency conversion has applications ranging from tunable light sources to telecommunications-band interfaces for quantum information science. Here, we demonstrate efficient, low-noise frequency conversion on a nanophotonic chip through four-wave-mixing Bragg scattering in compact (footprint <0.5 × 10-4 cm2) Si3N4 microring resonators. We investigate three frequency conversion configurations: spectral translation over a few nanometres within the 980 nm band; upconversion from 1,550 nm to 980 nm and downconversion from 980 nm to 1,550 nm. With conversion efficiencies ranging from 25% for the first process to >60% for the last two processes, a signal conversion bandwidth of >1 GHz, a required continuous-wave pump power of <60 mW and background noise levels between a few femtowatts and a few picowatts, these devices are suitable for quantum frequency conversion of single-photon states from InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Simulations based on coupled mode equations and the Lugiato-Lefever equation are used to model device performance, and show quantitative agreement with measurements.

  14. Impact of Atomic Layer Deposition to NanoPhotonic Structures and Devices: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Muhammad Rizwan; Ali, Rizwan; Khan, Mohammad Bilal; Turunen, Jari; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-10-01

    We review the significance of optical thin films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) method to fabricate nanophotonic devices and structures. ALD is a versatile technique to deposit functional coatings on reactive surfaces with conformal growth of compound materials, precise thickness control capable of angstrom resolution and coverage of high aspect ratio nanostructures using wide range of materials. ALD has explored great potential in the emerging fields of photonics, plasmonics, nano-biotechnology, and microelectronics. ALD technique uses sequential reactive chemical reactions to saturate a surface with a monolayer by pulsing of a first precursor (metal alkoxides or covalent halides), followed by reaction with second precursor molecules such as water to form the desired compound coatings. The targeted thickness of the desired compound material is controlled by the number of ALD cycles of precursor molecules that ensures the self limiting nature of reactions. The conformal growth and filling of TiO2 and Al2O3 optical material on nanostructures and their resulting optical properties have been described. The low temperature ALD-growth on various replicated sub-wavelength polymeric gratings is discussed.

  15. Nano-photonic organic solar cell architecture for advanced light management utilizing dual photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2015-09-01

    Organic solar cells have rapidly increasing efficiencies, but typically absorb less than half of the incident solar spectrum. To increase broadband light absorption, we rigorously design experimentally realizable solar cell architectures based on dual photonic crystals. Our optimized architecture consists of a polymer microlens at the air-glass interface, coupled with a photonic-plasmonic crystal at the metal cathode. The microlens focuses light on the periodic nanostructure that generates strong light diffraction. Waveguiding modes and surface plasmon modes together enhance long wavelength absorption in P3HT-PCBM. The architecture has a period of 500 nm, with absorption and photocurrent enhancement of 49% and 58%, respectively.

  16. Diamond nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Beha, Katja; Fedder, Helmut; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen-vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon-vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition.

  17. Diamond nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Beha, Katja; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition. PMID:23365803

  18. Photonics and Nanophotonics and Information and Communication Technologies in Modern Food Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapulova, Olha; Sherstiuk, Valentyn; Shvalagin, Vitaliy; Kukhta, Aleksander

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of the problem of conjunction of information and communication technologies (ICT) with packaging industry and food production was made. The perspective of combining the latest advances of nanotechnology, including nanophotonics, and ICT for creating modern smart packaging was shown. There were investigated luminescent films with zinc oxide nanoparticles, which change luminescence intensity as nano-ZnO interacts with decay compounds of food products, for active and intelligent packaging. High luminescent transparent films were obtained from colloidal suspension of ZnO and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The influence of molecular mass, concentration of nano-ZnO, and film thickness on luminescent properties of films was studied in order to optimize the content of the compositions. The possibility of covering the obtained films with polyvinyl alcohol was considered for eliminating water soluble properties of PVP. The luminescent properties of films with different covers were studied. The insoluble in water composition based on ZnO stabilized with colloidal silicon dioxide and PVP in polymethylmethacrylate was developed, and the luminescent properties of films were investigated. The compositions are non-toxic, safe, and suitable for applying to the inner surface of active and intelligent packaging by printing techniques, such as screen printing, flexography, inkjet, and pad printing.

  19. Photonics and nanophotonics and information and communication technologies in modern food packaging.

    PubMed

    Sarapulova, Olha; Sherstiuk, Valentyn; Shvalagin, Vitaliy; Kukhta, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the problem of conjunction of information and communication technologies (ICT) with packaging industry and food production was made. The perspective of combining the latest advances of nanotechnology, including nanophotonics, and ICT for creating modern smart packaging was shown. There were investigated luminescent films with zinc oxide nanoparticles, which change luminescence intensity as nano-ZnO interacts with decay compounds of food products, for active and intelligent packaging. High luminescent transparent films were obtained from colloidal suspension of ZnO and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The influence of molecular mass, concentration of nano-ZnO, and film thickness on luminescent properties of films was studied in order to optimize the content of the compositions. The possibility of covering the obtained films with polyvinyl alcohol was considered for eliminating water soluble properties of PVP. The luminescent properties of films with different covers were studied. The insoluble in water composition based on ZnO stabilized with colloidal silicon dioxide and PVP in polymethylmethacrylate was developed, and the luminescent properties of films were investigated. The compositions are non-toxic, safe, and suitable for applying to the inner surface of active and intelligent packaging by printing techniques, such as screen printing, flexography, inkjet, and pad printing.

  20. Nanophotonics: materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Uriel; Tsai, Chia-Ho; Nezhad, M.; Nakagawa, Wataru; Chen, C.-H.; Tetz, Kevin A.; Pang, L.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2004-07-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous applications areas, including communications, information processing, and data storage. However, as optical technology develops, it is evident that there is a growing need to develop reliable photonic integration technologies. This will include the development of passive as well as active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, switching fabrics that can be controlled either electrically or optically, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic chips. Our long-range goal is to develop a range of photonic nanostructures including artificially birefringent and resonant devices, photonic crystals, and photonic crystals with defects to tailor spectral filters, and nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities, to facilitate on-chip system integration through compatible materials and fabrication processes. The design of artificial nanostructured materials, PCs and integrated photonic systems is one of the most challenging tasks as it not only involves the accurate solution of electromagnetic optics equations, but also the need to incorporate the material and quantum physics equations. Near-field interactions in artificial nanostructured materials provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Furthermore, near-field optical devices facilitate miniaturization, and simultaneously enhance multifunctionality, greatly increasing the functional complexity per unit volume of the photonic system. Finally and most importantly, nanophotonics may enable easier integration with other nanotechnologies: electronics, magnetics, mechanics, chemistry, and biology.

  1. Nanophotonics for information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhad, M.; Abashin, M.; Ikeda, K.; Pang, L.; Kim, H. C.; Levy, U.; Tetz, K.; Rokitski, R.; Fainman, Y.

    2007-02-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous applications areas, including communications, information processing, and data storage. However, as optical technology develops, it is evident that there is a growing need to develop reliable photonic integration technologies. This will include the development of passive as well as active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, switching fabrics that can be controlled either electrically or optically, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic chips. Our long-range goal is to develop a range of photonic nanostructures including artificially birefringent and resonant devices, photonic crystals, and photonic crystals with defects to tailor spectral filters, and nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities, to facilitate on-chip system integration through compatible materials and fabrication processes. The design of artificial nanostructured materials, PCs and integrated photonic systems is one of the most challenging tasks as it not only involves the accurate solution of electromagnetic optics equations, but also the need to incorporate the material and quantum physics equations. Near-field interactions in artificial nanostructured materials provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Recently, the inclusion of surface plasmon photonics in this area has opened up a host of new possibilities Finally and most importantly, nanophotonics may enable easier integration with other nanotechnologies: electronics, magnetics, mechanics, chemistry, and biology. We will address some of these areas in this paper.

  2. A compact thermo-optical multimode-interference silicon-based 1 × 4 nano-photonic switch.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haifeng; Song, Junfeng; Chee, Edward K S; Li, Chao; Zhang, Huijuan; Lo, Guoqiang

    2013-09-09

    An ultra-compact multimode-interference (MMI)-based 1 × 4 nano-photonic switch is demonstrated by employing silicon thermo-optical effect on SOI platform. The device performance is systematically characterized by comprehensively investigating the constituent building blocks, including 1 × 4 power splitter, 4 × 4 MMI coupler and groove-isolated thermo-optical heaters. An instructive model is established to statistically estimate the required power consumption and investigate the influence of the power imbalance of the 4 × 4 MMI coupler on the switching performance. At the designed wavelength of 1550 nm, the average insertion loss of different switching states is 1.7 dB, and the transmission imbalance is 1.05 dB. The worst extinction ratio and crosstalk of all the output ports reach 11.48 dB and -11.38 dB, respectively.

  3. Quantum nanophotonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2017-05-01

    Nanophotonic structures that localize photons in sub-wavelength volumes are possible today thanks to modern nanofabrication and optical design techniques. Such structures enable studies of new regimes of light-matter interaction, quantum and nonlinear optics, and new applications in computing, communications, and sensing. The traditional quantum nanophotonics platform is based on InAs quantum dots inside GaAs photonic crystal cavities. Recently, alternative material systems have emerged, such as color centers in diamond and silicon carbide, that could potentially bring the described experiments to room temperature and facilitate scaling to large networks of resonators and emitters. Finally, the use of inverse design nanophotonic methods, that can efficiently perform physics-guided search through the full parameter space, leads to optical devices with properties superior to state of the art, including smaller footprints, better field localization, and novel functionalities.

  4. Single-photon transport through an atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a single-photon pulse traveling through a linear atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional (1D) single mode photonic waveguide. We derive a time-dependent dynamical theory for this collective many-body system which allows us to study the real time evolution of the photon transport and the atomic excitations. Our analytical result is consistent with previous numerical calculations when there is only one atom. For an atomic chain, the collective interaction between the atoms mediated by the waveguide mode can significantly change the dynamics of the system. The reflectivity of a photon can be tuned by changing the ratio of coupling strength and the photon linewidth or by changing the number of atoms in the chain. The reflectivity of a single-photon pulse with finite bandwidth can even approach 100 % . The spectrum of the reflected and transmitted photon can also be significantly different from the single-atom case. Many interesting physical phenomena can occur in this system such as the photonic band-gap effects, quantum entanglement generation, Fano-like interference, and superradiant effects. For engineering, this system may serve as a single-photon frequency filter, single-photon modulation, and may find important applications in quantum information.

  5. Electrically tunable color filter based on a polarization-tailored nano-photonic dichroic resonator featuring an asymmetric subwavelength grating.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Hyun; Yoon, Yeo-Taek; Shrestha, Vivek Raj; Park, Chul-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2013-11-18

    We have demonstrated a highly efficient electrically tunable color filter, which provides precise control of color output, taking advantage of a nano-photonic polarization-tailored dichroic resonator combined with a liquid-crystal based polarization rotator. The visible dichroic resonator based on the guided mode resonance, which incorporates a planar dielectric waveguide in Si3N4 integrated with an asymmetric two-dimensional subwavelength Al grating with unequal pitches along its principal axes, exhibited polarization specific transmission featuring high efficiency up to 75%. The proposed tunable color filters were constructed by combining three types of dichroic resonators, each of which deals with a mixture of two primary colors (i.e. blue/green, blue/red, and green/red) with a polarization rotator exploiting a twisted nematic liquid crystal cell. The output colors could be dynamically and seamlessly customized across the blend of the two corresponding primary colors, by altering the polarization via the voltage applied to the polarization rotator. For the blue/red filter, the center wavelength was particularly adjusted from 460 to 610 nm with an applied voltage variation of 2 V, leading to a tuning range of up to 150 nm. And the spectral tuning was readily confirmed via color mapping. The proposed devices may permit the tuning span to be readily extended by tailoring the grating pitches.

  6. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-11-01

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range.

  7. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-11-20

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range.

  8. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  9. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range. PMID:25410792

  10. Photon transport in a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide QED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Nha, Hyunchul; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-06-01

    The waveguide quantum electrodynamics (QED) system may have important applications in quantum device and quantum information technology. In this article we review the methods being proposed to calculate photon transport in a one-dimensional (1D) waveguide coupled to quantum emitters. We first introduce the Bethe ansatz approach and the input-output formalism to calculate the stationary results of a single photon transport. Then we present a dynamical time-dependent theory to calculate the real-time evolution of the waveguide QED system. In the longtime limit, both the stationary theory and the dynamical calculation give the same results. Finally, we also briefly discuss the calculations of the multiphoton transport problems.

  11. Nanophotonic Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Hu, Xin; Wen, Long; Yu, Yan; Cumming, David R S

    2016-09-01

    The increasing miniaturization and resolution of image sensors bring challenges to conventional optical elements such as spectral filters and polarizers, the properties of which are determined mainly by the materials used, including dye polymers. Recent developments in spectral filtering and optical manipulating techniques based on nanophotonics have opened up the possibility of an alternative method to control light spectrally and spatially. By integrating these technologies into image sensors, it will become possible to achieve high compactness, improved process compatibility, robust stability and tunable functionality. In this Review, recent representative achievements on nanophotonic image sensors are presented and analyzed including image sensors with nanophotonic color filters and polarizers, metamaterial-based THz image sensors, filter-free nanowire image sensors and nanostructured-based multispectral image sensors. This novel combination of cutting edge photonics research and well-developed commercial products may not only lead to an important application of nanophotonics but also offer great potential for next generation image sensors beyond Moore's Law expectations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Diamond electro-optomechanical resonators integrated in nanophotonic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P.; Ummethala, S.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Diewald, S.; Lewes-Malandrakis, G.; Brink, D.; Heidrich, N.; Nebel, C.

    2014-12-22

    Diamond integrated photonic devices are promising candidates for emerging applications in nanophotonics and quantum optics. Here, we demonstrate active modulation of diamond nanophotonic circuits by exploiting mechanical degrees of freedom in free-standing diamond electro-optomechanical resonators. We obtain high quality factors up to 9600, allowing us to read out the driven nanomechanical response with integrated optical interferometers with high sensitivity. We are able to excite higher order mechanical modes up to 115 MHz and observe the nanomechanical response also under ambient conditions.

  13. Nano-photonic structures for light trapping in ultra-thin crystalline silicon solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Pathi, Prathap; Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2017-01-13

    Thick wafer-silicon is the dominant solar cell technology. It is of great interest to develop ultra-thin solar cells that can reduce materials usage, but still achieve acceptable performance and high solar absorption. Accordingly, we developed a highly absorbing ultra-thin crystalline Si based solar cell architecture using periodically patterned front and rear dielectric nanocone arrays which provide enhanced light trapping. The rear nanocones are embedded in a silver back reflector. In contrast to previous approaches, we utilize dielectric photonic crystals with a completely flat silicon absorber layer, providing expected high electronic quality and low carrier recombination. This architecture creates a densemore » mesh of wave-guided modes at near-infrared wavelengths in the absorber layer, generating enhanced absorption. For thin silicon (<2 μm) and 750 nm pitch arrays, scattering matrix simulations predict enhancements exceeding 90%. Absorption approaches the Lambertian limit at small thicknesses (<10 μm) and is slightly lower (by ~5%) at wafer-scale thicknesses. Parasitic losses are ~25% for ultra-thin (2 μm) silicon and just 1%–2% for thicker (>100 μm) cells. There is potential for 20 μm thick cells to provide 30 mA/cm2 photo-current and >20% efficiency. Furthermore, this architecture has great promise for ultra-thin silicon solar panels with reduced material utilization and enhanced light-trapping.« less

  14. Nano-Photonic Structures for Light Trapping in Ultra-Thin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, Prathap; Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2017-01-01

    Thick wafer-silicon is the dominant solar cell technology. It is of great interest to develop ultra-thin solar cells that can reduce materials usage, but still achieve acceptable performance and high solar absorption. Accordingly, we developed a highly absorbing ultra-thin crystalline Si based solar cell architecture using periodically patterned front and rear dielectric nanocone arrays which provide enhanced light trapping. The rear nanocones are embedded in a silver back reflector. In contrast to previous approaches, we utilize dielectric photonic crystals with a completely flat silicon absorber layer, providing expected high electronic quality and low carrier recombination. This architecture creates a dense mesh of wave-guided modes at near-infrared wavelengths in the absorber layer, generating enhanced absorption. For thin silicon (<2 μm) and 750 nm pitch arrays, scattering matrix simulations predict enhancements exceeding 90%. Absorption approaches the Lambertian limit at small thicknesses (<10 μm) and is slightly lower (by ~5%) at wafer-scale thicknesses. Parasitic losses are ~25% for ultra-thin (2 μm) silicon and just 1%–2% for thicker (>100 μm) cells. There is potential for 20 μm thick cells to provide 30 mA/cm2 photo-current and >20% efficiency. This architecture has great promise for ultra-thin silicon solar panels with reduced material utilization and enhanced light-trapping. PMID:28336851

  15. Nano-Photonic Structures for Light Trapping in Ultra-Thin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pathi, Prathap; Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2017-01-13

    Thick wafer-silicon is the dominant solar cell technology. It is of great interest to develop ultra-thin solar cells that can reduce materials usage, but still achieve acceptable performance and high solar absorption. Accordingly, we developed a highly absorbing ultra-thin crystalline Si based solar cell architecture using periodically patterned front and rear dielectric nanocone arrays which provide enhanced light trapping. The rear nanocones are embedded in a silver back reflector. In contrast to previous approaches, we utilize dielectric photonic crystals with a completely flat silicon absorber layer, providing expected high electronic quality and low carrier recombination. This architecture creates a dense mesh of wave-guided modes at near-infrared wavelengths in the absorber layer, generating enhanced absorption. For thin silicon (<2 μm) and 750 nm pitch arrays, scattering matrix simulations predict enhancements exceeding 90%. Absorption approaches the Lambertian limit at small thicknesses (<10 μm) and is slightly lower (by ~5%) at wafer-scale thicknesses. Parasitic losses are ~25% for ultra-thin (2 μm) silicon and just 1%-2% for thicker (>100 μm) cells. There is potential for 20 μm thick cells to provide 30 mA/cm² photo-current and >20% efficiency. This architecture has great promise for ultra-thin silicon solar panels with reduced material utilization and enhanced light-trapping.

  16. Nanophotonic Design for Broadband Light Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, Emily; Callahan, Dennis; Horowitz, Kelsey; Pala, Ragip; Atwater, Harry

    2014-10-13

    We describe nanophotonic design approaches for broadband light management including i) crossed-trapezoidal Si structures ii) Si photonic crystal superlattices, and iii) tapered and inhomogeneous diameter III-V/Si nanowire arrays.

  17. Photonics and Optoelectronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    Distribution Outline/Agenda • Nanophotonics: plasmonics, nanostructures, metasurfaces etc • Integrated Nanophotonics & Silicon Photonics...Highlights Nanophotonics Nanophotonics: metasurfaces , nanostructures, plasmonics etc • Shalaev – Broadband Light Bending with Plasmonic...solitons, slot waveguide, “ Metasurface ” collimator etc " World Changing Ideas 2012” Electronic Tattoos, sciencemag , J. Rogers UICU P

  18. Unraveling the Mesoscopic Character of Quantum Dots in Nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Tighineanu, P; Sørensen, A S; Stobbe, S; Lodahl, P

    2015-06-19

    We provide a microscopic theory for semiconductor quantum dots that explains the pronounced deviations from the prevalent point-dipole description that were recently observed in spectroscopic experiments on quantum dots in photonic nanostructures. The deviations originate from structural inhomogeneities generating a large circular quantum current density that flows inside the quantum dot over mesoscopic length scales. The model is supported by the experimental data, where a strong variation of the multipolar moments across the emission spectrum of quantum dots is observed. Our work enriches the physical understanding of quantum dots and is of significance for the fields of nanophotonics, quantum photonics, and quantum-information science, where quantum dots are actively employed.

  19. Integrated nanophotonics of parity-time symmetry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetry is a fundamental notion in quantum field theories and opens a new paradigm of non-Hermitian photonics. Instead of counteracting optical losses in integrated photonics, we start from an opposite viewpoint to strategically manipulate optical losses by the concept of PT symmetry. In this talk, I will discuss harnessing PT symmetry using the state-of-the-art integrated nanophotonics technology for novel optoelectronic functionalities. I will present unidirectional reflectionless light transport and coherent light control on a passive silicon platform and effective control of cavity resonant modes for stable lasing actions on an active III-V semiconductor platform.

  20. Fiber-Coupled Diamond Quantum Nanophotonic Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael J.; Meuwly, Charles; Evans, Ruffin E.; Bhaskar, Mihir K.; Sipahigil, Alp; Meesala, Srujan; Machielse, Bartholomeus; Sukachev, Denis D.; Nguyen, Christian T.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Lončar, Marko

    2017-08-01

    Color centers in diamond provide a promising platform for quantum optics in the solid state, with coherent optical transitions and long-lived electron and nuclear spins. Building upon recent demonstrations of nanophotonic waveguides and optical cavities in single-crystal diamond, we now demonstrate on-chip diamond nanophotonics with a high-efficiency fiber-optical interface achieving >90 % power coupling at visible wavelengths. We use this approach to demonstrate a bright source of narrow-band single photons based on a silicon-vacancy color center embedded within a waveguide-coupled diamond photonic crystal cavity. Our fiber-coupled diamond quantum nanophotonic interface results in a high flux (approximately 38 kHz) of coherent single photons (near Fourier limited at <1 -GHz bandwidth) into a single-mode fiber, enabling possibilities for realizing quantum networks that interface multiple emitters, both on chip and separated by long distances.

  1. Multimodal nonlinear nanophotonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2017-05-01

    Nonlinear nanophotonics is a rapidly developing field of research with many potential applications for the design of nonlinear nanoantennas, light sources, nanolasers, and ultrafast miniature metadevices. A tight confinement of the local electromagnetic fields in resonant photonic nanostructures can boost nonlinear optical effects, thus offering versatile opportunities for the subwavelength control of light. To achieve the desired functionalities, it is essential to gain flexible control over the near- and far-field properties of nanostructures. To engineer nonlinear scattering from resonant nanoscale elements, both modal and multipolar control of the nonlinear response are widely exploited for enhancing the near-field interaction and optimizing the radiation directionality. Motivated by the recent progress of all-dielectric nanophotonics, where the electric and magnetic multipolar contributions may become comparable, here we review the advances in the recently emerged field of multipolar nonlinear nanophotonics, starting from earlier relevant studies of metallic and metal-dielectric structures supporting localized plasmonic resonances to then discussing the latest results for all-dielectric nanostructures driven by Mie-type multipolar resonances and optically induced magnetic response. These recent developments suggest intriguing opportunities for a design of nonlinear subwavelength light sources with reconfigurable radiation characteristics and engineering large effective optical nonlinearities at the nanoscale, which could have important implications for novel nonlinear photonic devices operating beyond the diffraction limit.

  2. Special issue on graphene nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. Yu; Maier, S. A.; Martin-Moreno, L.

    2013-11-01

    Graphene nanophotonics has recently appeared as a new research area, which combines the topics of nanophotonics (devoted to studying the behavior of electromagnetic fields on the deep subwavelength scale) and the several extraordinary material properties of graphene. Apart from being the thinnest existing material, graphene is very attractive for photonics due to its extreme flexibility, high mobility and the possibility of controlling its carrier concentration (and hence its electromagnetic response) via external gate voltages. From its very birth, graphene nanophotonics has the potential for innovative technological applications, aiming to complement (or in some cases even replace) the existing semiconductor/metallic photonic platforms. It has already shown exceptional capabilities in many directions, such as for instance in photodetection, photovoltaics, lasing, etc [1]. A special place in graphene photonics belongs to graphene plasmonics, which studies both intrinsic plasmons in graphene and the combination of graphene with plasmons supported by metallic structures [2]. Here, apart from the dynamic control via external voltages previously mentioned, the use of graphene brings with it the remarkable property that graphene plasmons have a wavelength λp that can be even one hundred times smaller than that in free space λ (for instance λp ~ 100 nm at λ ~ 10 μm). This provides both extreme confinement and extreme enhancement of the electromagnetic field at the graphene sheet which, together with its high sensitivity to the doping level, opens many interesting perspectives for new optical devices. The collection of papers presented in this special issue highlights different aspects of nanophotonics in graphene and related systems. The timely appearance of this publication was apparent during the monographic workshop 'Graphene Nanophotonics', sponsored by the European Science Foundation and held during 3-8 March 2013, in Benasque (Spain). This special issue

  3. Active integrated filters for RF-photonic channelizers.

    PubMed

    El Nagdi, Amr; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P; Hunt, Louis R; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L; Christensen, Marc P

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1-5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain.

  4. Active Integrated Filters for RF-Photonic Channelizers

    PubMed Central

    Nagdi, Amr El; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P.; Hunt, Louis R.; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L.; Christensen, Marc P.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1–5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain. PMID:22319352

  5. Dip-pen patterning of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) chain-conformation-based nano-photonic elements

    PubMed Central

    Perevedentsev, Aleksandr; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Belton, Colin R.; Sharma, Sanjiv; Cass, Anthony E. G.; Maier, Stefan A.; Kim, Ji-Seon; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Bradley, Donal D. C.

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials are a promising new class of materials, in which sub-wavelength physical structures, rather than variations in chemical composition, can be used to modify the nature of their interaction with electromagnetic radiation. Here we show that a metamaterials approach, using a discrete physical geometry (conformation) of the segments of a polymer chain as the vector for a substantial refractive index change, can be used to enable visible wavelength, conjugated polymer photonic elements. In particular, we demonstrate that a novel form of dip-pen nanolithography provides an effective means to pattern the so-called β-phase conformation in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) thin films. This can be done on length scales ≤500 nm, as required to fabricate a variety of such elements, two of which are theoretically modelled using complex photonic dispersion calculations. PMID:25598208

  6. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  7. Satyendra Nath Bose and nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponenko, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the 90th anniversary of the 1924 publication of the seminal paper by Bose titled "Planck's law and the hypothesis on light quanta" (Zeitschrift für Physik 26, 178-181). The paper has been the cornerstone quantum statistical physics. Remarkably, the very starting idea is the discreteness of phase space expressed in the form of the density of states. Bose considered equilibrium electromagnetic radiation as gas of photons and, therefore, introduced the photon density of states notion into the physics though without using directly the term "density of states." Today, engineering photon density of states to modify light-matter interaction in nanostructures including both spontaneous emission and spontaneous scattering of photons constitutes the solid part of nanophotonics.

  8. Colloidal nanophotonics: the emerging technology platform.

    PubMed

    Gaponenko, Sergey; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Seassal, Christian; Woggon, Ulrike

    2016-01-25

    Dating back to decades or even centuries ago, colloidal nanophotonics during the last ten years rapidly extends towards light emitting devices, lasers, sensors and photonic circuitry to manifest itself as an emerging technology platform rather than an entirely academic research field.

  9. Quantum optical networks with diamond nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Nathalie

    2013-03-01

    Scalable quantum optical networks require identical single photons from multiple quantum bits and high collection efficiency of these single photons. Nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a promising candidate for quantum information processing because they have quantum mechanical degrees of freedom that can be addressed optically and, as solid-state structures, can potentially be easily integrated into nanophotonic networks. In particular, they have a zero-phonon line (ZPL), which acts as an atom-like cycling transition that can be used for coherent optical manipulation. However, the ZPL only accounts for 3-5% of the total emission, and it is difficult to generate a high density of NV centers with stable ZPL. I will present progress toward gaining both spectral and spatial control over NV emission by coupling NV centers to nanophotonic devices. In particular, we have fabricated high quality factor (Q), small mode volume (V) photonic crystal cavities directly out of diamond, and have deterministically placed them around stable NV centers to enhance the spontaneous emission at the cavity resonance by a factor of 50-100. This emission is guided efficiently into a single optical mode, enabling integration with other photonic elements, as well as networks of cavities, each with their own optically addressable qubit. These nanophotonic elements in diamond will provide a building block for a variety of applications in quantum information processing, such as entanglement of distant NV centers and single photon transistors.

  10. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Sun, Shuai; Majumdar, Arka; Sorger, Volker J

    2016-11-21

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of "smaller-is-better" has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoelectronic device performance scales non-monotonically with device length due to the various device tradeoffs, and analyze how both optical and electrical constrains influence device power consumption and operating speed. Specifically, we investigate the direct influence of scaling on the performance of four classes of photonic devices, namely laser sources, electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, and all-optical switches based on three types of optical resonators; microring, Fabry-Perot cavity, and plasmonic metal nanoparticle. Results show that while microrings and Fabry-Perot cavities can outperform plasmonic cavities at larger length-scales, they stop working when the device length drops below 100 nanometers, due to insufficient functionality such as feedback (laser), index-modulation (modulator), absorption (detector) or field density (optical switch). Our results provide a detailed understanding of the limits of nanophotonics, towards establishing an opto-electronics roadmap, akin to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  11. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Sun, Shuai; Majumdar, Arka; Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-11-01

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of “smaller-is-better” has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoelectronic device performance scales non-monotonically with device length due to the various device tradeoffs, and analyze how both optical and electrical constrains influence device power consumption and operating speed. Specifically, we investigate the direct influence of scaling on the performance of four classes of photonic devices, namely laser sources, electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, and all-optical switches based on three types of optical resonators; microring, Fabry-Perot cavity, and plasmonic metal nanoparticle. Results show that while microrings and Fabry-Perot cavities can outperform plasmonic cavities at larger length-scales, they stop working when the device length drops below 100 nanometers, due to insufficient functionality such as feedback (laser), index-modulation (modulator), absorption (detector) or field density (optical switch). Our results provide a detailed understanding of the limits of nanophotonics, towards establishing an opto-electronics roadmap, akin to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  12. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Sun, Shuai; Majumdar, Arka; Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-01-01

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of “smaller-is-better” has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoelectronic device performance scales non-monotonically with device length due to the various device tradeoffs, and analyze how both optical and electrical constrains influence device power consumption and operating speed. Specifically, we investigate the direct influence of scaling on the performance of four classes of photonic devices, namely laser sources, electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, and all-optical switches based on three types of optical resonators; microring, Fabry-Perot cavity, and plasmonic metal nanoparticle. Results show that while microrings and Fabry-Perot cavities can outperform plasmonic cavities at larger length-scales, they stop working when the device length drops below 100 nanometers, due to insufficient functionality such as feedback (laser), index-modulation (modulator), absorption (detector) or field density (optical switch). Our results provide a detailed understanding of the limits of nanophotonics, towards establishing an opto-electronics roadmap, akin to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. PMID:27869159

  13. Lanthanide-Assisted Deposition of Strongly Electro-optic PZT Thin Films on Silicon: Toward Integrated Active Nanophotonic Devices.

    PubMed

    George, J P; Smet, P F; Botterman, J; Bliznuk, V; Woestenborghs, W; Van Thourhout, D; Neyts, K; Beeckman, J

    2015-06-24

    The electro-optical properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films depend strongly on the quality and crystallographic orientation of the thin films. We demonstrate a novel method to grow highly textured PZT thin films on silicon using the chemical solution deposition (CSD) process. We report the use of ultrathin (5-15 nm) lanthanide (La, Pr, Nd, Sm) based intermediate layers for obtaining preferentially (100) oriented PZT thin films. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate preferentially oriented intermediate Ln2O2CO3 layers providing an excellent lattice match with the PZT thin films grown on top. The XRD and scanning electron microscopy measurements reveal that the annealed layers are dense, uniform, crack-free and highly oriented (>99.8%) without apparent defects or secondary phases. The EDX and HRTEM characterization confirm that the template layers act as an efficient diffusion barrier and form a sharp interface between the substrate and the PZT. The electrical measurements indicate a dielectric constant of ∼650, low dielectric loss of ∼0.02, coercive field of 70 kV/cm, remnant polarization of 25 μC/cm(2), and large breakdown electric field of 1000 kV/cm. Finally, the effective electro-optic coefficients of the films are estimated with a spectroscopic ellipsometer measurement, considering the electric field induced variations in the phase reflectance ratio. The electro-optic measurements reveal excellent linear effective pockels coefficients of 110 to 240 pm/V, which makes the CSD deposited PZT thin film an ideal candidate for Si-based active integrated nanophotonic devices.

  14. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  15. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  16. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, S N; Moiseev, S A

    2015-10-31

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks. (quantum computations)

  17. Planar nanophotonic devices and integration technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard M.; Sorel, Marc; Samarelli, Antonio; Velha, Philippe; Strain, Michael; Johnson, Nigel P.; Sharp, Graham; Rahman, Faiz; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Macintyre, Douglas S.; McMeekin, Scott G.; Lahiri, Basudev

    2011-07-01

    Planar devices that can be categorised as having a nanophotonic dimension constitute an increasingly important area of photonics research. Device structures that come under the headings of photonic crystals, photonic wires and metamaterials are all of interest - and devices based on combinations of these conceptual approaches may also play an important role. Planar micro-/nano-photonic devices seem likely to be exploited across a wide spectrum of applications in optoelectronics and photonics. This spectrum includes the domains of display devices, biomedical sensing and sensing more generally, advanced fibre-optical communications systems - and even communications down to the local area network (LAN) level. This article will review both device concepts and the applications possibilities of the various different devices.

  18. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm2) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates. PMID:27941869

  19. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-12-12

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm(2)) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates.

  20. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm2) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates.

  1. Nanophotonic modal dichroism: mode-multiplexed modulators.

    PubMed

    Das, Susobhan; Fardad, Shima; Kim, Inki; Rho, Junsuk; Hui, Rongqing; Salandrino, Alessandro

    2016-09-15

    As the diffraction limit is approached, device miniaturization to integrate more functionality per area becomes more and more challenging. Here we propose a strategy to increase the functionality-per-area by exploiting the modal properties of a waveguide system. With such an approach the design of a mode-multiplexed nanophotonic modulator relying on the mode-selective absorption of a patterned indium-tin-oxide (ITO) is proposed. Full-wave simulations of a device operating at the telecom wavelength of 1550 nm show that two modes can be independently modulated, while maintaining performances in line with conventional single-mode ITO modulators reported in the recent literature. The proposed design principles can pave the way to a class of mode-multiplexed compact photonic devices able to effectively multiply the functionality-per-area in integrated photonic systems.

  2. Integrating nanophotonic concepts and topics into optics curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, Gregory J.

    2007-06-01

    Nanophotonics has emerged as a new and important field of study, not only in research, but also in undergraduate optics and photonics education and training. Beyond the study of classical and quantum optics, it is important for students to learn about how the flow of light can be manipulated on a nanoscale level, and used in applications such as telecommunications, imaging, and medicine. This paper reports on our work to integrate basic nanophotonic concepts and topics into existing optics and optical electronics courses, as well as independent study projects, at the undergraduate level. Through classroom lectures, topical readings, computer modeling exercises, and laboratory experiments, students are introduced to nanophotonic concepts subsequent to a study of physical and geometrical optics. A compare and contrast methodology is employed to help students identify similarities and differences that exist in the optical behavior of bulk and nanostructured media. Training is further developed through engineering design and simulation exercises that use advanced, vector-diffraction-based, modeling software for simulating the performance of various materials and structures. To date, the addition of a nanophotonics component to the optics curriculum has proven successful, been enthusiastically received by students, and should serve as a basis for further course development efforts that emphasize the combined capabilities of nanotechnology and photonics.

  3. Study on Locally Confined Deposition of Si Nanocrystals in High-Aspect-Ratio Si Nano-Pillar Array for Nano-Electronic and Nano-Photonic Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-23

    Final Report for AOARD Grant FA4869-08-1-4011 Title: Study on Locally Confined Deposition of Si Nanocrystals in High-Aspect-Ratio Si Nano ...Pillar Array for Nano -Electronic and Nano -Photonic Applications” Date: Feb. 23, 2010 Name of Principal Investigators: Gong-Ru Lin and Hao-Chung...efficiencies of Si MOSLEDs via the detuning the size and density of high-aspect-ration Si nano -rod and buried Si nanospheres. A rapid thermal annealing

  4. A nanophotonic solar thermophotovoltaic device.

    PubMed

    Lenert, Andrej; Bierman, David M; Nam, Youngsuk; Chan, Walker R; Celanović, Ivan; Soljačić, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-02-01

    The most common approaches to generating power from sunlight are either photovoltaic, in which sunlight directly excites electron-hole pairs in a semiconductor, or solar-thermal, in which sunlight drives a mechanical heat engine. Photovoltaic power generation is intermittent and typically only exploits a portion of the solar spectrum efficiently, whereas the intrinsic irreversibilities of small heat engines make the solar-thermal approach best suited for utility-scale power plants. There is, therefore, an increasing need for hybrid technologies for solar power generation. By converting sunlight into thermal emission tuned to energies directly above the photovoltaic bandgap using a hot absorber-emitter, solar thermophotovoltaics promise to leverage the benefits of both approaches: high efficiency, by harnessing the entire solar spectrum; scalability and compactness, because of their solid-state nature; and dispatchablility, owing to the ability to store energy using thermal or chemical means. However, efficient collection of sunlight in the absorber and spectral control in the emitter are particularly challenging at high operating temperatures. This drawback has limited previous experimental demonstrations of this approach to conversion efficiencies around or below 1% (refs 9, 10, 11). Here, we report on a full solar thermophotovoltaic device, which, thanks to the nanophotonic properties of the absorber-emitter surface, reaches experimental efficiencies of 3.2%. The device integrates a multiwalled carbon nanotube absorber and a one-dimensional Si/SiO2 photonic-crystal emitter on the same substrate, with the absorber-emitter areas optimized to tune the energy balance of the device. Our device is planar and compact and could become a viable option for high-performance solar thermophotovoltaic energy conversion.

  5. Spoked-ring microcavities: enabling seamless integration of nanophotonics in unmodified advanced CMOS microelectronics chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Mark T.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Ram, Rajeev J.; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Popovic, Milos A.

    2014-03-01

    We present the spoked-ring microcavity, a nanophotonic building block enabling energy-efficient, active photonics in unmodified, advanced CMOS microelectronics processes. The cavity is realized in the IBM 45nm SOI CMOS process - the same process used to make many commercially available microprocessors including the IBM Power7 and Sony Playstation 3 processors. In advanced SOI CMOS processes, no partial etch steps and no vertical junctions are available, which limits the types of optical cavities that can be used for active nanophotonics. To enable efficient active devices with no process modifications, we designed a novel spoked-ring microcavity which is fully compatible with the constraints of the process. As a modulator, the device leverages the sub-100nm lithography resolution of the process to create radially extending p-n junctions, providing high optical fill factor depletion-mode modulation and thereby eliminating the need for a vertical junction. The device is made entirely in the transistor active layer, low-loss crystalline silicon, which eliminates the need for a partial etch commonly used to create ridge cavities. In this work, we present the full optical and electrical design of the cavity including rigorous mode solver and FDTD simulations to design the Qlimiting electrical contacts and the coupling/excitation. We address the layout of active photonics within the mask set of a standard advanced CMOS process and show that high-performance photonic devices can be seamlessly monolithically integrated alongside electronics on the same chip. The present designs enable monolithically integrated optoelectronic transceivers on a single advanced CMOS chip, without requiring any process changes, enabling the penetration of photonics into the microprocessor.

  6. Waferscale nanophotonic circuits made from diamond-on-insulator substrates.

    PubMed

    Rath, P; Gruhler, N; Khasminskaya, S; Nebel, C; Wild, C; Pernice, W H P

    2013-05-06

    Wide bandgap dielectrics are attractive materials for the fabrication of photonic devices because they allow broadband optical operation and do not suffer from free-carrier absorption. Here we show that polycrystalline diamond thin films deposited by chemical vapor deposition provide a promising platform for the realization of large scale integrated photonic circuits. We present a full suite of photonic components required for the investigation of on-chip devices, including input grating couplers, millimeter long nanophotonic waveguides and microcavities. In microring resonators we measure loaded optical quality factors up to 11,000. Corresponding propagation loss of 5 dB/mm is also confirmed by measuring transmission through long waveguides.

  7. Nanophotonics of protein amyloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2014-04-01

    Technological breakthroughs in the super-resolution optical imaging techniques have enriched our current understanding of a range of biological systems and biomolecular processes at the nanoscopic spatial resolution. Protein amyloids are an important class of ordered protein assemblies consisting of misfolded proteins that are implicated in a wide range of devastating human diseases. In order to decipher the structural basis of the supramolecular protein assembly in amyloids and their detrimental interactions with the cell membranes, it is important to employ high-resolution optical imaging techniques. Additionally, amyloids could serve as novel biological nanomaterials for a variety of potential applications. In this review, we summarize a few examples of the utility of near-field scanning optical imaging methodologies to obtain a wealth of structural information into the nanoscale amyloid assembly. Although the near-field technologies were developed several decades ago, it is only recently that these methodologies are being applied and adapted for amyloid research to yield novel information pertaining to the exciting nanoscopic world of protein aggregates. We believe that the account on the nanophotonics of amyloids described in this review will be useful for the future studies on the biophysics of amyloids.

  8. Breaking reciprocity in nanophotonics: optomechanical interactions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alù, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Lorentz reciprocity refers to a fundamental symmetry relation that governs several physical systems. In this talk, we will discuss our recent theoretical, design, experimental, and commercialization efforts in the area of non-reciprocal photonics, using temporal modulation of metamaterial elements to realize isolation for guided waves in nanophotonic systems and radio-frequency circuits, and for propagating waves in free-space, as well as to break the symmetry between emission and absorption in optical and radio-frequency open systems.

  9. High resolution direct measurement of temperature distribution in silicon nanophotonics devices.

    PubMed

    Tzur, Mor; Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Grajower, Meir; Levy, Uriel

    2013-12-02

    Following the miniaturization of photonic devices and the increase in data rates, the issues of self heating and heat removal in active nanophotonic devices should be considered and studied in more details. In this paper we use the approach of Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) to obtain an image of the temperature field of a silicon micro ring resonator with sub-micron spatial resolution. The temperature rise in the device is a result of self heating which is caused by free carrier absorption in the doped silicon. The temperature is measured locally and directly using a temperature sensitive AFM probe. We show that this local temperature measurement is feasible in the photonic device despite the perturbation that is introduced by the probe. Using the above method we observed a significant self heating of about 10 degrees within the device.

  10. Graphene nanophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Alexander Y.; Cubukcu, Ertugrul

    2015-09-01

    Graphene is known to possess a host of remarkable properties such as a zero bandgap at its Dirac point, broadband saturable optical absorption, ballistic carrier transport at room temperature, as well as extremely high stiffness and thermal conductivity. This has in turn made it a material of interest for many applications, ranging from fundamental physics studies to electronic devices. From a photonics perspective, graphene’s ability to support surface plasmon-polaritons with extremely small mode volumes in the infrared spectral regime and beyond renders it an ideal platform for strongly enhanced light-matter interactions at deeply subwavelength size scales. Together with its large bandwidth of operation, as well as intrinsic chemical stability and affinity to organic molecules, graphene serves as a natural candidate for numerous optics-based sensing applications. This article reviews recent works that highlight the various advantages of graphene in an optical sensing context. Specifically, it focuses on how the passive functionalization of graphene can improve the performance of existing optical sensors, and how its use as an active signal transduction element could lead to various novel or hybrid devices that extend the functionalities of traditional sensors.

  11. Successful commercialization of nanophotonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Supriya L.; Clarke, Roger B. M.; Hyde, Sam C. W.

    2006-08-01

    The exploitation of nanotechnology from proof of principle to realizable commercial applications encounters considerable challenges in regards to high volume, large scale, low cost manufacturability and social ethics. This has led to concerns over converting powerful intellectual property into realizable, industry attractive technologies. At The Technology Partnership we specifically address the issue of successful integration of nanophotonics into industry in markets such as biomedical, ophthalmic, energy, telecommunications, and packaging. In this paper we draw on a few examples where we have either developed industrial scale nanophotonic technology or engineering platforms which may be used to fortify nano/microphotonic technologies and enhance their commercial viability.

  12. Deep learning with coherent nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yichen; Harris, Nicholas C.; Skirlo, Scott; Prabhu, Mihika; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Shijie; Larochelle, Hugo; Englund, Dirk; Soljačić, Marin

    2017-07-01

    Artificial neural networks are computational network models inspired by signal processing in the brain. These models have dramatically improved performance for many machine-learning tasks, including speech and image recognition. However, today's computing hardware is inefficient at implementing neural networks, in large part because much of it was designed for von Neumann computing schemes. Significant effort has been made towards developing electronic architectures tuned to implement artificial neural networks that exhibit improved computational speed and accuracy. Here, we propose a new architecture for a fully optical neural network that, in principle, could offer an enhancement in computational speed and power efficiency over state-of-the-art electronics for conventional inference tasks. We experimentally demonstrate the essential part of the concept using a programmable nanophotonic processor featuring a cascaded array of 56 programmable Mach-Zehnder interferometers in a silicon photonic integrated circuit and show its utility for vowel recognition.

  13. Information physics fundamentals of nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Makoto; Tate, Naoya; Aono, Masashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2013-05-01

    Nanophotonics has been extensively studied with the aim of unveiling and exploiting light-matter interactions that occur at a scale below the diffraction limit of light, and recent progress made in experimental technologies--both in nanomaterial fabrication and characterization--is driving further advancements in the field. From the viewpoint of information, on the other hand, novel architectures, design and analysis principles, and even novel computing paradigms should be considered so that we can fully benefit from the potential of nanophotonics. This paper examines the information physics aspects of nanophotonics. More specifically, we present some fundamental and emergent information properties that stem from optical excitation transfer mediated by optical near-field interactions and the hierarchical properties inherent in optical near-fields. We theoretically and experimentally investigate aspects such as unidirectional signal transfer, energy efficiency and networking effects, among others, and we present their basic theoretical formalisms and describe demonstrations of practical applications. A stochastic analysis of light-assisted material formation is also presented, where an information-based approach provides a deeper understanding of the phenomena involved, such as self-organization. Furthermore, the spatio-temporal dynamics of optical excitation transfer and its inherent stochastic attributes are utilized for solution searching, paving the way to a novel computing paradigm that exploits coherent and dissipative processes in nanophotonics.

  14. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  15. The PHOTON explorations: sixteen activities, many uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Judith; Amatrudo, Kathryn; Robinson, Kathleen; Hanes, Fenna

    2014-07-01

    The PHOTON Explorations were adapted from favorite demonstrations of teacher participants in the PHOTON projects of the New England Board of Higher Education as well as Hands-on-Optics activities and interesting demonstrations found on the web. Since the end of project PHOTON2 in 2006, the sixteen inquiry-based activities have formed the basis for a hands-on "home lab" distance- learning course that has been used for college students, teacher professional development and corporate training. With the support of OSA, they have been brought to life in a series of sixteen short videos aimed at a middle school audience. The Explorations are regularly used as activities in outreach activities for middle and high school students and are introduced yearly to an international audience at an outreach workshop at SPIE's Optics and Photonics meeting. In this paper we will demonstrate the Explorations, trace their origins and explain the content. We will also provide details on the development of the Exploration videos, the online course, and outreach materials and give statistics on their use in each format. Links to online resources will be provided.

  16. Local observation and spectroscopy of optical modes in an active photonic-crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Louvion, N; Gérard, D; Mouette, J; de Fornel, F; Seassal, C; Letartre, X; Rahmani, A; Callard, S

    2005-03-25

    We report the direct, room-temperature, near-field mapping and spectroscopy of the optical modes of a photonic-crystal microcavity containing quantum wells. We use a near-field optical probe to reveal the imprint of the cavity mode structure on the quantum-well emission. Furthermore, near-field spectroscopy allows us to demonstrate the strong spatial and spectral dependence of the coupling between the sources and the microcavity. This knowledge will be essential in devising future nanophotonic devices.

  17. Exploring neuronal activity with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Information coding * Optical recordings of neuronal activity * Functional organization of the cortex at the level of a cortical column * Microarchitecture of a cortical column * Dynamics of neuronal populations * Outlook * Bibliography

  18. Active learning in optics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemela, Joseph J.

    2016-09-01

    Active learning in optics and photonics (ALOP) is a program of the International Basic Sciences Program at UNESCO, in collaboration with the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and supported by SPIE, which is designed to help teachers in the developing world attract and retain students in the physical sciences. Using optics and photonics, it naturally attracts the interest of students and can be implemented using relatively low cost technologies, so that it can be more easily reproduced locally. The active learning methodology is student-centered, meaning the teachers give up the role of lecturer in favor of guiding and facilitating a learning process in which students engage in hands-on activities and active peer-peer discussions, and is shown to effectively enhance basic conceptual understanding of physics.

  19. Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    market . Overall Program Summary The overall objective of the Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS) program was to develop and demonstrate...mode fiber, with alignment tolerances of several microns functions well for data communications , single mode fiber is required for several significant...in the laser/optics community . Boeing and MCNC have signed a memorandum of agreement for commercialization and are actively seeking partners for

  20. Enhancing single-molecule fluorescence with nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Acuna, Guillermo; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has become an important research tool in the life sciences but a number of limitations hinder the widespread use as a standard technique. The limited dynamic concentration range is one of the major hurdles. Recent developments in the nanophotonic field promise to alleviate these restrictions to an extent that even low affinity biomolecular interactions can be studied. After motivating the need for nanophotonics we introduce the basic concepts of nanophotonic devices such as zero mode waveguides and nanoantennas. We highlight current applications and the future potential of nanophotonic approaches when combined with biological systems and single-molecule spectroscopy.

