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Sample records for nanoscale kirkendall effect

  1. Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-11

    We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

  2. Reversed nanoscale Kirkendall effect in Au–InAs hybrid nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Amit, Yorai; Li, Yuanyuan; Plonka, Anna M.; Ghose, Sanjit; Zhang, Lihua; Stach, Eric A.; Banin, Uri; Frenkel, Anatoly I.

    2016-10-10

    Metal–semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) offer interesting synergistic properties, leading to unique behaviors that have already been exploited in photocatalysis, electrical, and optoelectronic applications. A fundamental aspect in the synthesis of metal–semiconductor hybrid NPs is the possible diffusion of the metal species through the semiconductor lattice. The importance of understanding and controlling the co-diffusion of different constituents is demonstrated in the synthesis of various hollow-structured NPs via the Kirkendall effect. Here, we used a postsynthesis room-temperature reaction between AuCl3 and InAs nanocrystals (NCs) to form metal–semiconductor core–shell hybrid NPs through the “reversed Kirkendall effect”. In the presented system, the diffusion rate of the inward diffusing species (Au) is faster than that of the outward diffusing species (InAs), which results in the formation of a crystalline metallic Au core surrounded by an amorphous, oxidized InAs shell containing nanoscale voids. We used time-resolved X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy to monitor the diffusion process and found that both the size of the Au core and the extent of the disorder of the InAs shell depend strongly on the Au-to-NC ratio. We have determined, based on multielement fit analysis, that Au diffuses into the NC via the kick-out mechanism, substituting for In host atoms; this compromises the structural stability of the lattice and triggers the formation of In–O bonds. These bonds were used as markers to follow the diffusion process and indicate the extent of degradation of the NC lattice. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to measure the changes in the crystal structures of InAs and the nanoscale Au phases. By combining the results of XAFS, XRD, and electron microscopy, we correlated the changes in the local structure around Au, As, and In atoms and the changes in the overall InAs crystal structure. This

  3. Reversed Nanoscale Kirkendall Effect in Au–InAs Hybrid Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Amit, Yorai; Li, Yuanyuan; Plonka, Anna M.; Ghose, Sanjit; Zhang, Lihua; Stach, Eric A.; Banin, Uri; Frenkel, Anatoly I.

    2016-11-08

    Metal–semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) offer interesting synergistic properties, leading to unique behaviors that have already been exploited in photocatalysis, electrical, and optoelectronic applications. A fundamental aspect in the synthesis of metal–semiconductor hybrid NPs is the possible diffusion of the metal species through the semiconductor lattice. The importance of understanding and controlling the co-diffusion of different constituents is demonstrated in the synthesis of various hollow-structured NPs via the Kirkendall effect. Here, we used a postsynthesis room-temperature reaction between AuCl3 and InAs nanocrystals (NCs) to form metal–semiconductor core–shell hybrid NPs through the “reversed Kirkendall effect”. In the presented system, the diffusion rate of the inward diffusing species (Au) is faster than that of the outward diffusing species (InAs), which results in the formation of a crystalline metallic Au core surrounded by an amorphous, oxidized InAs shell containing nanoscale voids. We used time-resolved X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy to monitor the diffusion process and found that both the size of the Au core and the extent of the disorder of the InAs shell depend strongly on the Au-to-NC ratio. We have determined, based on multielement fit analysis, that Au diffuses into the NC via the kick-out mechanism, substituting for In host atoms; this compromises the structural stability of the lattice and triggers the formation of In–O bonds. These bonds were used as markers to follow the diffusion process and indicate the extent of degradation of the NC lattice. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to measure the changes in the crystal structures of InAs and the nanoscale Au phases. By combining the results of XAFS, XRD, and electron microscopy, we correlated the changes in the local structure around Au, As, and In atoms and the changes in the overall InAs crystal structure. This

  4. Reversed nanoscale Kirkendall effect in Au–InAs hybrid nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Jing; Amit, Yorai; Li, Yuanyuan; ...

    2016-10-10

    Metal–semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) offer interesting synergistic properties, leading to unique behaviors that have already been exploited in photocatalysis, electrical, and optoelectronic applications. A fundamental aspect in the synthesis of metal–semiconductor hybrid NPs is the possible diffusion of the metal species through the semiconductor lattice. The importance of understanding and controlling the co-diffusion of different constituents is demonstrated in the synthesis of various hollow-structured NPs via the Kirkendall effect. Here, we used a postsynthesis room-temperature reaction between AuCl3 and InAs nanocrystals (NCs) to form metal–semiconductor core–shell hybrid NPs through the “reversed Kirkendall effect”. In the presented system, the diffusion ratemore » of the inward diffusing species (Au) is faster than that of the outward diffusing species (InAs), which results in the formation of a crystalline metallic Au core surrounded by an amorphous, oxidized InAs shell containing nanoscale voids. We used time-resolved X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy to monitor the diffusion process and found that both the size of the Au core and the extent of the disorder of the InAs shell depend strongly on the Au-to-NC ratio. We have determined, based on multielement fit analysis, that Au diffuses into the NC via the kick-out mechanism, substituting for In host atoms; this compromises the structural stability of the lattice and triggers the formation of In–O bonds. These bonds were used as markers to follow the diffusion process and indicate the extent of degradation of the NC lattice. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to measure the changes in the crystal structures of InAs and the nanoscale Au phases. By combining the results of XAFS, XRD, and electron microscopy, we correlated the changes in the local structure around Au, As, and In atoms and the changes in the overall InAs crystal structure. This correlative

  5. Reversed nanoscale Kirkendall effect in Au–InAs hybrid nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Amit, Yorai; Li, Yuanyuan; Plonka, Anna M.; Ghose, Sanjit; Zhang, Lihua; Stach, Eric A.; Banin, Uri; Frenkel, Anatoly I.

    2016-10-10

    Metal–semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) offer interesting synergistic properties, leading to unique behaviors that have already been exploited in photocatalysis, electrical, and optoelectronic applications. A fundamental aspect in the synthesis of metal–semiconductor hybrid NPs is the possible diffusion of the metal species through the semiconductor lattice. The importance of understanding and controlling the co-diffusion of different constituents is demonstrated in the synthesis of various hollow-structured NPs via the Kirkendall effect. Here, we used a postsynthesis room-temperature reaction between AuCl3 and InAs nanocrystals (NCs) to form metal–semiconductor core–shell hybrid NPs through the “reversed Kirkendall effect”. In the presented system, the diffusion rate of the inward diffusing species (Au) is faster than that of the outward diffusing species (InAs), which results in the formation of a crystalline metallic Au core surrounded by an amorphous, oxidized InAs shell containing nanoscale voids. We used time-resolved X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy to monitor the diffusion process and found that both the size of the Au core and the extent of the disorder of the InAs shell depend strongly on the Au-to-NC ratio. We have determined, based on multielement fit analysis, that Au diffuses into the NC via the kick-out mechanism, substituting for In host atoms; this compromises the structural stability of the lattice and triggers the formation of In–O bonds. These bonds were used as markers to follow the diffusion process and indicate the extent of degradation of the NC lattice. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to measure the changes in the crystal structures of InAs and the nanoscale Au phases. By combining the results of XAFS, XRD, and electron microscopy, we correlated the changes in the local structure around Au, As, and In atoms and the changes in the overall InAs crystal structure. This

  6. Sodium-ion storage properties of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide composite powders prepared by a spray drying process and the nanoscale Kirkendall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. D.; Cho, J. S.; Kang, Y. C.

    2015-10-01

    Spray-drying and the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process are used to prepare nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders with excellent Na-ion storage properties. Metallic Ni nanopowder-decorated rGO powders, formed as intermediate products, are transformed into composite powders of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO with mixed crystal structures of Ni3S2 and Ni9S8 phases by the sulfidation process under H2S gas. Nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders with the main crystal structure of Ni3S2 are also prepared as comparison samples by the direct sulfidation of nickel acetate-graphene oxide (GO) composite powders obtained by spray-drying. In electrochemical properties, the discharge capacities at the 150th cycle of the nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders prepared by sulfidation of the Ni/rGO composite and nickel acetate/GO composite powders at a current density of 0.3 A g-1 are 449 and 363 mA h g-1, respectively; their capacity retentions, calculated from the tenth cycle, are 100 and 87%. The nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO composite powders possess structural stability over repeated Na-ion insertion and extraction processes, and also show excellent rate performance for Na-ion storage.Spray-drying and the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process are used to prepare nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders with excellent Na-ion storage properties. Metallic Ni nanopowder-decorated rGO powders, formed as intermediate products, are transformed into composite powders of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO with mixed crystal structures of Ni3S2 and Ni9S8 phases by the sulfidation process under H2S gas. Nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders with the main crystal structure of Ni3S2 are also prepared as comparison samples by the direct sulfidation of nickel acetate-graphene oxide (GO) composite powders obtained by spray-drying. In electrochemical properties, the discharge capacities at the

  7. Kirkendall Effect and Lattice Contraction in Nanocatalysts: A New Strategy to Enhance Sustainable Activity

    SciTech Connect

    J Wang; C Ma; Y Choi; D Su; Y Zhu; P Liu; R Si; M vukmirovic; Y Zhang; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    Core-shell nanoparticles increasingly are found to be effective in enhancing catalytic performance through the favorable influence of the core materials on the active components at the surface. Yet, sustaining high activities under operating conditions often has proven challenging. Here we explain how differences in the components diffusivity affect the formation and stability of the core-shell and hollow nanostructures, which we ascribe to the Kirkendall effect. Using Ni nanoparticles as the templates, we fabricated compact and smooth Pt hollow nanocrystals that exhibit a sustained enhancement in Pt mass activity for oxygen reduction in acid fuel cells. This is achieved by the hollow-induced lattice contraction, high surface area per mass, and oxidation-resistant surface morphology - a new route for enhancing both the catalysts activity and durability. The results indicate challenges and opportunities brought by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect for designing, at the atomic level, nanostructures with a wide range of novel properties.

  8. The Kirkendall effect and nanoscience: hollow nanospheres and nanotubes.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Nakamura, Ryusuke; Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Hollow nanostructures are ranked among the top materials for applications in various modern technological areas including energy storage devices, catalyst, optics and sensors. The last years have witnessed increasing interest in the Kirkendall effect as a versatile route to fabricate hollow nanostructures with different shapes, compositions and functionalities. Although the conversion chemistry of nanostructures from solid to hollow has reached a very advanced maturity, there is still much to be discovered and learned on this effect. Here, the recent progress on the use of the Kirkendall effect to synthesize hollow nanospheres and nanotubes is reviewed with a special emphasis on the fundamental mechanisms occurring during such a conversion process. The discussion includes the oxidation of metal nanostructures (i.e., nanospheres and nanowires), which is an important process involving the Kirkendall effect. For nanospheres, the symmetrical and the asymmetrical mechanisms are both reviewed and compared on the basis of recent reports in the literature. For nanotubes, in addition to a summary of the conversion processes, the unusual effects observed in some particular cases (e.g., formation of segmented or bamboo-like nanotubes) are summarized and discussed. Finally, we conclude with a summary, where the prospective future direction of this research field is discussed.

  9. Revealing bismuth oxide hollow nanoparticle formation by the Kirkendall effect.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of bismuth oxide hollow nanoparticles by the Kirkendall effect using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rich dynamics of bismuth diffusion through the bismuth oxide shell have been captured in situ. The diffusion coefficient of bismuth through bismuth oxide shell is 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk. Observation reveals that defects, temperature, sizes of the particles, and so forth can affect the diffusion of reactive species and modify the kinetics of the hollowing process.

  10. Wire-in-tube structure fabricated by single capillary electrospinning via nanoscale Kirkendall effect: the case of nickel-zinc ferrite.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiecai; Zhang, Junli; Peng, Yong; Zhao, Changhui; He, Yongmin; Zhang, Zhenxing; Pan, Xiaojun; Mellors, Nigel J; Xie, Erqing

    2013-12-21

    Wire-in-tube structures have previously been prepared using an electrospinning method by means of tuning hydrolysis/alcoholysis of a precursor solution. Nickel-zinc ferrite (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4) nanowire-in-nanotubes have been prepared as a demonstration. The detailed nanoscale characterization, formation process and magnetic properties of Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanowire-in-nanotubes has been studied comprehensively. The average diameters of the outer tubes and inner wires of Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanowire-in-nanotubes are around 120 nm and 42 nm, respectively. Each fully calcined individual nanowire-in-nanotube, either the outer-tube or the inner-wire, is composed of Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 monocrystallites stacked along the longitudinal direction with random orientation. The process of calcining electrospun polymer composite nanofibres can be viewed as a morphologically template nucleation and precursor diffusion process. This allows the nitrates precursor to diffuse toward the surface of the nanofibres while the oxides (decomposed from hydroxides and nitrates) products diffuse to the core region of the nanofibres; the amorphous nanofibres transforming thereby into crystalline nanowire-in-nanotubes. In addition, the magnetic properties of the Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanowire-in-nanotubes were also examined. It is believed that this nanowire-in-nanotube (sometimes called core-shell) structure, with its uniform size and well-controlled orientation of the long nanowire-in-nanotubes, is particularly attractive for use in the field of nano-fluidic devices and nano-energy harvesting devices.

  11. Synthesis of Hierarchical Nanoporous Microstructures via the Kirkendall Effect in Chemical Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ling; Pang, Chao; He, Dafang; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2015-11-01

    A series of novel hierarchical nanoporous microstructures have been synthesized through one-step chemical reduction of micron size Cu2O and Co3O4 particles. By controlling the reduction time, non-porous Cu2O microcubes sequentially transform to nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites and hollow eightling-like Cu microparticles. The mechanism involved in the complex structural evolution is explained based on oxygen diffusion and Kirkendall effect. The nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites exhibit superior electrochemical performance as compared to solid Cu2O microcubes. The reduction of nonporous Co3O4 also exhibits a uniform sequential reduction process from nonporous Co3O4 to porous Co3O4/CoO composites, porous CoO, porous CoO/Co composites, and porous foam-like Co particles. Nanoscale channels originate from the particle surface and eventually develop inside the entire product, resulting in porous foam-like Co microparticles. The Kirkendall effect is believed to facilitate the formation of porous structures in both processes.

  12. Synthesis of Hierarchical Nanoporous Microstructures via the Kirkendall Effect in Chemical Reduction Process

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Pang, Chao; He, Dafang; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel hierarchical nanoporous microstructures have been synthesized through one-step chemical reduction of micron size Cu2O and Co3O4 particles. By controlling the reduction time, non-porous Cu2O microcubes sequentially transform to nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites and hollow eightling-like Cu microparticles. The mechanism involved in the complex structural evolution is explained based on oxygen diffusion and Kirkendall effect. The nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites exhibit superior electrochemical performance as compared to solid Cu2O microcubes. The reduction of nonporous Co3O4 also exhibits a uniform sequential reduction process from nonporous Co3O4 to porous Co3O4/CoO composites, porous CoO, porous CoO/Co composites, and porous foam-like Co particles. Nanoscale channels originate from the particle surface and eventually develop inside the entire product, resulting in porous foam-like Co microparticles. The Kirkendall effect is believed to facilitate the formation of porous structures in both processes. PMID:26552845

  13. Transforming Gas-Phase-Alloyed, Ni-Based Wires into Microtubes via the Kirkendall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz y Puente, Ashley Elizabeth

    Metallic structures containing open porosity have low density and high surface area, which are characteristics of interest for a variety of applications from batteries to biomedical implants. In particular, the fabrication of hollow nano- and micro-objects has recently garnered significant attention. Because traditional methods for forming hollow structures, such as tubes, shells, and cages, typically require template removal from the outside in, these geometries are not easily achieved at such small scales. However, by taking advantage of the radial symmetry and spatial confinement of nano- and micro-objects, these hollow structures can be formed using an inside-out approach. The Kirkendall effect, a consequence of the imbalance of diffusivities among atomic species, can result in a supersaturation of vacancies in the material, which often condense to form so-called Kirkendall pores. Typically these Kirkendall pores are considered detrimental because they deteriorate the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of materials, but this thesis focuses on the use of the Kirkendall effect as a novel route for the fabrication of beta-NiAl(Cr) and shape memory NiTi microtubes. Both conventional ex situ metallography techniques and in situ X-ray tomography were used to study the phase and Kirkendall pore formation and evolution in these systems. The extension of this Kirkendall-based technique to other material systems and to 2D structures and 3D scaffolds is also discussed for potential future research.

  14. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates created by combining the Kirkendall effect and Ostwald ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Won, Jong Min; Lee, Jong-Heun; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-11-01

    The Kirkendall effect and Ostwald ripening were successfully combined to prepare uniquely structured NiO aggregates. In particular, a NiO-C composite powder was first prepared using a one-pot spray pyrolysis, which was followed by a two-step post-treatment process. This resulted in the formation of micron-sized spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates through a synergetic effect that occurred between nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion and Ostwald ripening. The discharge capacity of the spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates at the 500th cycle was 1118 mA h g-1 and their capacity retention, which was measured from the second cycle, was nearly 100%. However, the discharge capacities of the solid NiO aggregates and hollow NiO shells were 631 and 150 mA h g-1, respectively, at the 500th cycle and their capacity retentions, which were measured from the second cycle, were 63 and 14%, respectively. As such, the spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates, which were formed through the synergetic effect of nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion and Ostwald ripening, have high structural stability during cycling and have excellent lithium storage properties.The Kirkendall effect and Ostwald ripening were successfully combined to prepare uniquely structured NiO aggregates. In particular, a NiO-C composite powder was first prepared using a one-pot spray pyrolysis, which was followed by a two-step post-treatment process. This resulted in the formation of micron-sized spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates through a synergetic effect that occurred between nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion and Ostwald ripening. The discharge capacity of the spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates at the 500th cycle was 1118 mA h g-1 and their capacity retention, which was measured from the second cycle, was nearly 100%. However, the discharge capacities of the solid NiO aggregates and hollow NiO shells were 631 and 150 mA h g-1, respectively, at the 500th cycle and their

  15. Core-decomposition-facilitated fabrication of hollow rare-earth silicate nanowalnuts from core-shell structures via the Kirkendall effect.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenli; Zou, Rui; Yang, Xianfeng; Huang, Ningyu; Huang, Junjian; Liang, Hongbin; Wang, Jing

    2015-08-28

    Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2SiO5 interlayer by facilitating the initial nucleation of the Kirkendall nanovoids and accelerating the interfacial diffusion of Y2O3@SiO2 core@shell. The simple concept developed herein can be employed as a general Kirkendall effect strategy without the assistance of any catalytically active Pt nanocrystals or gold motion for future fabrication of novel hollow nanostructures. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of rare-earth ion doped hollow Y2SiO5 nanoparticles are researched.

  16. Morphology and magnetic properties of CoFe2O4 nanocables fabricated by electrospinning based on the Kirkendall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengmei; Yang, Guijin; Wei, Jinxin; Bian, Haiqin; Gao, Jiming; Li, Jinyun; Wang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    CoFe2O4 nanocables have been successfully fabricated by electrospinning involving the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. The average diameters of the outer tubes and inner wires of CoFe2O4 nanocables are around 200 nm and 85 nm, respectively. The detailed formation process nanoscale morphology, structure and unique magnetic properties of CoFe2O4 nanocables have been studied comprehensively. Each fully calcined individual nanocable is composed of CoFe2O4 monocrystallites, which stacked along the longitudinal direction with random orientation. The coercivity (Hc) of the CoFe2O4 nanocables decreases from 11043 Oe at 10 K to 707 Oe at 300 K, and a spin reorientation has been detected at 5 K and 100 K, which is different from CoFe2O4 nanorods and nanoparticles.

  17. Synthesis of hollow cobalt oxide nanopowders by a salt-assisted spray pyrolysis process applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion and their electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyeon Seok; Cho, Jung Sang; Kim, Jong Hwa; Choi, Yun Ju; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-12-21

    A new concept for preparing hollow metal oxide nanopowders by salt-assisted spray pyrolysis applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion is introduced. The composite powders of metal oxide and indecomposable metal salt are prepared by spray pyrolysis. Post-treatment under a reducing atmosphere and subsequent washing using distilled water produce aggregation-free metal nanopowders. The metal nanopowders are then transformed into metal oxide hollow nanopowders by nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. Co3O4 hollow nanopowders are prepared as first target materials. A cobalt oxide-NaCl composite powder prepared by spray pyrolysis transforms into several Co3O4 hollow nanopowders by several treatment processes. The discharge capacities of the Co3O4 nanopowders with filled and hollow structures at a current density of 1 A g(-1) for the 150th cycle are 605 and 775 mA h g(-1), respectively. The hollow structure formed by nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion improves the lithium-ion storage properties of Co3O4 nanopowders.

  18. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates created by combining the Kirkendall effect and Ostwald ripening.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sang; Won, Jong Min; Lee, Jong-Heun; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-12-14

    The Kirkendall effect and Ostwald ripening were successfully combined to prepare uniquely structured NiO aggregates. In particular, a NiO-C composite powder was first prepared using a one-pot spray pyrolysis, which was followed by a two-step post-treatment process. This resulted in the formation of micron-sized spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates through a synergetic effect that occurred between nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion and Ostwald ripening. The discharge capacity of the spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates at the 500(th) cycle was 1118 mA h g(-1) and their capacity retention, which was measured from the second cycle, was nearly 100%. However, the discharge capacities of the solid NiO aggregates and hollow NiO shells were 631 and 150 mA h g(-1), respectively, at the 500(th) cycle and their capacity retentions, which were measured from the second cycle, were 63 and 14%, respectively. As such, the spherical and hollow-structured NiO aggregates, which were formed through the synergetic effect of nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion and Ostwald ripening, have high structural stability during cycling and have excellent lithium storage properties.

  19. Core-decomposition-facilitated fabrication of hollow rare-earth silicate nanowalnuts from core-shell structures via the Kirkendall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenli; Zou, Rui; Yang, Xianfeng; Huang, Ningyu; Huang, Junjian; Liang, Hongbin; Wang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2SiO5 interlayer by facilitating the initial nucleation of the Kirkendall nanovoids and accelerating the interfacial diffusion of Y2O3@SiO2 core@shell. The simple concept developed herein can be employed as a general Kirkendall effect strategy without the assistance of any catalytically active Pt nanocrystals or gold motion for future fabrication of novel hollow nanostructures. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of rare-earth ion doped hollow Y2SiO5 nanoparticles are researched.Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2Si

  20. Ordered CaSi2 Microwall Arrays on Si Substrates Induced by the Kirkendall Effect.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiang; Ueki, Akiko; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu; Itahara, Hiroshi

    2017-03-02

    We have specified the synthetic conditions to obtain one-directionally ordered CaSi2 microwall arrays vertically grown on a Si substrate. Our basic concept is based on the utilization of the Kirkendall effect for reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE). We found for the first time that: 1) a much larger Ca vapor supply on the Si substrate than the conventional RDE, 2) the adoption of a two-step heating process, and 3) the selection of the crystal axis of the Si surface are the keys to control the microstructures of CaSi2 on the Si substrate. The CaSi phase was first formed on Si, then the CaSi2 phase was formed at the CaSi/Si interface. Based on the Kirkendall effect, the interdiffusion of Ca and Si was enhanced in the vertical direction rather than in the parallel direction to the Si surface. CaSi2 tends to grow along four equivalent Si{111} planes, however, the specific orientation of the Si surface resulted in CaSi2 microwalls grown along its Si(111‾ ) plane, the only plane directing nearly vertical to the surface among the Si{111} planes. These results suggest that the Kirkendall effect under asymmetric growth of target materials would be a rational strategy to obtain their ordered microstructures. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Applying Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion for Template-Free, Kilogram-Scale Production of SnO2 Hollow Nanospheres via Spray Drying System

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung Sang; Ju, Hyeon Seok; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    A commercially applicable and simple process for the preparation of aggregation-free metal oxide hollow nanospheres is developed by applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to a large-scale spray drying process. The precursor powders prepared by spray drying are transformed into homogeneous metal oxide hollow nanospheres through a simple post-treatment process. Aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres are selected as the first target material for lithium ion storage applications. Amorphous carbon microspheres with uniformly dispersed Sn metal nanopowder are prepared in the first step of the post-treatment process under a reducing atmosphere. The post-treatment of the Sn-C composite powder at 500 °C under an air atmosphere produces carbon- and aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres through nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. The hollow and filled SnO2 nanopowders exhibit different cycling performances, with their discharge capacities after 300 cycles being 643 and 280 mA h g−1, respectively, at a current density of 2 A g−1. The SnO2 hollow nanospheres with high structural stability exhibit superior cycling and rate performances for lithium ion storage compared to the filled ones. PMID:27033088

  2. Applying Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion for Template-Free, Kilogram-Scale Production of SnO2 Hollow Nanospheres via Spray Drying System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Ju, Hyeon Seok; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-04-01

    A commercially applicable and simple process for the preparation of aggregation-free metal oxide hollow nanospheres is developed by applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to a large-scale spray drying process. The precursor powders prepared by spray drying are transformed into homogeneous metal oxide hollow nanospheres through a simple post-treatment process. Aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres are selected as the first target material for lithium ion storage applications. Amorphous carbon microspheres with uniformly dispersed Sn metal nanopowder are prepared in the first step of the post-treatment process under a reducing atmosphere. The post-treatment of the Sn-C composite powder at 500 °C under an air atmosphere produces carbon- and aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres through nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. The hollow and filled SnO2 nanopowders exhibit different cycling performances, with their discharge capacities after 300 cycles being 643 and 280 mA h g‑1, respectively, at a current density of 2 A g‑1. The SnO2 hollow nanospheres with high structural stability exhibit superior cycling and rate performances for lithium ion storage compared to the filled ones.

  3. Effects of Ag on the Kirkendall void formation of Sn-xAg/Cu solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Yu, Jin

    2010-10-01

    Binary Sn-Ag solders with varying amounts of Ag (0.5, 2.0, and 3.5 wt %) were reacted with Cu under bump metallurgy (UBM) which was electroplated with bis-sodium sulfopropyl-disulfide additive, and the characteristics of Kirkendall void formation at the solder joints were investigated. The results indicate that the propensity to form Kirkendall voids at the solder joint decreased with the Ag content. Subsequent Auger electron spectroscopy analyses showed that Ag dissolved in the Cu UBM reduced the segregation of S to the Cu3Sn/Cu interface, which suppressed the nucleation of Kirkendall voids at the interface.

  4. Preparation of Hollow Fe2O3 Nanorods and Nanospheres by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion, and Their Electrochemical Properties for Use in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung Sang; Park, Jin-Sung; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process for the preparation of aggregate-free metal oxide nanopowders with spherical (0D) and non-spherical (1D) hollow nanostructures was introduced. Carbon nanofibers embedded with iron selenide (FeSe) nanopowders with various nanostructures are prepared via the selenization of electrospun nanofibers. Ostwald ripening occurs during the selenization process, resulting in the formation of a FeSe-C composite nanofiber exhibiting a hierarchical structure. These nanofibers transform into aggregate-free hollow Fe2O3 powders via the complete oxidation of FeSe and combustion of carbon. Indeed, the zero- (0D) and one-dimensional (1D) FeSe nanocrystals transform into the hollow-structured Fe2O3 nanopowders via a nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process, thus conserving their overall morphology. The discharge capacities for the 1000th cycle of the hollow-structured Fe2O3 nanopowders obtained from the FeSe-C composite nanofibers prepared at selenization temperatures of 500, 800, and 1000 °C at a current density of 1 A g−1 are 932, 767, and 544 mA h g−1, respectively; and their capacity retentions from the second cycle are 88, 92, and 78%, respectively. The high structural stabilities of these hollow Fe2O3 nanopowders during repeated lithium insertion/desertion processes result in superior lithium-ion storage performances. PMID:27958368

  5. Preparation of Hollow Fe2O3 Nanorods and Nanospheres by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion, and Their Electrochemical Properties for Use in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sang; Park, Jin-Sung; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-12-13

    A novel process for the preparation of aggregate-free metal oxide nanopowders with spherical (0D) and non-spherical (1D) hollow nanostructures was introduced. Carbon nanofibers embedded with iron selenide (FeSe) nanopowders with various nanostructures are prepared via the selenization of electrospun nanofibers. Ostwald ripening occurs during the selenization process, resulting in the formation of a FeSe-C composite nanofiber exhibiting a hierarchical structure. These nanofibers transform into aggregate-free hollow Fe2O3 powders via the complete oxidation of FeSe and combustion of carbon. Indeed, the zero- (0D) and one-dimensional (1D) FeSe nanocrystals transform into the hollow-structured Fe2O3 nanopowders via a nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process, thus conserving their overall morphology. The discharge capacities for the 1000(th) cycle of the hollow-structured Fe2O3 nanopowders obtained from the FeSe-C composite nanofibers prepared at selenization temperatures of 500, 800, and 1000 °C at a current density of 1 A g(-1) are 932, 767, and 544 mA h g(-1), respectively; and their capacity retentions from the second cycle are 88, 92, and 78%, respectively. The high structural stabilities of these hollow Fe2O3 nanopowders during repeated lithium insertion/desertion processes result in superior lithium-ion storage performances.

  6. Preparation of Hollow Fe2O3 Nanorods and Nanospheres by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion, and Their Electrochemical Properties for Use in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Park, Jin-Sung; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-12-01

    A novel process for the preparation of aggregate-free metal oxide nanopowders with spherical (0D) and non-spherical (1D) hollow nanostructures was introduced. Carbon nanofibers embedded with iron selenide (FeSe) nanopowders with various nanostructures are prepared via the selenization of electrospun nanofibers. Ostwald ripening occurs during the selenization process, resulting in the formation of a FeSe-C composite nanofiber exhibiting a hierarchical structure. These nanofibers transform into aggregate-free hollow Fe2O3 powders via the complete oxidation of FeSe and combustion of carbon. Indeed, the zero- (0D) and one-dimensional (1D) FeSe nanocrystals transform into the hollow-structured Fe2O3 nanopowders via a nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process, thus conserving their overall morphology. The discharge capacities for the 1000th cycle of the hollow-structured Fe2O3 nanopowders obtained from the FeSe-C composite nanofibers prepared at selenization temperatures of 500, 800, and 1000 °C at a current density of 1 A g-1 are 932, 767, and 544 mA h g-1, respectively; and their capacity retentions from the second cycle are 88, 92, and 78%, respectively. The high structural stabilities of these hollow Fe2O3 nanopowders during repeated lithium insertion/desertion processes result in superior lithium-ion storage performances.

  7. Phase field crystal study on the grain boundary porosity induced by the Kirkendall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guang-Ming; Lu, Yan-Li; Hu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Grain boundary (GB) porosity strongly degrades the bonding quality of interfaces and affects the physical and mechanical properties of solid polycrystalline materials. In this paper, the formation and evolution mechanisms of porosity at the grain boundary were investigated using the binary phase field crystal simulation method. Simulated results indicate that the Kirkendall effect existing in the interdiffusion of substitutional binary alloys can result in GB porosity. For the low-angle grain boundary interdiffusion system, the porosity initially forms at the isolated dislocation core, evolving from circle to irregular polygon. For the large-angle GB interdiffusion system, the porosity initially forms at the dislocation core close to the diffusion plane, and then evolves toward the dislocation cores away from the diffusion plane. The porosities finally connect as a continuous slit that splits up the GB. The results also show that the diffusion of fast diffusers along the GB is obviously enhanced with the mobility ratio of species A and B increasing. Our simulation results agree well with theoretical and experimental results.

  8. Na-ion Storage Performances of FeSex and Fe2O3 Hollow Nanoparticles-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls prepared by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion Process

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    Uniquely structured FeSex-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders, in which hollow FeSex nanoparticles are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO matrix, were prepared by spray pyrolysis applying the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. Iron oxide-rGO composite powders were transformed into FeSex-rGO composite powders by a two-step post-treatment process. Metallic Fe nanocrystals formed during the first-step post-treatment process were transformed into hollow FeSex nanoparticles during the selenization process. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had mixed crystal structures of FeSe and FeSe2 phases. A rGO content of 33% was estimated from the TG analysis of the FeSex-rGO composite powders. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had superior sodium-ion storage properties compared to those of the Fe2O3-rGO composite powders with similar morphological characteristics. The discharge capacities of the FeSex- and Fe2O3-rGO composite powders for the 200th cycle at a constant current density of 0.3 A g−1 were 434 and 174 mA h g−1, respectively. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had a high discharge capacity of 311 mA h g−1 for the 1000th cycle at a high current density of 1 A g−1. PMID:26928312

  9. Evolution of hollow TiO2 nanostructures via the Kirkendall effect driven by cation exchange with enhanced photoelectrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanhao; Yin, Xin; Kvit, Alexander; Wang, Xudong

    2014-05-14

    Hollow nanostructures are promising building blocks for electrode scaffolds and catalyst carriers in energy-related systems. In this paper, we report a discovery of hollow TiO2 nanostructure evolution in a vapor-solid deposition system. By introducing TiCl4 vapor pulses to ZnO nanowire templates, we obtained TiO2 tubular nanostructures with well-preserved dimensions and morphology. This process involved the cation exchange reaction between TiCl4 vapor and ZnO solid and the diffusion of reactants and products in their vapor or solid phases, which was likely a manifestation of the Kirkendall effect. The characteristic morphologies and the evolution phenomena of the hollow nanostructures from this vapor-solid system were in a good agreement with the Kirkendall effect discovered in solution systems. Complex hollow TiO2 nanostructures were successfully acquired by replicating various ZnO nanomorphologies, suggesting that this unique cation exchange process could also be a versatile tool for nanostructure replication in vapor-solid growth systems. The evolution of TiO2 nanotubes from ZnO NW scaffolds was seamlessly integrated with TiO2 NR branch growth and thus realized a pure TiO2-phased 3D NW architecture. Because of the significantly enlarged surface area and the trace amount of Zn left in the TiO2 crystals, such 3D TiO2 nanoforests demonstrated enhanced photoelectrochemical performance particularly under AM (air mass) 1.5G illumination, offering a new route for hierarchical functional nanomaterial assembly and application.

  10. Kirkendall-effect-based growth of dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures for lithium-ion battery anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yingying; Huang Xintang; Wang Kai; Liu Jinping; Jiang Jian; Ding Ruimin; Ji Xiaoxu; Li Xin

    2010-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures have been prepared via a Kirkendall-effect-based approach for the first time and have been demonstrated as a high-performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The as-prepared hollow structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical properties. A CuO hollow structure composed of nanocubes outside and a dense film inside was selected as a typical example of the optimized design; it exhibited significantly improved cyclability at a current rate of 0.5 C, with the average Coulombic efficiency of {approx}97.0% and 57.9% retention of the discharge capacity of the second cycle after 50 cycles. The correlation between the structure features of the hollow CuO and their electrochemical behavior was discussed in detail. Smaller size of primary structure and larger internal space of electrode materials are crucial to better electrochemical performance. This work represents that Kirkendall effect is a promising method to fabricate excellent hollow electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: SEM images of 3D dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures prepared via a Kirkendall-effect-based approach have been shown. The as-prepared CuO electrode exhibited significantly improved cyclability for Li-ion batteries.

  11. Solvothermal synthesis of TiO2 hollow nanospheres utilizing the Kirkendall effect and their photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sifeng; Wang, Huiqun; Zhu, Lianjie; Li, Jianfa; Sun, Jingfeng

    2014-12-01

    Anatase TiO2 hollow nanospheres were prepared by solvothermal method, using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as an auxiliary agent, followed by calcination at 400, 500 and 700 °C, respectively. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, thermal gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. The optical properties and photocatalytic reaction mechanism were investigated by means of UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra, radical-trapping experiments and fluorescent technique. The effect of the PEI quantity on morphologies of the products and the formation mechanism of the TiO2 nanospheres were explored on the basis of series of control experiments. The photocatalytic activities of the samples were evaluated by degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) solutions and compared with that of the commercial TiO2 (P25). The results clearly show that the TiO2 hollow nanospheres were formed via the Kirkendall effect. For the first time, we find that the morphologies of the products change dramatically with slightly increasing the PEI quantity. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 nanospheres calcined at 500 °C is higher than those of the other two samples and P25. The active species for the photocatalytic reactions is not ·OH.

  12. In situ hydrothermal crystallization of hexagonal hydroxyapatite tubes from yttrium ion-doped hydroxyapatite by the Kirkendall effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfeng; Ge, Xiaolu; Li, Guochang; Lu, Hao; Ding, Rui

    2014-12-01

    An in situ hydrothermal crystallization method with presence of glutamic acid, urea and yttrium ions was employed to fabricate hexagonal hydroxyapatite (HAp, Ca5(PO4)3(OH)) tubes with length of 200 nm-1 μm. Firstly, yttrium ion-doped HAp (Y-HAp, Ca(5-x)Y(x)(PO4)3(OH)) was synthesized after hydrolysis of urea and HPO4(2-) ions at 100°C with a dwell time of 24h. The shift of X-ray diffraction peaks of HAp to high angle was caused the substitution of Ca(2+) ions by small-sized Y(3+) ions. At 160°C, further hydrolysis reactions of urea and HPO4(2-) ions resulted in the generation of ample OH(-) and PO4(3-) ions, which provided a high chemical potential for the dissolution of Y-HAp and recrystallization of HAp and YPO4. Finally, HAp tubes were formed in situ on Y-HAp according to the Kirkendall effect as a result of the difference of diffusion rate of cations (Ca(2+) ions, outward and slow) and anions (OH(-) and PO4(3-) ions, inward and fast). The formation process of HAp tube was simulated by the encapsulation of fluorescein molecules in precipitates. Photoluminescence properties were enhanced for HAp tubes with thick and dense walls. This novel tubular material could find wide applications as carriers of drugs, dyes and catalysts.

  13. Fabrication based on the Kirkendall effect of Co3O4 porous nanocages with extraordinarily high capacity for lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lin; Yan, Nan; Chen, Qianwang; Zhang, Ping; Zhong, Hao; Zheng, Xinrui; Li, Yan; Hu, Xianyi

    2012-07-16

    Herein we report a novel facile strategy for the fabrication of Co(3)O(4) porous nanocages based on the Kirkendall effect, which involves the thermal decomposition of Prussian blue analogue (PBA) Co(3)[Co(CN)(6)](2) truncated nanocubes at 400 °C. Owing to the volume loss and release of internally generated CO(2) and N(x) O(y) in the process of interdiffusion, Co(3)O(4) nanocages with porous shells and containing nanoparticles were finally obtained. When evaluated as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the as-prepared Co(3)O(4) porous nanocages displayed superior battery performance. Most importantly, capacities of up to 1465 mA h g(-1) are attained after 50 cycles at a current density of 300 mA g(-1). Moreover, this simple synthetic strategy is potentially competitive for scaling-up industrial production. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Formation of nanotubes and hollow nanoparticles based on Kirkendall and diffusion processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hong Jin; Gösele, Ulrich; Zacharias, Margit

    2007-10-01

    The Kirkendall effect is a consequence of the different diffusivities of atoms in a diffusion couple causing a supersaturation of lattice vacancies. This supersaturation may lead to a condensation of extra vacancies in the form of so-called "Kirkendall voids" close to the interface. On the macroscopic and micrometer scale these Kirkendall voids are generally considered as a nuisance because they deteriorate the properties of the interface. In contrast, in the nanoworld the Kirkendall effect has been positively used as a new fabrication route to designed hollow nano-objects. In this Review we summarize and discuss the demonstrated examples of hollow nanoparticles and nanotubes induced by the Kirkendall effect. Merits of this route are compared with other general methods for nanotube fabrication. Theories of the kinetics and thermodynamics are also reviewed and evaluated in terms of their relevance to experiments. Moreover, nanotube fabrication by solid-state reactions and non-Kirkendall type diffusion processes are covered.

  15. Na-ion Storage Performances of FeSe(x) and Fe2O3 Hollow Nanoparticles-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls prepared by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion Process.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-02-29

    Uniquely structured FeSe(x)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders, in which hollow FeSe(x) nanoparticles are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO matrix, were prepared by spray pyrolysis applying the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. Iron oxide-rGO composite powders were transformed into FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders by a two-step post-treatment process. Metallic Fe nanocrystals formed during the first-step post-treatment process were transformed into hollow FeSe(x) nanoparticles during the selenization process. The FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders had mixed crystal structures of FeSe and FeSe2 phases. A rGO content of 33% was estimated from the TG analysis of the FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders. The FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders had superior sodium-ion storage properties compared to those of the Fe2O3-rGO composite powders with similar morphological characteristics. The discharge capacities of the FeSe(x)- and Fe2O3-rGO composite powders for the 200(th) cycle at a constant current density of 0.3 A g(-1) were 434 and 174 mA h g(-1), respectively. The FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders had a high discharge capacity of 311 mA h g(-1) for the 1000(th) cycle at a high current density of 1 A g(-1).

  16. Controlled synthesis of hollow Cu₂-x Te nanocrystals based on the Kirkendall effect and their enhanced CO gas-sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guanjun; Zeng, Yi; Jiang, Yueyue; Ning, Jiajia; Zheng, Weitao; Liu, Bingbing; Chen, Xiaodong; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2013-03-11

    This paper develops a facile solution-based method to synthesize hollow Cu2-x Te nanocrystals (NCs) with tunable interior volume based on the Kirkendall effect. Transmission electron microscopy images and time-dependent absorption spectra reveal the temporal growth process from solid copper nanoparticles to hollow Cu2-x Te NCs. Furthermore, the as-prepared hollow Cu2-x Te NCs show enhanced sensitivity for the detection of carbon monoxide (CO), which is often referred to as the "silent killer". The response and recovery time of the as-prepared sensor for the detection of 100 ppm CO gas are estimated to be about 21 and 100 s, respectively, which are sufficient to render it a promising candidate for effective CO gas-sensing applications. Such enhanced performance is achieved owing to the small grain size and large specific area of the hollow nanostructures. Therefore, the obtained hollow NCs based on the Kirkendall effect may have the potential as new functional blocks for high-performance gas sensors. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Formation of Aluminum Particles with Shell Morphology during Pressureless Spark Plasma Sintering of Fe–Al Mixtures: Current-Related or Kirkendall Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Dudina, Dina V.; Bokhonov, Boris B.; Mukherjee, Amiya K.

    2016-01-01

    A need to deeper understand the influence of electric current on the structure and properties of metallic materials consolidated by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) stimulates research on inter-particle interactions, bonding and necking processes in low-pressure or pressureless conditions as favoring technique-specific local effects when electric current passes through the underdeveloped inter-particle contacts. Until now, inter-particle interactions during pressureless SPS have been studied mainly for particles of the same material. In this work, we focused on the interactions between particles of dissimilar materials in mixtures of micrometer-sized Fe and Al powders forming porous compacts during pressureless SPS at 500–650 °C. Due to the chemical interaction between Al and Fe, necks of conventional shape did not form between the dissimilar particles. At the early interaction stages, the Al particles acquired shell morphology. It was shown that this morphology change was not related to the influence of electric current but was due to the Kirkendall effect in the Fe–Al system and particle rearrangement in a porous compact. No experimental evidence of melting or melt ejection during pressureless SPS of the Fe–Al mixtures or Fe and Al powders sintered separately was observed. Porous FeAl-based compacts could be obtained from Fe-40at.%Al mixtures by pressureless SPS at 650 °C. PMID:28773498

  18. Synthesis of Capsule-like Porous Hollow Nanonickel Cobalt Sulfides via Cation Exchange Based on the Kirkendall Effect for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongfu; Chen, Shunji; Mu, Shichun; Chen, Teng; Qiao, Yuqing; Yu, Shengxue; Gao, Faming

    2016-04-20

    To construct a suitable three-dimensional structure for ionic transport on the surface of the active materials for a supercapacitor, porous hollow nickel cobalt sulfides are successfully synthesized via a facile and efficient cation-exchange reaction in a hydrothermal process involving the Kirkendall effect with γ-MnS nanorods as a sacrificial template. The formation mechanism of the hollow nickel cobalt sulfides is carefully illustrated via the tuning reaction time and reaction temperature during the cation-exchange process. Due to the ingenious porous hollow structure that offers a high surface area for electrochemical reaction and suitable paths for ionic transport, porous hollow nickel cobalt sulfide electrodes exhibit high electrochemical performance. The Ni(1.77)Co(1.23)S4 electrode delivers a high specific capacity of 224.5 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 0.25 A g(-1) and a high capacity retention of 87.0% at 10 A g(-1). An all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor, assembled with a Ni(1.77)Co(1.23)S4 electrode as the positive electrode and a homemade activated carbon electrode as the negative electrode (denoted as NCS//HMC), exhibits a high energy density of 42.7 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 190.8 W kg(-1) and even 29.4 Wh kg(-1) at 3.6 kW kg(-1). The fully charged as-prepared asymmetric supercapacitor can light up a light emitting diode (LED) indicator for more than 1 h, indicating promising practical applications of the hollow nickel cobalt sulfides and the NCS//HMC asymmetric supercapacitor.

  19. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions.

  20. Real-time plasmon spectroscopy study of the solid-state oxidation and Kirkendall void formation in copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Susman, Mariano D; Feldman, Yishai; Bendikov, Tatyana A; Vaskevich, Alexander; Rubinstein, Israel

    2017-08-31

    Oxidation and corrosion reactions have a major effect on the application of non-noble metals. Kinetic information and simple theoretical models are often insufficient for describing such processes in metals at the nanoscale, particularly in cases involving formation of internal voids (nano Kirkendall effect, NKE) during oxidation. Here we study the kinetics of solid-state oxidation of chemically-grown copper nanoparticles (NPs) by in situ localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy during isothermal annealing in the range 110-170 °C. We show that LSPR spectroscopy is highly effective in kinetic studies of such systems, enabling convenient in situ real-time measurements during oxidation. Change of the LSPR spectra throughout the oxidation follows a common pattern, observed for different temperatures, NP sizes and substrates. The well-defined initial Cu NP surface plasmon (SP) band red-shifts continuously with oxidation, while the extinction intensity initially increases to reach a maximum value at a characteristic oxidation time τ, after which the SP intensity continuously drops. The characteristic time τ is used as a scaling parameter for the kinetic analysis. Evolution of the SP wavelength and extinction intensity during oxidation at different temperatures follows the same kinetics when the oxidation time is normalized to τ, thus pointing to a general oxidation mechanism. The characteristic time τ is used to estimate the activation energy of the process, determined to be 144 ± 6 kJ mol(-1), similar to previously reported values for high-temperature Cu thermal oxidation. The central role of the NKE in the solid-state oxidation process is revealed by electron microscopy, while formation of Cu2O as the major oxidation product is established by X-ray diffraction, XPS, and electrochemical measurements. The results indicate a transition of the oxidation mechanism from a Valensi-Carter (VC) to NKE mechanism with the degree of oxidation. To interpret the

  1. Electromigration revisited: competition between Kirkendall shift and backstress in pure metals and two-phase alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusak, A.; Wierzba, B.; Danielewski, M.

    2015-04-01

    The simple phenomenological model and analytical approach of electromigration in the two-phase alloy (solder) under combined influence of the Kirkendall effect, backstress and sedimentation is presented. It is compared with electromigration in pure metal under condition of quasi-equilibrium vacancies (unlimited power of vacancy sinks-sources) and electromigration in pure metal with account of nonequilibrium vacancies.

  2. Structure sensitivity and nanoscale effects in electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Koper, Marc T M

    2011-05-01

    This review discusses the role of the detailed nanoscale structure of catalytic surfaces on the activity of various electrocatalytic reactions of importance for fuel cells, hydrogen production, and other environmentally important catalytic reactions, such as carbon monoxide oxidation, methanol and ethanol oxidation, ammonia oxidation, nitric oxide reduction, hydrogen evolution, and oxygen reduction. Specifically, results and insights obtained from surface-science single-crystal-based model experiments are linked to experiments on well-defined shape-controlled nanoparticles. A classification of structure sensitive effects in electrocatalysis is suggested, based both on empirical grounds and on quantum-chemical viz. thermochemical considerations. The mutual relation between the two classification schemes is also discussed. The review underscores the relevance of single-crystal modeling of nanoscale effects in catalysis, and points to the special role of two kinds of active sites for electrocatalysis on nanoparticulate surfaces: (i) steps and defects in (111) terraces or facets, and (ii) long-range (100) terraces or facets. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  3. Electromigration induced Kirkendall void growth in Sn-3.5Ag/Cu solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yong; Yu, Jin

    2014-02-28

    Effects of electric current flow on the Kirkendall void formation at solder joints were investigated using Sn-3.5Ag/Cu joints specially designed to have localized nucleation of Kirkendall voids at the Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu interface. Under the current density of 1 × 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2}, kinetics of Kirkendall void growth and intermetallic compound thickening were affected by the electromigration (EM), and both showed the polarity effect. Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} showed a strong susceptibility to the polarity effect, while Cu{sub 3}Sn did not. The electromigration force induced additional tensile (or compressive) stress at the cathode (or anode), which accelerated (or decelerated) the void growth. From the measurements of the fraction of void at the Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu interface on SEM micrographs and analysis of the kinetics of void growth, the magnitude of the local stress induced by EM was estimated to be 9 MPa at the anode and −7 MPa at the cathode.

  4. Size Effects in Nanoscale Structural Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElhinny, Kyle Matthew

    The creation of nanostructures offers the opportunity to modify and tune properties in ways inaccessible in bulk materials. A key component in this development is the introduction of size effects which reduce the physical size, dimensionality, and increase the contribution of surface effects. The size effects strongly modify the structural dynamics in nanoscale systems and leads to changes in the vibrational, electrical, and optical properties. An increased level of understanding and control of nanoscale structural dynamics will enable more precise control over nanomaterial transport properties. My work has shown that 1D spatial confinement through the creation of semiconducting nanomembranes modifies the phonon population and dispersion. X ray thermal diffuse scattering distributions show an excess in intensity for nanomembranes less than 100 nm in thickness, for phonon modes with wavevectors spanning the entire Brillouin zone. This excess intensity indicates the development of new low energy phonon modes or the softening of elastic constants. Furthermore, an additional anisotropy in the phonon dispersion is observed with a symmetry matching the direction of spatial confinement. This work has also extended x ray thermal diffuse scattering for use in studying nanomaterials. In electro- and photoactive monolayers a structural reconfiguration can be produced by external optical stimuli. I have developed an electro and photoactive molecular monolayers on oxide surfaces. Using x ray reflectivity, I have evaluated the organization and reconfiguration of molecular monolayers deposited by Langmuir Blodgett technique. I have designed and probed the reconfiguration of optically reconfigurable monolayers of azobenzene donor molecules on semiconducting surfaces. These monolayers reconfigure through a cooperative switching process leading to the development of large isomeric domains. This work represents an advancement in the interpretation of x ray reflectivity from molecular

  5. Surface Effects on Nanoscale Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskok, Ali; Barisik, Murat

    2010-11-01

    3D MD simulations of linear Couette flow of argon gas confined within nano-scale channels are performed in the slip, transition and free molecular flow regimes. The velocity and density profiles show deviations from the kinetic theory based predictions in the near wall region that typically extends three molecular diameters (s) from each surface. Utilizing the Irwin-Kirkwood theorem, stress tensor components for argon gas confined in nano-channels are investigated. Outside the 3s region, three normal stress components are identical, and equal to pressure predicted using the ideal gas law, while the shear stress is a constant. Within the 3s region, the normal stresses become anisotropic and the shear stress shows deviations from its bulk value due to the surface virial effects. Utilizing the kinetic theory and MD predicted shear stress values, the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient for argon gas interacting with FCC structured walls (100) plane facing the fluid is calculated to be 0.75; this value is independent of the Knudsen number. Results show emergence of the 3s region as an additional characteristic length scale in nano-confined gas flows.

  6. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing.

  7. Microstructural study on Kirkendall void formation in Sn-containing/Cu solder joints during solid-state aging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Quan; Shang, Pan-Ju; Tan, Feifei; Li, Douxing

    2013-08-01

    Kirkendall void formation at the solder/metallization interface is an important reliability concern for Cu conductors and under-bump metallization in microelectronic packaging industry, whose mechanism is still hard to be understood for different individual cases. In the present work, two typical solder/Cu-diffusing couples, eutectic SnIn/Cu and SnBi/Cu, were studied by scanning/transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructural evolution and voiding process after soldering and then solid-state aging. It was concluded that Kirkendall voids formed between two sublayers within Cu2(In,Sn) phase in eutectic SnIn/Cu solder joint, whereas they appeared at the Cu3Sn/Cu interface or within Cu3Sn for eutectic SnBi/Cu solder joint. Besides the effect of impurity elements, the morphological difference within one intermetallic compound layer could change the diffusing rates of reactive species, hence resulting in void formation in the reaction zone.

  8. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; ...

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  9. Nanoscale elastic modulus mapping revisited: The concept of effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnikov, I.; Fratzl, P.; Zolotoyabko, E.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce the effective mass of the nanoindenter tip/sample assembly into the nanoscale dynamic modulus mapping technique that allows us to extract the correct storage modulus from the measured contact stiffness. We show that the developed approach successfully works for both stiff ceramics, such as fused quartz, and much compliant polymer materials, such as polycarbonate (PC) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA).

  10. Effectiveness of the Young-Laplace equation at nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hailong; Cao, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a new approach based on the behavior of pressurized water out of a nanopore (1.3–2.7 nm) in a flat plate is developed to calculate the relationship between the water surface curvature and the pressure difference across water surface. It is found that the water surface curvature is inversely proportional to the pressure difference across surface at nanoscale, and this relationship will be effective for different pore size, temperature, and even for electrolyte solutions. Based on the present results, we cannot only effectively determine the surface tension of water and the effects of temperature or electrolyte ions on the surface tension, but also show that the Young-Laplace (Y-L) equation is valid at nanoscale. In addition, the contact angle of water with the hydrophilic material can be further calculated by the relationship between the critical instable pressure of water surface (burst pressure) and nanopore size. Combining with the infiltration behavior of water into hydrophobic microchannels, the contact angle of water at nanoscale can be more accurately determined by measuring the critical pressure causing the instability of water surface, based on which the uncertainty of measuring the contact angle of water at nanoscale is highly reduced. PMID:27033874

  11. Nanoscale pinning effect evaluated from deformed nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshima, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Classical thermodynamics theory predicts that nanosized bubbles should disappear in a few hundred microseconds. The surprisingly long lifetime and stability of nanobubbles are therefore interesting research subjects. It has been proposed that the stability of nanobubbles arises through pinning of the three-phase contact line, which results from intrinsic nanoscale geometrical and chemical heterogeneities of the substrate. However, a definitive explanation of nanobubble stability is still lacking. In this work, we examined the stability mechanism by introducing a "pinning force." We investigated nanobubbles at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/pure water interface by peak force quantitative nano-mechanical mapping and estimated the pinning force and determined its maximum value. We then observed the shape of shrinking nanobubbles. Because the diameter of the shrinking nanobubbles was pinned, the height decreased and the contact angle increased. This phenomenon implies that the stability results from the pinning force, which flattens the bubble through the pinned three-phase contact line and prevents the Laplace pressure from increasing. The pinning force can also explain the metastability of coalesced nanobubbles, which have two semispherical parts that are joined to form a dumbbell-like shape. The pinning force of the semispherical parts was stronger than that of the joint region. This result demonstrates that the contact line of the semispherical parts is pinned strongly to keep the dumbbell-like shape. Furthermore, we proposed a nanobubble generation mechanism for the solvent-exchange method and explained why the pinning force of large nanobubbles was not initially at its maximum value, as it was for small nanobubbles.

  12. Nanoscale pinning effect evaluated from deformed nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Koji

    2017-01-07

    Classical thermodynamics theory predicts that nanosized bubbles should disappear in a few hundred microseconds. The surprisingly long lifetime and stability of nanobubbles are therefore interesting research subjects. It has been proposed that the stability of nanobubbles arises through pinning of the three-phase contact line, which results from intrinsic nanoscale geometrical and chemical heterogeneities of the substrate. However, a definitive explanation of nanobubble stability is still lacking. In this work, we examined the stability mechanism by introducing a "pinning force." We investigated nanobubbles at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/pure water interface by peak force quantitative nano-mechanical mapping and estimated the pinning force and determined its maximum value. We then observed the shape of shrinking nanobubbles. Because the diameter of the shrinking nanobubbles was pinned, the height decreased and the contact angle increased. This phenomenon implies that the stability results from the pinning force, which flattens the bubble through the pinned three-phase contact line and prevents the Laplace pressure from increasing. The pinning force can also explain the metastability of coalesced nanobubbles, which have two semispherical parts that are joined to form a dumbbell-like shape. The pinning force of the semispherical parts was stronger than that of the joint region. This result demonstrates that the contact line of the semispherical parts is pinned strongly to keep the dumbbell-like shape. Furthermore, we proposed a nanobubble generation mechanism for the solvent-exchange method and explained why the pinning force of large nanobubbles was not initially at its maximum value, as it was for small nanobubbles.