  1. Heterogeneous Integration of Materials on Si for Nanophotonics Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assefa, Solomon

    2009-03-01

    Optical interconnects are attractive candidates for achieving communication bandwidth well beyond terabit-per-second for high-performance multi-core microprocessors. Silicon has become a desirable material due to its transparency in the infrared wavelength range and the ease for integrating optical devices at the vicinity of CMOS circuitry utilizing standard processes. While state-of-the-art patterning techniques provide precise dimension control as well as pattern placement, standard doping and metallization steps enable utilization of phenomena such as carrier injection and depletion to render the devices tunable. As a result, large progress has been made on Si-based nanophotonic devices such as modulators, switches, and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems [1, 2]. To make photodetectors, however, a heterogeneous integration of other materials that absorb light in the infrared is necessary. Available in standard front-end CMOS processes for gate strain engineering, Germanium is suitable due to its high absorption coefficient at 1.3μm and 1.5μm wavelengths. Thus, Ge can be directly integrated into the process to fabricate compact photodetectors simultaneously with amplifier circuits in order to make a receiver for an optical network. Nevertheless, the integration of Ge photodetector into the CMOS process flow is very challenging due to process complexity and severe temperature constraints; as a result, photodetectors fabricated only after completing the front-end processes have been previously demonstrated. This talk will discuss Ge waveguide photodetectors that have been integrated into the front-end before the activation of CMOS well implants. By utilizing a lateral seeded crystallization method wherein the Ge waveguides are melted during high-temperature dopant activation, 20μm-long single-crystal Ge-on-insulator waveguides were formed. This approach eliminates the need for selective epitaxial growth of Ge, and avoids high-density misfit

  2. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2017-03-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows one to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating multipole modes excited. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here, we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and non-radiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible multipolar interference effects not yet exploited in the literature and envisage the prospect of achieving more flexible and advanced nanoscale control of light relying on the concepts of multipolar interference through full phase and amplitude engineering. This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  3. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2017-03-28

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows one to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating multipole modes excited. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here, we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and non-radiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible multipolar interference effects not yet exploited in the literature and envisage the prospect of achieving more flexible and advanced nanoscale control of light relying on the concepts of multipolar interference through full phase and amplitude engineering.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  4. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  5. CALL FOR PAPERS: Topical issue on the fundamental aspects of nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockman, Mark; Zayats, Anatoly; Zheludev, Nikolay

    2005-05-01

    The broad goals of the new discipline of nanophotonics are to develop concepts of optical functionality on the smallest possible spatial scale, at the lowest possible energy level, and on the shortest possible timescale by employing light interactions with nanostructures. A topical issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be devoted to papers reporting new and challenging results in this burgeoning field. Focused topical reviews within the special issue remit will also be considered, but potential contributors of such reviews should first contact the Guest Editors. Papers in other areas will also be considered for the issue as long as they offer ideas relevant for the field of nanophotonics. The special issue topics will include, but are not limited to: • Plasmonic nanophotonics • Nano-transmission lines and nano-antennas • Light in confined geometries and nano-cavities • Single molecule and single nanoparticle photonics • Quantum and coherent effects in nanophotonics • Nonlinear and ultrafast nanophotonics • Interaction of electron beams with nanophotonic structures • Nano-bio-photonics • Nanoscale imaging and photolithography • Optical atom trapping and manipulation in nanostructures All papers will be peer reviewed, and the normal refereeing standards of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be maintained. There are no page charges. Advice on preparing your work for publication in the journal, including advice on figures, tables and references, is available from our website at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopa. Manuscripts should be submitted to the Publisher by 1 September 2005, although authors are strongly encouraged to submit their work as soon as possible. Please include a covering letter stating that the submission is intended for the nanophotonics topical issue, to avoid treatment as a regular submission. Submission address: Dr Claire Bedrock (Publisher) Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics

  6. New Perspectives in Silicon Micro and Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; De Stefano, L.; Calio, A.; Rea, I.; Mocella, V.; Dardano, P.; Romano, S.; Rao, S.; Rendina, I.

    2015-05-01

    In the last two decades, there has been growing interest in silicon-based photonic devices for many optical applications: telecommunications, interconnects and biosensors. In this work, an advance overview of our results in this field is presented. Proposed devices allow overcoming silicon intrinsic drawbacks limiting its application as a photonic substrate. Taking advantages of both non-linear and linear effects, size reduction at nanometric scale and new two-dimensional emerging materials, we have obtained a progressive increase in device performance along the last years. In this work we show that a suitable design of a thin photonic crystal slab realized in silicon nitride can exhibit a very strong field enhancement. This result is very promising for all photonic silicon devices based on nonlinear phenomena. Moreover we report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon photodetectors working at near-infrared wavelengths based on the internal photoemission absorption in a Schottky junction. We show as an increase in device performance can be obtained by coupling light into both micro-resonant cavity and waveguiding structures. In addition, replacing metal with graphene in a Schottky junction, a further improve in PD performance can be achieved. Finally, silicon-based microarray for biomedical applications, are reported. Microarray of porous silicon Bragg reflectors on a crystalline silicon substrate have been realized using a technological process based on standard photolithography and electrochemical anodization of the silicon. Our insights show that silicon is a promising platform for the integration of various optical functionalities on the same chip opening new frontiers in the field of low-cost silicon micro and nanophotonics.

  7. Quantum Optics in the Solid State with Diamond Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Nathalie; Evans, Ruffin; de Greve, Kristiaan; Goldman, Michael; High, Alex; Markham, Matthew; Stacey, Alastair; Twitchen, Daniel; Loncar, Marko; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2015-05-01

    Large-scale quantum networks will require efficient interfaces between photons and stationary quantum bits. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a promising candidate for quantum information processing because they are optically addressable, have spin degrees of freedom with long coherence times, and as solid-state entities, can be integrated into nanophotonic devices. An enabling feature of the NV center is its zero-phonon line (ZPL), which acts as an atom-like cycling transition that can be used for coherent optical manipulation and read-out of the spin. However, the ZPL only accounts for 3-5% of the total emission, and previously demonstrated methods of producing high densities of NV centers yield unstable ZPLs. We have developed techniques to fabricate high quality factor, small mode volume photonic crystal cavities directly out of diamond, and to deterministically position these photonic crystal cavities so that a stable NV center sits at the maximum electric field. We observe an enhancement of the spontaneous emission at the cavity resonance by a factor of up to 100. Crucially, we are able to control the NV center precisely using both microwave and resonant optical manipulation. These nanophotonic elements in diamond will provide key building blocks for quantum information processing such as single photon transistors, enabling distribution of entanglement over quantum networks.

  8. Nanophotonic quantum phase switch with a single atom.

    PubMed

    Tiecke, T G; Thompson, J D; de Leon, N P; Liu, L R; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2014-04-10

    By analogy to transistors in classical electronic circuits, quantum optical switches are important elements of quantum circuits and quantum networks. Operated at the fundamental limit where a single quantum of light or matter controls another field or material system, such a switch may enable applications such as long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum information processing and metrology, and the exploration of novel quantum states of matter. Here, by strongly coupling a photon to a single atom trapped in the near field of a nanoscale photonic crystal cavity, we realize a system in which a single atom switches the phase of a photon and a single photon modifies the atom's phase. We experimentally demonstrate an atom-induced optical phase shift that is nonlinear at the two-photon level, a photon number router that separates individual photons and photon pairs into different output modes, and a single-photon switch in which a single 'gate' photon controls the propagation of a subsequent probe field. These techniques pave the way to integrated quantum nanophotonic networks involving multiple atomic nodes connected by guided light.

  9. Aluminum nitride nanophotonic circuits operating at ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Stegmaier, M.; Ebert, J.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Meckbach, J. M.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M.

    2014-03-03

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has recently emerged as a promising material for integrated photonics due to a large bandgap and attractive optical properties. Exploiting the wideband transparency, we demonstrate waveguiding in AlN-on-Insulator circuits from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths using nanophotonic components with dimensions down to 40 nm. By measuring the propagation loss over a wide spectral range, we conclude that both scattering and absorption of AlN-intrinsic defects contribute to strong attenuation at short wavelengths, thus providing guidelines for future improvements in thin-film deposition and circuit fabrication.

  10. Quantum optics in the solid state with diamond nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ruffin; de Leon, Nathalie; de Greve, Kristiaan; Chu, Yiwen; Shields, Brendan; Hausmann, Birgit; Burek, Michael; Maletinsky, Patrick; Zibrov, Alexander; Park, Hongkun; Loncar, Marko; Lukin, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Quantum networks require interfaces between photons and quantum bits. Nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a promising candidate for this interface: they are optically addressable, have spin degrees of freedom with long coherence times, and can be easily integrated into solid-state nanophotonic devices. The crucial optical feature of the NV is its zero-phonon line (ZPL), a cycling transition allowing coherent optical manipulation and read-out of the spin. However, the ZPL only accounts for 3-5% of the NV emission, and previous methods of producing NV centers yield unstable ZPLs. I will present methods for controlling NV emission by coupling NV centers to nanophotonic devices. In particular, we create a high-density layer of NVs with stable ZPLs in high purity diamond; carve waveguides out of the diamond substrate; and fabricate high quality factor, small mode volume photonic crystal cavities around NVs in these waveguides. We observe an enhancement of the NV emission at the cavity resonance by a factor of 100. These devices will become building blocks for quantum information processing such as single photon transistors, enabling distribution of entanglement over quantum networks.

  11. Integrated nanophotonic devices for optical interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yidong; Feng, Xue; Cui, Kaiyu; Li, Yongzhuo; Wang, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Nanostructure is an effective solution for realizing optoelectronic devices with compact size and high performances simultaneously. This paper reports our research progress on integrated nanophotonic devices for optical interconnections. We proposed a parent-sub micro ring structure for optical add-drop multiplexer (OADM) with compact footprint, large free spectral range, and uniform channel spacing. All eight channels can be multiplexed and de-multiplexed with 2.6 dB drop loss, 0.36 nm bandwidth (>40 GHz), -20 dB channel crosstalk, and high thermal tuning efficiency of 0.15 nm/mW. A novel principle of optical switch was proposed and demonstrated based on the coupling of the defect modes in photonic crystal waveguide. Switching functionality with bandwidth up to 24 nm and extinction ratio in excess of 15 dB over the entire bandwidth was achieved, while the footprint was only 8 μm×17.6 μm. We proposed an optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) coding and decoding method to increase the data-carrying capacity of wireless optical interconnect. An integrated OAM emitter, where the topological charge can be continuously varied from -4 to 4 was realized. Also we studied ultrafast modulated nLED as the integrated light source for optical interconnections using a nanobeam cavity with stagger holes.

  12. Nanophotonics and Optical Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Doorn, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    The goal of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) is to plays a leadership role in integration of nanostructured materials to enable novel capabilities and applications through its function as a Department of Energy/Office of Science Nanoscale Science Research Center (NSRC) national user facility. By coupling open access to unique and world-class capabilities and scientific expertise to an active user community, CINT supports high-impact research that no other single institution could achieve – the whole of CINT including its user community is greater than the sum of its parts.

  13. Enabling high-temperature nanophotonics for energy applications

    PubMed Central

    Yeng, Yi Xiang; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Bermel, Peter; Chan, Walker R.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The nascent field of high-temperature nanophotonics could potentially enable many important solid-state energy conversion applications, such as thermophotovoltaic energy generation, selective solar absorption, and selective emission of light. However, special challenges arise when trying to design nanophotonic materials with precisely tailored optical properties that can operate at high-temperatures (> 1,100 K). These include proper material selection and purity to prevent melting, evaporation, or chemical reactions; severe minimization of any material interfaces to prevent thermomechanical problems such as delamination; robust performance in the presence of surface diffusion; and long-range geometric precision over large areas with severe minimization of very small feature sizes to maintain structural stability. Here we report an approach for high-temperature nanophotonics that surmounts all of these difficulties. It consists of an analytical and computationally guided design involving high-purity tungsten in a precisely fabricated photonic crystal slab geometry (specifically chosen to eliminate interfaces arising from layer-by-layer fabrication) optimized for high performance and robustness in the presence of roughness, fabrication errors, and surface diffusion. It offers near-ultimate short-wavelength emittance and low, ultra-broadband long-wavelength emittance, along with a sharp cutoff offering 4∶1 emittance contrast over 10% wavelength separation. This is achieved via Q-matching, whereby the absorptive and radiative rates of the photonic crystal’s cavity resonances are matched. Strong angular emission selectivity is also observed, with short-wavelength emission suppressed by 50% at 75° compared to normal incidence. Finally, a precise high-temperature measurement technique is developed to confirm that emission at 1,225 K can be primarily confined to wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength. PMID:22308448

  14. Workshop on photon activation therapy: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-04-18

    This Workshop was held concurrently with an IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on Exploration of the Possibility of High-LET Radiation for Non-conventional Radiotherapy in Cancer. The Workshop on Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) was given as a special session on April 18, as it was thoght PAT might eventually be found to be attractive to developing countries, which is a major concern of the IAEA. An effort was made to bring together representatives of the various groups known to be actively working on PAT; these included investigators from Sweden and Japan as well as the US. It is hoped that this compendium of papers will be of use to those currently active in this developing field, as well as to those who might join this area of endeavor in the future.

  15. Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2007-06-12

    Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

  16. Metamaterial-inspired silicon nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staude, Isabelle; Schilling, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The prospect of creating metamaterials with optical properties greatly exceeding the parameter space accessible with natural materials has been inspiring intense research efforts in nanophotonics for more than a decade. Following an era of plasmonic metamaterials, low-loss dielectric nanostructures have recently moved into the focus of metamaterial-related research. This development was mainly triggered by the experimental observation of electric and magnetic multipolar Mie-type resonances in high-refractive-index dielectric nanoparticles. Silicon in particular has emerged as a popular material choice, due to not only its high refractive index and very low absorption losses in the telecom spectral range, but also its paramount technological relevance. This Review overviews recent progress on metamaterial-inspired silicon nanostructures, including Mie-resonant and off-resonant regimes.

  17. Interacting single atoms with nanophotonics for chip-integrated quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, Daniel James

    Underlying matter and light are their building blocks of tiny atoms and photons. The ability to control and utilize matter-light interactions down to the elementary single atom and photon level at the nano-scale opens up exciting studies at the frontiers of science with applications in medicine, energy, and information technology. Of these, an intriguing front is the development of quantum networks where N ≫ 1 single-atom nodes are coherently linked by single photons, forming a collective quantum entity potentially capable of performing quantum computations and simulations. Here, a promising approach is to use optical cavities within the setting of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). However, since its first realization in 1992 by Kimble et al., current proof-of-principle experiments have involved just one or two conventional cavities. To move beyond to N ≫ 1 nodes, in this thesis we investigate a platform born from the marriage of cavity QED and nanophotonics, where single atoms at ˜100 nm near the surfaces of lithographically fabricated dielectric photonic devices can strongly interact with single photons, on a chip. Particularly, we experimentally investigate three main types of devices: microtoroidal optical cavities, optical nanofibers, and nanophotonic crystal based structures. With a microtoroidal cavity, we realized a robust and efficient photon router where single photons are extracted from an incident coherent state of light and redirected to a separate output with high efficiency. We achieved strong single atom-photon coupling with atoms located ~100 nm near the surface of a microtoroid, which revealed important aspects in the atom dynamics and QED of these systems including atom-surface interaction effects. We present a method to achieve state-insensitive atom trapping near optical nanofibers, critical in nanophotonic systems where electromagnetic fields are tightly confined. We developed a system that fabricates high quality nanofibers with high

  18. Nanophotonic rare-earth quantum memory with optically controlled retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M; Bartholomew, John G; Rochman, Jake; Craiciu, Ioana; Miyazono, Evan; Bettinelli, Marco; Cavalli, Enrico; Verma, Varun; Nam, Sae Woo; Marsili, Francesco; Shaw, Matthew D; Beyer, Andrew D; Faraon, Andrei

    2017-08-31

    Optical quantum memories are essential elements in quantum networks for long distance distribution of quantum entanglement. Scalable development of quantum network nodes requires on-chip qubit storage functionality with control of its readout time. We demonstrate a high-fidelity nanophotonic quantum memory based on a mesoscopic neodymium ensemble coupled to a photonic crystal cavity. The nanocavity enables >95% spin polarization for efficient initialization of the atomic frequency comb memory, and time-bin-selective readout via enhanced optical Stark shift of the comb frequencies. Our solid-state memory is integrable with other chip-scale photon source and detector devices for multiplexed quantum and classical information processing at the network nodes. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Experimental generation of single photons via active multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaosong; Zotter, Stefan; Kofler, Johannes; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-04-15

    An on-demand single-photon source is a fundamental building block in quantum science and technology. We experimentally demonstrate the proof of concept for a scheme to generate on-demand single photons via actively multiplexing several heralded photons probabilistically produced from pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversions (SPDCs). By utilizing a four-photon-pair source, an active feed-forward technique, and an ultrafast single-photon router, we show a fourfold enhancement of the output photon rate. Simultaneously, we maintain the quality of the output single-photon states, confirmed by correlation measurements. We also experimentally verify, via Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, that the router does not affect the indistinguishability of the single photons. Furthermore, we give numerical simulations, which indicate that photons based on multiplexing of four SPDC sources can outperform the heralding based on highly advanced photon-number-resolving detectors. Our results show a route for on-demand single-photon generation and the practical realization of scalable linear optical quantum-information processing.

  20. Active temporal multiplexing of indistinguishable heralded single photons

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Collins, M. J.; Mahendra, A.; Helt, L. G.; Steel, M. J.; Choi, D. -Y.; Chae, C. J.; Leong, P. H. W.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    It is a fundamental challenge in quantum optics to deterministically generate indistinguishable single photons through non-deterministic nonlinear optical processes, due to the intrinsic coupling of single- and multi-photon-generation probabilities in these processes. Actively multiplexing photons generated in many temporal modes can decouple these probabilities, but key issues are to minimize resource requirements to allow scalability, and to ensure indistinguishability of the generated photons. Here we demonstrate the multiplexing of photons from four temporal modes solely using fibre-integrated optics and off-the-shelf electronic components. We show a 100% enhancement to the single-photon output probability without introducing additional multi-photon noise. Photon indistinguishability is confirmed by a fourfold Hong–Ou–Mandel quantum interference with a 91±16% visibility after subtracting multi-photon noise due to high pump power. Our demonstration paves the way for scalable multiplexing of many non-deterministic photon sources to a single near-deterministic source, which will be of benefit to future quantum photonic technologies. PMID:26996317

  1. Active temporal multiplexing of indistinguishable heralded single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, C.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Collins, M. J.; Mahendra, A.; Helt, L. G.; Steel, M. J.; Choi, D.-Y.; Chae, C. J.; Leong, P. H. W.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is a fundamental challenge in quantum optics to deterministically generate indistinguishable single photons through non-deterministic nonlinear optical processes, due to the intrinsic coupling of single- and multi-photon-generation probabilities in these processes. Actively multiplexing photons generated in many temporal modes can decouple these probabilities, but key issues are to minimize resource requirements to allow scalability, and to ensure indistinguishability of the generated photons. Here we demonstrate the multiplexing of photons from four temporal modes solely using fibre-integrated optics and off-the-shelf electronic components. We show a 100% enhancement to the single-photon output probability without introducing additional multi-photon noise. Photon indistinguishability is confirmed by a fourfold Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference with a 91+/-16% visibility after subtracting multi-photon noise due to high pump power. Our demonstration paves the way for scalable multiplexing of many non-deterministic photon sources to a single near-deterministic source, which will be of benefit to future quantum photonic technologies.

  2. Nanophotonic filters for digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Kirsty

    There has been an increasing demand for low cost, portable CMOS image sensors because of increased integration, and new applications in the automotive, mobile communication and medical industries, amongst others. Colour reproduction remains imperfect in conventional digital image sensors, due to the limitations of the dye-based filters. Further improvement is required if the full potential of digital imaging is to be realised. In alternative systems, where accurate colour reproduction is a priority, existing equipment is too bulky for anything but specialist use. In this work both these issues are addressed by exploiting nanophotonic techniques to create enhanced trichromatic filters, and multispectral filters, all of which can be fabricated on-chip, i.e. integrated into a conventional digital image sensor, to create compact, low cost, mass produceable imaging systems with accurate colour reproduction. The trichromatic filters are based on plasmonic structures. They exploit the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in arrays of subwavelength holes in metal films to filter light. The currently-known analytical expressions are inadequate for optimising all relevant parameters of a plasmonic structure. In order to obtain arbitrary filter characteristics, an automated design procedure was developed that integrated a genetic algorithm and 3D finite-difference time-domain tool. The optimisation procedure's efficacy is demonstrated by designing a set of plasmonic filters that replicate the CIE (1931) colour matching functions, which themselves mimic the human eye's daytime colour response.

  3. DNA nanotechnology for nanophotonic applications.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Anirban; Banerjee, Saswata; Liu, Yan

    2015-02-14

    DNA nanotechnology has touched the epitome of miniaturization by integrating various nanometer size particles with nanometer precision. This enticing bottom-up approach has employed small DNA tiles, large multi-dimensional polymeric structures or more recently DNA origami to organize nanoparticles of different inorganic materials, small organic molecules or macro-biomolecules like proteins, and RNAs into fascinating patterns that are difficult to achieve by other conventional methods. Here, we are especially interested in the self-assembly of nanomaterials that are potentially attractive elements in the burgeoning field of nanophotonics. These materials include plasmonic nanoparticles, quantum dots, fluorescent organic dyes, etc. DNA based self-assembly allows excellent control over distance, orientation and stoichiometry of these nano-elements that helps to engineer intelligent systems that can potentially pave the path for future technology. Many outstanding structures have been fabricated that are capable of fine tuning optical properties, such as fluorescence intensity and lifetime modulation, enhancement of Raman scattering and emergence of circular dichroism responses. Within the limited scope of this review we have tried to give a glimpse of the development of this still nascent but highly promising field to its current status as well as the existing challenges before us.

  4. DNA nanotechnology for nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Banerjee, Saswata; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology has touched the epitome of miniaturization by integrating various nanometer size particles with nanometer precision. This enticing bottom-up approach has employed small DNA tiles, large multi-dimensional polymeric structures or more recently DNA origami to organize nanoparticles of different inorganic materials, small organic molecules or macro-biomolecules like proteins, and RNAs into fascinating patterns that are difficult to achieve by other conventional methods. Here, we are especially interested in the self-assembly of nanomaterials that are potentially attractive elements in the burgeoning field of nanophotonics. These materials include plasmonic nanoparticles, quantum dots, fluorescent organic dyes, etc. DNA based self-assembly allows excellent control over distance, orientation and stoichiometry of these nano-elements that helps to engineer intelligent systems that can potentially pave the path for future technology. Many outstanding structures have been fabricated that are capable of fine tuning optical properties, such as fluorescence intensity and lifetime modulation, enhancement of Raman scattering and emergence of circular dichroism responses. Within the limited scope of this review we have tried to give a glimpse of the development of this still nascent but highly promising field to its current status as well as the existing challenges before us.

  5. Quantum transport simulations in a programmable nanophotonic processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas C.; Steinbrecher, Gregory R.; Prabhu, Mihika; Lahini, Yoav; Mower, Jacob; Bunandar, Darius; Chen, Changchen; Wong, Franco N. C.; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Lloyd, Seth; Englund, Dirk

    2017-07-01

    Environmental noise and disorder play critical roles in quantum particle and wave transport in complex media, including solid-state and biological systems. While separately both effects are known to reduce transport, recent work predicts that in a limited region of parameter space, noise-induced dephasing can counteract localization effects, leading to enhanced quantum transport. Photonic integrated circuits are promising platforms for studying such effects, with a central goal of developing large systems providing low-loss, high-fidelity control over all parameters of the transport problem. Here, we fully map the role of disorder in quantum transport using a nanophotonic processor: a mesh of 88 generalized beamsplitters programmable on microsecond timescales. Over 64,400 experiments we observe distinct transport regimes, including environment-assisted quantum transport and the 'quantum Goldilocks' regime in statically disordered discrete-time systems. Low-loss and high-fidelity programmable transformations make this nanophotonic processor a promising platform for many-boson quantum simulation experiments.

  6. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Stebunov, Yury V.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the nanophotonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic or plasmonic mode, cantilever is efficiently actuated and its response is directly read out using the same waveguide, which results in a very high sensitivity and capability of single-molecule detection even in atmosphere. PMID:26043287

  7. Photon-noise effect on detection in coherent active images.

    PubMed

    Réfrégier, Philippe; Goudail, François; Delyon, Guillaume

    2004-01-15

    We analyze photon-noise effects on target detection performance in low-flux coherent active imagery systems. We show that when photon noise is expected, the performance of classical detection techniques designed for pure and fully developed speckle images can be improved with no increase in algorithm complexity. Furthermore, the mean photon number under which photon noise becomes sensitive is higher when the target and background mean values are unknown than in the idealized case, where they are assumed to be known, and when the reflectivity ratio between the target and the background is low.

  8. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Pantelić, Dejan; Sarajlić, Milija; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Matović, Jovan; Jelenković, Branislav; Vasiljević-Radović, Dana; Ćurčić, Srećko; Vuković, Slobodan; Pavlović, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; Lačković, Vesna; Labudović-Borović, Milica; Ćurčić, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  9. Planarized nanophotonic sensor for real-time fluid sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yazhao; Salemink, H. W. M.

    2017-09-01

    A planarized on-chip nanophotonic sensor based on a photonic crystal cavity is realized in this work. The sensor was embedded in a solid protecting material (flowable oxide) with perfect filled holes: this eliminates problems of fouling in practical applications. The functional area of the sensor is created by carefully removing the protecting material only on the top surface of the cavity. A wavelength shift of 7.5 nm was observed in experiment which is very close to a simulation result of 9.0 nm for sensing water (n=1.33) and crude oil (n=1.45) samples. Swift and accurate sensing was verified by a real-time dynamic measurement with rapidly alternating analytes in a microfluid channel.

  10. Sunlight-thin nanophotonic monocrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depauw, Valérie; Trompoukis, Christos; Massiot, Inès; Chen, Wanghua; Dmitriev, Alexandre; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Gordon, Ivan; Poortmans, Jef

    2017-09-01

    Introducing nanophotonics into photovoltaics sets the path for scaling down the surface texture of crystalline-silicon solar cells from the micro- to the nanoscale, allowing to further boost the photon absorption while reducing silicon material loss. However, keeping excellent electrical performance has proven to be very challenging, as the absorber is damaged by the nanotexturing and the sensitivity to the surface recombination is dramatically increased. Here we realize a light-wavelength-scale nanotextured monocrystalline silicon cell with the confirmed efficiency of 8.6% and an effective thickness of only 830 nm. For this we adopt a self-assembled large-area and industry-compatible amorphous ordered nanopatterning, combined with an advanced surface passivation, earning strongly enhanced solar light absorption while retaining efficient electron collection. This prompts the development of highly efficient flexible and semitransparent photovoltaics, based on the industrially mature monocrystalline silicon technology.

  11. Observation of extraordinary optical activity in planar chiral photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Kuniaki; Bai, Benfeng; Meng, Xiangfeng; Karvinen, Petri; Turunen, Jari; Svirko, Yuri P; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2008-05-12

    Control of light polarization is a key technology in modern photonics including application to optical manipulation of quantum information. The requisite is to obtain large rotation in isotropic media with small loss. We report on extraordinary optical activity in a planar dielectric on-waveguide photonic crystal structure, which has no in-plane birefringence and shows polarization rotation of more than 25 degrees for transmitted light. We demonstrate that in the planar chiral photonic crystal, the coupling of the normally incident light wave with low-loss waveguide and Fabry-Pérot resonance modes results in a dramatic enhancement of the optical activity.

  12. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-01

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  13. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-30

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  14. Fiber-coupled nanophotonic devices for nonlinear optics and cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Paul Edward

    2007-10-01

    The sub-wavelength optical confinement and low optical loss of nanophotonic devices dramatically enhances the interaction between light and matter within these structures. When nanophotonic devices are combined with an efficient optical coupling channel, nonlinear optical behavior can be observed at low power levels in weakly-nonlinear materials. In a similar vein, when resonant atomic systems interact with nanophotonic devices, atom-photon coupling effects can be observed at a single quanta level. Crucially, the chip based nature of nanophotonics provides a scalable platform from which to study these effects. This thesis addresses the use of nanophotonic devices in nonlinear and quantum optics, including device design, optical coupling, fabrication and testing, modeling, and integration with more complex systems. We present a fiber taper coupling technique that allows efficient power transfer from an optical fiber into a photonic crystal waveguide. Greater than 97% power transfer into a silicon photonic crystal waveguide is demonstrated. This optical channel is then connected to a high-Q (> 40,000), ultra-small mode volume (V < (lambda/n)3) photonic crystal cavity, into which we couple > 44% of the photons input to a fiber. This permits the observation of optical bistability in silicon for sub-mW input powers at telecommunication wavelengths. To port this technology to cavity QED experiments at near-visible wavelengths, we also study silicon nitride microdisk cavities at wavelengths near 852 nm, and observe resonances with Q > 3 million and V < 15 (lambda/n)3). This Q/V ratio is sufficiently high to reach the strong coupling regime with cesium atoms. We then permanently align and mount a fiber taper within the near-field an array of microdisks, and integrate this device with an atom chip, creating an "atom-cavity chip" which can magnetically trap laser cooled atoms above the microcavity. Calculations of the microcavity single atom sensitivity as a function of Q

  15. Estimating ROI activity concentration with photon-processing and photon-counting SPECT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new class of imaging systems, referred to as photon-processing (PP) systems, are being developed that uses real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate multiple attributes per detected photon and store these attributes in a list format. PP systems could have a number of potential advantages compared to systems that bin photons based on attributes such as energy, projection angle, and position, referred to as photon-counting (PC) systems. For example, PP systems do not suffer from binning-related information loss and provide the potential to extract information from attributes such as energy deposited by the detected photon. To quantify the effects of this advantage on task performance, objective evaluation studies are required. We performed this study in the context of quantitative 2-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with the end task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a region of interest (ROI). We first theoretically outline the effect of null space on estimating the mean activity concentration, and argue that due to this effect, PP systems could have better estimation performance compared to PC systems with noise-free data. To evaluate the performance of PP and PC systems with noisy data, we developed a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based analytic method to estimate the activity concentration from PP systems. Using simulations, we studied the accuracy and precision of this technique in estimating the activity concentration. We used this framework to objectively compare PP and PC systems on the activity concentration estimation task. We investigated the effects of varying the size of the ROI and varying the number of bins for the attribute corresponding to the angular orientation of the detector in a continuously rotating SPECT system. The results indicate that in several cases, PP systems offer improved estimation performance compared to PC systems.

  16. Strain-optic active control for quantum integrated photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Peter C.; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Spring, Justin B.; Moore, Merritt; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Steven Kolthammer, W.; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2014-09-01

    We present a practical method for active phase control on a photonic chip that has immediate applications in quantum photonics. Our approach uses strain-optic modification of the refractive index of individual waveguides, effected by a millimeter-scale mechanical actuator. The resulting phase change of propagating optical fields is rapid and polarization-dependent, enabling quantum applications that require active control and polarization encoding. We demonstrate strain-optic control of non-classical states of light in silica, showing the generation of 2-photon polarisation N00N states by manipulating Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We also demonstrate switching times of a few microseconds, which are sufficient for silica-based feed-forward control of photonic quantum states.

  17. Strain-optic active control for quantum integrated photonics.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Spring, Justin B; Moore, Merritt; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J; Steven Kolthammer, W; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-08

    We present a practical method for active phase control on a photonic chip that has immediate applications in quantum photonics. Our approach uses strain-optic modification of the refractive index of individual waveguides, effected by a millimeter-scale mechanical actuator. The resulting phase change of propagating optical fields is rapid and polarization-dependent, enabling quantum applications that require active control and polarization encoding. We demonstrate strain-optic control of non-classical states of light in silica, showing the generation of 2-photon polarisation N00N states by manipulating Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We also demonstrate switching times of a few microseconds, which are sufficient for silica-based feed-forward control of photonic quantum states.

  18. Photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W. L.; Goulding, C. A.; Hollas, C. L.; Moss, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    The physics of photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) using the delayed neutron reinterrogation method is described in this paper. Two sets of active interrogation experiments were performed using a set of subcritical configurations of cocentric HEU metal hemishells. One set of measurements utilized a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator as the active source. The second set of measurements utilized a linear accelerator-based bremsstrahlung photon source as an active interrogation source. The neutron responses were measured for both sets of experiments. The operational details and results for both measurement sets are described.

  19. All-dielectric resonant nanophotonics and high-efficient metasurfaces (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2017-05-01

    Rapid progress in plasmonics is driven by the ability to enhance near-field effects with subwavelength localization of light. Recently, we observe the emergence of a new branch of nanophotonics aiming at the manipulation of strong optically-induced electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances in dielectric and semiconductor nanostructures with high refractive index. Unique ad-vantages of dielectric resonant optical nanostructures over their metallic counterparts are low dissipative losses, low heating, and the enhancement of both electric and magnetic fields. In this talk, I will review this new emerging field of nanophotonics and metasurfaces and demonstrate that Mie-type resonances in high-index dielectric nanoparticles and subwavelength structures can be exploited for new physics and novel functionalities of photonic structures especially in the non-linear regime.

  20. Epitaxial Nanoflag Photonics: Semiconductor Nanoemitters Grown with Their Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Sorias, Ofir; Kelrich, Alexander; Gladstone, Ran; Ritter, Dan; Orenstein, Meir

    2017-09-06

    Semiconductor nanostructures are desirable for electronics, photonics, quantum circuitry, and energy conversion applications as well as for fundamental science. In photonics, optical nanoantennas mediate the large size difference between photons and semiconductor nanoemitters or detectors and hence are instrumental for exhibiting high efficiency. In this work we present epitaxially grown InP nanoflags as optically active nanostructures encapsulating the desired characteristics of a photonic emitter and an efficient epitaxial nanoantenna. We experimentally characterize the polarized and directional emission of the nanoflag-antenna and show the control of these properties by means of structure, dimensions, and constituents. We analyze field enhancement and light extraction by the semiconductor nanoflag antenna, which yield comparable values to enhancement factors of metallic plasmonic antennas. We incorporated quantum emitters within the nanoflag structure and characterized their emission properties. Merging of active nanoemitters with nanoantennas at a single growth process enables a new class of devices to be used in nanophotonics applications.

  1. Standardizing Activation Analysis: New Software for Photon Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Green, J.; Segebade, C.

    2011-06-01

    Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) of environmental, archaeological and industrial samples requires extensive data analysis that is susceptible to error. For the purpose of saving time, manpower and minimizing error, a computer program was designed, built and implemented using SQL, Access 2007 and asp.net technology to automate this process. Based on the peak information of the spectrum and assisted by its PAA library, the program automatically identifies elements in the samples and calculates their concentrations and respective uncertainties. The software also could be operated in browser/server mode, which gives the possibility to use it anywhere the internet is accessible. By switching the nuclide library and the related formula behind, the new software can be easily expanded to neutron activation analysis (NAA), charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Implementation of this would standardize the analysis of nuclear activation data. Results from this software were compared to standard PAA analysis with excellent agreement. With minimum input from the user, the software has proven to be fast, user-friendly and reliable.

  2. Scalable Fabrication of Integrated Nanophotonic Circuits on Arrays of Thin Single Crystal Diamond Membrane Windows.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Afaq H; Rath, Patrik; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kühn, Stefan; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Prawer, Steven

    2016-05-11

    Diamond has emerged as a promising platform for nanophotonic, optical, and quantum technologies. High-quality, single crystalline substrates of acceptable size are a prerequisite to meet the demanding requirements on low-level impurities and low absorption loss when targeting large photonic circuits. Here, we describe a scalable fabrication method for single crystal diamond membrane windows that achieves three major goals with one fabrication method: providing high quality diamond, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy; achieving homogeneously thin membranes, enabled by ion implantation; and providing compatibility with established planar fabrication via lithography and vertical etching. On such suspended diamond membranes we demonstrate a suite of photonic components as building blocks for nanophotonic circuits. Monolithic grating couplers are used to efficiently couple light between photonic circuits and optical fibers. In waveguide coupled optical ring resonators, we find loaded quality factors up to 66 000 at a wavelength of 1560 nm, corresponding to propagation loss below 7.2 dB/cm. Our approach holds promise for the scalable implementation of future diamond quantum photonic technologies and all-diamond photonic metrology tools.

  3. Design of nanophotonic, hot-electron solar-blind ultraviolet detectors with a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-12-01

    Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection refers to photon detection specifically in the wavelength range of 200 nm-320 nm. Without background noises from solar radiation, it has broad applications from homeland security to environmental monitoring. The most commonly used solid state devices for this application are wide band gap (WBG) semiconductor photodetectors (Eg > 3.5 eV). However, WBG semiconductors are difficult to grow and integrate with Si readout integrated circuits (ROICs). In this paper, we design a nanophotonic metal-oxide-semiconductor structure on Si for solar-blind UV detectors. Instead of using semiconductors as the active absorber, we use Sn nano-grating structures to absorb UV photons and generate hot electrons for internal photoemission across the Sn/SiO2 interfacial barrier, thereby generating photocurrent between the metal and the n-type Si region upon UV excitation. Moreover, the transported hot electron has an excess kinetic energy >3 eV, large enough to induce impact ionization and generate another free electron in the conduction band of n-Si. This process doubles the quantum efficiency. On the other hand, the large metal/oxide interfacial energy barrier (>3.5 eV) also enables solar-blind UV detection by blocking the less energetic electrons excited by visible photons. With optimized design, ˜75% UV absorption and hot electron excitation can be achieved within the mean free path of ˜20 nm from the metal/oxide interface. This feature greatly enhances hot electron transport across the interfacial barrier to generate photocurrent. The simple geometry of the Sn nano-gratings and the MOS structure make it easy to fabricate and integrate with Si ROICs compared to existing solar-blind UV detection schemes. The presented device structure also breaks through the conventional notion that photon absorption by metal is always a loss in solid-state photodetectors, and it can potentially be extended to other active metal photonic devices.

  4. Photon-photon absorption and the uniqueness of the spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the feedback of e(+)-e(-) pair reinjection in a plasma due to photon-photon absorption of its own radiation was examined. Under the assumption of continuous electron injection with a power law spectrum E to the minus gamma power and Compton losses only, it is shown that for gamma 2 the steady state electron distribution function has a unique form independent of the primary injection spectrum. This electron distribution function can, by synchrotron emission, reproduce the general characteristics of the observed radio to optical active galactic nuclei spectra. Inverse Compton scattering of the synchrotron photons by the same electron distribution can account for their X-ray spectra, and also implies gamma ray emission from these objects. This result is invoked to account for the similarity of these spectra, and it is consistent with observations of the diffuse gamma ray background.

  5. Hybrid Group IV Nanophotonic Structures Incorporating Diamond Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Babinec, Thomas M; Radulaski, Marina; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Dory, Constantin; Dahl, Jeremy; Edgington, Robert; Soulière, Veronique; Ferro, Gabriel; Fokin, Andrey A; Schreiner, Peter R; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-13

    We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV(-)) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid diamond-SiC structures are realized by combining the growth of nano- and microdiamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV(-) color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ion-implantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV(-) on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV(-) centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV(-) lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow line widths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV(-) lines from all-diamond nanopillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV(-) centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing.

  6. Hybrid Group IV Nanophotonic Structures Incorporating Diamond Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Babinec, Thomas M.; Radulaski, Marina; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Dory, Constantin; Dahl, Jeremy; Edgington, Robert; Soulière, Veronique; Ferro, Gabriel; Fokin, Andrey A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV$^-$) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid SiC/diamond structures are realized by combining the growth of nanoand micro-diamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV$^-$ color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ionimplantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV$^-$ on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV$^-$ centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV$^-$ lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow linewidths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV$^-$ lines from all-diamond nano-pillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV$^-$ centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing.

  7. E-MRS Spring Meeting - Nanophotonic Materials Session

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-27

    MEETING SYMPOSIUM A2 Thursday, May 27, 2004 Morning Joint Session Symposium A1, A2: Silicon -based nanophotonics Session chairs: P. Fauchet...EUROPEAN MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY Strasbourg (France) E-MRS Spring Meeting 2004 May 24-28, 2004 SYMPOSIUM A2 Nanophotonic ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-04-1-5025 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE E-MRS Spring Meeting - Nanophotonic Materials Session 5c

  8. Quantum-dot supercrystals for future nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-01-01

    The study of supercrystals made of periodically arranged semiconductor quantum dots is essential for the advancement of emerging nanophotonics technologies. By combining the strong spatial confinement of elementary excitations inside quantum dots and exceptional design flexibility, quantum-dot supercrystals provide broad opportunities for engineering desired optical responses and developing superior light manipulation techniques on the nanoscale. Here we suggest tailoring the energy spectrum and wave functions of the supercrystals' collective excitations through the variation of different structural and material parameters. In particular, by calculating the excitonic spectra of quantum dots assembled in two-dimensional Bravais lattices we demonstrate a wide variety of spectrum transformation scenarios upon alterations in the quantum dot arrangement. This feature offers unprecedented control over the supercrystal's electromagnetic properties and enables the development of new nanophotonics materials and devices.

  9. Engineering metallic nanostructures for plasmonics and nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Nathan C; Nagpal, Prashant; McPeak, Kevin M; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-03-01

    Metallic nanostructures now play an important role in many applications. In particular, for the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics, the ability to engineer metals on nanometric scales allows the development of new devices and the study of exciting physics. This review focuses on top-down nanofabrication techniques for engineering metallic nanostructures, along with computational and experimental characterization techniques. A variety of current and emerging applications are also covered.

  10. Engineering metallic nanostructures for plasmonics and nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Nathan C; Nagpal, Prashant; McPeak, Kevin M; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures now play an important role in many applications. In particular, for the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics, the ability to engineer metals on nanometric scales allows the development of new devices and the study of exciting physics. This review focuses on top-down nanofabrication techniques for engineering metallic nanostructures, along with computational and experimental characterization techniques. A variety of current and emerging applications are also covered. PMID:22790420

  11. Development and Applications of Nanowire Nanophotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-23

    Nanowire Nanophotonics G F49620-03-1-0063 6. AUTHOR(S) Charles. M. Lieber 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Release; distribution is unlimited. 13, ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) The controlled and predictable synthesis of nanowires and nanowire heterostrucrures...nitride based nanowire materials, including radial nanowire heterostructures in which the composition and/or doping was modulated perpendicular to the

  12. Nanophotonics of isolated spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu. É.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Panina, E. K.

    2010-09-01

    The problem of extreme focusing of an optical beam into the spatial region with wavelength dimensions is considered with the use of the special features of radiation interaction with isolated spherical particles. Results of numerical computations of the optical field intensity at the surface of silver particles of different radii upon exposure to laser radiation with different wavelengths are presented. It is demonstrated that the relative intensity of the plasmon optical field on the nanoparticle surface increases and the field focusing region decreases with increasing particle radius. Results of numerical computations illustrating the influence of the shell of composite nanoparticles comprising a dielectric core and a metal shell on the optical field intensity in the vicinity of the particle are presented. The problem of local optical foci of a transparent microparticle (photonic nanojets) is investigated. It is established that variation of the micron particle size, its optical properties, and laser radiation parameters allows the amplitude and spatial characteristics of the photonic nanojet region to be controlled efficiently.

  13. Non-line-of-sight active imaging of scattered photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Velten, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Laser Gated Viewing is a prominent sensing technology for optical imaging in harsh environments and can be applied to the vision through fog, smoke and other degraded environmental conditions as well as to the vision through sea water in submarine operation. A direct imaging of non-scattered photons (or ballistic photons) is limited in range and performance by the free optical path length i.e. the length in which a photon can propagate without interaction with scattering particles or object surfaces. The imaging and analysis of scattered photons can overcome these classical limitations and it is possible to realize a non-line-of-sight imaging. The spatial and temporal distribution of scattered photons can be analyzed by means of computational optics and their information of the scenario can be restored. In the case of Lambertian scattering sources the scattered photons carry information of the complete environment. Especial the information outside the line of sight or outside the visibility range is of high interest. Here, we discuss approaches for non line of sight active imaging with different indirect and direct illumination concepts (point, surface and volume scattering sources).

  14. Low-power nanophotonics: material and device technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylén, Lars; Holmstrom, Petter; Wosinski, Lech; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2013-05-01

    Development in photonics for communications and interconnects pose increasing requirements on reduction of footprint, power dissipation and cost, as well as increased bandwidth. Nanophotonics integrated photonics has been viewed as a solution to this, capitalizing on development in nanotechnology and an increased understanding of light matter interaction on the nanoscale. The latter can be exemplified by plasmonics and low dimensional semiconductors such as quantum dots (QDs). In this scenario the development of improved electrooptic materials is of great importance, the electrooptic polymers being an example, since they potentially offer superior properties for optical phase modulators in terms of power and integratability. Phase modulators are essential for e.g. the rapidly developing advanced modulation formats, since phase modulation basically can generate any type of modulation. The electrooptic polymers, in combination with plasmonics nanoparticle array waveguides or nanostructured hybrid plasmonic media can give extremely compact and low power dissipation modulators. Low-dimensional semiconductors, e.g. in the shape of QDs, can be employed for modulation or switching functions, offering possibilities for scaling to 2 or 3 dimensions for advanced switching functions. In both the high field confinement plasmonics and QDs, the nanosizing is due to nearfield interactions, albeit being of different physical origin in the two cases. Epitaxial integration of III-V structures on Si plays an important role in developing high-performance light sources on silicon, eventually integrated with silicon electronics. A brief remark on all-optical vs. electronically controlled optical switching systems is also given.

  15. Precision tuning of silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Charlton J.

    In recent years, silicon photonics has begun to transition from research to commercialization. Decades of relentless advances in the field of computing have led to fundamental bottlenecks in the design of computers, especially in interconnect bandwidth density. For IBM, silicon photonics has become a potential technological solution for enabling the future of server systems and cutting-edge supercomputers. For Intel, silicon photonics has become a cost-effective solution for supplying the necessary bandwidth needed by future generations of consumer computing products. While the field of silicon photonics is now advancing at a rapid pace there is still a great deal of research to be done. This thesis investigates ways of improving the performance of fundamental silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes. These devices include numerous optical resonator designs as well as slow-light waveguides. Optical resonators are used to confine photons both spatially and temporally. In recent years, there has been much research, both theoretical and experimental, into improving the design of optical resonators. Improving these devices through fabrication processes has generally been less studied. Optical waveguides are used to guide the flow of photons over chip-level distances. Slow-light waveguides have also been studied by many research groups in recent years and can be applied to an increasingly wide-range of applications. The work can be divided into several parts: Chapter 1 is an introduction to the field of silicon photonics as well as an overview of the fabrication, experimental and computational techniques used throughout this work. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 describe our investigations into the precision tuning of nanophotonic devices using laser-assisted thermal oxidation and atomic layer deposition. Chapters 5 and 6 describe our investigations into improving the sidewall roughness of silicon photonic devices using hydrogen annealing and excimer laser

  16. Observation of optically induced transparency effect in silicon nanophotonic wires with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Longhai; Zheng, Jiajiu; Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2014-03-01

    Graphene, a well-known two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a honeycomb structure, has many unique and fascinating properties in optoelectronics and photonics. Integration of graphene on silicon nanophotonic wires is a promising approach to enhance light-graphene interactions. In this paper, we demonstrate on-chip silicon nanophotonic wires covered by graphene with CMOS-compatible fabrication processes. Under the illumination of pump light on the graphene sheet, a loss reduction of silicon nanophotonic wires, which is called optically induced transparency (OIT) effect, is observed over a broad wavelength range for the first time. The pump power required to generate the OIT effect is as low as ~0.1mW and the corresponding power density is about 2×103mW/cm2, which is significantly different from the saturated absorption effect of graphene reported previously. The extremely low power density implies a new mechanism for the present OIT effect, which will be beneficial to realize silicon on-chip all-optical controlling in the future. It also suggests a new and efficient approach to tune the carrier concentration (doping level) in graphene optically.

  17. Advanced active quenching circuits for single-photon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipčević, M.; Christensen, B. G.; Kwiat, P. G.; Gauthier, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Commercial photon-counting modules, often based on actively quenched solid-state avalanche photodiode sensors, are used in wide variety of applications. Manufacturers characterize their detectors by specifying a small set of parameters, such as detection efficiency, dead time, dark counts rate, afterpulsing probability and single photon arrival time resolution (jitter), however they usually do not specify the conditions under which these parameters are constant or present a sufficient description. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of the active quenching process and identify intrinsic limitations and engineering challenges. Based on that, we investigate the range of validity of the typical parameters used by two commercial detectors. We identify an additional set of imperfections that must be specified in order to sufficiently characterize the behavior of single-photon counting detectors in realistic applications. The additional imperfections include rate-dependence of the dead time, jitter, detection delay shift, and "twilighting." Also, the temporal distribution of afterpulsing and various artifacts of the electronics are important. We find that these additional non-ideal behaviors can lead to unexpected effects or strong deterioration of the system's performance. Specifically, we discuss implications of these new findings in a few applications in which single-photon detectors play a major role: the security of a quantum cryptographic protocol, the quality of single-photon-based random number generators and a few other applications. Finally, we describe an example of an optimized avalanche quenching circuit for a high-rate quantum key distribution system based on time-bin entangled photons.

  18. New material platforms and metasurface designs for nano- and quantum photonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Shaltout, Amr M.; Guler, Urcan; Kim, Jongbum; Bogdanov, Simeon; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    We outline the recent progress in developing new plasmonic materials that will form the basis for future low-loss, CMOS-compatible devices, enabling full-scale development of the metamaterial and nanophotonic technologies. Novel metasurface designs as a basis for a chip-compatible platform for nanophotonics and quantum photonics applications will be also discussed.

  19. Photonic properties of erbium activated coated microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jestin, Y.; Armellini, C.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Dumeige, Y.; Ferrari, M.; Féron, P.; Ghisa, L.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Trebaol, S.; Righini, G. C.

    2008-02-01

    μA simple method based on the sol-gel technology has been developed to coat passive microspheres with an active coating. The microspheres were prepared by fusion of a standard telecom fiber with a dimension of about 200 μm and 400 μm and have been respectively dipped in a 70SiO II-30HfO II sol activated by 1 mol% and 0.1 mol% of erbium ions. Here we first report about the luminescence properties of a silica-hafnia coating doped with erbium ions and then whispering gallery mode spectra were analysed for different sphere diameters, thickness of coating and erbium concentration. The thickness of the coating has been chosen in order to support at least one whispering gallery mode at 1.5 μm.

  20. Photonic muscles: optically controlled active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Joe; Brozik, Jim; Basame, Solomon; Fallbach, Mike; Bradford, Larry; Douglas, Dennis; Miner, Gilda

    2005-08-01

    Reported is an investigation of a novel approach for producing and correcting active optical mirrors. Photoactive polymers represent a special class of "smart materials" whose electronic and physical properties such as conductivity, charge distribution, and especially shape can be changed in response to the environment (voltage, light, stress). The ability of photoactive polymers to change the structure of a polymer matrix in response to light is being studied to allow active figure control of membranes for optical element use. Photoactive substrates (mirrors) were produced. Incoherent light sources were used to effect shape control. Shack-Hartman Wavefront sensing was used to quantify the initial and optically altered figure of samples. Motion of two classes of samples was measured and is reported here. Proposed is also a new stress control technology as well as new hybrid technology combining two classes of photoactive materials.

  1. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  2. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  3. Chiral nanophotonics and quantum optics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to paraxial light fields, the intrinsic angular momentum of transversally confined light fields is position-dependent and can be oriented perpendicular to the propagation direction. The interaction of emitters with such light fields leads to new and surprising effects. For example, the intrinsic mirror symmetry of dipolar emission can be broken. This allowed us to realize chiral interfaces between plasmonic nanoparticles or atoms and a nanophotonic waveguide in which the emission direction into the waveguide is controlled by the polarization of the emitted light. Moreover, we employed this chiral interaction to demonstrate nonreciprocal transmission of waveguided light.

  4. Nanophotonic resonators for InP solar cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel A; Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy N

    2016-05-16

    We describe high efficiency thin-film InP solar cells that utilize a periodic array of TiO2 nanocylinders. These nanophotonic resonators are found to reduce the solar-weighted average reflectivity of an InP solar cell to ~1.3%, outperforming the best double-layer antireflection coatings. The coupling between Mie scattering resonances and thin-film interference effects accurately describes the optical enhancement provided by the nanocylinders. The spectrally resolved reflectivity and J-V characteristics of the device under AM1.5G illumination are determined via coupled optical and electrical simulations, resulting in a predicted power conversion efficiency > 23%. We conclude that the nanostructured coating reduces reflection without negatively affecting the electronic properties of the InP solar cell by separating the nanostructured optical components from the active layer of the device.

  5. One-Dimensional Dielectric/Metallic Hybrid Materials for Photonic Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Jun; Xiong, Xiao; Zou, Chang-Ling; Ren, Xi Feng; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Explorations of 1D nanostructures have led to great progress in the area of nanophotonics in the past decades. Based on either dielectric or metallic materials, a variety of 1D photonic devices have been developed, such as nanolasers, waveguides, optical switches, and routers. What's interesting is that these dielectric systems enjoy low propagation losses and usually possess active optical performance, but they have a diffraction-limited field confinement. Alternatively, metallic systems can guide light on deep subwavelength scales, but they suffer from high metallic absorption and can work as passive devices only. Thus, the idea to construct a hybrid system that combines the merits of both dielectric and metallic materials was proposed. To date, unprecedented optical properties have been achieved in various 1D hybrid systems, which manifest great potential for functional nanophotonic devices. Here, the focus is on recent advances in 1D dielectric/metallic hybrid systems, with a special emphasis on novel structure design, rational fabrication techniques, unique performance, as well as their wide application in photonic components. Gaining a better understanding of hybrid systems would benefit the design of nanophotonic components aimed at optical information processing.

  6. True stopping of light: a new regime for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakmakidis, Kosmas L.; Zhang, Xiang; Hess, Ortwin

    2014-09-01

    The extremely large speed of light is a tremendous asset but also makes it challenging to control, store or shrink beyond its wavelength. Particularly, reducing the speed of light down to zero is of fundamental scientific interest that could usher in a host of important photonic applications, some of which are hitherto fundamentally inaccessible. These include cavity-free, low-threshold nanolasers, novel solar-cell designs for efficient harvesting of light, nanoscale quantum information processing (owing to the enhanced density of states), as well as enhanced biomolecular sensing. We shall here present nanoplasmonic-based schemes where timedependent sources excite "complex-frequency" modes in uniform (plasmonic) heterostructures, enabling complete and dispersion-free stopping of light pulses, resilient to realistic levels of dissipative, radiative and surface-roughness losses. Our theoretical and computational results demonstrate extraordinary large lightdeceleration factors (of the order of 15,000,000) in integrated nanophotonic media, comparable only to those attainable with ultracold atomic vapours or with quantum coherence effects, such as coherent population oscillations, in ruby crystals.

  7. Nanophotonic trapping for precise manipulation of biomolecular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Mohammad; Lin, Jun; Forties, Robert A.; Inman, James T.; Saraf, Summer N.; Fulbright, Robert M.; Lipson, Michal; Wang, Michelle D.

    2014-06-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful manipulation and measurement technique widely used in the biological and materials sciences. Miniaturizing optical trap instruments onto optofluidic platforms holds promise for high-throughput lab-on-a-chip applications. However, a persistent challenge with existing optofluidic devices has been achieving controlled and precise manipulation of trapped particles. Here, we report a new class of on-chip optical trapping devices. Using photonic interference functionalities, an array of stable, three-dimensional on-chip optical traps is formed at the antinodes of a standing-wave evanescent field on a nanophotonic waveguide. By employing the thermo-optic effect via integrated electric microheaters, the traps can be repositioned at high speed (~30 kHz) with nanometre precision. We demonstrate sorting and manipulation of individual DNA molecules. In conjunction with laminar flows and fluorescence, we also show precise control of the chemical environment of a sample with simultaneous monitoring. Such a controllable trapping device has the potential to achieve high-throughput precision measurements on chip.

  8. Photonic network R and D activities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aovama, Tomonori

    2005-11-01

    R and D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current, ongoing R and D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and WDM fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching, and control plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP over WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R and D programs for photonic networks over the next five years until 2010, by focusing on the report which has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R and D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis through the customer's initiative, to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  9. Resonant dielectric nanostructures: a low-loss platform for functional nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Manuel; Staude, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    This review overviews the state of the art of research into high-index dielectric nanoresonators and their use in functional photonic nanostructures at optical frequencies. We start by providing the motivations for this research area and by putting it into context with the more well-established subfields of nanophotonics, in particular nanoplasmonics. Following the introduction, fundamental concepts regarding the optical properties of subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators are established. To this end, we provide a brief summary of the Mie theory, before focussing on optically induced magnetic response in Mie-resonant dielectric nanoparticles. We discuss the influence of the nanoparticle’s shape on its optical response, and provide an overview of directional effects that can occur when light is scattered by a Mie-resonant nanoparticle. We then dedicate a few words to technology-related aspects, including an overview of fabrication methods for Mie-resonant dielectric nanoparticles. Next, recent progress on all-dielectric nanoantennas is presented, focussing on strategies to locally enhance optical near-fields and to achieve directional emission patterns. We then turn to all-dielectric metasurfaces and their potential applications. We touch on dielectric metamaterial reflectors and Fano-resonant dielectric metasurfaces, before discussing graded Mie-resonant dielectric metasurfaces for wavefront control applications in more detail. Following this, an overview of the recent progress in active, tunable and nonlinear dielectric nanostructures is provided. Finally, prospects and challenges are discussed, particularly the realization of highly efficient Mie-resonant nanostructures at visible frequencies, the integration of Mie-resonant nanostructures with active and functional materials, and the construction of three-dimensional high-index dielectric nanostructures.

  10. Coupled Quantum Dots and Photonic Crystals for Nanophotonic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Champaign, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 Voice: 217 265 0563 FAX: 217 244 6375 e-mail: choquett@uiuc.edu FINAL REPORT SUBMITTED TO DR . GERNOT... Geib , C. I. H. Ashby, R. D. Twesten, 0. Blum, H. Q. Hou, D. M. Follstaedt, B. E. Hammons, D. Mathes, and R. Hull, "Advances in selective wet

  11. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  12. Vertical optical ring resonators fully integrated with nanophotonic waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates.

    PubMed

    Madani, Abbas; Kleinert, Moritz; Stolarek, David; Zimmermann, Lars; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2015-08-15

    We demonstrate full integration of vertical optical ring resonators with silicon nanophotonic waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates to accomplish a significant step toward 3D photonic integration. The on-chip integration is realized by rolling up 2D differentially strained TiO(2) nanomembranes into 3D microtube cavities on a nanophotonic microchip. The integration configuration allows for out-of-plane optical coupling between the in-plane nanowaveguides and the vertical microtube cavities as a compact and mechanically stable optical unit, which could enable refined vertical light transfer in 3D stacks of multiple photonic layers. In this vertical transmission scheme, resonant filtering of optical signals at telecommunication wavelengths is demonstrated based on subwavelength thick-walled microcavities. Moreover, an array of microtube cavities is prepared, and each microtube cavity is integrated with multiple waveguides, which opens up interesting perspectives toward parallel and multi-routing through a single-cavity device as well as high-throughput optofluidic sensing schemes.

  13. Characterization of silicon avalanche photodiodes for photon correlation measurements. 2: Active quenching.

    PubMed

    Brown, R G; Jones, R; Rarity, J G; Ridley, K D

    1987-06-15

    We continue examination of the photon correlation properties of silicon avalanche photodiodes operated in photon-counting mode by extending their operation from that of passive quenching(1) to active quenching, yielding shorter dead time and higher frequency operation.

  14. Efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting with ultrathin films of hematite on three-dimensional nanophotonic structures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yongcai; Leung, Siu-Fung; Zhang, Qianpeng; Hua, Bo; Lin, Qingfeng; Wei, Zhanhua; Tsui, Kwong-Hoi; Zhang, Yuegang; Yang, Shihe; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar water splitting represents a clean and sustainable approach for hydrogen (H2) production and substantial research are being performed to improve the conversion efficiency. Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is considered as a promising candidate for PEC water splitting due to its chemical stability, appropriate band structure, and abundance. However, PEC performance based on hematite is hindered by the short hole diffusion length that put a constraint on the active layer thickness and its light absorption capability. In this work, we have designed and fabricated novel PEC device structure with ultrathin hematite film deposited on three-dimensional nanophotonic structure. In this fashion, the nanophotonic structures can largely improve the light absorption in the ultrathin active materials. In addition, they also provide large surface area to accommodate the slow surface water oxidation process. As the result, high current density of 3.05 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V with respect to the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) has been achieved on such nanophotonic structure, which is about three times of that for a planar photoelectrode. More importantly, our systematic analysis with experiments and modeling revealed that the design of high performance PEC devices needs to consider not only total optical absorption, but also the absorption profile in the active material, in addition to electrode surface area and carrier collection.

  15. Dielectric resonator antenna for applications in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Malheiros-Silveira, Gilliard N; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2013-01-14

    Optical nanoantennas, especially of the dipole type, have been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by many research groups. Likewise, the plasmonic waveguides and optical circuits have experienced significant advances. In radio frequencies and microwaves a category of antenna known as dielectric resonator antenna (DRA), whose radiant element is a dielectric resonator (DR), has been designed for several applications, including satellite and radar systems. In this letter, we explore the possibilities and advantages to design nano DRAs (NDRAs), i. e., DRAs for nanophotonics applications. Numerical demonstrations showing the fundamental antenna parameters for a circular cylindrical NDRA type have been carried out for the short (S), conventional (C), and long (L) bands of the optical communication spectrum.

  16. Novel nanophotonics geometries for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2004-10-01

    We describe our latest experimental and theoretical results on two promising nanophotonics geometries for sensor applications. These geometries are based on various combinations of nanohole and/or microdroplet arrays on the surfaces of metal films which support propagation of surface plasmon-polaritons. These novel geometries exhibit large enhancements of local electromagnetic field, which can be used in various nonlinear optical sensing arrangements. For example, liquid microdroplets on the gold film surface support surface plasmon whispering gallery modes. Local field enhancement due to excitation of such modes is determined by combination of both cavity electrodynamics and surface plasmon-polariton related effects. In addition, individual microdroplets have interesting imaging properties, which may be used in high-resolution visualization of individual viruses and cells.

  17. Control of photon transport properties in nanocomposite nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffa, M.; Fasano, V.; Camposeo, A.; Persano, L.; Pisignano, D.

    2016-02-01

    Active nanowires and nanofibers can be realized by the electric-field induced stretching of polymer solutions with sufficient molecular entanglements. The resulting nanomaterials are attracting an increasing attention in view of their application in a wide variety of fields, including optoelectronics, photonics, energy harvesting, nanoelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems. Realizing nanocomposite nanofibers is especially interesting in this respect. In particular, methods suitable for embedding inorganic nanocrystals in electrified jets and then in active fiber systems allow for controlling light-scattering and refractive index properties in the realized fibrous materials. We here report on the design, realization, and morphological and spectroscopic characterization of new species of active, composite nanowires and nanofibers for nanophotonics. We focus on the properties of light-confinement and photon transport along the nanowire longitudinal axis, and on how these depend on nanoparticle incorporation. Optical losses mechanisms and their influence on device design and performances are also presented and discussed.

  18. Photon Activation Analysis at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Douglas P.; Cole, Philip L.; Segebade, Christian R.

    2010-08-04

    Activation methods require minimal sample preparation and provide sufficiently high sensitivity for detecting the vast majority of the elements throughout the periodic table. In this paper we shall discuss photon activation analysis (PAA) at the Idaho Accelerator Center. The process of PAA begins with exposing a sample with photons in the energy range of 10 to 30 MeV. Many nuclides in the sample will become activated and, in turn, these radionuclides will decay by emitting characteristic radiation. These characteristic radiation decays are the telltale signatures for identifying elements which can then be measured with spectrometers such as a high-purity Germanium detector. PAA is not an 'absolute' method, as the samples under investigation must be irradiated along with a reference or calibrating material having a well-known elemental composition. The quantitative evaluation is performed through comparing the two resulting element spectra from the unknown sample and reference material. Besides the obvious advantage of being non-destructive, PAA has minimal contamination issues. Moreover, materials that are difficult to treat chemically, such as certain refractory metals, dusts, ashes, etc., offer no hindrance to the technique of PAA. A further advantage is that PAA is very well suited for investigated minute samples (sub-milligram dust particles) to very large ones (in the multi-kg range). PAA is a robust technique as there are no real limitations concerning the nature of material to be studied.

  19. Longitudinal photons in a relativistic magneto-active plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N. L.; Rehman, Ayesha; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2007-10-15

    This paper presents some aspects of interaction of superstrong high-frequency electromagnetic waves with strongly magnetized plasmas. The case in which the photon-photon interaction dominates the photon-plasma particle interaction is considered. Strictly speaking, the photon and photon bunch interaction leads to the self-modulation of the photon gas. Assuming that the density of the plasma does not change, the dispersion relation, which includes relativistic self-modulation, is investigated. The existence of longitudinal photons in a strong magnetic field has the well-known Bogoliubov-type energy spectrum. The stability of the photon flow is investigated and an expression for Landau damping of the photons is obtained. Finally, it has been shown that the interaction of even a very strong electromagnetic radiation with a plasma does not always lead to instability, but causes only a change in plasma properties, whereby the plasma remains stable.

  20. Mid-IR to THz polaritonics: realizing novel materials for nanophotonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.

    2016-09-01

    The field of nanophotonics is based on the ability to confine light to sub-diffractional dimensions. Up until recently, research in this field has been primarily focused on the use of plasmonic metals. However, the high optical losses inherent in such metal-based surface plasmon materials has led to an ever-expanding effort to identify, low-loss alternative materials capable of supporting sub-diffractional confinement. Beyond this, the limited availability of high efficiency optical sources, refractive and compact optics in the mid-infrared to THz spectral regions make nanophotonic advancements imperative. One highly promising alternative are polar dielectric crystals whereby sub-diffraction confinement of light can be achieved through the stimulation of surface phonon polaritons within an all-dielectric, and thus low loss material system. Due to the wide array of high quality crystalline species and varied crystal structures, a wealth of unanticipated optical properties have recently been reported. However, these materials also have some limitations, primarily in the limited spectral bandwidth of operation for any given material. This talk will discuss recent advancements to improve the material lifetime and to induce additional functionality through isotopic enrichment and hybridization of polaritonic modes for realizing low-loss, actively tunable/modulated nanophotonic materials.

  1. Terahertz Active Photonic Crystals for Condensed Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Alexander; Deutsch, Christoph; Brandstetter, Martin; Andrews, Aaron M.; Klang, Pavel; Detz, Hermann; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2011-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) spectral region, covering frequencies from 1 to 10 THz, is highly interesting for chemical sensing. The energy of rotational and vibrational transitions of molecules lies within this frequency range. Therefore, chemical fingerprints can be derived, allowing for a simple detection scheme. Here, we present an optical sensor based on active photonic crystals (PhCs), i.e., the pillars are fabricated directly from an active THz quantum-cascade laser medium. The individual pillars are pumped electrically leading to laser emission at cryogenic temperatures. There is no need to couple light into the resonant structure because the PhC itself is used as the light source. An injected gas changes the resonance condition of the PhC and thereby the laser emission frequency. We achieve an experimental frequency shift of 10−3 times the center lasing frequency. The minimum detectable refractive index change is 1.6 × 10−5 RIU. PMID:22163939

  2. Silicon nitride membrane photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernice, W. H. P.; Li, M.; Gallagher, D. F. G.; Tang, H. X.

    2009-11-01

    We propose a concept for realizing large area nanophotonic circuits in a silicon nitride membrane. Light is coupled into the membrane using a novel metallic photonic crystal grating coupler. A coupling loss of 5.5 dB is predicted for TE polarized light at 1550 nm. Waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths is achieved by using low loss photonic crystal defect waveguides. The propagation losses of the photonic crystal waveguides are estimated at 8.6 dB mm-1, comparable to early silicon photonic crystal waveguides. Using the proposed approach, photonic circuits can be fabricated using a single lithography and etching step. Thus the design scheme shows a route to low-cost fabrication.

  3. Photonic crystal lasers using wavelength-scale embedded active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari; Takeda, Koji; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Fujii, Takuro; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Lasers with ultra-low operating energy are desired for use in chip-to-chip and on-chip optical interconnects. If we are to reduce the operating energy, we must reduce the active volume. Therefore, a photonic crystal (PhC) laser with a wavelength-scale cavity has attracted a lot of attention because a PhC provides a large Q-factor with a small volume. To improve this device's performance, we employ an embedded active region structure in which the wavelength-scale active region is buried with an InP PhC slab. This structure enables us to achieve effective confinement of both carriers and photons, and to improve the thermal resistance of the device. Thus, we have obtained a large external differential quantum efficiency of 55% and an output power of -10 dBm by optical pumping. For electrical pumping, we use a lateral p-i-n structure that employs Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation for p-type and n-type doping, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature continuous-wave operation with a threshold current of 7.8 µA and a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz. The results of an experimental bit error rate measurement with a 10 Gbit s-1 NRZ signal reveal the minimum operating energy for transferring a single bit of 5.5 fJ. These results show the potential of this laser to be used for very short reach interconnects. We also describe the optimal design of cavity quality (Q) factor in terms of achieving a large output power with a low operating energy using a calculation based on rate equations. When we assume an internal absorption loss of 20 cm-1, the optimized coupling Q-factor is 2000.

  4. Frequency agile microwave photonic notch filter with anomalously high stopband rejection.

    PubMed

    Marpaung, David; Morrison, Blair; Pant, Ravi; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2013-11-01

    We report a novel class microwave photonic (MWP) notch filter with a very narrow isolation bandwidth (10 MHz), an ultrahigh stopband rejection (>60 dB), a wide frequency tuning (1-30 GHz), and flexible bandwidth reconfigurability (10-65 MHz). This performance is enabled by a new concept of sideband amplitude and phase controls using an electro-optic modulator and an optical filter. This concept enables energy efficient operation in active MWP notch filters, and opens up a pathway toward enabling low-power nanophotonic devices as high-performance RF filters.

  5. Nanophotonic structures for coupling to quantum emitters in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Jennifer Tze-Heng

    This thesis is about the design, fabrication, and characterization of nanophotonic elements in the visible that can enhance light-matter interaction for single quantum emitters. We focus on two material systems: single photon sources based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond with improved spontaneous emission rates and collection efficiencies, and passive TiO 2 devices that comprise a potentially broadband (from the visible to the infrared), low loss photonics platform and that are suitable for probing and manipulating single colloidal quantum dots. We first discuss the requirements for using color center emission in bulk diamond crystals for potential applications in quantum information processing, and provide examples of using nanowire structures and planar resonators made in diamond for engineering the NV center's pump and collection efficiencies, and spontaneous emission rates, respectively. We also describe the integration of diamond with plasmonic structures. We have designed and implemented diamond-silver apertures for broadband enhancements of the spontaneous emission rates of NV centers. We show that shallow-implanted NV centers in diamond nanoposts provide a good system for controlling the NV center spontaneous emission rates, allowing for quenched emission with long lifetimes in the bare case, and enhanced emission with fast decay rates (corresponding to a Purcell factor of around 6) when coated with silver. We add plasmonic gratings around the diamond-silver apertures to improve the collection efficiency of the system, and observe over two-fold improvement in collection. We demonstrate the fabrication of chip-scale linear optical elements such as waveguides and racetrack resonators in low-loss TiO2 thin films. The fabricated waveguides operate over a wide bandwidth with propagation losses from 30 dB/cm in the visible to 4 dB/cm in the IR, while racetrack resonators can critically couple to waveguides and have quality factors as high as

  6. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  7. Nanophotonic control of circular dipole emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Feber, B.; Rotenberg, N.; Kuipers, L.

    2015-04-01

    Controlling photon emission by single emitters with nanostructures is crucial for scalable on-chip information processing. Nowadays, nanoresonators can affect the lifetime of linear dipole emitters, while nanoantennas can steer the emission direction. Expanding this control to the emission of orbital angular momentum-changing transitions would enable a future coupling between solid state and photonic qubits. As these transitions are associated with circular dipoles, such control requires knowledge of the interaction of a complex dipole with optical eigenstates containing local helicity. We experimentally map the coupling of classical, circular dipoles to photonic modes in a photonic crystal waveguide. We show that, depending on the combination of the local helicity of the mode and the dipole helicity, circular dipoles can couple to left- or rightwards propagating modes with a near-unity directionality. The experimental maps are in excellent agreement with calculations. Our measurements, therefore, demonstrate the possibility of coupling the spin to photonic pathway.

  8. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons.

    PubMed

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-03-10

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection.

  9. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  10. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons

    PubMed Central

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V.; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection. PMID:25757068

  11. Photonic activation of plasminogen induced by low dose UVB.

    PubMed

    Correia, Manuel; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn; Campos, Sara R R; Baptista, António M; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760-765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the elimination of

  12. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-01

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ~200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ~32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of~190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits.

  13. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-28

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ∼200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ∼32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of∼190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits.

  14. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ∼200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ∼32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of∼190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits. PMID:27892463

  15. Magnetoresponsive discoidal photonic crystals toward active color pigments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Soo; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Joon-Seok; Sim, Jae Young; Seo, Jung Yoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Yang, Seung-Man; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2014-09-03

    Photonic microdisks with a multilayered structure are designed from photocurable suspensions by step-by-step photolithography. In each step of photolithography, either a colloidal photonic crystal or a magnetic-particle-laden layer is stacked over the windows of a photomask. Sequential photolithography enables the creation of multilayered photonic microdisks that have brilliant structural colors that can be switched by an external magnetic field. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry: controlling the excitation dynamics for frequency up- and down-conversion in lanthanide-doped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-07-16

    Nanophotonics is an emerging science dealing with the interaction of light and matter on a nanometer scale and holds promise to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency conversion of infrared (IR) light. Scientists can control the excitation dynamics by using nanochemistry to produce hierarchically built nanostructures and tailor their interfaces. These nanophosphors can either perform frequency up-conversion from IR to visible or ultraviolet (UV) or down-conversion, which results in the IR light being further red shifted. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry open up numerous opportunities for these photon converters, including in high contrast bioimaging, photodynamic therapy, drug release and gene delivery, nanothermometry, and solar cells. Applications of these nanophosphors in these directions derive from three main stimuli. Light excitation and emission within the near-infrared (NIR) "optical transparency window" of tissues is ideal for high contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. This is due to low natural florescence, reduced scattering background, and deep penetration in tissues. Secondly, the naked eye is highly sensitive in the visible range, but it has no response to IR light. Therefore, many scientists have interest in the frequency up-conversion of IR wavelengths for security and display applications. Lastly, frequency up-conversion can convert IR photons to higher energy photons, which can then readily be absorbed by solar materials. Current solar devices do not use abundant IR light that comprises almost half of solar energy. In this Account, we present our recent work on nanophotonic control of frequency up- and down-conversion in fluoride nanophosphors, and their biophotonic and nanophotonic applications. Through nanoscopic control of phonon dynamics, electronic energy transfer, local crystal field, and surface-induced non-radiative processes, we were able to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency

  17. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, R. J.; Price, D. M.; Dixon, J. E.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Kok, P.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.; Makhonin, M. N.

    2016-03-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95+/-5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations.

  18. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer

    PubMed Central

    Coles, R. J.; Price, D. M.; Dixon, J. E.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Kok, P.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.; Makhonin, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95±5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations. PMID:27029961

  19. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Patrik; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Summary Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices. PMID:23766953

  20. Microwave platform as a valuable tool for characterization of nanophotonic devices

    PubMed Central

    Shishkin, Ivan; Baranov, Dmitry; Slobozhanyuk, Alexey; Filonov, Dmitry; Lukashenko, Stanislav; Samusev, Anton; Belov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The rich potential of the microwave experiments for characterization and optimization of optical devices is discussed. While the control of the light fields together with their spatial mapping at the nanoscale is still laborious and not always clear, the microwave setup allows to measure both amplitude and phase of initially determined magnetic and electric field components without significant perturbation of the near-field. As an example, the electromagnetic properties of an add-drop filter, which became a well-known workhorse of the photonics, is experimentally studied with the aid of transmission spectroscopy measurements in optical and microwave ranges and through direct mapping of the near fields at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate that the microwave experiments provide a unique platform for the comprehensive studies of electromagnetic properties of micro- and nanophotonic devices, and allow to obtain data which are hardly acquirable by conventional optical methods. PMID:27759058

  1. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films.

    PubMed

    Rath, Patrik; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram Hp

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices.

  2. High-Aspect-Ratio Nanophotonic Components Fabricated by Cl(2) RIBE

    SciTech Connect

    Zubrzycki, W.J.; Vawter, G.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1999-07-08

    We describe highly anisotropic reactive ion beam etching of nanophotonic structures in AlGaAs based on the ion beam divergence angle and chamber pressure. The divergence angle is shown to influence the shape of the upper portion of the etch while the chamber pressure controls the shape of the lower portion. This predictable region of parameter space resulted in highly anisotropic nanostructures. Deeply etched distributed Bragg reflectors are etched to an aspect ratio of 8:1 with 100 nm trench widths. The profile of the grating etch is straight with smooth sidewalls, flat bottoms, and squared corners. Two-dimensional photonic crystal post arrays are fabricated with smooth and vertical sidewalls, with structures as small as 180 nm in diameter and 2.0 {micro}m in height.

  3. Diamond nanocrystals for photonics and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are becoming a pivotal material in a variety of applications spanning sensing, bio-labeling and nanophotonics. The unique feature of these nanoparticles is their ability to host bright, optically active, photostable defects (color centers) that emit across the entire spectral range. In conjunction with their chemical stability and the relatively known carbon chemistry, nanodiamonds are becoming a key player in modern technologies. This brief review will highlight some of the recent advances of FNDs with an emphasis on nanophotonics.

  4. Hydrogen induced optically-active defects in silicon photonic nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Boninelli, S; Franzò, G; Cardile, P; Priolo, F; Lo Savio, R; Galli, M; Shakoor, A; O'Faolain, L; Krauss, T F; Vines, L; Svensson, B G

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate intense room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from optically active hydrogen- related defects incorporated into crystalline silicon. Hydrogen was incorporated into the device layer of a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer by two methods: hydrogen plasma treatment and ion implantation. The room temperature PL spectra show two broad PL bands centered at 1300 and 1500 nm wavelengths: the first one relates to implanted defects while the other band mainly relates to the plasma treatment. Structural characterization reveals the presence of nanometric platelets and bubbles and we attribute different features of the emission spectrum to the presence of these different kind of defects. The emission is further enhanced by introducing defects into photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that the isotropicity of plasma treatment causes the formation of a higher defects density around the whole cavity compared to the ion implantation technique, while ion implantation creates a lower density of defects embedded in the Si layer, resulting in a higher PL enhancement. These results further increase the understanding of the nature of optically active hydrogen defects and their relation with the observed photoluminescence, which will ultimately lead to the development of intense and tunable crystalline silicon light sources at room temperature.

  5. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen Induced by Low Dose UVB

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Manuel; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn; Campos, Sara R. R.; Baptista, António M.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760–765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the elimination of

  6. Dyadic green functions and their applications in classical and quantum nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vlack, Cole P.

    Research in solid-state nanophotonics and quantum optics has been recently pushing the limits in semiconductor microcavity design. High quality microcavities that confine light into small volumes are now able to drastically alter the local density of states (LDOS). Plasmonic systems can provide smaller effective confinements, however it is unclear if the benefits of confinement are good enough to balance material losses due to non-radiative processes. This thesis presents a compendium of techniques for calculating photonic Green functions in various lossy, inhomogeneous magneto-dielectric systems. Subsequently we derive a rigorous theory of quantum light-matter interactions, valid in both weak and strong coupling limits, and show how the classical photonic Green function is developed to calculate Purcell factors, Lamb shifts, and the near and far field spectra from a single photon emitter. Using these techniques, this work investigates the classical and quantum optical properties of a variety of inhomogeneous structures, including their coupling to single photon emitters. This includes examining Purcell factors above negative index slabs and showing the convergence of many slow-light modes leads to a drastic increase in the LDOS along with large Lamb shifts. The optical trapping of metallic nanoparticles is examined above a negative index slab and a silver half-space, showing the importance of interparticle coupling on the optical forces. Then the interaction between a quantum dot and a metallic nanoparticle is studied where far-field strong coupling effects are observed only when the metallic nanoparticle is considered beyond the dipole approximation. Finally, this work addresses the issue of the LDOS diverging in lossy materials, which necessitates a description of spontaneous emission beyond the dipole approximation; the "local field problem'' in quantum optics is revisited and generalized to include local field corrections for use in any photonic medium. The

  7. Photonic glasses: a step beyond white paint.

    PubMed

    García, Pedro David; Sapienza, Riccardo; López, Cefe

    2010-01-05

    Self-assembly techniques are widely used to grow ordered structures such as, for example, opal-based photonic crystals. Here, we report on photonic glasses, new disordered materials obtained via a modified self-assembling technique. These random materials are solid thin films which exhibit rich novel light diffusion properties originating from the optical properties of their building blocks. This novel material inaugurated a wide range of nanophotonic materials with fascinating applications, such as resonant random lasers or Anderson localization.

  8. Nanophotonics and hybrid plasmonics: different technologies and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinski, Lech; Sun, Xu; Thylén, Lars

    2017-05-01

    This paper gives a review of the recent progresses in our research on nanophotonics and hybrid plasmonic geometries, structures and devices. In the first part we present SOI-nanowire-based integrated components. The concept and different configurations of hybrid plasmonic structures will be then discussed. Finally different fabricated devices for applications in optical interconnects and sensing will be presented and characterized.

  9. Two-Photon Cavity Solitons in Active Optical Media

    SciTech Connect

    Vilaseca, R.; Torrent, M. C.; Garcia-Ojalvo, J.; Brambilla, M.; San Miguel, M.

    2001-08-20

    We show that broad-area cascade lasers with no absorbing intracavity elements support the spontaneous formation of two-dimensional bright localized structures in a dark background. These cavity solitons consist of islands of two-photon emission embedded in a background of single-photon emission. We discuss the mechanisms through which these structures are formed and interact, along with their properties and stability.

  10. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively.

  11. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  12. A Nanophotonic Structure Containing Living Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Coles, David; Flatten, Lucas C; Sydney, Thomas; Hounslow, Emily; Saikin, Semion K; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Vedral, Vlatko; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang; Taylor, Robert A; Smith, Jason M; Lidzey, David G

    2017-10-01

    Photosynthetic organisms rely on a series of self-assembled nanostructures with tuned electronic energy levels in order to transport energy from where it is collected by photon absorption, to reaction centers where the energy is used to drive chemical reactions. In the photosynthetic bacteria Chlorobaculum tepidum, a member of the green sulfur bacteria family, light is absorbed by large antenna complexes called chlorosomes to create an exciton. The exciton is transferred to a protein baseplate attached to the chlorosome, before migrating through the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to the reaction center. Here, it is shown that by placing living Chlorobaculum tepidum bacteria within a photonic microcavity, the strong exciton-photon coupling regime between a confined cavity mode and exciton states of the chlorosome can be accessed, whereby a coherent exchange of energy between the bacteria and cavity mode results in the formation of polariton states. The polaritons have energy distinct from that of the exciton which can be tuned by modifying the energy of the optical modes of the microcavity. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the modification of energy levels within living biological systems using a photonic structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Photonic Network R&D Activities in Japan-Current Activities and Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-Ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aoyama, Tomonori

    2005-10-01

    R&D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current ongoing R&D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching (OBS), and control-plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP-over-WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R&D programs for photonic networks over the next 5 years until 2010, by focusing on the report that has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R&D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis, through the customer's initiative to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  14. Bis(pyrene)-Doped Cationic Dipeptide Nanoparticles for Two-Photon-Activated Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Lei; Li, Qi; He, Pingping; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Hao; Yang, Yang; Li, Junbai

    2017-08-25

    At present, one of main problems for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is how to improve the treatment depth. Two-photon activated (TPA) developed recently provide a possible solution for it. In this work, we report the energy-transferring assembled cationic dipeptide nanoparticles for two-photon activated photodynamic therapy (TPA-PDT). In the nanoparticles, the coencapsulated two-photon fluorescent dye bis(pyrene) (BP) is an energy donor, and a photosensitizer rose bengal (RB) is an acceptor based on an intraparticle fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism. BP in the nanoparticles can be excited by one- or two- photon laser. And then, the energy of BP was transferred to RB, which highly enhanced the generation of singlet oxygen. The cellular experiments indicated that this nanosystem can induce the cytotoxicity under one- and two-photon irradiation, which allows further applications of FRET-based biomaterials for TPA-PDT.

  15. Nanoimprinted photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jayan; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Munoz, Ramon; Peyghambarian, N.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a simple yet efficient approach for nanoimprinting sub-50 nm dimensions starting from a low molecular weight plasticized polymer melt. This technique enabled us to successfully imprint versatile large area nanopatterns with high degrees of fidelity and rational control over the residual layers. The key advantage is its reliability in printing versatile nanostructures and nanophotonic devices doped with organic dyes owing to its low processing temperature. Since nanopatterns can be fabricated easily at low costs, this approach offers an easy pathway for achieving excellent nanoimprinted structures for a variety of photonic, electronic and biological research and applications.

  16. Nanophotonic ion production from silicon microcolumn arrays.

    PubMed

    Walker, Bennett N; Razunguzwa, Trust; Powell, Matthew; Knochenmuss, Richard; Vertes, Akos

    2009-01-01

    Nanoantennas for ions: Silicon microcolumn arrays harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions. The system behaves like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of polarization and the angle of incidence of the laser beam. Photonic ion sources promise to enable enhanced control of ion production on a micro- and nanometer scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

  17. Coupling of Surface Plasmons and Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Nanophotonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanti, Sriharsha V.

    The goal of this thesis is to engineer the interaction between surface plasmons and semiconductor nanocrystals for nanophotonic applications. Plasmonic metals support surface plasmon polaritons, hybrid photon and electron waves that propagate along a metal-dielectric interface. Unlike photons, surface plasmons can be confined in sub-diffraction geometries. This has two important consequences: 1) optical devices can be designed at the nanoscale, and 2) the high density of electromagnetic fields allows study of enhanced light-matter interactions. Surface plasmons have been exploited to demonstrate components of optoelectronic circuits, optical antennas, surface enhanced spectroscopy, enhanced fluorescence from fluorophores, and nanolasers. Despite the advances, surface plasmon losses limit their propagation lengths to tens of micrometers in the visible wavelengths, hindering many applications. Recently, the template-stripping approach was shown to fabricate metal films that exhibit larger grains and smoother surface, reducing the grain boundary and roughness scattering. To further improve the plasmonic properties, we investigate the importance of deposition conditions in the template-stripping approach. We provide insight and recipes to enhance the plasmonic performance of the most commonly used metals in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared. We also explore the potential of low temperatures to improve the performance of metal films, where the electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering should be reduced. This sets a limit on the minimum loss metals can exhibit. Using this knowledge, we study the optical properties of quantum-confined semiconductor nanocrystals near metal structures. Semiconductor nanocrystals have many attractive characteristics that make them suitable for solid-state lighting and solar cells among others. Specifically, CdSe nanocrystals have been heavily studied for their large absorption and emission cross-sections, size dependent

  18. Nanophotonics of biomaterials and inorganic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, P.; Agocs, E.; Kalas, B.; Fodor, B.; Lohner, T.; Nador, J.; Saftics, A.; Kurunczi, S.; Novotny, T.; Perez-Feró, E.; Nagy, R.; Hamori, A.; Horvath, R.; Hózer, Z.; Fried, M.

    2017-01-01

    Optical methods have been used for the sensitive characterization of surfaces and thin films for more than a century. The first ellipsometric measurement was conducted on metal surfaces by Paul Drude in 1889. The word ‘ellipsometer’ was first used by Rothen in a study of antigen-antibody interactions on polished metal surfaces in 1945. The ‘bible’ of ellipsometry has been published in the second half of the ‘70s. The publications in the topic of ellipsometry started to increase rapidly by the end of the ‘80s, together with concepts like surface plasmon resonance, later new topics like photonic crystals emerged. These techniques find applications in many fields, including sensorics or photovoltaics. In optical sensorics, the highest sensitivities were achieved by waveguide interferometry and plasmon resonance configurations. The instrumentation of ellipsometry is also being developed intensively towards higher sensitivity and performance by combinations with plasmonics, scatterometry, imaging or waveguide methods, utilizing the high sensitivity, high speed, non-destructive nature and mapping capabilities. Not only the instrumentation but also the methods of evaluation show a significant development, which leads to the characterization of structures with increasing complexity, including photonic, porous or metal surfaces. This article discusses a selection of interesting applications of photonics in the Centre for Energy Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  19. Oxides in plasmonics and nanophotonics: materials and dynamic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Cleirci, Matteo; Ferrera, Marcello; Kim, Jongbum; DeVault, Clayton; Shaltout, Amr M.; Faccio, Daniele; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) have long been used in optics and electronics for their unique combination of both high transmission and high electrical conductivity. In recent years, the impact of such TCOs has been felt in the subgenre of nanophotonics and plasmonics.1-3 Specifically, the TCOs provide plasmonic response in the near infrared and infrared region,4 epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) properties in the telecom band, tunable static optical properties through deposition/annealing control,5 and the potential for dynamic control of their properties under electrical or optical biasing.6-8 Due to the combination of these interesting properties, TCOs such as In:SnO (ITO), Al:ZnO (AZO), and Ga:ZnO (GZO) have become leaders in the drive to produce high-performance dynamic and alternative nanophotonic devices and metamaterials. In our work, we have studied the potential for optical control of AZO thin films using both above bandgap and below bandgap excitation, noting strong changes in reflection/transmission with enhancement due to the ENZ as well as ultrafast response times less than 1 ps. Using a photo-modified carrier density and recombination to model above bandgap excitation, we demonstrated 40%/30% change in the reflection/transmission of a 350 nm AZO film with an 88 fs recombination time, corresponding to a modification of the carrier density by 10%.6 Below bandgap excitation has experimentally shown the potential for similar variations in the reflection and transmission under increased fluences with a factor of 8x increase in the normalized ΔR at ENZ. Current efforts are focused to model the material response as well as to investigate electrical modulation of AZO films. In summary, our work has demonstrated the potential for optical control of AZO films both above and below bandgap on an ultrafast timescale which can be enhanced through ENZ. Combining this with traditional nanophotonic and metamaterial devices opens a broad range of high impact studies such

  20. High-quality Si3N4 circuits as a platform for graphene-based nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Gruhler, N; Benz, C; Jang, H; Ahn, J-H; Danneau, R; Pernice, W H P

    2013-12-16

    Hybrid circuits combining traditional nanophotonic components with carbon-based materials are emerging as a promising platform for optoelectronic devices. We demonstrate such circuits by integrating single-layer graphene films with silicon nitride waveguides as a new architecture for broadband optical operation. Using high-quality microring resonators and Mach-Zehnder interferometers with extinction ratios beyond 40 dB we realize flexible circuits for phase-sensitive detection on chip. Hybrid graphene-photonic devices are fabricated via mechanical transfer and lithographic structuring, allowing for prolonged light-matter interactions. Our approach holds promise for studying optical processes in low-dimensional physical systems and for realizing electrically tunable photonic circuits.

  1. System-level integration of active silicon photonic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laplatine, L.; Al'Mrayat, O.; Luan, E.; Fang, C.; Rezaiezadeh, S.; Ratner, D. M.; Cheung, K.; Dattner, Y.; Chrostowski, L.

    2017-02-01

    Biosensors based on silicon photonic integrated circuits have attracted a growing interest in recent years. The use of sub-micron silicon waveguides to propagate near-infrared light allows for the drastic reduction of the optical system size, while increasing its complexity and sensitivity. Using silicon as the propagating medium also leverages the fabrication capabilities of CMOS foundries, which offer low-cost mass production. Researchers have deeply investigated photonic sensor devices, such as ring resonators, interferometers and photonic crystals, but the practical integration of silicon photonic biochips as part of a complete system has received less attention. Herein, we present a practical system-level architecture which can be employed to integrate the aforementioned photonic biosensors. We describe a system based on 1 mm2 dies that integrate germanium photodetectors and a single light coupling device. The die are embedded into a 16x16 mm2 epoxy package to enable microfluidic and electrical integration. First, we demonstrate a simple process to mimic Fan-Out Wafer-level-Packaging, which enables low-cost mass production. We then characterize the photodetectors in the photovoltaic mode, which exhibit high sensitivity at low optical power. Finally, we present a new grating coupler concept to relax the lateral alignment tolerance down to +/- 50 μm at 1-dB (80%) power penalty, which should permit non-experts to use the biochips in a"plug-and-play" style. The system-level integration demonstrated in this study paves the way towards the mass production of low-cost and highly sensitive biosensors, and can facilitate their wide adoption for biomedical and agro-environmental applications.

  2. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed. PMID:25822135

  3. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein distribution in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-30

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  4. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  5. Resonant Nanophotonic Spectrum Splitting for Ultrathin Multijunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach to spectrum splitting for photovoltaics that utilizes the resonant optical properties of nanostructures for simultaneous voltage enhancement and spatial separation of different colors of light. Using metal–insulator–metal resonators commonly used in broadband metamaterial absorbers we show theoretically that output voltages can be enhanced significantly compared to single-junction devices. However, the approach is general and works for any type of resonator with a large absorption cross section. Due to its resonant nature, the spectrum splitting occurs within only a fraction of the wavelength, as opposed to traditional spectrum splitting methods, where many wavelengths are required. Combining nanophotonic spectrum splitting with other nanophotonic approaches to voltage enhancements, such as angle restriction and concentration, may lead to highly efficient but deeply subwavelength photovoltaic devices. PMID:26322319

  6. Resonant Nanophotonic Spectrum Splitting for Ultrathin Multijunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, Sander A; Garnett, Erik C

    2015-07-15

    We present an approach to spectrum splitting for photovoltaics that utilizes the resonant optical properties of nanostructures for simultaneous voltage enhancement and spatial separation of different colors of light. Using metal-insulator-metal resonators commonly used in broadband metamaterial absorbers we show theoretically that output voltages can be enhanced significantly compared to single-junction devices. However, the approach is general and works for any type of resonator with a large absorption cross section. Due to its resonant nature, the spectrum splitting occurs within only a fraction of the wavelength, as opposed to traditional spectrum splitting methods, where many wavelengths are required. Combining nanophotonic spectrum splitting with other nanophotonic approaches to voltage enhancements, such as angle restriction and concentration, may lead to highly efficient but deeply subwavelength photovoltaic devices.

  7. Toward large-area roll-to-roll printed nanophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karioja, Pentti; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna M.; Alajoki, Teemu; Tuominen, Jarkko; Hiltunen, Marianne; Siitonen, Samuli; Kontturi, Ville; Böhlen, Karl; Hauser, Rene; Charlton, Martin; Boersma, Arjen; Lieberzeit, Peter; Felder, Thorsten; Eustace, David; Haskal, Eliav

    2014-05-01

    Polymers have become an important material group in fabricating discrete photonic components and integrated optical devices. This is due to their good properties: high optical transmittance, versatile processability at relative low temperatures and potential for low-cost production. Recently, nanoimprinting or nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has obtained a plenty of research interest. In NIL, a mould is pressed against a substrate coated with a moldable material. After deformation of the material, the mold is separated and a replica of the mold is formed. Compared with conventional lithographic methods, imprinting is simple to carry out, requires less-complicated equipment and can provide high-resolution with high throughput. Nanoimprint lithography has shown potential to become a method for low-cost and high-throughput fabrication of nanostructures. We show the development process of nano-structured, large-area multi-parameter sensors using Photonic Crystal (PC) and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) methodologies for environmental and pharmaceutical applications. We address these challenges by developing roll-to-roll (R2R) UV-nanoimprint fabrication methods. Our development steps are the following: Firstly, the proof of concept structures are fabricated by the use of wafer-level processes in Si-based materials. Secondly, the master molds of successful designs are fabricated, and they are used to transfer the nanophotonic structures into polymer materials using sheet-level UV-nanoimprinting. Thirdly, the sheet-level nanoimprinting processes are transferred to roll-to-roll fabrication. In order to enhance roll-to-roll manufacturing capabilities, silicone-based polymer material development was carried out. In the different development phases, Photonic Crystal and SERS sensor structures with increasing complexities were fabricated using polymer materials in order to enhance sheet-level and roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. In addition, chemical and molecular

  8. Silicon Nanophotonics for Many-Core On-Chip Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Moustafa

    Number of cores in many-core architectures are scaling to unprecedented levels requiring ever increasing communication capacity. Traditionally, architects follow the path of higher throughput at the expense of latency. This trend has evolved into being problematic for performance in many-core architectures. Moreover, the trends of power consumption is increasing with system scaling mandating nontraditional solutions. Nanophotonics can address these problems, offering benefits in the three frontiers of many-core processor design: Latency, bandwidth, and power. Nanophotonics leverage circuit-switching flow control allowing low latency; in addition, the power consumption of optical links is significantly lower compared to their electrical counterparts at intermediate and long links. Finally, through wave division multiplexing, we can keep the high bandwidth trends without sacrificing the throughput. This thesis focuses on realizing nanophotonics for communication in many-core architectures at different design levels considering reliability challenges that our fabrication and measurements reveal. First, we study how to design on-chip networks for low latency, low power, and high bandwidth by exploiting the full potential of nanophotonics. The design process considers device level limitations and capabilities on one hand, and system level demands in terms of power and performance on the other hand. The design involves the choice of devices, designing the optical link, the topology, the arbitration technique, and the routing mechanism. Next, we address the problem of reliability in on-chip networks. Reliability not only degrades performance but can block communication. Hence, we propose a reliability-aware design flow and present a reliability management technique based on this flow to address reliability in the system. In the proposed flow reliability is modeled and analyzed for at the device, architecture, and system level. Our reliability management technique is

  9. Design of nanophotonic circuits for autonomous subsystem quantum error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerckhoff, J.; Pavlichin, D. S.; Chalabi, H.; Mabuchi, H.

    2011-05-01

    We reapply our approach to designing nanophotonic quantum memories in order to formulate an optical network that autonomously protects a single logical qubit against arbitrary single-qubit errors. Emulating the nine-qubit Bacon-Shor subsystem code, the network replaces the traditionally discrete syndrome measurement and correction steps by continuous, time-independent optical interactions and coherent feedback of unitarily processed optical fields.