  13. Magnetic superlattices and their nanoscale phase transition effects.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Jinwoo; Park, Jong-Il; Choi, Jin-sil; Jun, Young-wook; Kim, Sehun; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Youn Joong

    2006-02-28

    The systematic assembly of nanoscale constituents into highly ordered superlattices is of significant interest because of the potential of their multifunctionalities and the discovery of new collective properties. However, successful observations of such superlattice-associated nanoscale phenomena are still elusive. Here, we present magnetic superlattices of Co and Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles with multidimensional symmetry of either AB (NaCl) or AB(2) (AlB(2)). The discovery of significant enhancement (approximately 25 times) of ferrimagnetism is further revealed by forming previously undescribed superlattices of magnetically soft-hard Fe(3)O(4)@CoFe(2)O(4) through the confined geometrical effect of thermally driven intrasuperlattice phase transition between the nanoparticulate components.

  14. Magnetic superlattices and their nanoscale phase transition effects

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jinwoo; Park, Jong-Il; Choi, Jin-sil; Jun, Young-wook; Kim, Sehun; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Youn Joong

    2006-01-01

    The systematic assembly of nanoscale constituents into highly ordered superlattices is of significant interest because of the potential of their multifunctionalities and the discovery of new collective properties. However, successful observations of such superlattice-associated nanoscale phenomena are still elusive. Here, we present magnetic superlattices of Co and Fe3O4 nanoparticles with multidimensional symmetry of either AB (NaCl) or AB2 (AlB2). The discovery of significant enhancement (≈25 times) of ferrimagnetism is further revealed by forming previously undescribed superlattices of magnetically soft–hard Fe3O4@CoFe2O4 through the confined geometrical effect of thermally driven intrasuperlattice phase transition between the nanoparticulate components. PMID:16492783

  15. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  16. Quantum Effects in Nanoscale MOSFET Devices at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    MOSFET transistors are a key component of virtually all modern electronic devices. Today's most advanced MOSFETs are small enough that quantum mechanical effects become relevant when considering their function and use. This project, completed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of a Society of Physics Students internship, presents a first step in describing the theoretical behavior of nanoscale MOSFETs at low temperature. I acknowledge generous support from the Society of Physics Students and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  17. Sulfidation of Cadmium at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Smith, Rachel; Yin, Yadong; Zheng, Haimei; Reinhard, Bjorn; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-05-22

    We investigate the evolution of structures that result when spherical Cd nanoparticles of a few hundred nanometers in diameter react with dissolved molecular sulfur species in solution to form hollow CdS. Over a wide range of temperatures and concentrations, we find that rapid Cd diffusion through the growing CdS shell localizes the reaction front at the outermost CdS/S interface, leading to hollow particles when all the Cd is consumed. When we examine partially reacted particles, we find that this system differs significantly from others in which the nanoscale Kirkendall effect has been used to create hollow particles. In previously reported systems, partial reaction creates a hollow particle with a spherically symmetric metal core connected to the outer shell by filaments. In contrast, here we obtain a lower symmetry structure, in which the unreacted metal core and the coalesced vacancies separate into two distinct spherical caps, minimizing the metal/void interface. This pattern of void coalescence is likely to occur in situations where the metal/vacancy self-diffusivities in the core are greater than the diffusivity of the cations through the shell.

  18. Modeling of a nanoscale flexoelectric energy harvester with surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    This work presents the modeling of a beam energy harvester scavenging energy from ambient vibration based on the phenomenon of flexoelectricity. By considering surface elasticity, residual surface stress, surface piezoelectricity and bulk flexoelectricity, a modified Euler-Bernoulli beam model for the energy harvester is developed. After deriving the requisite energy expressions, the extended Hamilton's principle and the assumed-modes method are employed to obtain the discrete electromechanical Euler-Lagrange's equations. Then, the expressions of the steady-state electromechanical responses are given for harmonic base excitation. Numerical simulations are conducted to show the output voltage and the output power of the flexoelectric energy harvesters with different materials and sizes. Particular emphasis is given to the surface effects on the performance of the energy harvesters. It is found that the surface effects are sensitive to the beam geometries and the surface material constants, and the effect of residual surface stress is more significant than that of the surface elasticity and the surface piezoelectricity. The axial deformation of the beam is also considered in the model to account for the electromechanical coupling due to piezoelectricity, and results indicate that piezoelectricity will diminish the output electrical quantities for the case investigated. This work could lead to the development of flexoelectric energy harvesters that can make the micro- and nanoscale sensor systems autonomous.

  19. Defect-Free nanoscale printing using the Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, Mario; Li, Wei; Martinez Esquiroz, Victor; Urbanski, Lukasz; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen; Stein, Aaron; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik

    2014-03-01

    An Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography technique that utilizes a compact EUV laser to print nanoscale features on a photoresist is presented. The lithographic method uses the Talbot effect and is based on the self-imaging produced when a periodic transmission mask is illuminated with a coherent light beam. A periodic mask composed of an array of tiles with an arbitrary design produces self images that are used to replicate the mask in the surface of a photoresist. When illuminated with coherent light, the tiled diffractive mask produces images which are 1 × replicas at certain locations (Talbot planes). The self-images are generated by the diffraction of the thousands of cells in the mask. Thus, any defect in any of the unitary cells is averaged over a very large numbers of tiles consequently rendering a virtually defect-free image. This is a unique characteristic of this photolithographic approach. This work was supported by NSF awards ECCS 0901806, EEC 0310717 and SBIR 1248924 and DOE Contract DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  20. Effects of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloid Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmuson, J. A.; Johnson, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in colloid transport science have demonstrated the importance of surface roughness on colloid attachment; however, few studies have investigated the influence of nano-scale roughness on colloid detachment. This study explores the effects of flow perturbations on a variety of mineral surfaces, as well as NaOH treated (i.e. rough, Figure 1a) and untreated (i.e. smooth, Figure 1b) surfaces for colloids of various sizes attached in an impinging jet system under flowing and stagnant conditions. These experiments showed minimal detachment from the roughened surfaces (treated glass) and significant detachment from the smooth surfaces (untreated glass and mica). A correlation between residence time and attachment irreversibility was also revealed, indicating that the particles that spent the longest time attached to the surface developed the strongest adhesion. The representative surface-heterogeneity model developed by Pazmino et al. (2014) was used to conduct detachment simulations under similar geochemical and flow conditions. While simulated results show qualitative agreement with experimental results, they tend to over-predict detachment, highlighting differences among simulated versus real surfaces, which may be related to surface roughness. These results suggest that more sophisticated models that incorporate surface roughness and time-based adhesion are needed to accurately predict colloid detachment in environmental systems.

  1. Multiresolution molecular mechanics: Surface effects in nanoscale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingcheng; To, Albert C.

    2017-05-01

    Surface effects have been observed to contribute significantly to the mechanical response of nanoscale structures. The newly proposed energy-based coarse-grained atomistic method Multiresolution Molecular Mechanics (MMM) (Yang, To (2015), [57]) is applied to capture surface effect for nanosized structures by designing a surface summation rule SRS within the framework of MMM. Combined with previously proposed bulk summation rule SRB, the MMM summation rule SRMMM is completed. SRS and SRB are consistently formed within SRMMM for general finite element shape functions. Analogous to quadrature rules in finite element method (FEM), the key idea to the good performance of SRMMM lies in that the order or distribution of energy for coarse-grained atomistic model is mathematically derived such that the number, position and weight of quadrature-type (sampling) atoms can be determined. Mathematically, the derived energy distribution of surface area is different from that of bulk region. Physically, the difference is due to the fact that surface atoms lack neighboring bonding. As such, SRS and SRB are employed for surface and bulk domains, respectively. Two- and three-dimensional numerical examples using the respective 4-node bilinear quadrilateral, 8-node quadratic quadrilateral and 8-node hexahedral meshes are employed to verify and validate the proposed approach. It is shown that MMM with SRMMM accurately captures corner, edge and surface effects with less 0.3% degrees of freedom of the original atomistic system, compared against full atomistic simulation. The effectiveness of SRMMM with respect to high order element is also demonstrated by employing the 8-node quadratic quadrilateral to solve a beam bending problem considering surface effect. In addition, the introduced sampling error with SRMMM that is analogous to numerical integration error with quadrature rule in FEM is very small.

  2. Structural Evolution of Solid Pt Nanoparticles to a Hollow PtFe Alloy with a Pt-Skin Surface via Space-Confined Pyrolysis and the Nanoscale Kirkendall Effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingmei; Chen, Siguo; Shi, Feng; Chen, Ke; Nie, Yao; Wang, Yao; Wu, Rui; Li, Jia; Zhang, Yun; Ding, Wei; Li, Yang; Li, Li; Wei, Zidong

    2016-12-01

    A space-confined interfacial conversion approach is developed to directly transform 3 nm solid Pt nanoparticles into a 5 nm hollow PtFe alloy featuring a Pt-skin surface. The approach presented for the structural evolution from solid Pt NPs to hollow PtFe alloy with controlled size, structure, and composition can be applied to other multimetallic electrocatalysts.

  3. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  4. The effect of nanoscale twin boundaries on fracture toughness in nanocrystalline Ni.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haofei; Qu, Shaoxing

    2010-01-22

    Nanoscale twin boundaries (TBs) were recently reported to be capable of enhancing the fracture toughness of nanocrystalline (nc) metals. The present study aims to investigate the toughening effects of nanoscale TBs in nc Ni by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It is shown that the presence of embedded nanoscale TBs facilitates the accommodation of dislocations through partial dislocation motion along TBs, resulting in improved fracture toughness. Moreover, crack propagation is observed to be intragranular in a nanotwinned sample, concurrent with nucleation of nanovoids in the intersections of TBs and grain boundaries (GBs).

  5. Nanoscale effects on thermodynamics and phase equilibria in oxide systems.

    PubMed

    Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-08-22

    Because different solid materials (phases) have different surface energies, equilibria among them will be significantly affected by particle size. This Minireview summarizes experimental (calorimetric) data for the surface energies of oxides and discusses shifts in the stability of polymorphs, the thermodynamics of hydration, and oxidation-reduction reactions in nanoscale oxide systems.

  6. Formation of CeO2 nanotubes from Ce(OH)CO3 nanorods through Kirkendall diffusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guozhu; Sun, Sixiu; Sun, Xun; Fan, Weiliu; You, Ting

    2009-02-16

    In this paper, CeO(2) nanotubes based on the Kirkendall effect (for simplicity, this type of nanotubes is denoted as K-type CeO(2) nanotubes) are fabricated through a solid-liquid interface reaction between Ce(OH)CO(3) nanorods and NaOH solutions. Our studies indicate the formation mechanism of K-type CeO(2) nanotubes is quite different from those of CeO(2) nanotubes subjected to template (T-type CeO(2) nanotubes) and lamellar rolling (L-type CeO(2) nanotubes) reported previously by our group. The K-type CeO(2) nanotubes are prepared by congregating Kirkendall voids and subsequent calcinations. The time evolution processes are imaged by TEM, and the results show that as the reaction processes, interior spaces are formed and enlarged in Ce(OH)CO(3) nanorods to form K-type CeO(2) nanotubes. In contrast, the interior space in T-type CeO(2) nanotubes decreases with reaction time. XRD is applied to study the phase transformation in the formation process of K-type CeO(2) nanotubes. Our study also indicates NaOH and reaction temperature are two key factors responsible for formation of K-type CeO(2) nanotubes. Combined with the T- and L-type nanotubes, three types of CeO(2) nanotubes with different formation mechanisms are successfully synthesized in one reaction system, which might afford some guidance for the synthesis of other inorganic nanotubes.

  7. Recessed source concept in nanoscale vertical surrounding gate (VSG) MOSFETs for controlling short-channel effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, B.; Jagadesh Kumar, M.

    2009-02-01

    In the recent past, vertical surrounding gate (VSG) MOSFETs have gained importance since defining their nanoscale channel length no longer depends on lithographic limitations and since they can lead to high packing densities. However, as the channel lengths decrease below 100 nm, VSG MOSFETs too suffer from short-channel effects due to the coupling between the drain and source side charges. In this paper, we demonstrate that using a recessed source, the short-channel effects in nanoscale VSG MOSFETs can be effectively controlled.

  8. The effect of spin transport on lifetime in nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Heman, Michael; Berger, Andrew; Zhang, Chi; Fong, Kin Chung; Jayaprakash, Ciriyam; Pelekhov, Denis; Hammel, Chris; Department of Physics, P. Chris Hammel Research Team, Prof.

    2014-03-01

    Spin transport electronics utilizes electron spin as a state variable for information processing and storage. This requires manipulation of spin ensembles for data encoding, and spin transport for information transfer. Here we report spatially resolved magnetic resonance studies of electron spin ensembles confined to a quasi 1D `spin nanowire' formed by nitrogen ion implantation in diamond. We obtain the ensemble spin lifetime, that is, spin autocorrelation time, by measuring statistical fluctuations of the net moment (√N <100 net spins), which is in thermal equilibrium and has no imposed polarization gradient. We find the lifetime of the ensemble is dominated by spin transport from the ensemble into an adjacent reservoir, which is in striking contrast to conventional spin-lattice relaxation measurements of isolated spin ensembles. In addition, using a novel spin manipulation protocol, we demonstrate spectroscopic measurements on nanoscale spin ensembles that corroborate spin transport in strong field gradients. Our experiments, supported by microscopic Monte Carlo modelling, provide a unique insight into the intrinsic dynamics of charge-motion-free spin currents needed for nanoscale devices which seek to control spins.

  9. Effect of Machining Velocity in Nanoscale Machining Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Sumaiya; Ibrahim, Raafat; Khondoker, Noman

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the generated forces and deformations of single crystal Cu with (100), (110) and (111) crystallographic orientations at nanoscale machining operation. A nanoindenter equipped with nanoscratching attachment was used for machining operations and in-situ observation of a nano scale groove. As a machining parameter, the machining velocity was varied to measure the normal and cutting forces. At a fixed machining velocity, different levels of normal and cutting forces were generated due to different crystallographic orientations of the specimens. Moreover, after machining operation percentage of elastic recovery was measured and it was found that both the elastic and plastic deformations were responsible for producing a nano scale groove within the range of machining velocities from 250-1000 nm/s.

  10. Nanoscale thermal AFM of polymers: transient heat flow effects.

    PubMed

    Duvigneau, Joost; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G Julius

    2010-11-23

    Thermal transport around the nanoscale contact area between the heated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and the specimen under investigation is a central issue in scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Polarized light microscopy and AFM imaging of the temperature-induced crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films in the region near the tip were used in this study to unveil the lateral heat transport. The radius of the observed lateral surface isotherm at 133 °C ranged from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 18.7 ± 0.5 μm for tip-polymer interface temperatures between 200 and 300 °C with contact times varying from 20 to 120 s, respectively. In addition, the heat transport into polymer films was assessed by measurements of the thermal expansion of poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) films with variable thickness on silicon supports. Our data showed that heat transport in the specimen normal (z) direction occurred to depths exceeding 1000 μm using representative non-steady-state SThM conditions (i.e., heating from 40 to 180 °C at a rate of 10 °C s(-1)). On the basis of the experimental results, a 1D steady-state model for heat transport was developed, which shows the temperature profile close to the tip-polymer contact. The model also indicates that ≤1% of the total power generated in the heater area, which is embedded in the cantilever end, is transported into the polymer through the tip-polymer contact interface. Our results complement recent efforts in the evaluation and improvement of existing theoretical models for thermal AFM, as well as advance further developments of SThM for nanoscale thermal materials characterization and/or manipulation via scanning thermal lithography (SThL).

  11. Development of a Subjective Evaluation Tool for Assessing Marksmanship Training Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-28

    WILLIAMS, H., ROBINSON , E., KIRKENDALL, C. NAMRU-D REPORT NUMBER 13-22 Enclosure (2) Report Documentation Page Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0/88 Pu...ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER H. Williams; E. Robinson ; C. Kirkendall 5e. TASK NUMBER Sf. WORK UNIT NUMBER 70705 7. PERFORMING...Training Effectiveness Henry P. Williams, F. Eric Robinson , and Cristina D. Kirkendall Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton January 2013

  12. Nanoscale effects in dendrimer-mediated targeting of neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Elizabeth; Zhang, Fan; Mishra, Manoj K.; Zhang, Zhi; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.; Kannan, Sujatha

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation, mediated by activated microglia and astrocytes, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. Systemically-administered dendrimers target neuroinflammation and deliver drugs with significant efficacy, without the need for ligands. Elucidating the nanoscale aspects of targeting neuroinflammation will enable superior nanodevices for eventual translation. Using a rabbit model of cerebral palsy, we studied the in vivo contributions of dendrimer physicochemical properties and disease pathophysiology on dendrimer brain uptake, diffusion, and cell specific localization. Neutral dendrimers move efficiently within the brain parenchyma and rapidly localize in glial cells in regions of injury. Dendrimer uptake is also dependent on the extent of blood-brain-barrier breakdown, glial activation, and disease severity (mild, moderate, or severe), which can lend the dendrimer to be used as an imaging biomarker for disease phenotype. This new understanding of the in vivo mechanism of dendrimer-mediated delivery in a clinically-relevant rabbit model provides greater opportunity for clinical translation of targeted brain injury therapies. PMID:27267631

  13. Surface-Gas Interaction Effects on Nanoscale Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat; Beskok, Ali

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of linear Couette flow of argon gas confined within nano-scale channels are investigated as a function of the surface-gas interaction strength ratio (ISR). Simulations are performed in the slip, transition and free molecular flow regimes by keeping the base pressure constant for different ISR cases. Near-wall gas density increases with increased ISR and eventually results in adsorption of argon on the surfaces. Although the velocity profiles agree with the kinetic theory predictions in the bulk of the channel, they show sudden increase in the near wall region, resulting in decreased velocity slip at the interface. High ISR values are shown to induce velocity stick. Increase in the ISR results in stronger surface-particle interactions. Hence, the surface virial becomes more dominant in the near wall region, resulting in increasingly anisotropic normal stresses. Utilizing the kinetic theory and MD predicted shear stress values, the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient for argon gas, interacting with FCC structured walls (100) plane facing the fluid, is shown to increase with increased ISR.

  14. Transient effects of drying creep in nanoporous solids: understanding the effects of nanoscale energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinko, Robert; Vandamme, Matthieu; Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Keten, Sinan

    2016-07-01

    The Pickett effect is the phenomenon of creep enhancement during transient drying. It has been observed for many nanoporous solids, including concrete, wood and Kevlar. While the existing micromechanical models can partially explain this effect, they have yet to consider nanoscale dynamic effects of water in nanopores, which are believed to be of paramount importance. Here, we examine how creep deformations in a slit pore are accelerated by the motion of water due to drying forces using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the drying that drives water flow in the nanopores lowers both the activation energy of pore walls sliding past one another and the apparent viscosity of confined water molecules. This lowering can be captured with an analytical Arrhenius relationship accounting for the role of water flow in overcoming the energy barriers. Notably, we use this model and simulation results to demonstrate that the drying creep strain is not linearly dependent on the applied creep stress at the nanopore level. Our findings establish the scaling relationships that explain how the creep driving force, drying force and fluid properties are related. Thus, we establish the nanoscale origins of the Pickett effect and provide strategies for minimizing the additional displacements arising from this effect.

  15. Transient effects of drying creep in nanoporous solids: understanding the effects of nanoscale energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Sinko, Robert; Vandamme, Matthieu; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Keten, Sinan

    2016-07-01

    The Pickett effect is the phenomenon of creep enhancement during transient drying. It has been observed for many nanoporous solids, including concrete, wood and Kevlar. While the existing micromechanical models can partially explain this effect, they have yet to consider nanoscale dynamic effects of water in nanopores, which are believed to be of paramount importance. Here, we examine how creep deformations in a slit pore are accelerated by the motion of water due to drying forces using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the drying that drives water flow in the nanopores lowers both the activation energy of pore walls sliding past one another and the apparent viscosity of confined water molecules. This lowering can be captured with an analytical Arrhenius relationship accounting for the role of water flow in overcoming the energy barriers. Notably, we use this model and simulation results to demonstrate that the drying creep strain is not linearly dependent on the applied creep stress at the nanopore level. Our findings establish the scaling relationships that explain how the creep driving force, drying force and fluid properties are related. Thus, we establish the nanoscale origins of the Pickett effect and provide strategies for minimizing the additional displacements arising from this effect.

  16. Transient effects of drying creep in nanoporous solids: understanding the effects of nanoscale energy barriers

    PubMed Central

    Sinko, Robert; Vandamme, Matthieu; Keten, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    The Pickett effect is the phenomenon of creep enhancement during transient drying. It has been observed for many nanoporous solids, including concrete, wood and Kevlar. While the existing micromechanical models can partially explain this effect, they have yet to consider nanoscale dynamic effects of water in nanopores, which are believed to be of paramount importance. Here, we examine how creep deformations in a slit pore are accelerated by the motion of water due to drying forces using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the drying that drives water flow in the nanopores lowers both the activation energy of pore walls sliding past one another and the apparent viscosity of confined water molecules. This lowering can be captured with an analytical Arrhenius relationship accounting for the role of water flow in overcoming the energy barriers. Notably, we use this model and simulation results to demonstrate that the drying creep strain is not linearly dependent on the applied creep stress at the nanopore level. Our findings establish the scaling relationships that explain how the creep driving force, drying force and fluid properties are related. Thus, we establish the nanoscale origins of the Pickett effect and provide strategies for minimizing the additional displacements arising from this effect. PMID:27493584

  17. Effect of the Size Distribution of Nanoscale Dispersed Particles on the Zener Drag Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eivani, A. R.; Valipour, S.; Ahmed, H.; Zhou, J.; Duszczyk, J.

    2011-04-01

    In this article, a new relationship for the calculation of the Zener drag pressure is described in which the effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles is taken into account, in addition to particle radius and volume fraction, which have been incorporated in the existing relationships. Microstructural observations indicated a clear correlation between the size distribution of dispersed particles and recrystallized grain sizes in the AA7020 aluminum alloy. However, the existing relationship to calculate the Zener drag pressure yielded a negligible difference of 0.016 pct between the two structures homogenized at different conditions resulting in totally different size distributions of nanoscale dispersed particles and, consequently, recrystallized grain sizes. The difference in the Zener drag pressure calculated by the application of the new relationship was 5.1 pct, being in line with the experimental observations of the recrystallized grain sizes. Mathematical investigations showed that the ratio of the Zener drag pressure from the new equation to that from the existing equation is maximized when the number densities of all the particles with different sizes are equal. This finding indicates that in the two structures with identical parameters except the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles, the one that possesses a broader size distribution of particles, i.e., the number densities of particles with different sizes being equal, gives rise to a larger Zener drag pressure than that having a narrow size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles, i.e., most of the particles being in the same size range.

  18. Effect of cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of fluid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Heiss, Arno; Salditt, Tim; Katsaras, John; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the effect of 5 and 40 mol% cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of phospholipid membranes. By measuring the excitation spectrum at several lateral q || values (up to q || = 3 1), complete dispersion curves were determined of gel, fluid and liquid-ordered phase bilayers. The inclusion of cholesterol had a distinct effect on the collective dynamics of the bilayer s hydrocarbon chains; specifically, we observed a pronounced stiffening of the membranes on the nanometer length scale in both gel and fluid bilayers, even though they were experiencing a higher degree of molecular disorder. Also, for the first time we determined the nanoscale dynamics in the high-cholesterol liquid-ordered phase of bilayers containing cholesterol. Namely, this phase appears to be softer than fluid bilayers, but better ordered than bilayers in the gel phase.

  19. The dilemma of hyperbolic heat conduction and its settlement by incorporating spatially nonlocal effect at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. Jun; Li, Chen-Lin; Xue, Zhang-Na; Tian, Xiao-Geng

    2016-01-01

    To model transiently thermal responses of numerous thermal shock issues at nano-scale, Fourier heat conduction law is commonly extended by introducing time rate of heat flux, and comes to hyperbolic heat conduction (HHC). However, solution to HHC under Dirichlet boundary condition depicts abnormal phenomena, e.g. heat conducts from the cold to the hot, and there are two temperatures at one location. In this paper, HHC model is further perfected with the aids of spatially nonlocal effect, and the exceeding temperature as well as the discontinuity at the wave front are avoided. The effect of nonlocal parameter on temperature response is discussed. From the analysis, the importance of size effect for nano-scale heat conduction is emphasized, indicating that spatial and temporal extensions should be simultaneously made to nano-scale heat conduction. Beyond that, it is found that heat flux boundary conditions should be directly given, instead of Neumann boundary condition, which does not make sense any longer for non-classical heat conductive models. And finally, it is observed that accurate solution to such problems may be obtained using Laplace transform method, especially for the time-dependent boundary conditions, e.g. heat flux boundary condition.

  20. Simulating gas-water relative permeabilities for nanoscale porous media with interfacial effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiulong; Song, Hongqing; Li, Tianxin; Wang, Yuhe; Gao, Xuhua

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a theoretical method to simulate gas-water relative permeability for nanoscale porous media utilizing fractal theory. The comparison between the calculation results and experimental data was performed to validate the present model. The result shows that the gas-water relative permeability would be underestimated significantly without interfacial effects. The thinner the liquid film thickness, the greater the liquid-phase relative permeability. In addition, both liquid surface diffusion and gas diffusion coefficient can promote gas-liquid two-phase flow. Increase of liquid surface diffusion prefer to increase liquid-phase permeability obviously as similar as increase of gas diffusion coefficient to increase gas-phase permeability. Moreover, the pore structure will become complicated with the increase of fractal dimension, which would reduce the gas-water relative permeability. This study has provided new insights for development of gas reservoirs with nanoscale pores such as shale.

  1. Nanoscale flexoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh D; Mao, Sheng; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Purohit, Prashant K; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-02-20

    Electromechanical effects are ubiquitous in biological and materials systems. Understanding the fundamentals of these coupling phenomena is critical to devising next-generation electromechanical transducers. Piezoelectricity has been studied in detail, in both the bulk and at mesoscopic scales. Recently, an increasing amount of attention has been paid to flexoelectricity: electrical polarization induced by a strain gradient. While piezoelectricity requires crystalline structures with no inversion symmetry, flexoelectricity does not carry this requirement, since the effect is caused by inhomogeneous strains. Flexoelectricity explains many interesting electromechanical behaviors in hard crystalline materials and underpins core mechanoelectric transduction phenomena in soft biomaterials. Most excitingly, flexoelectricity is a size-dependent effect which becomes more significant in nanoscale systems. With increasing interest in nanoscale and nano-bio hybrid materials, flexoelectricity will continue to gain prominence. This Review summarizes work in this area. First, methods to amplify or manipulate the flexoelectric effect to enhance material properties will be investigated, particularly at nanometer scales. Next, the nature and history of these effects in soft biomaterials will be explored. Finally, some theoretical interpretations for the effect will be presented. Overall, flexoelectricity represents an exciting phenomenon which is expected to become more considerable as materials continue to shrink.

  2. Effect of nanoscale powders and microwave sintering on densification of alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Han-Sol; Kim, Jong-Chan; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Cho, Nam-Hee

    2016-11-01

    Nanoscale alumina (Al2O3) powders with an average size of 100, 200, or 300 nm were sintered to investigate the effects of the initial powder size on the densification behavior under the application of microwaves (2.45 GHz, 2 kW). The sintering was performed using microwave-assisted sintering (MWS) and conventional sintering (CS) methods in the temperature range of 1100-1600 °C for 0-180 min. The Al2O3 samples prepared with the 100-nm-sized powders using MWS exhibited a relative density (RD) of over 90% when sintered at 1200 °C for 10 min; the same RD was achieved at 1500 °C when the sintering was performed for the same time using CS. However, a sintering temperature difference of 100 °C for a RD of 90% was observed between the MWS and CS methods for the 300-nm-sized powders. Nano-grained ( 290 nm) Al2O3 ceramics with a high density of ≥90% were obtained from nanoscale powders ( 100 nm) using MWS methods. The response of the nanoscale powders to microwaves was more significant as the initial powder size decreased from 300 to 100 nm.

  3. Nonlocal effects in a hybrid plasmonic waveguide for nanoscale confinement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiangsheng; Bao, Fanglin; He, Sailing

    2013-01-28

    The effect of nonlocal optical response is studied for a novel silicon hybrid plasmonic waveguide (HPW). Finite element method is used to implement the hydrodynamic model and the propagation mode is analyzed for a hybrid plasmonic waveguide of arbitrary cross section. The waveguide has an inverted metal nano-rib over a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure. An extremely small mode area of~10⁻⁶λ² is achieved together with several microns long propagation distance at the telecom wavelength of 1.55 μm. The figure of merit (FoM) is also improved in the same time, compared to the pervious hybrid plasmonic waveguide. We demonstrate the validity of our method by comparing our simulating results with some analytical results for a metal cylindrical waveguide and a metal slab waveguide in a wide wavelength range. For the HPW, we find that the nonlocal effects can give less loss and better confinement. In particular, we explore the influence of the radius of the rib's tip on the loss and the confinement. We show that the nonlocal effects give some new fundamental limitation on the confinement, leaving the mode area finite even for geometries with infinitely sharp tips.

  4. Effects of nanoscale density inhomogeneities on shearing fluids.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Benjamin A; Daivis, Peter J; Hansen, J S; Todd, B D

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that density inhomogeneities at the solid-liquid interface can have a strong effect on the velocity profile of a nanoconfined fluid in planar Poiseuille flow. However, it is difficult to control the density inhomogeneities induced by solid walls, making this type of system unsuitable for a comprehensive study of the effect on density inhomogeneity on nanofluidic flow. In this paper, we employ an external force compatible with periodic boundary conditions to induce the density variation, which greatly simplifies the problem when compared to flow in nonperiodic nanoconfined systems. Using the sinusoidal transverse force method to produce shearing velocity profiles and the sinusoidal longitudinal force method to produce inhomogeneous density profiles, we are able to observe the interactions between the two property inhomogeneities at the level of individual Fourier components. This gives us a method for direct measurement of the coupling between the density and velocity fields and allows us to introduce various feedback control mechanisms which customize fluid behavior in individual Fourier components. We briefly discuss the role of temperature inhomogeneity and consider whether local thermal expansion due to nonuniform viscous heating is sufficient to account for shear-induced density inhomogeneities. We also consider the local Newtonian constitutive relation relating the shear stress to the velocity gradient and show that the local model breaks down for sufficiently large density inhomogeneities over atomic length scales.

  5. Nanoscale spin rectifiers controlled by the Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossella, Francesco; Bertoni, Andrea; Ercolani, Daniele; Rontani, Massimo; Sorba, Lucia; Beltram, Fabio; Roddaro, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    The control of orbitals and spin states of single electrons is a key ingredient for quantum information processing and novel detection schemes and is, more generally, of great relevance for spintronics. Coulomb and spin blockade in double quantum dots enable advanced single-spin operations that would be available even for room-temperature applications with sufficiently small devices. To date, however, spin operations in double quantum dots have typically been observed at sub-kelvin temperatures, a key reason being that it is very challenging to scale a double quantum dot system while retaining independent field-effect control of individual dots. Here, we show that the quantum-confined Stark effect allows two dots only 5 nm apart to be independently addressed without the requirement for aligned nanometre-sized local gating. We thus demonstrate a scalable method to fully control a double quantum dot device, regardless of its physical size. In the present implementation we present InAs/InP nanowire double quantum dots that display an experimentally detectable spin blockade up to 10 K. We also report and discuss an unexpected re-entrant spin blockade lifting as a function of the magnetic field intensity.

  6. Effects of nanoscale density inhomogeneities on shearing fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Benjamin A.; Daivis, Peter J.; Hansen, J. S.; Todd, B. D.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that density inhomogeneities at the solid-liquid interface can have a strong effect on the velocity profile of a nanoconfined fluid in planar Poiseuille flow. However, it is difficult to control the density inhomogeneities induced by solid walls, making this type of system unsuitable for a comprehensive study of the effect on density inhomogeneity on nanofluidic flow. In this paper, we employ an external force compatible with periodic boundary conditions to induce the density variation, which greatly simplifies the problem when compared to flow in nonperiodic nanoconfined systems. Using the sinusoidal transverse force method to produce shearing velocity profiles and the sinusoidal longitudinal force method to produce inhomogeneous density profiles, we are able to observe the interactions between the two property inhomogeneities at the level of individual Fourier components. This gives us a method for direct measurement of the coupling between the density and velocity fields and allows us to introduce various feedback control mechanisms which customize fluid behavior in individual Fourier components. We briefly discuss the role of temperature inhomogeneity and consider whether local thermal expansion due to nonuniform viscous heating is sufficient to account for shear-induced density inhomogeneities. We also consider the local Newtonian constitutive relation relating the shear stress to the velocity gradient and show that the local model breaks down for sufficiently large density inhomogeneities over atomic length scales.

  7. Arrangement at the nanoscale: Effect on magnetic particle hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Myrovali, E.; Maniotis, N.; Makridis, A.; Terzopoulou, A.; Ntomprougkidis, V.; Simeonidis, K.; Sakellari, D.; Kalogirou, O.; Samaras, T.; Salikhov, R.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.; Wiedwald, U.; Angelakeris, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present the arrangement of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles into 3D linear chains and its effect on magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. The alignment has been performed under a 40 mT magnetic field in an agarose gel matrix. Two different sizes of magnetite nanoparticles, 10 and 40 nm, have been examined, exhibiting room temperature superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic behavior, in terms of DC magnetic field, respectively. The chain formation is experimentally visualized by scanning electron microscopy images. A molecular Dynamics anisotropic diffusion model that outlines the role of intrinsic particle properties and inter-particle distances on dipolar interactions has been used to simulate the chain formation process. The anisotropic character of the aligned samples is also reflected to ferromagnetic resonance and static magnetometry measurements. Compared to the non-aligned samples, magnetically aligned ones present enhanced heating efficiency increasing specific loss power value by a factor of two. Dipolar interactions are responsible for the chain formation of controllable density and thickness inducing shape anisotropy, which in turn enhances magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. PMID:27897195

  8. Arrangement at the nanoscale: Effect on magnetic particle hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrovali, E.; Maniotis, N.; Makridis, A.; Terzopoulou, A.; Ntomprougkidis, V.; Simeonidis, K.; Sakellari, D.; Kalogirou, O.; Samaras, T.; Salikhov, R.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.; Wiedwald, U.; Angelakeris, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we present the arrangement of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles into 3D linear chains and its effect on magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. The alignment has been performed under a 40 mT magnetic field in an agarose gel matrix. Two different sizes of magnetite nanoparticles, 10 and 40 nm, have been examined, exhibiting room temperature superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic behavior, in terms of DC magnetic field, respectively. The chain formation is experimentally visualized by scanning electron microscopy images. A molecular Dynamics anisotropic diffusion model that outlines the role of intrinsic particle properties and inter-particle distances on dipolar interactions has been used to simulate the chain formation process. The anisotropic character of the aligned samples is also reflected to ferromagnetic resonance and static magnetometry measurements. Compared to the non-aligned samples, magnetically aligned ones present enhanced heating efficiency increasing specific loss power value by a factor of two. Dipolar interactions are responsible for the chain formation of controllable density and thickness inducing shape anisotropy, which in turn enhances magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency.

  9. Arrangement at the nanoscale: Effect on magnetic particle hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Myrovali, E; Maniotis, N; Makridis, A; Terzopoulou, A; Ntomprougkidis, V; Simeonidis, K; Sakellari, D; Kalogirou, O; Samaras, T; Salikhov, R; Spasova, M; Farle, M; Wiedwald, U; Angelakeris, M

    2016-11-29

    In this work, we present the arrangement of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles into 3D linear chains and its effect on magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. The alignment has been performed under a 40 mT magnetic field in an agarose gel matrix. Two different sizes of magnetite nanoparticles, 10 and 40 nm, have been examined, exhibiting room temperature superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic behavior, in terms of DC magnetic field, respectively. The chain formation is experimentally visualized by scanning electron microscopy images. A molecular Dynamics anisotropic diffusion model that outlines the role of intrinsic particle properties and inter-particle distances on dipolar interactions has been used to simulate the chain formation process. The anisotropic character of the aligned samples is also reflected to ferromagnetic resonance and static magnetometry measurements. Compared to the non-aligned samples, magnetically aligned ones present enhanced heating efficiency increasing specific loss power value by a factor of two. Dipolar interactions are responsible for the chain formation of controllable density and thickness inducing shape anisotropy, which in turn enhances magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency.

  10. Study of nonlinear ferromagnetic resonance in a nanoscale magnetic tunnel junction using diode effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Hirofumi; Kudo, Kiwamu; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Kanao, Taro; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2016-09-01

    We use the diode effect caused by magnetization excitation in a microwave magnetic field to analyze the ferromagnetic resonance and magnetization switching in a nanoscale perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction. The cone angle and the lag angle with respect to the applied microwave field of the magnetization precession are accurately estimated by utilizing the homodyne nature of the diode effect. We observe a ferromagnetic resonance peak of the cone angle accompanied by an increase in the lag angle, and a nonlinear shift of the peak position with increasing the microwave field amplitude. We also reveal magnetization switching assisted by ferromagnetic resonance excitation.

  11. Interplay of Peltier and Seebeck Effects in Nanoscale Nonlocal Spin Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, F. L.; Slachter, A.; Adam, J.-P.; van Wees, B. J.

    2010-09-01

    We have experimentally studied the role of thermoelectric effects in nanoscale nonlocal spin valve devices. A finite element thermoelectric model is developed to calculate the generated Seebeck voltages due to Peltier and Joule heating in the devices. By measuring the first, second, and third harmonic voltage response nonlocally, the model is experimentally examined. The results indicate that the combination of Peltier and Seebeck effects contributes significantly to the nonlocal baseline resistance. Moreover, we found that the second and third harmonic response signals can be attributed to Joule heating and temperature dependencies of both the Seebeck coefficient and resistivity.

  12. Interplay of Peltier and Seebeck effects in nanoscale nonlocal spin valves.

    PubMed

    Bakker, F L; Slachter, A; Adam, J-P; van Wees, B J

    2010-09-24

    We have experimentally studied the role of thermoelectric effects in nanoscale nonlocal spin valve devices. A finite element thermoelectric model is developed to calculate the generated Seebeck voltages due to Peltier and Joule heating in the devices. By measuring the first, second, and third harmonic voltage response nonlocally, the model is experimentally examined. The results indicate that the combination of Peltier and Seebeck effects contributes significantly to the nonlocal baseline resistance. Moreover, we found that the second and third harmonic response signals can be attributed to Joule heating and temperature dependencies of both the Seebeck coefficient and resistivity.

  13. Effect of Electron-Phonon Scattering on Shot Noise in Nanoscale Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chang; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the effect of electron-phonon inelastic scattering on shot noise in nanoscale junctions in the regime of quasiballistic transport. We predict that when the local thermal energy of the junction is larger than its lowest vibrational mode energy eVc, the inelastic contribution to shot noise (conductance) increases (decreases) with bias as V (V). The corresponding Fano factor thus increases as V. We also show that the inelastic contribution to the Fano factor saturates with increasing thermal current exchanged between the junction and the bulk electrodes to a value which, for V≫Vc, is independent of bias. These predictions can be readily tested experimentally.

  14. Casimir Force on a Surface with Shallow Nanoscale Corrugations: Geometry and Finite Conductivity Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Guerout, R.; Lussange, J.; Lambrecht, A.; Cirelli, R. A.; Klemens, F.; Mansfield, W. M.; Pai, C. S.; Chan, H. B.

    2010-12-17

    We measure the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a silicon plate with nanoscale, rectangular corrugations with a depth comparable to the separation between the surfaces. In the proximity force approximation (PFA), both the top and bottom surfaces of the corrugations contribute to the force, leading to a distance dependence that is distinct from a flat surface. The measured Casimir force is found to deviate from the PFA by up to 10%, in good agreement with calculations based on scattering theory that includes both geometry effects and the optical properties of the material.

  15. Tremendous spin-splitting effects in open boron nitride nanotubes: application to nanoscale spintronic devices.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shaogang; Zhou, Gang; Duan, Wenhui; Wu, Jian; Gu, Bing-Lin

    2006-07-05

    Our calculations demonstrate that the intrinsic magnetism of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) can be induced by their open ends, and the resulting magnetic moment is sensitive to the chirality of BNNTs. It is found that BNNTs, a pure sp-electron system, present a tremendous spin-splitting larger than 1 eV and that B-rich-ended and N-rich-ended BNNTs exhibit "conjugate", spin-polarized, deep-gap states. Tremendous spin-splitting effects combined with considerable local spin-polarizations at the open ends make BNNTs significant for applications of nanoscale spintronics such as spin-polarized electron emitters.

  16. Giant piezoelectric resistance effect of nanoscale zinc oxide tunnel junctions: first principles simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genghong; Luo, Xin; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Biao

    2012-05-21

    Based on first principles simulations and quantum transport calculations, we have investigated in the present work the effect of the mechanical load on transport characteristics and the relative physical properties of nanoscale zinc oxide (ZnO) tunnel junctions, and verified an intrinsic giant piezoelectric resistance (GPR) effect. Our results show that the transport-relevant properties, e.g., the piezoelectric potential (piezopotential), built-in electric field, conduction band offset and electron transmission probability of the junction etc., can obviously be tuned by the applied strain. Accordingly, it is inspiring to find that the current-voltage characteristics and tunneling electro-resistance of the ZnO tunnel junction can significantly be adjusted with the strain. When the applied strain switches from -5% to 5%, an increase of more than 14 times in the tunneling current at a bias voltage of 1.1 V can be obtained. Meanwhile, an increase of up to 2000% of the electro-resistance ratio with respect to the zero strain state can be reached at the same bias voltage and with a 5% compression. According to our investigations, the giant piezoelectric resistance effect of nanoscale ZnO tunnel junctions exhibits great potential in exploiting tunable electronic devices. Furthermore, the methodology of strain engineering revealed in this work may shed light on the mechanical manipulations of electronic devices.

  17. Effects of nanoscale vacuum gap on photon-enhanced thermionic emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Liao, Tianjun; Zhang, Yanchao; Chen, Xiaohang E-mail: jcchen@xmu.edu.cn; Su, Shanhe; Chen, Jincan E-mail: jcchen@xmu.edu.cn

    2016-01-28

    A new model of the photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) device with a nanoscale vacuum gap is established by introducing the quantum tunneling effect and the image force correction. Analytic expressions for both the thermionic emission and tunneling currents are derived. The electron concentration and the temperature of the cathode are determined by the particle conservation and energy balance equations. The effects of the operating voltage on the maximum potential barrier, cathode temperature, electron concentration and equilibrium electron concentration of the conduction band, and efficiency of the PETE device are discussed in detail for different given values of the vacuum gap length. The influence of the band gap of the cathode and flux concentration on the efficiency is further analyzed. The maximum efficiency of the PETE and the corresponding optimum values of the band gap and the operating voltage are determined. The results obtained here show that the efficiency of the PETE device can be significantly improved by employing a nanoscale vacuum gap.

  18. Nanoscale effects in the tribological properties of materials---a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Maneesh

    With the emergence of technological applications such as magnetic storage devices, MEMS applications and ultra-thin film coatings, the study of friction, adhesion, and wear has become increasingly important. For better design and durability of these nanoscale devices, it is essential to understand deformation in small volumes and in particular how deformation mechanisms can be related to frictional response of an interface in the regime where plasticity is fully developed. However, there is a lack of analytical models that relate tribological response to material properties and/or contact geometry for nanoscale elastic-plastic contacts. To provide these solutions, this thesis focuses on (a) development of analytical models that describe tribological behavior at nanoscale contacts and (b) investigation of atomistic mechanisms that control nanoscale deformation during sliding of elastic-plastic contacts. Large scale molecular dynamics studies of single asperity sliding have been conducted on three different materials: crystalline silicon carbide, crystalline copper and nanocrystalline silicon carbide. We demonstrate that, unlike in a number of other brittle materials, a high pressure phase transformation in SiC is highly unlikely under indentation or cutting conditions. The different categories of dislocation activity are investigated as a function of normal load and depth of cut for single crystal SiC. For nanocrystalline (nc) SiC, deformation is shown to occur via grain boundary sliding, heterogeneous nucleation of partial dislocations, formation of voids at the triple junctions, and grain pull-out. Our results demonstrate that machining of nc ceramics can be performed with nanometer-sized tools because in this regime brittle ceramics are pliable. In addition, we have developed a new analytical model which describes the plowing coefficient of friction during sliding of elastic-plastic contacts between a single asperity and a flat substrate. The proposed model

  19. Effect of surface stress on stress intensity factors of a nanoscale crack via double cantilever beam model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Li, Xianfang; Tang, Guojin; Shen, Zhibin

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of surface elasticity on crack growth for a nanoscale crack advance. A crack is modeled as a double cantilever beam with consideration of surface stress. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory incorporating with surface effects, a governing equation of static bending is derived and bending solution of a cantilever nanowire is obtained for a concentrated force at the free end. Based on the viewpoint of energy balance, the elastic strain energy is given and energy release rate is determined. The influences of the Surface stress and the surface elasticity on crack growth are discussed. Obtained results indicate that consideration of the surface effects decreases stress intensity factors or energy release rates. The residual surface tension impedes propagation of a nanoscale crack and apparent fracture toughness of nanoscale materials is effectively enhanced.

  20. Effects of quantum confinement in nanoscale superconductors: From electronic density of states to vortex matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingfeng

    Due to quantum confinement, nanoscale superconductivity exhibits richer phenomena than bulk superconductivity. This will allow us to artificially design the electronic properties by changing the size and geometry of the superconductor, leading to the desired control and enhancement of superconductivity. However, the interplay between superconductivity and quantum confinement effect has not been fully understood yet. In this thesis, we theoretically investigated several aspects of nanoscale superconductivity by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The topics that are covered range from vortex states under the influence of quantum confinement to the electronic structure in various nano-structures. The density of states (DOS) obtained in this thesis can be compared with results from Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiments. In Chapter. 3 and 4, we studied vortex states under the influence of quantum confinement effect. We found that the shape resonances of the order parameter results in an additional contribution to quantum topological confinement - leading to unconventional vortex configurations. Our results reveal a plethora of asymmetric, giant multi-vortex, and vortex-antivortex structures. They are relevant for high-Tc nanograins, confined Bose-Einstein condensates, and graphene fakes with proximity-induced superconductivity. In Chapter. 5, we studied the effect of non-magnetic impurities in superconducting nanowires. We found that: 1) impurities strongly affect the transport properties, 2) the effect is impurity position-dependent, and 3) it exhibits opposite behavior for resonant and off-resonant wire widths due to the sub-band energy spectrum induced by lateral quantum confinement. These effects can be used to manipulate the Josephson current, filter electrons by subband. In Chapter. 6, we investigated the Tomasch effect on the electronic structure in nanoscale superconductors. Here it is the quasiparticle interference effect induced by an

  1. Effect of aggregation kinetics on the thermal conductivity of nanoscale colloidal solutions (nanofluid).

    PubMed

    Prasher, Ravi; Phelan, Patrick E; Bhattacharya, Prajesh

    2006-07-01

    The thermal conductivity, k, of nanoscale colloidal suspensions (also known as nanofluid), consisting of nanoparticles suspended in a base liquid, is much higher than the thermal conductivity of the base liquid at very small volume fractions of the nanoparticles. However, experimental results from various groups all across the world have shown various anomalies such as a peak in the enhancement of k with respect to nanoparticle size, an increase as well as a decrease in the ratio of k of these colloidal solutions with the k of the base fluid with increasing temperature, and a dependence of k on pH and time. In this paper, the aggregation kinetics of nanoscale colloidal solutions are combined with the physics of thermal transport to capture the effects of aggregation on k. Results show that the observed anomalies reported in experimental work can be well described by taking aggregation kinetics into account. Finally, we show that colloidal chemistry plays a significant role in deciding the k of colloidal nanosuspensions.

  2. High-capacity electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage: Role of nanoscale effects

    DOE PAGES

    Nanda, Jagjit; Martha, Surendra K.; Kalyanaraman, Ramki

    2015-06-02

    In this review, we summarize the current state-of-the art electrode materials used for high-capacity lithium-ion-based batteries and their significant role towards revolutionizing the electrochemical energy storage landscape in the area of consumer electronics, transportation and grid storage application. We discuss the role of nanoscale effects on the electrochemical performance of high-capacity battery electrode materials. Decrease in the particle size of the primary electrode materials from micron to nanometre size improves the ionic and electronic diffusion rates significantly. Nanometre-thick solid electrolyte (such as lithium phosphorous oxynitride) and oxides (such as Al2O3, ZnO, TiO2 etc.) material coatings also improve the interfacial stabilitymore » and rate capability of a number of battery chemistries. Finally, we elucidate these effects in terms of different high-capacity battery chemistries based on intercalation and conversion mechanism.« less

  3. High-capacity electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage: Role of nanoscale effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Jagjit; Martha, Surendra K.; Kalyanaraman, Ramki

    2015-06-02

    In this review, we summarize the current state-of-the art electrode materials used for high-capacity lithium-ion-based batteries and their significant role towards revolutionizing the electrochemical energy storage landscape in the area of consumer electronics, transportation and grid storage application. We discuss the role of nanoscale effects on the electrochemical performance of high-capacity battery electrode materials. Decrease in the particle size of the primary electrode materials from micron to nanometre size improves the ionic and electronic diffusion rates significantly. Nanometre-thick solid electrolyte (such as lithium phosphorous oxynitride) and oxides (such as Al2O3, ZnO, TiO2 etc.) material coatings also improve the interfacial stability and rate capability of a number of battery chemistries. Finally, we elucidate these effects in terms of different high-capacity battery chemistries based on intercalation and conversion mechanism.

  4. Coherent and tunable light radiation from nanoscale surface plasmons array via an exotic Smith-Purcell effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihao

    2015-10-15

    We demonstrate that surface plasmons on a nanoscale metallic array can be transformed into radiation waves via an exotic Smith-Purcell effect. Although the radiation frequency and direction satisfy the Smith-Purcell relation, it is coherent radiation with directions specified, which is essentially different from the ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation. Its radiation spectral density is an order of magnitude higher. By adjusting the material and structure of the array, the radiation frequency can be tuned from an infrared to ultraviolet region. Its remarkable advantages in intensity, coherence, tunability, and miniature size indicate new prospects in developing nanoscale light sources and related techniques.

  5. Micro- and Nanoscale Energetic Materials as Effective Heat Energy Sources for Enhanced Gas Generators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Beom; Kim, Kyung Ju; Cho, Myung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Soo Hyung

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we systematically investigated the effect of micro- and nanoscale energetic materials in formulations of aluminum microparticles (Al MPs; heat source)/aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs; heat source)/copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs; oxidizer) on the combustion and gas-generating properties of sodium azide microparticles (NaN3 MPs; gas-generating agent) for potential applications in gas generators. The burn rate of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.3 m/s. However, the addition of Al MPs and Al NPs to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP matrix caused the rates to reach ∼1.5 and ∼5.3 m/s, respectively. In addition, the N2 gas volume flow rate generated by the ignition of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.6 L/s, which was significantly increased to ∼1.4 and ∼3.9 L/s by adding Al MPs and Al NPs, respectively, to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder. This suggested that the highly reactive Al MPs and NPs, with the assistance of CuO NPs, were effective heat-generating sources enabling the complete thermal decomposition of NaN3 MPs upon ignition. Al NPs were more effective than Al MPs in the gas generators because of the increased reactivity induced by the reduced particle size. Finally, we successfully demonstrated that a homemade airbag with a specific volume of ∼140 mL could be rapidly and fully inflated by the thermal activation of nanoscale energetic material-added gas-generating agents (i.e., NaN3 MP/Al NP/CuO NP composites) within the standard time of ∼50 ms for airbag inflation.

  6. A novel nanoscale SOI MOSFET with Si embedded layer as an effective heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvarifard, Mohammad K.; Orouji, Ali A.

    2015-08-01

    A novel structure such as nanoscale silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOSFET with silicon embedded layer (SEL-SOI) is proposed to reduce self-heating effects (SHEs) successfully. The SEL as a useful heat sink with high thermal conductivity is inserted inside the buried oxide. The SEL acts like a heat sink and is therefore easily able to distribute the lattice heat throughout the device. We noticed excellent improvement in the thermal performance of the device using two-dimensional and two-carrier device simulation. Our simulation results show that SHE has been dramatically reduced in the proposed structure. In regard to the simulated results, the SEL-SOI structure has shown good performance in comparison with the conventional SOI (C-SOI) structure when utilised in the high temperature applications.

  7. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  8. Effect of nanoscale confinement on dielectric relaxations in a 3wt.% water-galactose mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Myeong; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2012-04-01

    We studied the effect of nanoscale confinement on dielectric relaxations in a water-galactose mixture with 3 wt.% water content (WGMIX) in the temperature range that covered the supercooled and the glassy states. We used a confining matrix with nanoporous of 3.5 nm, 8 nm, and 18 nm. For pore sizes of 3.5 nm and 8 nm, the α-relaxation process in the confined WGMIX was significantly accelerated compared to that in bulk WGMIX and approached the Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation process as the pore size decreased. The correlation length predicted by the number of correlation unit theory is an order of a few nanometers and is consistent with our results. In addition, the stretched exponent of the α-relaxation decreased with decreasing as predicted by the coupling model.

  9. Effects of nanoscale confinement on the functionality of nucleic acids: implications for nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, M; Stopar, A; Coral, L; Redhu, S K; Vidonis, M; Kumar, V; Ben, F Del; Grassi, M; Nicholson, A W

    2013-01-01

    The facile self-assembly and nanomanipulation of nucleic acids hold great promise in the design of innovative, programmable materials, with applications ranging from biosensing to cellular targeting and drug delivery. Little is known, however, of the effects of confinement on biochemical reactions within such systems, in which the level of packing and crowding is similar to that of intracellular environments. In this review article we outline novel, unexpected properties of nucleic acids that arise from nanoscale confinement, as mainly revealed by atomic force and electron microscopy, electrochemistry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and gel electrophoresis. We review selected scientific studies over the last decade that describe the novel behavior of nanoconfined nucleic acids with respect to hybridization, denaturation, conformation, stability, and enzyme accessibility. The nanoscale systems discussed include self-assembled, water-soluble, DNA or RNA nanostructures, ranging in width from a few to several tens of nm; gold nanoparticles coated with DNA monolayers; and self-assembled monolayers of DNA, from a few to several hundreds of bp in length. These studies reveal that the functionality of nucleic acid-based nanosystems is highly dependent upon the local density, molecular flexibility and network of weak interactions between adjacent molecules. These factors significantly affect steric hindrance, molecular crowding and hydration, which in turn control nucleic acid hybridization, denaturation, conformation, and enzyme accessibility. The findings discussed in this review article demonstrate that nucleic acids function in a qualitatively different manner within nanostructured systems, and suggest that these novel properties, if better understood, will enable the development of powerful molecular tools for nanomedicine.

  10. Effects of Alloying on Nanoscale Grain Growth in Substitutional Binary Alloy System: Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haoran; Chen, Yuzeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Applying the regular solution model, the Gibbs free energy of mixing for substitutional binary alloy system was constructed. Then, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, e.g., driving force and solute drag force, controlling nanoscale grain growth of substitutional binary alloy systems were derived and compared to their generally accepted definitions and interpretations. It is suggested that for an actual grain growth process, the classical driving force P = γ/D ( γ the grain boundary (GB) energy, D the grain size) should be replaced by a new expression, i.e., P^' = γ /D - Δ P . Δ P represents the energy required to adjust nonequilibrium solute distribution to equilibrium solute distribution, which is equivalent to the generally accepted solute drag force impeding GB migration. By incorporating the derived new driving force for grain growth into the classical grain growth model, the reported grain growth behaviors of nanocrystalline Fe-4at. pct Zr and Pd-19at. pct Zr alloys were analyzed. On this basis, the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters ( i.e., P, Δ P and the GB mobility ( M GB)) on nanoscale grain growth, were investigated. Upon grain growth, the decrease of P is caused by the reduction of γ as a result of solute segregation in GBs; the decrease of Δ P is, however, due to the decrease of grain growth velocity; whereas the decrease of M GB is attributed to the enhanced difference of solute molar fractions between the bulk and the GBs as well as the increased activation energy for GB diffusion.

  11. The effects of combined micron-/submicron-scale surface roughness and nanoscale features on cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gittens I, Rolando A.; McLachlan, Taylor; Cai, Ye; Berner, Simon; Tannenbaum, Rina; Schwartz, Zvi; Sandhage, Kenneth H.; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) osseointegration is critical for the success of dental and orthopaedic implants. Previous studies have shown that surface roughness at the micro- and submicro-scales promotes osseointegration by enhancing osteoblast differentiation and local factor production. Only relatively recently have the effects of nanoscale roughness on cell response been considered. The aim of the present study was to develop a simple and scalable surface modification treatment that introduces nanoscale features to the surfaces of Ti substrates without greatly affecting other surface features, and to determine the effects of such superimposed nano-features on the differentiation and local factor production of osteoblasts. A simple oxidation treatment was developed for generating controlled nanoscale topographies on Ti surfaces, while retaining the starting micro-/submicro-scale roughness. Such nano-modified surfaces also possessed similar elemental compositions, and exhibited similar contact angles, as the original surfaces, but possessed a different surface crystal structure. MG63 cells were seeded on machined (PT), nano-modified PT (NMPT), sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA), and nano-modified SLA (NMSLA) Ti disks. The results suggested that the introduction of such nanoscale structures in combination with micro-/submicro-scale roughness improves osteoblast differentiation and local factor production, which, in turn, indicates the potential for improved implant osseointegration in vivo. PMID:21310480

  12. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picotto, G. B.; Koenders, L.; Wilkening, G.