  10. Quantifying losses and thermodynamic limits in nanophotonic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Sander A.; Oener, Sebastian Z.; Cavalli, Alessandro; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Garnett, Erik C.

    2016-12-01

    Nanophotonic engineering shows great potential for photovoltaics: the record conversion efficiencies of nanowire solar cells are increasing rapidly and the record open-circuit voltages are becoming comparable to the records for planar equivalents. Furthermore, it has been suggested that certain nanophotonic effects can reduce costs and increase efficiencies with respect to planar solar cells. These effects are particularly pronounced in single-nanowire devices, where two out of the three dimensions are subwavelength. Single-nanowire devices thus provide an ideal platform to study how nanophotonics affects photovoltaics. However, for these devices the standard definition of power conversion efficiency no longer applies, because the nanowire can absorb light from an area much larger than its own size. Additionally, the thermodynamic limit on the photovoltage is unknown a priori and may be very different from that of a planar solar cell. This complicates the characterization and optimization of these devices. Here, we analyse an InP single-nanowire solar cell using intrinsic metrics to place its performance on an absolute thermodynamic scale and pinpoint performance loss mechanisms. To determine these metrics we have developed an integrating sphere microscopy set-up that enables simultaneous and spatially resolved quantitative absorption, internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) measurements. For our record single-nanowire solar cell, we measure a photocurrent collection efficiency of >90% and an open-circuit voltage of 850 mV, which is 73% of the thermodynamic limit (1.16 V).

  11. Quantifying losses and thermodynamic limits in nanophotonic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, Sander A; Oener, Sebastian Z; Cavalli, Alessandro; Haverkort, Jos E M; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Garnett, Erik C

    2016-12-01

    Nanophotonic engineering shows great potential for photovoltaics: the record conversion efficiencies of nanowire solar cells are increasing rapidly and the record open-circuit voltages are becoming comparable to the records for planar equivalents. Furthermore, it has been suggested that certain nanophotonic effects can reduce costs and increase efficiencies with respect to planar solar cells. These effects are particularly pronounced in single-nanowire devices, where two out of the three dimensions are subwavelength. Single-nanowire devices thus provide an ideal platform to study how nanophotonics affects photovoltaics. However, for these devices the standard definition of power conversion efficiency no longer applies, because the nanowire can absorb light from an area much larger than its own size. Additionally, the thermodynamic limit on the photovoltage is unknown a priori and may be very different from that of a planar solar cell. This complicates the characterization and optimization of these devices. Here, we analyse an InP single-nanowire solar cell using intrinsic metrics to place its performance on an absolute thermodynamic scale and pinpoint performance loss mechanisms. To determine these metrics we have developed an integrating sphere microscopy set-up that enables simultaneous and spatially resolved quantitative absorption, internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) measurements. For our record single-nanowire solar cell, we measure a photocurrent collection efficiency of >90% and an open-circuit voltage of 850 mV, which is 73% of the thermodynamic limit (1.16 V).

  12. Fabrication and characterization of integrated nanostructures & their applications to nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Shobha

    simple azimuthal rotation of photonic crystals. Detailed studies have been performed to understand the underlying phenomenon/physics. Plasmonic nanostructures are also very attractive due to their ability to tune the plasmonic response by changing geometry. Plasmonic nanoarrays have been prepared by templating in porous alumina template and have been found to show extended response in infrared region owing to transverse plasmon coupling in nanoarrays. We have also prepared several planar optically active structures via two-photon lithography. In situ reduction of metal salt with simultaneous polymerization of SU-8 was utilized for making all plasmonic nanostructures. Detailed studies involving expected chemical reaction and structural/optical properties have been performed to characterize the same.

  13. EDITORIAL: The next photonic revolution The next photonic revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2009-11-01

    dependence upon active and switchable photonic metamaterials and nanophotonic devices. This revolution will lead to dramatic new science and applications on a global scale in all technologies using light, from data storage to optical processing of information, from sensing to light harvesting and energy conversion. Five plenary talks at the conference outlined its topical boundaries. They were given by Sir Michael Berry, Bristol University, UK, who spoke on the new topic of optical super-oscillations; Harry A Atwater, California Institute of Technology, USA, who gave an overview of recent developments in plasmonics; Christian Colliex, Université Paris-Sud, France, who presented the concept of electron energy-loss spectroscopy for the study of localized plasmons; Xiang Zhang, University of California at Berkeley, USA, who talked about recent achievements in the optical super-lens, and Antoinette Taylor, National Laboratory, Los Alamos, USA, who discussed recent work on tunable terahertz metamaterials. In the specially assigned `breakthrough' talks Steven Anlage, University of Maryland, USA, introduced the emerging field of superconducting meta-materials, Tobias Kippenberg, Max-Planck-Institut, Garching, Germany, talked about cavity optomechanics on a chip, while Misha Lukin, Harvard University, USA, explored the field of quantum plasmonics and Victor Prinz, Russian Academy of Science, Russia, introduced a novel class of metamaterials based on three-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. The topical scope of this special section, to a great extent, echoes the paradigm shift in the NANOMETA community and includes papers on nanofabrication of plasmonic structure, transformation optics and invisibility, mapping of fields in nanostructures, nonlinear and magnetoplasmonic media, coherent effects in metamaterials, loss compensation in nanostructures, slow light and ultrafast switching of plasmon signals, and many other topics. The Guest Editor of this special section and the co

  14. Bioinspired Structures and Devices for Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Christopher J.

    2010-03-01

    The catalog of novel material structures and device concepts being discovered in biological systems continues to grow with astonishing speed. Nature's ``innovations'' include various strategies for structural coloration,footnotetext M. Srinivasarao, Chemical Reviews 99, 1935 (1999) broadband nanostructured low- and high-reflective surfaces, photonic crystal light collection schemes and unique multi-colored polarization based vision systems. Nature achieves these effects using very low-index structures and hierarchal fabrication schemes. In this presentation we review some of these key discoveries and present physical based fabrication strategies that emulate nature. For example, the green wing color of the Papilio palinurus butterfly results from a micro-bowl array formed from multilayers of air and chitin and is a consequence of the mixing of yellow light reflected from the bottom of the bowls and blue light reflected from the sides of the bowls.footnotetext P. Vukusic, J. R. Sambles, C. R. Lawrence, Nature 404, 457 (2000) We have emulated this strategy by using breath figure templated self-assembly to mimic the microbowl structure and then by atomic layer deposition of TiO2/Al2O3 multilayer films obtained the same coloration as the original butterfly structure. Additionally, other bioinspired schemes, such as those derived from the fluorescence properties displayed by the Princeps nireus butterfly which have lead to new concepts for detecting thermal neutrons, are presented.

  15. Plasmonic Enhancement in BiVO4 Photonic Crystals for Efficient Water Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwu; Lin, Chia-Yu; Valev, Ventsislav K; Reisner, Erwin; Steiner, Ullrich; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-01-01

    Photo-electrochemical water splitting is a very promising and environmentally friendly route for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen. However, the solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency is still very low due to rapid bulk recombination of charge carriers. Here, a photonic nano-architecture is developed to improve charge carrier generation and separation by manipulating and confining light absorption in a visible-light-active photoanode constructed from BiVO4 photonic crystal and plasmonic nanostructures. Synergistic effects of photonic crystal stop bands and plasmonic absorption are observed to operate in this photonic nanostructure. Within the scaffold of an inverse opal photonic crystal, the surface plasmon resonance is significantly enhanced by the photonic Bragg resonance. Nanophotonic photoanodes show AM 1.5 photocurrent densities of 3.1 ± 0.1 mA cm−2 at 1.23 V versus RHE, which is among the highest for oxide-based photoanodes and over 4 times higher than the unstructured planar photoanode. PMID:24916174

  16. Plasmonic enhancement in BiVO4 photonic crystals for efficient water splitting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwu; Lin, Chia-Yu; Valev, Ventsislav K; Reisner, Erwin; Steiner, Ullrich; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-10-15

    Photo-electrochemical water splitting is a very promising and environmentally friendly route for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen. However, the solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency is still very low due to rapid bulk recombination of charge carriers. Here, a photonic nano-architecture is developed to improve charge carrier generation and separation by manipulating and confining light absorption in a visible-light-active photoanode constructed from BiVO4 photonic crystal and plasmonic nanostructures. Synergistic effects of photonic crystal stop bands and plasmonic absorption are observed to operate in this photonic nanostructure. Within the scaffold of an inverse opal photonic crystal, the surface plasmon resonance is significantly enhanced by the photonic Bragg resonance. Nanophotonic photoanodes show AM 1.5 photocurrent densities of 3.1 ± 0.1 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus RHE, which is among the highest for oxide-based photoanodes and over 4 times higher than the unstructured planar photoanode. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of micro- /nano structures for nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Hongsub

    The objective of this thesis is finding and developing fabrication methods to provide background techniques for potential applications with nanomaterials. The inclined UV lithography has announced to make three-dimensional fabrication process. With a movable stage, complex structures were achieved but difference of the refractive index, design of the final structures were limited. Refractive index matching medium between the substrate and the light source could reduce the refractive indices between the polymer and the substrate successfully. Nanoporous structures fabricated by multibeam interference lithography shows limitation of the usage since its periodicity. By insertion of the lift off resist layer between the patterned layer and the substrate, final photonic crystal structures could be partially removed for its own purpose and it provide potential application in the future. Two-step processing, combining with reactive ion etching system, nanoporous structures were on various substrates such as silicon and Polydimethylsiloxane. Photonic crystal template anodic aluminum oxide process has been described too. Large optical activity at visible wavelengths are of great attention in photonics. Dramatic enhancement of the optical activity of chiral poly(fluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) with photoresist was demonstrated and successive photo patterning of chiral polymer shows the potential usage of this material for the photonics applications. Two photon lithography also used to pattern a photoresist-chiral polymer mixture into planar shapes and enhanced chirality can be realized by tuning the wavelength-dependent chiral response at both the molecular and geometric level. Near infrared light induced photopolymerization in-situ was demonstrated which can be applied everywhere where ultraviolet-polymerization is employed such as dentistry, coating industry. Use of the ultraviolet upconverting nanoparticles doped into the polymer, we show that expensive femtosecond pulsed

  18. Maleimide activation of photon upconverting nanoparticles for bioconjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B.; Soukka, Tero; Wolfbeis, Otto S.; Gorris, Hans H.

    2012-12-01

    Photon upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) have become an important new class of optical labels. Their unique property of emitting visible light after photo-excitation with near-infrared radiation enables biological imaging without background interference or cell damage. Biological applications require UCNPs that are dispersible in water and allow the attachment of biomolecules. Oleic acid-coated UCNPs obtained by solvothermal synthesis were functionalized with both hydrophilic PEG and thiol-reactive maleimides, either by ligand exchange or by silanization. Three different types of maleimide-functionalized UCNPs were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and Raman spectroscopy. Ligand exchange of oleic acid by maleimide-PEG-COOH yielded UCNPs that did not aggregate, were colloidally stable and reacted readily with proteins. Such luminescent labels are required for background-free imaging and many other bioanalytical applications.

  19. An innovative nanophotonic information processing concept implementing cogent micro/nanosensors for space robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoli, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    Cogent sensors, defined as sensors that are capable of performing the transformation of raw data into information, are shown to be of the essence for realization of the long sought-after autonomous robots for space applications. A strongly miniaturized integration of sensing and information processing systems is needed for cogent sensors designed for autonomous sensing—information processing (IP)—actuating behavior. It is shown that the recently developed field of quantum holography (QH), stemming from geometric quantization of any holographic processes through the Heisenberg Group (G) and deeply different, as stressed in detail, from other meanings of "quantum holography" in the literature, supplies the nanophotonic tools for designing and assembling an associative memory (AM) as the brain implementing such strong cogency. An AM is designed through a free-space interconnected large planar multilayer architecture of quantum well-based two-port neurons implementing a shift register on the manifold of G, and whose input consists of photonic holograms from high frequency pulsed microlasers in the infrared band of em or em-transduced outside signals. The optoelectronics as relative, integrated into a hybrid chip involving photonic detectors, microlasers and electronic components for the clock control system, would allow cycle times as short as 30 ns with the large spatial bandwidth available in photonics. IP through QH concerns the encoding and decoding of holographic interference patterns, not of mere binary digital logical (syntactic) information. Accordingly, QH defines on the G's manifold an IP paradigm where information as experimental knowledge is processed; i.e., IP concerns both syntax and semantics. It is shown that such QH-neural brain would cogently deal with spurious signals as random noise that would be caused to die out on the way to the intended target through parallel massive and real-time IP.

  20. A novel micro-pulse laser active imaging method based on photon counting scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenghao; Yin, Wenye; Miao, Zhuang; He, Wei-ji; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guo-Hua

    2013-12-01

    We present the use and characterization of a Single Photon Detector (SPD) for active micro-pulse laser imaging. Laser active imaging technology obtains the two dimensional (2D) intensity information of objects by using the active continuous or pulsed laser illumination and an image sensor array. The Maximum range of laser active imaging is limited by the performance of image sensor, whose noise can seriously lower the obtainable SNR and degrade the quality of the reconstructed image. This paper presents a photon counting scheme based micro-pulse laser active imaging method that utilizes the SPD as the receiver and the micro-pulsed laser as the source. In this case, SPD was used to detect the laser echo. By using repeated multi-cycle detection strategies, every detected photon event is treated as an independent measurement of laser echo and thus the intensity information of objects is acquired with the response possibility estimation of laser echo. We chose a Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiodes (GM-APD) based approach, extending the methods of micro-pulse laser active imaging. In our implement, the number of TTL pulses output from the GM-APD within the duration of the pixel dwell time was recorder by a LabView pre-programmed instrument and then the laser echo response possibility of GM-APD was established by Full Waveform Analysis algorithm. This approach combined remote imaging with single photon sensitivity and laser active imaging.

  1. Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett; Antonakos, Cory; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2013-01-01

    ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

  2. Active quenching circuit for single-photon detection with Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Stipcević, Mario

    2009-03-20

    In this paper a novel construction of an active quenching circuit intended for single-photon detection is presented, along with a few original methods for its evaluation. The circuit has been combined with a standard avalanche photodiode C30902S to form a single-photon detector. This detector has a dead time of 39 ns, maximum random counting frequency of 14 MHz, small afterpulsing probability, an estimated peak detection efficiency of over 20%, and a dark count rate of less than 100 Hz. This simple and robust active quenching circuit can be built from off-the-shelf electronic components and is presented with the detailed schematic diagram.

  3. Phase-sensitive amplification in silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanbing; Husko, Chad; Schröder, Jochen; Lefrancois, Simon; Rey, Isabella H; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2014-01-15

    We experimentally demonstrate phase-sensitive amplification in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide based on pump-degenerate four-wave mixing. An 11 dB phase-extinction ratio is obtained in a record compact 196 μm nanophotonic device due to broadband slow light, in spite of the presence of two-photon absorption and free carriers. Numerical calculations show good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol-gel and rf-sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Alombert-Goget, G.; Armellini, C.; Berneschi, S.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Boulard, B.; Brenci, M.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Duverger-Arfuso, C.; Féron, P.; Gonçalves, R. R.; Jestin, Y.; Minati, L.; Moser, E.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Rao, D. N.; Retoux, R.; Righini, G. C.; Speranza, G.

    2009-05-01

    The realization of photonic structures operating at visible and near infrared frequencies is a highly attractive scientific and technological challenge. Since optical fiber innovation, a huge of activity has been performed leading to interesting results, such as optical waveguides and planar lightwave circuits, microphotonic devices, optical microcavities, nanowires, plasmonic structures, and photonic crystals. These systems have opened new possibilities in the field of both basic and applied physics, in a large area covering Information Communication Technologies, Health and Biology, Structural Engineering, and Environment Monitoring Systems. Several materials and techniques are employed to successfully fabricate photonic structures. Concerning materials, Er3+-activated silica-based glasses still play an important role, although recently interesting results have been published about fluoride glass-ceramic waveguides. As far as regards the fabrication methods sol-gel route and rf sputtering have proved to be versatile and reliable techniques. In this article we will present a review of some Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol gel route and rf sputtering deposition. In the discussion on the sol-gel approach we focus our attention on the silica-hafnia binary system presenting an overview concerning fabrication protocols and structural, optical and spectroscopic assessment of SiO2-HfO2 waveguides activated by Er3+ ions. In order to put in evidence the reliability and versatility of the sol-gel route for photonics applications four different confined structures are briefly presented: amorphous waveguides, coated microspheres, monolithic waveguide laser, and core-shell nanospheres. As examples of rf sputtering technique, we will discuss Er3+-activated silica-hafnia and silica-germania waveguides, the latter system allowing fabrication of integrated optics structures by UV photo-imprinting. Finally, two examples of photonic crystal structures, one

  5. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500–3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip. PMID:25697764

  6. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W; Van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-02-20

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500-3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip.

  7. Active glass-polymer superlattice structure for photonic integration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhanxiang; Jose, Gin; Fernandez, Toney T; Comyn, Tim P; Irannejad, Mehrdad; Steenson, Paul; Harrington, John P; Ward, Michael; Bamiedakis, Nikos; Penty, Richard V; White, Ian H; Jha, Animesh

    2012-06-08

    We propose an all-laser processing approach allowing controlled growth of organic-inorganic superlattice structures of rare-earth ion doped tellurium-oxide-based glass and optically transparent polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) polymer; the purpose of which is to illustrate the structural and thermal compatibility of chemically dissimilar materials at the nanometer scale. Superlattice films with interlayer thicknesses as low as 2 nm were grown using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at low temperatures (100 °C). Planar waveguides were successfully patterned by femtosecond-laser micro-machining for light propagation and efficient Er(3+)-ion amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The proposed approach to achieve polymer-glass integration will allow the fabrication of efficient and durable polymer optical amplifiers and lossless photonic devices. The all-laser processing approach, discussed further in this paper, permits the growth of films of a multitude of chemically complex and dissimilar materials for a range of optical, thermal, mechanical and biological functions, which otherwise are impossible to integrate via conventional materials processing techniques.

  8. Advances in the theoretical understanding of photon upconversion in rare-earth activated nanophosphors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guokui

    2015-03-21

    Photon upconversion in rare earth activated phosphors involves multiple mechanisms of electronic transitions. Stepwise optical excitation, energy transfer, and various nonlinear and collective light-matter interaction processes act together to convert low-energy photons into short-wavelength light emission. Upconversion luminescence from nanomaterials exhibits additional size and surface dependencies. A fundamental understanding of the overall performance of an upconversion system requires basic theories on the spectroscopic properties of solids containing rare earth ions. This review article surveys the recent progress in the theoretical interpretations of the spectroscopic characteristics and luminescence dynamics of photon upconversion in rare earth activated phosphors. The primary aspects of upconversion processes, including energy level splitting, transition probability, line broadening, non-radiative relaxation and energy transfer, are covered with an emphasis on interpreting experimental observations. Theoretical models and methods for analyzing nano-phenomena in upconversion are introduced with detailed discussions on recently reported experimental results.

  9. Statistical analysis on activation and photo-bleaching of step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zetong; Lai, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Jihao; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is regarded as the most enigmatic pigments/biopolymers found in most organisms. We have shown previously that melanin goes through a step-wise multi-photon absorption process after the fluorescence has been activated with high laser intensity. No melanin step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) can be obtained without the activation process. The step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence has been observed to require less laser power than what would be expected from a non-linear optical process. In this paper, we examined the power dependence of the activation process of melanin SMPAF at 830nm and 920nm wavelengths. We have conducted research using varying the laser power to activate the melanin in a point-scanning mode for multi-photon microscopy. We recorded the fluorescence signals and position. A sequence of experiments indicates the relationship of activation to power, energy and time so that we can optimize the power level. Also we explored regional analysis of melanin to study the spatial relationship in SMPAF and define three types of regions which exhibit differences in the activation process.

  10. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example 232Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  11. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-02-09

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  12. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors. PMID:20672066

  13. Interfacing single photons and single quantum dots with photonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodahl, Peter; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Stobbe, Søren

    2015-04-01

    Photonic nanostructures provide a means of tailoring the interaction between light and matter and the past decade has witnessed tremendous experimental and theoretical progress on this subject. In particular, the combination with semiconductor quantum dots has proven successful. This manuscript reviews quantum optics with excitons in single quantum dots embedded in photonic nanostructures. The ability to engineer the light-matter interaction strength in integrated photonic nanostructures enables a range of fundamental quantum-electrodynamics experiments on, e.g., spontaneous-emission control, modified Lamb shifts, and enhanced dipole-dipole interaction. Furthermore, highly efficient single-photon sources and giant photon nonlinearities may be implemented with immediate applications for photonic quantum-information processing. This review summarizes the general theoretical framework of photon emission including the role of dephasing processes and applies it to photonic nanostructures of current interest, such as photonic-crystal cavities and waveguides, dielectric nanowires, and plasmonic waveguides. The introduced concepts are generally applicable in quantum nanophotonics and apply to a large extent also to other quantum emitters, such as molecules, nitrogen vacancy centers, or atoms. Finally, the progress and future prospects of applications in quantum-information processing are considered.

  14. Characterization of photonic nanojets in dielectric microdisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Chien-Jung

    2015-09-01

    The direct imaging of photonic nanojets in different dielectric microdisks illuminated by a laser source is reported. The SiO2 and Si3N4 microdisks are of height 650 nm with diameters ranging from 3 μm to 8 μm. The finite-difference time-domain calculation is used to execute the numerical simulation for the photonic nanojets in the dielectric microdisks. The photonic nanojet measurements are performed with a scanning optical microscope system. The photonic nanojets with high intensity spots and low divergence are observed in the dielectric microdisks illuminated from the side with laser source of wavelengths 405 nm, 532 nm and 671 nm. The experimental results of key parameters are compared to the simulations and in agreement with theoretical results. Our studies show that photonic nanojets can be efficiently created by a dielectric microdisk and straightforwardly applied to nano-photonics circuit.

  15. Nanophotonic implementation of optoelectrowetting for microdroplet actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Christopher M.; Hill, Kyle A.; DeWachter, Mark A.; Huizing, Alexander M.; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2015-02-01

    The development and ultimate operation of a nanocomposite high-aspect-ratio photoinjection (HARP) device is presented in this work. The device makes use of a nanocomposite material as the optically active layer and the device achieves a large optical penetration depth with a high aspect ratio which provides a strong actuation force far away from the point of photoinjection. The nanocomposite material can be continuously illuminated and the position of the microdroplets can, therefore, be controlled to diffraction limited resolution. The nanocomposite HARP device shows great potential for future on-chip applications.

  16. Determining concentrations of elements with different reaction channels in photon activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z J; Okafor, K; Isa, S

    2017-09-01

    In photon activation, same element may be activated by the bremsstrahlung beam through different nuclear reaction channels and produce different radioisotopes. These radioisotopes follow their own decay schemes and generate characteristic gamma rays. This phenomenon usually is an interference in spectra analysis, but it also offers a theoretical feasibility to determine the concentration of one element through different reaction channels. To realize this theoretical feasibility, we conducted series of photon activation experiments with sample and reference of known concentrations. Irradiation of the samples and the references were conducted with electronic LINAC with different photon converters at a peak energy around 30MeV. Several elements and their corresponding reaction channels were chosen to validate this procedure. Calculations of PAA were based on the internal monitor method. Our results have confirmed the advantages of current PAA reaction channel selection, and show that it might be beneficial to calculate the concentration of same elements with different reaction channels in some certain occasions. N-values, which indicate the relative intensity of reaction channels, were calculated and compared with those values generated from the photon activation at the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing in Germany (BAM). Results suggested that N values are impacted by several parameters of electron beam, and the design of electron-gamma converter may play a dominant role in determining N values. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Two-Photon Activation of p-Hydroxyphenacyl Phototriggers: Toward Spatially Controlled Release of Diethyl Phosphate and ATP.

    PubMed

    Houk, Amanda L; Givens, Richard S; Elles, Christopher G

    2016-03-31

    Two-photon activation of the p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) photoactivated protecting group is demonstrated for the first time using visible light at 550 nm from a pulsed laser. Broadband two-photon absorption measurements reveal a strong two-photon transition (>10 GM) near 4.5 eV that closely resembles the lowest-energy band at the same total excitation energy in the one-photon absorption spectrum of the pHP chromophore. The polarization dependence of the two-photon absorption band is consistent with excitation to the same S3 ((1)ππ*) excited state for both one- and two-photon activation. Monitoring the progress of the uncaging reaction under nonresonant excitation at 550 nm confirms a quadratic intensity dependence and that two-photon activation of the uncaging reaction is possible using visible light in the range 500-620 nm. Deprotonation of the pHP chromophore under mildly basic conditions shifts the absorption band to lower energy (3.8 eV) in both the one- and two-photon absorption spectra, suggesting that two-photon activation of the pHP chromophore may be possible using light in the range 550-720 nm. The results of these measurements open the possibility of spatially and temporally selective release of biologically active compounds from the pHP protecting group using visible light from a pulsed laser.

  18. A BODIPY-based two-photon fluorescent probe validates tyrosinase activity in live cells.

    PubMed

    Naidu Bobba, Kondapa; Won, Miae; Shim, Inseob; Velusamy, Nithya; Yang, Zhigang; Qu, Junle; Kim, Jong Seung; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad

    2017-10-10

    Herein, we report rational design, synthesis, and application of a two-photon fluorescent probe (Tyro-1) for tracking intracellular tyrosinase activity. The chemoselective detection of tyrosinase is precluded from interference of other competitive omnipresent oxidizing entities in cellular milieu. The probe showed 12.5-fold fluorescence enhancement at λem = 450 nm in the presence of tyrosinase. The nontoxic probe Tyro-1 provides information about H2O2-mediated upregulation of tyrosinase through cellular imaging. Its two-photon imaging ability makes it a noninvasive tool for validating the expression of tyrosinase in the live cells.

  19. Simultaneous two-photon activation of type-I photodynamic therapy agents.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W G; Partridge, W P; Dees, C; Wachter, E A

    1997-08-01

    The excitation and emission properties of several psoralen derivatives are compared using conventional single-photon excitation and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). Two-photon excitation is effected using the output of a mode-locked titanium: sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which is used to promote nonresonant TPE directly. Specifically, the excitation spectra and excited-state properties of 8-methoxypsoralen and 4'-aminomethyl-4,5,8-trimethylpsoralen are shown to be equivalent using both modes of excitation. Further, in vitro feasibility of two-photon photodynamic therapy (PDT) is demonstrated using Salmonella typhimurium. Two-photon excitation may be beneficial in the practice of PDT because it would allow replacement of visible or UV excitation light with highly penetrating, nondamaging near infrared light and could provide a means for improving localization of therapy. Comparison of possible laser excitation sources for PDT reveals the titanium: sapphire laser to be exceptionally well suited for nonlinear excitation of PDT agents in biological systems due to its extremely short pulse width and high repetition rate that together provide efficient PDT activation and greatly reduced potential for biological damage.

  20. Activation of snap-top capped mesoporous silica nanocontainers using two near-infrared photons.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Alvarez, Tania M; Sudha Devi, Lekshmi; Russell, Melissa M; Schwartz, Benjamin J; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2013-09-25

    Photoactivation of "snap-top" stoppers over the pore openings of mesoporous silica nanoparticles releases intact cargo molecules from the pores. The on-command release can be stimulated by either one UV photon or two coherent near-IR photons. Two-photon activation is particularly desirable for use in biological systems because it enables good tissue penetration and precise spatial control. Stoppers were assembled by first binding photolabile coumarin-based molecules to the nanoparticle surface. Then, after the particles were loaded with cargo, bulky β-cyclodextrin (CD) molecules were noncovalently associated with the substituted coumarin molecule, blocking the pores and preventing the cargo from escaping. One-photon excitation at 376 nm or two-photon excitation at 800 nm cleaves the bond holding the coumarin to the nanopore, releasing both the CD cap and the cargo. The dynamics of both the cleavage of the cap and the cargo release was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. This system traps intact cargo molecules without the necessity of chemical modification, releases them with tissue-penetrating near-IR light, and has possible applications in photostimulated drug delivery.

  1. Air surface microdischarge-photon synergy in antibacterial plasma-activated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David; Pavlovich, Mathew; Chang, Hung-Wen; Sakiyama, Yuki; Clark, Douglas

    2013-09-01

    We show that the antibacterial effects of air plasma on water can be amplified by synergy with ultraviolet (UV) photons. We use the surface microdischarge configuration (SMD) in atmospheric air adjacent to bacteria-laden water coupled with UVA (360 nm) photons from a light emitting diode (LED) to demonstrate this synergy. Air SMD, especially if operated in a confined space, can operate in different modes: low power mode (<0.1 W/cm2) generates primarily O3 whereas higher powers generate mainly nitrogen oxides; we focus here on the latter. The nitrogen oxide mode creates a powerful antibacterial mixture in water, including NO2-, NO3- and H2O2. Although these species alone can be strongly antibacterial, especially at low pH, we show that addition of UVA photons greatly amplifies the antibacterial effect. We first measured log reductions with only photons and then only plasma. Only when UVA exposes water after plasma does the synergy appear. Synergy appears to be due to UVA photolysis of plasma-generated NO2- to form NO and OH. We conclude that combining plasma-generated chemical species with activating photons can amplify and strengthen plasma effectiveness in many biological and other applications. Supported by Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Science Plasma Science Center.

  2. Photon-axion mixing within the jets of active galactic nuclei and prospects for detection

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Chadwick, P.M. E-mail: p.m.chadwick@durham.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    Very high energy γ-ray observations of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN) generally result in higher fluxes and harder spectra than expected, resulting in some tension with the level of the extragalactic background light (EBL). If hypothetical axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) were to exist, this tension could be relieved since the oscillation of photons to ALPs would mitigate the effects of EBL absorption and lead to softer inferred intrinsic AGN spectra. In this paper we consider the effect of photon-ALP mixing on observed spectra, including the photon-ALP mixing that would occur within AGN jets. We then simulate observations of three AGN with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a next generation γ-ray telescope, to determine its prospects for detecting the signatures of photon-ALP mixing on the spectra. We conclude that prospects for CTA detecting these signatures or else setting limits on the ALP parameter space are quite promising. We find that prospects are improved if photon-ALP mixing within the jet is properly considered and that the best target for observations is PKS 2155-304.

  3. Actively switchable nondegenerate polarization-entangled photon-pair distribution in dense wave-division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Jiang, Yun-Kun; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated experimentally a nondegenerate polarization-entangled photon-pair distribution in a commercial telecom dense wave-division multiplexing device (DWDM) with eight channels. A promising point of this experiment is that an entangled photon pair is obtained via spontaneous parametric down conversion in a single type-II periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal without postselection. Another promising advantage is that we can actively switch the distribution of the photon pair between different channel pairs in DWDM at will. There is no crosstalk between different channel pairs because of a limited emission bandwidth of the source. Maximum raw visibility of 97.88%±0.86% obtained in a Bell-type interference experiment and a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality S parameter of 2.63±0.08 calculated prove high entanglement of our source. Our work is helpful for building quantum communication networks.

  4. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  5. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  6. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qin; Skaar, Johannes; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-15

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  7. Sub-Shot-Noise Transmission Measurement Enabled by Active Feed-Forward of Heralded Single Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabines-Chesterking, J.; Whittaker, R.; Joshi, S. K.; Birchall, P. M.; Moreau, P. A.; McMillan, A.; Cable, H. V.; O'Brien, J. L.; Rarity, J. G.; Matthews, J. C. F.

    2017-07-01

    Harnessing the unique properties of quantum mechanics offers the possibility of delivering alternative technologies that can fundamentally outperform their classical counterparts. These technologies deliver advantages only when components operate with performance beyond specific thresholds. For optical quantum metrology, the biggest challenge that impacts on performance thresholds is optical loss. Here, we demonstrate how including an optical delay and an optical switch in a feed-forward configuration with a stable and efficient correlated photon-pair source reduces the detector efficiency required to enable quantum-enhanced sensing down to the detection level of single photons and without postselection. When the switch is active, we observe a factor of improvement in precision of 1.27 for transmission measurement on a per-input-photon basis compared to the performance of a laser emitting an ideal coherent state and measured with the same detection efficiency as our setup. When the switch is inoperative, we observe no quantum advantage.

  8. Advanced Photonic Crystal-Based Integrated Structures for Optical Communications and Optical Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-22

    High Quality Factor Silicon Nitride Planar Microdisk Resonators for Integrated Photonics in the Visible Range,” Integrated Photonics and...III.B. Conference presentations 1. M. Chamanzar, B. Momeni, and A. Adibi, “Highly Sensitive Compact On-Chip Micro- Interferometers,” Integrated ... Photonics and Nanophotonics Research and Applications (IPNRA), Boston, MA, July 2008. 2. E. Shah Hosseini, S. Yegnanarayanan, and Ali Adibi, “Ultra

  9. Hybrid quantum nanophotonic devices for coupling to rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazono, Evan; Hartz, Alex; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    With an assortment of narrow line-width transitions spanning the visible and IR spectrum and long spin coherence times, rare-earth doped crystals are the leading material system for solid-state quantum memories. Integrating these materials in an on-chip optical platform would create opportunities for highly integrated light-matter interfaces for quantum communication and quantum computing. Nano-photonic resonators with high quality factors and small mode volumes are required for efficient on-chip coupling to the small dipole moment of rare-earth ion transitions. However, direct fabrication of optical cavities in these crystals with current nanofabrication techniques is difficult and unparallelized, as either exotic etch chemistries or physical milling processes are required. We fabricated hybrid devices by mechanically transferring a nanoscale membrane of gallium arsenide (GaAs) onto a neodymium-doped yttrium silicon oxide (Y2SiO5) crystal and then using electron beam lithography and standard III-V dry etching to pattern nanobeam photonic crystal cavities and ring resonator cavities, a technique that is easily adapted to other frequency ranges for arbitrary dopants in any rare earth host system. Single crystalline GaAs was chosen for its low loss and high refractive index at the transition wavelength. We demonstrated the potential to evanescently couple between the cavity field and the 883 nm 4I9/2- 4F3/2 transition of nearby neodymium impurities in the host crystal by examining transmission spectra through a waveguide coupled to the resonator with a custom-built confocal microscope. The prospects and requirements for using this system for scalable quantum networks are discussed.

  10. Selectively lighting up two-photon photodynamic activity in mitochondria with AIE-active iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Jin, Chengzhi; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Xingguo; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2017-02-07

    Herein a series of mitochondria-targeted AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active Ir(iii) complexes were designed to selectively exert one-/two-photon photodynamic activities in mitochondria to address the issues which current PDT are confronted with (i.e., shallow penetration depth of routinely used irradiation; systematic toxicity associated with effective drug concentration; concentration-quenched photodynamic activity at the target, etc.).

  11. Injection and waveguiding properties in SU8 nanotubes for sub-wavelength regime propagation and nanophotonics integration.

    PubMed

    Bigeon, John; Huby, Nolwenn; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Bêche, Bruno

    2014-05-21

    We report photonic concepts related to injection and sub-wavelength propagation in nanotubes, an unusual but promising geometry for highly integrated photonic devices. Theoretical simulation by the finite domain time-dependent (FDTD) method was first used to determine the features of the direct light injection and sub-wavelength propagation regime within nanotubes. Then, the injection into nanotubes of SU8, a photoresist used for integrated photonics, was successfully achieved by using polymer microlensed fibers with a sub-micronic radius of curvature, as theoretically expected from FDTD simulations. The propagation losses in a single SU8 nanotube were determined by using a comprehensive set-up and a protocol for optical characterization. The attenuation coefficient has been evaluated at 1.25 dB mm(-1) by a cut-back method transposed to such nanostructures. The mechanisms responsible for losses in nanotubes were identified with FDTD theoretical support. Both injection and cut-back methods developed here are compatible with any sub-micronic structures. This work on SU8 nanotubes suggests broader perspectives for future nanophotonics.

  12. EDITORIAL: TaCoNa-Photonics 2008 TaCoNa-Photonics 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrin, Dmitry N.; Busch, Kurt; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2009-11-01

    This special section on theoretical and computational nano-photonics features papers presented at the first International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Nano-Photonics (TaCoNa-Photonics 2008) held in Bad Honnef, Germany, 3-5 December 2008. The workshop covered a broad range of topics related to current developments and achievements in this interdisciplinary area of research. Since the late 1960s, the word `photonics' has been understood as the science of generating, controlling, and detecting light. Nowadays, a routine fabrication of complex structures with micro- and nano-scale dimensions opens up many new and exciting possibilities in photonics. The science of generating, routing and detecting light in micro- and nano-structured matter, `nano-photonics', is becoming more important both in research and technology and offers many promising applications. The inherently sub-wavelength character of the structures that nano-photonics deals with challenges modern theoretical and computational physics and engineering with many nontrivial questions: Up to what length-scale can one use a macroscopic phenomenological description of matter? Where is the interface between the classical and quantum description of light in nano-scale structures? How can one combine different physical systems, different time- and length-scales in a single computational model? How can one engineer nano-structured materials in order to achieve the desired optical properties for particular applications? Any attempt at answering these kinds of questions is impossible without the joint efforts of physicists, engineers, applied mathematicians and programmers. This is the reason why the major goal of the TaCoNa-Photonics workshops is to provide a forum where theoreticians and specialists in numerical methods from all branches of physics, engineering sciences and mathematics can compare their results, report on novel results and breakthroughs, and discuss new challenges ahead. In order to

  13. Photon Activation Analysis—An Analytical Application Of High-Energy Electron Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segebade, Christian R.; Goerner, Wolf

    2009-03-01

    Photon activation analysis (PAA) was introduced about contemporarily with the other activation analysis methods (neutron, NAA, and charged particle activation, CPAA). Nonetheless, for different reasons, PAA has been applied less frequently than the other techniques mentioned. The incident photon energy should exceed about 12 MeV (except in some special rare applications) so as to obtain appreciably high activity yields of the product nuclides. Thus, cyclic electron accelerators (LINACs or microtrons) are used for activation preferably. The predominant photonuclear reaction is of the (γ,n)-type. Thus, normally neutron-deficient nuclides are produced. These usually emit gamma rays, annihilation quanta and characteristic X-ray fluorescence, all of whom can be used for analytical evaluation. The spectrometry equipment is the same as used for the other activation techniques (semiconductor detectors, sodium iodide crystals in coincidence geometry). Being uncharged high energy photons have a large penetration power, thus do not suffer from strong matrix absorption. Although not having a detection power as large as in NAA (in the most cases), PAA offers several further convincing advantages, e.g. several elements not or hardly detectable by NAA can be analysed: Titanium, nickel, thallium, lead, bismuth and, in particular, the light elements carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, phosphorus. Several typical applications will be described.

  14. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Femtosecond pulses in nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Anatoliy A.; Alfimov, Mikhail V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2004-07-01

    We give an overview of the physical fundamentals of femtosecond nanophotonics — the basic physical phenomena behind the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with nanoscale objects, nanocomposite materials, supramolecular structures, and molecular aggregates. Femtosecond laser pulses pave a way to achieving high intensities of electromagnetic radiation without irreversible damage to materials, making it possible to observe unique regimes of interaction of the light field with nanostructures and molecular aggregates. Dielectric and electron confinement, as well as resonances due to quantum size effects and collective phenomena in supramolecular and aggregate structures, radically enhance nonlinear-optical interactions of ultrashort pulses. These phenomena offer interesting solutions for a high-sensitivity nonlinear-optical metrology of nanostructured materials, including the analysis of their composition, structure, and morphology, suggesting new attractive strategies for the control, switching, and transformation of ultrashort pulses.

  15. Dynamic acousto-optic control of a strongly coupled photonic molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kapfinger, Stephan; Reichert, Thorsten; Lichtmannecker, Stefan; Müller, Kai; Finley, Jonathan J.; Wixforth, Achim; Kaniber, Michael; Krenner, Hubert J.

    2015-01-01

    Strongly confined photonic modes can couple to quantum emitters and mechanical excitations. To harness the full potential in quantum photonic circuits, interactions between different constituents have to be precisely and dynamically controlled. Here, a prototypical coupled element, a photonic molecule defined in a photonic crystal membrane, is controlled by a radio frequency surface acoustic wave. The sound wave is tailored to deliberately switch on and off the bond of the photonic molecule on sub-nanosecond timescales. In time-resolved experiments, the acousto-optically controllable coupling is directly observed as clear anticrossings between the two nanophotonic modes. The coupling strength is determined directly from the experimental data. Both the time dependence of the tuning and the inter-cavity coupling strength are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical calculations. The demonstrated mechanical technique can be directly applied for dynamic quantum gate operations in state-of-the-art-coupled nanophotonic, quantum cavity electrodynamic and optomechanical systems. PMID:26436203

  16. Two-photon activation and excitation properties of PA-GFP in the 720-920-nm region.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marc; Barozzi, Sara; Testa, Ilaria; Faretta, Mario; Diaspro, Alberto

    2005-08-01

    This report covers the two-photon activation and excitation properties of the PA-GFP, a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein in the spectral region from 720 to 920 nm. It is known from this special form of the molecule that it has an increased level of fluorescence emission when excited at 488 nm after irradiation at lambda approximately 413 nm, under single-photon excitation conditions. Here, we show that upon two-photon irradiation, PA-GFP yields activation in the spectral region from 720 to 840 nm. After photoactivation, the excitation spectrum shifts maintaining the very same emission spectrum of the single-photon case for the native and photoactivated protein. Additionally, when comparing the conventional photoactivation at lambda = 405 nm with a two-photon one, a sharper and better controllable three-dimensional volume of activation is obtained.

  17. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to 'internal photons' inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350-700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation.

  18. EDITORIAL: Breeding new science by coupling photons with `nano'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay; Stockman, Mark; Zayats, Anatoly

    2006-04-01

    The new field of `nanophotonics' is concerned with the generation, transport, routing and detection of light in sub-wavelength structures. There is nothing new in the desire to use small structures to control waves that are much bigger than the structures, and the science of acoustics has been dealing with this problem since the early days of musical instruments. What makes nanophotonics so special is that it claims for optics the unexplored playfield of dimensions between those of objects the human eye can see with a lens, and those of the invisible elementary building blocks of the material world, molecules and atoms. Nanophotonics is a synthetic discipline that breaks into the fields of electrodynamics, solid state physics and laser physics. In growing from these disciplines it takes ideas from them, for instance from solid state physics by drawing analogies between electrons in crystals and photons in nanostructures, and from laser physics and traditional nonlinear optics by achieving strong fields not through an increase in optical power, but through its concentration. From an engineering perspective, nanophotonics promises to develop optical functionality on the smallest possible size scale (thus allowing for ultra-high-density integration), at the lowest possible energy level (thus allowing for single photon all-optical devices), and on the shortest possible timescale (thus allowing for optical devices operating within a single period of an optical wave). In this special issue we are, however, concerned with the fundamental aspects of nanophotonics, i.e. the physics that underpins these new, mind-boggling nanophotonic applications. This special issue opens with 4 articles derived from lectures at the Summer School Photonic Metamaterials: from Micro to Nanoscale, Erice, Italy, 1 7 August 2005. These reviews establish the hierarchy of nanophotonic structures and relevant length scales, explore wave interactions in nanostructured media, and examine nanophotonic

  19. Complex Photonic Structures for Light Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Burresi, Matteo; Pratesi, Filippo; Riboli, Francesco; Wiersma, Diederik Sybolt

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, micro- and nanophotonics have roused a strong interest in the scientific community for their promising impact on the development of novel kinds of solar cells. Certain thin- and ultrathin-film solar cells are made of innovative, often cheap, materials which suffer from a low energy conversion efficiency. Light-trapping mechanisms based on nanophotonics principles are particularly suited to enhance the absorption of electromagnetic waves in these thin media without changing the material composition. In this review, the latest results achieved in this field are reported, with particular attention to the realization of prototypes, spanning from deterministic to disordered photonic architectures, and from dielectric to metallic nanostructures. PMID:26640755

  20. Active photonic devices based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals and organometallic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez Alvarez, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have arisen as outstanding materials to develop a new generation of optoelectronic devices. Their fabrication under simple and low cost colloidal chemistry methods results in cheap nanostructures able to provide a wide range of optical functionalities. Their attractive optical properties include a high absorption cross section below the band gap, a high quantum yield emission at room temperature, or the capability of tuning the band-gap with the size or the base material. In addition, their solution process nature enables an easy integration on several substrates and photonic structures. As a consequence, these nanoparticles have been extensively proposed to develop several photonic applications, such as detection of light, optical gain, generation of light or sensing. This manuscript reviews the great effort undertaken by the scientific community to construct active photonic devices based on these nanoparticles. The conditions to demonstrate stimulated emission are carefully studied by comparing the dependence of the optical properties of the nanocrystals with their size, shape and composition. In addition, this paper describes the design of different photonic architectures (waveguides and cavities) to enhance the generation of photoluminescence, and hence to reduce the threshold of optical gain. Finally, semiconductor nanocrystals are compared to organometallic halide perovskites, as this novel material has emerged as an alternative to colloidal nanoparticles.

  1. Optical activities of micro-spiral photonic crystals fabricated by multi-beam holographic lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jenny; Gao, Wensheng; Tam, Wing Yim

    2011-09-01

    We report on the optical activities of left- and right-handed micro-spirals fabricated in dichromate gelatin emulsions using a holographic interference technique involving six linearly polarized side beams and one circularly polarized central beam. Photonic bandgaps in the visible range are observed. More importantly, opposite optical activities—a polarization rotation of a few degrees and a circular dichroism (CD) of about 20% at the photonic band edges—are observed for the left- and right-handed spirals. Furthermore, the transmittance of circularly polarized light obeys the Lorentz reciprocity lemma for forward and backward incidence. However neither polarization rotation nor CD is observed for achiral split rings and hollow rods fabricated using all linearly polarized beams and six side beams without the central beam, respectively; this indicates that the chiral nature of the spirals is essential for the observed optical activities.

  2. A quantum phase switch between a single solid-state spin and a photon.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuo; Kim, Hyochul; Solomon, Glenn S; Waks, Edo

    2016-06-01

    Interactions between single spins and photons are essential for quantum networks and distributed quantum computation. Achieving spin-photon interactions in a solid-state device could enable compact chip-integrated quantum circuits operating at gigahertz bandwidths. Many theoretical works have suggested using spins embedded in nanophotonic structures to attain this high-speed interface. These proposals implement a quantum switch where the spin flips the state of the photon and a photon flips the spin state. However, such a switch has not yet been realized using a solid-state spin system. Here, we report an experimental realization of a spin-photon quantum switch using a single solid-state spin embedded in a nanophotonic cavity. We show that the spin state strongly modulates the polarization of a reflected photon, and a single reflected photon coherently rotates the spin state. These strong spin-photon interactions open up a promising direction for solid-state implementations of high-speed quantum networks and on-chip quantum information processors using nanophotonic devices.

  3. Hybrid Silicon Nanophotonic Devices: Enhancing Light Emission, Modulation, and Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Ryan Morrow

    Silicon has become an increasingly important photonic material for communications, information processing, and sensing applications. Silicon is inexpensive compared to compound semiconductors, and it is well suited for confining and guiding light at standard telecommunication wavelengths due to its large refractive index and minimal intrinsic absorption. Furthermore, silicon-based optical devices can be fabricated alongside microelectronics while taking advantage of advanced silicon processing technologies. In order to realize complete chip-based photonic systems, certain critical components must continue to be developed and refined on the silicon platform, including compact light sources, modulators, routers, and sensing elements. However, bulk silicon is not necessarily an ideal material for many active devices because of its meager light emission characteristics, limited refractive index tunability, and fundamental limitations in confining light beyond the diffraction limit. In this thesis, we present three examples of hybrid devices that use different materials to bring additional optical functionality to silicon photonics. First, we analyze high-index-contrast silicon slot waveguides and their integration with light-emitting erbium-doped glass materials. Theoretical and experimental results show significant enhancement of spontaneous emission rates in slot structures. We then demonstrate the integration of vanadium dioxide, a thermochromic phase-change material, with silicon waveguides to form micron-scale absorption modulators. It is shown experimentally that a 2-mum long waveguide-integrated device exhibits broadband modulation of more than 6.5 dB at wavelengths near 1550 nm. Finally, we demonstrate polymer-on-gold dielectric-loaded surface-plasmon waveguides and ring resonators coupled to silicon waveguides with 1.0+/-0.1 dB insertion loss. The plasmonic waveguides are shown to support a single surface mode at telecommunication wavelengths, with strong

  4. Sub-wavelength nanofluidics in photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Yanik, Ahmet Ali; Chang, Tsung-Yao; Altug, Hatice

    2009-12-21

    We introduce a novel sensor scheme combining nano-photonics and nano-fluidics on a single platform through the use of free-standing photonic crystals. By harnessing nano-scale openings, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that both fluidics and light can be manipulated at sub-wavelength scales. Compared to the conventional fluidic channels, we actively steer the convective flow through the nanohole openings for effective delivery of the analytes to the sensor surface. We apply our method to detect refractive index changes in aqueous solutions. Bulk measurements indicate that active delivery of the convective flow results in better sensitivities. The sensitivity of the sensor reaches 510 nm/RIU for resonance located around 850 nm with a line-width of approximately 10 nm in solution. Experimental results are matched very well with numerical simulations. We also show that cross-polarization measurements can be employed to further improve the detection limit by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Understanding the nanophotonic light-trapping structure of diatom frustule for enhanced solar energy conversion: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangfan; Wang, Chen; Baker, Evan; Wang, Jane; Sun, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Recent designs in nanophotonic light-trapping technologies offer promising potential to develop high-efficiency thin-film solar cell at dramatically reduced cost. However, the lack of a cost effective scalable nanomanufacturing technique remains the main road-block. In nature, diatoms exhibit high solar energy harvesting efficiency due to their frustules (i.e., hard porous cell wall made of silica) possessing remarkable hierarchical nano-features optimized for the photosynthetic process through millions of years evolution. To explore this unique light trapping effect, different species of diatoms (Coscinodiscus sp. and Coscinodiscus wailesii) are cultured and characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method are employed to numerically study the nanophotonic light-trapping effect. The absorption efficiency is significantly enhanced over the spectrum region centered on 450nm and 700nm where the electric fields are found strongly confined within the active layer. The transmission and reflection spectra are also measured by optical spectroscopy and the experimental results are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  6. Acute two-photon imaging of the neurovascular unit in the cortex of active mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Gordon, Grant R.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon scanning fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique to observe physiological processes from the millimeter to the micron scale in the intact animal. In neuroscience research, a common approach is to install an acute cranial window and head bar to explore neocortical function under anesthesia before inflammation peaks from the surgery. However, there are few detailed acute protocols for head-restrained and fully awake animal imaging of the neurovascular unit during activity. This is because acutely performed awake experiments are typically untenable when the animal is naïve to the imaging apparatus. Here we detail a method that achieves acute, deep-tissue two-photon imaging of neocortical astrocytes and microvasculature in behaving mice. A week prior to experimentation, implantation of the head bar alone allows mice to train for head-immobilization on an easy-to-learn air-supported ball treadmill. Following just two brief familiarization sessions to the treadmill on separate days, an acute cranial window can subsequently be installed for immediate imaging. We demonstrate how running and whisking data can be captured simultaneously with two-photon fluorescence signals with acceptable movement artifacts during active motion. We also show possible applications of this technique by (1) monitoring dynamic changes to microvascular diameter and red blood cells in response to vibrissa sensory stimulation, (2) examining responses of the cerebral microcirculation to the systemic delivery of pharmacological agents using a tail artery cannula during awake imaging, and (3) measuring Ca2+ signals from synthetic and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators in astrocytes. This method will facilitate acute two-photon fluorescence imaging in awake, active mice and help link cellular events within the neurovascular unit to behavior. PMID:25698926

  7. Inspiration, imagination and implementation: International Year of Light activities of the Photonics Academy of Wales at Bangor (PAWB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ray; Shore, K. Alan

    2016-09-01

    Since the establishment of the Photonics Academy of Wales in 2005, several generations of participants have been encouraged to use their imagination in devising, designing and building novel photonics devices of benefit to society. In pursuing photonics projects within PAWB, the participants have gained a practical proficiency in photonics experimentation and photonics product design. The Photonics Academy of Wales @ Bangor ( PAWB) assumed responsibility for the coordination of a series of events in Wales, UK as part of global activities celebrating 2015 as the International Year of Light. PAWB has worked with several organisations and individuals to devise a programme of events which are focussed on conveying the significance of light and its technologies to a broad swathe of the population. These events take into account the bi-lingual nature of Wales with significant events being delivered in the Welsh language. Arrangement and delivery of the events has largely been undertaken on a voluntary basis albeit with some funding having been obtained from supportive bodies and organisations. The presentation will report on the events which were organised and also will present examples of novel photonics devices developed by students working with PAWB. Being aware of the importance of creating an on-going interest in the topics treated during the International Year of Light, some attention will also be given to legacy activities beyond 2015. A specific concern is the identification of effective mechanisms for engagement with photonics industry.

  8. Active phase correction of high resolution silicon photonic arrayed waveguide gratings

    DOE PAGES

    Gehl, M.; Trotter, D.; Starbuck, A.; ...

    2017-03-10

    Arrayed waveguide gratings provide flexible spectral filtering functionality for integrated photonic applications. Achieving narrow channel spacing requires long optical path lengths which can greatly increase the footprint of devices. High index contrast waveguides, such as those fabricated in silicon-on-insulator wafers, allow tight waveguide bends which can be used to create much more compact designs. Both the long optical path lengths and the high index contrast contribute to significant optical phase error as light propagates through the device. Thus, silicon photonic arrayed waveguide gratings require active or passive phase correction following fabrication. We present the design and fabrication of compact siliconmore » photonic arrayed waveguide gratings with channel spacings of 50, 10 and 1 GHz. The largest device, with 11 channels of 1 GHz spacing, has a footprint of only 1.1 cm2. Using integrated thermo-optic phase shifters, the phase error is actively corrected. We present two methods of phase error correction and demonstrate state-of-the-art cross-talk performance for high index contrast arrayed waveguide gratings. As a demonstration of possible applications, we perform RF channelization with 1 GHz resolution. In addition, we generate unique spectral filters by applying non-zero phase offsets calculated by the Gerchberg Saxton algorithm.« less

  9. Measurement of total-body oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon in vivo by photon activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ulin, K.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of assessing nutritional status, the feasibility of measuring the total body quantities of the major body elements, i.e. oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon, using the photon beam of a 45 MV betatron and a whole-body counter, has been evaluated in detail. Following photon activation a single energy ..gamma..-radiation (.511 MeV) is observed from all three elements to be measured. The half-lives of /sup 15/O, /sup 13/N, and /sup 11/C, however, are sufficiently different (20.5 min, 10.0 min, and 20.4 min. respectively) to permit their measurement from an analysis of the measured decay curve. Following corrections for interfering reactions, a computer curve-fitting algorithm is used to resolve the data into /sup 15/O, /sup 13/N, and /sup 11/C components. Measurements of O, N, and C have been made both in phantoms and in live and dead rats. A comparison of the body composition results from this technique with results from chemical analysis indicates that measured carbon can quite accurately predict total body fat. The comparison of the total body nitrogen measurement by photon activation with total body protein by chemical analysis was inconclusive and suggests that further work be done to verify the estimated accuracy of the nitrogen measurement.

  10. All optical active high decoder using integrated 2D square lattice photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper introduces a novel all optical active high 2 × 4 decoder based on 2D photonic crystals (PhC) of silicon rods with permittivity of ε = 10.1 × 10-11 farad/m. The main structure of optical decoder is designed using a combination of five nonlinear photonic crystal ring resonator, set of T-type waveguide, and line defect of Y and T branch splitters. The proposed structure has two logic input ports, four output ports, and one bias input port. The total size of the proposed 2 × 4 decoder is equal to 40 μm × 38 μm. The PhC structure has a square lattice of silicon rod with refractive index of 3.39 in air. The overall design and the results are discussed through the realization and the numerically simulation to confirm its operation and feasibility.

  11. TiO2 activity enhancement through synergistic effect of photons localization of photonic crystals and the sensitization of CdS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Sheng-Li

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the enhancement of TiO2 photocatalytic activity was studied through synergistic effect of the photons localization of photonic crystals and the sensitization of CdS quantum dots (CdS QDs). CdS QDs sensitized TiO2 membrane (denoted as CdS QDs/TiO2) was synthesized through doping the TiO2 membrane with CdS QDs by chemical bath deposition method (CBD). After TiO2 was sensitized with CdS QDs, the edge of light absorption of TiO2 was red-shifted to 470 nm and the light absorption in the range of 400 600 nm was higher than that of plain TiO2 membrane. Another type of composite membrane, CdS QDs/TiO2/SiO2 opal composite membrane was prepared by coupling SiO2 opal (a kind of photonic crystal) layer onto the CdS QDs/TiO2 membrane, and the photonic band gap of the SiO2 opal photonic crystal layer was deliberately planned at the electronic band gap of the CdS QDs. The photodegradation of gaseous CH3CHO (acetaldehyde) was used as probe reaction to test the photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared membranes, and the results showed that the CdS QDs sensitization can significantly improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 membrane under visible light irradiation, with the acetaldehyde degradation rate constant (k) on CdS QDs/TiO2 membranes being 1.59 times of that on plain TiO2 membranes. The acetaldehyde degradation rate constant on CdS QDs/TiO2/SiO2 opal composite membrane reached 4 times of that on plain TiO2 membrane. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 membrane can be improved through synergistic effect of the photons localization of photonic crystals and the sensitization of CdS QDs.

  12. Design and testing of an active quenching circuit for an avalanche photodiode photon detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbel, D.; Schwartz, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The photon-detection capabilities of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating above their theoretical breakdown voltages are described, with particular attention given to the needs and methods of quenching an avalanche once breakdown has occurred. A brief background on the motives of and previous work with this mode of operation is presented. Finally, a description of the design and testing of an active quenching circuit is given. Although the active quenching circuit did not perform as expected, knowledge was gained as to the signal amplitudes necessary for quenching and the need for a better model for the above-breakdown circuit characteristics of the Geiger-mode APD.

  13. Design and testing of an active quenching circuit for an avalanche photodiode photon detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbel, D.; Schwartz, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The photon-detection capabilities of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating above their theoretical breakdown voltages are described, with particular attention given to the needs and methods of quenching an avalanche once breakdown has occurred. A brief background on the motives of and previous work with this mode of operation is presented. Finally, a description of the design and testing of an active quenching circuit is given. Although the active quenching circuit did not perform as expected, knowledge was gained as to the signal amplitudes necessary for quenching and the need for a better model for the above-breakdown circuit characteristics of the Geiger-mode APD.

  14. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  15. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment. PMID:28067332

  16. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment.

  17. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-09

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment.

  18. Two-Photon Enzymatic Probes Visualizing Sub-cellular/Deep-brain Caspase Activities in Neurodegenerative Models

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Linghui; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Mao, Yanli; Li, Lin; Gao, Nengyue; Lim, Kah-Leong; Xu, Qing-Hua; Yao, Shao Q.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases work as a double-edged sword in maintaining cell homeostasis. Highly regulated caspase activities are essential during animal development, but dysregulation might lead to different diseases, e.g. extreme caspase activation is known to promote neurodegeneration. At present, visualization of caspase activation has mostly remained at the cellular level, in part due to a lack of cell-permeable imaging probes capable of direct, real-time investigations of endogenous caspase activities in deep tissues. Herein, we report a suite of two-photon, small molecule/peptide probes which enable sensitive and dynamic imaging of individual caspase activities in neurodegenerative models under physiological conditions. With no apparent toxicity and the ability of imaging endogenous caspases both in different subcellular organelles of mammalian cells and in brain tissues, these probes serve as complementary tools to conventional histological analysis. They should facilitate future explorations of caspases at molecular, cellular and organism levels and inspire development of novel two-photon probes against other enzymes. PMID:27210613

  19. Photonic activation of disulfide bridges achieves oriented protein immobilization on biosensor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Snabe, Torben; Klitgaard, Søren; Duroux, Meg; Petersen, Steffen B

    2006-02-01

    Photonic induced immobilization is a novel technology that results in spatially oriented and spatially localized covalent coupling of biomolecules onto thiol-reactive surfaces. Immobilization using this technology has been achieved for a wide selection of proteins, such as hydrolytic enzymes (lipases/esterases, lysozyme), proteases (human plasminogen), alkaline phosphatase, immunoglobulins' Fab fragment (e.g., antibody against PSA [prostate specific antigen]), Major Histocompability Complex class I protein, pepsin, and trypsin. The reaction mechanism behind the reported new technology involves "photonic activation of disulfide bridges," i.e., light-induced breakage of disulfide bridges in proteins upon UV illumination of nearby aromatic amino acids, resulting in the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that will form covalent bonds with thiol-reactive surfaces (see Fig. 1). Interestingly, the spatial proximity of aromatic residues and disulfide bridges in proteins has been preserved throughout molecular evolution. The new photonic-induced method for immobilization of proteins preserves the native structural and functional properties of the immobilized protein, avoiding the use of one or more chemical/thermal steps. This technology allows for the creation of spatially oriented as well as spatially defined multiprotein/DNA high-density sensor arrays with spot size of 1 microm or less, and has clear potential for biomedical, bioelectronic, nanotechnology, and therapeutic applications.

  20. Active photonic sensor communication cable for field application of optical data and power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthau, Eike; Rieske, Ralf; Zerna, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Omitting electrically conducting wires for sensor communication and power supply promises protection for sensor systems and monitored structures against lightning or high voltages, prevention of explosion hazards, and reduction of susceptibility to tampering. The ability to photonically power remote systems opens up the full range of electrical sensors. Power-over-fiber is an attractive option in electromagnetically sensitive environments, particularly for longterm, maintenance-free applications. It can deliver uninterrupted power sufficient for elaborate sensors, data processing or even actuators alongside continuous high speed data communication for remote sensor application. This paper proposes an active photonic sensor communication system, which combines the advantages of optical data links in terms of immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), high bandwidth, hardiness against tampering or eavesdropping, and low cable weight with the robustness one has come to expect from industrial or military electrical connectors. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented that implements a closed-loop regulation of the sensor power supply to guarantee continuous, reliable data communications while maintaining a highly efficient, adaptive sensor supply scheme. It is demonstrated that the resulting novel photonic sensor communication cable can handle sensors and actuators differing orders of magnitude with respect to power consumption. The miniaturization of the electro-optical converters and driving electronics is as important to the presented development as the energy efficiency of the detached, optically powered sensor node. For this reason, a novel photonic packaging technology based on wafer-level assembly of the laser power converters by means of passive alignment will be disclosed in this paper.

  1. High-power monolithic single-mode diode lasers employing active photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan

    2003-06-01

    Photonic-lattice structures with modulated gain, that is active photonic lattices (APLs), of large index steps and gain preferentially enhanced on the low-index lattice sites have been used, as early as 1988, for effective lateral-mode control range in large-aperture (100-200 microns) high-power coherent devices. Photonic-bandpass (PBP) structures relying on long-range resonant leaky-wave coupling, so called ROW arrays, have allowed stable, near-diffraction-limited beam operation to powers as high as 1.6W CW and 10W peak pulsed. Photonic-bandgap (PBG) structures with a built-in lattice defect, so called ARROW lasers, have provided up to 0.5W peak-pulsed stable, single-mode power and hold the potential for 1W CW reliable single-mode operation from apertures 8-10 microns wide. The solution for high-efficiency surface emission, from 2nd-order DFB/DBR lasers, in an orthonormal, single-lobe beam pattern was found in 2000. Recently, single-lobe and single-mode operation in a diffraction-limited beam orthonormal to the chip surface was demonstrated from 1.5mm-long DFB/DBR ridge-guide lasers. That opens the way for the realization of 2-D surface-emitting,2nd-order APLs for the stable generation of watts of CW single-lobe, single-mode power from large 2-D apertures, as well as scalability of such devices at the wafer level.

  2. Nanophotonic interactions between organic excitons and plasmonic metasurfaces (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2016-09-01

    Thin-film organic semiconductor materials are emerging as energy-efficient, versatile alternatives to inorganic semiconductors for display and solid-state lighting applications. Additionally, thin-film organic laser and photovoltaic technologies, while not yet competitive with inorganic semiconductor-based analogues, can exhibit small device embodied energies (due to comparatively low temperature and low energy-use fabrication processes) which is of interest for reducing overall device cost. To improve energy conversion efficiency in thin-film organic optoelectronics, light management using nanophotonic structures is necessary. Here, our recent work on improving light trapping and light extraction in organic semiconductor thin films using nanostructured silver plasmonic metasurfaces will be presented [1,2]. Numerous optical phenomena, such as absorption induced scattering, out-of-plane waveguiding and morphology-dependent surface plasmon outcoupling, are identified due to exciton-plasmon coupling between the organic semiconductor and the metasurface. Interactions between localized and propagating surface plasmon polaritons and the excitonic transitions of a variety of organic conjugated polymer materials will be discussed and ways in which these interactions may be optimized for particular optoelectronic applications will be presented. [1] C. E. Petoukhoff, D. M. O'Carroll, Absorption-Induced Scattering and Surface Plasmon Out-Coupling from Absorber-Coated Plasmonic Metasurfaces. Nat. Commun. 6, 7899-1-13 (2015). [2] Z. Shen, D. M. O'Carroll, Nanoporous Silver Thin Films: Multifunctional Platforms for Influencing Chain Morphology and Optical Properties of Conjugated Polymers. Adv. Funct. Mater. 25, 3302-3313 (2015).

  3. Plasmonic antennas as design elements for coherent ultrafast nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Brinks, Daan; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Hildner, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2013-01-01

    Broadband excitation of plasmons allows control of light-matter interaction with nanometric precision at femtosecond timescales. Research in the field has spiked in the past decade in an effort to turn ultrafast plasmonics into a diagnostic, microscopy, computational, and engineering tool for this novel nanometric–femtosecond regime. Despite great developments, this goal has yet to materialize. Previous work failed to provide the ability to engineer and control the ultrafast response of a plasmonic system at will, needed to fully realize the potential of ultrafast nanophotonics in physical, biological, and chemical applications. Here, we perform systematic measurements of the coherent response of plasmonic nanoantennas at femtosecond timescales and use them as building blocks in ultrafast plasmonic structures. We determine the coherent response of individual nanoantennas to femtosecond excitation. By mixing localized resonances of characterized antennas, we design coupled plasmonic structures to achieve well-defined ultrafast and phase-stable field dynamics in a predetermined nanoscale hotspot. We present two examples of the application of such structures: control of the spectral amplitude and phase of a pulse in the near field, and ultrafast switching of mutually coherent hotspots. This simple, reproducible and scalable approach transforms ultrafast plasmonics into a straightforward tool for use in fields as diverse as room temperature quantum optics, nanoscale solid-state physics, and quantum biology. PMID:24163355

  4. Imaging nanophotonic modes of microresonators using a focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twedt, Kevin A.; Zou, Jie; Davanco, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik; McClelland, Jabez J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    Optical microresonators have proven powerful in a wide range of applications, including cavity quantum electrodynamics, biosensing, microfludics, cavity optomechanics and optical frequency combs. Their performance depends critically on the exact distribution of optical energy, confined and shaped by the nanoscale device geometry. Near-field optical probes can image this distribution, but the physical probe necessarily perturbs the near field, which is particularly problematic for sensitive high-quality-factor resonances. We present a new approach to mapping nanophotonic modes that uses a controllably small and local optomechanical perturbation introduced by a focused lithium ion beam. An ion beam (radius of ≈50 nm) induces a picometre-scale deformation of the resonator surface, which we detect through shifts in the optical resonance wavelengths. We map five modes of a silicon microdisk resonator (Q ≥ 20,000) with high spatial and spectral resolution. Our technique also enables in situ observation of ion implantation damage and relaxation dynamics in a silicon lattice.

  5. Resolving nanophotonic spectra with quasi-normal modes (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Many nanophotonic systems are strongly coupled to radiating waves, or suffer significant dissipative losses. Furthermore, they may have complex shapes which are not amenable to closed form calculations. This makes it challenging to determine their modes without resorting to quasi-static or point dipole approximations. To solve this problem, the quasi-normal modes (QNMs) are found from an integral equation model of the particle. These give complex frequencies where excitation can be supported without any incident field. The corresponding eigenvectors yield the modal distributions, which are non-orthogonal due to the non-Hermitian nature of the system. The model based on quasi-normal modes is applied to plasmonic and dielectric particles, and compared with a spherical multipole decomposition. Only with the QNMs is it possible to resolve all features of the extinction spectrum, as each peak in the spectrum can be attributed to a particular mode. In contrast, many of the multipole coefficient have multiple peaks and dips. Furthermore, by performing a multipolar decomposition of each QNM, the spectrum of multipole coefficients is explained in terms of destructive interference between modes of the same multipole order.

  6. Guided-mode resonance nanophotonics: fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Robert; Ko, Yeong Hwan

    2016-09-01

    We review principles and applications of nanophotonic devices based on electromagnetic resonance effects in thin periodic films. We discuss the fundamental resonance dynamics that are based on lateral Bloch modes excited by evanescent diffraction orders in these subwavelength devices. Theoretical and experimental results for selected example devices are furnished. Ultra-sparse nanogrids with duty cycle less than 10% are shown to provide substantially wide reflection bands and operate as effective polarizers. Narrow-passband resonant filters with extensive low sidebands are presented with focus on the zero-contrast grating architecture. This study is extended to long-wave operation in the THz region. Examples of fabricated guided-mode resonance devices with outstanding performance are given. This includes an unpolarized wideband reflector using serial single-layer reflectors, an ultra-sparse silicon nanowire grid as wideband reflector and polarizer, resonant bandpass filter with wide low sidebands, and a spatial/spectral filter permitting compact nonfocusing spatial filtering. The guided-mode resonance concept applies in all spectral regions, from the visible band to the microwave domain, with available low-loss materials.

  7. Imaging Nanophotonic Modes of Microresonators using a Focused Ion Beam

    PubMed Central

    Twedt, Kevin A.; Zou, Jie; Davanco, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik; McClelland, Jabez J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    Optical microresonators have proven powerful in a wide range of applications, including cavity quantum electrodynamics1–3, biosensing4, microfludics5, and cavity optomechanics6–8. Their performance depends critically on the exact distribution of optical energy, confined and shaped by the nanoscale device geometry. Near-field optical probes9 can image this distribution, but the physical probe necessarily perturbs the near field, which is particularly problematic for sensitive high quality factor resonances10,11. We present a new approach to mapping nanophotonic modes that uses a controllably small and local optomechanical perturbation introduced by a focused lithium ion beam12. An ion beam (radius ≈50 nm) induces a picometer-scale dynamic deformation of the resonator surface, which we detect through a shift in the optical resonance wavelength. We map five modes of a silicon microdisk resonator (Q≥20,000) with both high spatial and spectral resolution. Our technique also enables in-situ observation of ion implantation damage and relaxation dynamics in a silicon lattice13,14. PMID:27087832

  8. Nanophotonics-enabled smart windows, buildings and wearables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoff; Gentle, Angus; Arnold, Matthew; Cortie, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Design and production of spectrally smart windows, walls, roofs and fabrics has a long history, which includes early examples of applied nanophotonics. Evolving nanoscience has a special role to play as it provides the means to improve the functionality of these everyday materials. Improvement in the quality of human experience in any location at any time of year is the goal. Energy savings, thermal and visual comfort indoors and outdoors, visual experience, air quality and better health are all made possible by materials, whose "smartness" is aimed at designed responses to environmental energy flows. The spectral and angle of incidence responses of these nanomaterials must thus take account of the spectral and directional aspects of solar energy and of atmospheric thermal radiation plus the visible and color sensitivity of the human eye. The structures required may use resonant absorption, multilayer stacks, optical anisotropy and scattering to achieve their functionality. These structures are, in turn, constructed out of particles, columns, ultrathin layers, voids, wires, pure and doped oxides, metals, polymers or transparent conductors (TCs). The need to cater for wavelengths stretching from 0.3 to 35 μm including ultraviolet-visible, near-infrared (IR) and thermal or Planck radiation, with a spectrally and directionally complex atmosphere, and both being dynamic, means that hierarchical and graded nanostructures often feature. Nature has evolved to deal with the same energy flows, so biomimicry is sometimes a useful guide.

  9. EDITORIAL: Special issue on green photonics Special issue on green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Allan; Brongersma, Mark; Polman, Albert

    2012-02-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells can provide virtually unlimited amounts of energy by effectively converting sunlight into clean electrical power. Over the years, significant research and development efforts have been devoted to improving the structural and charge transport properties of the materials used in PV cells. Despite these efforts, the current energy conversion efficiencies of commercial solar cells are still substantially lower than the ultimate limits set by thermodynamics. Economic arguments in addition to the scarcity of some semiconductors and materials used in transparent conductive oxides are also driving us to use less and less material in a cell. For these reasons, it is clear that new approaches need to be found. One possible solution that is more-or-less orthogonal to previous approaches is aimed at managing the photons rather than the electrons or atoms in a cell. This type of photon management is termed Green Photonics. Nano- and micro-photonic trapping techniques are currently gaining significant attention. The use of engineered plasmonic and high refractive index structures shows tremendous potential for enhancing the light absorption per unit volume in semiconductors. Unfortunately, the design space in terms of the nanostructure sizes, shapes, and array structures is too large to allow for optimization of PV cells using brute force simulations. For this reason, new intuitive models and rapid optimization techniques for advanced light trapping technologies need to be developed. At the same time we need to come up with new, inexpensive, and scalable nanostructure fabrication and optical characterization techniques in order to realize the dream of inexpensive, high power conversion efficiency cells that make economic sense. This special issue discusses some of the exciting new approaches to light trapping that leverage the most recent advances in the field of nanophotonics. It also provides some insights into why giving the green light to green

  10. Determination of nitrogen in boron carbide by instrumental photon activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Merchel, Silke; Berger, Achim

    2007-05-01

    Boron carbide is widely used as industrial material, because of its extreme hardness, and as a neutron absorber. As part of a round-robin exercise leading to certification of a new reference material (ERM-ED102) which was demanded by the industry we analysed nitrogen in boron carbide by inert gas fusion analysis (GFA) and instrumental photon activation analysis (IPAA) using the 14N(gamma,n)13N nuclear reaction. The latter approach is the only non-destructive method among all the methods applied. By using photons with energy below the threshold of the 12C(gamma,n)11C reaction, we hindered activation of matrix and other impurities. A recently installed beam with a very low lateral activating flux gradient enabled us to homogeneously activate sample masses of approximately 1 g. Taking extra precautions, i.e. self-absorption correction and deconvolution of the complex decay curves, we calculated a nitrogen concentration of 2260+/-100 microg g-1, which is in good agreement with our GFA value of 2303+/-64 microg g-1. The values are the second and third highest of a rather atypical (non-S-shape) distribution of data of 14 round-robin participants. It is of utmost importance for the certification process that our IPAA value is the only one not produced by inert gas fusion analysis and, therefore, the only one which is not affected by a possible incomplete release of nitrogen from high-melting boron carbide.

  11. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  12. Disorder improves nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, U. W.; Smeets, M.; Meier, M.; Bittkau, K.; Merdzhanova, T.; Smirnov, V.; Michaelis, D.; Waechter, C.; Carius, R.; Rau, U.

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic experimental study on the impact of disorder in advanced nanophotonic light-trapping concepts of thin-film solar cells. Thin-film solar cells made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared on imprint-textured glass superstrates. For periodically textured superstrates of periods below 500 nm, the nanophotonic light-trapping effect is already superior to state-of-the-art randomly textured front contacts. The nanophotonic light-trapping effect can be associated to light coupling to leaky waveguide modes causing resonances in the external quantum efficiency of only a few nanometer widths for wavelengths longer than 500 nm. With increasing disorder of the nanotextured front contact, these resonances broaden and their relative altitude decreases. Moreover, overall the external quantum efficiency, i.e., the light-trapping effect, increases incrementally with increasing disorder. Thereby, our study is a systematic experimental proof that disorder is conceptually an advantage for nanophotonic light-trapping concepts employing grating couplers in thin-film solar cells. The result is relevant for the large field of research on nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells which currently investigates and prototypes a number of new concepts including disordered periodic and quasi periodic textures.

  13. Disorder improves nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paetzold, U. W. Smeets, M.; Meier, M.; Bittkau, K.; Merdzhanova, T.; Smirnov, V.; Carius, R.; Rau, U.; Michaelis, D.; Waechter, C.

    2014-03-31

    We present a systematic experimental study on the impact of disorder in advanced nanophotonic light-trapping concepts of thin-film solar cells. Thin-film solar cells made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared on imprint-textured glass superstrates. For periodically textured superstrates of periods below 500 nm, the nanophotonic light-trapping effect is already superior to state-of-the-art randomly textured front contacts. The nanophotonic light-trapping effect can be associated to light coupling to leaky waveguide modes causing resonances in the external quantum efficiency of only a few nanometer widths for wavelengths longer than 500 nm. With increasing disorder of the nanotextured front contact, these resonances broaden and their relative altitude decreases. Moreover, overall the external quantum efficiency, i.e., the light-trapping effect, increases incrementally with increasing disorder. Thereby, our study is a systematic experimental proof that disorder is conceptually an advantage for nanophotonic light-trapping concepts employing grating couplers in thin-film solar cells. The result is relevant for the large field of research on nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells which currently investigates and prototypes a number of new concepts including disordered periodic and quasi periodic textures.

  14. Instrumental photon activation analysis using the linear accelerator at the Naval Postgraduate School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. A.

    1982-10-01

    Charcoal, charcoal residue, potting soil, aluminum foil, bismuth germanate, and petroleum samples have been investigated using instrumental photon activation analysis (i.e., no radiochemistry). The major and minor elements routinely observed by this nondestructive method were: C, C1, Ca, Fe, Mg, Si, and K. A comprehensive review of the principles of IPAA was also included in the study. The principles were applied to a theoretical analysis of an oil sample in which the trace element concentrations were known. It was concluded that IPAA is a highly sensitive technique which could be used to fingerprint oils.

  15. Using Photon Activation Analysis To Determine Concentrations Of Unknown Components In Reference Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Jaromy; Sun, Zaijing; Wells, Doug; Maschner, Herb

    2011-06-01

    Using certified multi-element reference materials for instrumental analyses one frequently is confronted with the embarrassing fact that the concentration of some desired elements are not given in the respective certificate, nonetheless are detectable, e.g. by photon activation analysis (PAA). However, these elements might be determinable with sufficient quality of the results using scaling parameters and the well-known quantities of a reference element within the reference material itself. Scaling parameters include: activation threshold energy, Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) peak and endpoint energy of the bremsstrahlung continuum; integrated photo-nuclear cross sections for the isotopes of the reference element; bremsstrahlung continuum integral; target thickness; photon flux density. Photo-nuclear cross sections from the unreferenced elements must be known, too. With these quantities, the integral was obtained for both the known and unknown elements resulting in an inference of the concentration of the unreported element based upon the reported value, thus also the concentration of the unreferenced element in the reference material. A similar method to determine elements using the basic nuclear and experimental data has been developed for thermal neutron activation analysis some time ago (k{sub 0} Method).

  16. On the origin of large two-photon activity of DANS molecule.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Mehboob; Chattopadhyaya, Mausumi; Chakrabarti, Swapan

    2012-11-15

    In this work, using the quadratic response theory and two-state model approach, we have explained the origin of high two-photon activity and the corresponding solvent dependence of 4,4'-dimethyl-amino-nitro-stilbene (DANS) molecule. For this purpose, we have made two structural modifications in the DANS molecule (1) at the donor-acceptor part and (2) at the unsaturated bridge between the two rings and calculated the one- and two-photon (OP and TP) absorption parameters of all the systems in gas phase and in three different solvents, viz., MeCN, THF, and toluene. We found that the removal of donor-acceptor groups from the original DANS molecule vanishes the transition moment between the ground and excited states and also the corresponding dipole moment difference, and the saturation of the π-conjugation bridge between the two rings keeping the donor-acceptor groups intact causes a large decrease in the ground to excited state transition moment. These changes, in turn, decrease the overall TP activity of the molecules as compared to DANS. On the basis of our analysis, we have concluded that neither the donor-acceptor pair nor the π-conjugation bridge between the two, rather their cooperative involvement leads to a large overlap between the ground and virtual and also the virtual and charge-transfer states, which are eventually responsible for the very large TP activity of DANS.

  17. Note: Fully integrated active quenching circuit achieving 100 MHz count rate with custom technology single photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, G.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.

    2017-02-01

    The minimization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) dead time is a key factor to speed up photon counting and timing measurements. We present a fully integrated Active Quenching Circuit (AQC) able to provide a count rate as high as 100 MHz with custom technology SPAD detectors. The AQC can also operate the new red enhanced SPAD and provide the timing information with a timing jitter Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) as low as 160 ps.

  18. Note: Fully integrated active quenching circuit achieving 100 MHz count rate with custom technology single photon avalanche diodes.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, G; Labanca, I; Rech, I; Gulinatti, A; Ghioni, M

    2017-02-01

    The minimization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) dead time is a key factor to speed up photon counting and timing measurements. We present a fully integrated Active Quenching Circuit (AQC) able to provide a count rate as high as 100 MHz with custom technology SPAD detectors. The AQC can also operate the new red enhanced SPAD and provide the timing information with a timing jitter Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) as low as 160 ps.

  19. Simultaneous multi-electrode array recording and two-photon calcium imaging of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Shew, Woodrow L.; Bellay, Timothy; Plenz, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    A complete understanding of how brain circuits function will require measurement techniques which monitor large scale network activity simultaneously with the activity of local neural populations at a small scale. Here we present a useful step towards achieving this aim: simultaneous two-photon calcium imaging and multi-electrode array (MEA) recordings. The primary challenge of this method is removing an electrical artifact from the MEA signals that is caused by the imaging laser. Here we show that artifact removal can be achieved with a simple filtering scheme. As a demonstration of this technique we compare large-scale local field potential signals to single-neuron activity in a small-scale group of cells recorded from rat acute slices under two conditions: suppressed vs. intact inhibitory interactions between neurons. PMID:20659501

  20. Brain single photon emission computed tomography: Newer activation and intervention studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikofsky, R.S.; Hellman, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings using non-xenon 133 tracers in combination with activation and intervention techniques are reviewed. Examination of the currently available data indicates that it is possible to detect the effects of a variety of activations and interventional procedures using SPECT rCBF with non-xenon 133 tracers. There are still many issues to be resolved before SPECT can reach the level of sophistication attained by xenon 133 and positron emission tomography in studying rCBF during activation or intervention. However, research to date indicates that SPECT rCBF studied with tracers other than xenon 133 has an excellent potential for increasing the ability to differentiate normal and pathological states. 97 refs.

  1. Single-photon electroluminescence for on-chip quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentham, C.; Hallett, D.; Prtljaga, N.; Royall, B.; Vaitiekus, D.; Coles, R. J.; Clarke, E.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Itskevich, I. E.; Wilson, L. R.

    2016-10-01

    An electrically driven single-photon source has been monolithically integrated with nano-photonic circuitry. Electroluminescent emission from a single InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) is channelled through a suspended nanobeam waveguide. The emission line has a linewidth of below 6 μeV, demonstrating the ability to have a high coherence, electrically driven, waveguide coupled QD source. The single-photon nature of the emission is verified by g ( 2 ) ( τ ) correlation measurements. Moreover, in a cross-correlation experiment, with emission collected from the two ends of the waveguide, the emission and propagation of single photons from the same QD is confirmed. This work provides the basis for the development of electrically driven on-chip single-photon sources, which can be readily coupled to waveguide filters, directional couplers, phase shifters, and other elements of quantum photonic networks.

  2. Alternative materials lead to practical nanophotonic components (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Nathaniel; Ferrera, Marcello; DeVault, Clayton; Kim, Jongbum; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been a flurry of research in the field of alternative plasmonic materials, but for telecommunication applications, CMOS compatible materials titanium nitride and doped zinc oxides are among the most promising materials currently available. TiN is a gold-like ceramic with a permittivity cross-over near 500nm. In addition, TiN can attain ultra-thin, ultra-smooth epitaxial films on substrates such as c-sapphire, MgO, and silicon. Partnering TiN with CMOS compatible silicon nitride enables a fully solid state waveguide which is able to achieve a propagation length greater than 1cm for a ~8μm mode size at 1.55μm. Utilizing doped zinc oxide films as a dynamic material, high performance modulators can also be realized due to the low-loss achieved by the TiN/Si3N4 waveguide. Simply by placing a thin layer of aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) on top of the waveguide structure, a modulator with very low insertion loss is achieved. Our recent work has investigated optical tuning of AZO films by the pump-probe method, demonstrating a change in the refractive index of -0.17+0.25i at 1.3μm with an ultrafast response of 1ps. Assuming this change in the refractive index for the AZO film, a modulation of ~0.7dB/μm is possible in the structure with ~0.5dB insertion loss and an operational speed of 1THz. Further optimization of the design is expected to lead to an increased modulation depth without sacrificing insertion loss or speed. Consequently, nanophotonic technologies are reaching a critical point where many applications including telecom, medicine, and quantum science can see practical systems which provide new functionalities.

  3. Two-photon activation of photoactive ligands bound to gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, Brenden A.; Guo, Xi; See, Erich M.; Reyes, Roberto L.; Davis, Richey M.; Santos, Webster L.; Robinson, Hans D.

    2014-03-01

    Photoactive crosslinkers are useful tools for optically driven assembly of nano-particles. We report on the use of ultra-short laser pulses to affect localized photoreactions in o-nitrobenzyl-based photoactive ligands bound to a gold surface with thiol groups. The reaction is activated through a combination of thermal activation and two-photon absorption, while at higher power densities, ligands can be ablated from the surface through breaking of the gold-thiol bond. We will present data on the interplay of these three effects as a function of laser power and exposure time, and demonstrate assembly of nanoparticles onto optically patterned surfaces. Finally, we will discuss how this effect could be used to create well-defined nanoparticle assemblies where great binding-site selectivity can be obtained through the combination of high electromagnetic intensity enhancements at plasmon hotspots and the nonlinear scaling of photoactivation efficiency in two-photon absorption processes. We acknowledge financial support from the National Science Foundation and the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science.

  4. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, C.; Guo, X.; Fan, L.; Ma, X.; Poot, M.; Tang, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips. PMID:26792424

  5. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip.

    PubMed

    Schuck, C; Guo, X; Fan, L; Ma, X; Poot, M; Tang, H X

    2016-01-21

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips.

  6. Nematic and blue phase liquid crystals for temperature stabilization and active optical tuning of silicon photonic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-10-01

    We describe the underlying theories and experimental demonstrations of passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic devices clad in nematic liquid crystal mixtures, and active optical tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures combined with dye-doped nematic and blue phase liquid crystals. We show how modifications to the resonator device geometry allow for not only enhanced tuning of the resonator response, but also aid in achieving complete athermal operations of silicon photonic circuits. [Ref.: I.C. Khoo, "DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 40, 60-63 (2015); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 39, 5435-5438 (2014); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals," Materials 7(3), 2229-2241 (2014)].

  7. Integrated Nanophotonic Silicon Devices for Next Generation Computing Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Stevan

    Development of the computing platform of the future depends largely on high bandwidth interconnects at intra-die level. Silicon photonics, as an innately CMOS compatible technology, is a promising candidate for delivering terabit per second bandwidths through the use of wavelength division multiplex (WDM) signaling. Silicon photonic interconnects offer unmatched bandwidth, density, energy efficiency, latency and reach, compared with the electrical interconnects. WDM silicon photonic links are viewed today as a promising solution for resolving the inter/intra-chip communication bottlenecks for high performance computing systems. Towards its maturity, silicon photonic technology has to resolve the issues of waveguide propagation loss, density of device integration, thermal stability of resonant devices, heterogeneous integration of various materials and many other problems. This dissertation describes the development of integrated photonic technology on silicon and silicon nitride platforms in the increased order of device complexity, from the fabrication process of low loss waveguides and efficient off-chip coupling devices, to the die-size reconfigurable lattice filters for optical signal processing. Particular emphasis of the dissertation is on the demonstration of CMOS-compatible, athermal silicon ring modulators that potentially hold the key to solving the thermal problem of silicon photonic devices. The development of high quality amorphous titanium dioxide films with negative thermo-optic coefficient enabled the fabrication of gigahertz-bandwidth silicon ring modulators that can be made insensitive to ambient temperature changes.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of III-nitride nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Rajendra Prasad

    III-nitride photonic devices such as photodetectors (PDs), light emitting diode (LEDs), solar cells and optical waveguide amplifiers were designed, fabricated and characterized. High quality AlN epilayers were grown on sapphire and n-SiC substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and utilized as active deep UV (DUV) photonic materials for the demonstration of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detectors, Schottky barrier detectors, and avalanche photodetectors (APDs). AlN DUV PDs exhibited peak responsivity at 200 nm with a very sharp cutoff wavelength at 207 nm and extremely low dark current (<10 fA), very high breakdown voltages, high responsivity, and more than four orders of DUV to UV/visible rejection ratio. AlN Schottky PDs grown on n-SiC substrates exhibited high zero bias responsivity and a thermal energy limited detectivity of about 1.0 x 1015 cm Hz 1/2 W-1. The linear mode operation of AlN APDs with the shortest cutoff wavelength (210 nm) and a photocurrent multiplication of 1200 was demonstrated. A linear relationship between device size and breakdown field was observed for AlN APDs. Photovoltaic operation of InGaN solar cells in wavelengths longer than that of previous attainments was demonstrated by utilizing In xGa1-xN/GaN MQWs as the active layer. InxGa1-xN/GaN MQWs solar cells with x =0.3 exhibited open circuit voltage of about 2 V, a fill factor of about 60% and external quantum efficiency of 40% at 420 nm and 10% at 450 nm. The performance of InxGa1-xN/GaN MQWs solar cell was found to be highly correlated with the crystalline quality of the InxGa 1-xN active layer. The possible causes of poorer PV characteristics for higher In content in InGaN active layer were explained. Photoluminescence excitation studies of GaN:Er and In0.06Ga 0.94N:Er epilayers showed that Er emission intensity at 1.54 mum increases significantly as the excitation energy is tuned from below to above the energy bandgap of these epilayers. Current-injected 1.54 mum LEDs

  9. Interfacing broadband photonic qubits to on-chip cavity-protected rare-earth ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Rochman, Jake; Faraon, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Ensembles of solid-state optical emitters enable broadband quantum storage and transduction of photonic qubits, with applications in high-rate quantum networks for secure communications and interconnecting future quantum computers. To transfer quantum states using ensembles, rephasing techniques are used to mitigate fast decoherence resulting from inhomogeneous broadening, but these techniques generally limit the bandwidth, efficiency and active times of the quantum interface. Here, we use a dense ensemble of neodymium rare-earth ions strongly coupled to a nanophotonic resonator to demonstrate a significant cavity protection effect at the single-photon level--a technique to suppress ensemble decoherence due to inhomogeneous broadening. The protected Rabi oscillations between the cavity field and the atomic super-radiant state enable ultra-fast transfer of photonic frequency qubits to the ions (~50 GHz bandwidth) followed by retrieval with 98.7% fidelity. With the prospect of coupling to other long-lived rare-earth spin states, this technique opens the possibilities for broadband, always-ready quantum memories and fast optical-to-microwave transducers.

  10. Interfacing broadband photonic qubits to on-chip cavity-protected rare-earth ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Rochman, Jake; Faraon, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Ensembles of solid-state optical emitters enable broadband quantum storage and transduction of photonic qubits, with applications in high-rate quantum networks for secure communications and interconnecting future quantum computers. To transfer quantum states using ensembles, rephasing techniques are used to mitigate fast decoherence resulting from inhomogeneous broadening, but these techniques generally limit the bandwidth, efficiency and active times of the quantum interface. Here, we use a dense ensemble of neodymium rare-earth ions strongly coupled to a nanophotonic resonator to demonstrate a significant cavity protection effect at the single-photon level—a technique to suppress ensemble decoherence due to inhomogeneous broadening. The protected Rabi oscillations between the cavity field and the atomic super-radiant state enable ultra-fast transfer of photonic frequency qubits to the ions (∼50 GHz bandwidth) followed by retrieval with 98.7% fidelity. With the prospect of coupling to other long-lived rare-earth spin states, this technique opens the possibilities for broadband, always-ready quantum memories and fast optical-to-microwave transducers. PMID:28090078

  11. Interfacing broadband photonic qubits to on-chip cavity-protected rare-earth ensembles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M; Rochman, Jake; Faraon, Andrei

    2017-01-16

    Ensembles of solid-state optical emitters enable broadband quantum storage and transduction of photonic qubits, with applications in high-rate quantum networks for secure communications and interconnecting future quantum computers. To transfer quantum states using ensembles, rephasing techniques are used to mitigate fast decoherence resulting from inhomogeneous broadening, but these techniques generally limit the bandwidth, efficiency and active times of the quantum interface. Here, we use a dense ensemble of neodymium rare-earth ions strongly coupled to a nanophotonic resonator to demonstrate a significant cavity protection effect at the single-photon level-a technique to suppress ensemble decoherence due to inhomogeneous broadening. The protected Rabi oscillations between the cavity field and the atomic super-radiant state enable ultra-fast transfer of photonic frequency qubits to the ions (∼50 GHz bandwidth) followed by retrieval with 98.7% fidelity. With the prospect of coupling to other long-lived rare-earth spin states, this technique opens the possibilities for broadband, always-ready quantum memories and fast optical-to-microwave transducers.

  12. Superlattice for photonic band gap opening in monolayers of dielectric spheres.

    PubMed

    Vynck, Kevin; Cassagne, David; Centeno, Emmanuel

    2006-07-24

    Dielectric spheres synthesized for the fabrication of self-organized photonic crystals such as opals offer large opportunities for the design of novel nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we show that a hexagonal superlattice monolayer of dielectric spheres exhibits an even photonic band gap below the light cone for refractive indices higher than 1.93. The use of spheres with refractive index 2.9 and diameter 0.33 mum tunes the photonic band gap to the telecommunications range (lambda=1.55 mum). As a practical example for the use of such a photonic band gap, we demonstrate the possibility of waveguiding light linearly through the monolayer.

  13. Active Detection of Shielded Special Nuclear Material in the Presence of Variable High Backgrounds Using a Mixed Photon-Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philip N.; Clemett, Ceri D.; Hill, Cassie; O'Malley, John; Campbell, Ben

    This paper describes and compares two approaches to the analysis of active interrogation data containing high photon backgrounds associated with mixed photon-neutron source flash active interrogation. Results from liquid scintillation detectors (EJ301/EJ309) fielded at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), in collaboration with the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), using the NRL Mercury Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) operating in both a photon and mixed photon-neutron mode at a Depleted Uranium (DU) target are presented. The standard approach applying a Figure of Merit (FOM) consisting of background sigma above background is compared with an approach looking to fit only the time-decaying photon signal with standard delayed photon emission from ∼10-MeV end-point-energy Bremsstrahlung photofission of DU. Examples where each approach does well and less well are presented together with a discussion of the relative limitations of both approaches to the type of mixed photon-neutron flash active interrogation being considered.

  14. Opportunities for Low Cost Processing of Erbium 8-Quinolinolates for Active Integrated Photonic Applications.

    PubMed

    Penna, Stefano; Mattiello, Leonardo; Di Bartolo, Silvia; Pizzoleo, Angelo; Attanasio, Vincenzo; Beleffi, Giorgio Maria Tosi; Otomo, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Erbium-doped organic emitters are promising active materials for Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) due to their emission shown at 1550 nm combined to the potential low cost processing. In particular, Erbium Quinoline (ErQ) gained a strong interest in the last decade for the good emission efficiency. This contribution reports the results derived from the application of ErQ as active core material within a buried optical waveguide, following the development of a purposed optical process to control the refractive index of ErQ and then to define a patterned structure from a single thin film deposition step. The reported results show the potential of Er-doped organic materials for low cost processing and application to planar PICs.

  15. The stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence guided ablation of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; DiMarzio, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated and excited by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low-cost and reliable method for detecting melanin. We have developed a device utilizing the melanin SMPAF to guide the ablation of melanin with a 975 nm CW laser. This method provides the ability of targeting individual melanin particles with micrometer resolution, and enables localized melanin ablation to be performed without collateral damage. Compared to the traditional selective photothermolysis, which uses pulsed lasers for melanin ablation, this method demonstrates higher precision and lower cost. Therefore, the SMPAF guided selective ablation of melanin is a promising tool of melanin ablation for both medical and cosmetic purposes.

  16. Rapid detection of malignant bio-species using digital holographic pattern recognition and nano-photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Kukhtareva, Tatiana; Kukhtarev, Nickolai V.; Curley, Michael J.; Edwards, Vernessa; Creer, Marylyn

    2013-03-01

    There is a great need for rapid detection of bio-hazardous species particularly in applications to food safety and biodefense. It has been recently demonstrated that the colonies of various bio-species could be rapidly detected using culture-specific and reproducible patterns generated by scattered non-coherent light. However, the method heavily relies on a digital pattern recognition algorithm, which is rather complex, requires substantial computational power and is prone to ambiguities due to shift, scale, or orientation mismatch between the analyzed pattern and the reference from the library. The improvement could be made, if, in addition to the intensity of the scattered optical wave, its phase would be also simultaneously recorded and used for the digital holographic pattern recognition. In this feasibility study the research team recorded digital Gabor-type (in-line) holograms of colonies of micro-organisms, such as Salmonella with a laser diode as a low-coherence light source and a lensless high-resolution (2.0x2.0 micron pixel pitch) digital image sensor. The colonies were grown in conventional Petri dishes using standard methods. The digitally recorded holograms were used for computational reconstruction of the amplitude and phase information of the optical wave diffracted on the colonies. Besides, the pattern recognition of the colony fragments using the cross-correlation between the digital hologram was also implemented. The colonies of mold fungi Altenaria sp, Rhizophus, sp, and Aspergillus sp have been also generating nano-colloidal silver during their growth in specially prepared matrices. The silver-specific plasmonic optical extinction peak at 410-nm was also used for rapid detection and growth monitoring of the fungi colonies.