    2009-08-01

    characterization. The papers in the first part report on new or improved instrumentation, details of developments of metrology SFM, improvements to SFM, probes and scanning methods in the direction of nanoscale coordinate measuring machines and true 3D measurements as well as of progress of a 2D encoder based on a regular crystalline lattice. To ensure traceability to the SI unit of length many highly sophisticated instruments are equipped with laser interferometers to measure small displacements in the nanometre range very accurately. Improving these techniques is still a challenge and therefore new interferometric techniques are considered in several papers as well as improved sensors for nanodisplacement measurements or the development of a deep UV microscope for micro- and nanostructures. The tactile measurement of small structures also calls for a better control of forces in the nano- and piconewton range. A nanoforce facility, based on a disk-pendulum with electrostatic stiffness reduction and electrostatic force compensation, is presented for the measurement of small forces. In the second part the contributions are related to calibration and correction strategies and standards such as the development of test objects based on 3D silicon structures, and of samples with irregular surface profiles, and their use for calibration. The shape of the tip and its influence on measurements is still a contentious issue and addressed in several papers: use of nanospheres for tip characterization, a geometrical approach for reconstruction errors by tactile probing. Molecular dynamical calculations, classical as well as ab initio (based on density functional theory), are used to discuss effects of tip-sample relaxation on the topography and to have a better base from which to estimate uncertainties in measurements of small particles or features. Some papers report about measurements of air refractivity fluctuations by phase modulation interferometry, angle-scale traceability by laser

  13. A study of the effects of electromigration on structures at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bole, Timothy W.

    This thesis summarizes a study of the effects of electromigration on nanoscale metallic structures. We have studied the impact of electromigration on two types of nanoscale systems, and as such the thesis naturally divides into two portions. In the first portion, consisting of Chapters 2-4, we investigate the effects of electromigration on fluctuating step edges. When there is no electromigration present, a step undergoing motion by atoms diffusing along its edge demonstrates power-law scaling in temporal correlation functions. This is verified by approximating the step as a continuum and using Langevin analysis, and the Langevin analysis is extended to include electromigration forces. Under electromigration conditions, specifically for electromigration forces directed into or out-of the step, we find theoretical deviations from the power-law scaling in the correlation function. We demonstrate this in two ways: through Monte Carlo simulation of step edges under electromigration conditions and through experimental measurements of current-stressed steps at the surface of Silver films. We found good phenomenological agreement with the theoretical expectations in both simulation and experiment, as well as good quantitative agreement in the results of the simulations. The second portion of the thesis, consisting of Chapters 5 and 6, detail an investigation of the effects of electromigration on the Rayleigh-Plateau instability in solid nanowires. We begin by deriving an equation of motion for a continuous cylinder and including an electromigration force along the symmetry axis of the cylinder. This is equivalent to a model of a nanowire carrying current, where the electromigration force is modeled as a constant. We find power-law scaling in the pinching process, though the effects of electromigration are to extend the life of the nanowire by prolonging the pinch-off. This is confirmed by conducting kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of Aluminum nanowires under

  14. Quantum confinement effect of CdSe induced by nanoscale solvothermal reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Im, Jeong-Hyuk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-10-21

    We report a novel method, nanoscale solvothermal reaction (NSR), to induce the quantum confinement effect of CdSe on nanostructured TiO(2) by solvothermal route. The time-dependent growth of CdSe is observed in solution at room temperature, which is found to be accomplished instantly by heat-treatment in the presence of solvent at 1 atm. However, no crystal growth occurs upon heat-treatment in the absence of solvent. The nanoscale solvothermal growth of CdSe quantum dot is realized on the nanocrystalline oxide surface, where Cd(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O and Na(2)SeSO(3) solutions are sequentially spun on nanostructured TiO(2), followed by heat-treatment at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 250 °C. Size of CdSe increases from 4.4 nm to 5.3 nm, 8.7 nm and 14.8 nm, which results in decrease in optical band gap from 2.19 eV to, 1.95 eV, 1.74 eV and 1.75 eV with increasing the NSR temperature from 100 °C to 150 °C, 200 °C and 250 °C, respectively, which is indicative of the quantum confinement effect. Thermodynamic studies reveal that increase in the size of CdSe is related to increase in enthalpy, for instance, from 3.77 J mg(-1) for 100 °C to 8.66 J mg(-1) for 200 °C. Quantum confinement effect is further confirmed from the CdSe-sensitized solar cell, where onset wavelength in external quantum efficiency spectra is progressively shifted from 600 nm to 800 nm as the NSR temperature increases, which leads to a significant improvement of power conversion efficiency by a factor of more than four. A high photocurrent density of 13.7 mA cm(-2) is obtained based on CdSe quantum dot grown by NSR at 200 °C.

  15. Quantum confinement effect of CdSe induced by nanoscale solvothermal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Im, Jeong-Hyuk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-09-01

    We report a novel method, nanoscale solvothermal reaction (NSR), to induce the quantum confinement effect of CdSe on nanostructured TiO2 by solvothermal route. The time-dependent growth of CdSe is observed in solution at room temperature, which is found to be accomplished instantly by heat-treatment in the presence of solvent at 1 atm. However, no crystal growth occurs upon heat-treatment in the absence of solvent. The nanoscale solvothermal growth of CdSe quantum dot is realized on the nanocrystalline oxide surface, where Cd(NO3)2.4H2O and Na2SeSO3 solutions are sequentially spun on nanostructured TiO2, followed by heat-treatment at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 250 °C. Size of CdSe increases from 4.4 nm to 5.3 nm, 8.7 nm and 14.8 nm, which results in decrease in optical band gap from 2.19 eV to, 1.95 eV, 1.74 eV and 1.75 eV with increasing the NSR temperature from 100 °C to 150 °C, 200 °C and 250 °C, respectively, which is indicative of the quantum confinement effect. Thermodynamic studies reveal that increase in the size of CdSe is related to increase in enthalpy, for instance, from 3.77 J mg-1 for 100 °C to 8.66 J mg-1 for 200 °C. Quantum confinement effect is further confirmed from the CdSe-sensitized solar cell, where onset wavelength in external quantum efficiency spectra is progressively shifted from 600 nm to 800 nm as the NSR temperature increases, which leads to a significant improvement of power conversion efficiency by a factor of more than four. A high photocurrent density of 13.7 mA cm-2 is obtained based on CdSe quantum dot grown by NSR at 200 °C.

  16. Effect of the moist-heat sterilization on fabricated nanoscale solid lipid particles containing rasagiline mesylate

    PubMed Central

    Viveksarathi, K.; Kannan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nanoscale solid lipid particles of rasagiline mesylate (RM) were fabricated by microemulsion technique. The nanoscale particle must be sterile for intravenous administration, and several approaches are available for sterilization. However, the selection of sterilization technique for the fabricated RM loaded nanoscale solid lipid particles mainly depends on the nature of the drug that needs to be encapsulated and release pattern of the polymer. Materials and Methods: We have preferred moist heat sterilization, as it is the most convenient and the composition of the carrier and incorporated drug should remain unchanged and the incorporated drug should not leak out of the drug carrier. The physical and chemical stability of RM loaded nanoscale solid lipid particles investigated during sterilization and to determine the average mean particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential (ZP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), entrapment efficiency (EE), and drug content after autoclaving. Result: There were no significant changes in the average mean particle size, polydispersity index, ZP, TEM, EE, and drug content of RM loaded nanoscale solid lipid particles after autoclaving (121°C for 20 min [15 lbs]). Conclusion: These observations suggest that the moist heat sterilization by autoclaving is the most suitable method for nanoscale solid lipid formulations. PMID:25838993

  17. Explicit demonstration of the role of Marangoni effect in the breakup of nanoscale liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seric, Ivana; Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Hartnett, Chris; Fowlkes, Jason; Rack, Philip; Kondic, Lou

    2016-11-01

    We consider a breakup of bi-metal filaments deposited on a solid substrate. These filaments are exposed to laser irradiation and, while in the liquid phase, evolve by a process resembling breakup of a liquid jet governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The novel element is that the Marangoni effect, resulting from a different surface tension of the two metals from which the filament is built, is crucial in understanding the instability development. In particular, Marangoni effect may lead to the inversion of the breakup process, producing droplets at the locations where according to the Rayleigh-Plateau theory dry spots would be expected. We present experimental results carried out with Cu-Ni filaments, as well as direct numerical simulations based on a novel algorithm that includes variable surface tension in a Volume-of-Fluid based Navier-Stokes solver. These results suggest the possibility of using Marangoni effect for the purpose of self- and directed-assembly on the nanoscale. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET-1604351.

  18. Superhard nanobuttons: constraining crystal plasticity and dealing with extrinsic effects at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Antonio; Peralta, Pedro; Friesen, Cody; Nahar, Dhiraj; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Sieradzki, Karl

    2010-02-22

    The compressive plastic strength of nanosized single-crystal metallic pillars is known to depend on their diameter D. Herein, the role of pillar height h is analyzed instead, and the suppression of the generalized crystal plasticity below a critical value h(CR) is observed. Novel in situ compression tests on regular pillars as well as nanobuttons, that is, pillars with h < h(CR), show that the latter are much harder, withstanding stresses >2 GPa. A statistical model that holds for both pillars and buttons is formulated. Owing to their superhard nature, the nanobuttons examined here underline with unprecedented resolution the extrinsic effects-often overlooked-that naturally arise during testing when the Saint-Venant assumption ceases to be accurate. The bias related to such effects is identified in the test data and removed when possible. Finally, continuous hardening is observed to occur under increasing stress level, in analogy to reports on nanoparticles. From a metrological standpoint the results expose some difficulties in nanoscale testing related to current methodology and technology. The implications of the analysis of extrinsic effects go beyond nanobuttons and extend to nano-/microelectromechanical system design and nanomechanics in general.

  19. Nanoscale Metal–Organic Framework for Highly Effective Photodynamic Therapy of Resistant Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective anticancer procedure that relies on tumor localization of a photosensitizer followed by light activation to generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (e.g., 1O2). Here we report the rational design of a Hf–porphyrin nanoscale metal–organic framework, DBP–UiO, as an exceptionally effective photosensitizer for PDT of resistant head and neck cancer. DBP–UiO efficiently generates 1O2 owing to site isolation of porphyrin ligands, enhanced intersystem crossing by heavy Hf centers, and facile 1O2 diffusion through porous DBP–UiO nanoplates. Consequently, DBP–UiO displayed greatly enhanced PDT efficacy both in vitro and in vivo, leading to complete tumor eradication in half of the mice receiving a single DBP–UiO dose and a single light exposure. NMOFs thus represent a new class of highly potent PDT agents and hold great promise in treating resistant cancers in the clinic. PMID:25407895

  20. Understanding the effects of strain on morphological instabilities of a nanoscale island during heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shibin; Li, Linan; Shen, Min; Wang, Zhiyong; Chen, Zhenfei; Zhao, Yang

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive morphological stability analysis of a nanoscale circular island during heteroepitaxial growth is presented based on continuum elasticity theory. The interplay between kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms is revealed by including strain-related kinetic processes. In the kinetic regime, the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model is adopted to describe the growth front of the island. Together with kinetic boundary conditions, various kinetic processes including deposition flow, adatom diffusion, attachment-detachment kinetics, and the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier can be taken into account at the same time. In the thermodynamic regime, line tension, surface energy, and elastic energy are considered. As the strain relief in the early stages of heteroepitaxy is more complicated than commonly suggested by simple consideration of lattice mismatch, we also investigate the effects of external applied strain and elastic response due to perturbations on the island shape evolution. The analytical expressions for elastic fields induced by mismatch strain, external applied strain, and relaxation strain are presented. A systematic approach is developed to solve the system via a perturbation analysis which yields the conditions of film morphological instabilities. Consistent with previous experimental and theoretical work, parametric studies show the kinetic evolution of elastic relaxation, island morphology, and film composition under various conditions. Our present work offers an effective theoretical approach to get a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between different growth mechanisms and how to tailor the growth mode by controlling the nature of the crucial factors.

  1. Understanding the effects of strain on morphological instabilities of a nanoscale island during heteroepitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Lu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shibin; Li, Linan; Shen, Min; Wang, Zhiyong; Chen, Zhenfei; Zhao, Yang

    2015-07-21

    A comprehensive morphological stability analysis of a nanoscale circular island during heteroepitaxial growth is presented based on continuum elasticity theory. The interplay between kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms is revealed by including strain-related kinetic processes. In the kinetic regime, the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model is adopted to describe the growth front of the island. Together with kinetic boundary conditions, various kinetic processes including deposition flow, adatom diffusion, attachment-detachment kinetics, and the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier can be taken into account at the same time. In the thermodynamic regime, line tension, surface energy, and elastic energy are considered. As the strain relief in the early stages of heteroepitaxy is more complicated than commonly suggested by simple consideration of lattice mismatch, we also investigate the effects of external applied strain and elastic response due to perturbations on the island shape evolution. The analytical expressions for elastic fields induced by mismatch strain, external applied strain, and relaxation strain are presented. A systematic approach is developed to solve the system via a perturbation analysis which yields the conditions of film morphological instabilities. Consistent with previous experimental and theoretical work, parametric studies show the kinetic evolution of elastic relaxation, island morphology, and film composition under various conditions. Our present work offers an effective theoretical approach to get a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between different growth mechanisms and how to tailor the growth mode by controlling the nature of the crucial factors.

  2. Nanoscale transport of phonons: Dimensionality, subdiffusion, molecular damping, and interference effects

    SciTech Connect

    Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk L.

    2014-05-07

    We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in the systems composed of nanoscale chains of masses coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. Thermal conductance is obtained by using linearized Landauer-type formula for heat flux with phonon transmission probability calculated within atomistic Green's functions (AGF) method. AGF formalism is extended onto dissipative chains of masses with harmonic coupling beyond nearest-neighbor approximation, while atomistic description of heat reservoirs is also included into computational scheme. In particular, the phonon lifetimes and the phonon frequency shifts are discussed for harmonic lattices of different dimensions. Further, resonant structure of phonon transmission spectrum is analyzed with respect to reservoir-induced effects, molecular damping, and mass-to-mass harmonic coupling. Analysis of transmission zeros (antiresonances) and their accompanied Fano-shape resonances are discussed as a result of interference effects between different vibrational modes. Finally, we also predict subdiffusive transport regime for low-frequency ballistic phonons propagated along a linear chain of harmonically coupled masses.

  3. Bioinhibitory effect of hydrogenotrophic bacteria on nitrate reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    An, Yi; Dong, Qi; Zhang, Keqiang

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogenotrophic bacteria (HTB) were introduced into a nitrate removal system, which used nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reductant, to investigate its bioinhibitory effect. Based on the results, it was noted that addition of HTB culture (10-50 mL) led to 58.9-91.4% decrease in the first observed rate constant (kobs1), which represented the nitrate removal rate by nZVI, and a reduction in the generated poisonous by-products from 94.9% to 38.5%. In other words, HTB had a significant inhibitory effect on nitrate reduction by nZVI. However, the pathway of this bioinhibition only prevented the occurrence of chemical reduction, but not competition for nitrate. Furthermore, FeOOH coating was observed on the surface of nZVI, instead of Fe3O4 or Fe2O3, which could prevent electron transmission from nZVI to nitrate. Considering that FeOOH was the product of iron corrosion, the result indicated that HTB could inhibit chemical reduction by enhancing the reaction between nZVI and water.

  4. Effect of nano-scale characteristics of graphene on electrochemical performance of activated carbon supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasni, M. R. M.; Deraman, M.; Suleman, M.; Hamdan, E.; Sazali, N. E. S.; Nor, N. S. M.; Shamsudin, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Graphene with its typical nano-scale characteristic properties has been widely used as an additive in activated carbon electrodes in order to enhance the performance of the electrodes for their use in high performance supercapacitors. Activated carbon monoliths (ACMs) electrodes have been prepared by carbonization and activation of green monoliths (GMs) of pre-carbonized fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunches or self-adhesive carbon grains (SACGs) and SACGs added with 6 wt% of KOH-treated multi-layer graphene. ACMs electrodes have been assembled in symmetrical supercapacitor cells that employed aqueous KOH electrolyte (6 M). The cells have been tested with cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charge discharge methods to investigate the effect of graphene addition on the specific capacitance (Csp), specific energy (E), specific power (P), equivalent series resistance (ESR) and response time (τo) of the supercapacitor cells. The results show that the addition of graphene in the GMs change the values of Csp, Emax, Pmax, ESR and τo from (61-96) F/g, 2 Wh/kg, 104 W/kg, 2.6 Ω and 38 s, to the respective values of (110-124) F/g, 3 Wh/kg, 156 W/kg, 3.4 Ω and 63 s. This study demonstrates that the graphene addition in the GMs has a significant effect on the electrochemical behavior of the electrodes.

  5. Nanoscale transport of phonons: Dimensionality, subdiffusion, molecular damping, and interference effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk L.

    2014-05-01

    We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in the systems composed of nanoscale chains of masses coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. Thermal conductance is obtained by using linearized Landauer-type formula for heat flux with phonon transmission probability calculated within atomistic Green's functions (AGF) method. AGF formalism is extended onto dissipative chains of masses with harmonic coupling beyond nearest-neighbor approximation, while atomistic description of heat reservoirs is also included into computational scheme. In particular, the phonon lifetimes and the phonon frequency shifts are discussed for harmonic lattices of different dimensions. Further, resonant structure of phonon transmission spectrum is analyzed with respect to reservoir-induced effects, molecular damping, and mass-to-mass harmonic coupling. Analysis of transmission zeros (antiresonances) and their accompanied Fano-shape resonances are discussed as a result of interference effects between different vibrational modes. Finally, we also predict subdiffusive transport regime for low-frequency ballistic phonons propagated along a linear chain of harmonically coupled masses.

  6. The effect of nanoscale surface curvature on the oligomerization of surface-bound proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kurylowicz, M.; Paulin, H.; Mogyoros, J.; Giuliani, M.; Dutcher, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of surface topography on protein conformation and association is used routinely in biological cells to orchestrate and coordinate biomolecular events. In the laboratory, controlling the surface curvature at the nanoscale offers new possibilities for manipulating protein–protein interactions and protein function at surfaces. We have studied the effect of surface curvature on the association of two proteins, α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), which perform their function at the oil–water interface in milk emulsions. To control the surface curvature at the nanoscale, we have used a combination of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (NPs) and ultrathin PS films to fabricate chemically pure, hydrophobic surfaces that are highly curved and are stable in aqueous buffer. We have used single-molecule force spectroscopy to measure the contour lengths Lc for α-LA and β-LG adsorbed on highly curved PS surfaces (NP diameters of 27 and 50 nm, capped with a 10 nm thick PS film), and we have compared these values in situ with those measured for the same proteins adsorbed onto flat PS surfaces in the same samples. The Lc distributions for β-LG adsorbed onto a flat PS surface contain monomer and dimer peaks at 60 and 120 nm, respectively, while α-LA contains a large monomer peak near 50 nm and a dimer peak at 100 nm, with a tail extending out to 200 nm, corresponding to higher order oligomers, e.g. trimers and tetramers. When β-LG or α-LA is adsorbed onto the most highly curved surfaces, both monomer peaks are shifted to much smaller values of Lc. Furthermore, for β-LG, the dimer peak is strongly suppressed on the highly curved surface, whereas for α-LA the trimer and tetramer tail is suppressed with no significant change in the dimer peak. For both proteins, the number of higher order oligomers is significantly reduced as the curvature of the underlying surface is increased. These results suggest that the surface curvature provides a new

  7. Quasicontinuum simulations of geometric effect on onset plasticity of nano-scale patterned lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jianfeng; Cao, Jingyi; Zhou, Siyuan; Yang, Peijun; Guo, Zhengxiao

    2017-09-01

    Onset plasticity of metallic nano-lines or nano-beams is of considerable scientific and technological interest in micro-/nano- mechanics and interconnects of patterned lines in electronic devices, where capability of resistance to deformation is important. In this study, a multiscale quasicontinuum (QC) method was used to explore such an issue in a nano-scale copper (Cu) line protruding from a relatively large single crystal Cu substrate during compression. The results show that the yield stress of a rectangular beam on the substrate can be greatly reduced compared with that of a flat surface of the same area. For the rectangular line, the aspect ratio (width/height) affects dislocation morphology at the onset plasticity without much change of yield stress. However, for the trapezoidal line, the yield stress decreases with the base angle (α), especially when the α is over 54.7°. As the sidewall orientation changes from <100> at α = 0°, then to <111> at α = 54.7° and finally to <110> at α = 90°, a higher surface energy could enable easier dislocation formation and lower yield stress. Meanwhile, it is found that the interaction between the line and the support substrate also shows a great effect on yield stress. Moreover, although it is possible to open two extra dislocation slip planes inside from the two bottom corners of the Cu line with the α over 54.7°, dislocation nucleation derived from them is only observed at α = 90°.

  8. Liquid Sulfur Impregnation of Microporous Carbon Accelerated by Nanoscale Interfacial Effects.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Villaluenga, Irune; Wujcik, Kevin H; Devaux, Didier; Jiang, Xi; Wang, Dunyang Rita; Balsara, Nitash; Prendergast, David

    2017-03-17

    Impregnation of porous carbon matrices with liquid sulfur has been exploited to fabricate composite cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries, aimed at confining soluble sulfur species near conducting carbon to prevent both loss of active material into the electrolyte and parasitic reactions at the lithium metal anode. Here, through extensive computer simulations, we uncover the strongly favorable interfacial free energy between liquid sulfur and graphitic surfaces that underlies this phenomenon. Previously unexplored curvature-dependent enhancements are shown to favor the filling of smaller pores first and effect a quasi-liquid sulfur phase in microporous domains (diameters <2 nm) that persists ∼30° below the expected freezing point. Evidence of interfacial sulfur on carbon is shown to be a 0.3 eV red shift in the simulated and measured interfacial X-ray absorption spectra. Our results elucidate the critical morphology and thermodynamic properties necessary for future cathode design and highlight the importance of molecular-scale details in defining emergent properties of functional nanoscale interfaces.

  9. Effects of nanoscale dispersion in the dielectric properties of poly(vinyl alcohol)-bentonite nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Hernández, María C; Suárez, N; Martínez, Luis A; Feijoo, José L; Lo Mónaco, Salvador; Salazar, Norkys

    2008-05-01

    We investigate the effects of clay proportion and nanoscale dispersion in the dielectric response of poly(vinyl alcohol)-bentonite nanocomposites. The dielectric study was performed using the thermally stimulated depolarization current technique, covering the temperature range of the secondary and high-temperature relaxation processes. Important changes in the secondary relaxations are observed at low clay contents in comparison with neat poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). The high-temperature processes show a complex peak, which is a combination of the glass-rubber transition and the space-charge relaxations. The analysis of these processes shows the existence of two segmental relaxations for the nanocomposites. Dielectric results were complemented by calorimetric experiments using differential scanning calorimetry. Morphologic characterization was performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM and XRD results show a mixture of intercalated and exfoliated clay dispersion in a trend that promotes the exfoliated phase as the bentonite content diminishes. Dielectric and morphological results indicate the existence of polymer-clay interactions through the formation of hydrogen bounds and promoted by the exfoliated dispersion of the clay. These interactions affect not only the segmental dynamics, but also the secondary local dynamics of PVA.

  10. Vertical Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors with Nanoscale Gate-All-Around

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerfi, Youssouf; Larrieu, Guilhem

    2016-04-01

    Nanowires are considered building blocks for the ultimate scaling of MOS transistors, capable of pushing devices until the most extreme boundaries of miniaturization thanks to their physical and geometrical properties. In particular, nanowires' suitability for forming a gate-all-around (GAA) configuration confers to the device an optimum electrostatic control of the gate over the conduction channel and then a better immunity against the short channel effects (SCE). In this letter, a large-scale process of GAA vertical silicon nanowire (VNW) MOSFETs is presented. A top-down approach is adopted for the realization of VNWs with an optimum reproducibility followed by thin layer engineering at nanoscale. Good overall electrical performances were obtained, with excellent electrostatic behavior (a subthreshold slope (SS) of 95 mV/dec and a drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) of 25 mV/V) for a 15-nm gate length. Finally, a first demonstration of dual integration of n-type and p-type VNW transistors for the realization of CMOS inverter is proposed.

  11. Liquid Sulfur Impregnation of Microporous Carbon Accelerated by Nanoscale Interfacial Effects

    DOE PAGES

    Pascal, Tod A.; Villaluenga, Irune; Wujcik, Kevin H.; ...

    2017-03-14

    Impregnation of porous carbon matrices with liquid sulfur has been exploited to fabricate composite cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries, aimed at confining soluble sulfur species near conducting carbon to prevent both loss of active material into the electrolyte and parasitic reactions at the lithium metal anode. Here, through extensive computer simulations, we uncover the strongly favorable interfacial free energy between liquid sulfur and graphitic surfaces that underlies this phenomenon. Previously unexplored curvature-dependent enhancements are shown to favor the filling of smaller pores first and effect a quasi-liquid sulfur phase in microporous domains (diameters <2 nm) that persists ~30° below the expectedmore » freezing point. Evidence of interfacial sulfur on carbon is shown to be a 0.3 eV red shift in the simulated and measured interfacial X-ray absorption spectra. Our results elucidate the critical morphology and thermodynamic properties necessary for future cathode design and highlight the importance of molecular-scale details in defining emergent properties of functional nanoscale interfaces.« less

  12. Polymeric coatings eliminate the bactericidal effects of Nanoscale zero-valent iron to Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, G. V.; Gregory, K.; Li, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles that are used in aquifer remediation may come in contact with subsurface bacteria, and may adversely affect subsurface bacteria. Studies showed that NZVI is toxic toward E. coli at concentrations as low as a few mg/L. However, NZVI particles used in remediation are coated with polymers or natural organic matter (NOM). It is unclear how these surface coatings may affect the bactericidal properties of NZVI. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect that (i) coatings (both anthropogenic and natural) and (ii) particle oxidative state have on the bactericidal properties of NZVI on a gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. Bacteria (106 cells/L) were exposed to 100 mg/L of bare or coated NZVI for 60 minutes under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Bacteria were plated at specified times over 60 minutes to determine the number of viable bacteria in the reactor. Bare NZVI was cytotoxic at only 100 mg/L NZVI with over 5 log kill after 60 minutes of exposure. Exposure under aerobic conditions resulted in less than 1 log kill. The lower bactericidal effects were due to rapid oxidation of the iron to Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases that are not toxic. All organic coatings on NZVI decreased or eliminated NZVI cytotoxicity when exposed at the same NZVI concentrations as in the bare case. The decrease in bactericidal effects of coated NZVI over bare NZVI was due to electrosteric repulsions afforded by the coatings that inhibited contact of NZVI with the bacteria. The inhibition of attachment to bacteria was confirmed with TEM and with NZVI sedimentation studies. Application of coatings may be considered as a means of decreasing the effects of NZVI on subsurface bacteria in field application.

  13. Orthogonally functionalized nanoscale micelles for active targeted codelivery of methotrexate and mitomycin C with synergistic anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Wu, Hongjie; Chang, Ying; Yuan, Conghui; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shuang; Hou, Zhenqing; Dai, Lizong

    2015-03-02

    The design of nanoscale drug delivery systems for the targeted codelivery of multiple therapeutic drugs still remains a formidable challenge (ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9558-9570; ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9518-9525). In this article, both mitomycin C (MMC) and methotrexate (MTX) loaded DSPE-PEG micelles (MTX-M-MMC) were prepared by self-assembly using the dialysis technique, in which MMC-soybean phosphatidylcholine complex (drug-phospholipid complex) was encapsulated within MTX-functionalized DSPE-PEG micelles. MTX-M-MMC could coordinate an early phase active targeting effect with a late-phase synergistic anticancer effect and enable a multiple-responsive controlled release of both drugs (MMC was released in a pH-dependent pattern, while MTX was released in a protease-dependent pattern). Furthermore, MTX-M-MMC could codeliver both drugs to significantly enhance the cellular uptake, intracellular delivery, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis in vitro and improve the tumor accumulation and penetration and anticancer effect in vivo compared with either both free drugs treatment or individual free drug treatment. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the systemically administrated, orthogonally functionalized, and self-assisted nanoscale micelles for targeted combination cancer chemotherapy. The highly convergent therapeutic strategy opened the door to more simplified, efficient, and flexible nanoscale drug delivery systems.

  14. Toward nanoscale genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Declan; Rahimi, Maryam; Lund, John; Mehta, Ranjana; Parviz, Babak A

    2007-09-01

    This article reports on the state-of-the-art technologies that sequence DNA using miniaturized devices. The article considers the miniaturization of existing technologies for sequencing DNA and the opportunities for cost reduction that 'on-chip' devices can deliver. The ability to construct nano-scale structures and perform measurements using novel nano-scale effects has provided new opportunities to identify nucleotides directly using physical, and not chemical, methods. The challenges that these technologies need to overcome to provide a US$1000-genome sequencing technology are also presented.

  15. The Effect of Nano-Scale Topography on Keratinocyte Phenotype and Wound Healing Following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Suzanne M.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Wood, Fiona M.; Fear, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic modulation of tissue response is an important consideration in the design and manufacture of a biomaterial. In developing new tissue therapies for skin, all levels of architecture, including the nanoscale need to be considered. Here we show that keratinocyte phenotype is affected by nanoscale changes in topography with cell morphology, proliferation, and migration influenced by the pore size in anodic aluminum oxide membranes. A membrane with a pore size of 300 nm, which enhanced cell phenotype in vitro, was used as a dressing to cover a partial thickness burn injury in the pig. Wounds dressed with the membrane showed evidence of advanced healing with significantly less organizing granulation tissue and more mature epidermal layers than control wounds dressed with a standard burns dressing. The results demonstrate the importance of nanoscale topography in modulating keratinocyte phenotype and skin wound healing. PMID:21988618

  16. Nanoscale organic and polymeric field-effect transistors as chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Fine, Daniel; Sharma, Deepak; Torsi, Luisa; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews recently published work concerning improved understanding of, and advancements in, organic and polymer semiconductor vapor-phase chemical sensing. Thin-film transistor sensors ranging in size from hundreds of microns down to a few nanometers are discussed, with comparisons made of sensing responses recorded at these different channel-length scales. The vapor-sensing behavior of nanoscale organic transistors is different from that of large-scale devices, because electrical transport in a nanoscale organic thin-film transistor depends on its morphological structure and interface properties (for example injection barrier) which could be modulated by delivery of analyte. Materials used in nanoscale devices, for example nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires, are also briefly summarized in an attempt to introduce other relevant nano-transducers.

  17. Nanoscale effects of caspofungin against two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Formosa, C; Schiavone, M; Martin-Yken, H; François, J M; Duval, R E; Dague, E

    2013-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans are model yeasts for biotechnology and human health, respectively. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the effects of caspofungin, an antifungal drug used in hospitals, on these two species. Our nanoscale investigation revealed similar, but also different, behaviors of the two yeasts in response to treatment with the drug. While administration of caspofungin induced deep cell wall remodeling in both yeast species, as evidenced by a dramatic increase in chitin and decrease in β-glucan content, changes in cell wall composition were more pronounced with C. albicans cells. Notably, the increase of chitin was proportional to the increase in the caspofungin dose. In addition, the Young modulus of the cell was three times lower for C. albicans cells than for S. cerevisiae cells and increased proportionally with the increase of chitin, suggesting differences in the molecular organization of the cell wall between the two yeast species. Also, at a low dose of caspofungin (i.e., 0.5× MIC), the cell surface of C. albicans exhibited a morphology that was reminiscent of cells expressing adhesion proteins. Interestingly, this morphology was lost at high doses of the drug (i.e., 4× MIC). However, the treatment of S. cerevisiae cells with high doses of caspofungin resulted in impairment of cytokinesis. Altogether, the use of AFM for investigating the effects of antifungal drugs is relevant in nanomedicine, as it should help in understanding their mechanisms of action on fungal cells, as well as unraveling unexpected effects on cell division and fungal adhesion.

  18. Effects of nano-scale zero-valent iron particles on a mixed culture dechlorinating trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Zong-Ming; Jin, Zhao-Hui; Li, Tie-Long; Mahendra, Shaily; Lowry, Gregory V; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2010-02-01

    Nano-scale zero-valent iron particles (NZVI) are increasingly being used to treat sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents. This study investigated the effect of NZVI on dechlorinating microorganisms that participate in the anaerobic bioremediation of such sites. NZVI can have a biostimulatory effect associated with water-derived cathodic H(2) production during its anaerobic corrosion (730+/-30 micromol H(2) was produced in 166 h in abiotic controls with 1 g/L NZVI) or an inhibitory effect upon contact with cell surfaces (assessed by transmission electron microscopy). Methanogens, which are known to compete for H(2) with dechlorinators, were significantly biostimulated by NZVI and methane production increased relative to NZVI-free controls from 58+/-5 to 275+/-2 micromol. In contrast, bacteria dechlorinating TCE were inhibited by NZVI, and the first-order degradation rate coefficient decreased from 0.115+/-0.005 h(-1) (R(2)=0.99) for controls to 0.053+/-0.003 h(-1) (R(2)=0.98) for treatments with 1 g/L NZVI. Ethene production from TCE was initially inhibited by NZVI, but after 331 h increased to levels observed for an NZVI-free system (7.6+/-0.3 micromol ethene produced in 502 h compared to 11.6+/-0.5 mmol in the NZVI-free system and 3.8+/-0.3 micromol ethene for NZVI alone). Apparently, cathodic H(2) was utilized as electron donor by dechlorinating bacteria, which recovered following the partial oxidation and presumably passivation of the NZVI. Overall, these results suggest that reductive treatment of chlorinated solvent sites with NZVI might be enhanced by the concurrent or subsequent participation of bacteria that exploit cathodic depolarization and reductive dechlorination as metabolic niches.

  19. Nanoscale Wicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jijie; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Mory; Noca, Flavio

    2003-11-01

    A wick is a bundle of fibers that by capillary attraction draws up to be burned a steady supply of the oil in lamps. In textile research, wicking is the process by which liquids are transported across or along fibers by capillary action (of relevance to perspiration). A similar phenomenon was recently discovered in our lab with mats of nanoscale fibers. A droplet containing a surfactant solution was placed on top of a well-aligned mat of carbon nanotubes: wicking was then observed as a film of liquid propagating within the nanocarpet, such as a stain or drop absorbed into a textile fabric. The nanoscale wicking process in carbon nano-arrays offers a simple and enabling technology for the processing (transport, mixing, filtering) of picoliters of fluids without any need for confinement (nanochannel) or bulky driving pressure apparatus. In this work, nanoscale wicking properties are quantified as a function of surfactant activity and carbon nanoarray geometry. The biomolecular sieving capability of the nanotube arrays is also put to test by the addition of biomolecules, while using the wicking process as the fluid driving force.

  20. Nanoscale Surface Characterization of Aqueous Copper Corrosion: Effects of Immersion Interval and Orthophosphate Concentration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Morphology changes for copper surfaces exposed to different water parameters were investigated at the nanoscale with atomic force microscopy (AFM), as influenced by changes in pH and the levels of orthophosphate ions. Synthetic water samples were designed to mimic physiological c...

  1. Nanoscale Surface Characterization of Aqueous Copper Corrosion: Effects of Immersion Interval and Orthophosphate Concentration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Morphology changes for copper surfaces exposed to different water parameters were investigated at the nanoscale with atomic force microscopy (AFM), as influenced by changes in pH and the levels of orthophosphate ions. Synthetic water samples were designed to mimic physiological c...

  2. Effect of nanoscale particles incorporation on microhardness of polymers for oral prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Zuccolotti, Bruna Carolina Rossatti; Moreno, Amalia; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Paulini, Marcela Borghi; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the incorporation of pigments on surface hardness of four acrylic resins subjected to thermocycling and analyze their elemental composition using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Materials and Methods: Twenty-one discs of each resin were fabricated, whereas seven had no additive, seven had 3% of nanoscale pigments and last seven had 10% of them. The percentage was obtained by measuring the total weight of each resin disc. Besides, seven discs composed by only nanoscale pigments were also fabricated, totalizing 91 discs. The pigment was weighed by using an analytical balance (BEL Analytical Equipment, SP, Brazil). The surface hardness was measured through a hardness tester machine before and after thermocycling (5–55°C, for 2000 cycles). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). The chemical composition of the discs composed only by nanoscale pigments was analyzed with EDS test. Results: Hardness of all resins decreased after thermocycling. The lowest values were observed on the discs with 3% of nanoscale pigments and discs fabricated only with them. EDS showed the presence of titanium dioxide. Conclusion: Discs with 7% of pigments (after thermocycling) showed higher hardness values. PMID:27630492

  3. The formation and characterization of nanoscale soft electronic devices: Application to memory, field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chih-Wei

    Organic semiconductor devices have aroused considerable interest because of the unique advantages provided by organic materials and devices. These advantages include low fabrication cost, high mechanical flexibility and versatility of the chemical structure. Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) have been extensively applied in display technology. But electronic memory and transistor using organic materials is still in the exploration stage. This dissertation focuses on the device fabrication and electrical characterization of organic bistable devices (OBDs) and organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). A comprehensive review of the organic materials and organic electronic devices are presented in Chapter 1. The first part of this dissertation discusses an organic bistable switching and memory, which has two terminal device structure with a nanoscale organic composite film sandwiched between two metal electrodes is demonstrated. A systematic study on the relationship between different fabrication parameters and device performance is discussed. Additionally, the device mechanism is investigated. The second part of this dissertation focuses on improving the performance of OTFTs as well as integrating the OLED and OTFT via tandem structures. First, the increasing performance of OTFTs is achieved by using a nano-composite layer as a gate insulator. Second, by interface modification between source-drain (S/D) electrodes and organic layers, high performance OTFTs are demonstrated. The bi-layer S/D electrodes show enhanced hole-injection efficiencies compared to those with only metal electrodes. The improvement is attributed to a reduction in the contact barrier and the prevention of metal diffusion into the organic layer and/or unfavorable chemical reactions between the organic layer and the metal electrode. Finally, OLED and OTFT are effectively integrated by inserting a metal oxide coupling layer. Both the OTFT and OLED achieve their individual performance after

  4. Electrode Potential-Induced Reconstruction of Au(100): Effect of Chemisorption of Nanoscale Dynamics as Probed by In-Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    conversion dynamics observed in the absence of specific 7 anion adsorption . The latter condition will be discussed in some detail 7e elsewhere, so...Effect of Chemisorption on Nanoscale Dynamics as Probed by In-Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy by Xiaoping Cao and Michael J. Weaver Prepared for...nanoscale real-space dynamics associated with the electrode potential-induced formation and removal of the hexagonal reconstruction on Au(l0O) in aqueous

  5. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  6. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  7. An open-source platform to study uniaxial stress effects on nanoscale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorello, G.; Schraff, M.; Zellekens, P.; Drechsler, U.; Bürge, M.; Steinauer, H. R.; Heller, R.; Tschudy, M.; Riel, H.

    2017-05-01

    We present an automatic measurement platform that enables the characterization of nanodevices by electrical transport and optical spectroscopy as a function of the uniaxial stress. We provide insights into and detailed descriptions of the mechanical device, the substrate design and fabrication, and the instrument control software, which is provided under open-source license. The capability of the platform is demonstrated by characterizing the piezo-resistance of an InAs nanowire device using a combination of electrical transport and Raman spectroscopy. The advantages of this measurement platform are highlighted by comparison with state-of-the-art piezo-resistance measurements in InAs nanowires. We envision that the systematic application of this methodology will provide new insights into the physics of nanoscale devices and novel materials for electronics, and thus contribute to the assessment of the potential of strain as a technology booster for nanoscale electronics.

  8. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those

  9. Single-charge transport in ambipolar silicon nanoscale field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Filipp; Konstantaras, Georgios; Wiel, Wilfred G. van der; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2015-04-27

    We report single-charge transport in ambipolar nanoscale MOSFETs, electrostatically defined in near-intrinsic silicon. We use the ambipolarity to demonstrate the confinement of either a few electrons or a few holes in exactly the same crystalline environment underneath a gate electrode. We find similar electron and hole quantum dot properties while the mobilities differ quantitatively like in microscale devices. The understanding and control of individual electrons and holes are essential for spin-based quantum information processing.

  10. Effects of nanoscale surface roughness on the resistivity of ultrathin epitaxial copper films.

    PubMed

    Timalsina, Yukta P; Horning, Andrew; Spivey, Robert F; Lewis, Kim M; Kuan, Tung-Sheng; Wang, Gwo-Ching; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2015-02-20

    The knowledge on the influence of surface roughness and the electron-phonon (el-ph) interaction on electrical transport properties of nanoscale metal films is important from both fundamental and technological points of view. Here we report a study of the temperature dependent electron transport properties of nanoscale copper films by measuring temperature dependent electrical resistivity with thickness ranging from 4 to 500 nm. We show that the residual resistivity, which is temperature independent, can be described quantitatively using both measured vertical surface root-mean-square roughness and lateral correlation length in the nanoscale, with no adjustable parameter, by a recent quasi-classical model developed by Chatterjee and Meyerovich (2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 245409-10). We also demonstrate that the temperature dependent component of the resistivity can be described using the Bloch-Grüneisen equation with a thickness dependent el-ph coupling constant and a thickness dependent Debye temperature. We show that the increase of the el-ph coupling constant with the decrease of film thickness gives rise to an enhancement of the temperature dependent component of the resistivity.

  11. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  12. Effect of grain boundary on nanoscale electronic properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon studied by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priti, Rubana B.; Mahat, Sandeep; Bommisetty, Venkat

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) based alloys have strong potential in cost-effective and flexible photovoltaics. However, nc-Si:H undergoes light induced degradation (LID), which degrades the device efficiency by over 15%. The microstructural processes responsible for the LID are still under debate. Several recent studies suggest that the generation of metastable defects at grain/ grain-boundary (GB) interface enhances density of traps, which limits the charge collection efficiency. Conventional characterization techniques can measure transport properties such as electrical conductivity or carrier mobility averaged over large sample volumes. However, nanoscale characterization tools, such as Scanning Kelvin probe Force Microscopy (KFM), reveal local electronic properties of grains and GBs which may lead to better understanding of microscopic process of metastability. The optoelectronic properties of nc-Si:H films were measured in dark and under illumination to study the effect of LID at the nanoscale. The surface potential and charge distribution were measured in as-deposited and photo-degraded samples using a custom-designed scanning probe microscopy tool installed in an environment controlled glove-box. Photodegradation resulted in an upward bending of the conduction band edge, suggesting accumulation of photo-generated charges at GBs. This effect is attributed to the generation of acceptor like defects (traps) at GBs during illumination. Density of defects is estimated from grain/GB width and absolute value of band bending.

  13. Monolayer-precision synthesis of molybdenum sulfide nanoparticles and their nanoscale size effects in the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Seo, Bora; Jung, Gwan Yeong; Sa, Young Jin; Jeong, Hu Young; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Kim, Ho Young; Kim, Jin Chul; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2015-04-28

    Metal sulfide-based nanostructured materials have emerged as promising catalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), and significant progress has been achieved in enhancing their activity and durability for the HER. The understanding of nanoscale size-dependent catalytic activities can suggest critical information regarding catalytic reactivity, providing the scientific basis for the design of advanced catalysts. However, nanoscale size effects in metal sulfide-based HER catalysts have not yet been established fully, due to the synthetic difficulty in precisely size-controlled metal sulfide nanoparticles. Here we report the preparation of molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) nanoparticles with monolayer precision from one to four layers with the nearly constant basal plane size of 5 nm, and their size-dependent catalytic activity in the HER. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we identified the most favorable single-, double-, and triple-layer MoS2 model structures for the HER, and calculated elementary step energetics of the HER over these three model structures. Combining HER activity measurements and the DFT calculation results, we establish that the turnover frequency of MoS2 nanoparticles in the HER increases in a quasi-linear manner with decreased layer numbers. Cobalt-promoted MoS2 nanoparticles also exhibited similar HER activity trend. We attribute the higher HER activity of smaller metal sulfide nanoparticles to the higher degree of oxidation, higher Mo-S coordination number, formation of the 1T phase, and lower activation energy required to overcome transition state. This insight into the nanoscale size-dependent HER activity trend will facilitate the design of advanced HER catalysts as well as other hydrotreating catalysts.

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: A novel analytical thermal model for multilevel nano-scale interconnects considering the via effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhang-Ming; Li, Ru; Hao, Bao-Tian; Yang, Yin-Tang

    2009-11-01

    Based on the heat diffusion equation of multilevel interconnects, a novel analytical thermal model for multilevel nano-scale interconnects considering the via effect is presented, which can compute quickly the temperature of multilevel interconnects, with substrate temperature given. Based on the proposed model and the 65 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process parameter, the temperature of nano-scale interconnects is computed. The computed results show that the via effect has a great effect on local interconnects, but the reduction of thermal conductivity has little effect on local interconnects. With the reduction of thermal conductivity or the increase of current density, however, the temperature of global interconnects rises greatly, which can result in a great deterioration in their performance. The proposed model can be applied to computer aided design (CAD) of very large-scale integrated circuits (VLSIs) in nano-scale technologies.

  15. Observation of the spin-based plasmonic effect in nanoscale structures.

    PubMed

    Gorodetski, Y; Niv, A; Kleiner, V; Hasman, E

    2008-07-25

    Observation of surface-plasmon phenomena that are dependent upon the handedness of the circularly polarized incident light (spin) is presented. The polarization-dependent near-field intensity distribution obtained in our experiment is attributed to the presence of a geometric phase arising from the interaction of light with an anisotropic and inhomogeneous nanoscale structure. A near-field vortex surface mode with a spin-dependent topological charge was obtained in a plasmonic microcavity. The remarkable phenomenon of polarization-sensitive focusing in a plasmonic structure was also demonstrated.

  16. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapetek, P.; Koenders, L.

    2011-09-01

    This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2010 seminar held in Brno, Czech Republic. It was the 5th Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 9th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) and the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET. There were two workshops that were integrated into NanoScale 2010: first a workshop presenting the results obtained in NANOTRACE, a European Metrology Research Project (EMRP) on displacement-measuring optical interferometers, and second a workshop about the European metrology landscape in nanometrology related to thin films, scanning probe microscopy and critical dimension. The aim of this workshop was to bring together developers, applicants and metrologists working in this field of nanometrology and to discuss future needs. For more information see www.co-nanomet.eu. The articles in this special issue of Measurement Science and Technology cover some novel scientific results. This issue can serve also as a representative selection of topics that are currently being investigated in the field of European and world-wide nanometrology. Besides traditional topics of dimensional metrology, like development of novel interferometers or laser stabilization techniques, some novel interesting trends in the field of nanometrology are observed. As metrology generally reflects the needs of scientific and industrial research, many research topics addressed refer to current trends in nanotechnology, too, focusing on traceability and improved measurement accuracy in this field. While historically the most studied standards in nanometrology were related to simple geometric structures like step heights or 1D or 2D gratings, now we are facing tasks to measure 3D structures and many unforeseen questions arising from interesting physical

  17. Size effect and scaling power-law for superelasticity in shape-memory alloys at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, Jose F; Nó, Maria L; López-Ferreño, Iñaki; Hernández-Saz, Jesús; Molina, Sergio I; Chuvilin, Andrey; San Juan, Jose M

    2017-08-01

    Shape-memory alloys capable of a superelastic stress-induced phase transformation and a high displacement actuation have promise for applications in micro-electromechanical systems for wearable healthcare and flexible electronic technologies. However, some of the fundamental aspects of their nanoscale behaviour remain unclear, including the question of whether the critical stress for the stress-induced martensitic transformation exhibits a size effect similar to that observed in confined plasticity. Here we provide evidence of a strong size effect on the critical stress that induces such a transformation with a threefold increase in the trigger stress in pillars milled on [001] L21 single crystals from a Cu-Al-Ni shape-memory alloy from 2 μm to 260 nm in diameter. A power-law size dependence of n = -2 is observed for the nanoscale superelasticity. Our observation is supported by the atomic lattice shearing and an elastic model for homogeneous martensite nucleation.

  18. Effects of particle composition and environmental parameters on catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene by nanoscale bimetallic Ni-Fe.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianjun; Qian, Yajing; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Lutao; Ge, Yijie; Zhang, Jianghao; Yu, Jiang; Ma, Xingmao

    2014-05-01

    Catalytic nickel was successfully incorporated into nanoscale iron to enhance its dechlorination efficiency for trichloroethylene (TCE), one of the most commonly detected chlorinated organic compounds in groundwater. Ethane was the predominant product. The greatest dechlorination efficiency was achieved at 22 molar percent of nickel. This nanoscale Ni-Fe is poorly ordered and inhomogeneous; iron dissolution occurred whereas nickel was relatively stable during the 24-hr reaction. The morphological characterization provided significant new insights on the mechanism of catalytic hydrodechlorination by bimetallic nanoparticles. TCE degradation and ethane production rates were greatly affected by environmental parameters such as solution pH, temperature and common groundwater ions. Both rate constants decreased and then increased over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0, with the minimum value occurring at pH 7.5. TCE degradation rate constant showed an increasing trend over the temperature range of 10 to 25°C. However, ethane production rate constant increased and then decreased over the range, with the maximum value occurring at 20°C. Most salts in the solution appeared to enhance the reaction in the first half hour but overall they displayed an inhibitory effect. Combined ions showed a similar effect as individual salts.

  19. Synthesis of Nanoscale TiO2 and Study of the Effect of Their Crystal Structure on Single Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Ismagilov, Z. R.; Shikina, N. V.; Mazurkova, N. A.; Tsikoza, L. T.; Tuzikov, F. V.; Ushakov, V. A.; Ishchenko, A. V.; Rudina, N. A.; Korneev, D. V.; Ryabchikova, E. I.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO2) on cell responses, we synthesized four modifications of the TiO2 (amorphous, anatase, brookite, and rutile) capable of keeping their physicochemical characteristics in a cell culture medium. The modifications of nanoscale TiO2 were obtained by hydrolysis of TiCl4 and Ti(i-OC3H7)4 (TIP) upon variation of the synthesis conditions; their textural, morphological, structural, and dispersion characteristics were examined by a set of physicochemical methods: XRD, BET, SAXS, DLS, AFM, SEM, and HR-TEM. The effect of synthesis conditions (nature of precursor, pH, temperature, and addition of a complexing agent) on the structural-dispersion properties of TiO2 nanoparticles was studied. The hydrolysis methods providing the preparation of amorphous, anatase, brookite, and rutile modifications of TiO2 nanoparticles 3–5 nm in size were selected. Examination of different forms of TiO2 nanoparticles interaction with MDCK cells by transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections revealed different cell responses after treatment with different crystalline modifications and amorphous form of TiO2. The obtained results allowed us to conclude that direct contact of the nanoparticles with cell plasma membrane is the primary and critical step of their interaction and defines a subsequent response of the cell. PMID:22623903

  20. Tunable nanoscale graphene magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Pisana, Simone; Braganca, Patrick M; Marinero, Ernesto E; Gurney, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    The detection of magnetic fields with nanoscale resolution is a fundamental challenge for scanning probe magnetometry, biosensing, and magnetic storage. Current technologies based on giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance are limited at small sizes by thermal magnetic noise and spin-torque instability. These limitations do not affect Hall sensors consisting of high mobility semiconductors or metal thin films, but the loss of magnetic flux throughout the sensor's thickness greatly limits spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we demonstrate graphene extraordinary magnetoresistance devices that combine the Hall effect and enhanced geometric magnetoresistance, yielding sensitivities rivaling that of state of the art sensors but do so with subnanometer sense layer thickness at the sensor surface. Back-gating provides the ability to control sensor characteristics, which can mitigate both inherent variations in material properties and fabrication-induced device-to-device variability that is unavoidable at the nanoscale.

  1. Excitons in nanoscale systems.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Gregory D; Rumbles, Garry

    2006-09-01

    Nanoscale systems are forecast to be a means of integrating desirable attributes of molecular and bulk regimes into easily processed materials. Notable examples include plastic light-emitting devices and organic solar cells, the operation of which hinge on the formation of electronic excited states, excitons, in complex nanostructured materials. The spectroscopy of nanoscale materials reveals details of their collective excited states, characterized by atoms or molecules working together to capture and redistribute excitation. What is special about excitons in nanometre-sized materials? Here we present a cross-disciplinary review of the essential characteristics of excitons in nanoscience. Topics covered include confinement effects, localization versus delocalization, exciton binding energy, exchange interactions and exciton fine structure, exciton-vibration coupling and dynamics of excitons. Important examples are presented in a commentary that overviews the present understanding of excitons in quantum dots, conjugated polymers, carbon nanotubes and photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna complexes.

  2. Nanoscale 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenders, Ludger; Ducourtieux, Sebastien

    2014-04-01

    The accurate determination of the properties of micro- and nano-structures is essential in research and development. It is also a prerequisite in process control and quality assurance in industry. In most cases, especially at the nanometer range, knowledge of the dimensional properties of structures is the fundamental base, to which further physical properties are linked. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments, suitable measurement procedures as well as calibration artifacts and methods. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2013 seminar held in Paris, France, on 25 and 26 April. It was the 6th Seminar on NanoScale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 10th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais. Three satellite meetings related to nanometrology were coupled to the seminar. The first one was an open Symposium on Scanning Probe Microscopy Standardization organized by the ISO/TC 201/SC9 technical committee. The two others were specific meetings focused on two European Metrology Research Projects funded by the European Association of National Metrology Institutes (EURAMET) (see www.euramet.org), the first one focused on the improvement of the traceability for high accuracy devices dealing with sub-nm length measurement and implementing optical interferometers or capacitive sensors (JRP SIB08 subnano), the second one aiming to develop a new metrological traceability for the measurement of the mechanical properties of nano-objects (JRP NEW05 MechProNo). More than 100 experts from industry, calibration laboratories and metrology institutes from around the world joined the NanoScale 2013 Seminar to attend 23 oral and 64 poster

  3. Cosolvent Effects on Dechlorination of Soil-Sorbed Polychlorinated Biphenyls Using Bentonite Clay-Templated Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Sheng, G Daniel; McCall, Wesley

    2016-12-06

    Zero-valent iron synthesized using bentonite clay as a template (CZVI) was tested for its reactivity toward polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) dechlorination in soil slurries. Aqueous-phase decachlorobiphenyl (PCB209) was rapidly dechlorinated by CZVI with a reaction rate 10 times greater than that by conventional nanoscale zerovalent iron. This superior reactivity was due largely to the nanoscale size (∼0.5 nm) of the ZVI particles located in the clay galleries. In soil slurries where PCB209 was strongly soil-bound, adding ethanol as an organic cosolvent led to increased PCB209 desorption into the liquid phase, thereby enhancing the PCB209 dechlorination with CZVI. The more effective PCB209 dechlorination in such a cosolvent system also promoted the subsequent stepwise dechlorinative process, leading to a relatively more removal of chlorine in the product mixture. The dechlorination became more rapid as the ethanol fraction increased from 10% to 50%, due apparently to the increasingly greater PCB209 desorption and thus facilitated contact with CZVI. Further increase in ethanol fraction above 50% led to an insignificant enhancement in degradation rate, due partially to attenuated contact of PCB209 with CZVI and reduced proton source from limited water content in the liquid. It is suggested that addition of organic cosolvents may make CZVI potentially useful for remediation of soils containing halogenated organic contaminants.

  4. Effect of geometrical constraint condition on the formation of nanoscale twins in the Ni-based metallic glass composite

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M H; Kim, B S; Kim, D H; Ott, R T; Sansoz, F; Eckert, J

    2014-04-25

    We investigated the effect of geometrically constrained stress-strain conditions on the formation of nanotwins in alpha-brass phase reinforced Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 metallic glass (MG) matrix deformed under macroscopic uniaxial compression. The specific geometrically constrained conditions in the samples lead to a deviation from a simple uniaxial state to a multi-axial stress state, for which nanocrystallization in the MG matrix together with nanoscale twinning of the brass reinforcement is observed in localized regions during plastic flow. The nanocrystals in the MG matrix and the appearance of the twinned structure in the reinforcements indicate that the strain energy is highly confined and the local stress reaches a very high level upon yielding. Both the effective distribution of reinforcements on the strain enhancement of composite and the effects of the complicated stress states on the development of nanotwins in the second-phase brass particles are discussed.