  17. Self Assembled Nano-Photonic Devices Derived from Marine DNA for Opto-Electronic Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-30

    066-0015 Japan Date of this report : January 31, 2006 Summary Research 1 Optical and photochromic properties of spiropyran-intercalated...DNA-surfactant complex f i lms for optical switching Optical and photochromic propert ies of spiropyran-intercalated DNA-surfactant complex f i...containing the oxazine r ing and intercalated into DNA showed a very rapid photochromic response. I t is also shown that photochromic response t

  18. Monolithic active quenching and picosecond timing circuit suitable for large-area single-photon avalanche diodes.

    PubMed

    Gallivanoni, A; Rech, I; Resnati, D; Ghioni, M; Cova, S

    2006-06-12

    A new integrated active quenching circuit (i-AQC) designed in a standard CMOS process is presented, capable of operating with any available single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) over wide temperature range. The circuit is suitable for attaining high photon timing resolution also with wide-area SPADs. The new i-AQC integrates the basic active-quenching loop, a patented low-side timing circuit comprising a fast pulse pick-up scheme that substantially improves time-jitter performance, and a novel active-load passive quenching mechanism (consisting of a current mirror rather than a traditional high-value resistor) greatly improves the maximum counting rate. The circuit is also suitable for portable instruments, miniaturized detector modules and SPAD-array detectors. The overall features of the circuit may open the way to new developments in diversified applications of time-correlated photon counting in life sciences and material sciences.

  19. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  20. Nanophotonics of Chloroplasts for Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Cheryl R.

    2011-03-01

    In the search for new energy sources, lessons can be learned from chloroplast photonics. The nano-architecture of chloroplasts is remarkably well-adapted to mediate sunlight interactions for efficient energy conversion. We carried out experiments with chloroplasts isolated from spinach and leaf lettuce to elucidate the relationship between nano-architecture, biomolecular composition and photonic properties. We obtained high-resolution microscopic images of single chloroplasts to identify geometries of chloroplasts and interior grana. We performed micro-spectroscopy to identify strengths of absorption and fluorescence transitions and related them to broadband reflectance and transmittance spectra of whole leaf structures. Finally, the nonlinear optical properties were investigated with nanolaser spectroscopy by placing chloroplasts into micro-resonators and optically pumping. These spectra reveal chloroplast photonic modes and allow measurement of single chloroplast light scattering cross section, polarizability, and refractive index. The nanolaser spectra recorded at increasing pump powers enabled us to observe non-linear optics, photon dynamics, and stimulated emission from single chloroplasts. All of these experiments provide insight into plant photonics and inspiration of paradigms for synthetic biomaterials to harness sunlight in new ways.

  1. In vivo three-photon imaging of activity of GCaMP6-labeled neurons deep in intact mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Wang, Tianyu; Wang, Mengran; Feng, Danielle D; Horton, Nicholas G; Cruz-Hernández, Jean C; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Reimer, Jacob; Tolias, Andreas S; Nishimura, Nozomi; Xu, Chris

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution optical imaging is critical to understanding brain function. We demonstrate that three-photon microscopy at 1,300-nm excitation enables functional imaging of GCaMP6s-labeled neurons beyond the depth limit of two-photon microscopy. We record spontaneous activity from up to 150 neurons in the hippocampal stratum pyramidale at ∼1-mm depth within an intact mouse brain. Our method creates opportunities for noninvasive recording of neuronal activity with high spatial and temporal resolution deep within scattering brain tissues.

  2. Compact models for nanophotonic structures and on-chip interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mehboob

    Over the last few years, scaling in deep submicron technologies has shifted the paradigm from device-dominated to interconnect-dominated design methodology. Consequently, there is an increasing interest towards the miniaturization of the guiding medium in nanoscale integrated circuits by exploring plasmon-based waveguides to alleviate the scaling issues associated with today's copper interconnect. In this thesis, we seek short and long-term solutions of on-chip interconnect by developing accurate compact models of on-chip interconnects and impedance characterization of nanophotonic structures. The developed system models are compact and accurate over the operating frequency range and the adopted approach have provided many critical insights and produced many important results. This thesis first presents a new modeling strategy that represents the nanostructure by its equivalent impedance. By applying either quasistatic approximation or separately solving for voltage and current for dominant mode, we reduce the field problem to a circuit problem. The impedance expressed in terms of circuit components is dependent on the material constant as well as the operating frequency. The modeling methodology is successfully applied to nanoparticles and oscillating nanosphere. The proposed model characterizes plasmon resonance in these nanostructures, thereby providing basic building block to develop spice models of complex plasmon-based waveguide for sub-wavelength propagation. We also presented several techniques to develop compact models of on-chip interconnects and passive components for accurate estimation of power, noise and delay of high speed integrated circuits. The automated method generates reduced order models that are accurate across either a narrow or a wide-range of frequencies. The proposed methods are based on Krylov subspace method with interpolation points dynamically selected using either spline based algorithm or discrete wavelet transform. Narrow and

  3. Hybridization of active and passive elements for planar photonic components and interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, M.; Bidnyk, S.; Balakrishnan, A.

    2007-02-01

    The deployment of Passive Optical Networks (PON) for Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) applications currently represents the fastest growing sector of the telecommunication industry. Traditionally, FTTH transceivers have been manufactured using commodity bulk optics subcomponents, such as thin film filters (TFFs), micro-optic collimating lenses, TO-packaged lasers, and photodetectors. Assembling these subcomponents into a single housing requires active alignment and labor-intensive techniques. Today, the majority of cost reducing strategies using bulk subcomponents has been implemented making future reductions in the price of manufacturing FTTH transceivers unlikely. Future success of large scale deployments of FTTH depends on further cost reductions of transceivers. Realizing the necessity of a radically new packaging approach for assembly of photonic components and interconnects, we designed a novel way of hybridizing active and passive elements into a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. In our approach, all the filtering components were monolithically integrated into the chip using advancements in planar reflective gratings. Subsequently, active components were passively hybridized with the chip using fully-automated high-capacity flip-chip bonders. In this approach, the assembly of the transceiver package required no active alignment and was readily suitable for large-scale production. This paper describes the monolithic integration of filters and hybridization of active components in both silica-on-silicon and silicon-on-insulator PLCs.

  4. High-Performance Doped Silver Films: Overcoming Fundamental Material Limits for Nanophotonic Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Chen, Long; Ji, Chengang; Xu, Mingjie; Ferrera, Marcello; Pan, Xiaoqing; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Guo, L Jay

    2017-03-20

    The field of nanophotonics has ushered in a new paradigm of light manipulation by enabling deep subdiffraction confinement assisted by metallic nanostructures. However, a key limitation which has stunted a full development of high-performance nanophotonic devices is the typical large losses associated with the constituent metals. Although silver has long been known as the highest quality plasmonic material for visible and near infrared applications, its usage has been limited due to practical issues of continuous thin film formation, stability, adhesion, and surface roughness. Recently, a solution is proposed to the above issues by doping a proper amount of aluminum during silver deposition. In this work, the potential of doped silver for nanophotonic applications is presented by demonstrating several high-performance key nanophotonic devices. First, long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides show propagation distances of a few centimeters. Second, hyperbolic metamaterials consisting of ultrathin Al-doped Ag films are attained having a homogeneous and low-loss response, and supporting a broad range of high-k modes. Finally, transparent conductors based on Al-doped Ag possess both a high and flat transmittance over the visible and near-IR range.

  5. Analysis of marine sediment and lobster hepatopancreas reference materials by instrumental photon activation

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Davidson, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    By use of instrumental photon activation analysis, twelve trace (As, Ba, Cr, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr, U, Zn, and Zr) and eight minor (C, Na, Mg, Co, K, Ca, Tl, and Fe) elements were determined in a certified marine sediment standard reference material as well as eight trace (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, and Pb) and four minor (Na, Mg, Cl, and Ca) elements in a certified marine tissue (lobster hepatopancreas) standard reference material. The precision and accuracy of the present results when compared to the accepted values clearly demonstrate the reliability of this nondestructive technique and its applicability to marine environmental or marine geochemical studies. 24 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Engineering near-infrared single-photon emitters with optically active spins in ultrapure silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Stender, B; Trupke, M; Simin, D; Pflaum, J; Dyakonov, V; Astakhov, G V

    2015-07-07

    Vacancy-related centres in silicon carbide are attracting growing attention because of their appealing optical and spin properties. These atomic-scale defects can be created using electron or neutron irradiation; however, their precise engineering has not been demonstrated yet. Here, silicon vacancies are generated in a nuclear reactor and their density is controlled over eight orders of magnitude within an accuracy down to a single vacancy level. An isolated silicon vacancy serves as a near-infrared photostable single-photon emitter, operating even at room temperature. The vacancy spins can be manipulated using an optically detected magnetic resonance technique, and we determine the transition rates and absorption cross-section, describing the intensity-dependent photophysics of these emitters. The on-demand engineering of optically active spins in technologically friendly materials is a crucial step toward implementation of both maser amplifiers, requiring high-density spin ensembles, and qubits based on single spins.

  7. Engineering near-infrared single-photon emitters with optically active spins in ultrapure silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, F.; Stender, B.; Trupke, M.; Simin, D.; Pflaum, J.; Dyakonov, V.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2015-07-01

    Vacancy-related centres in silicon carbide are attracting growing attention because of their appealing optical and spin properties. These atomic-scale defects can be created using electron or neutron irradiation; however, their precise engineering has not been demonstrated yet. Here, silicon vacancies are generated in a nuclear reactor and their density is controlled over eight orders of magnitude within an accuracy down to a single vacancy level. An isolated silicon vacancy serves as a near-infrared photostable single-photon emitter, operating even at room temperature. The vacancy spins can be manipulated using an optically detected magnetic resonance technique, and we determine the transition rates and absorption cross-section, describing the intensity-dependent photophysics of these emitters. The on-demand engineering of optically active spins in technologically friendly materials is a crucial step toward implementation of both maser amplifiers, requiring high-density spin ensembles, and qubits based on single spins.

  8. Two-photon-excitation fluorescence imaging of three-dimensional calcium-ion activity.

    PubMed

    Piston, D W; Kirby, M S; Cheng, H; Lederer, W J; Webb, W W

    1994-02-01

    Two-photon excitation of the ultraviolet-absorbing fluorescent calcium indicator Indo-1 in laser scanning microscopy makes possible a quantitative, three-dimensional recording of intracellular free calcium activity ([Ca(2equation)](i)) distributions and dynamics with low background and minimal photobleaching. We have constructed a simple optical system that facilitates collection of the 400-500-nm Indo-1 fluorescence without the use of a confocal spatial filter. Instead of the fluorescence being descanned as is normally required in confocal microscopy, the fluorescence is deflected by a dichroic mirror into a separate detection pathway. Images of [Ca(2+)](i) distributions with three-dimensional submicrometer resolution and 10% precision are obtained at100-µM Indo-1 concentration and 3-s recording time for 384 × 512 pixels. Data on [Ca(2+)](i) in tumor mast cells and cardiac myocytes illustrate the capabilities of this technique.

  9. Solid state photon upconversion utilizing thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as triplet sensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tony C.; Congreve, Daniel N.; Baldo, Marc A.

    2015-07-20

    The ability to upconvert light is useful for a range of applications, from biological imaging to solar cells. But modern technologies have struggled to upconvert incoherent incident light at low intensities. Here, we report solid state photon upconversion employing triplet-triplet exciton annihilation in an organic semiconductor, sensitized by a thermally activated-delayed fluorescence (TADF) dye. Compared to conventional phosphorescent sensitizers, the TADF dye maximizes the wavelength shift in upconversion due to its small singlet-triplet splitting. The efficiency of energy transfer from the TADF dye is 9.1%, and the conversion yield of sensitizer exciton pairs to singlet excitons in the annihilator is 1.1%. Our results demonstrate upconversion in solid state geometries and with non-heavy metal-based sensitizer materials.

  10. Wide field-of-view, multi-region two-photon imaging of neuronal activity in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Stirman, Jeffrey N.; Smith, Ikuko T.; Kudenov, Michael W.; Smith, Spencer L.

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging provides an optical readout of neuronal activity in populations of neurons with subcellular resolution. However, conventional two-photon imaging systems are limited in their field of view to ~1 mm2, precluding the visualization of multiple cortical areas simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate a two-photon microscope with an expanded field of view (>9.5 mm2) for rapidly reconfigurable simultaneous scanning of widely separated populations of neurons. We custom designed and assembled an optimized scan engine, objective, and two independently positionable, temporally multiplexed excitation pathways. We used this new microscope to measure activity correlations between two cortical visual areas in mice during visual processing. PMID:27347754

  11. Wireless Communication with Nanoplasmonic Data Carriers: Macroscale Propagation of Nanophotonic Plasmon Polaritons Probed by Near-Field Nanoimaging.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Moshik; Abulafia, Yossi; Lev, Dmitry; Lewis, Aaron; Shavit, Reuven; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-09-13

    The ability to control the energy flow of light at the nanoscale is fundamental to modern communication and big-data technologies, as well as quantum information processing schemes. However, since photons are diffraction-limited, efforts of confining them to dimensions of integrated electronics have so far proven elusive. A promising way to facilitate nanoscale manipulation of light is through plasmon polaritons-coupled excitations of photons and charge carriers. These tightly confined hybrid waves can facilitate compression of optical functionalities to the nanoscale but suffer from huge propagation losses that limit their use to mostly subwavelength scale applications. With only weak evidence of macroscale plasmon polaritons, propagation has recently been reported theoretically and indirectly, no experiments so far have directly resolved long-range propagating optical plasmons in real space. Here, we launch and detect nanoscale optical signals, for record distances in a wireless link based on novel plasmonic nanotransceivers. We use a combination of scanning probe microscopies to provide high resolution real space images of the optical near fields and investigate their long-range propagation principles. We design our nanotransceivers based on a high-performance nanoantenna, Plantenna, hybridized with channel plasmon waveguides with a cross-section of 20 nm × 20 nm, and observe propagation for distances up to 1000 times greater than the plasmon wavelength. We experimentally show that our approach hugely outperforms both waveguide and wireless nanophotonic links. This successful alliance between Plantenna and plasmon waveguides paves the way for new generations of optical interconnects and expedites long-range interaction between quantum emitters and photomolecular devices.

  12. Fully integrated quantum photonic circuit with an electrically driven light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Pyatkov, Felix; Słowik, Karolina; Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Rath, Patrik; Vetter, Andreas; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M.; Gol'Tsman, G.; Korneev, A.; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Krupke, Ralph; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2016-11-01

    Photonic quantum technologies allow quantum phenomena to be exploited in applications such as quantum cryptography, quantum simulation and quantum computation. A key requirement for practical devices is the scalable integration of single-photon sources, detectors and linear optical elements on a common platform. Nanophotonic circuits enable the realization of complex linear optical systems, while non-classical light can be measured with waveguide-integrated detectors. However, reproducible single-photon sources with high brightness and compatibility with photonic devices remain elusive for fully integrated systems. Here, we report the observation of antibunching in the light emitted from an electrically driven carbon nanotube embedded within a photonic quantum circuit. Non-classical light generated on chip is recorded under cryogenic conditions with waveguide-integrated superconducting single-photon detectors, without requiring optical filtering. Because exclusively scalable fabrication and deposition methods are used, our results establish carbon nanotubes as promising nanoscale single-photon emitters for hybrid quantum photonic devices.

  13. Determination of Interesting Toxicological Elements in PM2.5 by Neutron and Photon Activation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capannesi, Geraldo; Lopez, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Human activities introduce compounds increasing levels of many dangerous species for environment and population. In this way, trace elements in airborne particulate have a preeminent position due to toxic element presence affecting the biological systems. The main problem is the analytical determination of such species at ultratrace levels: a very specific methodology is necessary with regard to the accuracy and precision and contamination problems. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Instrumental Photon Activation Analysis assure these requirements. A retrospective element analysis in airborne particulate collected in the last 4 decades has been carried out for studying their trend. The samples were collected in urban location in order to determine only effects due to global aerosol circulation; semiannual samples have been used to characterize the summer/winter behavior of natural and artificial origin. The levels of natural origin element are higher than those in other countries owing to geological and meteorological factors peculiar to Central Italy. The levels of artificial elements are sometimes less than those in other countries, suggesting a less polluted general situation for Central Italy. However, for a few elements (e.g., Pb) the levels measured are only slight lower than those proposed as air ambient standard. PMID:23878525

  14. Experimental Observations of Nuclear Activity in Deuterated Materials Subjected to a Low-Energy Photon Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Benyo, Theresa L.; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Westmeyer, Paul A.; Chait, Arnon; Becks, Michael D.; Martin, Richard E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of highly deuterated materials to a low-energy (nom. 2 MeV) photon beam resulted in nuclear activity of both the parent metals of hafnium and erbium and a witness material (molybdenum) mixed with the reactants. Gamma spectral analysis of all deuterated materials, ErD2.8+C36D74+Mo and HfD2+C36D74+Mo, showed that nuclear processes had occurred as shown by unique gamma signatures. For the deuterated erbium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of erbium ((163)Er and (171)Er) and of molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo) and by beta decay, technetium (99mTc and 101Tc). For the deuterated hafnium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of hafnium (180mHf and 181Hf) and molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo), and by beta decay, technetium ((99m)Tc and (101)Tc). In contrast, when either the hydrogenated or non-gas-loaded erbium or hafnium materials were exposed to the gamma flux, the gamma spectra revealed no new isotopes. Neutron activation materials showed evidence of thermal and epithermal neutrons. CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors showed evidence of fast neutrons with energies between 1.4 and 2.5 MeV and several instances of triple tracks, indicating (is) greater than 10 MeV neutrons. Further study is required to determine the mechanism causing the nuclear activity.

  15. Tissue dissolution ability of sodium hypochlorite activated by photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming technique.

    PubMed

    Guneser, Mehmet Burak; Arslan, Dilara; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) technique on the pulp tissue-dissolving capacity of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and compare it with the EndoActivator System (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) and the Er:YAG laser with an endodontic fiber tip. Bovine pulp tissue samples (45 ± 15 mg) and dentin powder (10 mg) were placed in 1.5-mL Eppendorf tubes with 1 mL 5.25% NaOCl (Wizard; Rehber Kimya, Istanbul, Turkey) or distilled water (control) for 5 minutes with activation by the EndoActivator System, the Er:YAG laser with an endodontic fiber tip, and the PIPS technique. Nonactivated NaOCl served as the positive control. All testing procedures were performed at room temperature. The tissue samples were weighed before and after treatment, and the percentage of weight loss was calculated. The differences were statistically analyzed. The highest rate of tissue dissolution was observed in the NaOCl + Er:YAG group (P < .05). The NaOCl + PIPS group dissolved more bovine pulp tissue than the nonactivated NaOCl group (P < .05). There was no statistically significant difference between the rates of tissue dissolution of the NaOCl + EA and the nonactivated NaOCl groups (P > .05). NaOCl activation with the Er:YAG laser with an endodontic fiber tip was the most effective in bovine pulp tissue dissolution. The PIPS technique also promoted superior tissue-dissolving effects when compared with no activation. However, the EndoActivator System had no direct effect on tissue dissolution. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Two-photon-excited luminescence of biologically active solid-state structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Kozulin, E. A.

    1994-05-01

    A study was made of the characteristics of two-photon-excited luminescence of a number of pharmaceutical and biologically active solid-state materials: aspirin, sulfadimethoxine, Streptocid (sulfanilamide), pig insulin, and lysozyme. This luminescence was excited by pulse-periodic laser radiation. The characteristics of the luminescence spectra were compared with the familiar spectra of two-photon-excited luminescence of L-tryptophan. The results were used to determine the characteristics of molecular excitons in the investigated organic crystals and to estimate the concentration of tryptophan in solid-state proteins.

  17. Light-induced protein dimerization by one- and two-photon activation of gibberellic acid derivatives in living cells.

    PubMed

    Schelkle, Korwin M; Griesbaum, Tristan; Ollech, Dirk; Becht, Steffy; Buckup, Tiago; Hamburger, Manuel; Wombacher, Richard

    2015-02-23

    We developed a highly efficient system for light-induced protein dimerization in live cells using photo-caged derivatives of the phytohormone gibberellic acid (GA3 ). We demonstrate the application of the photo-activatable chemical inducer of dimerization (CID) for the control of protein translocation with high spatiotemporal precision using light as an external trigger. Furthermore, we present a new two-photon (2P)-sensitive caging group, whose exceptionally high two-photon cross section allows the use of infrared light to efficiently unleash the active GA3 for inducing protein dimerization in living cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Silicon-on-insulator-based photonic-crystal Mach-Zehnder interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lanlan; Jiang, Yongqiang; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaonan; Choi, Jin H.; Chen, Ray T.

    2006-02-01

    Si nanophotonics is anticipated to play a critical role in the future ultra-compact system integration due to the maturity of sub-micron silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Photonic crystals (PhCs) provide a promising platform for developing novel optoelectronic devices with significantly reduced device size and power consumption. The active control of photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) incorporated in Mach-Zehnder interferometers has been investigated in this paper. We designed and fabricated a PCW based silicon thermo-optic (TO) switch operating at 1.55 μm. A novel device structure was proposed to enhance the heat exchange efficiency between the source and the active PCW region, which resulted in a faster switching time (< 20μs) compared with the conventional structure. The required π phase shift between the two arms of the MZI has been successfully achieved within an 80 μm interaction distance. The maximum modulation depth of 84% was demonstrated for switching power of 78mW. For high-speed applications, a p-i-n structure based PCW electro-optical (EO) MZI modulator was proposed. The transient performance of such a device was evaluated using a two-dimensional semiconductor device simulator MEDICI. The simulated structure demonstrated a great potential to realize high-speed ultra-compact Si modulators in the GHz region.

  19. Optimizing nanophotonic cavity designs with the gravitational search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Saucer, Timothy W; Sih, Vanessa

    2013-09-09

    Designing photonic crystal cavities with high quality factors and low mode volumes is of great importance for maximizing interactions of light and matter in metamaterials. Previous work on photonic crystal cavities has revealed dramatic improvements in performance by fine-tuning the device design. In L3 cavities, slight shifts of the holes on the edge of the cavity have been found to greatly increase quality factors without significantly altering the mode volume. Here we demonstrate utilizing a nature inspired search algorithm to efficiently explore a large parameter space. The results converge upon a new cavity model with a high quality factor to mode volume ratio (Q/V = 798,000 (λ/n)(-3)).

  20. Luminescent Properties of Arylpolyene Organic Dyes and Cross-Conjugated Ketones Promising for Quantum Optics and Nanophotonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, N. L.; Vasilyeva, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    The spectral-luminescent properties of some dyes of substituted arylpolyenes and cross-conjugated ketones class in Shpolsky matrices, promising for using in solving quantum optics and nanophotonics, were studied.

  1. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  2. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon's polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry.

  3. Large-scale quantum photonic circuits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas C.; Bunandar, Darius; Pant, Mihir; Steinbrecher, Greg R.; Mower, Jacob; Prabhu, Mihika; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Quantum information science offers inherently more powerful methods for communication, computation, and precision measurement that take advantage of quantum superposition and entanglement. In recent years, theoretical and experimental advances in quantum computing and simulation with photons have spurred great interest in developing large photonic entangled states that challenge today's classical computers. As experiments have increased in complexity, there has been an increasing need to transition bulk optics experiments to integrated photonics platforms to control more spatial modes with higher fidelity and phase stability. The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanophotonics platform offers new possibilities for quantum optics, including the integration of bright, nonclassical light sources, based on the large third-order nonlinearity (χ(3)) of silicon, alongside quantum state manipulation circuits with thousands of optical elements, all on a single phase-stable chip. How large do these photonic systems need to be? Recent theoretical work on Boson Sampling suggests that even the problem of sampling from e30 identical photons, having passed through an interferometer of hundreds of modes, becomes challenging for classical computers. While experiments of this size are still challenging, the SOI platform has the required component density to enable low-loss and programmable interferometers for manipulating hundreds of spatial modes. Here, we discuss the SOI nanophotonics platform for quantum photonic circuits with hundreds-to-thousands of optical elements and the associated challenges. We compare SOI to competing technologies in terms of requirements for quantum optical systems. We review recent results on large-scale quantum state evolution circuits and strategies for realizing high-fidelity heralded gates with imperfect, practical systems. Next, we review recent results on silicon photonics-based photon-pair sources and device architectures, and we discuss a path towards

  4. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Propagation of frequency-modulated pulses in active one-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Ostatochnikov, V A

    2015-02-28

    The propagation of frequency-modulated pulses in onedimensional photonic crystals with gain is considered. A correct expression is derived for the delay time of the pulse maximum. This expression takes into account the input pulse characteristics: duration, frequency modulation and spectrum position in the photonic band gap. The analytical results are basically in agreement with the results of numerical simulation. The influence of gain in the photonic-crystal structure is considered. It is shown that the parameters of a transmitted pulse can be controlled by changing the inputpulse frequency modulation. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  6. Active zinc-blende III-nitride photonic structures on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergent, Sylvain; Kako, Satoshi; Bürger, Matthias; Blumenthal, Sarah; Iwamoto, Satoshi; As, Donat Josef; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We use a layer transfer method to fabricate free-standing photonic structures in a zinc-blende AlN epilayer grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a 3C-SiC pseudosubstrate and containing GaN quantum dots. The method leads to the successful realization of microdisks, nanobeam photonic crystal cavities, and waveguides integrated on silicon (100) and operating at short wavelengths. We assess the quality of such photonic elements by micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy in the visible and ultraviolet ranges, and extract the absorption coefficient of ZB AlN membranes (α ˜ (2-5) × 102 cm-1).

  7. Active 2D and carbon-based materials: physics and devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-09-01

    In nanophotonics we create material-systems, which are structured at length scales smaller than the wavelength of light. When light propagates inside such effective materials numerous novel physics phenomena emerge including thresholdless lasing, atto-joule per bit efficient modulators, and exciton-polariton effects. However, in order to make use of these opportunities, synergistic device designs have to be applied to include materials, electric and photonic constrains - all at the nanoscale. In this talk, I present our recent progress in exploring 2D and TCO materials for active optoelectronics. I highlight nanoscale device demonstrations including their physical operation principle and performance benchmarks. Details include epsilon-bear-zero tuning of thin-film ITO, Graphene electro-static gating via Pauli-blocking, plasmonic electro-optic modulation, and hetero-integrated III-V and carbon-based plasmon lasers on Silicon photonics.

  8. Integrated photonic circuit in silicon on insulator for Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsever, Gunay; Dumon, Pieter; Bogaerts, Wim; Baets, Roel

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a medical imaging technology capable of producing high-resolution, crosssectional images through inhomogeneous samples, such as biological tissue. It has been widely adopted in clinical ophthalmology and a number of other clinical applications are in active research. Other applications of OCT include material characterization and non-destructive testing. In addition to current uses, OCT has a potential for a much wider range of applications and further commercialization. One of the reasons for slow penetration of OCT in clinical and industrial use is probably the cost and the size of the current systems. Current commercial and research OCT systems are fiber/free space optics based. Although fiber and micro-optical components have made these systems portable, further significant miniaturization and cost reduction could be achieved through the use of integrated photonic components. We demonstrate a Michelson interferometer using integrated photonic waveguides on nanophotonic silicon on insulator platform. The size of the interferometer is 1500 μm x 50 μm. The structure has been tested using a mirror as a reflector. We can achieve 40 μm axial resolution and 25 dB sensitivity which can be substantially improved.

  9. Remote Maneuver of Space Debris Using Photon Pressure for Active Collision Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C.

    2014-09-01

    The Space Environment Research Corporation (SERC) is a consortium of companies and research institutions that have joined together to pursue research and development of technologies and capabilities that will help to preserve the orbital space environment. The consortium includes, Electro Optics Systems (Australia), Lockheed Martin Australia, Optus Satellite Systems (Australia), The Australian national University, RMIT University, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) as well as affiliates from NASA Ames and ESA. SERC is also the recipient of and Australian Government Cooperative Research Centre grant. SERC will pursue a wide ranging research program including technologies to improve tracking capability and capacity, orbit determination and propagation algorithms, conjunction analysis and collision avoidance. All of these technologies will contribute to the flagship program to demonstrate active collision avoidance using photon pressure to provide remote maneuver of space debris. This project joins of the proposed NASA Lightforce concept with infrastructure and capabilities provided by SERC. This paper will describe the proposed research and development program to provide an on-orbit demonstration within the next five years for remote maneuver of space debris.

  10. Active Mediation of Plasmon Enhanced Localized Exciton Generation, Carrier Diffusion and Enhanced Photon Emission.

    PubMed

    Haq, Sharmin; Addamane, Sadhvikas; Kafle, Bijesh; Huang, Danhong; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Habteyes, Terefe G

    2017-04-13

    Understanding the enhancement of charge carrier generation and their diffusion is imperative for improving the efficiency of optoelectronic devices particularly infrared photodetectors that are less developed than their visible counterpart. Here, using gold nanorods as model plasmonic systems, InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in an InGaAs quantum well as an emitter, and GaAs as an active mediator of surface plasmons for enhancing carrier generation and photon emission, the distance dependence of energy transfer and carrier diffusion have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Analysis of the QD emission enhancement as a function of distance reveals a Förster radius of 3.85 ± 0.15 nm, a near-field decay length of 4.8 ± 0.1 nm and an effective carrier diffusion length of 64.0 ± 3.0 nm. Theoretical study of the temporal-evolution of the electron-hole occupation number of the excited states of the QDs indicates that the emission enhancement trend is determined by the carrier diffusion and capture rates.

  11. On the Photonic Cellular Interaction and the Electric Activity of Neurons in the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J.; Bokkon, I.; Rahnama, M.; Cifra, M.

    2011-12-01

    The subject of Ultraweak Photon Emission (UPE) by biological systems is very fascinating, and both evidence of its effects and applications are growing rapidly due to improvements in experimental techniques. Since the relevant equipment should be ultrasensitive with high quantum efficiencies and very low noise levels, the subject of UPE is still hotly debated and some of the interpretations need stronger empirical evidence to be accepted at face value. In this paper we first review different types of interactions between light and living systems based on recent publications. We then discuss the feasibility of UPE production in the human brain. The subject of UPE in the brain is still in early stages of development and needs more accurate experimental methods for proper analysis. In this work we also discuss a possible role of mitochondria in the production of UPE in the neurons of the brain and the plausibility of their effects on microtubules (MTs). MTs have been implicated as playing an important role in the signal and information processing taking place in the mammalian (especially human) brain. Finally, we provide a short discussion about the feasible effects of MTs on electric neural activity in the human brain.

  12. High performance nanophotonic circuits based on partially buried horizontal slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chi; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Li, Mo; Tang, Hong X

    2010-09-27

    We present a novel platform to construct high-performance nanophotonic devices in low refractive index dielectric films at telecoms wavelengths. The formation of horizontal slots by PECVD deposition of high index amorphous silicon provides a convenient and low-cost way to tailor nanophotonic devices to application needs. Low propagation loss of less than 2 dB/cm is obtained allowing us to fabricate optical resonators with measured high optical quality factors exceeding 10(5). We design and experimentally demonstrate on-chip grating couplers to efficiently couple light into integrated circuitry with coupling loss of 4 dB and optical bandwidth exceeding 110 nm. The entire on-chip circuitry consisting of input/output couplers, Mach-Zehnder interferometers with high extinction ratio and ring, racetrack resonators are designed, fabricated and characterized.

  13. Mode Conversion of Propagating Surface Plasmons in Nanophotonic Networks Induced by Structural Symmetry Breaking

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Deng; Wei, Hong; Jia, Zhili; Xu, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Nanophotonic plasmon circuits may play important roles in next-generation information technology as semiconductor-based electronics is approaching the physical limit. The functions of such circuits rely on the rigorous control of plasmon propagation. One important aspect of such control is controlling the conversion of different plasmon modes for designed plasmon routing in complex nanophotonic networks. Here, for the first time, we experimentally prove that the conversion of plasmon modes occurs widely in metallic nanowire waveguides, the basic components of plasmonic circuits, by introducing local structural symmetry breaking. In further simulations for the structure of a nanowire with a particle in its proximity, it is shown that the mode conversions originate from the redistribution of electric field on the wave front which is caused by the scattering of localized modes in the nanogap and on the nanoparticle. This mode conversion effect can be applied to flexibly control the plasmon propagation behavior in plasmonic nanowire networks.

  14. Nanophotonic graphene-based racetrack-resonator add/drop filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth L., A.; da Silva, M. G.; Neves, D. M. C.; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We are presenting and analyzing a graphene-based nanophotonic device to operate as a resonator-add/drop filter, whose control is obtained by varying the graphene chemical potential. That device consists of graphene-based waveguides, two directional couplers and a racetrack resonator with 90° bends. Since the graphene chemical potential provides the achievement of the necessary parameters, the resonance and filtering of the signals are obtained by applying the correct value of the graphene chemical potential in the graphene nanoribbons. The results of this study should help in the development of new graphene-based nanophotonic devices operating in the terahertz and infrared range (including in the C-band of the International Telecommunication Union - ITU), for use in future communications networks.

  15. Oxygen dependence of two-photon activation of zinc and copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Mir, Youssef; van Lier, Johan E; Paquette, Benoit; Houde, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), the use of light-activated drugs, is a promising treatment of cancer as well as several nonmalignant conditions. However, the efficacy of one-photon (1-gamma) PDT is limited by hypoxia, which can prevent the production of the cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) species, leading to tumor resistance to PDT. To solve this problem, we propose an irradiation protocol based on a simultaneous, two-photon (2-gamma) excitation of the photosensitizer (Ps). Excitation of the Ps triplet state leads to an upper excited triplet state T(n) with distinct photochemical properties, which could inflict biologic damage independent of the presence of molecular oxygen. To determine the potential of a 2-gamma excitation process, Jurkat cells were incubated with zinc or copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (ZnPcS(4) or CuPcS(4)). ZnPcS(4) is a potent (1)O(2) generator in 1-gamma PDT, while CuPcS(4) is inactive under these conditions. Jurkat cells incubated with either ZnPcS(4) or CuPcS(4) were exposed to a 670 nm continuous laser (1-gamma PDT), 532 nm pulsed-laser light (2-gamma PDT), or a combination of 532 and 670 nm (2-gamma PDT). The efficacy of ZnPcS(4) to photoinactivate the Jurkat cells decreased as the concentration of oxygen decreased for both the 1-gamma and 2-gamma protocols. In the case of CuPcS(4), cell phototoxicity was measured only following 2-gamma irradiation, and its efficacy also decreased at a lower oxygen concentration. Our results suggest that for CuPcS(4) the T(n) excited state can be populated after 2-gamma irradiation at 532 nm or the combination of 532 and 670 nm light. Dependency of phototoxicity upon aerobic conditions for both 1-gamma and 2-gamma PDT suggests that reactive oxygen species play an important role in 1-gamma and 2-gamma PDT.

  16. Self-aligned active quantum nanostructures in photonic crystals via selective wet-chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong Yoon; Kim, Se-Heon; Huang, Jingqing; Scofield, Adam; Huffaker, Diana; Scherer, Axel

    2013-07-05

    We propose a method of forming quantum-size emitters within a pre-defined photonic crystal in a self-aligned fashion through controlled removal of quantum well layers via selective wet-chemical etching. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our method, we take the example of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab containing multiple quantum wells at its center. We successfully fabricate vertically stacked quantum nanostructures (or quantum dots) well aligned with respect to the photonic crystal backbone. Micro-photoluminescence measurements performed at 78 K reveal that the radiative transition energy blue-shifts when the lateral dimension reaches less than 100 nm, which is compared with a simple model based on the 'particle-in-a-box' picture. The proposed method may find a broad range of applications in photonics and quantum optics, where the coupling between an emitter and an optical mode needs to be maximized.

  17. 150 mW deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with large-area AlN nanophotonic light-extraction structure emitting at 265 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Tamari, Naoki; Taniguchi, Manabu

    2017-04-01

    High-power 265 nm deep-ultraviolet (DUV) AlGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with large-area AlN nanophotonic light-extraction structures that were fabricated by a nanoimprint lithography process are presented. Each DUV-LED has a large active area (mesa size of ˜0.35 mm2) and a uniform current spreading design that allows high injection current operation. We have shown that these DUV-LEDs with their large-area nanoimprinted AlN nanophotonic structures exhibit wider near-field emitting areas, stronger far-field extracted light intensities, and an approximately 20-fold increase in output power when compared with a conventional flat-surface DUV-LED. A large-area nanoimprinted single-chip DUV-LED operating in the UV-C wavelength regime has demonstrated a record continuous-wave output power in excess of 150 mW for an injection current of 850 mA at a peak emission wavelength of 265 nm.

  18. Hybrid photon-plasmon nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Xiao, Yao; Meng, Chao; Zhang, Xining; Yu, Shaoliang; Wang, Yipei; Yang, Chuanxi; Guo, Xin; Ning, C Z; Tong, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Metallic and plasmonic nanolasers have attracted growing interest recently. Plasmonic lasers demonstrated so far operate in hybrid photon-plasmon modes in transverse dimensions, rendering it impossible to separate photonic from plasmonic components. Thus only the far-field photonic component can be measured and utilized directly. But spatially separated plasmon modes are highly desired for applications including high-efficiency coupling of single-photon emitters and ultrasensitivity optical sensing. Here, we report a nanowire (NW) laser that offers subdiffraction-limited beam size and spatially separated plasmon cavity modes. By near-field coupling a high-gain CdSe NW and a 100 nm diameter Ag NW, we demonstrate a hybrid photon-plasmon laser operating at 723 nm wavelength at room temperature, with a plasmon mode area of 0.008λ(2). This device simultaneously provides spatially separated photonic far-field output and highly localized coherent plasmon modes, which may open up new avenues in the fields of integrated nanophotonic circuits, biosensing, and quantum information processing.

  19. Identification of the direction of the neural network activation with a cellular resolution by fast two-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiuli; Quan, Tingwei; Zeng, Shaoqun; Lv, Xiaohua

    2011-08-01

    Spatiotemporal activity patterns in local neural networks are fundamental to understanding how information is processed and stored in brain microcircuits. Currently, imaging techniques are able to map the directional activation of macronetworks across brain areas; however, these strategies still fail to resolve the activation direction for fine microcircuits with cellular spatial resolution. Here, we show the capability to identify the activation direction of a multicell network with a cellular resolution and millisecond precision by using fast two-photon microscopy and cross correlation procedures. As an example, we characterized a directional neuronal network in an epilepsy brain slice to provide different initiation delay among multiple neurons defined at a millisecond scale.

  20. Mid-infrared nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoping; Kuyken, Bart; Green, William M. J.; Osgood, Richard M.; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther

    2014-03-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in mid-infrared (mid-IR) photonic technology with a wavelength of operation approximately from 2-14 μm. Among several established mid-IR photonic platforms, silicon nanophotonic platform could potentially offer ultra-compact, and monolithically integrated mid-IR photonic devices and device arrays, which could have board impact in the mid-IR technology, such as molecular spectroscopy, and imaging. At room temperature, silicon has a bandgap ~ 1.12 eV resulting in vanishing two-photon absorption (TPA) for mid-IR wavelengths beyond 2.2 μm, which, coupled with silicon's large nonlinear index of refraction and its strong waveguide optical confinement, enables efficient nonlinear processes in the mid-IR. By taking advantage of these nonlinear processes and judicious dispersion engineering in silicon waveguides, we have recently demonstrated a handful of silicon mid-IR nonlinear components, including optical parametric amplifiers (OPA), broadband sources, and a wavelength translator. Silicon nanophotonic waveguide's anomalous dispersion design, providing four-wave-mixing (FWM) phase-matching, has enabled the first demonstration of silicon mid-IR optical parametric amplifier (OPA) with a net off-chip gain exceeding 13 dB. In addition, reduction of propagation losses and balanced second and fourth order waveguide dispersion design led to an OPA with an extremely broadband gain spectrum from 1.9-2.5 μm and >50 dB parametric gain, upon which several novel silicon mid-IR light sources were built, including a mid-IR optical parametric oscillator, and a supercontinuum source. Finally, a mid-IR wavelength translation device, capable of translating signals near 2.4 μm to the telecom-band near 1.6 μm with simultaneous 19 dB gain, was demonstrated.

  1. Plasmonic and nanophotonics sensors from visible to terahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Alireza

    The global research objective of this thesis is to demonstrate design of novel compact and ultra-sensitive plasmonic sensors operating anywhere from the visible to the THz spectral ranges. The enabling technologies for such sensors are photonic bandgap and microstructured waveguides and fibers containing metallic inclusions. We achieve the stated global objective by systematically addressing several smaller problems. Firstly, this thesis demonstrates plasmonic excitation in metalized microstructured fibers in the context of bio-chemical sensing with enhanced microfluidics for visible and IR ranges. Furthemore, this basic design concept is generalized for the use with photonic bandgap fibers and waveguides; major advantages of using photonic bandgap waveguides in place of Total Internal Reflection (TIR) fibers for plasmonic sensing are discovered. In the first chapter, we discuss the theory of surface plasmons, surface plasmon excitation and sensing methodologies. In the second chapter we show that using microstructured fibers one can solve much easier the problem of phase matching between the surface plasmon wave and fiber core mode, which is common when standard TIR fibers are used. Moreover, the use of microstructured fibers enables integration of the microfluidics and optics during drawing step thus simplifying considerably the sensor fabrication and operation. Furthermore, the different shapes of the metalized surface to enhance the plasmonic excitation were explored with an aim to enhance sensitivity. In the third chapter, the design of photonic crystal waveguide-based surface plasmon resonance sensor is proposed. By judicious design of a photonic crystal waveguide, the effective refractive index of a core mode can be made considerably smaller than that of the core material, thus enabling efficient phase matching with a plasmon, high sensitivity, and high coupling efficiency from an external Gaussian source, at any wavelength of choice from the visible to near

  2. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon’s polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry. PMID:27626072

  3. Large-area nanofabrication and applications in advanced nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wei

    The research work presented in this dissertation includes novel large area nanofabrication techniques and their applications in advanced nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. The fabrications and applications include: 1) high performance transparent electrodes, 2) a novel plasmonic nanocavity and its applications in organic solar cells and light emitting diodes, and 3) a bipolar plasmonic nonlinear optical device to enhance and tune second harmonic generation. Based upon these topics, the thesis is divided into the following parts. First, a novel transparent electrode (TE), metallic deep subwavelength mesh electrode is developed and fabricated, showing better transmittance and conductance than previous TEs. Its performance dependence on nanostructure geometries and materials are investigated. The deep-subwavelength mesh electrode also has excellent antiglare properties. Such electrodes are fabricated on 4" wafer by nanoimprint, scalable to meter sizes. Second, a novel plasmonic nanocavity from the MESH is developed, named "plasmonic cavity with subwavelength hole-array (PlaCSH)", consisting of a thin MESH as a transparent front electrode, a thin metal back electrode, and in-between layer of active material. This structure is used to create high performance solar cells and LEDs. PlaCSH solar cell gives a solution to three central challenges in organic solar cells (light coupling into solar cell, light trapping in a sub-absorption-length-thick layer, and replacement of the indium-tin-oxide). Experimentally, the PlaCSH polymer SCs achieve high light coupling-efficiency/absorptance/power conversion efficiency, along with broad-band, Omni angle/polarization acceptance. In OLEDs, PlaCSH shows numerous benefits with both the small- molecule and polymer active materials. Enhanced light extraction, internal quantum efficiency, ambient light absorption, contrast, viewing angle, brightness, and decreased glare are all observed. The above experiments -- along with

  4. Developing 1D nanostructure arrays for future nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Polanyi, John C; Yang, JodySY; Wu, Zhanghua; Philipose, Usha; Xu, Tao; Yang, Susan; Kavanagh, KL; Liu, JQ; Yang, L; Wang, Y; Robbie, Kevin; Yang, J; Kaminska, K; Cooke, DG; Hegmann, FA; Budz, AJ; Haugen, HK

    2006-01-01

    There is intense and growing interest in one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures from the perspective of their synthesis and unique properties, especially with respect to their excellent optical response and an ability to form heterostructures. This review discusses alternative approaches to preparation and organization of such structures, and their potential properties. In particular, molecular-scale printing is highlighted as a method for creating organized pre-cursor structure for locating nanowires, as well as vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) templated growth using nano-channel alumina (NCA), and deposition of 1-D structures with glancing angle deposition (GLAD). As regards novel optical properties, we discuss as an example, finite size photonic crystal cavity structures formed from such nanostructure arrays possessing highQand small mode volume, and being ideal for developing future nanolasers.

  5. Novel Biomarker Assays Based on Photothermal Effects and Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunfei

    The early diagnosis of some chronic and severe diseases such as cancer, tuberculosis, etc. has been a long-sought goal of the medicine community. Traditional diagnostic tools such as X-ray and fecal blood tests cannot detect the disease before the focus or tumor have grown to an appreciable size or before the number of pathogens or tumor cells has reached a considerable amount in body fluids. These drawbacks could significantly delay the diagnosis. To detect and diagnose such diseases at an early stage, people have sought to detect the biomarkers related to certain physical conditions so that the anomalies caused by the diseases can be detected before a significant tumor has developed or the onset of symptoms. Driven by the needs to detect and quantify biomarkers, immunoassays have been developed. Two representative formats of immunoassays are enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and lateral flow assay. They have been widely used for medical and research purposes, yet they still have drawbacks such as costly instruments and lack of sensitivity. To improve their performance, I have developed photoacoustic-based detection schemes that can be easily integrated with commercial immunoassay formats and can increase the sensitivity as well as lower the costs. For both assay formats, limit of detection has been lowered by two orders of magnitude with low-cost and portable instruments. As a follow up of the photoacoustic detection schemes, a technique based on photothermal lens is also developed. In this work, one-dimensional photonic crystal substrates have also been exploited to enhance the photoacoustic and photothermal signals. Due to the guided-mode resonance, the photonic crystal substrate can enhance the photoacoustic or photothermal signals by 10 to 40 times, making it a promising tool for biomarker detection.

  6. Enhanced plasmonic resonance energy transfer in mesoporous silica-encased gold nanorod for two-photon-activated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nai-Tzu; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chung, Ming-Fang; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Ching-Mao; Chu, Chia-Hui; Chou, Pi-Tai; Souris, Jeffrey S; Chen, Chin-Tu; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of gold nanorods (GNRs) have recently drawn considerable interest from those working in in vivo biomolecular sensing and bioimaging. Especially appealing in these applications is the plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence of GNRs induced by two-photon excitation at infrared wavelengths, owing to the significant penetration depth of infrared light in tissue. Unfortunately, many studies have also shown that often the intensity of pulsed coherent irradiation of GNRs needed results in irreversible deformation of GNRs, greatly reducing their two-photon luminescence (TPL) emission intensity. In this work we report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of mesoporous silica-encased gold nanorods (MS-GNRs) that incorporate photosensitizers (PSs) for two-photon-activated photodynamic therapy (TPA-PDT). The PSs, doped into the nano-channels of the mesoporous silica shell, can be efficiently excited via intra-particle plasmonic resonance energy transfer from the encased two-photon excited gold nanorod and further generates cytotoxic singlet oxygen for cancer eradication. In addition, due to the mechanical support provided by encapsulating mesoporous silica matrix against thermal deformation, the two-photon luminescence stability of GNRs was significantly improved; after 100 seconds of 800 nm repetitive laser pulse with the 30 times higher than average power for imaging acquisition, MS-GNR luminescence intensity exhibited ~260% better resistance to deformation than that of the uncoated gold nanorods. These results strongly suggest that MS-GNRs with embedded PSs might provide a promising photodynamic therapy for the treatment of deeply situated cancers via plasmonic resonance energy transfer.

  7. Enhanced Plasmonic Resonance Energy Transfer in Mesoporous Silica-Encased Gold Nanorod for Two-Photon-Activated Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Tzu; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chung, Ming-Fang; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Ching-Mao; Chu, Chia-Hui; Chou, Pi-Tai; Souris, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of gold nanorods (GNRs) have recently drawn considerable interest from those working in in vivo biomolecular sensing and bioimaging. Especially appealing in these applications is the plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence of GNRs induced by two-photon excitation at infrared wavelengths, owing to the significant penetration depth of infrared light in tissue. Unfortunately, many studies have also shown that often the intensity of pulsed coherent irradiation of GNRs needed results in irreversible deformation of GNRs, greatly reducing their two-photon luminescence (TPL) emission intensity. In this work we report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of mesoporous silica-encased gold nanorods (MS-GNRs) that incorporate photosensitizers (PSs) for two-photon-activated photodynamic therapy (TPA-PDT). The PSs, doped into the nano-channels of the mesoporous silica shell, can be efficiently excited via intra-particle plasmonic resonance energy transfer from the encased two-photon excited gold nanorod and further generates cytotoxic singlet oxygen for cancer eradication. In addition, due to the mechanical support provided by encapsulating mesoporous silica matrix against thermal deformation, the two-photon luminescence stability of GNRs was significantly improved; after 100 seconds of 800 nm repetitive laser pulse with the 30 times higher than average power for imaging acquisition, MS-GNR luminescence intensity exhibited ~260% better resistance to deformation than that of the uncoated gold nanorods. These results strongly suggest that MS-GNRs with embedded PSs might provide a promising photodynamic therapy for the treatment of deeply situated cancers via plasmonic resonance energy transfer. PMID:24955141

  8. Sensitive multiplex detection of serological liver cancer biomarkers using SERS-active photonic crystal fiber probe.

    PubMed

    Dinish, U S; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Chang, Young Tae; Olivo, Malini

    2014-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy possesses the most promising advantage of multiplex detection for biosensing applications, which is achieved due to the narrow 'fingerprint' Raman spectra from the analyte molecules. We developed an ultrasensitive platform for the multiplex detection of cancer biomarkers by combining the SERS technique with a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF). Axially aligned air channels inside the HCPCF provide an excellent platform for optical sensing using SERS. In addition to the flexibility of optical fibers, HCPCF provides better light confinement and a larger interaction length for the guided light and the analyte, resulting in an improvement in sensitivity to detect low concentrations of bioanalytes in extremely low sample volumes. Herein, for the first time, we demonstrate the sensitive multiplex detection of biomarkers immobilized inside the HCPCF using antibody-conjugated SERS-active nanoparticles (SERS nanotags). As a proof-of-concept for targeted multiplex detection, initially we carried out the sensing of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarker in oral squamous carcinoma cell lysate using three different SERS nanotags. Subsequently, we also achieved simultaneous detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarkers-alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) secreted in the supernatant from Hep3b cancer cell line. Using a SERS-HCPCF sensing platform, we could successfully demonstrate the multiplex detection in an extremely low sample volume of ∼20 nL. In future, this study may lead to sensitive biosensing platform for the low concentration detection of biomarkers in an extremely low sample volume of body fluids to achieve early diagnosis of multiple diseases. (© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  9. Continuous outreach activities performed by a student project team of undergraduates and their program topics in optics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Makoto; Tokumitsu, Seika

    2016-09-01

    The out-of-curriculum project team "Rika-Kobo", organized by undergraduate students, has been actively engaged in a variety of continuous outreach activities in the fields of science and technology including optics and photonics. The targets of their activities cover wide ranges of generations from kids to parents and elderly people, with aiming to promote their interests in various fields of science and technologies. This is an out-of-curriculum project team with about 30 to 40 undergraduate students in several grades and majors. The total number of their activities per year tends to reach 80 to 90 in recent years. Typical activities to be performed by the project team include science classes in elementary and/or secondary schools, science classes at other educational facilities such as science museums, and experiment demonstrations at science events. Popular topics cover wide ranges from explanations and demonstrations of nature phenomena, such as rainbow colors, blue sky, sunset color, to demonstration experiments related to engineering applications, such as polarization of light, LEDs, and optical communications. Experimental topics in optics and photonics are especially popular to the audiences. Those activities are very effective to enhance interests of the audiences in learning related knowledges, irrespective of their generations. Those activities are also helpful for the student members to achieve and/or renew scientific knowledges. In addition, each of the activities provides the student members with effective and advantageous Project-Based-Learning (PBL) style experiences including manufacturing experiences, which are advantageous to cultivate their engineering skills.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and preclinical studies of two-photon-activated targeted PDT therapeutic triads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, C. W.; Starkey, J. R.; Rebane, A.; Meng, F.; Gong, A.; Drobizhev, M.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) continues to evolve into a mature clinical treatment of a variety of cancer types as well as age-related macular degeneration of the eye. However, there are still aspects of PDT that need to be improved in order for greater clinical acceptance. While a number of new PDT photo-sensitizers, sometimes referred to as second- or third- generation therapeutic agents, are currently under clinical investigation, the direct treatment through the skin of subcutaneous tumors deeper than 5 mm remains problematic. Currently approved PDT porphyrin photo-sensitizers, as well as several modified porphyrins (e.g. chlorins, bacteriochlorins, etc.) that are under clinical investigation can be activated at 630-730 nm, but none above 800 nm. It would be highly desirable if new PDT paradigms could be developed that would allow photo-activation deep in the tissue transparency window in the Near-infrared (NIR) above 800 nm to reduce scattering and absorption phenomena that reduce deep tissue PDT efficacy. Rasiris and MPA Technologies have developed new porphyrins that have greatly enhanced two-photon absorption ( P A ) cross-sections and can be activated deep in the NIR (ca. 780-850 nm). These porphyrins can be incorporated into a therapeutic triad that also employs an small molecule targeting agent that directs the triad to over-expressed tumor receptor sites, and a NIR onephoton imaging agent that allows tracking the delivery of the triad to the tumor site, as well as clearance of excess triad from healthy tissue prior to the start of PDT treatment. We are currently using these new triads in efficacy studies with a breast cancer cell line that has been transfected with luciferase genes that allow implanted tumor growth and post- PDT treatment efficacy studies in SCID mouse models by following the rise and decay of the bioluminescence signal. We have also designed highly absorbing and scattering collagen breast cancer phantoms in which we have demonstrated

  11. Observation of Spin Hall Effect in Photon Tunneling via Weak Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinxing; Ling, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyou; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-01-01

    Photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) manifesting itself as spin-dependent splitting escapes detection in previous photon tunneling experiments due to the fact that the induced beam centroid shift is restricted to a fraction of wavelength. In this work, we report on the first observation of this tiny effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements based on preselection and postselection technique on the spin states. We find that the spin-dependent splitting is even larger than the potential barrier thickness when spin-polarized photons tunneling through a potential barrier. This photonic SHE is attributed to spin-redirection Berry phase which can be described as a consequence of the spin-orbit coupling. These findings provide new insight into photon tunneling effect and thereby offer the possibility of developing spin-based nanophotonic applications. PMID:25487043

  12. Atom-light interactions in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Goban, A; Hung, C-L; Yu, S-P; Hood, J D; Muniz, J A; Lee, J H; Martin, M J; McClung, A C; Choi, K S; Chang, D E; Painter, O; Kimble, H J

    2014-05-08

    The integration of nanophotonics and atomic physics has been a long-sought goal that would open new frontiers for optical physics, including novel quantum transport and many-body phenomena with photon-mediated atomic interactions. Reaching this goal requires surmounting diverse challenges in nanofabrication and atomic manipulation. Here we report the development of a novel integrated optical circuit with a photonic crystal capable of both localizing and interfacing atoms with guided photons. Optical bands of a photonic crystal waveguide are aligned with selected atomic transitions. From reflection spectra measured with average atom number N=1.1+/-0.4, we infer that atoms are localized within the waveguide by optical dipole forces. The fraction of single-atom radiative decay into the waveguide is Γ1D/Γ'≃(0.32±0.08), where Γ1D is the rate of emission into the guided mode and Γ' is the decay rate into all other channels. Γ1D/Γ' is unprecedented in all current atom-photon interfaces.

  13. A programmable nanoreplica molding for the fabrication of nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Longju; Zhang, Jingxiang; Badshah, Mohsin Ali; Dong, Liang; Li, Jingjing; Kim, Seok-Min; Lu, Meng

    2016-03-01

    The ability to fabricate periodic structures with sub-wavelength features has a great potential for impact on integrated optics, optical sensors, and photovoltaic devices. Here, we report a programmable nanoreplica molding process to fabricate a variety of sub-micrometer periodic patterns using a single mold. The process utilizes a stretchable mold to produce the desired periodic structure in a photopolymer on glass or plastic substrates. During the replica molding process, a uniaxial force is applied to the mold and results in changes of the periodic structure, which resides on the surface of the mold. Direction and magnitude of the force determine the array geometry, including the lattice constant and arrangement. By stretching the mold, 2D arrays with square, rectangular, and triangular lattice structures can be fabricated. As one example, we present a plasmonic crystal device with surface plasmon resonances determined by the force applied during molding. In addition, photonic crystal slabs with different array patterns are fabricated and characterized. This unique process offers the capability of generating various periodic nanostructures rapidly and inexpensively.

  14. Flatland plasmonics and nanophotonics based on graphene and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pai-Yen; Argyropoulos, Christos; Farhat, Mohamed; Gomez-Diaz, J. Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we review and discuss how the recently discovered two-dimensional (2D) Dirac materials, particularly graphene, may be utilized as new efficient platforms for excitations of propagating and localized surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in the terahertz (THz) and mid-infrared (MIR) regions. The surface plasmon modes supported by the metallic 2D materials exhibit tunable plasmon resonances that are essential, yet missing, ingredients needed for THz and MIR photonic and optoelectronic devices. We describe how the atomically thin graphene monolayer and metamaterial structures based on it may tailor and control the spectral, spatial, and temporal properties of electromagnetic radiation. In the same frequency range, the newly unveiled nonlocal, nonlinear, and nonequilibrium electrodynamics in graphene show a variety of nonlinear and amplifying electromagnetic responses, whose potential applications are yet unexplored. With these 2D material platforms, virtually all plasmonic, optoelectronic, and nonlinear functions found in near-infrared (NIR) and visible devices can be analogously transferred to the long-wavelength regime, even with enhanced tunability and new functionalities. The spectral range from THz to MIR is particularly compelling because of the many spectral fingerprints of key chemical, gas, and biological agents, as well as a myriad of remote sensing, imaging, communication, and security applications.

  15. A programmable nanoreplica molding for the fabrication of nanophotonic devices

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Longju; Zhang, Jingxiang; Badshah, Mohsin Ali; Dong, Liang; Li, Jingjing; Kim, Seok-min; Lu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    The ability to fabricate periodic structures with sub-wavelength features has a great potential for impact on integrated optics, optical sensors, and photovoltaic devices. Here, we report a programmable nanoreplica molding process to fabricate a variety of sub-micrometer periodic patterns using a single mold. The process utilizes a stretchable mold to produce the desired periodic structure in a photopolymer on glass or plastic substrates. During the replica molding process, a uniaxial force is applied to the mold and results in changes of the periodic structure, which resides on the surface of the mold. Direction and magnitude of the force determine the array geometry, including the lattice constant and arrangement. By stretching the mold, 2D arrays with square, rectangular, and triangular lattice structures can be fabricated. As one example, we present a plasmonic crystal device with surface plasmon resonances determined by the force applied during molding. In addition, photonic crystal slabs with different array patterns are fabricated and characterized. This unique process offers the capability of generating various periodic nanostructures rapidly and inexpensively. PMID:26925828

  16. Highly entangled photons and rapidly responding polarization qubit phase gates in a room-temperature active Raman gain medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hang Chao; Huang Guoxiang

    2010-11-15

    We present a scheme for obtaining entangled photons and quantum phase gates in a room-temperature four-state tripod-type atomic system with two-mode active Raman gain (ARG). We analyze the linear and nonlinear optical responses of this ARG system and show that the scheme is fundamentally different from those based on electromagnetically induced transparency and hence can avoid significant probe-field absorption as well as a temperature-related Doppler effect. We demonstrate that highly entangled photon pairs can be produced and rapidly responding polarization qubit phase gates can be constructed based on the unique features of the enhanced cross-phase-modulation and superluminal probe-field propagation of the system.

  17. Photo-redox activated drug delivery systems operating under two photon excitation in the near-IR.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Alvarez, Tania M; Devi, Lekshmi Sudha; Vabre, Jean-Marie; Pecorelli, Travis A; Schwartz, Benjamin J; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2014-05-07

    We report the design and synthesis of a nano-container consisting of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with the pore openings covered by "snap-top" caps that are opened by near-IR light. A photo transducer molecule that is a reducing agent in an excited electronic state is covalently attached to the system. Near IR two-photon excitation causes inter-molecular electron transfer that reduces a disulfide bond holding the cap in place, thus allowing the cargo molecules to escape. We describe the operation of the "snap-top" release mechanism by both one- and two-photon activation. This system presents a proof of concept of a near-IR photoredox-induced nanoparticle delivery system that may lead to a new type of photodynamic drug release therapy.

  18. Photonic homeostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Li, Fan-Hui

    2010-11-01

    Photonic homeostatics is a discipline to study the establishment, maintenance, decay, upgrading and representation of function-specific homoestasis (FSH) by using photonics. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stress may increase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activities above FSH-specific SIRT1 activity to induce a function far from its FSH. On the one hand, low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LLL) can not modulate a function in its FSH or a stress in its stress-specific homeostasis (StSH), but modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. On the other hand, the biophotons from a biosystem with its function in its FSH should be less than the one from the biosystem with its function far from its FSH. The non-resonant interaction of low intensity laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LIL) and a kind of membrane protein can be amplified by all the membrane proteins if the function is far from its FSH. This amplification might hold for biophoton emission of the membrane protein so that the photonic spectroscopy can be used to represent the function far from its FSH, which is called photonomics.

  19. A Three-Photon Active Organic Fluorophore for Deep Tissue Ratiometric Imaging of Intracellular Divalent Zinc.

    PubMed

    Philips, Divya Susan; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; He, Tingchao; Menon, Nishanth Venugopal; Anees, Palapuravan; Mathew, Jomon; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Kang, Yuejun; Stuparu, Mihaiela Corina; Sun, Handong; Zhao, Yanli; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2016-05-20

    Deep tissue bioimaging with three-photon (3P) excitation using near-infrared (NIR) light in the second IR window (1.0-1.4 μm) could provide high resolution images with an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Herein, we report a photostable and nontoxic 3P excitable donor-π-acceptor system (GMP) having 3P cross-section (σ3 ) of 1.78×10(-80)  cm(6)  s(2)  photon(-2) and action cross-section (σ3 η3 ) of 2.31×10(-81)  cm(6)  s(2)  photon(-2) , which provides ratiometric fluorescence response with divalent zinc ions in aqueous conditions. The probe signals the Zn(2+) binding at 530 and 600 nm, respectively, upon 1150 nm excitation with enhanced σ3 of 1.85×10(-80)  cm(6)  s(2)  photon(-2) and σ3 η3 of 3.33×10(-81)  cm(6)  s(2)  photon(-2) . The application of this probe is demonstrated for ratiometric 3P imaging of Zn(2+) in vitro using HuH-7 cell lines. Furthermore, the Zn(2+) concentration in rat hippocampal slices was imaged at 1150 nm excitation after incubation with GMP, illustrating its potential as a 3P ratiometric probe for deep tissue Zn(2+) ion imaging.

  20. Silicon chip integrated photonic sensors for biological and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Yan, Hai; Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate applications of photonic crystal waveguide based devices for on-chip optical absorption spectroscopy for the detection of chemical warfare simulant, triethylphosphate as well as applications with photonic crystal microcavity devices in the detection of biomarkers for pancreatic cancer in patient serum and cadmium metal ions in heavy metal pollution sensing. At mid-infrared wavelengths, we experimentally demonstrate the higher sensitivity of photonic crystal based structures compared to other nanophotonic devices such as strip and slot waveguides with detection down to 10ppm triethylphosphate. We also detected 5ppb (parts per billion) of cadmium metal ions in water at near-infrared wavelengths using established techniques for the detection of specific probe-target biomarker conjugation chemistries.

  1. Study of narrowband single photon emitters in polycrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Russell G.; Shimoni, Olga; Martin, Aiden A.; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-11-03

    Quantum information processing and integrated nanophotonics require robust generation of single photon emitters on demand. In this work, we demonstrate that diamond films grown on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition can host bright, narrowband single photon emitters in the visible—near infra-red spectral range. The emitters possess fast lifetime (∼several ns), absolute photostability, and exhibit full polarization at excitation and emission. Pulsed and continuous laser excitations confirm their quantum behaviour at room temperature, while low temperature spectroscopy is performed to investigate inhomogeneous broadening. Our results advance the knowledge of solid state single photon sources and open pathways for their practical implementation in quantum communication and quantum information processing.

  2. Patterning metamaterials for fast and efficient single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, O. A.; Shalaginov, M. Y.; Bogdanov, S.; Guler, U.; Boltasseva, A.; Kildishev, A. V.; Shalaev, V. M.

    2017-02-01

    Solid state quantum emitters are prime candidates to realize fast on-demand single-photon sources. The improvement in photon emission and collection efficiencies for quantum emitters, such as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond, can be achieved by using a near-field coupling to nanophotonic structures. Plasmonic metamaterial structures with hyperbolic dispersion have been previously demonstrated to significantly increase the fluorescence decay rates from NV centers. However, the electromagnetic waves propagating inside the metamaterial must be outcoupled before they succumb to ohmic losses. We propose a nano-grooved hyperbolic metamaterial that improves the collection efficiency from a nanodiamond-based NV center by a factor of 4.3 compared to the case of coupling to a flat metamaterial. Our design can be utilized to achieve highly efficient and fast single-photon sources based on a variety of quantum emitters.

  3. Photonic Component Qualification and Implementation Activities at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Jin, Xiaodan Linda; Chuska, Richard F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; MacMurphy, Shawn L.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Zellar, Ronald S.; Friedberg, Patricia R.; Malenab, Mary C.

    2006-01-01

    The photonics group in Code 562 at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center supports a variety of space flight programs at NASA including the: International Space Station (ISS), Shuttle Return to Flight Mission, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Express Logistics Carrier, and the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program (NEPP). Through research, development, and testing of the photonic systems to support these missions much information has been gathered on practical implementations for space environments. Presented here are the highlights and lessons learned as a result of striving to satisfy the project requirements for high performance and reliable commercial optical fiber components for space flight systems. The approach of how to qualify optical fiber components for harsh environmental conditions, the physics of failure and development lessons learned will be discussed.

  4. High-speed two-photon calcium imaging of neuronal population activity using acousto-optic deflectors.

    PubMed

    Grewe, Benjamin F; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2014-06-02

    Two-photon calcium imaging of neuronal populations allows optical measurements of spiking activity in living animals. However, laser-scanning microscopes with galvanometric scan mirrors are too slow to capture population activity on a millisecond timescale. This protocol describes a two-photon microscope that is based on two-dimensional laser scanning with acousto-optic deflectors (AODs), enabling high-speed in vivo recording of neuronal population activity at temporal resolutions of several hundred hertz. The detailed construction plan of the AOD-based microscope is accompanied by equally detailed optimization procedures. We also introduce a novel random-access pattern scanning (RAPS) technique for high-speed in vivo measurements of neuronal population activity. AOD-based RAPS can measure calcium transients in neocortical neuronal populations, revealing spike trains with near-millisecond precision. The current limitations of the AOD-based microscope are discussed, and we provide an outlook of its future applications. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. High efficiency and broad bandwidth grating coupler between nanophotonic waveguide and fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Xu, Xue-Jun; Li, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Liang; Han, Wei-Hua; Fan, Zhong-Chao; Yu, Yu-De; Yu, Jin-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    A high efficiency and broad bandwidth grating coupler between a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanophotonic waveguide and fibre is designed and fabricated. Coupling efficiencies of 46% and 25% at a wavelength of 1.55 μm are achieved by simulation and experiment, respectively. An optical 3 dB bandwidth of 45 nm from 1530 nm to 1575 nm is also obtained in experiment. Numerical calculation shows that a tolerance to fabrication error of 10 nm in etch depth is achievable. The measurement results indicate that the alignment error of ±2 μm results in less than 1 dB additional coupling loss.

  6. Broadband nanophotonic wireless links and networks using on-chip integrated plasmonic antennas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanqing; Li, Qiang; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their high capacity and flexibility, broadband wireless communications have been widely employed in radio and microwave regimes, playing indispensable roles in our daily life. Their optical analogs, however, have not been demonstrated at the nanoscale. In this paper, by exploiting plasmonic nanoantennas, we demonstrate the complete design of broadband wireless links and networks in the realm of nanophotonics. With a 100-fold enhancement in power transfer superior to previous designs as well as an ultrawide bandwidth that covers the entire telecommunication wavelength range, such broadband nanolinks and networks are expected to pave the way for future optical integrated nanocircuits. PMID:26783033

  7. Near-infrared III-nitride-on-silicon nanophotonic platform with microdisk resonators.

    PubMed

    Roland, I; Zeng, Y; Checoury, X; El Kurdi, M; Sauvage, S; Brimont, C; Guillet, T; Gayral, B; Gromovyi, M; Duboz, J Y; Semond, F; de Micheli, M P; Boucaud, P

    2016-05-02

    We have developed a nanophotonic platform with microdisks using epitaxial III-nitride materials on silicon. The two-dimensional platform consists of suspended waveguides and mushroom-type microdisks as resonators side-coupled with a bus waveguide. Loaded quality factors up to 80000 have been obtained in the near-infrared spectral range for microdisk diameters between 8 and 15 μm. We analyze the dependence of the quality factors as a function of coupling efficiency. We have performed continuous-wave second harmonic generation experiments in resonance with the whispering gallery modes supported by the microdisks.

  8. Photons to axion-like particles conversion in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Roncadelli, Marco; Galanti, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    The idea that photons can convert to axion-like particles (ALPs) γ → a in or around an AGN and reconvert back to photons a → γ in the Milky Way magnetic field has been put forward in 2008 and has recently attracted growing interest. Yet, so far nobody has estimated the conversion probability γ → a as carefully as allowed by present-day knowledge. Our aim is to fill this gap. We first remark that AGN which can be detected above 100 GeV are blazars, namely AGN with jets, with one of them pointing towards us. Moreover, blazars fall into two well defined classes: BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) and Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs), with drastically different properties. In this Letter we report a preliminary evaluation of the γ → a conversion probability inside these two classes of blazars. Our findings are surprising. Indeed, while in the case of BL Lacs the conversion probability turns out to be totally unpredictable due to the strong dependence on the values of the somewhat uncertain position of the emission region along the jet and strength of the magnetic field therein, for FSRQs we are able to make a clear-cut prediction. Our results are of paramount importance in view of the planned very-high-energy photon detectors like the CTA, HAWK, GAMMA-400 and HISCORE.

  9. Tuning of an active photonic crystal cavity by an hybrid silica/silicon near-field probe.

    PubMed

    Le Gac, G; Rahmani, A; Seassal, C; Picard, E; Hadji, E; Callard, S

    2009-11-23

    The influence of a near-field tip on the spectral characteristics of a resonant mode of an active photonic crystal micro-cavity was investigated. The wavelength shift of the mode was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated and evaluated as a function of the nature and the position of the tip above the cavity. Experiment showed that the shift induced is ten times higher with a Si-coated silica probe than with a bare silica tip: a shift until 2 nm was reached with Si-coated tip whereas the shift with bare silica tip is in the range of the tenth of nanometer, for wavelengths around 1,55 microm.

  10. Photon bunching reveals single-electron cathodoluminescence excitation efficiency in InGaN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuret, Sophie; Coenen, Toon; Zeijlemaker, Hans; Latzel, Michael; Christiansen, Silke; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Polman, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy is a key analysis technique in nanophotonics research and technology, yet many aspects of its fundamental excitation mechanisms are not well understood on the single-electron and single-photon level. Here, we determine the cathodoluminescence emission statistics of InGaN quantum wells embedded in GaN under 6-30-keV electron excitation and find that the light emission rate varies strongly from electron to electron. Strong photon bunching is observed for the InGaN quantum well emission at 2.77 eV due to the generation of multiple quantum well excitations by a single primary electron. The bunching effect, measured by the g(2 )(t ) autocorrelation function, decreases with increasing beam current in the range 3-350 pA. Under pulsed excitation (p =2 -100 ns ; 0.13-6 electrons per pulse), the bunching effect strongly increases. A model based on Monte Carlo simulations is developed that assumes a fraction γ of the primary electrons generates electron-hole pairs that create multiple photons in the quantum wells. At a fixed primary electron energy (10 keV) the model explains all g(2 ) measurements for different beam currents and pulse durations using a single value for γ =0.5 . At lower energies, when electrons cause mostly near-surface excitations, γ is reduced (γ =0.01 at 6 keV), which is explained by the presence of a AlGaN barrier layer that inhibits carrier diffusion to the buried quantum wells. The combination of g(2 ) measurements in pulsed and continuous mode with spectral analysis provides a powerful tool to study optoelectronic properties and may find application in many other optically active systems and devices.

  11. Triple-helical nanowires by tomographic rotatory growth for chiral photonics.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marco; Tasco, Vittorianna; Todisco, Francesco; Cuscunà, Massimo; Benedetti, Alessio; Sanvitto, Daniele; Passaseo, Adriana

    2015-03-18

    Three dimensional helical chiral metamaterials resulted in effective manipulation of circularly polarized light in the visible infrared for advanced nanophotonics. Their potentialities are severely limited by the lack of full rotational symmetry preventing broadband operation, high signal-to-noise ratio and inducing high optical activity sensitivity to structure orientation. Complex intertwined three dimensional structures such as multiple-helical nanowires could overcome these limitations, allowing the achievement of several chiro-optical effects combining chirality and isotropy. Here we report three dimensional triple-helical nanowires, engineered by the innovative tomographic rotatory growth, on the basis of focused ion beam-induced deposition. These three dimensional nanostructures show up to 37% of circular dichroism in a broad range (500-1,000 nm), with a high signal-to-noise ratio (up to 24 dB). Optical activity of up to 8° only due to the circular birefringence is also shown, tracing the way towards chiral photonic devices that can be integrated in optical nanocircuits to modulate the visible light polarization.

  12. Nanoporous hard data: optical encoding of information within nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Santos, Abel; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Pereira, Taj; Losic, Dusan

    2016-04-21

    Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for developing advanced nanophotonic tools for a wide range of applications, including sensing, photonic tagging, self-reporting drug releasing systems and secure encoding of information.

  13. Scalable high-precision tuning of photonic resonators by resonant cavity-enhanced photoelectrochemical etching

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Baker, Christopher; Lemaître, Aristide; Gomez, Carmen; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Photonic lattices of mutually interacting indistinguishable cavities represent a cornerstone of collective phenomena in optics and could become important in advanced sensing or communication devices. The disorder induced by fabrication technologies has so far hindered the development of such resonant cavity architectures, while post-fabrication tuning methods have been limited by complexity and poor scalability. Here we present a new simple and scalable tuning method for ensembles of microphotonic and nanophotonic resonators, which enables their permanent collective spectral alignment. The method introduces an approach of cavity-enhanced photoelectrochemical etching in a fluid, a resonant process triggered by sub-bandgap light that allows for high selectivity and precision. The technique is presented on a gallium arsenide nanophotonic platform and illustrated by finely tuning one, two and up to five resonators. It opens the way to applications requiring large networks of identical resonators and their spectral referencing to external etalons. PMID:28117394

  14. Scalable high-precision tuning of photonic resonators by resonant cavity-enhanced photoelectrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Baker, Christopher; Lemaître, Aristide; Gomez, Carmen; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Photonic lattices of mutually interacting indistinguishable cavities represent a cornerstone of collective phenomena in optics and could become important in advanced sensing or communication devices. The disorder induced by fabrication technologies has so far hindered the development of such resonant cavity architectures, while post-fabrication tuning methods have been limited by complexity and poor scalability. Here we present a new simple and scalable tuning method for ensembles of microphotonic and nanophotonic resonators, which enables their permanent collective spectral alignment. The method introduces an approach of cavity-enhanced photoelectrochemical etching in a fluid, a resonant process triggered by sub-bandgap light that allows for high selectivity and precision. The technique is presented on a gallium arsenide nanophotonic platform and illustrated by finely tuning one, two and up to five resonators. It opens the way to applications requiring large networks of identical resonators and their spectral referencing to external etalons.

  15. Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Christian; Goerner, Wolf

    2011-06-01

    Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

  16. Bridging the Gap between Dielectric Nanophotonics and the Visible Regime with Effectively Lossless Gallium Phosphide Antennas.

    PubMed

    Cambiasso, Javier; Grinblat, Gustavo; Li, Yi; Rakovich, Aliaksandra; Cortés, Emiliano; Maier, Stefan A

    2017-02-08

    We present all-dielectric gallium phosphide (GaP) nanoantennas as an efficient nanophotonic platform for surface-enhanced second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence (SEF), showing negligible losses in the visible range. Employing single GaP nanodisks, we observe an increase of more than 3 orders of magnitude in the SHG conversion signal in comparison with the bulk. This constitutes an SHG efficiency as large as 0.0002%, which is to the best of our knowledge the highest yet achieved value for a single nano-object in the optical region. Furthermore, we show that GaP dimers with 35 nm gap can enhance up to 3600 times the fluorescence emission of dyes located in the gap of the nanoantenna. This is accomplished by a fluorescence lifetime reduction of at least 22 times, accompanied by a high-intensity field confinement in the gap region. These results open new avenues for low-loss nanophotonics in the optical regime.

  17. Local and nonlocal optically induced transparency effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longhai; Zheng, Jiajiu; Xu, Yang; Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2014-11-25

    Graphene is well-known as a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms arrayed in a honeycomb structure. It has some unique and fascinating properties, which are useful for realizing many optoelectronic devices and applications, including transistors, photodetectors, solar cells, and modulators. To enhance light-graphene interactions and take advantage of its properties, a promising approach is to combine a graphene sheet with optical waveguides, such as silicon nanophotonic wires considered in this paper. Here we report local and nonlocal optically induced transparency (OIT) effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits. A low-power, continuous-wave laser is used as the pump light, and the power required for producing the OIT effect is as low as ∼0.1 mW. The corresponding power density is several orders lower than that needed for the previously reported saturated absorption effect in graphene, which implies a mechanism involving light absorption by the silicon and photocarrier transport through the silicon-graphene junction. The present OIT effect enables low power, all-optical, broadband control and sensing, modulation and switching locally and nonlocally.

  18. Dynamic performance of microelectromechanical systems deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Archer-Zhang, Christian Chunzi; Foster, Warren B; Downey, Ryan D; Arrasmith, Christopher L; Dickensheets, David L

    2016-12-01

    Active optics such as deformable mirrors can be used to control both focal depth and aberrations during scanning laser microscopy. If the focal depth can be changed dynamically during scanning, then imaging of oblique surfaces becomes possible. If aberrations can be corrected dynamically during scanning, an image can be optimized throughout the field of view. Here, we characterize the speed and dynamic precision of a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element aberration correction mirror and a Revibro Optics 4-zone focus control mirror to assess suitability for use in an active and adaptive two-photon microscope. Tests for the multi-DM include both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and trefoil). We find wavefront error settling times for mode amplitude steps as large as 400 nm to be less than 52???s, with 3 dB frequencies ranging from 6.5 to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with wavefront error settling time less than 80???s for defocus steps up to 3000 nm, and less than 45???s for spherical aberration steps up to 600 nm. These response speeds are sufficient for intrascan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  19. Dynamic performance of microelectromechanical systems deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Zhang, Christian Chunzi; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-12-01

    Active optics such as deformable mirrors can be used to control both focal depth and aberrations during scanning laser microscopy. If the focal depth can be changed dynamically during scanning, then imaging of oblique surfaces becomes possible. If aberrations can be corrected dynamically during scanning, an image can be optimized throughout the field of view. Here, we characterize the speed and dynamic precision of a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element aberration correction mirror and a Revibro Optics 4-zone focus control mirror to assess suitability for use in an active and adaptive two-photon microscope. Tests for the multi-DM include both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and trefoil). We find wavefront error settling times for mode amplitude steps as large as 400 nm to be less than 52 μs, with 3 dB frequencies ranging from 6.5 to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with wavefront error settling time less than 80 μs for defocus steps up to 3000 nm, and less than 45 μs for spherical aberration steps up to 600 nm. These response speeds are sufficient for intrascan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  20. High-voltage integrated active quenching circuit for single photon count rate up to 80 Mcounts/s.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Giulia; Rech, Ivan; Gulinatti, Angelo; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-08-08

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been subject to a fast improvement in recent years. In particular, custom technologies specifically developed to fabricate SPAD devices give the designer the freedom to pursue the best detector performance required by applications. A significant breakthrough in this field is represented by the recent introduction of a red enhanced SPAD (RE-SPAD) technology, capable of attaining a good photon detection efficiency in the near infrared range (e.g. 40% at a wavelength of 800 nm) while maintaining a remarkable timing resolution of about 100ps full width at half maximum. Being planar, the RE-SPAD custom technology opened the way to the development of SPAD arrays particularly suited for demanding applications in the field of life sciences. However, to achieve such excellent performance custom SPAD detectors must be operated with an external active quenching circuit (AQC) designed on purpose. Next steps toward the development of compact and practical multichannel systems will require a new generation of monolithically integrated AQC arrays. In this paper we present a new, fully integrated AQC fabricated in a high-voltage 0.18 µm CMOS technology able to provide quenching pulses up to 50 Volts with fast leading and trailing edges. Although specifically designed for optimal operation of RE-SPAD devices, the new AQC is quite versatile: it can be used with any SPAD detector, regardless its fabrication technology, reaching remarkable count rates up to 80 Mcounts/s and generating a photon detection pulse with a timing jitter as low as 119 ps full width at half maximum. The compact design of our circuit has been specifically laid out to make this IC a suitable building block for monolithically integrated AQC arrays.

  1. Diffuse neutrino intensity from the inner jets of active galactic nuclei: Impacts of external photon fields and the blazar sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Dermer, Charles D.

    2014-07-01

    We study high-energy neutrino production in inner jets of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), taking into account effects of external photon fields and the blazar sequence. We show that the resulting diffuse neutrino intensity is dominated by quasar-hosted blazars, in particular, flat spectrum radio quasars, and that PeV-EeV neutrino production due to photohadronic interactions with broadline and dust radiation is unavoidable if the AGN inner jets are ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources. Their neutrino spectrum has a cutoff feature around PeV energies since target photons are due to Lyα emission. Because of infrared photons provided by the dust torus, neutrino spectra above PeV energies are too hard to be consistent with the IceCube data unless the proton spectral index is steeper than 2.5, or the maximum proton energy is ≲100 PeV. Thus, the simple model has difficulty in explaining the IceCube data. For the cumulative neutrino intensity from blazars to exceed ˜10-8 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1, their local cosmic-ray energy generation rate would be ˜10-100 times larger than the local UHECR emissivity but is comparable to the averaged γ-ray blazar emissivity. Interestingly, future detectors such as the Askaryan Radio Array can detect ˜0.1-1 EeV neutrinos even in more conservative cases, allowing us to indirectly test the hypothesis that UHECRs are produced in the inner jets. We find that the diffuse neutrino intensity from radio-loud AGN is dominated by blazars with γ-ray luminosity of ≳1048 erg s-1, and the arrival directions of their ˜1-100 PeV neutrinos correlate with the luminous blazars detected by Fermi.

  2. Complex-envelope alternating-direction-implicit FDTD method for simulating active photonic devices with semiconductor/solid-state media.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Ravi, Koustuban; Wang, Qian; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2012-06-15

    A complex-envelope (CE) alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach to treat light-matter interaction self-consistently with electromagnetic field evolution for efficient simulations of active photonic devices is presented for the first time (to our best knowledge). The active medium (AM) is modeled using an efficient multilevel system of carrier rate equations to yield the correct carrier distributions, suitable for modeling semiconductor/solid-state media accurately. To include the AM in the CE-ADI-FDTD method, a first-order differential system involving CE fields in the AM is first set up. The system matrix that includes AM parameters is then split into two time-dependent submatrices that are then used in an efficient ADI splitting formula. The proposed CE-ADI-FDTD approach with AM takes 22% of the time as the approach of the corresponding explicit FDTD, as validated by semiconductor microdisk laser simulations.

  3. Photonic band gaps of wurtzite GaN and AlN photonic crystals at short wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, E. G.; Alayo, M. I.

    2015-04-01

    Group III-nitride materials such as GaN and AlN have attracted a great attention in researches on photonic devices that operate at short light wavelengths. The large band gaps of these materials turn them suitable for nanophotonic devices that operate in light ranges from visible to deep ultraviolet. The physical properties of wurtzite GaN and AlN such as their second and third order nonlinear susceptibilities, and their thermal and piezoelectric coefficients, also make them excellent candidates for integrate photonic devices with electronics, microelectromechanics, microfluidics and general sensing applications. Using a plane wave expansion method (PWE) the photonic band gap maps of 36 different two-dimensional photonic crystal lattices in wurtzite GaN and AlN were obtained and analyzed. The wavelength dependence and the effects of the material anisotropy on the position of the photonic band gaps are also discussed. The results show regions with slow group velocity at the edges of a complete photonic band gap in the M-K direction of the triangular lattices with circular, hexagonal, and rhombic air holes. Was also found a very interesting disposition of the photonic band gaps in the lattices composed of rhombic air holes.

  4. In vitro studies of the efficiency of two-photon activation of photodynamic therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Mamta; Karotki, Aliaksandr; Collins, Hazel; Anderson, Harry L.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2006-09-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of severe vision loss in the older population, due to ingrowth of new leaky blood vessels (neovasculature) from the choriocapillaris, which results in destruction of photoreceptors in the fovea and loss of central vision. "Standard" one-photon (1-γ) photodynamic therapy (PDT) using Visudyne (R) is an approved method of AMD treatment but has the potential to damage healthy tissues lying above and below the neovasculature due to photosensitizer accumulation and its wide-beam 1-γ excitation. Highly-targeted two-photon (2-γ) excitation may avoid this, since, due to its non-linear intensity dependence, the probability of 2-γ excitation is greatest in the focal plane, which intrinsically avoids out-of-focus damage to healthy tissues. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the 2-γ efficiency of Visudyne and to compare it to the archetypal photosensitizer Photofrin (R). Since neovascular endothelium is targeted in AMD, an endothelial cell line (YPEN-1) was selected as the in vitro model. 2-γ PDT was delivered using tightly focused ~300 fs laser pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser operating at 850 nm with 90 MHz pulse repetition rate. An assay was developed for quantification of the cellular damage using the permeability stain Hoechst 33258 and the viability stain SYTOX. Visudyne (LD 50= dose to kill 50% of cells: 500 J/cm2, 10 M, 7.2 μg/ml) was about an order of magnitude more effective than Photofrin (LD50 : 7500 J/cm2, ~42 μM, 25 μg/ml). We also demonstrate for the first time the quadratic dependence of the cellular response to 2-γ PDT. This in vitro work will lead to the design of optimized in vivo studies in animal models of AMD.

  5. A Priori Method of Using Photon Activation Analysis to Determine Unknown Trace Element Concentrations in NIST Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Jaromy; Sun Zaijing; Wells, Doug; Benson, Buck; Maschner, Herb

    2009-03-10

    Photon activation analysis detected elements in two NIST standards that did not have reported concentration values. A method is currently being developed to infer these concentrations by using scaling parameters and the appropriate known quantities within the NIST standard itself. Scaling parameters include: threshold, peak and endpoint energies; photo-nuclear cross sections for specific isotopes; Bremstrahlung spectrum; target thickness; and photon flux. Photo-nuclear cross sections and energies from the unknown elements must also be known. With these quantities, the same integral was performed for both the known and unknown elements resulting in an inference of the concentration of the un-reported element based on the reported value. Since Rb and Mn were elements that were reported in the standards, and because they had well-identified peaks, they were used as the standards of inference to determine concentrations of the unreported elements of As, I, Nb, Y, and Zr. This method was tested by choosing other known elements within the standards and inferring a value based on the stated procedure. The reported value of Mn in the first NIST standard was 403{+-}15 ppm and the reported value of Ca in the second NIST standard was 87000 ppm (no reported uncertainty). The inferred concentrations were 370{+-}23 ppm and 80200{+-}8700 ppm respectively.

  6. Rapid electrostatics-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Askar, Khalid; Leo, Sin-Yen; Xu, Can; Liu, Danielle; Jiang, Peng

    2016-11-15

    Here we report a rapid and scalable bottom-up technique for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembling near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals consisting of large (⩾1μm) silica microspheres. By combining a new electrostatics-assisted colloidal transferring approach with spontaneous colloidal crystallization at an air/water interface, we have demonstrated that the crystal transfer speed of traditional Langmuir-Blodgett-based colloidal assembly technologies can be enhanced by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, the crystalline quality of the resultant photonic crystals is not compromised by this rapid colloidal assembly approach. They exhibit thickness-dependent near-infrared stop bands and well-defined Fabry-Perot fringes in the specular transmission and reflection spectra, which match well with the theoretical calculations using a scalar-wave approximation model and Fabry-Perot analysis. This simple yet scalable bottom-up technology can significantly improve the throughput in assembling large-area, multilayer colloidal crystals, which are of great technological importance in a variety of optical and non-optical applications ranging from all-optical integrated circuits to tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultra-large Angle Curved Reflectors and Their Applications to Passive and Active Photonic Integrated Circuit Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhenyu

    Nanoscale optical components such as waveguides, resonators are the building blocks of integrated optical networks. With the advent of nano-fabrication technologies we are able to realize such components in strongly confined sub-micron dimensions. A photonic integrated circuit (PIC) that contains these components integrates multiple photonic functions on a single chip. Traditionally, functionality of PIC is realized via modification of waveguide structure. on the contrary, reflective components such as curved reflectors propagate light in two dimensional free space thence have many advantages over their refractive counterparts such as tighter space requirement, more flexibility, and lower loss. In this work, we propose curved reflector as an essential component to realize multiple integrated functions in PICs. These functions include spot size conversion, beam turning, waveguide crossing, etc. Waveguide taper, bended waveguide, direct waveguide crossing are the conventional counterparts to realize such functions. In particular, we proposed and realized photonic integrated interconnections using curved reflectors and curved reflector semiconductor optical amplifier (CR-SOA). In this thesis, theoretically analysis of curved reflectors is introduced and discussed in depth. Gaussian beam analysis, in particular, Hermite-Gaussian beam analysis is used to explain light propagation and distortion in interaction with curved reflectors. Theoretical formulation of beam propagation in presence of curved reflector is verified with Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. General design strategies of curved reflectors are proposed. Multiple applications of curved reflector in passive and active devices are introduced. Distortions induced in light beams by curved reflectors, its original, theoretical description, and compensation methods are discussed in details as well. Photonic integrated interconnection based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform and curved reflector

  8. On-chip single photon filtering and multiplexing in hybrid quantum photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Elshaari, Ali W; Zadeh, Iman Esmaeil; Fognini, Andreas; Reimer, Michael E; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J; Zwiller, Val; Jöns, Klaus D

    2017-08-30

    Quantum light plays a pivotal role in modern science and future photonic applications. Since the advent of integrated quantum nanophotonics different material platforms based on III-V nanostructures-, colour centers-, and nonlinear waveguides as on-chip light sources have been investigated. Each platform has unique advantages and limitations; however, all implementations face major challenges with filtering of individual quantum states, scalable integration, deterministic multiplexing of selected quantum emitters, and on-chip excitation suppression. Here we overcome all of these challenges with a hybrid and scalable approach, where single III-V quantum emitters are positioned and deterministically integrated in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible photonic circuit. We demonstrate reconfigurable on-chip single-photon filtering and wavelength division multiplexing with a foot print one million times smaller than similar table-top approaches, while offering excitation suppression of more than 95 dB and efficient routing of single photons over a bandwidth of 40 nm. Our work marks an important step to harvest quantum optical technologies' full potential.Combining different integration platforms on the same chip is currently one of the main challenges for quantum technologies. Here, Elshaari et al. show III-V Quantum Dots embedded in nanowires operating in a CMOS compatible circuit, with controlled on-chip filtering and tunable routing.

  9. Localization of Narrowband Single Photon Emitters in Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Kerem; Sandstrom, Russell; Elbadawi, Christopher; Fischer, Martin; Schreck, Matthias; Shimoni, Olga; Lobo, Charlene; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-03-23

    Diamond nanocrystals that host room temperature narrowband single photon emitters are highly sought after for applications in nanophotonics and bioimaging. However, current understanding of the origin of these emitters is extremely limited. In this work, we demonstrate that the narrowband emitters are point defects localized at extended morphological defects in individual nanodiamonds. In particular, we show that nanocrystals with defects such as twin boundaries and secondary nucleation sites exhibit narrowband emission that is absent from pristine individual nanocrystals grown under the same conditions. Critically, we prove that the narrowband emission lines vanish when extended defects are removed deterministically using highly localized electron beam induced etching. Our results enhance the current understanding of single photon emitters in diamond and are directly relevant to fabrication of novel quantum optics devices and sensors.

  10. Electrically controlled one-way photon flow in plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Davoyan, Artur; Engheta, Nader

    2014-11-06

    Photonics is frequently regarded as a potential pathway for substituting current solid-state electronics and as a promise for higher-speed all-optical computing. The fundamental challenges facing nanophotonics and electronics of the future are nanoscale on-chip integration of electronics and photonics with an efficient electric field tuning of light propagation, dynamic access to the light sources and material parameters of the system, as well as isolation of optical signals analogous to that in electronics. Here we suggest a paradigm for a monolithically integrated electronic control over the light propagation in nanoscale plasmonic waveguides. We theoretically demonstrate that magnetic field induced by the direct electric current flowing in metallic constituents of plasmonic nanostructures alters the material parameters and thus the optical signal flow. We use this principle for the design of an electrically controlled subwavelength optical isolator.

  11. Spin Hall effect of light in photon tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Hailu; Wen Shuangchun; Shu Weixing; Fan Dianyuan

    2010-10-15

    We resolve the breakdown of angular momentum conservation on two-dimensional photon tunneling by considering the spin Hall effect (SHE) of light. This effect manifests itself as polarization-dependent transverse shifts of the field centroid when a classic wave packet tunnels through a prism-air-prism barrier. For the left or the right circularly polarized component, the transverse shift can be modulated by altering the refractive index gradient associated with the two prisms. We find that the SHE in conventional beam refraction can be evidently enhanced via photon tunneling mechanism. The transverse spatial shift is governed by the total angular momentum conservation law, while the transverse angular shift is governed by the total linear momentum conservation law. These findings open the possibility for developing new nanophotonic devices and can be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  12. Photonic spin-controlled multifunctional shared-aperture antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguid, Elhanan; Yulevich, Igor; Veksler, Dekel; Kleiner, Vladimir; Brongersma, Mark L.; Hasman, Erez

    2016-06-01

    The shared-aperture phased antenna array developed in the field of radar applications is a promising approach for increased functionality in photonics. The alliance between the shared-aperture concepts and the geometric phase phenomenon arising from spin-orbit interaction provides a route to implement photonic spin-control multifunctional metasurfaces. We adopted a thinning technique within the shared-aperture synthesis and investigated interleaved sparse nanoantenna matrices and the spin-enabled asymmetric harmonic response to achieve helicity-controlled multiple structured wavefronts such as vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum. We used multiplexed geometric phase profiles to simultaneously measure spectrum characteristics and the polarization state of light, enabling integrated on-chip spectropolarimetric analysis. The shared-aperture metasurface platform opens a pathway to novel types of nanophotonic functionality.

  13. Angular dependence of light trapping in nanophotonic thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Michael; Smirnov, Vladimir; Bittkau, Karsten; Meier, Matthias; Carius, Reinhard; Rau, Uwe; Paetzold, Ulrich W

    2015-11-30

    The angular dependence of light-trapping in nanophotonic thin-film solar cells is inherent due to the wavelength-scale dimensions of the periodic nanopatterns. In this paper, we experimentally investigate the dependence of light coupling to waveguide modes for light trapping in a-Si:H solar cells deposited on nanopatterned back contacts. First, we accurately determine the spectral positions of individual waveguide modes in thin-film solar cells in external quantum efficiency and absorptance. Second, we demonstrate the strong angular dependence of this spectral position for our solar cells. Third, a moderate level of disorder is introduced to the initially periodic nanopattern of the back contacts. As a result, the angular dependence is reduced. Last, we experimentally compare this dependence on the angle of incidence for randomly textured, 2D periodically nanopatterned and 2D disordered back contacts in external quantum efficiency and short-circuit current density.

  14. Mixed-Mode Operation of Hybrid Phase-Change Nanophotonic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yegang; Stegmaier, Matthias; Nukala, Pavan; Giambra, Marco A; Ferrari, Simone; Busacca, Alessandro; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-01-11

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are highly attractive for nonvolatile electrical and all-optical memory applications because of unique features such as ultrafast and reversible phase transitions, long-term endurance, and high scalability to nanoscale dimensions. Understanding their transient characteristics upon phase transition in both the electrical and the optical domains is essential for using PCMs in future multifunctional optoelectronic circuits. Here, we use a PCM nanowire embedded into a nanophotonic circuit to study switching dynamics in mixed-mode operation. Evanescent coupling between light traveling along waveguides and a phase-change nanowire enables reversible phase transition between amorphous and crystalline states. We perform time-resolved measurements of the transient change in both the optical transmission and resistance of the nanowire and show reversible switching operations in both the optical and the electrical domains. Our results pave the way toward on-chip multifunctional optoelectronic integrated devices, waveguide integrated memories, and hybrid processing applications.

  15. Geometrical shape design of nanophotonic surfaces for thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, W I; Yoo, Y J; Song, Y M

    2016-07-11

    We present the effect of geometrical parameters, particularly shape, on optical absorption enhancement for thin film solar cells based on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) using a rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method. It is discovered that the "sweet spot" that maximizes efficiency of solar cells exists for the design of nanophotonic surfaces. For the case of ultrathin, rod array is practical due to the effective optical resonances resulted from the optimum geometry whereas parabola array is viable for relatively thicker cells owing to the effective graded index profile. A specific value of thickness, which is the median value of other two devices tailored by rod and paraboloid, is optimized by truncated shape structure. It is therefore worth scanning the optimum shape of nanostructures in a given thickness in order to achieve high performance.

  16. Metal slit array Fresnel lens for wavelength-scale optical coupling to nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Jin; Park, Dongwon; Koo, Sukmo; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2009-10-12

    We propose a novel metal slit array Fresnel lens for wavelength-scale optical coupling into a nanophotonic waveguide. Using the plasmonic waveguide structure in Fresnel lens form, a much wider beam acceptance angle and wavelength-scale working distance of the lens was realized compared to a conventional dielectric Fresnel lens. By applying the plasmon waveguide dispersion relation to a phased antenna array model, we also develop and analyze design rules and parameters for the suggested metal slit Fresnel lens. Numerical assessment of the suggested structure shows excellent coupling efficiency (up to 59%) of the 10 mum free-space Gaussian beam to the 0.36 mum Si waveguide within a working distance of a few mum.