  5. Comparison of the bias voltage effect and the force effect during the nanoscale AFM electric lithography on the copper thin film surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Lin, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As one of the tip-based nanoscale machining methods, AFM-based nanolithography has been proved to be capable of fabricating nanostructures and devices on a wide range of materials by means of mechanical force, bias voltage, chemical reaction, etc. In this paper, we have compared the influences of the bias voltage effect and the force effect during the nanoscale AFM electric lithography on the metallic copper film surface respectively through the bias voltage dominating scheme and the contact force dominating scheme. The geometric sizes of the line structures and the area patterns fabricated under the two schemes with different parameter settings were compared to obtain the machining characteristics and mechanisms of the two distinct effects separately. The ratios of debris amount to the total material removal amount under the two schemes were quantitatively evaluated. Furthermore, both the arbitrary line structure with high aspect ratio and the area pattern with small surface roughness were fabricated under the appropriate scheme and parameter settings. This study is of great help to effectively achieve the desired nanoscale patterns by AFM electric lithography for their promising applications in the fabrication of various MEMS or NEMS devices. SCANNING 38:412-420, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Field Effect Modulation of Ion Transport in Silicon-On-Insulator Nanopores and Their Application as Nanoscale Coulter Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Punarvasu

    In the last few years, significant advances in nanofabrication have allowed tailoring of structures and materials at a molecular level enabling nanofabrication with precise control of dimensions and organization at molecular length scales, a development leading to significant advances in nanoscale systems. Although, the direction of progress seems to follow the path of microelectronics, the fundamental physics in a nanoscale system changes more rapidly compared to microelectronics, as the size scale is decreased. The changes in length, area, and volume ratios due to reduction in size alter the relative influence of various physical effects determining the overall operation of a system in unexpected ways. One such category of nanofluidic structures demonstrating unique ionic and molecular transport characteristics are nanopores. Nanopores derive their unique transport characteristics from the electrostatic interaction of nanopore surface charge with aqueous ionic solutions. In this doctoral research cylindrical nanopores, in single and array configuration, were fabricated in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) using a combination of electron beam lithography (EBL) and reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication method presented is compatible with standard semiconductor foundries and allows fabrication of nanopores with desired geometries and precise dimensional control, providing near ideal and isolated physical modeling systems to study ion transport at the nanometer level. Ion transport through nanopores was characterized by measuring ionic conductances of arrays of nanopores of various diameters for a wide range of concentration of aqueous hydrochloric acid (HCl) ionic solutions. Measured ionic conductances demonstrated two distinct regimes based on surface charge interactions at low ionic concentrations and nanopore geometry at high ionic concentrations. Field effect modulation of ion transport through nanopore arrays, in a fashion similar to semiconductor transistors

  7. Nanoscale nonlinear radio frequency properties of bulk Nb: Origins of extrinsic nonlinear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Tamin; Ghamsari, B. G.; Bieler, T.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of niobium-based superconducting radio frequency (SRF) particle-accelerator cavities can be sensitive to localized defects that give rise to quenches at high accelerating gradients. In order to identify these material defects on bulk Nb surfaces at their operating frequency and temperature, a wide-bandwidth microwave microscope with localized and strong RF magnetic fields is developed by integrating a magnetic write head into the near-field microwave microscope to enable mapping of the local electrodynamic response in the multi-GHz frequency regime at cryogenic temperatures. This magnetic writer demonstrates a localized and strong RF magnetic field on bulk Nb surface with Bsurface>102 mT and submicron resolution. By measuring the nonlinear response of the superconductor, nonlinearity coming from the nanoscale weak-link Josephson junctions due to the contaminated surface in the cavity-fabrication process is demonstrated.

  8. Effect of micro- and nanoscale topography on the adhesion of bacterial cells to solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lillian C; Fang, Jean; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana A; Worobo, Randy W; Moraru, Carmen I

    2013-04-01

    Attachment and biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens on surfaces in natural, industrial, and hospital settings lead to infections and illnesses and even death. Minimizing bacterial attachment to surfaces using controlled topography could reduce the spreading of pathogens and, thus, the incidence of illnesses and subsequent human and financial losses. In this context, the attachment of key microorganisms, including Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, to silica and alumina surfaces with micron and nanoscale topography was investigated. The results suggest that orientation of the attached cells occurs preferentially such as to maximize their contact area with the surface. Moreover, the bacterial cells exhibited different morphologies, including different number and size of cellular appendages, depending on the topographical details of the surface to which they attached. This suggests that bacteria may utilize different mechanisms of attachment in response to surface topography. These results are important for the design of novel microbe-repellant materials.

  9. Nano-scale machining of polycrystalline coppers - effects of grain size and machining parameters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive investigation on nano-scale machining of polycrystalline copper structures is carried out by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Simulation cases are constructed to study the impacts of grain size, as well as various machining parameters. Six polycrystalline copper structures are produced, which have the corresponding equivalent grain sizes of 5.32, 6.70, 8.44, 13.40, 14.75, and 16.88 nm, respectively. Three levels of depth of cut, machining speed, and tool rake angle are also considered. The results show that greater cutting forces are required in nano-scale polycrystalline machining with the increase of depth of cut, machining speed, and the use of the negative tool rake angles. The distributions of equivalent stress are consistent with the cutting force trends. Moreover, it is discovered that in the grain size range of 5.32 to 14.75 nm, the cutting forces and equivalent stress increase with the increase of grain size for the nano-structured copper, while the trends reserve after the grain size becomes even higher. This discovery confirms the existence of both the regular Hall–Petch relation and the inverse Hall–Petch relation in polycrystalline machining, and the existence of a threshold grain size allows one of the two relations to become dominant. The dislocation-grain boundary interaction shows that the resistance of the grain boundary to dislocation movement is the fundamental mechanism of the Hall–Petch relation, while grain boundary diffusion and movement is the reason of the inverse Hall–Petch relation. PMID:24267785

  10. Effects of nanoscale inclusions on the dynamics and properties of polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuteja, Anish

    In recent times, nanofillers have attracted the interest of a variety of research groups as these materials can cause unusual mechanical, electrical, optical and thermal enhancements. These enhancements are induced by the presence of the nanoparticles, their interaction with the host matrix, and also quite critically, by their state of dispersion. In this work we find that nanoparticles can be dispersed in linear polymers, despite chemical dissimilarity, when the nanoparticle is smaller than the linear polymer, as demonstrated by the miscibility of polyethylene (PE) nanoparticles in linear polystyrene (PS) or PS nanoparticles in poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) (PS-PE and PS-PMMA are classical phase separating systems). If the particles become larger than the polymer, phase separation occurs with even polystyrene nanoparticles phase separating from linear polystyrene. In addition, small angle neutron scattering shows the linear polymer becomes distorted on the addition of nanoparticles in the stable systems and is far from its equilibrium conformation. This aspect demonstrates the uniqueness of nanoscale thermodynamics as phase separation is expected (i.e. depletion flocculation) and we believe that the nanoparticles are stabilized by enthalpic gain. When properly dispersed, the addition of nanoparticles causes a large reduction (up to 90%) in the melt viscosity of the system, a result at odds with Einstein's century old prediction and experimental observations of the viscosity increase particles provide to liquids (i.e. slurries and suspensions) and melts. Also, the addition of specific nanoparticles, apart from improving the polymer processing by reducing the viscosity, can simultaneously lead to enhanced electrical conductivity (greater than Maxwell's prediction), enhanced mechanical damping (up to 5 fold increase), enhanced thermal stability/fire retardancy, and can even make the polymers magnetic. The above and other unusual nanoscale phenomena are discussed

  11. Nano-scale machining of polycrystalline coppers - effects of grain size and machining parameters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Yachao; Yang, Xiaoping

    2013-11-22

    In this study, a comprehensive investigation on nano-scale machining of polycrystalline copper structures is carried out by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Simulation cases are constructed to study the impacts of grain size, as well as various machining parameters. Six polycrystalline copper structures are produced, which have the corresponding equivalent grain sizes of 5.32, 6.70, 8.44, 13.40, 14.75, and 16.88 nm, respectively. Three levels of depth of cut, machining speed, and tool rake angle are also considered. The results show that greater cutting forces are required in nano-scale polycrystalline machining with the increase of depth of cut, machining speed, and the use of the negative tool rake angles. The distributions of equivalent stress are consistent with the cutting force trends. Moreover, it is discovered that in the grain size range of 5.32 to 14.75 nm, the cutting forces and equivalent stress increase with the increase of grain size for the nano-structured copper, while the trends reserve after the grain size becomes even higher. This discovery confirms the existence of both the regular Hall-Petch relation and the inverse Hall-Petch relation in polycrystalline machining, and the existence of a threshold grain size allows one of the two relations to become dominant. The dislocation-grain boundary interaction shows that the resistance of the grain boundary to dislocation movement is the fundamental mechanism of the Hall-Petch relation, while grain boundary diffusion and movement is the reason of the inverse Hall-Petch relation.

  12. Effect of nanoscale geometry on molecular conformation: vibrational sum-frequency generation of alkanethiols on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Weeraman, Champika; Yatawara, Achani K; Bordenyuk, Andrey N; Benderskii, Alexander V

    2006-11-08

    Vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy was used to study the nanoscale geometric effects on molecular conformation of dodecanethiol ligand on gold nanoparticles of varying size between 1.8 and 23 nm. By analyzing the CH3 and CH2 stretch transitions of dodecanethiol using the spectroscopic propensity rules for the SFG process, we observe the increase of the gauche defects in the alkyl chain of the ligand on the nanoparticle surface when the curvature approaches the size of the molecule ( approximately 1.6 nm). In contrast, linear infrared absorption and Raman spectra, governed by different selection rules, do not allow observation of the size-dependent conformational changes. The results are understood in terms of the geometric packing effect, where the curvature of the nanoparticle surface results in the increased conical volume available for the alkyl chain.

  13. Two-dimensional threshold voltage model of a nanoscale silicon-on-insulator tunneling field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Chen; Zhang, He-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Hu, Hui-Yong; Wang, Bin; Lou, Yong-Le; Zhou, Chun-Yu

    2013-03-01

    The tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET) is a potential candidate for the post-CMOS era. In this paper, a threshold voltage model is developed for this new kind of device. First, two-dimensional (2D) models are used to describe the distributions of potential and electric field in the channel and two depletion regions. Then based on the physical definition of threshold voltage for the nanoscale TFET, the threshold voltage model is developed. The accuracy of the proposed model is verified by comparing the calculated results with the 2D device simulation data. It has been demonstrated that the effects of varying the device parameters can easily be investigated using the model presented in this paper. This threshold voltage model provides a valuable reference to TFET device design, simulation, and fabrication.

  14. 3-D compact model for nanoscale junctionless triple-gate nanowire MOSFETs, including simple treatment of quantization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtij, Thomas; Kloes, Alexander; Iñíguez, Benjamín

    2015-10-01

    In this work we briefly review our 2-D compact model for nanoscale junctionless (JL) double-gate (DG) MOSFETs and present and extension for 3-D triple-gate nanowire (TG-NW) devices. The model itself is physics-based and derived in closed-form. Important short-channel effects (SCEs) are covered by the model, as well as carrier quantization effects (QEs). The modeling of QEs in JL devices differs from their common treatment in inversion mode devices and therefore, requires some special attention. The model is verified versus TCAD simulations and measurement data, which were provide through the "SQWIRE" project, by the LETI in Grenoble, France. Additionally, important device characteristics such as symmetry around Vds = 0 V and continuity of the drain current Ids at derivatives of higher order (up to third order) are in focus of this work.

  15. Multi-physics simulation of metal printing at micro/nanoscale using meniscus-confined electrodeposition: Effect of environmental humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsali, Seyedreza; Daryadel, Soheil; Zhou, Zhong; Behroozfar, Ali; Qian, Dong; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Capability to print metals at micro/nanoscale in arbitrary 3D patterns at local points of interest will have applications in nano-electronics and sensors. Meniscus-confined electrodeposition (MCED) is a manufacturing process that enables depositing metals from an electrolyte containing nozzle (pipette) in arbitrary 3D patterns. In this process, a meniscus (liquid bridge or capillary) between the pipette tip and the substrate governs the localized electrodeposition process. Fabrication of metallic microstructures using this process is a multi-physics process in which electrodeposition, fluid dynamics, and mass and heat transfer physics are simultaneously involved. We utilized multi-physics finite element simulation, guided by experimental data, to understand the effect of water evaporation from the liquid meniscus at the tip of the nozzle for deposition of free-standing copper microwires in MCED process.

  16. The investigation of nanoscale effects on schottky interfaces and the scattering rates of high resistivity metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durcan, Christopher

    Understanding the transport of electrons through materials and across interfaces is fundamental to modern day electronics. As electrons travel, interactions with defects within the crystal lattice induce scattering which gives rise to resistivity. At the interface between two materials, electrostatic barriers exist which can impede the flow of electrons. The work of this thesis is to further the understanding of electron transport by measuring the transport across metal-semiconductor interfaces at the nanoscale and measure scattering phenomena in metals. The measurement technique ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) was used due to its ability to probe the scattering processes within a metal film and across metal semiconductor interfaces with nanoscale resolution. It was discovered that the hot electron transmission of the W/Si(001) Schottky barrier decreases over a period of 21 days with the initial Schottky barrier height of 0.71eV decreasing to 0.62eV. The spatial map changes dramatically from 98% of the spectra able to be fit to only 27%. This is supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing the formation of a tungsten silicide which increases in thickness. It was discovered that the deposition of tungsten on silicon using electron beam evaporation and RF magnetron sputtering resulted in dramatic differences in the Schottky barrier height and transport of hot electrons. A difference of ˜70meV was measured in the Schottky barrier height's for both p-type and n-type silicon. Spatial maps show a uniform barrier height for the sputter film and varying barrier height for the e-beam film. Histograms show a symmetric gaussian profile for the sputtered film and an asymmetric profile for the evaporated film, arising from an increase in elastic scattering. The hot electron attenuation length of tungsten and chromium thin films were measured on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates. An attenuation length of 2.26nm was measured at 1.0V bias for tungsten

  17. Functionalising surfaces at the nanoscale using plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Moore, R

    2009-01-01

    Plasma technology offers a highly effective toolbox for nanoscale surface engineering of materials. The potential variety of nanoscale features and new properties that can be achieved are reviewed here.

  18. Dissociative electron attachment in nanoscale ice films: Thickness and charge trapping effects

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.C.; Orlando, T.M.

    1998-03-01

    The yield and kinetic energy (KE) distributions of D{sup {minus}} ions produced via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) resonances in nanoscale D{sub 2}O ice films are collected as a function of film thickness. The {sup 2}B{sub 1}, {sup 2}A{sub 1}, and {sup 2}B{sub 2} DEA resonances shift to higher energies and their D{sup {minus}} ion yields first increase and then decrease as the D{sub 2}O films thicken. The D{sup {minus}} KE distributions also shift to higher energy with increasing film thickness. We interpret the changes in the DEA yield and the D{sup {minus}} KE distributions in terms of modifications in the electronic and geometric structure of the surface of the film as it thickens. A small amount of charge build-up occurs following prolonged electron beam exposure at certain energies, which primarily affects the D{sup {minus}} KE distributions. Charge trapping measurements indicate that an enhancement in the trapping cross section occurs at energies near zero and between 6 and 10 eV. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Self-assembled nanoscale coordination polymers with trigger release properties for effective anticancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Demin; Poon, Christopher; Lu, Kuangda; He, Chunbai; Lin, Wenbin

    2014-06-01

    Nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs) are self-assembled from metal ions and organic bridging ligands, and can overcome many drawbacks of existing drug delivery systems by virtue of tunable compositions, sizes and shapes, high drug loadings, ease of surface modification and intrinsic biodegradability. Here we report the self-assembly of zinc bisphosphonate NCPs that carry 48±3 wt% cisplatin prodrug and 45±5 wt% oxaliplatin prodrug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in mice show minimal uptake of pegylated NCPs by the mononuclear phagocyte system and excellent blood circulation half-lives of 16.4±2.9 and 12.0±3.9 h for the NCPs carrying cisplatin and oxaliplatin, respectively. In all tumour xenograft models evaluated, including CT26 colon cancer, H460 lung cancer and AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer, pegylated NCPs show superior potency and efficacy compared with free drugs. As the first example of using NCPs as nanotherapeutics with enhanced antitumour activities, this study establishes NCPs as a promising drug delivery platform for cancer therapy.

  20. Method and apparatus for remote sensing of molecular species at nanoscale utilizing a reverse photoacoustic effect

    DOEpatents

    Su, Ming [Oviedo, FL; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Hedden, David [Lenoir City, TN

    2010-02-23

    A method and apparatus for identifying a sample, involves illuminating the sample with light of varying wavelengths, transmitting an acoustic signal against the sample from one portion and receiving a resulting acoustic signal on another portion, detecting a change of phase in the acoustic signal corresponding to the light of varying wavelengths, and analyzing the change of phase in the acoustic signal for the varying wavelengths of illumination to identify the sample. The apparatus has a controlled source for illuminating the sample with light of varying wavelengths, a transmitter for transmitting an acoustic wave, a receiver for receiving the acoustic wave and converting the acoustic wave to an electronic signal, and an electronic circuit for detecting a change of phase in the acoustic wave corresponding to respective ones of the varying wavelengths and outputting the change of phase for the varying wavelengths to allow identification of the sample. The method and apparatus can be used to detect chemical composition or visual features. A transmission mode and a reflection mode of operation are disclosed. The method and apparatus can be applied at nanoscale to detect molecules in a biological sample.

  1. Effects of nitrate on the treatment of lead contaminated groundwater by nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Su, Yiming; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Zhou, Xuefei; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Weixian; Keller, Arturo A; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-09-15

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) is efficient for removing Pb(2+) and nitrate from water. However, the influence of nitrate, a common groundwater anion, on Pb(2+) removal by nZVI is not well understood. In this study, we showed that under excess Fe(0) conditions (molar ratio of Fe(0)/nitrate>4), Pb(2+) ions were immobilized more quickly (<5 min) than in nitrate-free systems (∼ 15 min) due to increasing pH. With nitrate in excess (molar ratio of Fe(0)/nitrate<4), nitrate stimulated the formation of crystal PbxFe3-xO4 (ferrite), which provided additional Pb(2+) removal. However, ∼ 7% of immobilized Pb(2+) ions were released into aqueous phase within 2h due to ferrite deformation. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) values below -600 mV correlated with excess Fe(0) conditions (complete Pb(2+) immobilization), while ORP values ≥-475 mV characterized excess nitrate conditions (ferrite process and Pb(2+) release occurrence). This study indicates that ORP monitoring is important for proper management of nZVI-based remediation in the subsurface to avoid lead remobilization in the presence of nitrate.

  2. Effect of strontium ranelate on bone mineral: Analysis of nanoscale compositional changes.

    PubMed

    Rossi, André L; Moldovan, Simona; Querido, William; Rossi, Alexandre; Werckmann, Jacques; Ersen, Ovidiu; Farina, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Strontium ranelate has been used to prevent bone loss and stimulate bone regeneration. Although strontium may integrate into the bone crystal lattice, the chemical and structural modifications of the bone when strontium interacts with the mineral phase are not completely understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate apatite from the mandibles of rats treated with strontium ranelate in the drinking water and compare its characteristics with those from untreated rats and synthetic apatites with and without strontium. Electron energy loss near edge structures from phosphorus, carbon, calcium and strontium were obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. The strontium signal was detected in the biological and synthetic samples containing strontium. The relative quantification of carbon by analyzing the CK edge at an energy loss of ΔE = 284 eV showed an increase in the number of carbonate groups in the bone mineral of treated rats. A synthetic strontium-containing sample used as control did not exhibit a carbon signal. This study showed physicochemical modifications in the bone mineral at the nanoscale caused by the systemic administration of strontium ranelate.

  3. Effect of enamel morphology on nanoscale adhesion forces of streptococcal bacteria : An AFM study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanyong; Zhao, Yongqi; Zheng, Sainan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Jinglin; Tang, Yi; Jiang, Li; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We explore the influence of enamel surface morphology on nanoscale bacterial adhesion forces. Three dimensional morphology characteristics of enamel slices, which were treated with phosphoric acid (for 0 s, 5 s, 10 s, 20 s, and 30 s), were acquired. Adhesion forces of three initial colonizers (Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Streptococcus mitis) and two cariogenic bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus) with etched enamel surfaces were determined. Comparison of the forces was made by using bacterial probe method under atomic force microscope (AFM) in adhesion buffer. The results showed that enamel morphology was significantly altered by etching treatment. The roughness, peak-to-valley height, and valley-to-valley width of the depth profile, surface area, and volume increased linearly with acid exposure time, and reached the maximum at 30s, respectively. The adhesion forces of different strains increased accordingly with etching time. Adhesion forces of S. oralis, S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. sobrinus reached the maximum values of 0.81 nN, 0.84 nN, 0.73 nN, and 0.64 nN with enamel treated for 20s, respectively, whereas that of S. sanguinis at 10s (1.28nN), and dropped on coarser enamel surfaces. In conclusion, enamel micro-scale morphology may significantly alter the direct adhesion forces of bacteria. And there may be a threshold roughness for bacterial adhesion on enamel surface. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Design of Ternary Nanoalloy Catalysts: Effect of Nanoscale Alloying and Structural Perfection on Electrocatalytic Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Fang, Bin; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Zhu, Pengyu; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Chen, Yongsheng; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Yang, Lefu; Shao, Minhua; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-10-22

    The ability to tune the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in nanoalloy catalysts is essential for achieving the ultimate goal of high activity and stability of catalyst by design. This article shows this ability with a ternary nanoalloy of platinum with vanadium and cobalt for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. The strategy is to enable nanoscale alloying and structural perfection through oxidative–reductive thermochemical treatments. The structural manipulation is shown to produce a significant enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity of the ternary nanoalloy catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction. Mass activities as high as 1 A/mg of Pt have been achieved by this strategy based on direct measurements of the kinetic currents from rotating disk electrode data. Using a synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique coupled with atomic pair function analysis and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in nanoalloy catalysts prepared by the oxidative–reductive thermochemical treatments were examined. A phase transition has been observed, showing an fcc-type structure of the as-prepared and the lower-temperature-treated particles into an fct-type structure for the particles treated at the higher temperature. The results reveal a thermochemically driven evolution of the nanoalloys from a chemically disordered state into chemically ordered state with an enhanced degree of alloying. The increase in the chemical ordering and shrinking of interatomic distances as a result of thermochemical treatment at increased temperature is shown to increase the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction, exhibiting an optimal activity at 600 °C. It is the alloying and structural perfection that allows the optimization of the catalytic performance in a controllable way, highlighting the significant role of atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering

  5. Design of Ternary Nanoalloy Catalysts: Effect of Nanoscale Alloying and Structural Perfection on Electrocatalytic Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Fang, Bin; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Zhu, Pengyu; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Chen, Yongsheng; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Yang, Lefu; Shao, Minhua; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-11-27

    The ability to tune the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in nanoalloy catalysts is essential for achieving the ultimate goal of high activity and stability of catalyst by design. This article demonstrates this ability with a ternary nanoalloy of platinum with vanadium and cobalt for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. The strategy is to enable nanoscale alloying and structural perfection through oxidative–reductive thermochemical treatments. The structural manipulation is shown to produce a significant enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity of the ternary nanoalloy catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction. Mass activities as high as 1 A/mg of Pt have been achieved by this strategy based on direct measurements of the kinetic currents from rotating disk electrode data. Using a synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique coupled with atomic pair function analysis and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in nanoalloy catalysts prepared by the oxidative–reductive thermochemical treatments were examined. A phase transition has been observed, showing an fcc-type structure of the as-prepared and the lower-temperature-treated particles into an fct-type structure for the particles treated at the higher temperature. The results reveal a thermochemically driven evolution of the nanoalloys from a chemically disordered state into chemically ordered state with an enhanced degree of alloying. The increase in the chemical ordering and shrinking of interatomic distances as a result of thermochemical treatment at increased temperature is shown to increase the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction, exhibiting an optimal activity at 600 °C. It is the alloying and structural perfection that allows the optimization of the catalytic performance in a controllable way, highlighting the significant role of atomic-scale structural and chemical

  6. Nanoscale memory elements based on the superconductor-ferromagnet proximity effect and spin-transfer torque magnetization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Burm

    Superconducting-ferromagnetic hybrid devices have potential for a practical memory technology compatible with superconducting logic circuits and may help realize energy-efficient, high-performance superconducting computers. We have developed Josephson junction devices with pseudo-spin-valve barriers. We observed changes in Josephson critical current depending on the magnetization state of the barrier (parallel or anti-parallel) through the superconductor-ferromagnet proximity effect. This effect persists to nanoscale devices in contrast to the remanent field effect. In nanopillar devices, the magnetization states of the pseudo-spin-valve barriers could also be switched with applied bias currents at 4 K, which is consistent with the spin-transfer torque effect in analogous room-temperature spin valve devices. These results demonstrate devices that combine major superconducting and spintronic effects for scalable read and write of memory states, respectively. Further challenges and proposals towards practical devices will also be discussed.In collaboration with: William Rippard, NIST - Boulder, Matthew Pufall, NIST - Boulder, Stephen Russek, NIST-Boulder, Michael Schneider, NIST - Boulder, Samuel Benz, NIST - Boulder, Horst Rogalla, NIST-Boulder, Paul Dresselhaus, NIST - Boulder

  7. An anti-ultrasonic-stripping effect in confined micro/nanoscale cavities and its applications for efficient multiscale metallic patterning.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Quan; Chen, Yiqin; Li, Zhiqin; Bi, Kaixi; Zhang, Guanhua; Duan, Huigao

    2016-12-01

    We report a method to reliably and efficiently fabricate high-fidelity metallic structures from a ten-nanometer to a millimeter scale based on an anti-ultrasonic-stripping (AUS) effect in confined micro/nanoscale cavities. With this AUS effect, metallic structures, which are surrounded by the pre-patterned closed templates, could be defined through selectively removing the evaporated metallic layer at the top and outside of the templates by ultrasonic-cavitation-induced stripping. Because only pre-patterned templates are required for exposure in this multiscale patterning process, this AUS-based process enables much smaller and more reliable plasmonic nanogaps due to the mitigated proximity effect and allows rapid fabrication of multiscale metallic structures which require both tiny and large structures. With unprecedented efficiency and resolution down to a ten-nanometer scale, various metallic structures were fabricated using this AUS-effect-based multiscale patterning process. This AUS effect paves the way for direct writing of metallic structures with a high resolution over a large area for practical applications in plasmonics and nanogap-based electronics.

  8. Simulating nanoscale semiconductor devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Zhao, P.; Woolard, D. L.; Kelley, C. Tim; Lasater, Matthew S.

    2005-03-01

    The next generation of electronic devices will be developed at the nanoscale and molecular level, where quantum mechanical effects are observed. These effects must be accounted for in the design process for such small devices. One prototypical nanoscale semiconductor device under investigation is a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). Scientists are hopeful the quantum tunneling effects present in an RTD can be exploited to induce and sustain THz frequency current oscillations. To simulate the electron transport within the RTD, the Wigner-Poisson equations are used. These equations describe the time evolution of the electrons distribution within the device. In this paper, this model and a parameter study using this model will be presented. The parameter study involves calculating the steady-state current output from the RTD as a function of an applied voltage drop across the RTD and also calculating the stability of that solution. To implement the parameter study, the computational model was connected to LOCA (Library of Continuation Algorithms), a part of Sandia National Laboratories parallel solver project, Trilinos. Numerical results will be presented.

  9. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge

  10. Evaluation of the effects of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) dispersants on intrinsic biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE).

    PubMed

    Chang, Y C; Huang, S C; Chen, K F

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the biodegradability of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) dispersants and their effects on the intrinsic biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) were evaluated. Results of a microcosm study show that the biodegradability of three dispersants followed the sequence of: polyvinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate-co-itaconic acid (PV3A) > polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) > polyacrylic acid (PAA) under aerobic conditions, and PV3A > Tween 20 > PAA under anaerobic conditions. Natural biodegradation of TCE was observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. No significant effects were observed on the intrinsic biodegradation of TCE under aerobic conditions with the presence of the dispersants. The addition of PAA seemed to have a slightly adverse impact on anaerobic TCE biodegradation. Higher accumulation of the byproducts of anaerobic TCE biodegradation was detected with the addition of PV3A and Tween 20. The diversity of the microbial community was enhanced under aerobic conditions with the presence of more biodegradable PV3A and Tween 20. The results of this study indicate that it is necessary to select an appropriate dispersant for nZVI to prevent a residual of the dispersant in the subsurface. Additionally, the effects of the dispersant on TCE biodegradation and the accumulation of TCE biodegrading byproducts should also be considered.

  11. A general formalism for the determination of the effective mass of the nanoscale structural inhomogeneities of the domain wall in uniaxial ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Barabash, Maksym

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the method of gyrotropic Thiele forces, we build a formalism that allows the determination of the effective mass of the nanoscales structural elements of the domain wall (DW): vertical Bloch line and Bloch point in uniaxial ferromagnets. As shown, the effective mass of these magnetic inhomogeneities depends on the value of the gyrotropic domain wall bend that is created by their movement.

  12. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  13. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L; Emelko, Monica B

    2015-12-11

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or "sag effect" was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  14. Observation of nanoscale cooling effects by substrates and the surrounding media for single gold nanoparticles under CW-laser illumination.

    PubMed

    Setoura, Kenji; Okada, Yudai; Werner, Daniel; Hashimoto, Shuichi

    2013-09-24

    Understanding the nanoscale heating-induced local thermal response is important but hampered by lack of information on temperatures at such small scales. This paper reports laser-induced heating and thermal equilibration of metal nanoparticles supported on different substrates and immersed in several media. We use single-particle spectroscopy to monitor nanoparticle temperature rises due to laser excitation. Because of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding medium, the scattering spectrum of the gold nanoparticles undergoes a shift that is related to the temperature of the system. We find that the temperature increase depends on both the surrounding medium and the supporting substrate. We furthermore model the nanoparticle temperature using a simplified 1-D heat conduction model with an effective thermal conductivity that takes both substrate and environment into account. The results from this model are also compared to a more detailed 2-D heat transfer analysis. The results presented here are quite new and important to many plasmonic nanoparticle applications where the strong absorption cross section of the nanoparticles leads to a significant temperature rise. In particular, the current work introduces an analysis that can be easily implemented to model the temperature of a nanoparticle supported on a substrate, as is the case in many single-particle measurements.

  15. Nanoscale Coordination Polymers Codeliver Carboplatin and Gemcitabine for Highly Effective Treatment of Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Poon, Christopher; Duan, Xiaopin; Chan, Christina; Han, Wenbo; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-11-07

    Due to the ability of ovarian cancer (OCa) to acquire drug resistance, it has been difficult to develop efficient and safe chemotherapy for OCa. Here, we examined the therapeutic use of a new self-assembled core-shell nanoscale coordination polymer nanoparticle (NCP-Carbo/GMP) that delivers high loadings of carboplatin (28.0 ± 2.6 wt %) and gemcitabine monophosphate (8.6 ± 1.5 wt %). A strong synergistic effect was observed between carboplatin and gemcitabine against platinum-resistant OCa cells, SKOV-3 and A2780/CDPP, in vitro. The coadministration of carboplatin and gemcitabine in the NCP led to prolonged blood circulation half-life (11.8 ± 4.8 h) and improved tumor uptake of the drugs (10.2 ± 4.4% ID/g at 24 h), resulting in 71% regression and 80% growth inhibition of SKOV-3 and A2780/CDDP tumors, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that NCP particles provide great potential for the codelivery of multiple chemotherapeutics for treating drug-resistant cancer.

  16. Effects of surface-modified nano-scale carbon black on Cu and Zn fractionations in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie-Min; Liu, Yu-Zhen; Wang, Han-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cu contamination soil (547 mg kg(-1)) was mixed separately with the surface-modified nano-scale carbon black (MCB) and placed in the ratios (w/w) of 0, 1%, 3%, and 5% in pots, together with 0.33 g KH2PO4 and 0.35 g urea/pot. Each pot contained 20 ryegrass seedlings (Lolium multiflorum). Greenhouse cultivation experiments were conducted to examine the effect of the MCB on Cu and Zn fractionations in soil, accumulation in shoot and growth of ryegrass. The results showed that the biomass of ryegrass shoot and root increased with the increasing of MCB adding amount (p < 0.05). The Cu and Zn accumulation in ryegrass shoot and the concentrations of DTPA extractable Cu and Zn in soil were significantly decreased with the increasing of MCB adding amount (p < 0.05). The metal contents of exchangeable and bound to carbonates (EC-Cu or EC-Zn) in the treatments with MCB were generally lower than those without MCB, and decreased with the increasing of MCB adding amount (p < 0.05). There was a positive linear correlation between the Cu and Zn accumulation in ryegrass shoot and the EC-Cu and EC-Zn in soil. The present results indicated the MCB could be applied for the remediation the soils polluted by Cu and Zn.

  17. Reactivity of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron in Unbuffered Systems: Effect of pH and Fe(II) Dissolution.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sungjun; Hanna, Khalil

    2015-09-01

    While most published studies used buffers to maintain the pH, there is limited knowledge regarding the reactivity of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) in poorly buffered pH systems to date. In this work, the effect of pH and Fe(II) dissolution on the reactivity of NZVI was investigated during the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in unbuffered pH systems. The reduction rate increased exponentially with respect to the NZVI concentration, and the ratio of dissolved Fe(II)/initial NZVI was related proportionally to the initial pH values, suggesting that lower pH (6-7) with low NZVI loading may slow the 4-NP reduction through acceleration of the dissolution of NZVI particles. Additional experiments using buffered pH systems confirmed that high pH values (8-9) can preserve the NZVI particles against dissolution, thereby enhancing the reduction kinetics of 4-NP. Furthermore, reduction tests using ferrous ion in suspensions of magnetite and maghemite showed that surface-bound Fe(II) on oxide coatings can play an important role in enhancing 4-NP reduction by NZVI at pH 8. These unexpected results highlight the importance of pH and Fe(II) dissolution when NZVI technology is applied to poorly buffered systems, particularly at a low amount of NZVI (i.e., <0.075 g/L).

  18. Effect of anions and humic acid on the performance of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles coated with polyacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Seok; Ahn, Jun-Young; Kim, Cheolyong; Lee, Seockheon; Hwang, Inseong

    2014-10-01

    Effects of anions (NO3(-), HCO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) and humic acid on the reactivity and core/shell chemistries of polyacrylic acid-coated nanoscale zero-valent iron (PAA-NZVI) and inorganically modified NZVI (INORG-NZVI) particles were investigated. The reactivity tests under various ion concentrations (0.2-30mN) revealed the existence of a favorable molar ratio of anion/NZVI that increased the reactivity of NZVI particles. The presence of a relatively small amount of humic acid (0.5mgL(-1)) substantially decreased the INORG-NZVI reactivity by 76%, whereas the reactivity of PAA-NZVI decreased only by 12%. The XRD and TEM results supported the role of the PAA coating of PAA-NZVI in impeding the oxidation of the Fe(0) core by groundwater solutes. This protective role provided by the organic coating also resulted in a 2.3-fold increase in the trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction capacity of PAA-NZVI compared to that of INORG-NZVI in the presence of anions/humic acid. Ethylene and ethane were simultaneously produced as the major reduction products of TCE in both NZVI systems, suggesting that a hydrodechlorination occurred without the aid of metallic catalysts. The PAA coating, originally designed to improve the mobility of NZVI, enhanced TCE degradation performances of NZVI in the presence of anions and humic acid.

  19. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition. PMID:26658159

  20. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  1. The effect of dipole boron centers on the electroluminescence of nanoscale silicon p{sup +}−n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Mashkov, Vladimir

    2014-02-21

    Nanoscale silicon p{sup +}−;n junctions with very high concentration of boron, 5 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3}, are found to demonstrate interesting optical properties. Emission band dominated in near-infrared electroluminescence (EL) spectra possesses high degree of the linear polarization along preferred crystallographic axis which can be controlled by the lateral voltage applied in the plane of the p{sup +}−n junction. Such behavior together with the temperature dependence of the EL intensity is attributed to the presence of the self-compensating dipole boron centers, B{sup +}-B{sup −}, with negative correlation energy which are identified using the ESR technique in the nanoscale silicon p{sup +}−n junctions heavily doped with boron. The model of the recombination process though the negative-U dipole boron centers controlling the optical properties of the nanoscale silicon p{sup +}−n junctions is proposed.

  2. Using mathematical models to understand the effect of nanoscale roughness on protein adsorption for improving medical devices.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Batur; Khang, Dongwoo; Carpenter, Joseph; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Surface roughness and energy significantly influence protein adsorption on to biomaterials, which, in turn, controls select cellular adhesion to determine the success and longevity of an implant. To understand these relationships at a fundamental level, a model was originally proposed by Khang et al to correlate nanoscale surface properties (specifically, nanoscale roughness and energy) to protein adsorption, which explained the greater cellular responses on nanostructured surfaces commonly reported in the literature today. To test this model for different surfaces from what was previously used to develop that model, in this study we synthesized highly ordered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) surfaces of identical chemistry but altered nanoscale surface roughness and energy using poly(dimethylsiloxane) molds of polystyrene beads. Fibronectin and collagen type IV adsorption studies showed a linear adsorption behavior as the surface nanoroughness increased. This supported the general trends observed by Khang et al. However, when fitting such data to the mathematical model established by Khang et al, a strong correlation did not result. Thus, this study demonstrated that the equation proposed by Khang et al to predict protein adsorption should be modified to accommodate for additional nanoscale surface property contributions (ie, surface charge) to make the model more accurate. In summary, results from this study provided an important step in developing future mathematical models that can correlate surface properties (such as nanoscale roughness and surface energy) to initial protein adsorption events important to promote select cellular adhesion. These criteria are critical for the fundamental understanding of the now well-documented increased tissue growth on nanoscale materials.

  3. Effect of oxidative stress from nanoscale TiO2 particles on a Physarum polycephalum macroplasmodium under dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Jianhua; Shi, Caixia; Guo, Heng; Ni, RuiYang; Qu, Junle; Tang, Jiaoning; Liu, Shide

    2017-07-01

    Information regarding the effect of nanoscale titanium dioxide particles (nTiO2) on the environment under dark conditions is scarce, and the effect of nTiO2 on fungi is largely unknown. Due to its huge size and high sensitivity to external stimuli, the slime mold fungi cell, Physarum polycephalum macroplasmodium, was utilized as a novel subject for the toxicity investigations in the present study, and oxidative stress from nTiO2 on the macroplasmodium was assessed under dark conditions. Short exposure (2-3 h) caused an intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) imbalance, and an anti-oxidative mechanism was activated from intermediate doses of nTiO2 (5-18 mg/mL). At long exposure times (~3 days), relatively low doses of nTiO2 (≤9 mg/mL) stimulated the growth of macroplasmodium and oxidative stress without DNA damage, whereas higher doses of nTiO2 (≥15 mg/mL) led to growth inhibition, significant DNA oxidative damage, and activation of the DNA single-strand repairing system. Although DNA oxidative damage was decreased to the same level as the control group by the supplementation of the anti-oxidant vitamin C, growth of the macroplasmodium failed to be completely restored. We inferred that nTiO2 induced a complicated toxicity effect on P. polycephalum in addition to DNA oxidative damage. Taken as a whole, the present study implied the probability of using P. polycephalum macroplasmodium for toxicity studies at the single-cell level, indicating that nTiO2 could induce oxidative stress or damage in P. polycephalum even under dark conditions and suggesting that the release of nTiO2 could lead to a growth imbalance of slime molds in the environment.

  4. The dual effects of carboxymethyl cellulose on the colloidal stability and toxicity of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haoran; Xie, Yankai; Zeng, Guangming; Tang, Lin; Liang, Jie; He, Qi; Zhao, Feng; Zeng, Yalan; Wu, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles are usually modified with surface coating to mitigate the particle stability in water during the environmental application. However, the surface coating may not only influence the particle stabilization but also the particle cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the dual effects of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on the colloidal stability and cytotoxicity of NZVI towards gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and discussed the interrelation between particle stability and cytotoxicity. The effect of CMC concentration, ionic strength (Ca(2+)) and aging treatment on the particle cytotoxicity were also examined. Specifically, the aqueous stability of NZVI suspensions with CMC ratio dose-dependently strengthened within 1 h. The inactivation of E. coli by bare NZVI was significant and concentration- and time-dependent. On the contrary, an increasing reduction in cytotoxicity of NZVI with CMC ratio increasing was observed, even though the particles became more dispersed. TEM analysis demonstrates the membrane disruption and the cellular internalization of nanoparticles after exposure of E. coli to NZVI. However, in the case of CMC-modified NZVI (CNZVI), the bacterial cell wall displays an outer shell of a layer of nanoparticles attached around the outer membrane, but the cell membrane was kept intact. The presence of Ca(2+) can either increase or decrease the cytotoxicity of NZVI and CNZVI, depending on the concentration. The aged NZVI and CNZVI particles did not seem to present obvious bactericidal effect due to the transformation of Fe(0) to the less toxic or non-toxic iron oxides, as indicated by the XRD analysis.

  5. Electrostatic effect of Au nanoparticles on near-infrared photoluminescence from Si/SiGe due to nanoscale metal/semiconductor contact.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yefei; Wang, Ze; Wang, Shuguang; Bai, Yujie; Jiang, Zuimin; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2017-04-18

    Photoluminescence (PL) from Si and SiGe is comprehensively modified by Au NPs under excitation without surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the PL sensitively depends on the size of the Au NPs, the excitation power and the thickness of the Si layer between the Au NPs and SiGe. A model is proposed in terms of the electrostatic effects of Au NPs naturally charged by electron transfer through the nanoscale metal/semiconductor Schottky junction without an external bias or external injection of carriers. The model accounts well for all the unique PL features. It also reveals that Au NPs can substantially modify the energy band structures, distribution and transition of carriers in the nanoscale region below the Au NPs. Our results demonstrate that Au NPs on semiconductors can efficiently modulate light-matter interaction.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of conformal inorganic nanoscale coatings on three-dimensional natural fiber systems: effect of surface topology on film growth characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hyde, G Kevin; Park, Kie Jin; Stewart, S Michael; Hinestroza, Juan P; Parsons, Gregory N

    2007-09-11

    Atomic-scale material deposition is utilized to achieve uniform coverage and modification of the surface properties of natural fiber and woven fabric materials, where irregular nanoscale features are embedded in a macroscale interpenetrating fiber network. The complex surface topology of the woven fabric results in significantly different film-growth thickness per ALD cycle as compared to planar surfaces coated using the same process conditions, likely due to reactant adsorption within the fiber starting material, as well as impeded reactant transport out of the fabric system during the purge cycle. Cotton textiles modified with conformal nanoscale Al2O3 are found to show extreme hydrophobic effects, distinctly different from planar surfaces that receive the same coatings. The results highlight key concerns for achieving controlled conformal coatings on complex surfaces and open the possibility for new textile finishing approaches to create novel fabric-based materials with specialized function and performance.

  7. Electrostatic effect of Au nanoparticles on near-infrared photoluminescence from Si/SiGe due to nanoscale metal/semiconductor contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yefei; Wang, Ze; Wang, Shuguang; Bai, Yujie; Jiang, Zuimin; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2017-04-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from Si and SiGe is comprehensively modified by Au NPs under excitation without surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the PL sensitively depends on the size of the Au NPs, the excitation power and the thickness of the Si layer between the Au NPs and SiGe. A model is proposed in terms of the electrostatic effects of Au NPs naturally charged by electron transfer through the nanoscale metal/semiconductor Schottky junction without an external bias or external injection of carriers. The model accounts well for all the unique PL features. It also reveals that Au NPs can substantially modify the energy band structures, distribution and transition of carriers in the nanoscale region below the Au NPs. Our results demonstrate that Au NPs on semiconductors can efficiently modulate light–matter interaction.

  8. Size effect on transfection and cytotoxicity of nanoscale plasmid DNA/polyethyleneimine complexes for aerosol gene delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon Byeon, Jeong; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2014-02-03

    Nanoscale plasmid DNA (pDNA)/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes were fabricated in the aerosol state using a nebulization system consisting of a collison atomizer and a cool-walled diffusion dryer. The aerosol fabricated nanoscale complexes were collected and employed to determine fundamental properties of the complexes, such as size, structure, surface charge, and in vitro gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity. The results showed that mass ratio between pDNA and PEI should be optimized to enhance gene transfection efficiency without a significant loss of cell viability. These findings may support practical advancements in the field of nonviral gene delivery.

  9. Dynamical effect of confining wall on diffusion of fluid at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Reena; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical effect of wall-fluid interaction on diffusion in direction perpendicular to confining walls has been studied, theoretically. The properties of fluids which incorporates the effect of static changes in confined fluid has been modified to include, directly, the dynamical effects of wall on the motion of particles. The results obtained for VACF in perpendicular direction of channel of width of two atomic diameters are presented and compared with the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation results as well as the results obtained without including the dynamical effect.

  10. Dynamical effect of confining wall on diffusion of fluid at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Reena; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K.

    2016-05-06

    The dynamical effect of wall-fluid interaction on diffusion in direction perpendicular to confining walls has been studied, theoretically. The properties of fluids which incorporates the effect of static changes in confined fluid has been modified to include, directly, the dynamical effects of wall on the motion of particles. The results obtained for VACF in perpendicular direction of channel of width of two atomic diameters are presented and compared with the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation results as well as the results obtained without including the dynamical effect.

  11. Evaluating Born and Local Effective Charges in Nanoscale MnO

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Xiaoshan; Baker, Sheila N; Christianson, Andrew D; Musfeldt, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Phonons are exquisitely sensitive to finite-length scale effects in complex materials because they are intimately connected to charge, polarizability, and structure, and a quantitative analysis of their behavior can reveal microscopic aspects of chemical bonding. To investigate these effects in a model correlated oxide, we measured the infrared vibrational properties of 8-nm particles of MnO, compared the results with the analogous bulk material, and quantified the phonon confinement with a calculation of the Born effective charge. Our analysis reveals that the Born effective charge decreases by {approx}20%, compared to the bulk material. Moreover, this change impacts both ionicity and polarizability. Specifically, we find that MnO nanoparticles are {approx}12% less ionic than the corresponding bulk. This discovery is important for understanding finite-length scale effects in this simple binary oxide and the more complicated functional oxides that emanate from this parent compound.

  12. Nanoscale Effects of Ethanol and Naltrexone on Protein Organization in the Plasma Membrane Studied by Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM)

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Steven J.; Cacao, Eliedonna E.; Hong, Daniel Wing Wo; Terenius, Lars; Vukojevic, Vladana; Jovanovic-Talisman, Tijana

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethanol affects the signaling of several important neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems in the CNS. It has been recently proposed that ethanol alters the dynamic lateral organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane, thereby affecting surface receptor-mediated cellular signaling. Our aims are to establish whether pharmacologically relevant levels of ethanol can affect the lateral organization of plasma membrane and cytoskeletal proteins at the nanoscopic level, and investigate the relevance of such perturbations for mu-opioid receptor (MOP) function. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Photoactivated Localization Microscopy with pair-correlation analysis (pcPALM), a quantitative fluorescence imaging technique with high spatial resolution (15–25 nm) and single-molecule sensitivity, to study ethanol effects on protein organization in the plasma membrane. We observed that short (20 min) exposure to 20 and 40 mM ethanol alters protein organization in the plasma membrane of cells that harbor endogenous MOPs, causing a rearrangement of the lipid raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). These effects could be largely occluded by pretreating the cells with the MOP antagonist naltrexone (200 nM for 3 hours). In addition, ethanol induced pronounced actin polymerization, leading to its partial co-localization with GPI. Conclusions/Significance Pharmacologically relevant levels of ethanol alter the lateral organization of GPI-linked proteins and induce actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Pretreatment with the MOP antagonist naltrexone is protective against ethanol action and significantly reduces the extent to which ethanol remodels the lateral organization of lipid-rafts-associated proteins in the plasma membrane. Super-resolution pcPALM reveals details of ethanol action at the nanoscale level, giving new mechanistic insight on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of its action. PMID:24503624

  13. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Bong, Victor N-S; Wong, Basil T.

    2015-08-28

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering.

  14. Nanoscale patterns produced by self-sputtering of solid surfaces: The effect of ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R. Mark; Hofsäss, Hans

    2016-08-21

    A theory of the effect that ion implantation has on the patterns produced by ion bombardment of solid surfaces is introduced. For simplicity, the case of self-sputtering of an elemental material is studied. We find that implantation of self-ions has a destabilizing effect along the projected beam direction for angles of incidence θ that exceed a critical value. In the transverse direction, ion implantation has a stabilizing influence for all θ.

  15. Nanoscale roughness effect on Maxwell-like boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    Brull, S. Charrier, P. Mieussens, L.

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that the roughness of the wall has an effect on microscale gas flows. This effect can be shown for large Knudsen numbers by using a numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. However, when the wall is rough at a nanometric scale, it is necessary to use a very small mesh size which is much too expansive. An alternative approach is to incorporate the roughness effect in the scattering kernel of the boundary condition, such as the Maxwell-like kernel introduced by the authors in a previous paper. Here, we explain how this boundary condition can be implemented in a discrete velocity approximation of the Boltzmann equation. Moreover, the influence of the roughness is shown by computing the structure scattering pattern of mono-energetic beams of the incident gas molecules. The effect of the angle of incidence of these molecules, of their mass, and of the morphology of the wall is investigated and discussed in a simplified two-dimensional configuration. The effect of the azimuthal angle of the incident beams is shown for a three-dimensional configuration. Finally, the case of non-elastic scattering is considered. All these results suggest that our approach is a promising way to incorporate enough physics of gas-surface interaction, at a reasonable computing cost, to improve kinetic simulations of micro- and nano-flows.

  16. The effect of surface wettability on water vapor condensation in nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, D.; Tang, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of surface wettability on condensation heat transfer in a nanochannel is studied with the molecular dynamics simulations. Different from the conventional size, the results show that the filmwise mode leads to more efficient heat transfer than the dropwise mode, which is attributed to a lower interfacial thermal resistance between the hydrophilic surface and the condensed water compared with the hydrophobic case. The observed temperature jump at the solid-liquid surface confirms that the hydrophilic properties of the solid surface can suppress the interfacial thermal resistance and improve the condensation heat transfer performance effectively.

  17. Effect of nanoscale morphology on selective ethanol transport through block copolymer membranes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report on the effect of block copolymer domain size on transport of liquid mixtures through the membranes by presenting pervaporation data of an 8 wt% ethanol/water mixture through A-B-A and B-A-B triblock copolymer membranes. The A-block was chosen to facilitate ethanol transport while the B-blo...

  18. Multiple stiffening effects of nanoscale knobs on human red blood cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Huang, Changjin; Kim, Sangtae; Golkaram, Mahdi; Dixon, Matthew W A; Tilley, Leann; Li, Ju; Zhang, Sulin; Suresh, Subra

    2015-05-12

    During its asexual development within the red blood cell (RBC), Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), the most virulent human malaria parasite, exports proteins that modify the host RBC membrane. The attendant increase in cell stiffness and cytoadherence leads to sequestration of infected RBCs in microvasculature, which enables the parasite to evade the spleen, and leads to organ dysfunction in severe cases of malaria. Despite progress in understanding malaria pathogenesis, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the dramatic loss of deformability of Pf-infected RBCs have remained elusive. By recourse to a coarse-grained (CG) model that captures the molecular structures of Pf-infected RBC membrane, here we show that nanoscale surface protrusions, known as "knobs," introduce multiple stiffening mechanisms through composite strengthening, strain hardening, and knob density-dependent vertical coupling. On one hand, the knobs act as structural strengtheners for the spectrin network; on the other, the presence of knobs results in strain inhomogeneity in the spectrin network with elevated shear strain in the knob-free regions, which, given its strain-hardening property, effectively stiffens the network. From the trophozoite to the schizont stage that ensues within 24-48 h of parasite invasion into the RBC, the rise in the knob density results in the increased number of vertical constraints between the spectrin network and the lipid bilayer, which further stiffens the membrane. The shear moduli of Pf-infected RBCs predicted by the CG model at different stages of parasite maturation are in agreement with experimental results. In addition to providing a fundamental understanding of the stiffening mechanisms of Pf-infected RBCs, our simulation results suggest potential targets for antimalarial therapies.

  19. Nanoscale zero-valent iron application for in situ reduction of hexavalent chromium and its effects on indigenous microorganism populations.

    PubMed

    Němeček, Jan; Lhotský, Ondřej; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2014-07-01

    Because of its high toxicity and mobility, hexavalent chromium is considered to be a high priority pollutant. This study was performed to carry out a pilot-scale in-situ remediation test in the saturated zone of a historically Cr(VI)-contaminated site using commercially available nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI). The site was monitored before and after the nZVI application by means of microbial cultivation tests, phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) and toxicological tests with Vibrio fischeri. Injection of nZVI resulted in a rapid decrease in the Cr(VI) and total Cr concentrations in the groundwater without any substantial effect on its chemical properties. The ecotoxicological test with V. fischeri did not indicate any negative changes in the toxicity of the groundwater following the application of nZVI and no significant changes were observed in cultivable psychrophilic bacteria densities and PLFA concentrations in the groundwater samples during the course of the remediation test. However, PLFA of soil samples revealed that the application of nZVI significantly stimulated the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. Principle component analysis (PCA) was applied to the PLFA results for the soil samples from the site in order to explain how Cr(VI) reduction and the presence of Fe influence the indigenous populations. The PCA results clearly indicated a negative correlation between the Cr concentrations and the biota before the application of nZVI and a significant positive correlation between bacteria and the concentration of Fe after the application of nZVI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanoscale Particulate Matter from Urban Traffic Rapidly Induces Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Olfactory Epithelium with Concomitant Effects on Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hank; Saffari, Arian; Sioutas, Constantinos; Forman, Henry J.; Morgan, Todd E.; Finch, Caleb E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rodent models for urban air pollution show consistent induction of inflammatory responses in major brain regions. However, the initial impact of air pollution particulate material on olfactory gateways has not been reported. Objective: We evaluated the olfactory neuroepithelium (OE) and brain regional responses to a nanosized subfraction of urban traffic ultrafine particulate matter (nPM, < 200 nm) in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. Methods: Adult mice were exposed to reaerosolized nPM for 5, 20, and 45 cumulative hours over 3 weeks. The OE, the olfactory bulb (OB), the cerebral cortex, and the cerebellum were analyzed for oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Acute responses of the OE to liquid nPM suspensions were studied with ex vivo and primary OE cultures. Results: After exposure to nPM, the OE and OB had rapid increases of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) protein adducts, whereas the cerebral cortex and cerebellum did not respond at any time. All brain regions showed increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) protein by 45 hr, with earlier induction of TNFα mRNA in OE and OB. These responses corresponded to in vitro OE and mixed glial responses, with rapid induction of nitrite and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), followed by induction of TNFα. Conclusions: These findings show the differential time course of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses to nPM between the OE and the brain. Slow cumulative transport of inhaled nPM into the brain may contribute to delayed responses of proximal and distal brain regions, with potential input from systemic factors. Citation: Cheng H, Saffari A, Sioutas C, Forman HJ, Morgan TE, Finch CE. 2016. Nanoscale particulate matter from urban traffic rapidly induces oxidative stress and inflammation in olfactory epithelium with concomitant effects on brain. Environ Health Perspect 124:1537–1546; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP134 PMID:27187980

  1. Illite precipitation and surface cracking during biotite dissolution under hydrothermal conditions: Effects of nanoscale system changes on larger scale processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Jun, Y.

    2012-12-01

    To ensure safe and efficient geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), it is crucial to have a better understanding of CO2-brine-caprock interactions under GCS conditions. In this work, using biotite (K(Mg,Fe)3AlSi3O10(OH,F)2) as a model abundant clay mineral of the caprock at GCS sites, CO2-brine-biotite interactions were studied under hydrothermal conditions relevant to GCS sites (at 95 deg C, under 102 atm CO2, in 1 M NaCl, 0.4 M MgCl2, or 0.4 M CaCl2 solution). In these salt solutions, after reaction for 3 hrs, fast growth of micron-sized fibrous illite on flat basal planes of biotite was observed. After 22 hrs reaction, microscale cracks formed on the biotite basal surface, resulting in fibrous illite detaching from the surface. After reaction in 1 M NaCl solution for longer time, the cracked biotite pieces detached from the surface layer and released into solution. In control experiments with water under the same temperature and pressure, neither micron-sized fibrous illite nor cracks were observed, while oriented aggregation of hexagonal nanoparticles starting to form the fibrous-shaped illite was observed. These nano- and micro-scale behaviors have great effects on the macroscopic biotite dissolution and the aquifer properties. The cracking of the biotite surface can increase the surface area in contact with solution and accelerate biotite dissolution. The fibrous illite formation and its later mobilization in the salt solutions after its detachment could decrease the permeability of the aquifers greatly. This work provides unique information on how nanoscale system changes induced by geochemical reactions can affect larger scale chemical interactions and geophysical properties such as porosity and permeability. Ultimately, this information can help design safer and more efficient operations at not only GCS sites, but also other subsurface hydrothermal conditions.

  2. Nanoscale field effect optical modulators based on depletion of epsilon-near-zero films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhaolin; Shi, Kaifeng; Yin, Peichuan

    2016-12-01

    The field effect in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors plays a key role in field-effect transistors (FETs), which are the fundamental building blocks of modern digital integrated circuits. Recent works show that the field effect can also be used to make optical/plasmonic modulators. In this paper, we report the numerical investigation of field effect electro-absorption modulators each made of an ultrathin epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) film, as the active material, sandwiched in a silicon or plasmonic waveguide. Without a bias, the ENZ films maximize the attenuation of the waveguides and the modulators work at the OFF state; on the other hand, depletion of the carriers in the ENZ films greatly reduces the attenuation and the modulators work at the ON state. The double capacitor gating scheme with two 10-nm HfO2 films as the insulator is used to enhance the modulation by the field effect. The depletion requires about 10 V across the HfO2 layers. According to our simulation, extinction ratio up to 3.44 dB can be achieved in a 500-nm long Si waveguide with insertion loss only 0.71 dB (85.0% pass); extinction ratio up to 7.86 dB can be achieved in a 200-nm long plasmonic waveguide with insertion loss 1.11 dB (77.5% pass). The proposed modulators may find important applications in future on-chip or chip-to-chip optical interconnection.

  3. Magnetic field effects on buckling behavior of smart size-dependent graded nanoscale beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In this article, buckling behavior of nonlocal magneto-electro-elastic functionally graded (MEE-FG) beams is investigated based on a higher-order beam model. Material properties of smart nanobeam are supposed to change continuously throughout the thickness based on the power-law model. Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory is adopted to capture the small size effects. Nonlocal governing equations of MEE-FG nanobeam are obtained employing Hamilton's principle and they are solved using the Navier solution. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effects of magnetic potential, electric voltage, nonlocal parameter and material composition on buckling behavior of MEE-FG nanobeams. Therefore, the present study makes the first attempt in analyzing the buckling responses of higher-order shear deformable (HOSD) MEE-FG nanobeams.

  4. A training effect on electrical properties in nanoscale BiFeO3.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sudipta; Bhattacharya, Dipten; Li, Wuxia; Cui, Ajuan; Jiang, QianQing; Gu, Chang-zhi

    2013-04-05

    We report our observation of the training effect on dc electrical properties in a nanochain of BiFeO3 as a result of large scale migration of defects under the combined influence of electric field and Joule heating. We show that an optimum number of cycles of electric field within the range zero to ~1.0 MV cm(-1) across a temperature range 80-300 K helps in reaching the stable state via a glass-transition-like process in the defect structure. Further treatment does not give rise to any substantial modification. We conclude that such a training effect is ubiquitous in pristine nanowires or chains of oxides and needs to be addressed for applications in nanoelectronic devices.

  5. A new technique to control floating body effect in nano-scale double-gate MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Meisam; Etaati, Gholamreza

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel structure of Double Gate (DG) MOSFET to control the impacts of floating body effect. Floating body effect increases hole concentration in the channel region due to the impact ionization. In this novel structure which is named as SiGe Region in DG-MOSFET (SR-DG) two spacers are considered in both sides of gate region and a SiGe zone is incorporated in gate-source spacer. The SiGe region with lower band gap than silicon collects the excess hole in the channel. Our simulation with two dimensional ATLAS simulator shows that the proposed SR-DG improves the performance of DG-MOSFET in terms of threshold voltage, breakdown voltage and electric field. Also, the impacts of parasitic bipolar junction transistor (BJT) are controlled significantly.

  6. Effective medium theory of the space-charge region electrostatics of arrays of nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar; Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2016-01-01

    We develop an Effective Medium Theory for the electrostatics of the Space-Charge Region (SCR) of Schottky and p-n junctions in arrays of nanofilms (NFs), nanowires (NWs), and nanotubes (NTs) in a dielectric ambient. The theory captures the effects of electric fields in both the semiconductor, i.e., NF/NW/NT, and the dielectric media of the array. It shows that the depletion width and the screening length characterizing the SCR tail in the array correspond to those in a bulk junction with an effective semiconductor medium, whose permittivity and doping are their weighted averages over the cross-sectional areas of the semiconductor and dielectric; the shapes of the cross-sections are immaterial. Further, the reverse bias 1 /C2 -V behavior of junctions in NF/NW/NT arrays is linear, as in bulk junctions, and is useful to extract from measurements the built-in potential, effective doping including the semiconductor-dielectric interface charge, and NF/NW/NT length. The theory is validated with numerical simulations, is useful for the experimentalist, and yields simple formulas for nano-device design which predict the following. In the limiting case of a single sheet-like NF, the junction depletion width variation with potential drop is linear rather than square-root (as in a bulk junction). In arrays of symmetric silicon p-n junctions in oxide dielectric where NF/NW thickness and separation are 5% and 100% of the bulk depletion width, respectively, the junction depletion width and the screening length are scaled up from their bulk values by the same factor of ˜2 for NF and ˜10 for NW array.

  7. Interface traps and quantum size effects on the retention time in nanoscale memory devices.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ling-Feng

    2013-08-29

    Based on the analysis of Poisson equation, an analytical surface potential model including interface charge density for nanocrystalline (NC) germanium (Ge) memory devices with p-type silicon substrate has been proposed. Thus, the effects of Pb defects at Si(110)/SiO2, Si(111)/SiO2, and Si(100)/SiO2 interfaces on the retention time have been calculated after quantum size effects have been considered. The results show that the interface trap density has a large effect on the electric field across the tunneling oxide layer and leakage current. This letter demonstrates that the retention time firstly increases with the decrease in diameter of NC Ge and then rapidly decreases with the diameter when it is a few nanometers. This implies that the interface defects, its energy distribution, and the NC size should be seriously considered in the aim to improve the retention time from different technological processes. The experimental data reported in the literature support the theoretical expectation.

  8. Inverse polarity of the resistive switching effect and strong inhomogeneity in nanoscale YBCO-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchly, M.; Plecenik, T.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Belogolovskii, M.; Dvoranova, M.; Kus, P.; Plecenik, A.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied a bipolar resistive switching phenomenon in c-axis oriented normal-state YBa2Cu3O7-c (YBCO) thin films at room temperature by scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques. The most striking experimental finding has been the opposite (in contrast to the previous room and low-temperature data for planar metal counter-electrode-YBCO bilayers) voltage-bias polarity of the switching effect in all SSRM and a number of STM measurements. We have assumed that the hysteretic phenomena in current-voltage characteristics of YBCO-based contacts can be explained by migration of oxygen-vacancy defects and, as a result, by the formation or dissolution of more or less conductive regions near the metal-YBCO interface. To support our interpretation of the macroscopic resistive switching phenomenon, a minimalist model that describes radical modifications of the oxygen-vacancy effective charge in terms of a charge-wind effect was proposed. It was shown theoretically that due to the momentum exchange between current carriers (holes in the YBCO compound) and activated oxygen ions, the direction in which oxygen vacancies are moving is defined by the balance between the direct electrostatic force on them and that caused by the current-carrier flow.

  9. Predicting the effects of nanoscale cerium additives in diesel fuel on regional-scale air quality.

    PubMed

    Erdakos, Garnet B; Bhave, Prakash V; Pouliot, George A; Simon, Heather; Mathur, Rohit

    2014-11-04

    Diesel vehicles are a major source of air pollutant emissions. Fuel additives containing nanoparticulate cerium (nCe) are currently being used in some diesel vehicles to improve fuel efficiency. These fuel additives also reduce fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions and alter the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and hydrocarbon (HC) species, including several hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). To predict their net effect on regional air quality, we review the emissions literature and develop a multipollutant inventory for a hypothetical scenario in which nCe additives are used in all on-road and nonroad diesel vehicles. We apply the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to a domain covering the eastern U.S. for a summer and a winter period. Model calculations suggest modest decreases of average PM2.5 concentrations and relatively larger decreases in particulate elemental carbon. The nCe additives also have an effect on 8 h maximum ozone in summer. Variable effects on HAPs are predicted. The total U.S. emissions of fine-particulate cerium are estimated to increase 25-fold and result in elevated levels of airborne cerium (up to 22 ng/m3), which might adversely impact human health and the environment.

  10. Nanoscale triboelectric-effect-enabled energy conversion for sustainably powering portable electronics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sihong; Lin, Long; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-12-12

    Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging based on triboelectric effect has been proven to be simple, cost-effective, and robust. However, its output is still insufficient for sustainably driving electronic devices/systems. Here, we demonstrated a rationally designed arch-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) by utilizing the contact electrification between a polymer thin film and a metal thin foil. The working mechanism of the TENG was studied by finite element simulation. The output voltage, current density, and energy volume density reached 230 V, 15.5 μA/cm(2), and 128 mW/cm(3), respectively, and an energy conversion efficiency as high as 10-39% has been demonstrated. The TENG was systematically studied and demonstrated as a sustainable power source that can not only drive instantaneous operation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) but also charge a lithium ion battery as a regulated power module for powering a wireless sensor system and a commercial cell phone, which is the first demonstration of the nanogenerator for driving personal mobile electronics, opening the chapter of impacting general people's life by nanogenerators.

  11. Hydration effects on gypsum dissolution revealed by in situ nanoscale atomic force microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, A.; Putnis, C. V.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that the rates of mineral dissolution in aqueous solutions are dependent on the kinetics of dehydration of the ions building the crystal. Dehydration kinetics will be ultimately determined by the competition between ion-water and water-water interactions, which can be significantly modified by the presence of background ions in solution. At low ionic strength, the effect of electrolytes on ion-water (electrostatic) interactions will dominate (Kowacz et al., 2007). By performing macroscopic and in situ, microscopic (atomic force microscopy) dissolution experiments, the effect of background electrolytes on the dissolution kinetics of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) {0 1 0} cleavage surfaces is tested at constant, low ionic strength (IS = 0.05) and undersaturation (saturation index, SI = -0.045). Dissolution rates are systematically lower in the presence of 1:1 background electrolytes than in an electrolyte-free solution, regardless of the nature of the electrolyte tested. We hypothesize that stabilization of the hydration shell of calcium by the presence of background ions can explain this result, based on the observed correlations in dissolution rates with the ionic surface tension increment of the background ion in solution. Stabilization of the cation hydration shell should favor dissolution. However, in the case of strongly hydrated ions such as Ca2+, this has a direct entropic effect that reduces the overall ΔG of the system, so that dissolution is energetically less favorable. Overall, these results provide new evidence that supports cation dehydration being the rate-controlling step for gypsum dissolution, as proposed for other minerals such as barite, dolomite and calcite.

  12. Nanoscale and proximity effects on low-dimensional helical magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandratskii, Leonid; Fisher, J.; Park, S.; Ouazi, S.; Sander, D.; Kirschner, J.

    We combine symmetry arguments, first-principles calculations and spin-resolved STS measurements to study a 2D helical magnet of some nm extension in proximity to ferromagnetic Co and vacuum regions. Considering the prototypical helical 2D system, an Fe bilayer with intrinsic helical spin structure (1), we report a non-uniform distortion of the spin helix which depends on the lateral extension of the bilayer and on the proximity to either Co or vacuum. The proximity effect manifests itself in different modifications of the magnetic and electronic structures of Fe in vicinity of the interfaces with Co and vacuum. These nanosize and proximity effects have not been discussed before. We demonstrate that, in contrast to an ideal helix of infinite length, the lack of symmetry of the nm-long distorted Fe spin helix, induces an energy dependence of the direction of the electronic magnetization which is revealed in the measured energy dependence of the spin-asymmetry of the differential tunneling conductance. (1) Phark, S. H.; Fischer, J. A.; Corbetta, M.; Sander, D.; Nakamura, K. & Kirschner, J. Reduced-dimensionality-induced helimagnetism in iron nanoislands Nat Commun 5 (2014) 5183.

  13. Switching Kinetics in Nanoscale Hafnium Oxide Based Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Mulaosmanovic, Halid; Ocker, Johannes; Müller, Stefan; Schroeder, Uwe; Müller, Johannes; Polakowski, Patrick; Flachowsky, Stefan; van Bentum, Ralf; Mikolajick, Thomas; Slesazeck, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The recent discovery of ferroelectricity in thin hafnium oxide films has led to a resurgence of interest in ferroelectric memory devices. Although both experimental and theoretical studies on this new ferroelectric system have been undertaken, much remains to be unveiled regarding its domain landscape and switching kinetics. Here we demonstrate that the switching of single domains can be directly observed in ultrascaled ferroelectric field effect transistors. Using models of ferroelectric domain nucleation we explain the time, field and temperature dependence of polarization reversal. A simple stochastic model is proposed as well, relating nucleation processes to the observed statistical switching behavior. Our results suggest novel opportunities for hafnium oxide based ferroelectrics in nonvolatile memory devices.

  14. Switching times of nanoscale FePt: Finite size effects on the linear reversal mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, M. O. A.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2015-04-20

    The linear reversal mechanism in FePt grains ranging from 2.316 nm to 5.404 nm has been simulated using atomistic spin dynamics, parametrized from ab-initio calculations. The Curie temperature and the critical temperature (T{sup *}), at which the linear reversal mechanism occurs, are observed to decrease with system size whilst the temperature window T{sup *}effects. Calculations of the minimum pulse duration show faster switching in small grains and are qualitatively described by the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation with finite size atomistic parameterization, which suggests that multiscale modeling of FePt down to a grain size of ≈3.5 nm is possible.

  15. van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale: The effects of nonlocality

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yu; Zhao, Rongkuo; Pendry, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Calculated using classical electromagnetism, the van der Waals force increases without limit as two surfaces approach. In reality, the force saturates because the electrons cannot respond to fields of very short wavelength: polarization charges are always smeared out to some degree and in consequence the response is nonlocal. Nonlocality also plays an important role in the optical spectrum and distribution of the modes but introduces complexity into calculations, hindering an analytical solution for interactions at the nanometer scale. Here, taking as an example the case of two touching nanospheres, we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that nonlocality in 3D plasmonic systems can be accurately analyzed using the transformation optics approach. The effects of nonlocality are found to dramatically weaken the field enhancement between the spheres and hence the van der Waals interaction and to modify the spectral shifts of plasmon modes. PMID:25468982

  16. van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale: the effects of nonlocality.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Zhao, Rongkuo; Pendry, John B

    2014-12-30

    Calculated using classical electromagnetism, the van der Waals force increases without limit as two surfaces approach. In reality, the force saturates because the electrons cannot respond to fields of very short wavelength: polarization charges are always smeared out to some degree and in consequence the response is nonlocal. Nonlocality also plays an important role in the optical spectrum and distribution of the modes but introduces complexity into calculations, hindering an analytical solution for interactions at the nanometer scale. Here, taking as an example the case of two touching nanospheres, we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that nonlocality in 3D plasmonic systems can be accurately analyzed using the transformation optics approach. The effects of nonlocality are found to dramatically weaken the field enhancement between the spheres and hence the van der Waals interaction and to modify the spectral shifts of plasmon modes.

  17. Effects of applied strain on nanoscale self-interstitial cluster formation in BCC iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ning; Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2017-09-01

    The effect of applied strains on the configurational evolution of self-interstitial clusters in BCC iron (Fe) is explored with atomistic simulations. A novel cluster configuration is discovered at low temperatures (<600 K), which consists of < 110 > dumbbells and < 111 > crowdions in a specific configuration, resulting in an immobile defect. The stability and diffusion of this cluster at higher temperatures is explored. In addition, an anisotropy distribution factor of a particular [ hkl ] interstitial loop within the family of < hkl > loops is calculated as a function of strain. The results show that loop anisotropy is governed by the angle between the stress direction and the orientation of the < 111 > crowdions in the loop, and directly linked to the stress induced preferred nucleation of self-interstitial atoms.

  18. Size and shape effects on the thermodynamic properties of nanoscale volumes of water.

    PubMed

    Strøm, Bjørn A; Simon, Jean-Marc; Schnell, Sondre K; Kjelstrup, Signe; He, Jianying; Bedeaux, Dick

    2017-03-29

    Small systems are known to deviate from the classical thermodynamic description, among other things due to their large surface area to volume ratio compared to corresponding big systems. As a consequence, extensive thermodynamic properties are no longer proportional to the volume, but are instead higher order functions of size and shape. We investigate such functions for second moments of probability distributions of fluctuating properties in the grand-canonical ensemble, focusing specifically on the volume and surface terms of Hadwiger's theorem, explained in Klain, Mathematika, 1995, 42, 329-339. We resolve the shape dependence of the surface term and show, using Hill's nanothermodynamics [Hill, J. Chem. Phys., 1962, 36, 3182], that the surface satisfies the thermodynamics of a flat surface as described by Gibbs [Gibbs, The Scientific Papers of J. Willard Gibbs, Volume 1, Thermodynamics, Ox Bow Press, Woodbridge, Connecticut, 1993]. The Small System Method (SSM), first derived by Schnell et al. [Schnell et al., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2011, 115, 10911], is extended and used to analyze simulation data on small systems of water. We simulate water as an example to illustrate the method, using TIP4P/2005 and other models, and compute the isothermal compressibility and thermodynamic factor. We are able to retrieve the experimental value of the bulk phase compressibility within 2%, and show that the compressibility of nanosized volumes increases by up to a factor of two as the number of molecules in the volume decreases. The value for a tetrahedron, cube, sphere, polygon, etc. can be predicted from the same scaling law, as long as second order effects (nook and corner effects) are negligible. Lastly, we propose a general formula for finite reservoir correction to fluctuations in subvolumes.

  19. Effect of nanoscale flows on the surface structure of nanoporous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemore, Matthew M.; Montessori, Andrea; Succi, Sauro; Barroo, Cédric; Falcucci, Giacomo; Bell, David C.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2017-06-01

    The surface structure and composition of a multi-component catalyst are critical factors in determining its catalytic performance. The surface composition can depend on the local pressure of the reacting species, leading to the possibility that the flow through a nanoporous catalyst can affect its structure and reactivity. Here, we explore this possibility for oxidation reactions on nanoporous gold, an AgAu bimetallic catalyst. We use microscopy and digital reconstruction to obtain the morphology of a two-dimensional slice of a nanoporous gold sample. Using lattice Boltzmann fluid dynamics simulations along with thermodynamic models based on first-principles total-energy calculations, we show that some sections of this sample have low local O2 partial pressures when exposed to reaction conditions, which leads to a pure Au surface in these regions, instead of the active bimetallic AgAu phase. We also explore the effect of temperature on the surface structure and find that moderate temperatures (≈300-450 K) should result in the highest intrinsic catalytic performance, in apparent agreement with experimental results.

  20. Investigating physical field effects on the size-dependent dynamic behavior of inhomogeneous nanoscale plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    This article investigates the thermo-mechanical vibration frequencies of magneto-electro-thermo-elastic functionally graded (METE-FG) nanoplates in the framework of refined four-unknown shear deformation plate theory. The present nanoplate is subjected to various kinds of thermal loads with uniform, linear and nonlinear distributions. The nonlinear distribution is considered as heat conduction and sinusoidal temperature rise. The present refined theory captures the influences of shear deformations without the need for shear correction factors. Thermo-magneto-electro-elastic coefficients of the FG nanoplate vary gradually along the thickness according to the power-law form. The scale coefficient is taken into consideration implementing the nonlocal elasticity of Eringen. The governing equations are derived through Hamilton's principle and are solved analytically. The frequency response is compared with those of previously published data. The obtained results are presented for the thermo-mechanical vibrations of the FG nanobeams to investigate the effects of material graduation, nonlocal parameter, mode number, slenderness ratio and thermal loading in detail. The present study is associated to aerospace, mechanical and nuclear engineering structures which are under thermal loads.

  1. Buff/wipe effects on the physicochemical properties of perfluoropolyether nanoscale thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haigang; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S.

    2014-05-01

    Buff/Wipe (B/W) process is commonly used in disk drive manufacturing to remove the particles and asperities on the lubricated disk surface. In this paper, we investigated how B/W process impacts the physicochemical properties of perfluoropolyethers (PFPE) nano-films through the study of surface energy and bonded ratio. Two-liquid geometric method was used to analyze the surface energy of nonfunctional PFPE, i.e., Z03, and functional PFPE, i.e., Zdol, lubricated media before and after B/W process. It was found that the dispersive surface energy of Z03 films greatly decreased after B/W, which was more significant in the submonolayer regime. In addition, the bonded ratio slightly increased. However, B/W effect on the surface energy and bonded ratio was not detected for Zdol films. It is hypothesized that nonfunctional PFPE behaves liquid-like on the carbon overcoat due to the weak interaction between lubricant and overcoat. External mechanical stress as applied with B/W can change the conformation and increase the surface coverage for nonfunctional PFPE. On the other hand, functional PFPEs behave solid-like due to the strong attraction between lubricant and overcoat; therefore, it is difficult to change the conformation by external stress from B/W process.

  2. Effect of nanoscale flows on the surface structure of nanoporous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Montemore, Matthew M; Montessori, Andrea; Succi, Sauro; Barroo, Cédric; Falcucci, Giacomo; Bell, David C; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2017-06-07

    The surface structure and composition of a multi-component catalyst are critical factors in determining its catalytic performance. The surface composition can depend on the local pressure of the reacting species, leading to the possibility that the flow through a nanoporous catalyst can affect its structure and reactivity. Here, we explore this possibility for oxidation reactions on nanoporous gold, an AgAu bimetallic catalyst. We use microscopy and digital reconstruction to obtain the morphology of a two-dimensional slice of a nanoporous gold sample. Using lattice Boltzmann fluid dynamics simulations along with thermodynamic models based on first-principles total-energy calculations, we show that some sections of this sample have low local O2 partial pressures when exposed to reaction conditions, which leads to a pure Au surface in these regions, instead of the active bimetallic AgAu phase. We also explore the effect of temperature on the surface structure and find that moderate temperatures (≈300-450 K) should result in the highest intrinsic catalytic performance, in apparent agreement with experimental results.

  3. The effect of pharmaceuticals on the nanoscale structure of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen K; Reilly, Meghan J; Jones, Deanna N; Robinson, Paul M; Bhatia, Surita R

    2008-01-15

    We present results on the effects of various hydrophobic drugs and additives on the micellar structure of Pluronic F127 solutions. Small-angle neutron scattering experiments on 5wt% F127 solutions were used to measure micelle core size (R(1)), micelle corona size (R(2)), intermicellar interaction distance (R(int)), polydispersity (sigma), and aggregation number (N(agg)); dynamic light scattering was used to measure critical micelle concentration (CMC); and ultraviolet spectroscopy was used to measure drug solubility and apparent micelle-water partition coefficient (K(mw)). The core and corona size were found to generally increase in the presence of the drugs, as did R(int). Both sigma and N(agg) were found to decrease in the presence of most of the drugs, and the CMC was found to vary considerably with no clear correlation. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to analyze the results and build empirical correlations. All of the parameters from the SANS experiments were found to depend strongly on drug solubility, with a weak dependence on K(mw) in most cases. The aggregation number, however, was found to depend strongly on both K(mw) and solubility. The correlations can be used to roughly predict the structural parameters of F127 micelles for other hydrophobic drugs.

  4. Toward quantitative electrochemical measurements on the nanoscale by scanning probe microscopy: environmental and current spreading effects.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Thomas M; Kumar, Amit; Jesse, Stephen; Veith, Gabriel M; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-09-24

    The application of electric bias across tip-surface junctions in scanning probe microscopy can readily induce surface and bulk electrochemical processes that can be further detected though changes in surface topography, Faradaic or conductive currents, or electromechanical strain responses. However, the basic factors controlling tip-induced electrochemical processes, including the relationship between applied tip bias and the thermodynamics of local processes, remains largely unexplored. Using the model Li-ion reduction reaction on the surface in Li-ion conducting glass ceramic, we explore the factors controlling Li-metal formation and find surprisingly strong effects of atmosphere and back electrode composition on the process. We find that reaction processes are highly dependent on the nature of the counter electrode and environmental conditions. Using a nondepleting Li counter electrode, Li particles could grow significantly larger and faster than a depleting counter electrode. Significant Li ion depletion leads to the inability for further Li reduction. Time studies suggest that Li diffusion replenishes the vacant sites after ∼12 h. These studies suggest the feasibility of SPM-based quantitative electrochemical studies under proper environmental controls, extending the concepts of ultramicroelectrodes to the single-digit nanometer scale.

  5. X-ray Reflectivity Measurements of Nanoscale Structures: Limits of the Effective Medium Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-Jeong; Soles, Christopher L.; Kang, Shuhui; Wook Ro, Hyun; Lin, Eric K.; Wu, Wen-li

    2007-09-26

    Specular X-ray reflectivity (SXR) can be used, in the limit of the effective medium approximation (EMA), as a high-resolution shape metrology for periodic patterns on a smooth substrate. The EMA means that the density of the solid patterns and the spaces separating the periodic patterns are averaged together. In this limit the density profile as a function of pattern height obtained by SXR can be used to extract quantitative pattern profile information. Here we explore the limitations of SXR as a pattern shape metrology by studying a series of linear grating structures with periodicities ranging from 300 nm to 16 {mu}m and determining at which length scales the EMA breaks down. We also study the angular dependence of the grating orientation with respect to the incident X-ray beam. The gratings systematically are rotated through a series of azimuthal angles with the incident X-ray beams ranging from 0 deg. to 90 deg. . The applicability of the EMA is related to the coherence length of the X-ray source. When the coherence length of beam is larger than the physical dimension of grating periodicities, EMA can be applied for characterizing nanostructures. For our slit-collimated X-ray source, the coherence length in the direction parallel to the long axis of the slit is on the order of 900 nm while the coherence length along the main axis of the beam appears to be in the range of (22 to 26) {mu}m.

  6. The effect of sulphate on magnesite growth: in-situ and ex-situ nanoscale observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Helen E.; Satoh, Hisao; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Putnis, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The composition of a solution has important implications for growth mechanisms and the incorporation of impurities during growth. For example, the presence of sulphate during CO2 sequestration in Mg-silicate rocks such as ophiolites is expected to restrict magnesite (MgCO3) growth due to the formation of Mg-sulphate ion pairs in solution (Pye et al. 1998), which lower the solution supersaturation with respect to magnesite. Conversely, direct interactions of sulphate with the magnesite surface, observed during dissolution (King and Putnis, 2013), could limit the negative effects of Mg-sulphate ion pair formation in solution by aiding growth through assisted desolvation of the Mg2+ ion (e.g., Piana et al. 2006). Furthermore, if the adsorbed sulphate is incorporated into the magnesite structure during growth it removes the need for expensive SO2 flue gas scrubbers as both CO2 and SO2 can be sequestered simultaneously. To explore the implications of sulphate in solution for CO2 sequestration we have observed the growth of cleaved magnesite {104} surfaces in-situ using phase shift interferometry (PSI), a technique specially designed to monitor ultra-slow growing or dissolving mineral surfaces. In addition, we have conducted batch experiments in Teflon-lined steel autoclaves and examined the surfaces ex-situ using atomic force microscopy (AFM). All experiments were conducted at 90 ° C in solutions of 0.2 M NaHCO3 and 0.8 M NaCl or 0.4 M Na2SO4. Supersaturation of the solution was varied by changing the concentration of either MgCl2 for Cl-rich or MgSO4 in sulphate-rich solutions. For the PSI experiments a pressure of 1 MPa was used to prevent the formation of bubbles. In these experiments magnesite was grown in a flowing solution (100 μL/min) for 12 hours, whereas the batch experiments were conducted for 1-7 days under static conditions. The in-situ observations from the PSI experiments indicate that the presence of sulphate increased the rate of obtuse step

  7. Effects of Silicon Variation on Nano-Scale Solid-State Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halupka, David

    This thesis explores means of mitigating the effects of silicon variation on SRAM by means of circuit techniques. This thesis also explores novel read and write techniques for MRAM that support a non-destructive read operation and power-saving write operations in the face of device and silicon variation. First, this thesis proposes the use of a cross-coupled bit line BL biasing scheme that retains an SRAM's fast access speed while reducing the read-access failures in the presence of Vt variation, without excessively increasing the SRAM cell size. It is shown, by extensive Monte-Carlo simulations using 22-nm predictive CMOS models, that the proposed scheme reduces the cell area by 6.5% compared to the conventional BL biasing schemes also analyzed. Second, this thesis proposes a 10T SRAM cell that supports lower voltage operation, achieves lower static power dissipation, and is similar in area to the 6T SRAM cell when the 3-sigma variation of Vt exceeds 40% of nominal Vt. The 10T cell achieves improved write functionality, in comparison to the 6T cell, by preemptively turning off the cell's power supply to the side of the cell that is being pulled low, while not disturbing any unselected cells. Write access time is not affected, as the positive-feedback required to quickly regenerate CMOS voltage levels remains intact. Finally, this thesis proposes a negative-resistance read scheme and write scheme for spin-torque-transfer (STT) MRAM. A negative resistance shunting an STT-MRAM cell guarantees a non-destructive read operation, and saves power during write operations compared with a conventional scheme. Measurements confirm an 7ns non-destructive read access time without the use of a typical sense amplifier and an average write power savings of 10.5% for a 16Kb STT-MRAM fabricated in 0.13mum CMOS using a CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJ.

  8. The effect of electrolytes on dolomite dissolution: nanoscale observations using in situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urosevic, Maja; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.; Cardell, Carolina; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Putnis, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Dissolution of carbonate minerals is one of the main chemical reactions occurring at shallow levels in the crust of the Earth and has a paramount importance for a wide range of geological and biological processes. Calcite (CaCO3), and to a lesser extent dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2), are the major carbonate minerals in sedimentary rocks and building stone materials. The dissolution of calcite has been thoroughly investigated over a range of conditions and solution compositions. In contrast, dolomite dissolution studies have been traditionally hampered by its low reaction rates compared to calcite and its poorly constrained relationship between cation ordering and reactivity (Morse and Arvidson, 2002). Yet important questions like the so-called 'dolomite problem' (e.g. Higgins and Hu, 2005) remain unresolved and more experimental work is needed in order to understand the role of other dissolved species, such as soluble salts, on the kinetics and mechanism of dolomite dissolution and precipitation. We have explored the effect of different electrolytes on the dissolution rate of dolomite by using in situ Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM). Experiments were carried out by passing alkali halide, nitrate and sulfate salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, LiCl, NaI, NaNO3 and Na2SO4) with different ionic strengths (IS = 10-3, 10-2 and 10-1) over dolomite {1014} cleavage surfaces. We show that all electrolytes tested enhance dolomite dissolution. Moreover, the morphology and density of etch pits are controlled by the presence of different ions in solution. The etch pit spreading rate and dolomite dissolution rate depend on both (1) the nature of the electrolyte and (2) the ionic strength. This is in agreement with recent experimental studies on calcite dissolution (Ruiz-Agudo et al., 2010). This study highlights the role of electrolytes in dolomite dissolution and points to a common behavior for carbonate minerals. Our results suggest that soluble salts may play a critical role in the weathering of

  9. Humidity effect on nanoscale electrochemistry in solid silver ion conductors and the dual nature of its locality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sang Mo; Strelcov, Evgheni; Paranthaman, M Parans; Tselev, Alexander; Noh, Tae Won; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-02-11

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a powerful tool to investigate electrochemistry in nanoscale volumes. While most SPM-based studies have focused on reactions at the tip-surface junction, charge and mass conservation requires coupled and intrinsically nonlocal cathodic and anodic processes that can be significantly affected by ambient humidity. Here, we explore the role of water in both cathodic and anodic processes, associated charge transport, and topographic volume changes depending on the polarity of tip bias. The first-order reversal curve current-voltage technique combined with simultaneous detection of the sample topography, referred to as FORC-IVz, was applied to a silver solid ion conductor. We found that the protons generated from water affect silver ionic conduction, silver particle formation and dissolution, and mechanical integrity of the material. This work highlights the dual nature (simultaneously local and nonlocal) of electrochemical SPM studies, which should be considered for comprehensive understanding of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  10. Humidity Effect on Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver Ion Conductors and the Dual Nature of Its Locality

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sangmo; Strelcov, Evgheni; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Tselev, Alexander; Noh, Tae Won; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-01-07

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a powerful tool to investigate electrochemistry in nanoscale volumes. While most SPM-based studies have focused on reactions at the tip-surface junction, charge and mass conservation requires coupled and intrinsically non-local cathodic and anodic processes that can be significantly affected by ambient humidity. Here, we explore the role of water in both cathodic and anodic processes, associated charge transport, and topographic volume changes depending on the polarity of tip bias. The first-order reversal curve current-voltage technique combined with simultaneous detection of the sample topography, referred to as FORC-IVz, was applied to a silver solid ion conductor. We found that the protons generated from water affect silver ionic conduction, silver particle formation and dissolution, and mechanical integrity of the material. This work highlights the dual nature (simultaneously local and non-local) of electrochemical SPM studies, which should be considered for comprehensive understanding of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  11. Interface reactions and Kirkendall voids in metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy grown Cu(In ,Ga)Se2 thin films on GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, C. H.; Rockett, A. A.; Robertson, I. M.; Papathanasiou, N.; Siebentritt, S.

    2006-12-01

    Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 (CIGS) films were grown on (001) GaAs at 570 or 500°C by means of metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy. All films were Cu-rich [Cu /(In+Ga)>1] with pseudomorphic Cu2Se second phase particles found only on the growth surface. During growth, diffusion of Ga from the substrate and vacancies generated by the formation of CIGS from Cu2Se at the surface occurred. The diffusion processes lead to the formation of Kirkendall voids at the GaAs/CIGS interface. Transmission electron microscopy and nanoprobe energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to analyze the diffusion and void formation processes. The diffusivity of Ga in CIGS was found to be relatively low. This is postulated to be due to a comparatively low concentration of point defects in the epitaxial films. A reaction model explaining the observed profiles and voids is proposed.

  12. Effects of Loading Frequency and Film Thickness on the Mechanical Behavior of Nanoscale TiN Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-na; Xu, Bin-shi; Wang, Hai-dou; Cui, Xiu-fang; Jin, Guo; Xing, Zhi-guo

    2017-08-01

    The mechanical properties of a nanoscale-thickness film material determine its reliability and service life. To achieve quantitative detection of film material mechanical performance based on nanoscale mechanical testing methods and to explore the influence of loading frequency of the cycle load on the fatigue test, a TiN film was prepared on monocrystalline silicon by magnetron sputtering. The microstructure of the nanoscale-thickness film material was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The residual stress distribution of the thin film was obtained by using an electronic film stress tester. The hardness values and the fatigue behavior were measured by using a nanomechanical tester. Combined with finite element simulation, the paper analyzed the influence of the film thickness and loading frequency on the deformation, as well as the equivalent stress and strain. The results showed that the TiN film was a typical face-centered cubic structure with a large amount of amorphous. The residual compressive stress decreased gradually with increasing thin film thickness, and the influence of the substrate on the elastic modulus and hardness was also reduced. A greater load frequency would accelerate the dynamic fatigue damage that occurs in TiN films.

  13. Interface proximity effects on ionic conductivity in nanoscale oxide-ion conducting yttria stabilized zirconia: an atomistic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2011-02-14

    We present an atomistic simulation study on the size dependence of dopant distribution and the influence of nanoscale film thickness on carrier transport properties of the model oxide-ion conductor yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Simulated amorphization and recrystallization approach was utilized to generate YSZ films with varying thicknesses (3-9 nm) on insulating MgO substrates. The atomic trajectories generated in the molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structural evolution of the YSZ thin films and correlate the resulting microstructure with ionic transport properties at the nanoscale. The interfacial conductivity increases by 2 orders of magnitude as the YSZ film size decreases from 9 to 3 nm owing to a decrease in activation energy barrier from 0.54 to 0.35 eV in the 1200-2000 K temperature range. Analysis of dopant distribution indicates surface enrichment, the extent of which depends on the film thickness. The mechanisms of oxygen conductivity for the various film thicknesses at the nanoscale are discussed in detail and comparisons with experimental and other modeling studies are presented where possible. The study offers insights into mesoscopic ion conduction mechanisms in low-dimensional solid oxide electrolytes.

  14. Capillarity at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    van Honschoten, Joost W; Brunets, Nataliya; Tas, Niels R

    2010-03-01

    In this critical review we treat the phenomenon of capillarity in nanoscopic confinement, based on application of the Young-Laplace equation. In classical capillarity the curvature of the meniscus is determined by the confining geometry and the macroscopic contact angle. We show that in narrow confinement the influence of the disjoining pressure and the related wetting films have to be considered as they may significantly change the meniscus curvature. Nanochannel based static and dynamic capillarity experiments are reviewed. A typical effect of nanoscale confinement is the appearance of capillarity induced negative pressure. Special attention is paid to elasto-capillarity and electro-capillarity. The presence of electric fields leads to an extra stress term to be added in the Young-Laplace equation. A typical example is the formation of the Taylor cone, essential in the theory of electrospray. Measurements of the filling kinetics of nanochannels with water and aqueous salt solutions are discussed. These experiments can be used to characterize viscosity and apparent viscosity effects of water in nanoscopic confinement. In the final section we show four examples of appearances of capillarity in engineering and in nature (112 references).

  15. Identification of nanoscale ingredients in commercial food products and their induction of mitochondrially mediated cytotoxic effects on human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alshatwi, Ali A; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri S; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman A

    2015-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (E171) and silicon dioxide (E551) are common additives found in food products, personal-care products, and many other consumer products used in daily life. Recent studies have reported that these food additives (manufactured E171 and E551) contain nanosized particles of less than 100 nm. However, the particle size distribution and morphology of added TiO2 and SiO2 particles are not typically stated on the package label. Furthermore, there is an increasing debate regarding health and safety concerns related to the use of synthetic food additives containing nanosized ingredients in consumer products. In this study, we identified the size and morphology of TiO2 and SiO2 particles in commercially available food products by using transmission electron microscope (TEM). In addition, the in vitro toxicological effects of E171 and E551 on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), an adult stem cell-based model, were assessed using the MTT assay and a flow cytometry-based JC-1 assay. Our TEM results confirmed the presence of nanoscale ingredients in food products, and the in vitro toxicology results indicated that the nanoscale E171 and E551 ingredients induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity, changes in cellular morphology, and the loss of mitochondrial trans-membrane potential in hMSCs. These preliminary results clearly demonstrated that the nanoscale E171 and E551 particles had adverse effects on hMSCs by inducing oxidative stress-mediated cell death. Accordingly, further studies are needed to identify the specific pathway involved, with an emphasis on differential gene expression in hMSCs.

  16. Exposure, health and ecological effects review of engineered nanoscale cerium and cerium oxide associated with its use as a fuel additive.

    PubMed

    Cassee, Flemming R; van Balen, Erna C; Singh, Charanjeet; Green, David; Muijser, Hans; Weinstein, Jason; Dreher, Kevin

    2011-03-01

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatings, electronics, biomedical, energy and fuel additives. Many applications of engineered CeO(2) nanoparticles are dispersive in nature increasing the risk of exposure and interactions with a variety of environmental media with unknown health, safety and environmental implications. As evident from a risk assessment perspective, the health effects of CeO(2) nanoparticles are not only dependent on their intrinsic toxicity but also on the level of exposure to these novel materials. Although this may seem logical, numerous studies have assessed the health effects of nanoparticles without this simple but critical risk assessment perspective. This review extends previous exposure and toxicological assessments for CeO(2) particles by summarizing the current state of micro and nano-scale cerium exposure and health risks derived from epidemiology, air quality monitoring, fuel combustion and toxicological studies to serve as a contemporary comprehensive and integrated toxicological assessment. Based on the new information presented in this review there is an ongoing exposure to a large population to new diesel emissions generated using fuel additives containing CeO2 nanoparticles for which the environmental (air quality and climate change) and public health impacts of this new technology are not known. Therefore, there is an absolute critical need for integrated exposure and toxicological studies in order to accurately assess the environmental, ecological and health implications of nanotechnology enabled diesel fuel additives with existing as well as new engine designs and fuel formulations.

  17. Nanoscale effect on thermal decomposition kinetics of organic particles: dynamic vacuum stability test of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Yu, Weifei; Zhang, Tonglai; Yang, Li; Zhou, Zunning

    2013-05-28

    Despite the extensive research that has been carried out on organic nanoparticles, little explanation has been provided for the reasons behind their exceptional properties. In this work, the effect of the particles being on the nanoscale on the thermal decomposition kinetics of organic particles was examined by means of a dynamic vacuum stability test. Nano- and microscale particles of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene were measured for comparison. Analysis of the evolved gas revealed that the nanoparticles (NPs) show much higher reaction activity than the microparticles (MPs). Both the non-isothermal and isothermal reaction mechanisms and kinetics were computed. The NPs and MPs exhibit different reaction mechanisms, while similarly sized particles follow different mechanisms for different stages of the reaction. The mechanisms for the NPs are affected by the temperature in the range considered. NPs have larger values for the apparent activation energy (E(a)) and pre-exponential factor (A) than MPs and the relationship of E(a) to A demonstrates that a kinetic compensation effect is evident. The nanoscale effect shows there to be a significant influence on the apparent performances and kinetics as well as on the intrinsic reaction mechanisms of organic particles. This effect can be attributed to the surface properties of NPs, where the high surface area contributes to efficient mass transfer and heat transfer, thus leading to numerous activated molecules being involved in the reaction.

  18. The opposing nanoscale and macroscale effects of selected nanoparticle addition to AZ91/ZK60A hybrid magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramsothy, Muralidharan; Gupta, Manoj

    2013-09-01

    B4C and AlN nanoparticles were separately added to solidification processed AZ91/ZK60A hybrid magnesium alloy to improve tensile and compressive properties. In tension, both nanoparticles strengthened the hybrid alloy. However, only B4C nanoparticle addition significantly improved the ductility of the hybrid alloy, while AlN nanoparticle addition slightly decreased the ductility of the hybrid alloy. Comparing both nanocomposites as well as monolithic alloy, there was no significant difference in the grain size or crystallographic texture. However, it was possible that the AlN nanoparticle was more chemically reactive with the alloy matrix compared to the B4C nanoparticle. Also, it was observed that unlike AlN nanoparticle addition, B4C nanoparticle addition enabled the formation of numerous nanoscale stacking faults in the hybrid alloy matrix. Further, it was apparent that the B4C nanoparticle promoted the nanoscale precipitation of Al12Mg17 intermetallic particles (with particle coarsening thereafter), whereas the AlN nanoparticle did not alter the intermetallic precipitation characteristics in the alloy matrix. Consequently, nano/micro-particle induced high strain zone (HSZ) formation during tensile deformation was more pronounced in the AZ91/ZK60A/B4C nanocomposite compared to the AZ91/ZK60A/AlN nanocomposite, rendering the B4C nanoparticle significantly greater capability (compared to the AlN nanoparticle) in enhancing the tensile ductility of the hybrid alloy. The promotion of nanoscale precipitation of Al12Mg17 intermetallic particles (with particle coarsening thereafter) by the B4C nanoparticle also enabled the AZ91/ZK60A/B4C nanocomposite to have significantly higher compressive strength (per strain level during deformation) compared to the AZ91/ZK60A/AlN nanocomposite.

  19. Nonplanar Nanoscale Fin Field Effect Transistors on Textile, Paper, Wood, Stone, and Vinyl via Soft Material-Enabled Double-Transfer Printing.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Jhonathan P; Torres Sevilla, Galo A; Alfaraj, Nasir; Ghoneim, Mohamed T; Kutbee, Arwa T; Sridharan, Ashvitha; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-05-26

    The ability to incorporate rigid but high-performance nanoscale nonplanar complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics with curvilinear, irregular, or asymmetric shapes and surfaces is an arduous but timely challenge in enabling the production of wearable electronics with an in situ information-processing ability in the digital world. Therefore, we are demonstrating a soft-material enabled double-transfer-based process to integrate flexible, silicon-based, nanoscale, nonplanar, fin-shaped field effect transistors (FinFETs) and planar metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) on various asymmetric surfaces to study their compatibility and enhanced applicability in various emerging fields. FinFET devices feature sub-20 nm dimensions and state-of-the-art, high-κ/metal gate stacks, showing no performance alteration after the transfer process. A further analysis of the transferred MOSFET devices, featuring 1 μm gate length, exhibits an ION value of nearly 70 μA/μm (VDS = 2 V, VGS = 2 V) and a low subthreshold swing of around 90 mV/dec, proving that a soft interfacial material can act both as a strong adhesion/interposing layer between devices and final substrate as well as a means to reduce strain, which ultimately helps maintain the device's performance with insignificant deterioration even at a high bending state.

  20. Effects of micro- and nano-scale wave-like structures on fatigue strength of a beta-type titanium alloy developed as a biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kengo; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Some newly developed β-type titanium alloys for biomedical applications exhibit distinctive heterogeneous structures. The formation mechanisms for these structures have not been completely revealed; however, understanding these mechanisms could lead to improving their properties. In this study, the heterogeneous structures of a Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ), which is a candidate for next-generation metallic biomaterials, were analyzed. Furthermore, the effects of such heterogeneous structures on the mechanical strength of this alloy, including fatigue strength, were revealed by comparing its strength to that of homogenous TNTZ. The heterogeneous structures were characterized micro-, submicro- and nano-scale wave-like structures. The formation mechanisms of these wave-like structures are found to be different from each other even though their morphologies are similar. It is revealed that the micro-, submicro- and nano-scale wave-like structures are caused by elemental segregation, crystal distortion related to kink band and phase separation into β and β', respectively. However, these structures have no significant effect on both tensile properties and fatigue strength comparison with homogeneous structure in this study. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Humidity Effect on Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver Ion Conductors and the Dual Nature of Its Locality

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Sangmo; Strelcov, Evgheni; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; ...

    2015-01-07

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a powerful tool to investigate electrochemistry in nanoscale volumes. While most SPM-based studies have focused on reactions at the tip-surface junction, charge and mass conservation requires coupled and intrinsically non-local cathodic and anodic processes that can be significantly affected by ambient humidity. Here, we explore the role of water in both cathodic and anodic processes, associated charge transport, and topographic volume changes depending on the polarity of tip bias. The first-order reversal curve current-voltage technique combined with simultaneous detection of the sample topography, referred to as FORC-IVz, was applied to a silver solid ion conductor.more » We found that the protons generated from water affect silver ionic conduction, silver particle formation and dissolution, and mechanical integrity of the material. This work highlights the dual nature (simultaneously local and non-local) of electrochemical SPM studies, which should be considered for comprehensive understanding of nanoscale electrochemistry.« less

  2. Toward understanding the electrical properties of metal/semiconductor Schottky contacts: The effects of barrier inhomogeneities and geometry in bulk and nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpatwari, Karthik

    The work presented in this thesis comprises of two parts. Part I deals with Schottky contacts to the wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors SiC, GaN and ZnO. These semiconductors offer great promise for a wide variety of electronic and optoelectronic applications. Schottky barriers to WBG semiconductors are attractive in particular for high temperature/high power diodes, photodetectors, and gas sensors. However, the Schottky barriers exhibit non-ideal behavior, due in part to inhomogeneities originating from immature crystal growth and device processing technologies. Apart from being a versatile electronic component, the Schottky diode is a valuable test structure. The Schottky contact is routinely used to probe substrate and epilayer quality by different electrical characterization techniques. It is well established that the current-voltage-temperature ( I-V-T) characteristics of Schottky contacts are routinely affected by the presence of barrier height inhomogeneities (BHI). Consequently, Schottky diode parameters such as the Schottky barrier height and the Richardson constant extracted using the I-V-T measurements can deviate from their actual values. The effects of BHI on the extracted Schottky barrier height have been studied in the literature. However, the effects of BHI on the Richardson constant have not been thoroughly explored and are the focus of the first part of this thesis. Based on the inhomogeneous Schottky barrier model provided by Tung, a new method for the extraction of the Richardson constant is developed. The new method is applied to the Richardson constant determination of n-type ZnO and GaN. Excellent agreement with the theoretical value is obtained in both cases. The advent of the nanoelectronics era has resulted in the Schottky contact evolving from the relatively simple, planar structure into a more complex structure. Compared to bulk Schottky contacts, the Schottky barrier properties are expected to be widely different at the nanoscale. For

  3. Rapid reductive degradation of aqueous p-nitrophenol using nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica with enhanced antioxidation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lin; Tang, Jing; Zeng, Guangming; Yang, Guide; Xie, Xia; Zhou, Yaoyu; Pang, Ya; Fang, Yan; Wang, Jiajia; Xiong, Weiping

    2015-04-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica (nZVI/SBA-15) were successfully prepared for effective degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). The nZVI/SBA-15 composites were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall nanoscale zero-valent iron particles were formed and well dispersed on mesoporous silica (SBA-15). Batch experiments revealed that PNP removal declined from 96.70% to 16.14% as solution pH increased from 3.0 to 9.0. Besides, degradation equilibrium was reached within 5 min, which was independent of initial PNP concentration. Furthermore, only a little PNP elimination on SBA-15 indicated that nZVI immobilized on mesoporous silica was mainly responsible for the target contaminant removal. The UV-vis spectrum and XPS measurement confirmed that the PNP removal was a reductive degradation process, which was further proved by the detected intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The excellent antioxidation ability had been discovered with more than 80% of PNP being removed by nZVI/SBA-15 treated with 30 days' exposure to air. These results demonstrated the feasible and potential application of nZVI/SBA-15 composites in organic wastewater treatment.

  4. Thresholdless nanoscale coaxial lasers.

    PubMed

    Khajavikhan, M; Simic, A; Katz, M; Lee, J H; Slutsky, B; Mizrahi, A; Lomakin, V; Fainman, Y

    2012-02-08

    The effects of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), caused by the interaction of matter and the electromagnetic field in subwavelength resonant structures, have been the subject of intense research in recent years. The generation of coherent radiation by subwavelength resonant structures has attracted considerable interest, not only as a means of exploring the QED effects that emerge at small volume, but also for its potential in applications ranging from on-chip optical communication to ultrahigh-resolution and high-throughput imaging, sensing and spectroscopy. One such strand of research is aimed at developing the 'ultimate' nanolaser: a scalable, low-threshold, efficient source of radiation that operates at room temperature and occupies a small volume on a chip. Different resonators have been proposed for the realization of such a nanolaser--microdisk and photonic bandgap resonators, and, more recently, metallic, metallo-dielectric and plasmonic resonators. But progress towards realizing the ultimate nanolaser has been hindered by the lack of a systematic approach to scaling down the size of the laser cavity without significantly increasing the threshold power required for lasing. Here we describe a family of coaxial nanostructured cavities that potentially solve the resonator scalability challenge by means of their geometry and metal composition. Using these coaxial nanocavities, we demonstrate the smallest room-temperature, continuous-wave telecommunications-frequency laser to date. In addition, by further modifying the design of these coaxial nanocavities, we achieve thresholdless lasing with a broadband gain medium. In addition to enabling laser applications, these nanoscale resonators should provide a powerful platform for the development of other QED devices and metamaterials in which atom-field interactions generate new functionalities.

  5. Nanoscale optimization of quantum dot solar sells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanshu; Sergeev, Andrei; Vagidov, Nizami; Mitin, Vladimir; Sablon, Kimberly; State Univ of NY-Buffalo Team; Army Research Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) offer possibilities for nanoscale control of photoelectron processes via engineering the band structure and potential profile. Nanoscale potential profile (potential barriers) and nanoscale band engineering (AlGaAs atomically thin barriers) effectively suppress the photoelectron capture to QDs. QDs also increase conversion efficiency of the above-bandgap photons due to extraction of electrons from QDs via Coulomb interaction with hot electrons that excited by high-energy photons. To study the effects of the band structure engineering and nanoscale potential barriers on the photovoltaic performance we fabricated 3- μm base GaAs devices with various InAs quantum dot media and selective doping. All quantum dot devices show improvement in conversion efficiency compared with the reference cell. Quantum efficiency measurements allow us to associate the spectral characteristics of photoresponse enhancement with nanoscale structure of QD media. The dark current analysis provides valuable information about recombination in QD solar cells. The two-diode model well fit the scope of data and recovers the measured open circuit voltage.

  6. Mesoscale effects in electrochemical conversion: coupling of chemistry to atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron-based electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wiaderek, Kamila M; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Pereira, Nathalie; Ilavsky, Jan; Amatucci, Glenn G; Chupas, Peter J; Chapman, Karena W

    2014-04-30

    The complex coupling of atomic, chemical, and electronic transformations across multiple length scales underlies the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices. Here, the coupling of chemistry with atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron conversion electrodes is resolved by combining pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis for a series of Fe fluorides, oxyfluorides, and oxides. The data show that the anion chemistry of the initial electrode influences the abundance of atomic defects in the Fe atomic lattice. This, in turn, is linked to different atom mobilities and propensity for particle growth. Competitive nanoparticle growth in mixed anion systems contributes to a distinct nanostructure, without the interconnected metallic nanoparticles formed for single anion systems.

  7. Nanoscale analysis of the effects of antibiotics and CX1 on a Pseudomonas aeruginosa multidrug-resistant strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, C.; Grare, M.; Jauvert, E.; Coutable, A.; Regnouf-de-Vains, J. B.; Mourer, M.; Duval, R. E.; Dague, E.

    2012-08-01

    Drug resistance is a challenge that can be addressed using nanotechnology. We focused on the resistance of the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and investigated, using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), the behavior of a reference strain and of a multidrug resistant clinical strain, submitted to two antibiotics and to an innovative antibacterial drug (CX1). We measured the morphology, surface roughness and elasticity of the bacteria under physiological conditions and exposed to the antibacterial molecules. To go further in the molecules action mechanism, we explored the bacterial cell wall nanoscale organization using functionalized AFM tips. We have demonstrated that affected cells have a molecularly disorganized cell wall; surprisingly long molecules being pulled off from the cell wall by a lectin probe. Finally, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of CX1: it destroys the outer membrane of the bacteria as demonstrated by the results on artificial phospholipidic membranes and on the resistant strain.

  8. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  9. Nanoscale hierarchical optical interactions for secure information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Naoya; Naruse, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    There is increasing demand for novel physical security that can differentiate between real and false specific artifact that have been added to bank bills, certifications, and other vouchers. The most simple and effective method for improving the security level is to scale down the elemental structures so that they cannot be duplicated by attackers. While there is a paradox that the achieved fabrication resolution by a defender can also be realized by an attacker, further improvement in security is possible by the functional fusion of artifact metrics and nanophotonics. The fundamental advantages of this concept are the high-level clone resistance and individuality of nanoscale artifacts, which are based on the super-resolution fabrication and nanoscale hierarchical structure of optical near-field interactions, respectively. In this paper, the basis for the fabrication of nanoscale artifacts by utilizing random phenomena is described, and a quantitative evaluation of the security level is presented. An experimental demonstration using a nano-/macro-hierarchical hologram is presented to demonstrate the fundamental procedure for retrieving nanoscale features as hidden information. Finally, the concept and a simple demonstration of non-scanning probe microscopy are described as a practical application of the retrieval and authentication of nanoscale artifact metrics.

  10. Effects of Nanoscale Structure on the Magnetism and Transport Properties of Chromium and Chromium-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekelheide, Zoe Austin

    This thesis studies the unique properties of Cr and Cr-Al alloys; the first half focuses on Cr while the second half focuses on Cr-Al alloys. This thesis particularly focuses on the effects of nanoscale structure such as crystal defects, grain boundaries, and short- to medium-range chemical ordering, on both the magnetism and the electronic transport properties of Cr and Cr-Al. This thesis aimed to understand the spin density waves (SDW) in polycrystalline Cr films such as those commonly used in GMR multilayers, where disorder and stress are the important variables. Infrared reflectivity was used to measure the characteristic SDWpseudogap energies to distinguish the SDW state of Cr thin films grown under different deposition conditions (e-beam and sputtered at different argon pressures). The fundamental distinguishing properties of the films are stress and disorder, both strongly affected by the deposition conditions. Films with low stress and disorder are ISDW, like bulk Cr. Films with high tensile stress are CSDW, like Mn-doped Cr. Finally, films with high disorder, determined from the resistivity, have regions of both ISDW and CSDW. Importantly, all of the Cr films measured showed SDW signatures, showing that the SDW is quite robust even in highly disordered thin films. A low temperature magnetic phase diagram was created for Cr films. It was shown that Cr thin films show unusual and extremely deposition condition-dependent resistivity due to resonant scattering, such as residual resistivity ranging between 3 and 400 muO-cm, and significant resistivity minima at low temperature. Several experiments showed that these features are due to defects in the Cr lattice such as grain boundaries and vacancies. When a highly disordered, 400 muO-cm film with a significant minimum is annealed to 800°C, the resistivity is decreased by 10x and the depth of the minimum is decreased by 50x. On the other end of the spectrum, two low resistivity (< 10 muO-cm) samples grown in the

  11. Exposure and Health Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Dioxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive - NOW IN PRINT IN THE JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels that are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (Ce02) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatin...

  12. Exposure, Health and Ecological Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Oxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coa...

  13. Exposure, Health and Ecological Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Oxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coa...

  14. Exposure and Health Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Dioxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive - NOW IN PRINT IN THE JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels that are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (Ce02) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatin...