  17. Gigahertz Optomechanical Modulation by Split-Ring-Resonator Nanophotonic Meta-Atom Arrays.

    PubMed

    Imade, Yuta; Ulbricht, Ronald; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Wright, Oliver B

    2017-10-05

    Using polarization-resolved transient reflection spectroscopy, we investigate a metasurface consisting of coherently vibrating nanophotonic U-shaped split-ring meta-atoms that exhibit colocalized optical and mechanical resonances. With an array of these resonators formed of gold on glass, essentially miniature tuning forks, we monitor the visible-pump induced gigahertz oscillations in reflected infrared light intensity to probe the multimodal vibrational response. Numerical simulations of the associated transient deformations and strain fields elucidate the complex nanomechanical dynamics contributing to the ultrafast optical modulation and point to the role of acousto-plasmonic interactions through the opening and closing motion of the SRR gaps as the dominant effect. Applications include ultrafast acoustooptic modulator design and sensing.

  18. Nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation for off-grid water purification

    PubMed Central

    Dongare, Pratiksha D.; Alabastri, Alessandro; Pedersen, Seth; Zodrow, Katherine R.; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Neumann, Oara; Wu, Jinjian; Wang, Tianxiao; Deshmukh, Akshay; Elimelech, Menachem; Li, Qilin; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2017-01-01

    With more than a billion people lacking accessible drinking water, there is a critical need to convert nonpotable sources such as seawater to water suitable for human use. However, energy requirements of desalination plants account for half their operating costs, so alternative, lower energy approaches are equally critical. Membrane distillation (MD) has shown potential due to its low operating temperature and pressure requirements, but the requirement of heating the input water makes it energy intensive. Here, we demonstrate nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation (NESMD), where highly localized photothermal heating induced by solar illumination alone drives the distillation process, entirely eliminating the requirement of heating the input water. Unlike MD, NESMD can be scaled to larger systems and shows increased efficiencies with decreased input flow velocities. Along with its increased efficiency at higher ambient temperatures, these properties all point to NESMD as a promising solution for household- or community-scale desalination. PMID:28630307

  19. Nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation for off-grid water purification.

    PubMed

    Dongare, Pratiksha D; Alabastri, Alessandro; Pedersen, Seth; Zodrow, Katherine R; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Neumann, Oara; Wu, Jinjian; Wang, Tianxiao; Deshmukh, Akshay; Elimelech, Menachem; Li, Qilin; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2017-07-03

    With more than a billion people lacking accessible drinking water, there is a critical need to convert nonpotable sources such as seawater to water suitable for human use. However, energy requirements of desalination plants account for half their operating costs, so alternative, lower energy approaches are equally critical. Membrane distillation (MD) has shown potential due to its low operating temperature and pressure requirements, but the requirement of heating the input water makes it energy intensive. Here, we demonstrate nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation (NESMD), where highly localized photothermal heating induced by solar illumination alone drives the distillation process, entirely eliminating the requirement of heating the input water. Unlike MD, NESMD can be scaled to larger systems and shows increased efficiencies with decreased input flow velocities. Along with its increased efficiency at higher ambient temperatures, these properties all point to NESMD as a promising solution for household- or community-scale desalination.

  20. Cavity-QED models of switches for attojoule-scale nanophotonic logic

    SciTech Connect

    Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-10-15

    Quantum optical input-output models are described for a class of optical switches based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) with a single multilevel atom (or comparable bound system of charges) coupled simultaneously to several resonant field modes. A recent limit theorem for quantum stochastic differential equations is used to show that such models converge to a simple scattering matrix in a type of strong-coupling limit that seems natural for nanophotonic systems. Numerical integration is used to show that the behavior of the prelimit model approximates that of the simple scattering matrix in a realistic regime for the physical parameters and that it is possible in the proposed cavity-QED configuration for low-power optical signals to switch higher-power signals at attojoule energy scales.

  1. pH Measurement Using Dual-Wavelength Fluorescent Ratio by Two-Photon Excitation for Mitochondrial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazashi, Yasuaki; Li, Yongbo; Onojima, Takumi; Iwami, Kentaro; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Umeda, Norihiro

    2012-11-01

    A mitochondrion has a pH gradient between the two sides of its inner membrane in order to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Because ATP depletion causes numerous diseases, the measurement of the pH value around the mitochondrion is expected to clarify the mechanism of these diseases. In this study, a dual-wavelength pH-sensitive dye was excited by two-photon absorption initiated using a femtosecond pulse laser. In addition, fluorescence from the dye was directly collected from the fluorescent point using the collection-mode probe of a scanning near-field optical microscope. By this proposed method, a pH calibration curve was obtained from the fluorescent intensity ratio of the dye solution, and temporal pH variations with 0.1 s time resolution following the addition of acid were observed. Moreover, mitochondrial activity on the basis of the pH changes was successfully observed in three different mitochondrial densities.

  2. A high-speed, tunable silicon photonic ring modulator integrated with ultra-efficient active wavelength control.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuezhe; Chang, Eric; Amberg, Philip; Shubin, Ivan; Lexau, Jon; Liu, Frankie; Thacker, Hiren; Djordjevic, Stevan S; Lin, Shiyun; Luo, Ying; Yao, Jin; Lee, Jin-Hyoung; Raj, Kannan; Ho, Ron; Cunningham, John E; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2014-05-19

    We report the first complete 10G silicon photonic ring modulator with integrated ultra-efficient CMOS driver and closed-loop wavelength control. A selective substrate removal technique was used to improve the ring tuning efficiency. Limited by the thermal tuner driver output power, a maximum open-loop tuning range of about 4.5nm was measured with about 14mW of total tuning power including the heater driver circuit power consumption. Stable wavelength locking was achieved with a low-power mixed-signal closed-loop wavelength controller. An active wavelength tracking range of > 500GHz was demonstrated with controller energy cost of only 20fJ/bit.

  3. Active layer identification of photonic crystal waveguide biosensor chip for the detection of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painam, Balveer; Kaler, Rajinder S.; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-07-01

    This work represents experimental and simulation analysis of photonic crystal waveguide (PCW)-based biosensor structures, which is used for detection of the Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell. A method is adopted for E. coli culture to measure length, diameter, and refractive index to finalize the structural design and to verify the suitability of PCW as a biosensor. This method is tested using DH5α strains of E. coli. The typical precisions of measurements are varied in ranges from 1.132 to 1.825 μm and from 0.447 to 0.66 μm for pathogen's length and diameter, respectively. The measured distribution of samples over length and diameter are in correlation with the measurements performed by scanning electron microscope. After obtaining average length and diameter of cylindrical shaped E. coli cell, we consider these values for simulation analysis of designed PCW biosensor. E. coli cell is trapped in the middle of the PCW biosensor having three different types of waveguides, i.e., gallium arsenide/silicon dioxide (GaAs/SiO2), silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO2), or silicon nitride/silicon dioxide (Si3N4/SiO2) to observe the maximum resonance shift and sensitivity. It is observed from the simulation data analysis that GaAs/SiO2 is the preferred PCW biosensor for the identification of E. coli.

  4. High quality beaming and efficient free-space coupling in L3 photonic crystal active nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Haddadi, S; Le-Gratiet, L; Sagnes, I; Raineri, F; Bazin, A; Bencheikh, K; Levenson, J A; Yacomotti, A M

    2012-08-13

    We report on far-field measurements of L3 photonic crystal (PhC) cavities with high quality beaming. This is achieved by means of the so-called "band folding" technique, in which a modulation of the radius of specific holes surrounding the cavity is introduced. Far-field patterns are measured from photoluminescence of quantum wells embedded in the PhC. A very good agreement between experimental results and simulated radiation patterns has been found. Laser effect is demonstrated in the beaming cavity with a threshold comparable to the regular one. In addition, free-space input coupling to this cavity has been achieved. In order to fully analyze the coupling efficiency, we generalize the approach developed in S. Fan, et al., [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 20, 569 (2003)], relaxing the hypothesis of mirror symmetry. The obtained coupling efficiencies are about 15% with quality factors (Q) exceeding 10(4). These results further validate the "folding" technique on L3 cavities for nanocavity realization with efficient free-space coupling and high Q factors.

  5. Dynamic performance of MEMS deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Christian C.; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Active optics can facilitate two-photon microscopic imaging deep in tissue. We are investigating fast focus control mirrors used in concert with an aberration correction mirror to control the axial position of focus and system aberrations dynamically during scanning. With an adaptive training step, sample-induced aberrations may be compensated as well. If sufficiently fast and precise, active optics may be able to compensate under-corrected imaging optics as well as sample aberrations to maintain diffraction-limited performance throughout the field of view. Toward this end we have measured a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element deformable mirror, and a Revibro Optics electrostatic 4-zone focus control mirror to characterize dynamic performance. Tests for the Multi-DM included both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes. For the step response we measured 10%-90% rise times for the target Zernike amplitude, and wavefront rms error settling times. Frequency sweeps identified the 3dB bandwidth of the mirror when attempting to follow a sinusoidal amplitude trajectory for a specific Zernike mode. For five tested Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism and trefoil) we find error settling times for mode amplitudes up to 400nm to be less than 52 us, and 3 dB frequencies range from 6.5 kHz to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with error settling time of 80 μs for a large 3 um defocus step, and settling time of only 18 μs for a 400nm spherical aberration step. These response speeds are sufficient for intra-scan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  6. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T.; Chakravarty, Swapnajit

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  7. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  8. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yi; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  9. Bleaching effect of activation of hydrogen peroxide using photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming technique.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hakan; Akcay, Merve; Yasa, Bilal; Hatirli, Huseyin; Saygili, Gökhan

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the bleaching effectiveness of photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) using 35 % hydrogen peroxide on discolored teeth as compared with different devital bleaching techniques. Fifty extracted human mandibular incisors were collected and artificially stained using sheep's blood. The teeth were then randomly divided into five groups according to the different bleaching procedures to be tested: walking bleach with sodium perborate and with 35 % hydrogen peroxide gel, both for 1 week; PIPS using 35 % hydrogen peroxide liquid for 30 min; and just 35 % hydrogen peroxide, as a liquid and as a gel (again, for 30 min). Spectrophotometric measurements were obtained on the buccal surfaces of the crowns, at the beginning, just after the bleaching procedures had been performed, and the following first, third, and seventh days. The ∆E values were calculated, and the data were analyzed with a two-way analysis of variance (P = 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between the PIPS technique using 35 % hydrogen peroxide liquid and the 35 % hydrogen peroxide liquid and gel without PIPS immediately after the procedures (P < 0.05). On Days 1, 3, and 7, the PIPS technique further bleached specimens more than all of the other techniques (P < 0.05). The PIPS technique using 35 % hydrogen peroxide was found to be more effective than all of the conventional techniques. Within limitations of this study, PIPS technique using hydrogen peroxide was superior to the conventional techniques. Further studies should be conducted to determine if the PIPS technique results in any complications, particularly cervical resorption.

  10. Normal range of osteoblastic activity in total hip arthroplasties on single-photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Senpei; Boktor, Raef R; Kc Man, Kenneth; Pitman, Alexander G

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the normal range of periprosthetic osteoblastic activity around total hip arthroplasties is required for rational diagnosis of complications. The aim of this study was to establish such a normal range for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Clinical utility of such a range is confident differentiation of normal from abnormal arthroplasties. A total of 122 asymptomatic acetabular cups (age: 0-22 years) and 71 femoral stems (age: 0-20 years) were scanned with SPECT/CT. Two acetabular and three femoral activity ratios to normal reference bone were defined [acetabular axial (AA/RA), acetabular coronal (AC/RA), RA=reference acetabulum; femoral calcar (FC/RF), femoral mid-stem (FM/RF), femoral stem tip (FS/RF), RF=reference femur]. Upper cut-off of normal was defined as mean +3 SD (rounded). Two time breakpoints were analysed (12 and 24 months). The upper cut-off for the normal range was 1.0 for AA/RA, 1.5 for AC/RA and 2.2 for all thee of FC/RF, FM/RF and FS/RF. AA/RA, FM/RF and FS/RF showed no statistically significant temporal trends. AC/RA showed stabilization of activity after 12 months and FC/RF after 24 months. Measured activity ratios that fall within our normal range are likely to represent normal periprosthetic osteoblastic activity. Measured activity ratios that fall above the upper cut-offs of our normal range are likely to be abnormal. The cut-offs are robust in clinical practice and have utility in discriminating normal from abnormal stabilized arthroplasties where visual interpretation is ambiguous. Elevated AC/RA under 12 months and FC/RF under 24 months may represent normal periprosthetic activity and should be interpreted with caution.

  11. Fundamental Modeling and Design Strategies in Computational Photonics-Applications to Lasercom Through Clouds and Electro-Optical/Nanophotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-31

    VECSEL ). Funding was provided under the project to grow VECSEL wafers that could be processed into laser chips. The chip processing (mounting and...etching) and VECSEL laser demonstration was carried out under parallel ongoing JTO MRI projects. The main focus of the project was on developing novel...semiconductor lasers ( VECSELs ). These devices at the time showed great promise as high- brightness, wavelength tunable TEM00 multi-Watt sources and we sought

  12. Photonic Hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new "universality class" of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  13. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  14. Strained Silicon Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Schriever, Clemens; Bohley, Christian; Schilling, Jörg; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2012-01-01

    A review of recent progress in the field of strained silicon photonics is presented. The application of strain to waveguide and photonic crystal structures can be used to alter the linear and nonlinear optical properties of these devices. Here, methods for the fabrication of strained devices are summarized and recent examples of linear and nonlinear optical devices are discussed. Furthermore, the relation between strain and the enhancement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility is investigated, which may enable the construction of optically active photonic devices made of silicon. PMID:28817015

  15. Topological photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    We associate intrinsic energy equal to hν /2 with the spin angular momentum of photon, and propose a topological model based on orbifold in space and tifold in time as topological obstructions. The model is substantiated using vector wavefield disclinations. The physical photon is suggested to be a particlelike topological photon and a propagating wave such that the energy hν of photon is equally divided between spin energy and translational energy, corresponding to linear momentum of hν /c. The enigma of wave-particle duality finds natural resolution, and the proposed model gives new insights into the phenomena of interference and emission of radiation.

  16. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  17. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  18. Proof-of-principle results for identifying the composition of dust particles and volcanic ash samples through the technique of photon activation analysis at the IAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, Mayir; Cole, Philip L.; Segebade, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Instrumental analytical methods are preferable in studying sub-milligram quantities of airborne particulates collected in dust filters. The multi-step analytical procedure used in treating samples through chemical separation can be quite complicated. Further, due to the minute masses of the airborne particulates collected on filters, such chemical treatment can easily lead to significant levels of contamination. Radio-analytical techniques, and in particular, activation analysis methods offer a far cleaner alternative. Activation methods require minimal sample preparation and provide sufficient sensitivity for detecting the vast majority of the elements throughout the periodic table. In this paper, we will give a general overview of the technique of photon activation analysis. We will show that by activating dust particles with 10- to 30-MeV bremsstrahlung photons, we can ascertain their elemental composition. The samples are embedded in dust-collection filters and are irradiated "as is" by these photons. The radioactivity of the photonuclear reaction products is measured with appropriate spectrometers and the respective analytes are quantified using multi-component calibration materials. We shall provide specific examples of identifying the elemental components of airborne dust particles and volcanic ash by making use of bremsstrahlung photons from an electron linear accelerator at the Idaho Accelerator Center in Pocatello, Idaho.

  19. Design and characterization of free-running InGaAsP single-photon detector with active-quenching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Tingfa; Li, Yongfu; Ding, Lei; Tao, Junchao; Wang, Ying; Wang, Qingpu; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2017-07-01

    A free-running single-photon detector for 1.06 μm wavelength based on an InGaAsP/InP single-photon avalanche diode is presented. The detector incorporates an ultra-fast active-quenching technique to greatly lessen the afterpulsing effects. An improved method for avalanche characterization using electroluminescence is proposed, and the performance of the detector is evaluated. The number of avalanche carriers is as low as 1.68 ×106 , resulting in a low total afterpulse probability of 4% at 233 K, 10% detection efficiency, and 1 μs hold-off time.

  20. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    passive and active versions of each fiber designed under this task. Crystal Fibre shall provide characteristics of the fiber fabricated to include core...passive version of multicore fiber iteration 2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Laser physics, Fibre Lasers, Photonic Crystal, Multicore, Fiber Laser 16...9 00* 0 " CRYSTAL FIBRE INT ODUCTION This report describes the photonic crystal fibers developed under agreement No FA8655-o5-a- 3046. All

  1. Incremental value of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of active condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Mukherjee, Anirban; St, ArunRaj; Tripathi, Madhavi; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the incremental value of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (Tc-MDP) single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) over planar bone scintigraphy (BS) and SPECT for the diagnosis of active condylar hyperplasia (CH). Data of 21 patients (mean age: 21.9±5.3 years, 10 males, 11 females) who underwent Tc-MDP BS along with regional SPECT/CT for the diagnosis of active CH were retrospectively evaluated. Planar BS, SPECT, and SPECT/CT images were evaluated by two nuclear medicine physician in consensus. Radioactive counts were measured per region of interest and the respective ratios were calculated. A percentage of condylar uptake 55% or higher, generating differences of 10% or more between condyles, was considered to be indicative of active unilateral condylar hyperactivity. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated separately for planar BS, SPECT, and SPECT/CT. Clinical/imaging follow-up and histopathology was considered the reference standard. Planar BS, SPECT, and SPECT-CT of 21 patients with suspected CH were retrospectively evaluated. Planar BS was positive in eight patients, of whom six had active CH as the final diagnosis. SPECT was positive in 14 patients, of whom 12 patients had CH. Out of 14 patients who were positive in SPECT, two patients were considered negative in SPECT-CT. The diagnostic accuracy was the lowest for planar BS (47.6%) and the highest for SPECT/CT (85.8%). SPECT/CT and SPECT had similar sensitivity (80%), whereas SPECT-CT had the highest specificity (100%). SPECT/CT is superior to planar BS and SPECT for the diagnosis of active CH.

  2. Progress in Ultrafast Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro

    2005-08-01

    Recent progress in ultrafast photonics is reviewed with special emphasis on the research and development activities in Japanese research institutions in the field of optical communication and related measurement technologies. After summarizing the physical natures of ultrashort optical pulses, selected topics are reviewed on such as (1) ultrahigh-bit-rate optical communication employing the combination of optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), (2) optical components for ultrafast photonics with emphasis on all optical switches including semiconductor optical amplifiers, cascaded second order frequency converters, semiconductor saturable absorber switches, organic dye saturable absorber switches and bistable semiconductor lasers, (3) microwave photonics, emphasizing millimeter-wave/photonic communication technologies, and (4) high-speed optical measurements featuring both compact femtosecond pulse source development and rf magnetic field imaging. Some comments on the future prospect of ultrafast photonics are also given. It is concluded that in order to bring the powerful and versatile capability of ultrafast photonics into the real world, further collaboration between photonics specialists and production engineers/information specialists is strongly desired.

  3. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  4. Two-photon imaging of intratumoral CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity during adoptive T cell therapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Breart, Béatrice; Lemaître, Fabrice; Celli, Susanna; Bousso, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    CTLs have the potential to attack tumors, and adoptive transfer of CTLs can lead to tumor regression in mouse models and human clinical settings. However, the dynamics of tumor cell elimination during efficient T cell therapy is unknown, and it is unclear whether CTLs act directly by destroying tumor cells or indirectly by initiating the recruitment of innate immune cells that mediate tumor damage. To address these questions, we report real-time imaging of tumor cell apoptosis in vivo using intravital 2-photon microscopy and a Förster resonance energy transfer–based (FRET-based) reporter of caspase 3 activity. In a mouse model of solid tumor, we found that tumor regression after transfer of in vitro–activated CTLs occurred primarily through the direct action of CTLs on each individual tumor cell, with a minimal bystander effect. Surprisingly, the killing of 1 target cell by an individual CTL took an extended period of time, 6 hours on average, which suggested that the slow rate of killing intrinsically limits the efficiency of antitumor T cell responses. The ability to visualize when, where, and how tumor cells are killed in vivo offers new perspectives for understanding how immune effectors survey cancer cells and how local tumor microenvironments may subvert immune responses. PMID:18357341

  5. Variable activation of the DNA damage response pathways in patients undergoing single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Hee; Nguyen, Patricia; Hu, Shijun; Liang, Grace; Ong, Sang-Ging; Han, Leng; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Lee, Andrew S; Vasanawala, Minal; Segall, George; Wu, Joseph C

    2015-02-01

    Although single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI) has improved the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected coronary artery disease, it remains a primary source of low-dose radiation exposure for cardiac patients. To determine the biological effects of low-dose radiation from SPECT MPI, we measured the activation of the DNA damage response pathways using quantitative flow cytometry and single-cell gene expression profiling. Blood samples were collected from patients before and after SPECT MPI (n=63). Overall, analysis of all recruited patients showed no marked differences in the phosphorylation of proteins (H2AX, protein 53, and ataxia telangiectasia mutated) after SPECT. The majority of patients also had either downregulated or unchanged expression in DNA damage response genes at both 24 and 48 hours post-SPECT. Interestingly, a small subset of patients with increased phosphorylation had significant upregulation of genes associated with DNA damage, whereas those with no changes in phosphorylation had significant downregulation or no difference, suggesting that some patients may potentially be more sensitive to low-dose radiation exposure. Our findings showed that SPECT MPI resulted in a variable activation of the DNA damage response pathways. Although only a small subset of patients had increased protein phosphorylation and elevated gene expression postimaging, continued care should be taken to reduce radiation exposure to both the patients and operators. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ian A D; Mousavi, S Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-05-04

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene's large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude.

  7. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ian A. D.; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene’s large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude. PMID:27143314

  8. Determination of spatial distributions of zinc and active biomass in microbial biofilms by two-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Hidalgo, Gabriela; Houston, Paul L; Hay, Anthony G; Shuler, Michael L; Abruña, Héctor D; Ghiorse, William C; Lion, Leonard W

    2005-07-01

    The spatial distributions of zinc, a representative transition metal, and active biomass in bacterial biofilms were determined using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM). Application of 2P-LSM permits analysis of thicker biofilms than are amenable to observation with confocal laser scanning microscopy and also provides selective excitation of a smaller focal volume with greater depth localization. Thin Escherichia coli PHL628 biofilms were grown in a minimal mineral salts medium using pyruvate as the carbon and energy source under batch conditions, and thick biofilms were grown in Luria-Bertani medium using a continuous-flow drip system. The biofilms were visualized by 2P-LSM and shown to have heterogeneous structures with dispersed dense cell clusters, rough surfaces, and void spaces. Contrary to homogeneous biofilm model predictions that active biomass would be located predominantly in the outer regions of the biofilm and inactive or dead biomass (biomass debris) in the inner regions, significant active biomass fractions were observed at all depths in biofilms (up to 350 microm) using live/dead fluorescent stains. The active fractions were dependent on biofilm thickness and are attributed to the heterogeneous characteristics of biofilm structures. A zinc-binding fluorochrome (8-hydroxy-5-dimethylsulfoamidoquinoline) was synthesized and used to visualize the spatial location of added Zn within biofilms. Zn was distributed evenly in a thin (12 microm) biofilm but was located only at the surface of thick biofilms, penetrating less than 20 microm after 1 h of exposure. The relatively slow movement of Zn into deeper biofilm layers provides direct evidence in support of the concept that thick biofilms may confer resistance to toxic metal species by binding metals at the biofilm-bulk liquid interface, thereby retarding metal diffusion into the biofilm (G. M. Teitzel and M. R. Park, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:2313-2320, 2003).

  9. Analysis of the swimming activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using photonic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Han; Chang, Bo-Jui; Huang, Ying-Jung; Fan, Chia-Chieh; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Swimming activity of flagella is a main factor of the motility of bacteria. Flagella expressed on the surface of bacterial species serve as a primary means of motility including swimming. We propose to use optical tweezers to analyze the swimming activity of bacteria. The sample bacteria in the work is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and it is a gram-negative bacterium and often causes leading to burn wound infections, urinary-tract infections, and pneumonia. The single polar flagellum of P. aeruginosa has been demonstrated to be important virulence and colonization factor of this opportunistic pathogen. We demonstrate a gene to regulate the bacterial swimming activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by biological method. However, the change of flagellar morphology was not observed by electron microscopy analysis, suggesting that the gene regulates the flagellar rotation that could not be detected by biological method. PFM exhibits a spatial resolution of a few nanometers to detect the relative position of the probe at an acquisition rate over 1 MHz. By binding a probe such as a bead or a quantum dot on the flagella, we expect the rotation of the probe due to the flagella could be detected. It is expected that the study of the swimming activity of P. aeruginosa provide potent method for the pathogenic role of the flagella in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Recent developments for an active UF6 gas target for photon-induced fission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenberger, M.; Eckardt, C.; Enders, J.; Göök, A.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent developments for an active uranium-hexafluoride-loaded gas target as well as results on the detector gas properties are presented. The gas of choice is a mixture of argon with small amounts of UF6. This contribution presents the experimental setup and focusses on the electron drift velocity with increasing UF6 content. A time-dependent decrease in electron drift velocity is observed in our setup.

  11. Selective and reversible ammonia gas detection with nanoporous film functionalized silicon photonic micro-ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Yebo, Nebiyu A; Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Levrau, Elisabeth; Detavernier, Christophe; Hens, Zeger; Martens, Johan A; Baets, Roel

    2012-05-21

    Portable, low cost and real-time gas sensors have a considerable potential in various biomedical and industrial applications. For such applications, nano-photonic gas sensors based on standard silicon fabrication technology offer attractive opportunities. Deposition of high surface area nano-porous coatings on silicon photonic sensors is a means to achieve selective, highly sensitive and multiplexed gas detection on an optical chip. Here we demonstrate selective and reversible ammonia gas detection with functionalized silicon-on-insulator optical micro-ring resonators. The micro-ring resonators are coated with acidic nano-porous aluminosilicate films for specific ammonia sensing, which results in a reversible response to NH(3)with selectivity relative to CO(2). The ammonia detection limit is estimated at about 5 ppm. The detectors reach a steady response to NH(3) within 30 and return to their base level within 60 to 90 seconds. The work opens perspectives on development of nano-photonic sensors for real-time, non-invasive, low cost and light weight biomedical and industrial sensing applications.

  12. Deep investigation on inorganic fraction of atmospheric PM in Mediterranean area by neutron and photon activation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic activities introduce materials increasing levels of many dangerous substances for the environmental quality and being hazardous to human health. Major attention has been given to those elements able to alter the environment and endanger human health. The airborne particulate matter pollutant is considered one of the most difficult task in environmental chemistry for its complex composition and implications complicating notably the behavior comprehension. So, for investigating deeply the elemental composition we used two nuclear techniques, Neutron Activation Analysis and Photon Activation Analysis, characterized by high sensitivity, precision and accuracy. An important task has been devoted to the investigation of Quality Control (QC) and Quality Assurance (QA) of the methodology used in this study. This study was therefore extended as far back as possible in time (from 1965 until 2000) in order to analyze the trend of airborne concentration of pollutant elements in connection with the industrial and lifestyle growth during the entire period. Results Almost all the elements may be attributed to long-range transport phenomena from other natural and/or anthropogenic sources: this behavior is common to all the periods studied even if a very light decreasing trend can be evidenced from 1970 to 2002. Finally, in order to investigate a retrospective study of elements in PM10 and their evolution in relationship with the natural or anthropogenic origins, we have investigated the Enrichment Factors. The study shows the EF trends for some elements in PM10 during four decades. Conclusions The two nuclear techniques have allowed to reach elevated sensibility/accuracy levels for determining elements at very low concentrations (trace and ultra-trace levels). The element concentrations determined in this study do not basically show a significant level of attention from a toxicological point of view. PMID:24196275

  13. UNESCO active learning approach in optics and photonics leads to significant change in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.; Channa, R.; Outzourhit, A.; Azizan, M.; Oueriagli, A.

    2014-07-01

    There are many difficulties in teaching science and technology in developing countries. Several different teaching strategies have to be applied in these cases. More specifically, for developing countries competencies in teaching science in the introductory classroom has attracted much attention. As a specific example we will consider the Moroccan system. In most developing countries everything is moving so slowly that the progress stays static for development. Also, any change needs time, effort and engagement. In our case we discovered that many teachers feel uncomfortable when introducing new teaching methods and evaluation in classes at introductory physics. However, the introduction of an Active Learning in our curricula showed difficulties that students have in understanding physics and especially concepts. Students were interested in having Active Learning courses much more than passive and traditional ones. Changing believes on physical phenomena and reality of the world students become more attractive and their way of thinking Science changed. The main philosophy of fostering modern hands-on learning techniques -adapted to local needs and availability of teaching resources- is elaborated. The Active Learning program provides the teachers with a conceptual evaluation instrument, drawn from relevant physics education research, giving teachers an important tool to measure student learning. We will try to describe the UNESCO Chair project in physics created in 2010 at Cadi Ayyad University since our first experience with UNESCO ALOP program. Many efforts have been done so far and the project helps now to develop more national and international collaborations between universities and Regional Academies of Education and Training. As a new result of these actions and according to our local needs, the translation of the ALOP program into Arabic is now available under the auspice of UNESCO and encouragement of international partners SPIE, ICTP, ICO and OSA.

  14. Photon activation therapy of RG2 glioma carrying Fischer rats using stable thallium and monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberg, Crister; Jönsson, Bo-Anders; Prezado, Yolanda; Pommer, Tobias; Nittby, Henrietta; Englund, Elisabet; Grafström, Gustav; Edvardsson, Anneli; Stenvall, Anna; Strömblad, Susanne; Wingårdh, Karin; Persson, Bertil; Elleaume, Hélène; Baldetorp, Bo; Salford, Leif G.; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2012-12-01

    75 RG2 glioma-carrying Fischer rats were treated by photon activation therapy (PAT) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation and stable thallium. Three groups were treated with thallium in combination with radiation at different energy; immediately below and above the thallium K-edge, and at 50 keV. Three control groups were given irradiation only, thallium only, or no treatment at all. For animals receiving thallium in combination with radiation to 15 Gy at 50 keV, the median survival time was 30 days, which was 67% longer than for the untreated controls (p = 0.0020) and 36% longer than for the group treated with radiation alone (not significant). Treatment with thallium and radiation at the higher energy levels were not effective at the given absorbed dose and thallium concentration. In the groups treated at 50 keV and above the K-edge, several animals exhibited extensive and sometimes contra-lateral edema, neuronal death and frank tissue necrosis. No such marked changes were seen in the other groups. The results were discussed with reference to Monte Carlo calculated electron energy spectra and dose enhancement factors.

  15. Photochemical Modulation of Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction using Caged Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors: Activation via One- and Two-Photon Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Warmka, Janel K.; Dore, Timothy M.; Blank, David A.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates, and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase, Bhc-FTI, is described. The inhibitor was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol functional group with a Bhc moiety; while Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryls. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor (FTI) that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies. PMID:22492666

  16. Photochemical modulation of Ras-mediated signal transduction using caged farnesyltransferase inhibitors: activation by one- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A; Ochocki, Joshua D; Warmka, Janel K; Dore, Timothy M; Blank, David A; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-05-07

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase is described. The inhibitor, FTI, was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol group with a bromohydroxycoumarin (Bhc) moiety. While Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryl groups. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies.

  17. Actively tunable double-Fano and Ramsey-Fano resonances in photonic molecules and improved sensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Optical Fano resonances are an increasingly important line-shape engineering tool with applications ranging from high-sensitivity sensing and ultrasmall lasers to low-power optical switching or modulating. Here we demonstrate a fully on-chip resonant nanostructure on a photonic crystal molecule platform exhibiting typical double- and Ramsey-Fano resonances, which can be actively controlled by the modification of the blockade transmittance in the waveguide. First, we investigate the transmission spectrum of a coupled double-cavity setting, showing a kind of double-Fano resonance line shape which consists of an asymmetric low-frequency Fano (LF) resonance and a high-frequency Fano (HF) resonance. At the same time, we elucidate the influences of various physical quantities on the generated LF and HF resonances. Second, and more interestingly, we reveal the occurrence of the Ramsey-Fano resonance profile by extending a double-cavity arrangement to a coupled-cavity-array arrangement. This Ramsey-Fano resonance can be attributed to the multiple quantum interference among a variety of light pathways. Finally, as an application, we discuss how to use an asymmetric double-Fano resonance line shape, which features the steep spectral slope, to improve the sensing performance. Our obtained results may stimulate future experimental efforts in controlling the double- and Ramsey-Fano resonance line shapes of this system more accurately.

  18. Nondestructive assay of fluorine in geological and other materials by instrumental photon activation analysis with a microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausová, Ivana; Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk; Chvátil, David; Krist, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Reliable determination of low concentrations of fluorine in geological and coal samples is difficult. It usually requires tedious decomposition and dissolution of the sample followed by chemical conversion of fluorine into its anionic form. The present paper examines possibilities of non-destructive determination of fluorine, mainly in minerals, rocks and coal, by instrumental photon activation analysis (IPAA) using the MT-25 microtron. The fluorine assay consists of counting the positron-electron annihilation line of 18F at 511 keV, which is a product of the photonuclear reaction 19F(γ, n)18F and a pure positron emitter. The assay is complicated by the simultaneous formation of other positron emitters. The main contributors to interference in geological samples are from 45Ti and 34mCl, whereas those from 44Sc and 89Zr are minor. Optimizing beam energy and irradiation-decay-counting times, together with using interfering element calibration standards, allowed reliable IPAA determination of fluorine in selected USGS and CRPG geochemical reference materials, NIST coal reference materials, and NIST RM 8414 Bovine Muscle. In agreement with the published data obtained by PIGE, the results of the F assay by IPAA have revealed erroneous reference values provided for the NIST reference materials SRM 1632 Bituminous Coal and RM 8414 Bovine Muscle. The detection limits in rock and coal samples are in the range of 10-100 μg g-1.

  19. Photonic modulation of EGFR: 280nm low level light arrests cancer cell activation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botelho, Cláudia M.; Marques, Rogério; Viruthachalam, Thiagarajan; Gonçalves, Odete; Vorum, Henrik; Gomes, Andreia C.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2017-02-01

    Overexpression of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) by cancer cells is associated with a poor prognosis for the patient. For several decades, therapies targeting EGFR have been designed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The use of these molecules had good clinical results, although its efficiency (and specificity) is still far from being optimal. In this paper, we present a new approach for a possible new cancer therapy targeting EGFR and using low intensity 280nm light. The influence of 280nm UVB illumination on cancer cells stimulated with 2nM of EGF was followed by time-lapse confocal microscopy. The 280nm illumination of the cancer cells blocks EGFR activation, inhibiting EGFR internalization and cell migration thus inhibiting the transition to the metastatic phenotype. Exposure time is a very important factor. The higher the illumination time the more significant differences were observed: 280nm light delayed or completely halted EGFR activation in the cell membrane, mainly at the cell junction level, and delayed or halted EGFR endocytic internalization, filopodia formation and cell migration.

  20. An examination of athermal photonic effects on boron diffusion and activation during microwave rapid thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Bonifas, Christopher J; Thompson, Keith; Booske, John H; Cooper, Reid F

    2008-01-01

    This work examines the role of 672 nm optical illumination on the diffusion and activation of B in Si as a function of various factors. The factors studied include length of anneal, maximum temperature of anneal, type of co-implanted and pre-amorphizing species and ambient oxygen concentration. The anneal conditions fell into one of three categories: (1) high-temperature (> 900 degrees C) spike and 10-second anneals; (2) low temperature (550 degrees C) 30-minute anneals; and (3) room-temperature long-term "anneals". Implanted species included BF2 implants, pre-amorphized B-only implants, and pre-amorphized BF2 implants. Finally, the ambient oxygen concentration was varied from atmospheric pressure to 100 ppm. The results show that illumination: (1) affects the diffusion of B on spike anneal time frames; (2) has limited effect on diffusion over 10-second time frames; and (3) fails to enhance the activation of B during low-temperature solid phase epitaxy and at room temperature. Additionally, illumination has no effect on B-diffusion when oxygen is present in ambient concentrations but does show an effect when the presence of oxygen is restricted. Finally, the presence of F affects both the net diffusion of B in Si and the relative effect of illumination on the diffusion of B.

  1. Effects of Lac operon activation, deletion of the Yhha gene, and the removal of oxygen on the ultra-weak photon emission of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Laager, Frédéric M; Becker, Nicholas M; Park, Sang-Hyun; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2009-01-01

    We observed a relation between gene activity and ultra-weak photon emission (UPE). By comparing the UPEs of E. coli with the LacI gene present and deleted we found that more gene activity produced higher UPE. This relation was further confirmed by studying the UPE of the E. coli with and without the Yhha gene. We interpreted that a higher aminoacyl t-RNA synthetase activity, which used ATP from the respiratory chain, could increase the emission. Satisfying the increased need of ATP by the E. coli through an increase of respiratory chain activity, which has reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a byproduct, results in a higher rate of photon emission. To ensure that oxygen is at the origin of this emission, we replaced the air by pure nitrogen. After 30 min, it was observed that the emission levels equaled the emission levels of the sterile medium. We could therefore conclude that the source of the photon emission would be affected by genetic activity and is oxygen related.

  2. Poly β-cyclodextrin/TPdye nanomicelle-based two-photon nanoprobe for caspase-3 activation imaging in live cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huijuan; He, Leiliang; Zhao, Wenjie; Li, Jishan; Xiao, Yue; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-11-18

    Two-photon excitation (TPE) with near-infrared (NIR) photons as the excitation source has important advantages over conventional one-photon excitation (OPE) in the field of biomedical imaging. β-cyclodextrin polymer (βCDP)-based two-photon absorption (TPA) fluorescent nanomicelle exhibits desirable two-photon-sensitized fluorescence properties, high photostability, high cell-permeability and excellent biocompatibility. By combination of the nanostructured two-photon dye (TPdye)/βCDP nanomicelle with the TPE technique, herein we have designed a TPdye/βCDP nanomicelle-based TPA fluorescent nanoconjugate for enzymatic activity assay in biological fluids, live cells and tissues. This sensing system is composed of a trans-4-[p-(N,N-diethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (DEASPI)/βCDP nanomicelle as TPA fluorophore and carrier vehicle for delivery of a specific peptide sequence to live cell through fast endocytosis, and an adamantine (Ad)-GRRRDEVDK-BHQ2 (black hole quencher 2) peptide (denoted as Ad-DEVD-BHQ2) anchored on the DEASPI/βCDP nanomicelle's surface to form TPA DEASPI/βCDP@Ad-DEVD-BHQ2 nanoconjugate by the βCD/Ad host-guest inclusion strategy. Successful in vitro and in vivo enzymatic activities assay of caspase-3 was demonstrated with this sensing strategy. Our results reveal that this DEASPI/βCDP@Ad-DEVD-BHQ2 nanoconjugate not only is a robust, sensitive and selective sensor for quantitative assay of caspase-3 in the complex biological environment but also can be efficiently delivered into live cells as well as tissues and act as a "signal-on" fluorescent biosensor for specific, high-contrast imaging of enzymatic activities. This DEASPI/βCDP@Ad-DEVD-BHQ2 nanoconjugate provides a new opportunity to screen enzyme inhibitors and evaluate the apoptosis-associated disease progression. Moreover, our design also provides a methodology model scheme for development of future TPdye/βCDP nanomicelle-based two-photon fluorescent probes for in vitro or

  3. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10−19 W/Hz−1/2 range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms. PMID:26061283

  4. Evanescent-Vacuum-Enhanced Photon-Exciton Coupling and Fluorescence Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Juanjuan; Gu, Ying; Zhao, Dongxing; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Tiancai; Gong, Qihuang

    2017-02-01

    An evanescent optical mode existing in various nanophotonic structures always acts as a cavity mode rather than an electromagnetic vacuum in the study of cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED). Here we show that taking the evanescent mode as an electromagnetic vacuum in which the nanocavity is located is possible through the optical mode design. The proposed evanescent vacuum enables us to enhance both the reversible photon-exciton interaction and fluorescence collection. By embedding the custom-designed plasmon nanocavity into the evanescent vacuum provided by a metallic or dielectric nanowire, the photon-exciton coupling coefficient can achieve 4.2 times that in vacuum due to the exponential decay of the evanescent wave, and spontaneously emitted photons with Rabi splitting can be guided by an evanescent wave with a collection efficiency of 47% at most. Electromagnetic vacuum engineering at subwavelength scale holds promise for controlling the light-matter interaction in quantum optics, CQED, and on-chip quantum information.

  5. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2015-06-10

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10(-19) W/Hz(-1/2) range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms.

  6. Quantum-confined single photon emission at room temperature from SiC tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Stefania; Bodrog, Zoltán; Magyar, Andrew P; Gentle, Angus; Gali, Adam; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-09-07

    Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H)--a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics.

  7. Experimental interference of independent photons.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Blauensteiner, Bibiane; Zukowski, Marek; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-06-23

    Interference of photons emerging from independent sources is essential for modern quantum-information processing schemes, above all quantum repeaters and linear-optics quantum computers. We report an observation of nonclassical interference of two single photons originating from two independent, separated sources, which were actively synchronized with a rms timing jitter of 260 fs. The resulting (two-photon) interference visibility was (83+/-4)%.

  8. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; de Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-04-01

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. These results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.

  9. Analysis of alternative splicing events for cancer diagnosis using a multiplexing nanophotonic biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, César S.; Domínguez-Zotes, Santos; Lechuga, Laura M.

    2017-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a promising tool not only for prevention, screening and development of more efficient treatment strategies, but also for diminishing the side effects caused by current therapies. Deciphering gene regulation pathways provides a reliable prognostic analysis to elucidate the origin of grave diseases and facilitate the selection of the most adequate treatment for each individual. Alternative splicing of mRNA precursors is one of these gene regulation pathways and enables cells to generate different protein outputs from the same gene depending on their developmental or homeostatic status. Its deregulation is strongly linked to disease onset and progression constituting a relevant and innovative class of biomarker. Herein we report a highly selective and sensitive nanophotonic biosensor based on the direct monitoring of the aberrant alternative splicing of Fas gene. Unlike conventional methods, the nanobiosensor performs a real-time detection of the specific isoforms in the fM-pM range without any cDNA synthesis or PCR amplification requirements. The nanobiosensor has been proven isoform-specific with no crosshybridization, greatly minimizing detection biases. The demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity make our nanobiosensor ideal for examining significant tumor-associated expression shifts of alternatively spliced isoforms for the early and accurate theranostics of cancer. PMID:28120920

  10. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  11. Self-induced back-action optical trapping in nanophotonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeier, Lukas; Quidant, Romain; Chang, Darrick E.

    2015-12-01

    Optical trapping is an indispensable tool in physics and the life sciences. However, there is a clear trade off between the size of a particle to be trapped, its spatial confinement, and the intensities required. This is due to the decrease in optical response of smaller particles and the diffraction limit that governs the spatial variation of optical fields. It is thus highly desirable to find techniques that surpass these bounds. Recently, a number of experiments using nanophotonic cavities have observed a qualitatively different trapping mechanism described as ‘self-induced back-action trapping’ (SIBA). In these systems, the particle motion couples to the resonance frequency of the cavity, which results in a strong interplay between the intra-cavity field intensity and the forces exerted. Here, we provide a theoretical description that for the first time captures the remarkable range of consequences. In particular, we show that SIBA can be exploited to yield dynamic reshaping of trap potentials, strongly sub-wavelength trap features, and significant reduction of intensities seen by the particle, which should have important implications for future trapping technologies.

  12. Nanophotonic detection of freely interacting molecules on a single influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Pilgyu; Schein, Perry; Serey, Xavier; O’Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular interactions, such as antibody-antigen binding, are fundamental to many biological processes. At present, most techniques for analyzing these interactions require immobilizing one or both of the interacting molecules on an assay plate or a sensor surface. This is convenient experimentally but can constrain the natural binding affinity and capacity of the molecules, resulting in data that can deviate from the natural free-solution behavior. Here we demonstrate a label-free method for analyzing free-solution interactions between a single influenza virus and specific antibodies at the single particle level using near-field optical trapping and light-scattering techniques. We determine the number of specific antibodies binding to an optically trapped influenza virus by analyzing the change of the Brownian fluctuations of the virus. We develop an analytical model that determines the increased size of the virus resulting from antibodies binding to the virus membrane with uncertainty of ±1–2 nm. We present stoichiometric results of 26 ± 4 (6.8 ± 1.1 attogram) anti-influenza antibodies binding to an H1N1 influenza virus. Our technique can be applied to a wide range of molecular interactions because the nanophotonic tweezer can handle molecules from tens to thousands of nanometers in diameter. PMID:26160194

  13. Nanophotonic lab-on-a-chip platforms including novel bimodal interferometers, microfluidics and grating couplers.

    PubMed

    Duval, Daphné; González-Guerrero, Ana Belén; Dante, Stefania; Osmond, Johann; Monge, Rosa; Fernández, Luis J; Zinoviev, Kirill E; Domínguez, Carlos; Lechuga, Laura M

    2012-05-08

    One of the main limitations for achieving truly lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices for point-of-care diagnosis is the incorporation of the "on-chip" detection. Indeed, most of the state-of-the-art LOC devices usually require complex read-out instrumentation, losing the main advantages of portability and simplicity. In this context, we present our last advances towards the achievement of a portable and label-free LOC platform with highly sensitive "on-chip" detection by using nanophotonic biosensors. Bimodal waveguide interferometers fabricated by standard silicon processes have been integrated with sub-micronic grating couplers for efficient light in-coupling, showing a phase resolution of 6.6 × 10(-4)× 2π rad and a limit of detection of 3.3 × 10(-7) refractive index unit (RIU) in bulk. A 3D network of SU-8 polymer microfluidics monolithically assembled at the wafer-level was included, ensuring perfect sealing and compact packaging. To overcome some of the drawbacks inherent to interferometric read-outs, a novel all-optical wavelength modulation system has been implemented, providing a linear response and a direct read-out of the phase variation. Sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility of the wavelength modulated BiMW sensor has been demonstrated through the label-free immunodetection of the human hormone hTSH at picomolar level using a reliable biofunctionalization process.

  14. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    DOE PAGES

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; ...

    2016-04-15

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing themore » free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrodinger equation model. Finally, these results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.« less

  15. Nanophotonic detection of freely interacting molecules on a single influenza virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Pilgyu; Schein, Perry; Serey, Xavier; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-07-01

    Biomolecular interactions, such as antibody-antigen binding, are fundamental to many biological processes. At present, most techniques for analyzing these interactions require immobilizing one or both of the interacting molecules on an assay plate or a sensor surface. This is convenient experimentally but can constrain the natural binding affinity and capacity of the molecules, resulting in data that can deviate from the natural free-solution behavior. Here we demonstrate a label-free method for analyzing free-solution interactions between a single influenza virus and specific antibodies at the single particle level using near-field optical trapping and light-scattering techniques. We determine the number of specific antibodies binding to an optically trapped influenza virus by analyzing the change of the Brownian fluctuations of the virus. We develop an analytical model that determines the increased size of the virus resulting from antibodies binding to the virus membrane with uncertainty of ±1-2 nm. We present stoichiometric results of 26 ± 4 (6.8 ± 1.1 attogram) anti-influenza antibodies binding to an H1N1 influenza virus. Our technique can be applied to a wide range of molecular interactions because the nanophotonic tweezer can handle molecules from tens to thousands of nanometers in diameter.

  16. Biocompatibility and cytotoxicity study of nanophotonic rigid gas permeable contact lens material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, M.; Munćan, J.; Stamenković, D.; Jokanović, M.; Matija, L.

    2013-04-01

    Since materials on nanoscale have different characteristics from materials on macro scale their biocompatibility should be precisely and specifically investigated. Fullerenes, the third carbon allotrope, are one of the most used nanomaterials. The least stable and the most common is fullerene C60. One of the main disadvantages of fullerene is its low solubility in water. In order to make it soluble, it must be functionalized with polar groups such as -OH and -COOH. From all the water soluble fullerenes the most important ones are those with -OH groups attached named fullerols. We have developed new materials for contact lenses by adding fullerene (C60) and fullerol (C60(OH)24) into PMMA. The aim of our investigation was to compare the influences of those materials on aqueous solutions similar to tear film. For the analysis of the solutions we used opto-magnetic imaging and IR spectroscopy. The acquired spectrums were commented and compared with the standard contact lens material, which was analyzed by the same methods. The ISO 10993 cytotoxicity test on extract of nanophotonic material with incorporated C60 was done as well. This research contributes to better understanding of the biocompatibility of new rigid gas permeable contact lens materials.

  17. Nanophotonic approaches for nanoscale imaging and single-molecule detection at ultrahigh concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mivelle, Mathieu; Van Zanten, Thomas S; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2014-07-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed an outburst of many different optical techniques aimed at breaking the diffraction limit of light, providing super-resolution imaging on intact fixed cells. In parallel, single-molecule detection by means of fluorescence has become a common tool to investigate biological interactions at the molecular level both in vitro and in living cells. Despite these advances, visualization of dynamic events at relevant physiological concentrations at the nanometer scale remains challenging. In this review, we focus on recent advancements in the field of nanophotonics toward nanoimaging and single-molecule detection at ultrahigh sample concentrations. These approaches rely on the use of metal nanostructures known as optical antennas to localize and manipulate optical fields at the nanometer scale. We highlight examples on how different optical antenna geometries are being implemented for nanoscale imaging of cell membrane components. We also discuss different implementations of self-standing and two-dimensional antenna arrays for studying nanoscale dynamics in living cell membranes as well as detection of individual biomolecular interactions in the µM range for sensing applications.

  18. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  19. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-04-15

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrodinger equation model. Finally, these results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.

  20. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.