  15. Nanoscale-phase-separated Pd-Rh boxes synthesized via metal migration: an archetype for studying lattice strain and composition effects in electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Brian T; Brodsky, Casey N; Kuo, Chun-Hong; Lamontagne, Leo K; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Yong; Tao, Franklin Feng; Huang, Weixin; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2013-10-02

    Developing syntheses of more sophisticated nanostructures comprising late transition metals broadens the tools to rationally design suitable heterogeneous catalysts for chemical transformations. Herein, we report a synthesis of Pd-Rh nanoboxes by controlling the migration of metals in a core-shell nanoparticle. The Pd-Rh nanobox structure is a grid-like arrangement of two distinct metal phases, and the surfaces of these boxes are {100} dominant Pd and Rh. The catalytic behaviors of the particles were examined in electrochemistry to investigate strain effects arising from this structure. It was found that the trends in activity of model fuel cell reactions cannot be explained solely by the surface composition. The lattice strain emerging from the nanoscale separation of metal phases at the surface also plays an important role.

  16. Enhanced effects of nano-scale topography on the bioactivity and osteoblast behaviors of micron rough ZrO2 coatings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Zreiqat, Hala; Ding, Chuanxian

    2011-09-01

    Implant surface topography is one of the most important factors affecting the rate and extent of osseointegration. Randomly micron-roughened surfaces have been documented to support osteoblast adhesion, differentiation, and mineralized phenotype, and thus favoring bone fixation of implants to host tissues. However, few studies have been done yet to investigate whether their effects on osteoblast behaviors can be enhanced by incorporation of nano-scale topographic cues. To validate this hypothesis, zirconia coatings with micron roughness (about 6.6 μm) superimposed by nano-sized grains (<50 nm) were fabricated by plasma spraying. To validate the impact of nano-sized grains, post-treatments of surface polishing (SP) and heat treatment (HT) were performed on the as-sprayed (AS) coatings to change the surface topographies but keep the chemical and phase composition similar. Results of in vitro bioactivity test showed that apatite was formed only on coating surfaces with nano-sized grains (AS coatings), indicating the significance of nano-topographic cues on the in vitro bioactivity. Enhanced osteoblast adhesion and higher cell proliferation rate were observed on coatings with both micron-roughness and nano-sized grains (AS-coatings), compared to coatings with smooth surfaces (SP-coatings) and coatings with only micron-scale roughness (heat-treated coatings), indicating the significant effects of nano-size grains on osteoblast responses. As the micron rough surfaces have been well-documented to enhance bone fixation, results of this work suggest that a combination of surface modifications at both micron and nano-scale is required for enhanced osseointegration of orthopedic implants.

  17. Developing an Effective Model for Shale Gas Flow in Nano-scale Pore Clusters based on FIB-SEM Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W. B.; Lin, M.; Yi, Z. X.; Li, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    Nano-scale pores existed in the form of clusters are the controlling void space in shale gas reservoir. Gas transport in nanopores which has a significant influence on shale gas' recoverability displays multiple transport regimes, including viscous, slippage flow and Knudsen diffusion. In addition, it is also influenced by pore space characteristics. For convenience and efficiency consideration, it is necessary to develop an upscaling model from nano pore to pore cluster scale. Existing models are more like framework functions that provide a format, because the parameters that represent pore space characteristics are underdetermined and may have multiple possibilities. Therefore, it is urgent to make them clear and obtained a model that is closer to reality. FIB-SEM imaging technology is able to acquire three dimensional images with nanometer resolution that nano pores can be visible. Based on the images of two shale samples, we used a high-precision pore network extraction algorithm to generate equivalent pore networks and simulate multiple regime (non-Darcy) flow in it. Several structural parameters can be obtained through pore network modelling. It is found that although the throat-radius distributions are very close, throat flux-radius distributions of different samples can be divided into two categories. The variation of tortuosity with pressure and the overall trend of throat-flux distribution changes with pressure are disclosed. A deeper understanding of shale gas flow in nano-scale pore clusters is obtained. After all, an upscaling model that connects absolute permeability, apparent permeability and other characteristic parameters is proposed, and the best parameter scheme considering throat number-radius distribution and flowing porosity for this model is selected out of three schemes based on pore scale results, and it can avoid multiple-solution problem and is useful in reservoir modelling and experiment result analysis, etc. This work is supported by

  18. A nanoscale shape memory oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinxing; Ke, Xiaoxing; Gou, Gaoyang; Seidel, Jan; Xiang, Bin; Yu, Pu; Liang, Wen-I.; Minor, Andrew M.; Chu, Ying-Hao; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ren, Xiaobing; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2013-11-01

    Stimulus-responsive shape-memory materials have attracted tremendous research interests recently, with much effort focused on improving their mechanical actuation. Driven by the needs of nanoelectromechanical devices, materials with large mechanical strain, particularly at nanoscale level, are therefore desired. Here we report on the discovery of a large shape-memory effect in bismuth ferrite at the nanoscale. A maximum strain of up to ~14% and a large volumetric work density of ~600±90 J cm-3 can be achieved in association with a martensitic-like phase transformation. With a single step, control of the phase transformation by thermal activation or electric field has been reversibly achieved without the assistance of external recovery stress. Although aspects such as hysteresis, microcracking and so on have to be taken into consideration for real devices, the large shape-memory effect in this oxide surpasses most alloys and, therefore, demonstrates itself as an extraordinary material for potential use in state-of-art nanosystems.

  19. Electronic transport in nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerqvist, Johan

    In this dissertation electronic transport in nanoscale structures is discussed. An expression for the shot noise, a fluctuation in current due to the discreteness of charge, is derived directly from the wave functions of a nanoscale system. Investigation of shot noise is of particular interest due to the rich fundamental physics involved. For example, the study of shot noise can provide fundamental insight on the nature of electron transport in a nanoscale junction. We report calculations of the shot noise properties of parallel wires in the regime in which the interwire distance is much smaller than the inelastic mean free path. The validity of quantized transverse momenta in a nanoscale structure and its effect on shot noise is also discussed. We theoretically propose and show the feasibility of a novel protocol for DNA sequencing based on the electronic signature of single-stranded DNA while it translocates through a nanopore. We find that the currents for the bases are sufficiently different to allow for efficient sequencing. Our estimates reveal that sequencing of an entire human genome could be done with very high accuracy in a matter of hours, e.g., orders of magnitude faster than present techniques. We also find that although the overall magnitude of the current may change dramatically with different detection conditions, the intrinsic distinguishability of the bases is not significantly affected by pore size and transverse field strength. Finally, we study the ability of water to screen charges in nanopores by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations coupled to electrostatic calculations. Due to the short length scales of the nanopore geometry and the large local field gradient of a single ion, the energetics of transporting an ion through the pore is strongly dependent on the microscopic details of the electric field. We show that as long as the pore allows the first hydration shell to stay intact, e.g., ˜6 nearby water molecules, the electric field

  20. Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Moon, Dong-Il; Meyyappan, M

    2017-04-12

    Vacuum tubes that sparked the electronics era had given way to semiconductor transistors. Despite their faster operation and better immunity to noise and radiation compared to the transistors, the vacuum device technology became extinct due to the high power consumption, integration difficulties, and short lifetime of the vacuum tubes. We combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern silicon nanofabrication technology here. The surround gate nanoscale vacuum channel transistor consists of sharp source and drain electrodes separated by sub-50 nm vacuum channel with a source to gate distance of 10 nm. This transistor performs at a low voltage (<5 V) and provides a high drive current (>3 microamperes). The nanoscale vacuum channel transistor can be a possible alternative to semiconductor transistors beyond Moore's law.

  1. Mapping nanoscale light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, N.; Kuipers, L.

    2014-12-01

    The control of light fields on subwavelength scales in nanophotonic structures has become ubiquitous, driven by both curiosity and a multitude of applications in fields ranging from biosensing to quantum optics. Mapping these fields in detail is crucial, as theoretical modelling is far from trivial and highly dependent on nanoscale geometry. Recent developments of nanoscale field mapping, particularly with near-field microscopy, have not only led to a vastly increased resolution, but have also resulted in increased functionality. The phase and amplitude of different vector components of both the electric and magnetic fields are now accessible, as is the ultrafast temporal or spectral evolution of propagating pulses in nanostructures. In this Review we assess the current state-of-the-art of subwavelength light mapping, highlighting the new science and nanostructures that have subsequently become accessible.

  2. Aggregation of nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides and corresponding effects on metal uptake, retention, and speciation: II. Temperature and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegemeier, J. P.; Reinsch, B. C.; Lentini, C. J.; Dale, J. G.; Kim, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation and growth of nanosized particles can greatly impact their capacity to sorb and retain dissolved metals, thus affecting metal fate and transport in contaminated systems. Aqueous suspensions of synthesized nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides were exposed to dissolved Zn(II) or Cu(II) and aged at room temperature (∼20 °C), 50 °C, and 75 °C for timeframes ranging from 0 to 96 h before sorbed metal ions were desorbed by lowering the suspension pH. Atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of supernatants both before and after the desorption step determined how temperature and time affect macroscopic metal uptake and retention capacities. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy analysis described the local binding environment of the sorbed/retained metals on the solid phase. With increasing aging temperature and time, the initial ∼5-nm oblong nanoparticles formed dense aggregates, lost reactive surface area, and retained progressively larger fractions of the initially-introduced Zn(II) and Cu(II) following the desorption step, with the copper species inhibiting the oriented aggregation of the nanoparticles into nanorods. Based on EXAFS analysis, the speciation of the sorbed metal species evolves with increasing time and temperature from surface-sorbed metal ions, which readily desorb and return to solution, to more strongly-bound, structurally-incorporated metal ions. These retained metals appear to associate intimately with the nanoparticle aggregates by substituting for iron in the nanoparticle lattice or by binding within nanoparticle aggregate pore spaces.

  3. Effect of Nano-Scale and Micro-Scale Yttria Reinforcement on Powder Forged AA-7075 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Tilak C.; Prakash, U.; Dabhade, Vikram V.

    2016-05-01

    The present investigation deals with the development of AA-7075 metal matrix composites reinforced with nano yttria particles (0.1 to 3 vol.%) and micron yttria particles (1 to 15 vol.%) by powder forging. Matrix powders (AA-7075) and reinforcement powders (yttria) were blended, cold compacted, sintered under pure nitrogen, and finally hot forged in a closed floating die. The hot forged samples were artificially age hardened at 121 °C for various time durations to determine the peak aging time. The mechanical properties in the peak-aged condition as well as density and microstructure were determined and correlated with the reinforcement size and content. The nano composites exhibited a well-densified structure as well as better hardness and tensile/compressive strength as compared to micro-scale composites. The mechanical properties in nano-scale composites peaked at 0.5 vol.% yttria addition while for micro-scale composites these properties peaked at 5 vol.% yttria addition.

  4. Effect of nanoscale tin-dioxide layers on the efficiency of CdS/CdTe-based film solar elements

    SciTech Connect

    Khrypunov, G. S. Pirohov, O. V.; Gorstka, T. A.; Novikov, V. A.; Kovtun, N. A.

    2015-03-15

    Comparative investigations of the output parameters and optical diode characteristics of ITO/CdS/CdTe/Cu/Au and SnO{sub 2}: F/CdS/CdTe/Cu/Au film solar cells are carried out with the aim of optimizing the design of the front electrodes. It is established that the high voltage and large filling factor of the solar elements with SnO{sub 2}: F films are caused by a lower diode saturation current density and series resistance due to the stability of the crystal structure and electrical properties of these films against chloride treatment of the base layer during device fabrication. At the same time, solar elements with an ITO front electrode exhibit a higher short-circuit current density due to the larger average light transmittance of the ITO layers. The use of nanoscale SnO{sub 2} layers in the ITO front contacts allows the efficiency of the CdS/CdTe-based solar elements to be enhanced to 11.4% on account of stabilization of the crystal structure and electrical properties of the ITO films and a possible reduction in the cadmium-sulphide-layer thickness without shunting the device structure.

  5. Fats, Oils, & Colors of a Nanoscale Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisensky, George C.; Horoszewski, Dana; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C .

    2006-01-01

    Phase changes and intermolecular forces are important physical science concepts but are not always easy to present in an active learning format. This article presents several interactive activities in which students plot the melting points of some fatty acids and explore the effect that the nanoscale size and shape of molecules have on the…

  6. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  7. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of "dynamic structural disorder" (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

  8. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  9. Fats, Oils, & Colors of a Nanoscale Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisensky, George C.; Horoszewski, Dana; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C .

    2006-01-01

    Phase changes and intermolecular forces are important physical science concepts but are not always easy to present in an active learning format. This article presents several interactive activities in which students plot the melting points of some fatty acids and explore the effect that the nanoscale size and shape of molecules have on the…

  10. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-04-07

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

  11. Nanoscale thermal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  12. Transport in closed nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushong, Neil

    2005-03-01

    An alternative way to describe electrical transport in nanoscale systems has been recently proposed where two large but finite charged electrodes discharge across a nanoscale junction (M. Di Ventra and T. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004)). We have applied this concept to describe the dynamics of a finite quasi-one dimensional gold wire using both a simple tight-binding model and time-dependent density-functional theory. After an initial transient, a quasi-steady state sets in whose lifetime increases with system size. This quasi-steady state is due to the wave properties of the electron wavefunctions and the resultant uncertainty principle and is established without inelastic effects. The corresponding current-voltage characteristics at steady state are in very good agreement with those calculated from the static scattering approach. We discuss local electron distributions, electrostatic potentials, and local resistivity dipoles formed at the quasi-steady state and compare these findings with the static open-boundary problem. A relation between information entropy and electron dynamics is discussed. Work supported by NSF.

  13. Nanoscale proximity effect in the high-temperature superconductor Bi{2}Sr{2}CaCu{2}O{8+delta} using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Parker, Colin V; Pushp, Aakash; Pasupathy, Abhay N; Gomes, Kenjiro K; Wen, Jinsheng; Xu, Zhijun; Ono, Shimpei; Gu, Genda; Yazdani, Ali

    2010-03-19

    High-temperature cuprate superconductors exhibit extremely local nanoscale phenomena and strong sensitivity to doping. While other experiments have looked at nanoscale interfaces between layers of different dopings, we focus on the interplay between naturally inhomogeneous nanoscale regions. Using scanning tunneling microscopy to carefully track the same region of the sample as a function of temperature, we show that regions with weak superconductivity can persist to elevated temperatures if bordered by regions of strong superconductivity. This suggests that it may be possible to increase the maximum possible transition temperature by controlling the distribution of dopants.

  14. Nanoscale Proximity Effect in the High-Temperature Superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, C.V.; Gu, G.; Pushp, A.; Pasupathy, A.N.; Gomes, K.K.; Wen, J.; Xu, Z.; Ono, S.; Yazdani, A.

    2010-03-15

    High-temperature cuprate superconductors exhibit extremely local nanoscale phenomena and strong sensitivity to doping. While other experiments have looked at nanoscale interfaces between layers of different dopings, we focus on the interplay between naturally inhomogeneous nanoscale regions. Using scanning tunneling microscopy to carefully track the same region of the sample as a function of temperature, we show that regions with weak superconductivity can persist to elevated temperatures if bordered by regions of strong superconductivity. This suggests that it may be possible to increase the maximum possible transition temperature by controlling the distribution of dopants.

  15. The Effects of Noncellulosic Compounds on the Nanoscale Interaction Forces Measured between Carbohydrate-Binding Module and Lignocellulosic Biomass.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Baran; Colpan, Mert; Ju, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiao; Kostyukova, Alla; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2016-05-09

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the types of forces that govern how cellulose-degrading enzymes interact with cellulosic and noncellulosic components of lignocellulosic surfaces limits the design of new strategies for efficient conversion of biomass to bioethanol. In a step to improve our fundamental understanding of such interactions, nanoscale forces acting between a model cellulase-a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) of cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I)-and a set of lignocellulosic substrates with controlled composition were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The three model substrates investigated were kraft (KP), sulfite (SP), and organosolv (OPP) pulped substrates. These substrates varied in their surface lignin coverage, lignin type, and xylan and acetone extractives' content. Our results indicated that the overall adhesion forces of biomass to CBM increased linearly with surface lignin coverage with kraft lignin showing the highest forces among lignin types investigated. When the overall adhesion forces were decoupled into specific and nonspecific component forces via the Poisson statistical model, hydrophobic and Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) forces dominated the binding forces of CBM to kraft lignin, whereas permanent dipole-dipole interactions and electrostatic forces facilitated the interactions of lignosulfonates to CBM. Xylan and acetone extractives' content increased the attractive forces between CBM and lignin-free substrates, most likely through hydrogen bonding forces. When the substrates treated differently were compared, it was found that both the differences in specific and nonspecific forces between lignin-containing and lignin-free substrates were the least for OPP. Therefore, cellulase enzymes represented by CBM would weakly bind to organosolv lignin. This will facilitate an easy enzyme recovery compared to other substrates treated with kraft or sulfite pulping. Our results also suggest that altering the surface hydrophobicity

  16. Removal of nitrobenzene by immobilized nanoscale zero-valent iron: Effect of clay support and efficiency optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Ying; Xi, Beidou; Mao, Xuhui; Gong, Bin; Li, Rui; Peng, Xing; Liu, Hongliang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, natural clays were used as the support for nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) to fulfill affordable and efficient decontamination materials. In comparison with the kaolinite (K) and montmorillonite (M) supported nZVI materials (K-nZVI and M-nZVI), Hangjin clay supported nZVI (HJ-nZVI) exhibited the best performance for nitrobenzene (NB) removal because of its favorable characteristics, such as higher specific surface area (SSA, 82.0 m2 g-1), larger pore volume (0.1198 cm3 g-1) and bigger average pore diameter (6.2 nm). The NB removal efficiency achieved by HJ-nZVI (93.2 ± 2.8%) was much higher than these achieved by HJ clay alone (38.2 ± 2.3%), nZVI alone (52.3 ± 2.5%) and by the combined use of nZVI and HJ clay (70.2 ± 1.3%). The superior performance of HJ-nZVI was associated with three aspects: the even distribution of nZVIs onto HJ clay, higher payload efficiency of nZVIs and the stronger adsorption capability of HJ clay support. Higher SSA, larger pore volume, favorable cation exchange capacity and structural negative charges all facilitated the payload of iron onto HJ clay. The adsorption process accelerated the reduction via increasing the local concentration of aqueous NB. The high efficiency of HJ-nZVI for decontamination warranted its promising prospect in remediation applications.

  17. Self-assembly of fatty acids on hydroxylated Al surface and effects of their stability on wettability and nanoscale organization.

    PubMed

    Liascukiene, Irma; Steffenhagen, Marie; Asadauskas, Svajus J; Lambert, Jean-François; Landoulsi, Jessem

    2014-05-27

    The self-assembly of fatty acids (FA) on the surfaces of inorganic materials is a relevant way to control their wetting properties. While the mechanism of adsorption on model flat substrate is well described in the literature, interfacial processes remain poorly documented on nanostructured surfaces. In this study, we report the self-assembly of a variety of FA on a hydroxylated Al surface which exhibits a random nanoscale organization. Our results revealed a peculiar fingerprint due to the FA self-assembly which consists in the formation of aligned nanopatterns in a state of hierarchical nanostructuration, regardless of the molecular structure of the FA (chain length, level of unsaturation). After a significant removal of adsorbed FA using UV/O3 treatment, a complete wetting was reached, and a noticeable disturbance of the surface morphology was observed, evidencing the pivotal role of FA molecules to maintain these nanostructures. The origin of wetting properties was investigated prior to and after conditioning of FA-modified samples taking into account key parameters, namely the surface roughness and its composition. For this purpose, the Wenzel roughness, defined as the third moment of power spectral density, was used, as it is sensitive to high spatial frequency and thus to the obtained hierarchical level of nanostructuration. Our results revealed that no correlation can be made between water contact angles (θ(w)) and the Wenzel roughness. By contrast, θ(w) strongly increased with the amount of -CHx- groups exhibited by adsorbed FA. These findings suggest that the main origin of hydrophobization is the presence of self-assembled molecules and that the surface roughness has only a small contribution to the wettability.

  18. Nanoscale zero valent supported by Zeolite and Montmorillonite: Template effect of the removal of lead ion from an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Arancibia-Miranda, Nicolás; Baltazar, Samuel E; García, Alejandra; Muñoz-Lira, Daniela; Sepúlveda, Pamela; Rubio, María A; Altbir, Dora

    2016-01-15

    In this work, we have studied the Pb(2+) sorption capacity of Zeolite (Z) and Montmorillonite (Mt) functionalized with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), at 50% w/w, obtained by means of an impregnating process with a solvent excess. The composites were characterized by several techniques including X-ray diffraction; scanning electron microscopy (SEM); BET area; isoelectric point (IEP); and, finally a magnetic response. Comparatively significant differences in terms of electrophoretic and magnetic characteristics were found between the pristine materials and the composites. Both structures show a high efficiency and velocity in the removal of Pb(2+) up to 99.0% (200.0 ppm) after 40 min of reaction time. The removal kinetics of Pb(2+) is adequately described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model, and the maximum adsorbed amounts (q(e)) of this analyte are in close accordance with the experimental results. The intraparticle diffusion model shows that this is not the only rate-limiting step, this being the Langmuir model which was well adjusted to our experimental data. Therefore, maximum sorption capacities were found to be 115.1±11.0, 105.5±9.0, 68.3±1.3, 54.2±1.3, and 50.3±4.2 mg g(-1), for Mt-nZVI, Z-nZVI, Zeolite, Mt, and nZVI, respectively. The higher sorption capacities can be attributed to the synergetic behavior between the clay and iron nanoparticles, as a consequence of the clay coating process with nZVI. These results suggest that both composites could be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of lead from contaminated water sources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Qu, Zhihua; Braiman, Yehuda; Zhang, Zhenyu; Barhen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  20. Meissner effect measurement of single indium particle using a customized on-chip nano-scale superconducting quantum interference device system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Long; Chen, Lei; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    As many emergent phenomena of superconductivity appear on a smaller scale and at lower dimension, commercial magnetic property measurement systems (MPMSs) no longer provide the sensitivity necessary to study the Meissner effect of small superconductors. The nano-scale superconducting quantum interference device (nano-SQUID) is considered one of the most sensitive magnetic sensors for the magnetic characterization of mesoscopic or microscopic samples. Here, we develop a customized on-chip nano-SQUID measurement system based on a pulsed current biasing method. The noise performance of our system is approximately 4.6 × 10-17 emu/Hz1/2, representing an improvement of 9 orders of magnitude compared with that of a commercial MPMS (~10-8 emu/Hz1/2). Furthermore, we demonstrate the measurement of the Meissner effect of a single indium (In) particle (of 47 μm in diameter) using our on-chip nano-SQUID system. The system enables the observation of the prompt superconducting transition of the Meissner effect of a single In particle, thereby providing more accurate characterization of the critical field Hc and temperature Tc. In addition, the retrapping field Hre as a function of temperature T of single In particle shows disparate behavior from that of a large ensemble.

  1. Meissner effect measurement of single indium particle using a customized on-chip nano-scale superconducting quantum interference device system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Chen, Lei; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhen

    2017-04-04

    As many emergent phenomena of superconductivity appear on a smaller scale and at lower dimension, commercial magnetic property measurement systems (MPMSs) no longer provide the sensitivity necessary to study the Meissner effect of small superconductors. The nano-scale superconducting quantum interference device (nano-SQUID) is considered one of the most sensitive magnetic sensors for the magnetic characterization of mesoscopic or microscopic samples. Here, we develop a customized on-chip nano-SQUID measurement system based on a pulsed current biasing method. The noise performance of our system is approximately 4.6 × 10(-17) emu/Hz(1/2), representing an improvement of 9 orders of magnitude compared with that of a commercial MPMS (~10(-8) emu/Hz(1/2)). Furthermore, we demonstrate the measurement of the Meissner effect of a single indium (In) particle (of 47 μm in diameter) using our on-chip nano-SQUID system. The system enables the observation of the prompt superconducting transition of the Meissner effect of a single In particle, thereby providing more accurate characterization of the critical field Hc and temperature Tc. In addition, the retrapping field Hre as a function of temperature T of single In particle shows disparate behavior from that of a large ensemble.

  2. Investigation of Device Performance and Negative Bias Temperature Instability of Plasma Nitrided Oxide in Nanoscale p-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, In-Shik; Ji, Hee-Hwan; Goo, Tae-Gyu; Yoo, Ook-Sang; Choi, Won-Ho; Na, Min-Ki; Kim, Yong-Goo; Park, Sung-Hyung; Lee, Heui-Seung; Kang, Young-Seok; Kim, Dae-Byung; Lee, Hi-Deok

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we investigated the device performance and negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation for thermally nitrided oxide (TNO) and plasma nitrided oxide (PNO) in nanoscale p-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (PMOSFET). PNOs show the improvement of dielectric performance compared to TNO with no change of the device performance. PNOs also show the improvement of NBTI immunity than TNO at low temperature stress, whereas NBTI immunity of PNO with high N concentration can be worse than TNO at high temperature stress. Recovery effect of NBTI degradation of PNO is lower than that of TNO and it is increased as the N concentration is increased in PNO because the dissociated Si dangling bonds and generated positive oxide charges are repassivated and neutralized, respectively. Moreover, complete recovery of ΔVth is dominated by neutralization of positive oxide charges. Therefore, N contents at polycrystalline Si/SiO2 interface as well as N contents at Si/SiO2 interface can affect significantly on NBTI degradation and recovery effect.

  3. Meissner effect measurement of single indium particle using a customized on-chip nano-scale superconducting quantum interference device system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Long; Chen, Lei; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    As many emergent phenomena of superconductivity appear on a smaller scale and at lower dimension, commercial magnetic property measurement systems (MPMSs) no longer provide the sensitivity necessary to study the Meissner effect of small superconductors. The nano-scale superconducting quantum interference device (nano-SQUID) is considered one of the most sensitive magnetic sensors for the magnetic characterization of mesoscopic or microscopic samples. Here, we develop a customized on-chip nano-SQUID measurement system based on a pulsed current biasing method. The noise performance of our system is approximately 4.6 × 10−17 emu/Hz1/2, representing an improvement of 9 orders of magnitude compared with that of a commercial MPMS (~10−8 emu/Hz1/2). Furthermore, we demonstrate the measurement of the Meissner effect of a single indium (In) particle (of 47 μm in diameter) using our on-chip nano-SQUID system. The system enables the observation of the prompt superconducting transition of the Meissner effect of a single In particle, thereby providing more accurate characterization of the critical field Hc and temperature Tc. In addition, the retrapping field Hre as a function of temperature T of single In particle shows disparate behavior from that of a large ensemble. PMID:28374779

  4. Probing and manipulating magnetization at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarth, Nitin

    2012-02-01

    Combining semiconductors with magnetism in hetero- and nano-structured geometries provides a powerful means of exploring the interplay between spin-dependent transport and nanoscale magnetism. We describe two recent studies in this context. First, we use spin-dependent transport in ferromagnetic semiconductor thin films to provide a new window into nanoscale magnetism [1]: here, we exploit the large anomalous Hall effect in a ferromagnetic semiconductor as a nanoscale probe of the reversible elastic behavior of magnetic domain walls and gain insight into regimes of domain wall behavior inaccessible to more conventional optical techniques. Next, we describe novel ways to create self-assembled hybrid semiconductor/ferromagnet core-shell nanowires [2] and show how magnetoresistance measurements in single nanowires, coupled with micromagnetic simulations, can provide detailed insights into the magnetization reversal process in nanoscale ferromagnets [3]. The work described here was carried out in collaboration with Andrew Balk, Jing Liang, Nicholas Dellas, Mark Nowakowski, David Rench, Mark Wilson, Roman Engel-Herbert, Suzanne Mohney, Peter Schiffer and David Awschalom. This work is supported by ONR, NSF and the NSF-MRSEC program.[4pt] [1] A. L. Balk et al., Phys. Rev.Lett. 107, 077205 (2011).[0pt] [2] N. J. Dellas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 072505 (2010).[0pt] [3] J. Liang et al., in preparation.

  5. Nanoscale subsurface imaging.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mikhael; Ding, Yi; Tetard, Laurene

    2017-01-31

    The ability to probe structures and functional properties of complex systems at the nanoscale, both at their surface and in their volume, has drawn substantial attention in recent years. Besides detecting heterogeneities, cracks and defects below the surface, more advanced explorations of chemical or electrical properties are of great interest. In this review article, we review some approaches developed to explore heterogeneities below the surface, including recent progress in the different aspects of metrology in optics, electron microscopy, and scanning probe microscopy. We discuss the principle and mechanisms of image formation associated with each technique, including data acquisition, data analysis and modeling for nanoscale structural and functional imaging. We highlight the advances based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our discussion first introduces methods providing structural information of the buried structures, such as position in the volume and geometry. Next we present how functional properties including conductivity, capacitance, and composition can be extracted from the modalities available to date and how they could eventually enable tomography reconstructions of systems such as overlay structures in transistors or living systems. Finally we propose a perspective regarding the outstanding challenges and needs to push the field forward.

  6. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  7. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time.

  8. Nanoscale subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, M.; Ding, Y.; Tetard, L.

    2017-05-01

    The ability to probe structures and functional properties of complex systems at the nanoscale, both at their surface and in their volume, has drawn substantial attention in recent years. Besides detecting heterogeneities, cracks and defects below the surface, more advanced explorations of chemical or electrical properties are of great interest. In this article, we review some approaches developed to explore heterogeneities below the surface, including recent progress in the different aspects of metrology in optics, electron microscopy, and scanning probe microscopy. We discuss the principle and mechanisms of image formation associated with each technique, including data acquisition, data analysis and modeling for nanoscale structural and functional imaging. We highlight the advances based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our discussion first introduces methods providing structural information of the buried structures, such as position in the volume and geometry. Next we present how functional properties including conductivity, capacitance, and composition can be extracted from the modalities available to date and how they could eventually enable tomography reconstructions of systems such as overlay structures in transistors or living systems. Finally we propose a perspective regarding the outstanding challenges and needs to push the field forward.

  9. Nanoscale precipitation in hot rolled sheet steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun

    Some newer hot rolled high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels with a single phase ferrite matrix have obtained substantial strengthening from nanoscale precipitation. These HSLA are reported to have a good combination of strength, ductility and hole-expansion ability. In the current work, Gleeble ® 3500 torsion testing was employed to simulate the hot rolling process with varying run-out table cooling rates and coiling temperatures on five microalloyed steels with additions of Ti, Nb, Mo, Cr and V, to investigate the effects of microalloy additions and processing conditions on microstructures as well as mechanical properties. Subsized tensile specimens obtained from as-twisted torsion samples were used to evaluate mechanical properties. The precipitation states of the five steels with different processing conditions were characterized using extraction replica TEM. Comparison of microstructures and mechanical properties was discussed. Characterization of the microstructure via light optical microscopy showed the matrix microstructure was mainly influenced by coiling temperature, which indicates that the transformation from austenite to ferrite occurred during the coiling period. A higher Ti content was shown to reduce the second constituent fractions. Investigation of carbon extraction replica specimens via TEM revealed the presence of nanoscale precipitation. Extensive nanoscale precipitation was observed in most of the specimens having a polygonal ferrite matrix, while in the granular bainite/ferrite microstructure at lower temperatures, fewer microalloy carbides were present. The specimens with polygonal ferrite had similar or higher yield strength than the specimens with granular bainite microstructure, which suggests the effectiveness of precipitation strengthening from extensive nanoscale precipitates. In the Nb-Mo steel, more significant strengthening due to grain refinement was evident. Yield strength values were less than reported for JFE's "NANOHITEN

  10. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  11. One-pot synthesis of multifunctional nanoscale metal-organic frameworks as an effective antibacterial agent against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Das, Balaram; Kumar, Amit; Tripathy, Satyajit; Roy, Somenath; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious threat to global public health. In particular, infections from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive bacteria (i.e. Staphylococcus aureus) are growing global health concerns. In this work, we report the first use of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) coencapsulating an antibiotic (vancomycin) and targeting ligand (folic acid) in one pot to enhance therapeutic efficacy against MDR S. aureus. Zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) NMOFs, which have globular morphologies coencapsulating vancomycin and folic acid, are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, ulltraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and dynamic light-scattering techniques. We determined that the presence of folic acid on the surface of the NMOFs is significant in the sense of effective uptake by MDR S. aureus through endocytosis. The functionalized NMOFs transport vancomycin across the cell wall of MDR S. aureus and enhance antibacterial activity, which has been confirmed from studies of the minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration, cytotoxicity of bacterial cells, and generation of reactive oxygen species. This work shows that functionalized NMOFs hold great promise for effective treatment of MDR S. aureus.

  12. Effect of Channel Thickness, Annealing Temperature and Channel Length on Nanoscale Ga2O3-In2O3-ZnO Thin Film Transistor Performance.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Yogeenth; Pak, Yusin; Lim, Namsoo; Lee, Ryeri; Song, Hui; Kim, Tae Heon; Choi, Boran; Jung, Gun Young

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrated the effect of active layer (channel) thickness and annealing temperature on the electrical performances of Ga2O3-In2O3-ZnO (GIZO) thin film transistor (TFT) having nanoscale channel width (W/L: 500 nm/100 μm). We found that the electron carrier concentration of the channel was decreased significantly with increasing the annealing temperature (100 degrees C to 300 degrees C). Accordingly, the threshold voltage (V(T)) was shifted towards positive voltage (-12.2 V to 10.8 V). In case of channel thickness, the V(T) was shifted towards negative voltage with increasing the channel thickness. The device with channel thickness of 90 nm annealed at 200 degrees C revealed the best device performances in terms of mobility (10.86 cm2/Vs) and V(T) (0.8 V). The effect of channel length was also studied, in which the channel width, thickness and annealing temperature were kept constant such as 500 nm, 90 nm and 200 degrees C, respectively. The channel length influenced the on-current level significantly with small variation of V(T), resulting in lower value of on/off current ratio with increasing the channel length. The device with channel length of 0.5 μm showed enhanced on/off current ratio of 10(6) with minimum V(T) of 0.26 V.

  13. Systematic Investigation of Nanoscale Adsorbate Effects at Organic Light-Emitting diode Interfaces. Interfacial Structure-Charge Injection-Luminance Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,Q.; Li, J.; Evmenenko, G.; Dutta, P.; Marks, T.

    2006-01-01

    Molecule-scale structure effects at indium tin oxide (ITO) anode-hole transport layer (HTL) interfaces in organic light-emitting diode (OLED) heterostructures are systematically probed via a self-assembly approach. A series of ITO anode-linked silyltriarylamine precursors differing in aryl group and linker density are synthesized for this purpose and used to probe the relationship between nanoscale interfacial chemical structure and charge-injection/electroluminescence properties. These precursors form conformal and largely pinhole-free self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the ITO anode surface with angstrom-level thickness control. Deposition of a HTL on top of the SAMs places the probe molecules precisely at the anode-HTL interface. OLEDs containing ITO/SAM/HTL configurations have dramatically varied hole-injection magnitudes and OLED responses. These can be correlated with the probe molecular structures and electrochemically derived heterogeneous electron-transfer rates for such triarylamine fragments. The large observed interfacial molecular structure effects offer an approach to tuning OLED hole-injection flux over 1-2 orders of magnitude, resulting in up to 3-fold variations in OLED brightness at identical bias and up to a 2 V driving voltage reduction at identical brightness. Very bright and efficient ({approx}70 000 cd/m{sup 2}, {approx}2.5% forward external quantum efficiency, {approx}11 lm/W power efficiency) Alq (tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum(III))-based OLEDs can thereby be fabricated.

  14. One-pot synthesis of multifunctional nanoscale metal-organic frameworks as an effective antibacterial agent against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Das, Balaram; Kumar, Amit; Tripathy, Satyajit; Roy, Somenath; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2017-03-03

    Drug-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious threat to global public health. In particular, infections from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive bacteria (i.e. Staphylococcus aureus) are growing global health concerns. In this work, we report the first use of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) coencapsulating an antibiotic (vancomycin) and targeting ligand (folic acid) in one pot to enhance therapeutic efficacy against MDR S. aureus. Zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) NMOFs, which have globular morphologies coencapsulating vancomycin and folic acid, are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, ulltraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and dynamic light-scattering techniques. We determined that the presence of folic acid on the surface of the NMOFs is significant in the sense of effective uptake by MDR S. aureus through endocytosis. The functionalized NMOFs transport vancomycin across the cell wall of MDR S. aureus and enhance antibacterial activity, which has been confirmed from studies of the minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration, cytotoxicity of bacterial cells, and generation of reactive oxygen species. This work shows that functionalized NMOFs hold great promise for effective treatment of MDR S. aureus.

  15. Nanoscale hotspots due to nonequilibrium thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Sanjiv; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental and modeling efforts have been directed towards the issue of temperature localization and hotspot formation in the vicinity of nanoscale heat generating devices. The nonequilibrium transport conditions which develop around these nanoscale devices results in elevated temperatures near the heat source which can not be predicted by continuum diffusion theory. Efforts to determine the severity of this temperature localization phenomena in silicon devices near and above room temperature are of technological importance to the development of microelectronics and other nanotechnologies. In this work, we have developed a new modeling tool in order to explore the magnitude of the additional thermal resistance which forms around nanoscale hotspots from temperatures of 100-1000K. The models are based on a two fluid approximation in which thermal energy is transferred between ''stationary'' optical phonons and fast propagating acoustic phonon modes. The results of the model have shown excellent agreement with experimental results of localized hotspots in silicon at lower temperatures. The model predicts that the effect of added thermal resistance due to the nonequilibrium phonon distribution is greatest at lower temperatures, but is maintained out to temperatures of 1000K. The resistance predicted by the numerical code can be easily integrated with continuum models in order to predict the temperature distribution around nanoscale heat sources with improved accuracy. Additional research efforts also focused on the measurements of the thermal resistance of silicon thin films at higher temperatures, with a focus on polycrystalline silicon. This work was intended to provide much needed experimental data on the thermal transport properties for micro and nanoscale devices built with this material. Initial experiments have shown that the exposure of polycrystalline silicon to high temperatures may induce recrystallization and radically increase the thermal

  16. Inlaying nanoscale surface recess patterns with nanoscale objects.

    PubMed

    Yau, Siu-Tung; Thai, Ngee Mei; Strauss, Ela; Rana, Narender; Wang, Gang

    2006-03-01

    A simple and versatile approach to constructing patterns on a solid surface using nanoscale objects is demonstrated. The approach is essentially an inlaying process, in which recess patterns fabricated on a surface are selectively filled with nanoscale objects. The objects are anchored firmly on the surface due to the spatial confinement provided by the recess structures. Protein molecules and inorganic nanoparticles are used in this demonstration. Cyclic voltammetry is used to detect electron transfer signals from patterns of protein molecules. The approach suggests a potentially fast, high-throughput and versatile technique for constructing architectural structures on a solid surface using nanoscale objects.

  17. Effect of Novel Nanoscale Energy Patches on Spectral and Nonlinear Dynamic Features of Heart Rate Variability Signals in Healthy Individuals during Rest and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Nazeran, Homer; Chatlapalli, Surya; Krishnam, Rohit

    2005-01-01

    LifeWave energy patches are novel nanoscale semiconducting biomolecular antennas, that when placed in the oscillating bioelectromagnetic field of the body, resonate at frequencies in unison with certain biomolecules in the cells and signal specific metabolic pathways to accelerate fat metabolism. As a consequence of accelerated fat burning more cellular energy becomes readily available to support all bodily energy-consuming functions. Heart rate variability refers to the beat-to-beat variation in heart rate (HR) and is modulated largely by the autonomic nervous system via changes in the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic influences. Since short-term variations in HR reflect sympathetic nervous activity, they provide useful non-invasive markers for assessing autonomic control under various physiologic states and conditions. To evaluate the effect of LifeWave energy patches on HRV signals, pilot data from healthy volunteers were collected under three different conditions during rest and exercise using a BIOPAC system. The HRV signal was derived from preprocessed ECG signals using an Enhanced Hilbert Transform (EHT) algorithm with built-in missing beat detection capability for reliable QRS detection. Autoregressive (AR) modeling of the HRV signal power spectrum was achieved and different parameters from power spectrum as well as approximate entropy were calculated for comparison. Poincaré plots were then used as a visualization tool to highlight the variations in HRV signals before and after exercise under normal conditions and under the influence of placebo and energy patches.

  18. Nanoscale confinement effects on the relaxation dynamics in networks of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and low-molecular-weight poly(ethylene oxide).

    PubMed

    Kalogeras, Ioannis M; Stathopoulos, Andreas; Vassilikou-Dova, Aglaia; Brostow, Witold

    2007-03-22

    Thermoplastic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) (Mw(PEO) approximately 4000) has been used to prepare thermosetting nanocomposites incorporating diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy oligomer. Blends with various PEO/DGEBA weight ratios were cured using stoichiometric portions of 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane. The resulting semi-interpenetrating polymer networks were studied by several techniques. Nanoscale confinement effects, thermal (glass transition, melting and crystallization temperatures) and structural features of our materials are similar to those for networks with much higher Mw(PEO) and different curing agents; however, the polyether crystallization onset occurs in our case at a lower PEO concentration; shorter PEO chains organize themselves more easily into crystalline domains. Very low estimates of the k parameter of the Gordon-Taylor equation, used to fit the compositional dependences of the dielectric and calorimetric glass transition temperatures, and a strong plasticization of the motion of the glyceryl segments (beta-relaxation) in the epoxy resin were observed. These illustrate an intensified weakening in the strength of the intermolecular interactions in the modified networks, as compared to the high strength of the self-association of hydroxyls in the neat resin. The significance of hydrogen-bonding interactions between the components for obtaining structurally homogeneous thermoset-i-thermoplastic networks is discussed.

  19. Multi-physics simulation of metal printing at micro/nanoscale using meniscus-confined electrodeposition: Effect of nozzle speed and diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsali, Seyedreza; Daryadel, Soheil; Zhou, Zhong; Behroozfar, Ali; Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Moreno, Salvador; Qian, Dong; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2017-06-01

    Meniscus-confined electrodeposition (MCED) is a solution-based, room temperature process for 3D printing of metals at micro/nanoscale. In this process, a meniscus (liquid bridge or capillary) between a nozzle and a substrate governs the localized electrodeposition process, which involves multiple physics of electrodeposition, fluid dynamics, mass, and heat transfer. We have developed a multiphysics finite element (FE) model to investigate the effects of nozzle speed ( v N) and nozzle diameter (D0) in the MCED process. The simulation results are validated with experimental data. Based on theoretical approach and experimental observation, the diameter of the deposited wire is in the range of 0.5-0.9 times of the nozzle diameter. The applicable range for vN for various nozzle diameters is computed. The results showed that the contribution of migration flux to total flux remains nearly constant (˜50%) for all values of pipette diameter in the range examined (100 nm-5 μm), whereas the contribution of diffusion and evaporation fluxes to total flux increase and decrease with the increasing pipette diameter, respectively. Results of this multiphysics study can be used to guide the experiment for optimal process conditions.

  20. Effect of promoter and noble metals and suspension pH on catalytic nitrate reduction by bimetallic nanoscale Fe(0) catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sungjun; Hamid, Shanawar; Jung, Junyoung; Sihn, Youngho; Lee, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of experimental factors (types of promotor and noble metals, H2 injection, and suspension pH) on catalytic nitrate reduction by bimetallic catalysts supported by nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI). NZVI without H2 injection showed 71% of nitrate reduction in 1 h. Cu/NZVI showed the almost complete nitrate reduction (96%) in 1 h, while 67% of nitrate was reduced by Ni/NZVI. The presence of noble metals (Pd and Pt) on Cu/NZVI without H2 injection resulted in the decrease of removal efficiency to 89% and 84%, respectively, due probably to the electron loss of NZVI for formation of metallic Pd and Pt. H2 injection into Cu-Pd/NZVI suspension significantly improved both catalytic nitrate reduction (>97% in 30 min) and N2 selectivity (18%), indicating that adsorbed H on active Pd sites played an important role for the enhanced nitrate reduction and N2 selectivity. The rapid passivation of NZVI surface resulted in a dramatic decrease in nitrate reduction (79-28%) with an increase in N2 selectivity (8-66%) as the suspension pH increased from 8 to 10.

  1. Nanoscale Surface Curvature Effects on Ligand-Nanoparticle Interactions: A Plasmon-Enhanced Spectroscopic Study of Thiolated Ligand Adsorption, Desorption, and Exchange on Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Esteban; Li, Guangfang Grace; Zhang, Qingfeng; Fu, Xiaoqi; Wang, Hui

    2017-07-12

    The interfacial adsorption, desorption, and exchange behaviors of thiolated ligands on nanotextured Au nanoparticle surfaces exhibit phenomenal site-to-site variations essentially dictated by the local surface curvatures, resulting in heterogeneous thermodynamic and kinetic profiles remarkably more sophisticated than those associated with the self-assembly of organothiol ligand monolayers on atomically flat Au surfaces. Here we use plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering as a spectroscopic tool combining time-resolving and molecular fingerprinting capabilities to quantitatively correlate the ligand dynamics with detailed molecular structures in real time under a diverse set of ligand adsorption, desorption, and exchange conditions at both equilibrium and nonequilibrium states, which enables us to delineate the effects of nanoscale surface curvature on the binding affinity, cooperativity, structural ordering, and the adsorption/desorption/exchange kinetics of organothiol ligands on colloidal Au nanoparticles. This work provides mechanistic insights on the key thermodynamic, kinetic, and geometric factors underpinning the surface curvature-dependent interfacial ligand behaviors, which serve as a central knowledge framework guiding the site-selective incorporation of desired surface functionalities into individual metallic nanoparticles for specific applications.

  2. Total aerobic destruction of azo contaminants with nanoscale zero-valent copper at neutral pH: promotion effect of in-situ generated carbon center radicals.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guohui; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-12-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent copper (nZVC) was synthesized with a facile solvothermal method and used for the aerobic removal of azo contaminants at neutral pH for the first time. We found that both Cu(I) and OH generated during the nZVC induced molecular oxygen activation process accounted for the rapid total destruction of azo contaminants in the nZVC/Air system, where nZVC could activate molecular oxygen to produce H2O2, and also release Cu(I) to break the -NN- bond of azo contaminants via the sandmeyer reaction for the generation of carbon center radicals. The in-situ generated carbon center radicals would then react with OH produced by the Cu(I) catalyzed decomposition of H2O2, resulting in the generation of low molecular weight organic acids and their subsequent mineralization. The indispensible role of Cu(I) catalyzed sandmeyer reaction and the promotion effect of in-situ generated carbon center radicals on the rapid total destruction of azo contaminants in the nZVC/Air system were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. This study can deepen our understanding on the degradation of organic pollutant with molecular oxygen activated by zero valent metal, and also provide a new method to remove azo contaminants at neutral pH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anomalous electrical conductivity of nanoscale colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Suman; Padhy, Sourav

    2008-10-28

    The electrical conductivity of colloidal suspensions containing nanoscale conducting particles is nontrivially related to the particle volume fraction and the electrical double layer thickness. Classical electrochemical models, however, tend to grossly overpredict the pertinent effective electrical conductivity values, as compared to those obtained under experimental conditions. We attempt to address this discrepancy by appealing to the complex interconnection between the aggregation kinetics of the nanoscale particles and the electrodynamics within the double layer. In particular, we model the consequent alterations in the effective electrophoretic mobility values of the suspension by addressing the fundamentals of agglomeration-deagglomeration mechanisms through the pertinent variations in the effective particulate dimensions, solid fractions, as well as the equivalent suspension viscosity. The consequent alterations in the electrical conductivity values provide a substantially improved prediction of the corresponding experimental findings and explain the apparent anomalous behavior predicted by the classical theoretical postulates.

  4. Anatomy of Nanoscale Propulsion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vinita; Duan, Wentao; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-01-01

    Nature supports multifaceted forms of life. Despite the variety and complexity of these forms, motility remains the epicenter of life. The applicable laws of physics change upon going from macroscales to microscales and nanoscales, which are characterized by low Reynolds number (Re). We discuss motion at low Re in natural and synthetic systems, along with various propulsion mechanisms, including electrophoresis, electrolyte diffusiophoresis, and nonelectrolyte diffusiophoresis. We also describe the newly uncovered phenomena of motility in non-ATP-driven self-powered enzymes and the directional movement of these enzymes in response to substrate gradients. These enzymes can also be immobilized to function as fluid pumps in response to the presence of their substrates. Finally, we review emergent collective behavior arising from interacting motile species, and we discuss the possible biomedical applications of the synthetic nanobots and microbots.

  5. A Nanoscale Tale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Elba

    2008-10-01

    Experimentalists constantly seek to overcome technical limitations. This is especially true in the world of biophysics, where the drive to study molecular targets such as ion channels, a type of membrane transport protein, has resulted in methodological breakthroughs that have merited the Nobel Prize (Hodgkin and Huxley, 1963; Neher and Sakmann, 1991). In this presentation I will explain how nanoscale phenomena that are essential for sensory perception underlie the ability of dancers, gymnasts, and musicians to excel at their artistic endeavors. I will describe how our investigations of sensory mechanotransduction and the quest for improved signal amplification inspired a scientific journey that has culminated in an exciting new line of collaborative NIH-funded research with nanomaterials (quantum dots). I will conclude with a general discussion of how training in physics offers an ideal foundation for interdisciplinary research in health related fields, such as those that deal with neuroscience and disorders of the nervous system.

  6. Kinetics and Pathways for the Debromination of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers by Bimetallic and Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron: Effects of Particle Properties and Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Jin, Luting; Luthy, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are recognized as a new class of widely-distributed and persistent contaminants for which effective treatment and remediation technologies are needed. In this study, two kinds of commercially available nanoscale Fe° slurries (Nanofer N25 and N25S), a freeze-dried laboratory-synthesized Fe° nanoparticle (nZVI), and their palladized forms were used to investigate the effect of particle properties and catalyst on PBDE debromination kinetics and pathways. Nanofers and their palladized forms were found to debrominate PBDEs effectively. The laboratory-synthesized Fe° nanoparticles also debrominated PBDEs, but were slower due to deactivation by the freeze-drying and stabilization processes in the laboratory synthesis. An organic modifier, polyacrylic acid (PAA), bound on N25S slowed PBDE debromination by a factor of three to four compared to N25. The activity of palladized nZVI (nZVI/Pd) was optimized at 0.3 Pd/Fe wt% in our system. N25 could debrominate selected environmentally-abundant PBDEs, including BDE 209, 183, 153, 99, and 47, to end products di-BDEs, mono-BDEs and diphenyl ether (DE) in one week, while nZVI/Pd (0.3 Pd/Fe wt%) mainly resulted in DE as a final product. Step-wise major PBDE debromination pathways by unamended and palladized Fe° are described and compared. Surface precursor complex formation is an important limiting factor for palladized Fe° reduction as demonstrated by PBDE pathways where steric hindrance and rapid sequential debromination of adjacent bromines play an important role. PMID:22732301

  7. Effects of Bias Pulsing on Etching of SiO2 Pattern in Capacitively-Coupled Plasmas for Nano-Scale Patterning of Multi-Level Hard Masks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sechan; Choi, Gyuhyun; Chae, Heeyeop; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-05-01

    In order to study the effects of bias pulsing on the etching characteristics of a silicon dioxide (SiO2) layer using multi-level hard mask (MLHM) structures of ArF photoresist/bottom anti-reflected coating/SiO2/amorphous carbon layer (ACL)/SiO2, the effects of bias pulsing conditions on the etch characteristics of a SiO2 layer with an ACL mask pattern in C4F8/CH2F2/O2/Ar etch chemistries were investigated in a dual-frequency capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP) etcher. The effects of the pulse frequency, duty ratio, and pulse-bias power in the 2 MHz low-frequency (LF) power source were investigated in plasmas generated by a 27.12 MHz high-frequency (HF) power source. The etch rates of ACL and SiO2 decreased, but the etch selectivity of SiO2/ACL increased with decreasing duty ratio. When the ACL and SiO2 layers were etched with increasing pulse frequency, no significant change was observed in the etch rates and etch selectivity. With increasing LF pulse-bias power, the etch rate of ACL and SiO2 slightly increased, but the etch selectivity of SiO2/ACL decreased. Also, the precise control of the critical dimension (CD) values with decreasing duty ratio can be explained by the protection of sidewall etching of SiO2 by increased passivation. Pulse-biased etching was successfully applied to the patterning of the nano-scale line and space of SiO2 using an ACL pattern.

  8. Kinetics and pathways for the debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by bimetallic and nanoscale zerovalent iron: effects of particle properties and catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Jin, Luting; Luthy, Richard G

    2012-10-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are recognized as a new class of widely-distributed and persistent contaminants for which effective treatment and remediation technologies are needed. In this study, two kinds of commercially available nanoscale Fe(0) slurries (Nanofer N25 and N25S), a freeze-dried laboratory-synthesized Fe(0) nanoparticle (nZVI), and their palladized forms were used to investigate the effect of particle properties and catalyst on PBDE debromination kinetics and pathways. Nanofers and their palladized forms were found to debrominate PBDEs effectively. The laboratory-synthesized Fe(0) nanoparticles also debrominated PBDEs, but were slower due to deactivation by the freeze-drying and stabilization processes in the laboratory synthesis. An organic modifier, polyacrylic acid (PAA), bound on N25S slowed PBDE debromination by a factor of three to four compared to N25. The activity of palladized nZVI (nZVI/Pd) was optimized at 0.3 Pd/Fe wt% in our system. N25 could debrominate selected environmentally-abundant PBDEs, including BDE 209, 183, 153, 99, and 47, to end products di-BDEs, mono-BDEs and diphenyl ether (DE) in one week, while nZVI/Pd (0.3 Pd/Fe wt%) mainly resulted in DE as a final product. Step-wise major PBDE debromination pathways by unamended and palladized Fe(0) are described and compared. Surface precursor complex formation is an important limiting factor for palladized Fe(0) reduction as demonstrated by PBDE pathways where steric hindrance and rapid sequential debromination of adjacent bromines play an important role.

  9. Decolorization of Methyl Orange by a new clay-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron: Synergetic effect, efficiency optimization and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Ying; Xi, Beidou; Meng, Xiaoguang; Gong, Bin; Li, Rui; Peng, Xing; Liu, Hongliang

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a novel nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) composite material was successfully synthesized using a low-cost natural clay, "Hangjin 2(#) clay" (HJ clay) as the support and tested for the decolorization of the azo dye Methyl Orange (MO) in aqueous solution by nZVI particles. According to the characterization and MO decolorization experiments, the sample with 5:1 HJ clay-supported nZVI (HJ/nZVI) mass ratio (HJ-nZVI5) showed the best dispersion and reactivity and the highest MO decolorization efficiency. With the same equivalent Fe(0) dosage, the HJ-nZVI1 and HJ-nZVI5 samples demonstrated a synergetic effect for the decolorization of MO: their decolorization efficiencies were much higher than that achieved by physical mixing of HJ clay and nZVIs, or the sum of HJ clay and nZVIs alone. The synergetic effect was primarily due to the improved dispersion and more effective utilization of the nZVI particles on/in the composite materials. Higher decolorization efficiency of MO was obtained at larger HJ-nZVI dosage, higher temperature and under N2 atmosphere, while the MO initial concentration and pH were negatively correlated to the efficiency. HJ clay not only works as a carrier for nZVI nanoparticles, but also contributes to the decolorization through an "adsorption-enhanced reduction" mechanism. The high efficiency of HJ-nZVI for decontamination gives it great potential for use in a variety of remediation applications.

  10. A new relaxation mechanism in nanoscale films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovid'ko, I. A.; Sheinerman, A. G.

    2007-02-01

    A new mechanism of stress relaxation in heteroepitaxial films of nanoscale thickness is suggested and theoretically described. The mechanism represents nucleation of a 'non-crystallographic' partial dislocation (at the film-substrate interface) whose Burgers vector magnitude continuously grows during the nucleation process. It is shown that the new mechanism effectively competes with the standard nucleation of a perfect misfit dislocation at the free surface of the film and its further glide towards the film-substrate interface.

  11. Nanoscale friction and wear maps.

    PubMed

    Tambe, Nikhil S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-04-28

    Friction and wear are part and parcel of all walks of life, and for interfaces that are in close or near contact, tribology and mechanics are supremely important. They can critically influence the efficient functioning of devices and components. Nanoscale friction force follows a complex nonlinear dependence on multiple, often interdependent, interfacial and material properties. Various studies indicate that nanoscale devices may behave in ways that cannot be predicted from their larger counterparts. Nanoscale friction and wear mapping can help identify some 'sweet spots' that would give ultralow friction and near-zero wear. Mapping nanoscale friction and wear as a function of operating conditions and interface properties is a valuable tool and has the potential to impact the very way in which we design and select materials for nanotechnology applications.

  12. Bioaccumulation and toxic effects of decabromodiphenyl ether in the presence of nanoscale zero-valent iron in an earthworm-soil system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Xia, Xiaoqian; Zaman, Waqas Qamar; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Kuangfei; Hu, Shuangqing; Lin, Zhifen

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bioaccumulation and toxic effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) (1 and 10 mg kg(-1)) were investigated in the earthworm Eisenia fetida in the presence of different levels of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) (100, 500, and 1000 mg kg(-1)) in an earthworm-soil system. The results demonstrated that compared to single BDE209 exposure, the addition of high levels of nZVI significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited growth and respiration, while increased the avoidance response of earthworms. The perturbations of antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)) and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content clearly revealed that oxidative stress was induced by the two chemicals. The histopathological observations of the body wall of earthworms under a combined exposure of 10 mg kg(-1) BDE209 with 500 or 1000 mg kg(-1) nZVI illustrated the presence of a serious injury in the intestinal tissues after a 28-day exposure. Additionally, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the coexistence of high level of nZVI significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the bioaccumulation of BDE209 in earthworms; BDE208 and BDE206 were the predominant congeners of debrominated metabolites, and 4,6-dibromobenzene-1,2,3,5-tetraol along with benzene-1,2,4,5-tetraol were determined as the two main intermediates. The possible degradation pathways were proposed on the basis of the identified products. This work provides useful information on the biological effects of BDE209 and nZVI.

  13. Democratization of Nanoscale Imaging and Sensing Tools Using Photonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Providing means for researchers and citizen scientists in the developing world to perform advanced measurements with nanoscale precision can help to accelerate the rate of discovery and invention as well as improve higher education and the training of the next generation of scientists and engineers worldwide. Here, we review some of the recent progress toward making optical nanoscale measurement tools more cost-effective, field-portable, and accessible to a significantly larger group of researchers and educators. We divide our review into two main sections: label-based nanoscale imaging and sensing tools, which primarily involve fluorescent approaches, and label-free nanoscale measurement tools, which include light scattering sensors, interferometric methods, photonic crystal sensors, and plasmonic sensors. For each of these areas, we have primarily focused on approaches that have either demonstrated operation outside of a traditional laboratory setting, including for example integration with mobile phones, or exhibited the potential for such operation in the near future. PMID:26068279

  14. Democratization of Nanoscale Imaging and Sensing Tools Using Photonics.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Euan; Wei, Qingshan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-07-07

    Providing means for researchers and citizen scientists in the developing world to perform advanced measurements with nanoscale precision can help to accelerate the rate of discovery and invention as well as improve higher education and the training of the next generation of scientists and engineers worldwide. Here, we review some of the recent progress toward making optical nanoscale measurement tools more cost-effective, field-portable, and accessible to a significantly larger group of researchers and educators. We divide our review into two main sections: label-based nanoscale imaging and sensing tools, which primarily involve fluorescent approaches, and label-free nanoscale measurement tools, which include light scattering sensors, interferometric methods, photonic crystal sensors, and plasmonic sensors. For each of these areas, we have primarily focused on approaches that have either demonstrated operation outside of a traditional laboratory setting, including for example integration with mobile phones, or exhibited the potential for such operation in the near future.

  15. Friction laws at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yifei; Turner, Kevin T; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2009-02-26

    Macroscopic laws of friction do not generally apply to nanoscale contacts. Although continuum mechanics models have been predicted to break down at the nanoscale, they continue to be applied for lack of a better theory. An understanding of how friction force depends on applied load and contact area at these scales is essential for the design of miniaturized devices with optimal mechanical performance. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with realistic force fields to establish friction laws in dry nanoscale contacts. We show that friction force depends linearly on the number of atoms that chemically interact across the contact. By defining the contact area as being proportional to this number of interacting atoms, we show that the macroscopically observed linear relationship between friction force and contact area can be extended to the nanoscale. Our model predicts that as the adhesion between the contacting surfaces is reduced, a transition takes place from nonlinear to linear dependence of friction force on load. This transition is consistent with the results of several nanoscale friction experiments. We demonstrate that the breakdown of continuum mechanics can be understood as a result of the rough (multi-asperity) nature of the contact, and show that roughness theories of friction can be applied at the nanoscale.

  16. Thermodynamics of diamond nucleation on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Wang, C X; Yang, Y H; Xu, N S; Yang, G W

    2004-09-15

    To have a clear insight into the diamond nucleation upon the hydrothermal synthesis and the reduction of carbide (HSRC), we performed the thermodynamic approach on the nanoscale to elucidate the diamond nucleation taking place in HSRC supercritical-fluid systems taking into account the capillary effect of the nanosized curvature of the diamond critical nuclei, based on the carbon thermodynamic equilibrium phase diagram. These theoretical analyses showed that the nanosize-induced interior pressure of diamond nuclei could drive the metastable phase region of the diamond nucleation in HSRC into the new stable phase region of diamond in the carbon phase diagram. Accordingly, the diamond nucleation is preferable to the graphite phase formation in the competing growth between diamond and graphite upon HSRC. Meanwhile, we predicted that 400 MPa should be the threshold pressure for the diamond synthesis by HSRC in the metastable phase region of diamond, based on the proposed thermodynamic nucleation on the nanoscale.

  17. Nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells for T cell immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; De León Medero, Andrés; Durai, Malarvizhi; Chiu, Yen Ling; Bieler, Joan Glick; Sibener, Leah; Niemöller, Michaela; Assenmacher, Mario; Richter, Anne; Edidin, Michael; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC), which deliver stimulatory signals to cytotoxic lymphocytes, are a powerful tool for both adoptive and active immunotherapy. Thus far, aAPC have been synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins such as CD3 or MHC-peptide to micron-sized beads. Nanoscale platforms have different trafficking and biophysical interaction properties and may allow development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. We therefore manufactured aAPC based on two types of nanoscale particle platforms: biocompatible iron-dextran paramagnetic particles (50-100 nm in diameter) and avidin-coated quantum dot nanocrystals (~30 nm). Nanoscale aAPC induced antigen-specific T cell proliferation from mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood T cells. When injected in vivo, both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhanced tumor rejection in a subcutaneous mouse melanoma model. This is the first description of nanoscale aAPC that induce antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vitro and lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Artifical antigen presenting cells could revolutionize the field of cancer-directed immunotherapy. This team of investigators have manufactured two types of nanoscale particle platform-based aAPCs and demonstrates that both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhance tumor rejection in a melanoma model, providing the first description of nanoscale aAPCs that lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth. © 2013.

  18. Nanoscale Electrostatics in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, L. John; West, Patrick Michael

    2001-04-01

    Primitive biological cells had to divide with very little biology. This work simulates a physicochemical mechanism, based upon nanoscale electrostatics, which explains the anaphase A poleward motion of chromosomes. In the cytoplasmic medium that exists in biological cells, electrostatic fields are subject to strong attenuation by Debye screening, and therefore decrease rapidly over a distance equal to several Debye lengths. However, the existence of microtubules within cells changes the situation completely. Microtubule dimer subunits are electric dipolar structures, and can act as intermediaries that extend the reach of the electrostatic interaction over cellular distances. Experimental studies have shown that intracellular pH rises to a peak at mitosis, and decreases through cytokinesis. This result, in conjunction with the electric dipole nature of microtubule subunits and the Debye screened electrostatic force is sufficient to explain and unify the basic events during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) assembly of asters, (2) motion of the asters to poles, (3) poleward motion of chromosomes (anaphase A), (4) cell elongation, and (5) cytokinesis. This paper will focus on a simulation of the dynamics if anaphase A motion based on this comprehensive model. The physicochemical mechanisms utilized by primitive cells could provide important clues regarding our understanding of cell division in modern eukaryotic cells.

  19. Electrostatics at the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, David A.; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic forces are amongst the most versatile interactions to mediate the assembly of nanostructured materials. Depending on experimental conditions, these forces can be long- or short-ranged, can be either attractive or repulsive, and their directionality can be controlled by the shapes of the charged nano-objects. This Review is intended to serve as a primer for experimentalists curious about the fundamentals of nanoscale electrostatics and for theorists wishing to learn about recent experimental advances in the field. Accordingly, the first portion introduces the theoretical models of electrostatic double layers and derives electrostatic interaction potentials applicable to particles of different sizes and/or shapes and under different experimental conditions. This discussion is followed by the review of the key experimental systems in which electrostatic interactions are operative. Examples include electroactive and “switchable” nanoparticles, mixtures of charged nanoparticles, nanoparticle chains, sheets, coatings, crystals, and crystals-within-crystals. Applications of these and other structures in chemical sensing and amplification are also illustrated.

  20. Electrostatics at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Walker, David A; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2011-04-01

    Electrostatic forces are amongst the most versatile interactions to mediate the assembly of nanostructured materials. Depending on experimental conditions, these forces can be long- or short-ranged, can be either attractive or repulsive, and their directionality can be controlled by the shapes of the charged nano-objects. This Review is intended to serve as a primer for experimentalists curious about the fundamentals of nanoscale electrostatics and for theorists wishing to learn about recent experimental advances in the field. Accordingly, the first portion introduces the theoretical models of electrostatic double layers and derives electrostatic interaction potentials applicable to particles of different sizes and/or shapes and under different experimental conditions. This discussion is followed by the review of the key experimental systems in which electrostatic interactions are operative. Examples include electroactive and "switchable" nanoparticles, mixtures of charged nanoparticles, nanoparticle chains, sheets, coatings, crystals, and crystals-within-crystals. Applications of these and other structures in chemical sensing and amplification are also illustrated.

  1. Nanoscale effects on the thermal and mechanical properties of AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser diodes: influence on the catastrophic optical damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, Jorge; Pura, José Luis; Jiménez, Juan

    2017-06-01

    In this work we study the catastrophic optical damage (COD) of graded-index separate confinement heterostructure quantum well (QW) laser diodes based on AlGaAs/GaAs. The emphasis is placed on the impact that the nanoscale physical properties have on the operation and degradation of the active layers of these devices. When these laser diodes run in continuous-wave mode with high internal optical power densities, the QW and guide layers can experiment very intense local heating phenomena that lead to device failure. A thermo-mechanical model has been set up to study the mechanism of degradation. This model has been solved by applying finite element methods. A variety of physical factors related to the materials properties, which play a paramount role in the laser degradation process, have been considered. Among these, the reduced thicknesses of the QW and the guides lead to thermal conductivities smaller than the bulk figures, which are further reduced as extended defects develop in these layers. This results in a progressively deteriorating thermal management in the device. To the best of our knowledge, this model for laser diodes is the first one to have taken into account low scale mechanical effects that result in enhanced strengths in the structural layers. Moreover, the consequences of these conflicting size-dependent properties on the thermo-mechanical behaviour on the route to COD are examined. Subsequently, this approach opens the possibility of taking advantage of these properties in order to design robust diode lasers (or other types of power devices) in a controlled manner.

  2. GMAG Student Dissertation Award Talk: Effects of Nanoscale Structure on the Magnetism and Transport Properties of Chromium and Chromium-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekelheide, Zoe

    2011-03-01

    Bulk Cr has an incommensurate spin density wave (ISDW) due to nesting of the Fermi surface which is easily disrupted by perturbation. Thus, the properties of Cr are sensitive to small amounts of dopant atoms, application of pressure, etc. which has been well studied in bulk. We have taken advantage of thin film growth techniques to study the effects of nanoscale structure on the properties of Cr and Cr1-xAlx alloys. The first part of my talk will discuss our research on polycrystalline Cr thin films, where variables such as strain and disorder crucially affect the SDW. We find that Cr thin films can be ISDW like in bulk Cr, or transition to commensurate SDW (CSDW) or mixed depending on deposition conditions and the resulting thin film microstructure. The transport properties are also strongly affected, as quasilocal defect states inside the SDW gap cause resonant scattering. This results in anomalous features such as residual resistivity ranging between 3 and 400 μ O -cm and significant resistivity minima at low temperature. Further evidence of quasilocal states inside the SDW gap is seen in the enhanced electronic density of states (DOS) from specific heat measurements of Cr thin films. The second part of my talk will discuss Cr1-xAlx alloys. The addition of Al to Cr causes the ISDW to transition to CSDW for x = 0.03. Cr1-xAlx also exhibits previously unexplained semiconducting behavior for x = 0.15-0.30. I will discuss our ongoing theoretical and experimental research which suggests that a chemically ordered, rhombohedrally distorted Cr3Al structure occurs in nanosized domains and causes a hybridization gap on part of the Fermi surface. The CSDW causes a gap on another part of the Fermi surface, so that the semiconducting behavior can be explained by a combination of structural and magnetic affects. Supported by the DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  3. The effect of an electrical double layer on the voltammetric performance of nanoscale interdigitated electrodes: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Guigen

    2008-11-19

    Finite-element based computational simulation is performed to investigate the effect of an electrical double layer (EDL) on the electrochemical processes of nanometer-scale interdigitated electrodes (nano-IDEs). Results show that the EDL structure will alter the voltammetric current response of nano-IDEs due to the expansion of the diffuse layer into the diffusion layer at the electrode surfaces and the overlap of the electrical fields of the neighboring electrodes. The EDL induced change in the voltammetric current response is more severe for nano-IDEs with a smaller electrode size and gap spacing, and the EDL effect is influenced by the compact layer thickness, the charge valence of the redox species, the electron transfer rate, and the absence of the supporting electrolyte.

  4. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  5. Topics in theoretical and computational nanoscience: From controlling light at the nanoscale to calculating quantum effects with classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeffrey Michael

    Interest in structures with nanometer-length features has significantly increased as experimental techniques for their fabrication have become possible. The study of phenomena in this area is termed nanoscience, and is a research focus of chemists, pure and applied physicists, electrical engineers, and others. The reason for such focus is the wide range of novel effects that exist at this scale, both of fundamental and practical interest, which often arise from the interaction between metallic nanostructures and light, and range from large electromagnetic field enhancements to extraordinary optical transmission of light through arrays of subwavelength holes. For the theoretician and computational scientist, this area has been, and continues to be rich with interesting problems to explore and phenomena to explain. For the most part, the phenomena can be explained using classical electrodynamics. However, recent experimental techniques allow individual nanostructures to be studied, questioning the accuracy of such methods at this most detailed level. Moreover, for structures with dimensions of just a few nanometers, the applicability of such methods at all needs to be questioned. Even if a system contains many hundreds of atoms or more so that a continuum level of description is adequate, the optical (and other) properties can be difficult to correctly calculate due to the importance of quantum effects. Thus, the theoretician is in trouble, and the accurate descriptions of such structures remain largely unknown. This dissertation is aimed at addressing some of the most fundamental and outstanding questions in nanoscience from a theoretical and computational perspective, specifically: (i) At the single nanoparticle level, how well do experiment and classical electrodynamics agree? (ii) What is the detailed relationship between optical response and nanoparticle morphology, composition, and environment? (iii) Does an optimal nanostructure exist for generating large

  6. The effects of the bottom anti-reflective coating with different baked temperatures and thicknesses on nanoscale patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Li, Ling; Chen, Weidong

    2015-12-01

    The bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) material can enhance the resolution of the nanopatterns structures in laser interference lithography process. In this study, WIDE-B ARC material was investigated to confirm the reduction of the vertical standing wave which leads to defect of nanopatterns. And the critical dimension (CD) of 100 nm L/S patterns with and without the application of BARC material was fabricated by laser interference lithography technology. The compared results showed that BARC can effectively reduce CD swing and obtain more uniform nanopatterns. Meanwhile, we also verified the influence of cured temperature and film thickness of BARC on the uniformity of nanopatterns.

  7. Merging of Kirkendall Growth and Ostwald Ripening: CuO@MnO2 Core-shell Architectures for Asymmetric Supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming; Zhang, Yuxin; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhongchang; Alamusi; Hu, Ning; Wen, Zhiyu; Liu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fabricating hierarchical core-shell nanostructures is currently the subject of intensive research in the electrochemical field owing to the hopes it raises for making efficient electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors. Here, we develop a simple and cost-effective approach to prepare CuO@MnO2 core-shell nanostructures without any surfactants and report their applications as electrodes for supercapacitors. An asymmetric supercapacitor with CuO@MnO2 core-shell nanostructure as the positive electrode and activated microwave exfoliated graphite oxide (MEGO) as the negative electrode yields an energy density of 22.1 Wh kg−1 and a maximum power density of 85.6 kW kg−1; the device shows a long-term cycling stability which retains 101.5% of its initial capacitance even after 10000 cycles. Such a facile strategy to fabricate the hierarchical CuO@MnO2 core-shell nanostructure with significantly improved functionalities opens up a novel avenue to design electrode materials on demand for high-performance supercapacitor applications. PMID:24682149

  8. Algorithm for Designing Nanoscale Supramolecular Therapeutics with Increased Anticancer Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish; Pandey, Prithvi; Rao, Poornima; Mahmoud, Ayaat; Goldman, Aaron; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Parcha, Shashikanth; Natarajan, Siva Kumar; Chandrasekar, Vineethkrishna; Dinulescu, Daniela; Roy, Sudip; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2016-09-27

    In the chemical world, evolution is mirrored in the origin of nanoscale supramolecular structures from molecular subunits. The complexity of function acquired in a supramolecular system over a molecular subunit can be harnessed in the treatment of cancer. However, the design of supramolecular nanostructures is hindered by a limited atomistic level understanding of interactions between building blocks. Here, we report the development of a computational algorithm, which we term Volvox after the first multicellular organism, that sequentially integrates quantum mechanical energy-state- and force-field-based models with large-scale all-atomistic explicit water molecular dynamics simulations to design stable nanoscale lipidic supramolecular structures. In one example, we demonstrate that Volvox enables the design of a nanoscale taxane supramolecular therapeutic. In another example, we demonstrate that Volvox can be extended to optimizing the ratio of excipients to form a stable nanoscale supramolecular therapeutic. The nanoscale taxane supramolecular therapeutic exerts greater antitumor efficacy than a clinically used taxane in vivo. Volvox can emerge as a powerful tool in the design of nanoscale supramolecular therapeutics for effective treatment of cancer.

  9. Understanding and characterizing the effect of nanoscale confinement on glass transition temperature and film dewetting of macrocylic polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lanhe; Elupula, Ravinder; Grayson, Scott; Torkelson, John

    There is a growing interest in the dynamics of different polymer topologies when confined to nanoscopic length scales. Macrocyclic polymers have attracted research interest because their lack of chain ends and cyclic topology has led to a range of unique physical properties. Cyclic polystyrene (c-PS) of well-defined molecular weight (MW) ranging from 2,300 to 8,700 g/mol was synthesized via click cyclization of dilute solutions of linear PS (l-PS) with azide and alkyne end functionalities. The click reaction enables nearly quantitative cyclization of l-PS. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure bulk glass transition temperature (Tg) and fragility of c-PS, both of which exhibit less MW dependence compared to l-PS. Compared to thin l-PS films, thin c-PS films exhibited extraordinary stability against dewetting. 22-nm-thick c-PS films were nearly stable for up to 4 hr at bulk Tg + 45 °C in contrast, 22-nm-thick l-PS films underwent severe dewetting. Nanoconfinement effects on Tgand fragility of c-PS are investigated using ellipsometry and/or fluorescence spectroscopy and compared to effects for l-PS precursors as well as commercial anionic l-PS standards.

  10. Effective medium theory based analytical models for the potential and field distributions in arrays of nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar; Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2017-07-01

    Recently, we developed an Effective Medium Theory (EMT) for the Space-Charge Region electrostatics of Schottky and p-n junctions in arrays of nanofilms (NFs), nanowires, and nanotubes in a dielectric ambient and gave formulas for their junction depletion width and screening length characterizing the space-charge tail. In the present work, we develop this EMT further and derive simple formulas for the potential and field distributions in the semiconductor and dielectric media of the array. The formulas derived are validated with numerical simulations. It is shown that the potential and field distributions perpendicular to the junction plane in the array correspond to those in a bulk junction with an effective semiconductor medium, whose permittivity and doping are their weighted averages over the cross-sectional areas of the semiconductor and dielectric; the shapes of the cross-sections are immaterial. We also analyze a single NF junction, treating it as a limiting case of an array, and obtain the following key results. For negligible film thickness, the depletion width depends linearly on applied voltage and inverse of doping; the peak electric field depends linearly on doping and inverse of ambient permittivity and varies very gradually with applied voltage. These features of a thin film junction are remarkably different from the bulk junction, wherein the depletion width and peak field have a square-root dependence on applied voltage.

  11. Novel π-type vortex in a nanoscale extreme type-II superconductor: Induced by quantum-size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiyan; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Wenhui; Chen, Yajiang

    2016-11-01

    By numerically solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, we report a novel π-type vortex state whose order parameter near the core undergoes an extraordinary π-phase change for a quantum-confined extreme type-II s-wave superconductor. Its supercurrent behaves as the cube of the radial coordinate near the core, and its local density of states spectrum exhibits a significant negative-shifted zero-bias peak. Such π-type vortex state is induced by quantum-size effect, and can survive thermal smearing at temperatures up to a critical value Tτ. The Anderson's approximation indicates that the π-type vortex may remain stable under sufficiently week magnetic field in the case less deep in the type-II limit. Moreover, we find that its appearance is governed by the sample size and kFξ0 with kF the Fermi wave number and ξ0 the zero-temperature coherence length. Similar effects may be expected in quantum-confined ultracold superfluid Fermi gasses, or even high-Tc superconductors with proper kFξ0 value.

  12. Computer-aided analysis of nonequilibrium optical-phonon effects in nanoscale n-GaAs devices and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulavicius, Gediminas

    1998-12-01

    We have elaborated reliable computer-aided models of carrier and phonon systems in GaAs low dimensional structures. Nonequilibrium phonon effects on coupled electron-phonon relaxation and transport in specific GaAs/AlGaAs-based quantum devices and structures have been studied by the simulation techniques developed. We have found that for low electron concentrations in GaAs quantum wells the hot optical-phonon distribution reflects the main features of the "parental" carrier distribution. However, hot-phonon feedback in the electron subsystem is negligible in this case. For high carrier concentrations in the well structures, enhanced phonon interactions with the confined electron subsystem result in an isotropic phonon distribution. In this case, nonequilibrium optical phonons lead to an increase in the mean electron energy and a reduction in the carrier drift velocity. We have simulated kinetics of electron runaway from GaAs quantum wires in the 0effects on coupled electron-phonon system relaxation dynamics in an AlGaAs/GaAs quantum cascade laser structure at 10 K. We have investigated in detail the possibility of increasing the effective lifetime of carriers in the upper lasing subband--and the consequent lowering of the lasing threshold currents-as a result of carrier return there from the lower level by means of induced hot optical-phonon reabsorption. Unfortunately, the simulation results reveal that under realistic conditions, the complete role of hot phonons is the opposite; indeed, they cause substantial electron heating in the subbands and significant induced optical-phonon emission. Both of these phenomena reduce the electron population inversion

  13. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lepetit, Bruno Lemoine, Didier; Márquez-Mijares, Maykel

    2016-08-28

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  14. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepetit, Bruno; Lemoine, Didier; Márquez-Mijares, Maykel

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  15. Effects of surface concentration on the porphine monolayers: Molecular simulations at the nanoscale water-gas interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krongsuk, Sriprajak; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2011-05-01

    The effect of surface concentration on the structure and stability of porphine (PH 2) monolayers at the water-gas interface was studied by using molecular dynamics simulation. Five monolayer systems having different surface concentrations were investigated in order to cover a full range of the experimental π- A isotherm. The simulation results show that increment of a number of the PH 2 molecules not only affects the significantly decreasing water density at the interface but also the monolayer surface tensions. The calculated surface tensions of the five systems indicate that the monolayer phase transfer corresponding to gaseous, expanded, condensed, and collapsed phases are observed. The hydrogen bonding between water and the PH 2 molecules at the interface plays an important role on the monolayer film formation, especially at the lower surface concentrations. The PH 2 orientations for all surface concentrations, except the highest one, are favored to be the β-structure as observed in the copper porphyrazine (CuPz) monolayer.

  16. Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Husaini, S.; Shima, D.; Ahirwar, P.; Rotter, T. J.; Hains, C. P.; Dang, T.; Bedford, R. G.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2013-02-11

    Effects of antimony crystallization on the surface of GaSb during low temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth are investigated. The geometry of these structures is studied via transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, which show the surface metal forms triangular-shaped, elongated nano-wires with a structured orientation composed entirely of crystalline antimony. By depositing antimony on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector, the field is localized within the antimony layer. Polarization dependent transmission measurements are carried out on these nano-structures deposited on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. It is shown that the antimony-based structures at the surface favor transmission of light polarized perpendicular to the wires.

  17. Direct fabrication of thin layer MoS{sub 2} field-effect nanoscale transistors by oxidation scanning probe lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Francisco M.; Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo; Marinov, Kolyo; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras

    2015-03-09

    Thin layer MoS{sub 2}-based field effect transistors (FET) are emerging candidates to fabricate very fast and sensitive devices. Here, we demonstrate a method to fabricate very narrow transistor channel widths on a single layer MoS{sub 2} flake connected to gold electrodes. Oxidation scanning probe lithography is applied to pattern insulating barriers on the flake. The process narrows the electron path to about 200 nm. The output and transfer characteristics of the fabricated FET show a behavior that is consistent with the minimum channel width of the device. The method relies on the direct and local chemical modification of MoS{sub 2}. The straightforward character and the lack of specific requirements envisage the controlled patterning of sub-100 nm electron channels in MoS{sub 2} FETs.

  18. A novel twisted nematic alignment and its effects on the electro-optical dynamics of nanoscale liquid crystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauzan, Brittany; Lee, Lay Min; Nuzzo, Ralph

    2015-03-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic studies of a surface induced, twisted alignment of the nematic liquid crystal, 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) and its temperature-dependent electro-optical (EO) dynamics were studied near the crystalline-nematic and nematic-isotropic transition temperatures, and at a median temperature in the nematic phase. A 50 nm thick film of 5CB was confined in nanocavities defined by the dimensions of a gold interdigitated electrode array patterned on a unidirectionally polished ZnSe substrate. The film was assembled between two polished substrates bearing extended nanometer-scaled grooves that are oriented orthogonally to one another. The results show that with this anchoring scheme, the molecular director of the LC film undergoes a ninety-degree twist. Step-scan time resolved spectroscopy (TRS) measurements were made to determine the rate constants for the temperature-dependent EO dynamics of both the electric field-induced orientation and thermal relaxation processes of the LC film. The work rationalizes the impacts of organizational anisotropy and illustrates how it can be exploited as a design principle to effectively influence the electric field-induced dynamics of LC systems.

  19. Nanoscale characterization of effect of L-arginine on Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shivani; Lavender, Stacey; Woo, JungReem; Guo, Lihong; Shi, Wenyuan; Kilpatrick-Liverman, LaTonya; Gimzewski, James K

    2014-07-01

    A major aetiological factor of dental caries is the pathology of the dental plaque biofilms. The amino acid L-arginine (Arg) is found naturally in saliva as a free molecule or as a part of salivary peptides and proteins. Plaque bacteria metabolize Arg to produce alkali and neutralize glycolytic acids, promoting a less cariogenous oral microbiome. Here, we explored an alternative and complementary mechanism of action of Arg using atomic force microscopy. The nanomechanical properties of Streptococcus mutans biofilm extracellular matrix were characterized under physiological buffer conditions. We report the effect of Arg on the adhesive behaviour and structural properties of extracellular polysaccharides in S. mutans biofilms. High-resolution imaging of biofilm surfaces can reveal additional structural information on bacterial cells embedded within the surrounding extracellular matrix. A dense extracellular matrix was observed in biofilms without Arg compared to those grown in the presence of Arg. S. mutans biofilms grown in the presence of Arg could influence the production and/or composition of extracellular membrane glucans and thereby affect their adhesion properties. Our results suggest that the presence of Arg in the oral cavity could influence the adhesion properties of S. mutans to the tooth surface.

  20. Annealing Temperature and Initial Iron Valence Ratio Effects on the Structural Characteristics of Nanoscale Nickel Zinc Ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, S.; Shultz, M; Glowzenski, L; Carpenter, E

    2010-01-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite (NZFO) nanoparticles were synthesized via a reverse micelle method with a nonionic surfactant. Three different initial Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratios were employed along with three different firing temperatures (200, 500, 1000 C) to investigate the effects on the NZFO system. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results reveal zinc loss at high annealing temperatures; at 1000 C, the loss is nearly total for Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratios other than 10:90. Annealing at 500 C, however, appears necessary for fully incorporating the zinc and nickel into the spinel phase. The best nanoferrite was thus obtained using an initial Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratio of 10:90 and a moderate firing temperature of 500 C. This sample exhibits a room temperature saturation magnetization of 58 emu/g as measured via vibrating sample magnetometry, comparable with bulk values and greater than that of confirmed nano-NZFOs found in the literature. EXAFS also indicates that in all cases in which the elements adopted a spinel structure, the nickel occupies only octahedral sites and the zinc primarily tetrahedral sites.

  1. Sensitive thermal transitions of nanoscale polymer samples using the bimetallic effect: application to ultra-thin polythiophene.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, O; Pérez-Madrigal, M M; Ramirez, J; Curcó, D; Esteves, C; Salvador-Matar, A; Luongo, G; Armelin, E; Puiggalí, J; Alemán, C

    2013-05-01

    A sensitive nanocalorimetric technology based on microcantilever sensors is presented. The technology, which combines very short response times with very small sample consumption, uses the bimetallic effect to detect thermal transitions. Specifically, abrupt variations in the Young's modulus and the thermal expansion coefficient produced by temperature changes have been employed to detect thermodynamic transitions. The technology has been used to determine the glass transition of poly(3-thiophene methyl acetate), a soluble semiconducting polymer with different nanotechnological applications. The glass transition temperature determined using microcantilevers coated with ultra-thin films of mass = 10(-13) g is 5.2 °C higher than that obtained using a conventional differential scanning calorimeter for bulk powder samples of mass = 5 × 10(-3) g. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on models that represent the bulk powder and the ultra-thin films have been carried out to provide understanding and rationalization of this feature. Simulations indicate that the film-air interface plays a crucial role in films with very small thickness, affecting both the organization of the molecular chains and the response of the molecules against the temperature.

  2. Sensitive thermal transitions of nanoscale polymer samples using the bimetallic effect: Application to ultra-thin polythiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, O.; Pérez-Madrigal, M. M.; Ramirez, J.; Curcó, D.; Esteves, C.; Salvador-Matar, A.; Luongo, G.; Armelin, E.; Puiggalí, J.; Alemán, C.

    2013-05-01

    A sensitive nanocalorimetric technology based on microcantilever sensors is presented. The technology, which combines very short response times with very small sample consumption, uses the bimetallic effect to detect thermal transitions. Specifically, abrupt variations in the Young's modulus and the thermal expansion coefficient produced by temperature changes have been employed to detect thermodynamic transitions. The technology has been used to determine the glass transition of poly(3-thiophene methyl acetate), a soluble semiconducting polymer with different nanotechnological applications. The glass transition temperature determined using microcantilevers coated with ultra-thin films of mass = 10-13 g is 5.2 °C higher than that obtained using a conventional differential scanning calorimeter for bulk powder samples of mass = 5 × 10-3 g. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on models that represent the bulk powder and the ultra-thin films have been carried out to provide understanding and rationalization of this feature. Simulations indicate that the film-air interface plays a crucial role in films with very small thickness, affecting both the organization of the molecular chains and the response of the molecules against the temperature.

  3. Direct observation of nanoscale Peltier and Joule effects at metal-insulator domain walls in vanadium dioxide nanobeams.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Tela; Suh, Joonki; Vermeersch, Bjorn; Liu, Kai; Gu, Yijia; Chen, Long-Qing; Wang, Kevin X; Wu, Junqiao; Shakouri, Ali

    2014-05-14

    The metal to insulator transition (MIT) of strongly correlated materials is subject to strong lattice coupling, which brings about the unique one-dimensional alignment of metal-insulator (M-I) domains along nanowires or nanobeams. Many studies have investigated the effects of stress on the MIT and hence the phase boundary, but few have directly examined the temperature profile across the metal-insulating interface. Here, we use thermoreflectance microscopy to create two-dimensional temperature maps of single-crystalline VO2 nanobeams under external bias in the phase coexisting regime. We directly observe highly localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain boundaries, indicating the significance of the domain walls and band offsets. Utilizing the thermoreflectance technique, we are able to elucidate strain accumulation along the nanobeam and distinguish between two insulating phases of VO2 through detection of the opposite polarity of their respective thermoreflectance coefficients. Microelasticity theory was employed to predict favorable domain wall configurations, confirming the monoclinic phase identification.

  4. Effects of the Surface Morphology and Conformations of Lignocellulosic Biomass Biopolymers on Their Nanoscale Interactions with Hydrophobic Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Baran; Egerton, Kirstin; Zhang, Xiao; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2017-07-11

    The effects of the morphology and conformations of the surface biopolymers present on lignocellulosic biomass as well as their steric hindrance on enzymatic adsorption to biomass surfaces remain elusive. In a step to better understand these effects, nanoscale steric forces between a model surface that represents the hydrophobic residues of a cellulase enzyme and a set of reference lignocellulosic substrates were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid media. The reference substrates investigated were prepared by kraft, sulfite, and organosolv pulping pretreatment methods and varied in their surface lignin, xylan, and acetone extractives' contents. Measured steric forces were quantified through fitting to a model developed to describe polyelectrolytes brushes in terms of a brush thickness and a brush grafting density. Our data indicated that cellulose microfibrils extend from the microfibril matrix leading to a long-range steric repulsion and low attractive forces to the hydrophobic model of the enzyme, suggesting that steric hindering can be a possible mechanism for nonproductive binding of enzymes to cellulose. When the amount of xylan increased in the absence of lignin, steric repulsions between the hydrophobic model of the enzyme, and biomass biopolymers decreased as a result of collapsed cellulose microfibrils and adhesion forces increased. This suggests that leaving a small amount of xylan after biomass pretreatment can help improve enzymatic binding to cellulose. Irrespective of the type of lignin present on biomass, grafting densities increased and brush thicknesses decreased compared to those of lignin-free substrates. When compared to lignin-free substrates, lignin-containing substrates had higher attractive forces and lower steric repulsive forces. In addition, AFM images of the reference substrates in the wet and dry states showed that lignin precipitates on the biomass surface where kraft lignin had the highest particle size leading to a

  5. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  6. Molecular Photovoltaics in Nanoscale Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Burtman, Vladimir; Zelichonok, Alexander; Pakoulev, Andrei V.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC) devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs) fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM) method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI) SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox) mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures. PMID:21339983

  7. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    DOE PAGES

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; ...

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-rangingmore » lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.« less

  8. Nanoscale fabrication by nonconventional approaches.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ampere A; Notargiacomo, Andrea

    2005-05-01

    An overview of three major nonconventional approaches in nanofabrication, scanning probe microscopy lithography, self-assembly, and imprint lithography, is presented. Typically, these nonconventional approaches are emerging technologies based on simple principles with potential cost-effective manufacturability, as compared to those conventional processes that are widely used and highly developed for making microelectronic circuits. Following the introduction of nonconventional technologies and their significances in nanofabrication, the details of each approach are presented. The lithographic applications of scanning probe microscopy, which involves three major variations: scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, are first evaluated with emphasis on their abilities in making structures with subnanoscale resolutions. The principles and processes for each technique are presented while their differences are also discussed. For the second approach, self-assembly, which uses a bottom-up fabrication strategy, is reported starting with an introduction of its basic principle. Self-assembly, with and without externally controlled forces for patterning nanoscale structures, is then examined. The associated principles and procedures of key assembling processes are presented. The third one, imprint lithography, is addressed with an emphasis on its recent progress and challenges. The nanolithographic abilities of different techniques developed using the general imprinting principle are examined. Finally, concluding remarks are provided to summarize the major technologies studied and to recommend the scopes for technology improvement and future research.

  9. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Teresa B; Strickhouser, Rachel B; Hatab, Nahla A; Charlton, Jennifer J; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2015-05-21

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2 μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200-400 nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  10. Applications of Optical Spectroscopy in Studies on Energy & Electron Transfer and Solvation Effects in Nanoscale and Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Megan H. J.

    This thesis describes three investigations, ranging in subject matters, all of which relating to systems capable of photoinduced reactions involving energy or electron transfer. The phenomenon and the effects of environment in the various systems are explored using different methodologies of optical spectroscopy. As the chapters progress, different investigations introduce and build on fundamental concepts encountered and in complexity of the methodologies used to explore the systems. The first chapter introduces the preparation of water-soluble CdSe nanocrystal clusters. The clusters, created using a protein, are 3-D close-packed self-assemblies of nanocrystals. Due to this close-packed nature, electronic interactions between the nanocrystals allow for energy migration within the cluster. The structural and optical properties of the clusters were described. Then using steady-state spectroscopy, properties of the original nanocrystals were compared to that of the cluster to determine the consequence of nanocrystal coupling interactions and their potential use toward the development of artificial light-harvesting systems. In the second chapter, CdSe nanocrystals are functionalized with a unique electro-active polymer, and the electron transfer between the nanocrystal and the electro-active polymer adsorbate is investigated. Using fluorescence decay measurements, the electron transfer reaction inherent to the system with respect to a comprehensive range of dielectric solvents was explored. The study illustrates the high complexity of seemingly typical nanocrystal-based systems and provides general awareness of what factors need to be considered when dealing with such systems. The final chapter starts with an informal review of ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, focusing on two methods, three-pulse photon echo peak shift (3PEPS) and two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) electronic spectroscopy, and how they are related. A straightforward approach for extracting 3PEPS data

  11. Nanoscale confinement and interfacial effects on the dynamics and glass transition/crystallinity of thin adsorbed films on silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madathingal, Rajesh Raman

    The research investigated in this dissertation has focused on understanding the structure-property-function relationships of polymer nanocomposites. The properties of composite systems are dictated by the properties of their components, typically fillers in a polymer matrix. In nanocomposites, the polymer near an interface has significantly different properties compared with the bulk polymer, and the contribution of the adsorbed polymer to composite properties becomes increasingly important as the filler size decreases. Despite many reports of highly favorable properties, the behavior of polymer nanocomposites is not generally predictable, and thus requires a better understanding of the interfacial region. The ability to tailor the filler/matrix interaction and an understanding of the impact of the interface on macroscopic properties are keys in the design of nanocomposite properties. In this original work the surface of silica nanoparticles was tailored by: (a) Changing the number of sites for polymer attachment by varying the surface silanols and, (b) By varying the size/curvature of nanoparticles. The effect of surface tailoring on the dynamic properties after the adsorption of two model polymers, amorphous polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and semicrystalline polyethylene oxide (PEO) was observed. The interphase layer of polymers adsorbed to silica surfaces is affected by the surface silanol density as well as the relative size of the polymer compared with the size of the adsorbing substrate. The non-equilibrium adsorption of PMMA onto individual colloidal Stober silica (SiO2) particles, where Rparticle (100nm) > RPMMA (˜6.5nm) was compared with the adsorption onto fumed silica, where Rparticle (7nm) ˜ RPMMA (6.5nm) < Raggregate (˜1000nm), both as a function of silanol density [SiOH] and hydrophobility. In the former case, TEM images showed that the PMMA adsorbed onto individual nanoparticles, so that the number of PMMA chains/bead could be calculated, whereas

  12. Effect of injection velocity and particle concentration on transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron and hydraulic conductivity in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Strutz, Tessa J; Hornbruch, Götz; Dahmke, Andreas; Köber, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Successful groundwater remediation by injecting nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles requires efficient particle transportation and distribution in the subsurface. This study focused on the influence of injection velocity and particle concentration on the spatial NZVI particle distribution, the deposition processes and on quantifying the induced decrease in hydraulic conductivity (K) as a result of particle retention by lab tests and numerical simulations. Horizontal column tests of 2m length were performed with initial Darcy injection velocities (q0) of 0.5, 1.5, and 4.1m/h and elemental iron input concentrations (Fe(0)in) of 0.6, 10, and 17g/L. Concentrations of Fe(0) in the sand were determined by magnetic susceptibility scans, which provide detailed Fe(0) distribution profiles along the column. NZVI particles were transported farther at higher injection velocity and higher input concentrations. K decreased by one order of magnitude during injection in all experiments, with a stronger decrease after reaching Fe(0) concentrations of about 14-18g/kg(sand). To simulate the observed nanoparticle transport behavior the existing finite-element code OGS has been successfully extended and parameterized for the investigated experiments using blocking, ripening, and straining as governing deposition processes. Considering parameter relationships deduced from single simulations for each experiment (e.g. deposition rate constants as a function of flow velocity) one mean parameter set has been generated reproducing the observations in an adequate way for most cases of the investigated realistic injection conditions. An assessment of the deposition processes related to clogging effects showed that the percentage of retention due to straining and ripening increased during experimental run time resulting in an ongoing reduction of K. Clogging is mainly evoked by straining which dominates particle deposition at higher flow velocities, while blocking and ripening play a

  13. Effect of injection velocity and particle concentration on transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron and hydraulic conductivity in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutz, Tessa J.; Hornbruch, Götz; Dahmke, Andreas; Köber, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Successful groundwater remediation by injecting nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles requires efficient particle transportation and distribution in the subsurface. This study focused on the influence of injection velocity and particle concentration on the spatial NZVI particle distribution, the deposition processes and on quantifying the induced decrease in hydraulic conductivity (K) as a result of particle retention by lab tests and numerical simulations. Horizontal column tests of 2 m length were performed with initial Darcy injection velocities (q0) of 0.5, 1.5, and 4.1 m/h and elemental iron input concentrations (Fe0in) of 0.6, 10, and 17 g/L. Concentrations of Fe0 in the sand were determined by magnetic susceptibility scans, which provide detailed Fe0 distribution profiles along the column. NZVI particles were transported farther at higher injection velocity and higher input concentrations. K decreased by one order of magnitude during injection in all experiments, with a stronger decrease after reaching Fe0 concentrations of about 14-18 g/kg(sand). To simulate the observed nanoparticle transport behavior the existing finite-element code OGS has been successfully extended and parameterized for the investigated experiments using blocking, ripening, and straining as governing deposition processes. Considering parameter relationships deduced from single simulations for each experiment (e.g. deposition rate constants as a function of flow velocity) one mean parameter set has been generated reproducing the observations in an adequate way for most cases of the investigated realistic injection conditions. An assessment of the deposition processes related to clogging effects showed that the percentage of retention due to straining and ripening increased during experimental run time resulting in an ongoing reduction of K. Clogging is mainly evoked by straining which dominates particle deposition at higher flow velocities, while blocking and ripening play a

  14. Sensing at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  15. Computational Spectroscopy for Nanoscale Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Marco

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale photovoltaic (PV) systems employ nanomaterial interfaces to dissociate bound excitons formed upon sunlight absorption. This mechanism results in a correlated electron, hole, and exciton interface dynamics whose accurate determination is challenging both theoretically and experimentally. In this talk, I will discuss approaches available to compute and combine relevant spectroscopic quantities to predict efficient nanoscale PV systems. Further, I will present our recent work on two novel families of nanoscale PV devices based on: 1) Nanocarbon materials, achieving 1.3% efficiency, tunable infra-red optical absorption, and superior photostability compared to organic solar cells 2) Two-dimensional monolayer semiconductors such as Graphene-BN and MoS2, capable of absorbing a significant fraction of sunlight within just ~ 10 nm, and showing tunable absorption, band offsets, and power conversion efficiency (PCE).

  16. Field Effect Transistor in Nanoscale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-26

    PB Public Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Weakly coupled molecular junctions are quite active and important field of research as they...applied perturbations modify both the site charge densities as well as occupation probabilities of transport active channels, resulting in a quite...a searchable DoD database. Weakly coupled molecular junctions are quite active and important field of research as they exhibit various non

  17. Facile Fabrication of Binary Nanoscale Interface for No-Loss Microdroplet Transportation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Weitao; Zhu, Liqun; Li, Weiping; Xu, Chang; Liu, Huicong

    2016-06-07

    Binary nanoscale interfacial materials are fundamental issues in many applications for smart surfaces. A binary nanoscale interface with binary surface morphology and binary wetting behaviors has been prepared by a facile wet-chemical method. The prepared surface presents superhydrophobicity and high adhesion with the droplet at the same time. The composition, surface morphology, and wetting behaviors of the prepared surface have been systematic studied. The special wetting behaviors can be contributed to the binary nanoscale effect. The stability of the prepared surface was also investigated. As a primary application, a facile device based on the prepared binary nanoscale interface with superhydrophobicity and high adhesion was constructed for microdroplet transportation.

  18. Defect-tolerant extreme ultraviolet nanoscale printing.

    PubMed

    Urbanski, L; Isoyan, A; Stein, A; Rocca, J J; Menoni, C S; Marconi, M C

    2012-09-01

    We present a defect-free lithography method for printing periodic features with nanoscale resolution using coherent extreme ultraviolet light. This technique is based on the self-imaging effect known as the Talbot effect, which is produced when coherent light is diffracted by a periodic mask. We present a numerical simulation and an experimental verification of the method with a compact extreme ultraviolet laser. Furthermore, we explore the extent of defect tolerance by testing masks with different defect layouts. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  19. Fabrication of nanoscale electrostatic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinno, I.; Sanz-Velasco, A.; Kang, S.; Jansen, H.; Olsson, E.; Enoksson, P.; Svensson, K.

    2010-09-01

    The fabrication of cylindrical multi-element electrostatic lenses at the nanoscale presents a challenge; they are high-aspect-ratio structures that should be rotationally symmetric, well aligned and freestanding, with smooth edges and flat, clean surfaces. In this paper, we present the fabrication results of a non-conventional process, which uses a combination of focused gallium ion-beam milling and hydrofluoric acid vapor etching. This process makes it possible to fabricate nanoscale electrostatic lenses down to 140 nm in aperture diameter and 4.2 µm in column length, with a superior control of the geometry as compared to conventional lithography-based techniques.

  20. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  1. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  2. Nanoscale Cobalt-Manganese Oxide Catalyst Supported on Shape-Controlled Cerium Oxide: Effect of Nanointerface Configuration on Structural, Redox, and Catalytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Hillary, Brendan; Sudarsanam, Putla; Amin, Mohamad Hassan; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2017-02-28

    Understanding the role of nanointerface structures in supported bimetallic nanoparticles is vital for the rational design of novel high-performance catalysts. This study reports the synthesis, characterization, and the catalytic application of Co-Mn oxide nanoparticles supported on CeO2 nanocubes with the specific aim of investigating the effect of nanointerfaces in tuning structure-activity properties. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals the formation of different types of Co-Mn nanoalloys with a range of 6 ± 0.5 to 14 ± 0.5 nm on the surface of CeO2 nanocubes, which are in the range of 15 ± 1.5 to 25 ± 1.5 nm. High concentration of Ce(3+) species are found in Co-Mn/CeO2 (23.34%) compared with that in Mn/CeO2 (21.41%), Co/CeO2 (15.63%), and CeO2 (11.06%), as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Nanoscale electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis in combination with XPS studies shows the transformation of Co(2+) to Co(3+) and simultaneously Mn(4+/3+) to Mn(2+). The Co-Mn/CeO2 catalyst exhibits the best performance in solvent-free oxidation of benzylamine (89.7% benzylamine conversion) compared with the Co/CeO2 (29.2% benzylamine conversion) and Mn/CeO2 (82.6% benzylamine conversion) catalysts for 3 h at 120 °C using air as the oxidant. Irrespective of the catalysts employed, a high selectivity toward the dibenzylimine product (97-98%) was found compared with the benzonitrile product (2-3%). The interplay of redox chemistry of Mn and Co at the nanointerface sites between Co-Mn nanoparticles and CeO2 nanocubes as well as the abundant structural defects in cerium oxide plays a key role in the efficiency of the Co-Mn/CeO2 catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of benzylamine.

  3. Developmental toxicity studies with 6 forms of titanium dioxide test materials (3 pigment-different grade & 3 nanoscale) demonstrate an absence of effects in orally-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Boatman, R; Brown, S C

    2015-12-01

    Six different commercial forms and sizes of titanium dioxide particles were tested in separate developmental toxicity assays. The three pigment-grade (pg) or 3 ultrafine (uf)/nanoscale (anatase and/or rutile) titanium dioxide (TiO2) particle-types were evaluated for potential maternal and developmental toxicity in pregnant rats by two different laboratories. All studies were conducted according to OECD Guideline 414 (Prenatal Developmental Toxicity Study). In addition, all test materials were robustly characterized. The BET surface areas of the pg and uf samples ranged from 7 to 17 m(2)/g and 50-82 m(2)/g respectively (see Table 1). The test substances were formulated in sterile water. In all of the studies, the formulations were administered by oral gavage to time-mated rats daily beginning around the time of implantation and continuing until the day prior to expected parturition. In 3 of the studies (uf-1, uf-3, & pg-1), the formulations were administered to Crl:CD(SD) rats beginning on gestation day (GD) 6 through GD 20. In 3 additional studies (uf-2, and pg-2, pg-3 TiO2 particles), the formulations were administered to Wistar rats beginning on GD 5 through 19. The dose levels used in all studies were 0, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day; control group animals were administered the vehicle. During the in-life portions of the studies, body weights, food consumption, and clinical observations before and after dosing were collected on a daily basis. All dams were euthanized just prior to expected parturition (GD 21 for Crl:CD(SD) rats and GD 20 for Wistar rats). The gross necropsies included an examination and description of uterine contents including counts of corpora lutea, implantation sites, resorptions, and live and dead fetuses. All live fetuses were sexed, weighed, and examined externally and euthanized. Following euthanasia, fresh visceral and head examinations were performed on selected fetuses. The fetal carcasses were then processed and examined for skeletal

  4. Stabilization of aqueous nanoscale zerovalent iron dispersions by anionic polyelectrolytes: adsorbed anionic polyelectrolyte layer properties and their effect on aggregation and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Saleh, Navid; Sirk, Kevin; Kim, Hye-Jin; Tilton, Robert D.; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2008-05-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles are 5-40 nm sized Fe0/Fe-oxide particles that rapidly transform many environmental contaminants to benign products and are a promising in situ remediation agent. Rapid aggregation and limited mobility in water-saturated porous media limits the ability to deliver NZVI dispersions in the subsurface. This study prepares stable NZVI dispersions through physisorption of commercially available anionic polyelectrolytes, characterizes the adsorbed polymer layer, and correlates the polymer coating properties with the ability to prevent rapid aggregation and sedimentation of NZVI dispersions. Poly(styrene sulfonate) with molecular weights of 70 k and 1,000 k g/mol (PSS70K and PSS1M), carboxymethyl cellulose with molecular weights of 90 k and 700 k g/mol (CMC90K and CMC700K), and polyaspartate with molecular weights of 2.5 k and 10 k g/mol (PAP2.5K and 10K) were compared. Particle size distributions were determined by dynamic light scattering during aggregation. The order of effectiveness to prevent rapid aggregation and stabilize the dispersions was PSS70K(83%) > ≈PAP10K(82%) > PAP2.5K(72%) > CMC700K(52%), where stability is defined operationally as the volume percent of particles that do not aggregate after 1 h. CMC90K and PSS1M could not stabilize RNIP relative to bare RNIP. A similar trend was observed for their ability to prevent sedimentation, with 40, 34, 32, 20, and 5 wt%, of the PSS70K, PAP10K, PAP2.5K, CMC700K, and CMC90K modified NZVI remaining suspended after 7 h of quiescent settling, respectively. The stable fractions with respect to both aggregation and sedimentation correlate well with the adsorbed polyelectrolyte mass and thickness of the adsorbed polyelectrolyte layers as determined by Oshima's soft particle theory. A fraction of the particles cannot be stabilized by any modifier and rapidly agglomerates to micron sized aggregates, as is also observed for unmodified NZVI. This non-dispersible fraction is

  5. Catalysis at the nanoscale may change selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Costentin, Cyrille; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Among the many virtues ascribed to catalytic nanoparticles, the prospect that the passage from the macro- to the nanoscale may change product selectivity attracts increasing attention. To date, why such effects may exist lacks explanation. Guided by recent experimental reports, we propose that the effects may result from the coupling between the chemical steps in which the reactant, intermediates, and products are involved and transport of these species toward the catalytic surface. Considering as a thought experiment the competitive formation of hydrogen and formate upon reduction of hydrogenocarbonate ions on metals like palladium or platinum, a model is developed that allows one to identify the governing parameters and predict the effect of nanoscaling on selectivity. The model leads to a master equation relating product selectivity and thickness of the diffusion layer. The latter parameter varies considerably upon passing from the macro- to the nanoscale, thus predicting considerable variations of product selectivity. These are subtle effects in the sense that the same mechanism might exhibit a reverse variation of the selectivity if the set of parameter values were different. An expression is given that allows one to predict the direction of the effect. There has been a tendency to assign the catalytic effects of nanoscaling to chemical reactivity changes of the active surface. Such factors might be important in some circumstances. We, however, insist on the likely role of short-distance transport on product selectivity, which could have been thought, at first sight, as the exclusive domain of chemical factors. PMID:27688766

  6. Catalysis at the nanoscale may change selectivity.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2016-10-18

    Among the many virtues ascribed to catalytic nanoparticles, the prospect that the passage from the macro- to the nanoscale may change product selectivity attracts increasing attention. To date, why such effects may exist lacks explanation. Guided by recent experimental reports, we propose that the effects may result from the coupling between the chemical steps in which the reactant, intermediates, and products are involved and transport of these species toward the catalytic surface. Considering as a thought experiment the competitive formation of hydrogen and formate upon reduction of hydrogenocarbonate ions on metals like palladium or platinum, a model is developed that allows one to identify the governing parameters and predict the effect of nanoscaling on selectivity. The model leads to a master equation relating product selectivity and thickness of the diffusion layer. The latter parameter varies considerably upon passing from the macro- to the nanoscale, thus predicting considerable variations of product selectivity. These are subtle effects in the sense that the same mechanism might exhibit a reverse variation of the selectivity if the set of parameter values were different. An expression is given that allows one to predict the direction of the effect. There has been a tendency to assign the catalytic effects of nanoscaling to chemical reactivity changes of the active surface. Such factors might be important in some circumstances. We, however, insist on the likely role of short-distance transport on product selectivity, which could have been thought, at first sight, as the exclusive domain of chemical factors.

  7. Nanoscale wicking methods and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Jijie (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Noca, Flavio (Inventor); Sansom, Elijah B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A fluid transport method and fluid transport device are disclosed. Nanoscale fibers disposed in a patterned configuration allow transport of a fluid in absence of an external power source. The device may include two or more fluid transport components having different fluid transport efficiencies. The components may be separated by additional fluid transport components, to control fluid flow.

  8. Nanoscale heat flux between nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Biehs, S-A; Ben-Abdallah, P; Rosa, F S S; Joulain, K; Greffet, J-J

    2011-09-12

    By combining stochastic electrodynamics and the Maxwell-Garnett description for effective media we study the radiative heat transfer between two nanoporous materials. We show that the heat flux can be significantly enhanced by air inclusions, which we explain by: (a) the presence of additional surface waves that give rise to supplementary channels for heat transfer throughout the gap, (b) an increase in the contribution given by the ordinary surface waves at resonance, (c) and the appearance of frustrated modes over a broad spectral range. We generalize the known expression for the nanoscale heat flux for anisotropic metamaterials.

  9. Nanoscale Semiconductor Devices as New Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, John; Parameswaran, Ramya; Tian, Bozhi

    2016-01-01

    Research on nanoscale semiconductor devices will elicit a novel understanding of biological systems. First, we discuss why it is necessary to build interfaces between cells and semiconductor nanoelectronics. Second, we describe some recent molecular biophysics studies with nanowire field effect transistor sensors. Third, we present the use of nanowire transistors as electrical recording devices that can be integrated into synthetic tissues and targeted intra- or extracellularly to study single cells. Lastly, we discuss future directions and challenges in further developing this area of research, which will advance biology and medicine. PMID:27213041

  10. Long Range Interactions in Nanoscale Science

    SciTech Connect

    French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgonik, Rudolph; Rajter, Rick; Jagota, Anand; Luo, Jian; Asthagiri, Dilip; Chaudhury, Manoj; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Granick, Steve; Kalinin, Sergei V; Kardar, Mehran; Kjellander, Roland; Langreth, David C.; Lewis, Jennifer; Lustig, Steve; Wesolowski, David J; Wettlaufer, John; Ching, Wai-Yim; Finnis, Mike; Houlihan, Frank; Von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Van Oss, Carel; Zemb, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the long range electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces perspective, a large number of systems are described from which one can learn about these organizing forces and how to modulate them. The many practical systems that harness these nanoscale forces are then surveyed. The survey reveals not only the promise of new devices and materials, but also the possibility of designing them more effectively.

  11. Nanoscale Semiconductor Devices as New Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, John; Parameswaran, Ramya; Tian, Bozhi

    2014-05-01

    Research on nanoscale semiconductor devices will elicit a novel understanding of biological systems. First, we discuss why it is necessary to build interfaces between cells and semiconductor nanoelectronics. Second, we describe some recent molecular biophysics studies with nanowire field effect transistor sensors. Third, we present the use of nanowire transistors as electrical recording devices that can be integrated into synthetic tissues and targeted intra- or extracellularly to study single cells. Lastly, we discuss future directions and challenges in further developing this area of research, which will advance biology and medicine.

  12. Optimum design of a nanoscale spin-Seebeck power device.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tianjun; Lin, Jian; Su, Guozhen; Lin, Bihong; Chen, Jincan

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical model of a nanoscale spin-Seebeck power device (SSPD) is proposed based on the longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect in bilayers made of a ferromagnetic insulator and a normal metal. Expressions for the power output and thermal efficiency of the SSPD are derived analytically. The performance characteristics of the nanoscale SSPD are analyzed using numerical simulation. The maximum power output density and efficiency are calculated numerically. The effect of the spin Hall angle on the performance characteristics of the SSPD is analyzed. The choice of materials and the structure of the device are discussed. The optimum criteria of some key parameters of the SSPD, such as the power output density, efficiency, thickness of the normal metal, and the load resistance, are given. The results obtained here could provide a theoretical basis for the optimal design and operation of nanoscale SSPDs.

  13. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    The recent technological developments in the synthesis and characterization of high-quality nanostructures and developments in the theoretical techniques needed to model these materials, have motivated this focus section of Superconductor Science and Technology. Another motivation is the compelling evidence that all new superconducting materials, such as iron pnictides and chalcogenides, diborides (doped MgB2) and fullerides (alkali-doped C60 compounds), are heterostrucures at the atomic limit, such as the cuprates made of stacks of nanoscale superconducting layers intercalated by different atomic layers with nanoscale periodicity. Recently a great amount of interest has been shown in the role of lattice nano-architecture in controlling the fine details of Fermi surface topology. The experimental and theoretical study of superconductivity in the nanoscale started in the early 1960s, shortly after the discovery of the BCS theory. Thereafter there has been rapid progress both in experiments and the theoretical understanding of nanoscale superconductors. Experimentally, thin films, granular films, nanowires, nanotubes and single nanoparticles have all been explored. New quantum effects appear in the nanoscale related to multi-component condensates. Advances in the understanding of shape resonances or Fano resonances close to 2.5 Lifshitz transitions near a band edge in nanowires, 2D films and superlattices [1, 2] of these nanosized modules, provide the possibility of manipulating new quantum electronic states. Parity effects and shell effects in single, isolated nanoparticles have been reported by several groups. Theoretically, newer techniques based on solving Richardson's equation (an exact theory incorporating finite size effects to the BCS theory) numerically by path integral methods or solving the entire Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation in these limits have been attempted, which has improved our understanding of the mechanism of superconductivity in these confined

  14. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  15. Reliability Assessment and Activation Energy Study of Au and Pd-Coated Cu Wires Post High Temperature Aging in Nanoscale Semiconductor Packaging.

    PubMed

    Gan, C L; Hashim, U

    2013-06-01

    Wearout reliability and high temperature storage life (HTSL) activation energy of Au and Pd-coated Cu (PdCu) ball bonds are useful technical information for Cu wire deployment in nanoscale semiconductor device packaging. This paper discusses the influence of wire type on the wearout reliability performance of Au and PdCu wire used in fine pitch BGA package after HTSL stress at various aging temperatures. Failure analysis has been conducted to identify the failure mechanism after HTSL wearout conditions for Au and PdCu ball bonds. Apparent activation energies (Eaa) of both wire types are investigated after HTSL test at 150 °C, 175 °C and 200 °C aging temperatures. Arrhenius plot has been plotted for each ball bond types and the calculated Eaa of PdCu ball bond is 0.85 eV and 1.10 eV for Au ball bond in 110 nm semiconductor device. Obviously Au ball bond is identified with faster IMC formation rate with IMC Kirkendall voiding while PdCu wire exhibits equivalent wearout and or better wearout reliability margin compare to conventional Au wirebond. Lognormal plots have been established and its mean to failure (t50) have been discussed in this paper.

  16. Temperature mapping of operating nanoscale devices by scanning probe thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Fabian; Mensch, Philipp; Schmid, Heinz; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Imaging temperature fields at the nanoscale is a central challenge in various areas of science and technology. Nanoscopic hotspots, such as those observed in integrated circuits or plasmonic nanostructures, can be used to modify the local properties of matter, govern physical processes, activate chemical reactions and trigger biological mechanisms in living organisms. The development of high-resolution thermometry techniques is essential for understanding local thermal non-equilibrium processes during the operation of numerous nanoscale devices. Here we present a technique to map temperature fields using a scanning thermal microscope. Our method permits the elimination of tip-sample contact-related artefacts, a major hurdle that so far has limited the use of scanning probe microscopy for nanoscale thermometry. We map local Peltier effects at the metal-semiconductor contacts to an indium arsenide nanowire and self-heating of a metal interconnect with 7 mK and sub-10 nm spatial temperature resolution.

  17. Temperature mapping of operating nanoscale devices by scanning probe thermometry

    PubMed Central

    Menges, Fabian; Mensch, Philipp; Schmid, Heinz; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Imaging temperature fields at the nanoscale is a central challenge in various areas of science and technology. Nanoscopic hotspots, such as those observed in integrated circuits or plasmonic nanostructures, can be used to modify the local properties of matter, govern physical processes, activate chemical reactions and trigger biological mechanisms in living organisms. The development of high-resolution thermometry techniques is essential for understanding local thermal non-equilibrium processes during the operation of numerous nanoscale devices. Here we present a technique to map temperature fields using a scanning thermal microscope. Our method permits the elimination of tip–sample contact-related artefacts, a major hurdle that so far has limited the use of scanning probe microscopy for nanoscale thermometry. We map local Peltier effects at the metal–semiconductor contacts to an indium arsenide nanowire and self-heating of a metal interconnect with 7 mK and sub-10 nm spatial temperature resolution. PMID:26936427

  18. Transport in nanoscale systems: hydrodynamics, turbulence, and local electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale systems is usually described as an open-boundary scattering problem. This picture, however, says nothing about the dynamical onset of steady states, their microscopic nature, or their dependence on initial conditions [1]. In order to address these issues, I will first describe the dynamical many-particle state via an effective quantum hydrodynamic theory [2]. This approach allows us to predict a series of novel phenomena like turbulence of the electron liquid [2], local electron heating in nanostructures [3], and the effect of electron viscosity on resistance [4]. I will provide both analytical results and numerical examples of first-principles electron dynamics in nanostructures using the above approach. I will also discuss possible experimental tests of our predictions. Work supported in part by NSF and DOE. [1] N. Bushong, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Approach to steady-state transport in nanoscale systems'' Nano Letters, 5 2569 (2005); M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, ``Transport in nanoscale systems: the microcanonical versus grand-canonical picture,'' J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, ``Hydrodynamic approach to transport and turbulence in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/05123326; J. Phys. Cond. Matt., in press. [3] R. D'Agosta, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Local electron heating in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/0605312; Nano Letters, in press. [4] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale and M. Di Ventra, ``Dynamical corrections to the DFT-LDA electron conductance in nanoscale systems,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005).

  19. Organic Micro/Nanoscale Lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2016-09-20

    Micro/nanoscale lasers that can deliver intense coherent light signals at (sub)wavelength scale have recently captured broad research interest because of their potential applications ranging from on-chip information processing to high-throughput sensing. Organic molecular materials are a promising kind of ideal platform to construct high-performance microlasers, mainly because of their superiority in abundant excited-state processes with large active cross sections for high gain emissions and flexibly assembled structures for high-quality microcavities. In recent years, ever-increasing efforts have been dedicated to developing such organic microlasers toward low threshold, multicolor output, broadband tunability, and easy integration. Therefore, it is increasingly important to summarize this research field and give deep insight into the structure-property relationships of organic microlasers to accelerate the future development. In this Account, we will review the recent advances in organic miniaturized lasers, with an emphasis on tunable laser performances based on the tailorable microcavity structures and controlled excited-state gain processes of organic materials toward integrated photonic applications. Organic π-conjugated molecules with weak intermolecular interactions readily assemble into regular nanostructures that can serve as high-quality optical microcavities for the strong confinement of photons. On the basis of rational material design, a series of optical microcavities with different structures have been controllably synthesized. These microcavity nanostructures can be endowed with effective four-level dynamic gain processes, such as excited-state intramolecular charge transfer, excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, and excimer processes, that exhibit large dipole optical transitions for strongly active gain behaviors. By tailoring these excited-state processes with molecular/crystal engineering and external stimuli, people have effectively

  20. Biosafe nanoscale pharmaceutical adjuvant materials.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-09-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes.

  1. Biosafe Nanoscale Pharmaceutical Adjuvant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes. PMID:25429253

  2. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators.

    PubMed

    Agio, Mario

    2012-02-07

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate sub-wavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review the designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interactions, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  3. Systems engineering at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason J.; Breidenich, Jennifer L.; Wei, Michael C.; Clatterbaughi, Guy V.; Keng, Pei Yuin; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Nanomaterials have provided some of the greatest leaps in technology over the past twenty years, but their relatively early stage of maturity presents challenges for their incorporation into engineered systems. Perhaps even more challenging is the fact that the underlying physics at the nanoscale often run counter to our physical intuition. The current state of nanotechnology today includes nanoscale materials and devices developed to function as components of systems, as well as theoretical visions for "nanosystems," which are systems in which all components are based on nanotechnology. Although examples will be given to show that nanomaterials have indeed matured into applications in medical, space, and military systems, no complete nanosystem has yet been realized. This discussion will therefore focus on systems in which nanotechnology plays a central role. Using self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia as an example, we will discuss how systems engineering concepts apply to nanotechnology.

  4. Trap state passivation improved hot-carrier instability by zirconium-doping in hafnium oxide in a nanoscale n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistors with high-k/metal gate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hsi-Wen; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Ye, Yi-Han

    2016-04-25

    This work investigates the effect on hot carrier degradation (HCD) of doping zirconium into the hafnium oxide high-k layer in the nanoscale high-k/metal gate n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors. Previous n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistor studies demonstrated that zirconium-doped hafnium oxide reduces charge trapping and improves positive bias temperature instability. In this work, a clear reduction in HCD is observed with zirconium-doped hafnium oxide because channel hot electron (CHE) trapping in pre-existing high-k bulk defects is the main degradation mechanism. However, this reduced HCD became ineffective at ultra-low temperature, since CHE traps in the deeper bulk defects at ultra-low temperature, while zirconium-doping only passivates shallow bulk defects.

  5. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-21

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  6. Nanoscale deformation mechanisms in bone.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himadri S; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Zickler, Gerald A; Raz-Ben Aroush, D; Funari, Sérgio S; Roschger, Paul; Wagner, H Daniel; Fratzl, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Deformation mechanisms in bone matrix at the nanoscale control its exceptional mechanical properties, but the detailed nature of these processes is as yet unknown. In situ tensile testing with synchrotron X-ray scattering allowed us to study directly and quantitatively the deformation mechanisms at the nanometer level. We find that bone deformation is not homogeneous but distributed between a tensile deformation of the fibrils and a shearing in the interfibrillar matrix between them.

  7. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-01

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  8. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  9. Nanoscale Thermal Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-15

    loy , but was never lower than that of the alloy, which is in contrast with previous observations. Clearly, the mismatch in acoustic impedance between Si...of the corresponding al- loy . It was suggested that this was due to phonon band-gap effects. However, Touzelbaev et al.132 did not find any sig...new materials and process methods ~e.g., Si al- loys , polymers, and 3D structures! also contribute to the measurement challenge. Effective control of

  10. Nanoscale design of Ni-Al shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, Arun K; Sun, C T

    2009-02-25

    Nanoscale design of Ni-Al alloys was performed to optimize the phase transformation behavior. The distribution of nickel and aluminum atoms was identified as a key parameter in the phase transformation process. A design criterion based on thermal expansion asymmetry was proposed. The effectiveness of the design criterion was validated using molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. An investigation of the effects of history dependent damage in time dependent fracture mechanics: nano-scale studies of damage evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W. Jr; Mohan, R.; Yang, Y.P.; Oh, J.; Katsube, N.

    2002-12-01

    High-temperature operation of technical engineering systems is critical for system efficiency, and will be a key driver in the future US DOE energy policy. Developing an understanding of high-temperature creep and creep-fatigue failure processes is a key driver for the research work described here. The focus is on understanding the high-temperature deformation and damage development on the nano-scale (50 to 500 nm) level. The high-temperature damage development process, especially with regard to low and high cyclic loading, which has received little attention to date, is studied. Damage development under cyclic loading develops in a fashion quite different from the constant load situation. The development of analytical methodologies so that high-temperature management of new systems can be realized is the key goal of this work.

  12. Application of the self-consistent quantum method for simulating the size quantization effect in the channel of a nano-scale dual gate MOSFET

    SciTech Connect

    Pratap, Surender; Sarkar, Niladri

    2015-06-24

    Self-Consistent Quantum Method using Schrodinger-Poisson equations have been used for determining the Channel electron density of Nano-Scale MOSFETs for 6nm and 9nm thick channels. The 6nm thick MOSFET show the peak of the electron density at the middle where as the 9nm thick MOSFET shows the accumulation of the electrons at the oxide/semiconductor interface. The electron density in the channel is obtained from the diagonal elements of the density matrix; [ρ]=[1/(1+exp(β(H − μ)))] A Tridiagonal Hamiltonian Matrix [H] is constructed for the oxide/channel/oxide 1D structure for the dual gate MOSFET. This structure is discretized and Finite-Difference method is used for constructing the matrix equation. The comparison of these results which are obtained by Quantum methods are done with Semi-Classical methods.

  13. Nanoscale Microelectronic Circuit Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-17

    using conventional ring-oscillator-like structures, for process portability. Such low-power high- 10 speed links will be useful for massively parallel...systems MESFET Metal-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor MHz Megahertz MIMO Multiple input, multiple output MOSFET Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field

  14. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A. Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2γ/R, with γ the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  15. Transport and structure in nanoscale channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, Gregory William

    Driven by the rapidly advancing fields of nano- and biotechnology, there has been an explosion of interest in molecular transport and structure formation on small length scales. A canonical model for the transport of particles along one dimensional pathways in nanoscale channels is the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process (TASEP). After introducing the standard TASEP, modifications of the TASEP designed to increase its utility in modeling biological transport processes are described. One variant of the TASEP is particularly suitable for modeling protein translation, and the results of using this variant to investigate the effects of slow-codons on the translation process are discussed. A related topic is the voltage-driven translocation of DNA hairpins through membrane-embedded nanopores. Motivated by recent experiments, a stochastic model is developed that couples the translocation and dehybridization of the DNA hairpin. This model is used to explore the behaviour of the mean translocation time of hairpins as a function of driving voltage, and two translocation mechanisms are identified and discussed. Finally, the adsorption and equilibrium structures of water in the interior of ion-bearing nanoscale pores are considered. The behaviour of water and ions under confinement is critical to the functioning of biological ion channels and nanoporous filters. Here, the adsorption isotherms of water are examined, and the layered structures formed by the confined water are described.

  16. Nanoscale characterization of crystallinity in DSA® coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmgren, C.; Hummelgård, M.; Bäckström, J.; Cornell, A.; Olin, H.

    2008-03-01

    Dimensionally Stable Anodes (DSA®) are used for industrial production of e.g. chlorine and chlorate. It is known that the superior electrocatalytical properties of DSA® is due to the large effective area of the porous coating. However, this knowledge is mainly found from in situ electrochemical measurements. Here, we used ex situ methods, AFM, TEM and gas porosimetry, for characterization at the nanoscale. The DSA® coating was found to consist of mono-crystalline grains with a size of 20-30 nm and with pores of about 10 nm in diameter. Using a simple geometrical model an effective area was calculated. For a typical coating thickness, an increase of about 1000 times in the effective surface area was found, which is consistent with in situ estimations. These results suggest that the dominating source of surface enlargement is due to nano-crystallinity.

  17. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  18. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (<200 mV/decade). Scale analysis was used to successfully account for disparities observed among a number of sample devices. N-type conduction was found in all NWFETs with

  19. Quantifying dissipative contributions in nanoscale interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Sergio; Gadelrab, Karim R.; Souier, Tewfik; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Imaging with nanoscale resolution has become routine practice with the use of scanning probe techniques. Nevertheless, quantification of material properties and processes has been hampered by the complexity of the tip-surface interaction and the dependency of the dynamics on operational parameters. Here, we propose a framework for the quantification of the coefficients of viscoelasticity, surface energy, surface energy hysteresis and elastic modulus. Quantification of these parameters at the nanoscale will provide a firm ground to the understanding and modelling of tribology and nanoscale sciences with true nanoscale resolution.

  20. Nanoscale thermal fluctuation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, Patrick Louis

    The utilization of thermal fluctuations or Johnson/Nyquist noise as a spectroscopic method to determine transport properties in conductors or semiconductors is developed in this paper. The autocorrelation function is obtained from power spectral density measurements thus enabling electronic transport property calculation through the Green-Kubo formalism. This experimental approach is distinct from traditional numerical methods such as molecular dynamics simulations, which have been used to extract the autocorrelation function and directly related physics only. This work reports multi-transport property measurements consisting of the electronic relaxation time, resistivity, mobility, diffusion coefficient, electronic contribution to thermal conductivity and Lorenz number from experimental data. Double validation of the experiment was accomplished through the use of a standard reference material and a standard measurement method, i.e. four-probe collinear resistivity technique. The advantages to this new experimental technique include the elimination of any required thermal or potential gradients, multi-transport property measurements within one experiment, very low error and the ability to apply controlled boundary conditions while gathering data. This research has experimentally assessed the gas pressure and flow effects of helium and argon on 30 nm Au and Cu thin films. The results show a reduction in Au and Cu electronic thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity when subjected to helium and argon pressure and flow. The perturbed electronic transport coefficients, attributed to increased electron scattering at the surface, were so dominant that further data was collected through straight-forward resistance measurements. The resistance data confirmed the thermal noise measurements thus lending considerable evidence to the presence of thin film surface scattering due to elastic and inelastic gas particle scattering effects with the electron ensemble. Keywords

  1. Nanoscale engineering materials by supercritical fluid and atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qing

    , complex coaxial Al2O3/ZnO/Al2O3 multilayed microtubular structure is fabricated, which provides an unique platform to study the solid state reaction and diffusion process (Kirkendall Effect) between Al2 O3 shells and the confined middle ZnO layers by annealing the samples at 700°C. (6) The extension of ALD-MLD process of polyamides, zinc hybrid, aminosilane self assembly monolayers were studied by various techniques to illustrate the surface reaction mechanism.

  2. Nanoscale Deformable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Several missions and instruments in the conceptual design phase rely on the technique of interferometry to create detectable fringe patterns. The intimate emplacement of reflective material upon electron device cells based upon chalcogenide material technology permits high-speed, predictable deformation of the reflective surface to a subnanometer or finer resolution with a very high degree of accuracy. In this innovation, a layer of reflective material is deposited upon a wafer containing (perhaps in the millions) chalcogenic memory cells with the reflective material becoming the front surface of a mirror and the chalcogenic material becoming a means of selectively deforming the mirror by the application of heat to the chalcogenic material. By doing so, the mirror surface can deform anywhere from nil to nanometers in spots the size of a modern day memory cell, thereby permitting realtime tuning of mirror focus and reflectivity to mitigate aberrations caused elsewhere in the optical system. Modern foundry methods permit the design and manufacture of individual memory cells having an area of or equal to the Feature (F) size of the design (assume 65 nm). Fabrication rules and restraints generally require the instantiation of one memory cell to another no closer than 1.5 F, or, for this innovation, 90 nm from its neighbor in any direction. Chalcogenide is a semiconducting glass compound consisting of a combination of chalcogen ions, the ratios of which vary according to properties desired. It has been shown that the application of heat to cells of chalcogenic material cause a large alteration in resistance to the range of 4 orders of magnitude. It is this effect upon which chalcogenidebased commercial memories rely. Upon removal of the heat source, the chalcogenide rapidly cools and remains frozen in the excited state. It has also been shown that the chalcogenide expands in volume because of the applied heat, meaning that the coefficient of expansion of chalcogenic

  3. Nanoscale surface cues and in vitro neuronal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Yoonkey; Jang, Min Jee; Kang, Kyungtae; Choi, Insung S.

    2012-10-01

    Nerve cells (neurons) have been used for a convenient and effective model for basic neurobiology and it has also served as a test bed for the development of neural prosthetic devices. The characterization of neuronal growth in vitro has become an important part of neural tissue engineering. In this talk, I will present recent progresses on the investigation of nano-scale effects on neuronal growth in vitro. Hippocampal neurons from a small brain tissue dissected from E-18 (embryonic stage 18 days) Sprague-Dawley rat were used as a developing neuron model. They were seeded on substrates with carbon nanotube patterned glass substrates, anodized aluminum oxide surfaces with two different pitch sizes (60 nm, 400 nm), and silica nano bead surfaces with five different bead sizes (110, 190, 320, 480, 670 nm). These surfaces uniquely defined nano-scale surfaces with different topographical features. We observed longer neurite outgrowth and faster neuronal development on nano-scale surfaces compared to plain glass surfaces. The results from nano-scale cell culture platforms will be useful to understand nano-environments of the brain during the early neural developments. In addition, the promoted neuronal development could be further applied for neural tissue scaffolds or implantable neural interface systems.

  4. Spin transfer torque and dc bias magnetic field effects on the magnetization reversal time of nanoscale ferromagnets at very low damping: Mean first-passage time versus numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, D. J.; Coffey, W. T.; Dowling, W. J.; Kalmykov, Y. P.; Titov, S. V.

    2016-02-01

    Spin transfer torque and bias field effects on the magnetization reversal time of a nanoscale ferromagnet are investigated in the very-low-damping regime via the energy-controlled diffusion equation. That equation is rooted in a generalization of the Kramers escape rate theory for point Brownian particles in a potential to the magnetic relaxation of a macrospin. Using the mean first-passage method, the reversal time is then evaluated in closed integral form for a nanomagnet with the free-energy density given in the standard form of superimposed easy-plane and in-plane easy-axis anisotropies with the dc bias field along the easy axis. The results completely agree with those yielded by independent numerical methods.

  5. Fine tuning of activity for nanoscale catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; van derVliet, D.; Lucas, C.; Karapetrov, G.; Markovic, N.; Stamenkovic, V.; Materials Science Division

    2008-01-01

    Ability to tune the electronic and structural properties of nanocatalysts can potentially lead towards the superior catalytic enhancement that was reported for the Pt{sub 3}Ni(111)-skin surface. Here we report investigation of the extended well-defined surfaces of Pt and PtM alloys (M=Ni,Co,Fe,V,Ti,Re) as well as Pt(hkl) single crystalline surfaces for various catalytic reaction. The electrode surfaces were initially characterized in ultra-high vacuum by AES, LEIS and UPS before controlled transfer into electrochemical environment. Catalytic properties have been determined in three compartment electrochemical cell for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by rotational disk electrode technique. The single crystalline surfaces of Pt electrodes have been used to benchmark the activity range that could be expected on pure Pt electrodes. We have proposed that surface modifications induced by the second metal, and consequent catalytic enhancements could occur through the following effects: (1) Electronic effect, due to changes in the metallic d-band center position vs. Fermi level; and (2) Structural effect, which reflects relationship between atomic geometry, and/or surface chemistry, i.e., dissolution - surface roughening. It has been reported that Pt bimetallic alloys, could form surfaces with two different compositions. Due to surface segregation annealed surfaces can form the outermost Pt-skin surface layer, while the lightly sputtered surfaces have the bulk ratio of alloying components and form Pt-skeleton outermost layers as a result of dissolution of non-precious atoms. In principle, different near-surface compositions (Pt-skin, Pt-skeleton and polycrystalline Pt) have been found to have different electronic structures. Modification in Pt electronic properties alters adsorption/catalytic properties of corresponding materials. The most active systems for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are established to be the Pt-skin near-surface formation. The

  6. Young's Equation at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seveno, David; Blake, Terence D.; De Coninck, Joël

    2013-08-01

    In 1805, Thomas Young was the first to propose an equation to predict the value of the equilibrium contact angle of a liquid on a solid. Today, the force exerted by a liquid on a solid, such as a flat plate or fiber, is routinely used to assess this angle. Moreover, it has recently become possible to study wetting at the nanoscale using an atomic force microscope. Here, we report the use of molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the force distribution along a 15 nm fiber dipped into a liquid meniscus. We find very good agreement between the measured force and that predicted by Young’s equation.

  7. Preface: Friction at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusc, Claudio; Smith, Roger; Urbakh, Michael; Vanossi, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    Interfacial friction is one of the oldest problems in physics and chemistry, and certainly one of the most important from a practical point of view. Everyday operations on a broad range of scales, from nanometer and up, depend upon the smooth and satisfactory functioning of countless tribological systems. Friction imposes serious constraints and limitations on the performance and lifetime of micro-machines and, undoubtedly, will impose even more severe constraints on the emerging technology of nano-machines. Standard lubrication techniques used for large objects are expected to be less effective in the nano-world. Novel methods for control and manipulation are therefore needed. What has been missing is a molecular level understanding of processes occurring between and close to interacting surfaces to help understand, and later manipulate friction. Friction is intimately related to both adhesion and wear, and all three require an understanding of highly non-equilibrium processes occurring at the molecular level to determine what happens at the macroscopic level. Due to its practical importance and the relevance to basic scientific questions there has been major increase in activity in the study of interfacial friction on the microscopic level during the last decade. Intriguing structural and dynamical features have been observed experimentally. These observations have motivated theoretical efforts, both numerical and analytical. This special issue focusses primarily on discussion of microscopic mechanisms of friction and adhesion at the nanoscale level. The contributions cover many important aspects of frictional behaviour, including the origin of stick-slip motion, the dependence of measured forces on the material properties, effects of thermal fluctuations, surface roughness and instabilities in boundary lubricants on both static and kinetic friction. An important problem that has been raised in this issue, and which has still to be resolved, concerns the

  8. Recent advances in superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems.

    PubMed

    Nagappan, Saravanan; Park, Sung Soo; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2014-02-01

    This review describes the recent advances in the field of superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems. The term superhydrophobic is defined from the surface properties when the surface shows the contact angle (CA) higher than 150 degrees. This could be well known from the lotus effect due to the non-stick and self-cleaning properties of the lotus leaf (LL). We briefly introduced the methods of preparing superhydrophobic surfaces using top-down approaches, bottom-up approaches and a combination of top-down and bottom-up approaches and various ways to prepare superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems using the bio-inspired materials, polymer nanocomposites, metal nanoparticles graphene oxide (GO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We also pointed out the recent applications of the superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems in oil-spill capture and separations, self-cleaning and self-healing systems, bio-medicals, anti-icing and anti-corrosive, electronics, catalysis, textile fabrics and papers etc. The review also highlights the visionary outlook for the future development and use of the superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems for a wide variety of applications.

  9. Nanoscale Membrane Curvature detected by Polarized Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Christopher; Maarouf, Abir; Woodward, Xinxin

    Nanoscale membrane curvature is a necessary component of countless cellular processes. Here we present Polarized Localization Microscopy (PLM), a super-resolution optical imaging technique that enables the detection of nanoscale membrane curvature with order-of-magnitude improvements over comparable optical techniques. PLM combines the advantages of polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence localization microscopy to reveal single-fluorophore locations and orientations without reducing localization precision by point spread function manipulation. PLM resolved nanoscale membrane curvature of a supported lipid bilayer draped over polystyrene nanoparticles on a glass coverslip, thus creating a model membrane with coexisting flat and curved regions and membrane radii of curvature as small as 20 nm. Further, PLM provides single-molecule trajectories and the aggregation of curvature-inducing proteins with super-resolution to reveal the correlated effects of membrane curvature, dynamics, and molecular sorting. For example, cholera toxin subunit B has been observed to induce nanoscale membrane budding and concentrate at the bud neck. PLM reveals a previously hidden and critical information of membrane topology.

  10. ToF-SIMS imaging of the nanoscale phase separation in polymeric light emitting diodes: effect of nanostructure on device efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bang-Ying; Kuo, Che-Hung; Wang, Wei-Ben; Yen, Guo-Ji; Iida, Shin-ichi; Chen, Sun-Zen; Lin, Wei-Chun; Lee, Szu-Hsian; Kao, Wei-Lun; Liu, Chia-Yi; Chang, Hsun-Yun; You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chi-Jen; Liu, Chi-Ping; Jou, Jwo-Huei; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2011-02-21

    The nanostructure of the light emissive layer (EL) of polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) was investigated using force modulation microscopy (FMM) and scanning time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) excited with focused Bi(3)(2+) primary beam. Three-dimensional nanostructures were reconstructed from high resolution ToF-SIMS images acquired with different C(60)(+) sputtering times. The observed nanostructure is related to the efficiency of the PLED. In poly(9-vinyl-carbazole) (PVK) based EL, a high processing temperature (60 °C) yielded less nanoscale phase separation than a low processing temperature (30 °C). This nanostructure can be further suppressed by replacing the host polymer with poly[oxy(3-(9H-9-carbazol-9-ilmethyl-2-methyltrimethylene)] (SL74) and poly[3-(carbazol-9-ylmethyl)-3-methyloxetane] (RS12), which have similar chemical structures and energy levels as PVK. The device efficiency increases when the phase separation inside the EL is suppressed. While the spontaneous formation of a bicontinuous nanostructure inside the active layer is known to provide a path for charge carrier transportation and to be the key to highly efficient polymeric solar cells, these nanostructures are less efficient for trapping the carrier inside the EL and thus lower the power conversion efficiency of the PLED devices.

  11. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  12. Endocytosis of Nanoscale Systems for Cancer Treatments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Li, Xue; Zhu, Hongyan; Gong, Qiyong; Luo, Kui

    2017-04-28

    Advances of nanoscale systems for cancer treatment have been involved in enabling highly regulated site-specific localization to sub cellular organelles hidden beneath cell membranes. Thus far, the cellular entry of these nanoscale systems has been not fully understood. Endocytosisis a form of active transport in which cell transports elected extracellular molecules (such as proteins, viruses, micro-organisms and nanoscale systems) are allowed into cell interiors by engulfing them in an energy-dependent process. This process appears at the plasma membrane surface and contains internalization of the cell membrane as well as the membrane proteins and lipids of cell. There are multiform pathways of endocytosis for nanoscale systems. Further comprehension for the mechanisms of endocytosis is achieved with a combination of efficient genetic manipulations, cell dynamic imaging, and chemical endocytosis inhibitors. This review provides an account of various endocytic pathways, itemizes current methods to study endocytosis of nanoscale systems, discusses some factors associated with cellular uptake for nanoscale systems and introduces the trafficking behavior for nanoscale systems with active targeting. An insight into the endocytosis mechanism is urgent and significant for developing safe and efficient nanoscale systems for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. An approach to the impact of nanoscale vat coloration of cotton on reducing agent account.

    PubMed

    Hakeim, O A; Nassar, S H; Raghab, A A; Abdou, L A W

    2013-02-15

    Aqueous dispersions of nanoscale vat dyes were successfully prepared through ball milling and ultrasonication of three test dyes in the presence of dispersing agent. Critical factors included the time of ball milling and ultrasonication and the molecular structure of the vat dyes have been studied. These dispersions were characterized by morphological structures with particle size determination and quality was evaluated by shelf-life stability using digital images. The nanoscale vat dyes have been applied in dyeing and printing of cotton to evaluate the effect of nanoscale dispersion on the reducing agent account and the difference of coloration performance of a nanoscale and conventionally dispersed vat dyes. Results showed that use of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) maintained a high stability of dispersion with storage. The size and stability of nanoscale dispersion were greatly influenced by molecular structure of the vat dyes. Ultrasonication was helpful in decreasing average particle size. Nanoscale vat dye dispersions gave a much higher color yield than conventional vat dyes. Fastness properties were excellent for washing effects. It is clear that coloration using nanoscale vat dye dispersions offer a number of advantages in terms of reducing agent requirement, improved appearance and also in environmental protection.

  14. Nanoscale magnetic heat pumps and engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Bretzel, Stefan; Brataas, Arne; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2010-01-01

    We present the linear-response matrix for a sliding domain wall in a rotatable magnetic nanowire, which is driven out of equilibrium by temperature and voltage bias, mechanical torque, and magnetic field. An expression for heat-current-induced domain-wall motion is derived. Application of Onsager’s reciprocity relation leads to a unified description of the Barnett and Einstein-de Haas effects as well as spin-dependent thermoelectric properties. We envisage various heat pumps and engines, such as coolers driven by magnetic fields or mechanical rotation as well as nanoscale motors that convert temperature gradients into useful work. All parameters (with the exception of mechanical friction) can be computed microscopically by the scattering theory of transport.

  15. Plasmonically enhanced photoluminescence of nanoscale semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Gabrielle; Tejerina, Alejandro; Churchill, Hugh; Bajwa, Pooja; Heyes, Collin; Herzog, Joseph B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent work has shown that plasmonic structures enhance the emitted light of nanoscale semiconductor materials, such as the photoluminescence of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and MoS2 2D materials. This project will compare the photoluminescence of CdSe colloidal quantum dots and MoS2. A variety of studies will be performed such as photobleaching effects, how photoluminescence relates to lifetime of sample, and polarization studies. In addition, this project will further the understanding of plasmonically enhanced photoluminescence between these semiconductor nanostructures and metal nanostructures. Initial studies will drop cast colloidal metal nanospheres onto quantum dots and MoS2, while future work will fabricate gold structures with electron beam lithography.

  16. Surface Properties from Transconductance in Nanoscale Systems.

    PubMed

    Lynall, David; Byrne, Kristopher; Shik, Alexander; Nair, Selvakumar V; Ruda, Harry E

    2016-10-12

    Because of the continued scaling of transistor dimensions and incorporation of nanostructured materials into modern electronic and optoelectronic devices, surfaces and interfaces have become a dominant factor dictating material properties and device performance. In this study, we investigate the temperature-dependent electronic transport properties of InAs nanowire field-effect transistors. A point where the nanowire conductance becomes independent of temperature is observed, known as the zero-temperature-coefficient. The distribution of surface states is determined by a spectral analysis of the conductance activation energy and used to develop a carrier transport model that explains the existence and gate voltage dependence of this point. We determine that the position of this point in gate voltage is directly related to the fixed oxide charge on the nanowire surface and demonstrate the utility of this method for studying surface passivations in nanoscale systems by characterizing (NH4)2Sx and H2 plasma surface treatments on InAs nanowires.

  17. Nanoscale characterization of engineered cementitious composites (ECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakulich, Aaron Richard Li, Victor C.

    2011-02-15

    Engineered cementitious composites (ECC) are ultra-ductile fiber-reinforced cementitious composites. The nanoscale chemical and mechanical properties of three ECC formulae (one standard formula, and two containing nanomaterial additives) were studied using nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Nanoindentation results highlight the difference in modulus between bulk matrix ({approx} 30 GPa) and matrix/fiber interfacial transition zones as well as between matrix and unreacted fly ash ({approx} 20 GPa). The addition of carbon black or carbon nanotubes produced little variation in moduli when compared to standard M45-ECC. The indents were observed by electron microscopy; no trace of the carbon black particles could be found, but nanotubes, including nanotubes bridging cracks, were easily located in ultrafine cracks near PVA fibers. Elemental analysis failed to show a correlation between modulus and chemical composition, implying that factors such as porosity have more of an effect on mechanical properties than elemental composition.

  18. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  19. Synthesis of MoS2 @C Nanotubes Via the Kirkendall Effect with Enhanced Electrochemical Performance for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqian; Li, Xiaona; Liang, Jianwen; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-05-01

    A MoS2 @C nanotube composite is prepared through a facile hydrothermal method, in which the MoS2 nanotube and amorphous carbon are generated synchronically. When evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIB), the MoS2 @C nanotube manifests an enhanced capacity of 1327 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 C with high initial Coulombic efficiency (ICE) of 92% and with capacity retention of 1058.4 mA h g(-1) (90% initial capacity retention) after 300 cycles at a rate of 0.5 C. A superior rate capacity of 850 mA h g(-1) at 5 C is also obtained. As for sodium ion batteries, a specific capacity of 480 mA h g(-1) at 0.5 C is achieved after 200 cycles. The synchronically formed carbon and stable hollow structure lead to the long cycle stability, high ICE, and superior rate capability. The good electrochemical behavior of MoS2 @C nanotube composite suggests its potential application in high-energy LIB. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations using electron microscopy: Light-localization properties of biological cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen

    2010-12-13

    We report a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of heterogeneous optical dielectric media, including nanomaterials and biological cells, by quantifying their nanoscale light-localization properties. Transmission electron microscope images of the media are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. Light-localization properties are studied by the statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. We validated IPR analysis using nanomaterials as models of disordered systems fabricated from dielectric nanoparticles. As an example, we then applied such analysis to distinguish between cells with different degrees of aggressive malignancy.

  1. Engineering Platinum Alloy Electrocatalysts in Nanoscale for PEMFC Application

    SciTech Connect

    He, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Fuel cells are expected to be a key next-generation energy source used for vehicles and homes, offering high energy conversion efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. However, due to large overpotentials on anode and cathode, the efficiency is still much lower than theoretically predicted. During the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate synergy effect of platinum alloyed with base metals. But, engineering the alloy particles in nanoscale has been a challenge. Most important challenges in developing nanostructured materials are the abilities to control size, monodispersity, microcomposition, and even morphology or self-assembly capability, so called Nanomaterials-by-Design, which requires interdisciplinary collaborations among computational modeling, chemical synthesis, nanoscale characterization as well as manufacturing processing. Electrocatalysts, particularly fuel cell catalysts, are dramatically different from heterogeneous catalysts because the surface area in micropores cannot be electrochemically controlled on the same time scale as more transport accessible surfaces. Therefore, electrocatalytic architectures need minimal microporous surface area while maximizing surfaces accessible through mesopores or macropores, and to "pin" the most active, highest performance physicochemical state of the materials even when exposed to thermodynamic forces, which would otherwise drive restructuring, crystallization, or densification of the nanoscale materials. In this presentation, results of engineering nanoscale platinum alloy particles down to 2 ~ 4 nm will be discussed. Based on nature of alloyed base metals, various synthesis technologies have been studied and developed to achieve capabilities of controlling particle size and particle microcomposition, namely, core-shell synthesis, microemulsion technique, thermal decomposition process, surface organometallic chemical method, etc. The results show that by careful engineering the

  2. Effect of nanoscale zero-valent iron and magnetite (Fe3O4) on the fate of metals during anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    PubMed

    Suanon, Fidèle; Sun, Qian; Mama, Daouda; Li, Jiangwei; Dimon, Biaou; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the most widely used processes to stabilize waste sewage sludge and produce biogas renewable energy. In this study, two different iron nanoparticles [nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and magnetite (Fe3O4)] were used in the mesophilic AD processes (37 ± 1 °C) to improve biogas production. In addition, changes of heavy metal (Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr) speciation during AD of sludge with and without iron nanoparticles have been investigated. Concentrations of metals in the initial sludge were as follows: 63.1, 73.4, 1102.2, 2060.3, 483.9 and 604.1 mg kg(-1) (dry sludge basis) for Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, respectively. Sequential fractionation showed that metals were predominantly bonded to organic matter and carbonates in the initial sludge. Compared with AD without iron nanoparticles, the application of iron nanoparticles (at dose of 0.5% in this study) showed positive impact not only on biogas production, but also on improvement of metals stabilization in the digestate. Metals were found concentrated in Fe-Mn bound and residual fractions and little was accumulated in the liquid digestate and most mobile fractions of solid digestate (water soluble, exchangeable and carbonates bound). Therefore, iron nanoparticles when properly used, could improve not only biogas yield, but also regulate and control the mobilization of metals during AD process. However, our study also observed that iron nanoparticles could promote the immobilization of phosphorus within the sludge during AD, and more research is needed to fully address the mechanism behind this phenomenon and the impact on future phosphorus reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Lawrence H; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties-all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts.

  4. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts. PMID:27330220

  5. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-03-21

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts.

  6. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; ...

    2015-03-18

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. Our mini review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reducemore » angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.« less

  7. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-18

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. Our mini review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  8. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods. PMID:25816102

  9. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  10. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-04-01

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  11. Nanoscale metal-organic materials.

    PubMed

    Carné, Arnau; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic materials are found to be a fascinating novel class of functional nanomaterials. The limitless combinations between inorganic and organic building blocks enable researchers to synthesize 0- and 1-D metal-organic discrete nanostructures with varied compositions, morphologies and sizes, fabricate 2-D metal-organic thin films and membranes, and even structure them on surfaces at the nanometre length scale. In this tutorial review, the synthetic methodologies for preparing these miniaturized materials as well as their potential properties and future applications are discussed. This review wants to offer a panoramic view of this embryonic class of nanoscale materials that will be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working in chemistry, physics, medicine, nanotechnology, materials chemistry, etc., in the next years.

  12. Nanoscale Engineering of Designer Cellulosomes.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Melissabye; Cazade, Pierre-André; Galera-Prat, Albert; Nash, Michael A; Czjzek, Mirjam; Cieplak, Marek; Alvarez, Beatriz; Aguilar, Marina; Karpol, Alon; Gaub, Hermann; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Bayer, Edward A; Thompson, Damien

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalysts showcase the upper limit obtainable for high-speed molecular processing and transformation. Efforts to engineer functionality in synthetic nanostructured materials are guided by the increasing knowledge of evolving architectures, which enable controlled molecular motion and precise molecular recognition. The cellulosome is a biological nanomachine, which, as a fundamental component of the plant-digestion machinery from bacterial cells, has a key potential role in the successful development of environmentally-friendly processes to produce biofuels and fine chemicals from the breakdown of biomass waste. Here, the progress toward so-called "designer cellulosomes", which provide an elegant alternative to enzyme cocktails for lignocellulose breakdown, is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to rational design via computational modeling coupled with nanoscale characterization and engineering tools. Remaining challenges and potential routes to industrial application are put forward.

  13. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-11-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  14. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  15. Nanoscale structural modulation and enhanced room-temperature multiferroic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shujie; Huang, Yan; Wang, Guopeng; Wang, Jianlin; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran; Knize, Randy J.; Lu, Yalin

    2014-10-01

    Availability of a single-phase multiferroic material functional at room temperature poses a big challenge, although it is very important to both fundamental physics and application development. Recently, layered Aurivillius oxide materials, one of the most promising candidates, have attracted considerable interest. In this work, we investigated the nanoscale structural evolution of the six-layer Bi7Fe3-xCoxTi3O21 when substituting excessive Co. Nanoscale structural modulation (NSM) occurred at the boundaries when changing the material gradually from the originally designed six-layer nanoscale architecture down to five and then four, when increasing the Co content, inducing a previously unidentified analogous morphotropic transformation (AMT) effect. The AMT's net contribution to the enhanced intrinsic multiferroic properties at room temperature was confirmed by quantifying and deducting the contribution from the existing impurity phase using derivative thermo-magneto-gravimetry measurements (DTMG). Significantly, this new AMT effect may be caused by a possible coupling contribution from co-existing NSM phases, indicating a potential method for realizing multiferroic materials that function at room temperature.Availability of a single-phase multiferroic material functional at room temperature poses a big challenge, although it is very important to both fundamental physics and application development. Recently, layered Aurivillius oxide materials, one of the most promising candidates, have attracted considerable interest. In this work, we investigated the nanoscale structural evolution of the six-layer Bi7Fe3-xCoxTi3O21 when substituting excessive Co. Nanoscale structural modulation (NSM) occurred at the boundaries when changing the material gradually from the originally designed six-layer nanoscale architecture down to five and then four, when increasing the Co content, inducing a previously unidentified analogous morphotropic transformation (AMT) effect. The AMT

  16. BIOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF HEPATOTOXICITY IN BLOOD SERUM OF RATS UNDER THE EFFECT OF NOVEL 4-THIAZOLIDINONE DERIVATIVES AND DOXORUBICIN AND THEIR COMPLEXES WITH POLYETHYLENEGLYCOL-CONTAINING NANOSCALE POLYMERIC CARRIER.

    PubMed

    Kobylinska, L I; Havrylyuk, D Ya; Ryabtseva, A O; Mitina, N E; Zaichenko, O S; Lesyk, R B; Zimenkovsky, B S; Stoika, R S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of new synthetic 4-tiazolidinone derivatives (compounds 3882, 3288 and 3833) and doxorubicin (positive control) in free form and in their complexes with synthetic polyethyleneglycol-containing nanoscale polymeric carrier on the biochemical indicators of hepatotoxicity in blood serum of rats. The activity of enzymes considered as the markers of hepatotoxicity, as well as. the concentration of total protein, urea and creatinine were measured in blood serum of rats. It was found that after injection of investigated compounds the activities ofalanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and α-amylase increased in comparison to control. Doxorubicin injection was accompanied by 4-fold increase in the activity of γ-glutamyltransferase, and injection ofcompound 3833 led to 2.5-fold elevation ofthe activity of this enzyme. Complexation ofthese antineoplastic derivatives with a synthetic nanocarrier lowered the activity ofthe investigated enzymes substantially if compared to the effect of these compounds infreeform. The most evident decrease was measured for α-amylase, γ-glutamyltransferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities. The normalization of concentrations of total protein, urea and creatinine in blood serum of rats treated with complexes of the studied compounds with a polymeric carrier comparing with their introduction infreeform was also detected. Thus, the immobilization by novel polymeric carrier of anticancer drugs possessing high general toxicity in the treated organism mitigates their toxic effect, which is evident as normalization of specific biochemical indicators of the hepatodestructive effects of the anticancer drugs.

  17. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    compared with the as-produced nanotubes. The second day was dedicated to three more sessions: Characterization and excitations in nanostructures. Superconductivity at the nanoscale. Transport in low-dimensional electron systems and spin effects. The first session of this second day was opened by G Stefani with a lecture on Auger spectroscopies. Then E Perfetto showed the results of a study on electron correlations in carbon nanotubes and graphite from Auger spectroscopy. He determined the screened on-site Coulomb repulsion in graphite and single wall carbon nanotubes by measuring their Auger spectra and performing a new theoretical analysis based on an extended Cini-Sawatzky approach where only one fit parameter is employed. The experimental lineshape is very well reproduced by the theory and this allows the value of the screened on-site repulsion between 2p states to be determined, which is found to be 2.1 eV in graphite and 4.6 eV in nanotubes. The latter is robust by varying the nanotube radius from 1 to 2 nm. S Ugenti gave a presentation setting up a model aimed for the calculation of three-hole features like the ones due to core-valence-valence Auger decays following Coster-Kronig transitions. While several experiments made in the 1970s and in the 1990s on the Auger LMM spectra of transition metals showed the existence of these structures, a theory able to explain and predict them is still missing today. The described model is grounded on the one-step approach, but the use of a valence band fully below the Fermi level allowed the authors to treat their calculations in a three-step approach, so keeping in this exploratory work complications to a minimum. The Hamiltonian of the system is placed in an Anderson-like picture and the spectra are computed evaluating a three-body Green's function. Within this model one arrives to a simple and closed formula covering the whole range between weak and strong correlation. It is found that in general the satellites cover separated

  18. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  19. Molecular Control of the Nanoscale: Effect of Phosphine–Chalcogenide Reactivity on CdS–CdSe Nanocrystal Composition and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruberu, T. Purnima A.; Albright, Haley R.; Callis, Brandon; Ward, Brittney; Cisneros, Joana; Fan, Hua-Jun; Vela, Javier

    2012-04-22

    We demonstrate molecular control of nanoscale composition, alloying, and morphology (aspect ratio) in CdS–CdSe nanocrystal dots and rods by modulating the chemical reactivity of phosphine–chalcogenide precursors. Specific molecular precursors studied were sulfides and selenides of triphenylphosphite (TPP), diphenylpropylphosphine (DPP), tributylphosphine (TBP), trioctylphosphine (TOP), and hexaethylphosphorustriamide (HPT). Computational (DFT), NMR (31P and 77Se), and high-temperature crossover studies unambiguously confirm a chemical bonding interaction between phosphorus and chalcogen atoms in all precursors. Phosphine–chalcogenide precursor reactivity increases in the order: TPPE < DPPE < TBPE < TOPE < HPTE (E = S, Se). For a given phosphine, the selenide is always more reactive than the sulfide. CdS1–xSex quantum dots were synthesized via single injection of a R3PS–R3PSe mixture to cadmium oleate at 250 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV/Vis and PL optical spectroscopy reveal that relative R3PS and R3PSe reactivity dictates CdS1–xSex dot chalcogen content and the extent of radial alloying (alloys vs core/shells). CdS, CdSe, and CdS1–xSex quantum rods were synthesized by injection of a single R3PE (E = S or Se) precursor or a R3PS–R3PSe mixture to cadmium–phosphonate at 320 or 250 °C. XRD and TEM reveal that the length-to-diameter aspect ratio of CdS and CdSe nanorods is inversely proportional to R3PE precursor reactivity. Purposely matching or mismatching R3PS–R3PSe precursor reactivity leads to CdS1–xSex nanorods without or with axial composition gradients, respectively. We expect these observations will lead to scalable and highly predictable “bottom-up” programmed syntheses of finely heterostructured nanomaterials with well-defined architectures and properties that are tailored for precise applications.

  20. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  1. Nanoscale assembly of superconducting vortices with scanning tunnelling microscope tip

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jun-Yi; Gladilin, Vladimir N.; Tempere, Jacques; Xue, Cun; Devreese, Jozef T.; Van de Vondel, Joris; Zhou, Youhe; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    Vortices play a crucial role in determining the properties of superconductors as well as their applications. Therefore, characterization and manipulation of vortices, especially at the single-vortex level, is of great importance. Among many techniques to study single vortices, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) stands out as a powerful tool, due to its ability to detect the local electronic states and high spatial resolution. However, local control of superconductivity as well as the manipulation of individual vortices with the STM tip is still lacking. Here we report a new function of the STM, namely to control the local pinning in a superconductor through the heating effect. Such effect allows us to quench the superconducting state at nanoscale, and leads to the growth of vortex clusters whose size can be controlled by the bias voltage. We also demonstrate the use of an STM tip to assemble single-quantum vortices into desired nanoscale configurations. PMID:27934960

  2. Nanoscale manipulation of Ge nanowires by ion hammering

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel T; Romano, Lucia; Rudawski, Nicholas G; Holzworth, Monta R; Jones, Kevin S; Choi, S G

    2009-01-01

    Nanowires generated considerable interest as nanoscale interconnects and as active components of both electronic and electromechanical devices. However, in many cases, manipulation and modification of nanowires are required to realize their full potential. It is essential, for instance, to control the orientation and positioning of nanowires in some specific applications. This work demonstrates a simple method to reversibly control the shape and the orientation of Ge nanowires by using ion beams. Initially, crystalline nanowires were partially amorphized by 30 keY Ga+-implantation. After amorphization, viscous flow and plastic deformation occurred due to the ion hammering effect, causing the nanowires to bend toward the beam direction. The bending was reversed multiple times by ion-implanting the opposite side of the nanowires, resulting in straightening of the nanowires and subsequent bending in the opposite direction. This ion hammering effect demonstrates the detailed manipulation of nanoscale structures is possible through the use of ion irradiation.

  3. Nanoscale assembly of superconducting vortices with scanning tunnelling microscope tip.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jun-Yi; Gladilin, Vladimir N; Tempere, Jacques; Xue, Cun; Devreese, Jozef T; Van de Vondel, Joris; Zhou, Youhe; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2016-12-09

    Vortices play a crucial role in determining the properties of superconductors as well as their applications. Therefore, characterization and manipulation of vortices, especially at the single-vortex level, is of great importance. Among many techniques to study single vortices, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) stands out as a powerful tool, due to its ability to detect the local electronic states and high spatial resolution. However, local control of superconductivity as well as the manipulation of individual vortices with the STM tip is still lacking. Here we report a new function of the STM, namely to control the local pinning in a superconductor through the heating effect. Such effect allows us to quench the superconducting state at nanoscale, and leads to the growth of vortex clusters whose size can be controlled by the bias voltage. We also demonstrate the use of an STM tip to assemble single-quantum vortices into desired nanoscale configurations.

  4. Nanoscale depth reconstruction from defocus: within an optical diffraction model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yangjie; Wu, Chengdong; Dong, Zaili

    2014-10-20

    Depth from defocus (DFD) based on optical methods is an effective method for depth reconstruction from 2D optical images. However, due to optical diffraction, optical path deviation occurs, which results in blurring imaging. Blurring, in turn, results in inaccurate depth reconstructions using DFD. In this paper, a nanoscale depth reconstruction method using defocus with optical diffraction is proposed. A blurring model is proposed by considering optical diffraction, leading to a much higher accuracy in depth reconstruction. Firstly, Fresnel diffraction in an optical system is analyzed, and a relationship between intensity distribution and depth information is developed. Secondly, a blurring imaging model with relative blurring and heat diffusion is developed through curving fitting of a numerical model. In this way, a new DFD method with optical diffraction is proposed. Finally, experimental results show that this new algorithm is more effective for depth reconstruction on the nanoscale.

  5. Nanoscale semiconducting silicon as a nutritional food additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canham, L. T.

    2007-05-01

    Very high surface area silicon powders can be realized by high energy milling or electrochemical etching techniques. Such nanoscale silicon structures, whilst biodegradable in the human gastrointestinal tract, are shown to be remarkably stable in most foodstuffs and beverages. The potential for using silicon to improve the shelf life and bioavailability of specific nutrients in functional foods is highlighted. Published drug delivery data implies that the nanoentrapment of hydrophobic nutrients will significantly improve their dissolution kinetics, through a combined effect of nanostructuring and solid state modification. Nutrients loaded to date include vitamins, fish oils, lycopene and coenzyme Q10. In addition, there is growing published evidence that optimized release of orthosilicic acid, the biodegradation product of semiconducting silicon in the gut, offers beneficial effects with regard bone health. The utility of nanoscale silicon in the nutritional field shows early promise and is worthy of much further study.

  6. Magnetoresistive phenomena in nanoscale magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, John D.

    Nanomagnetic materials are playing an increasingly important role in modern technologies. A particular area of interest involves the interplay between magnetism and electric transport, i.e. magnetoresistive properties. Future generations of field sensors and memory elements will have to be on a length scale of a few nanometers or smaller. Magnetoresistive properties of such nanoscale objects exhibit novel features due to reduced dimensionality, complex surfaces and interfaces, and quantum effects. In this dissertation theoretical aspects of three such nanoscale magnetoresistive phenomena are discussed. Very narrow magnetic domain walls can strongly scatter electrons leading to an increased resistance. Specifically, this dissertation will cover the newly predicted effect of magnetic moment softening in magnetic nanocontacts or nanowires. Atomically thin domain walls in Ni exhibit a reduction, or softening, of the local magnetic moments due to the noncollinearity of the magnetization. This effect leads to a strong enhancement of the resistance of a domain wall. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consist of two ferromagnetic electrodes separated by a thin layer of insulating material through which current can be carried by electron tunneling. The resistance of an MTJ depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the two ferromagnetic layers, an effect known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). A first-principles analysis of CoFeB|MgO|CoFeB MTJs will be presented. Calculations reveal that it is energetically favorable for interstitial boron atoms to reside at the interface between the electrode and MgO tunneling barrier, which can be detrimental to the TMR effect. Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) is the change in resistance of a ferromagnetic system as the orientation of the magnetization is altered. In this dissertation, the focus will be on AMR in the tunneling regime. Specifically we will present new theoretical results on tunneling AMR (TAMR) in two

  7. Nanoscale Substances on the TSCA Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is to help the regulated community comply with the requirements of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Section 5 Premanufacturing Notice (PMN) Program for nanoscale chemical substances.

  8. EXAFS and XANES analysis of oxides at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Alexei; Chaboy, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide research activity at the nanoscale is triggering the appearance of new, and frequently surprising, materials properties in which the increasing importance of surface and interface effects plays a fundamental role. This opens further possibilities in the development of new multifunctional materials with tuned physical properties that do not arise together at the bulk scale. Unfortunately, the standard methods currently available for solving the atomic structure of bulk crystals fail for nanomaterials due to nanoscale effects (very small crystallite sizes, large surface-to-volume ratio, near-surface relaxation, local lattice distortions etc.). As a consequence, a critical reexamination of the available local-structure characterization methods is needed. This work discusses the real possibilities and limits of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis at the nanoscale. To this end, the present state of the art for the interpretation of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is described, including an advanced approach based on the use of classical molecular dynamics and its application to nickel oxide nanoparticles. The limits and possibilities of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine several effects associated with the nanocrystalline nature of materials are discussed in connection with the development of ZnO-based dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) and iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25485137

  9. Charge separation at nanoscale interfaces: Energy-level alignment including two-quasiparticle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huashan; Lin, Zhibin; Lusk, Mark T. Wu, Zhigang

    2014-10-21

    The universal and fundamental criteria for charge separation at interfaces involving nanoscale materials are investigated. In addition to the single-quasiparticle excitation, all the two-quasiparticle effects including exciton binding, Coulomb stabilization, and exciton transfer are considered, which play critical roles on nanoscale interfaces for optoelectronic applications. We propose a scheme allowing adding these two-quasiparticle interactions on top of the single-quasiparticle energy level alignment for determining and illuminating charge separation at nanoscale interfaces. Employing the many-body perturbation theory based on Green's functions, we quantitatively demonstrate that neglecting or simplifying these crucial two-quasiparticle interactions using less accurate methods is likely to predict qualitatively incorrect charge separation behaviors at nanoscale interfaces where quantum confinement dominates.

  10. Structural transitions in nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Mina

    In this work I investigate three different materials: nanoscale carbon systems, ferrofluid systems, and molecular-electronic devices. In particular, my study is focused on the theoretical understanding of structural changes and the associated electronic, mechanical, and magnetic properties of these materials. To study the equilibrium packing of fullerenes in carbon nanotube peapods optimization techniques were applied. In agreement with experimental measurements, my results for nanotubes containing fullerenes with 60--84 atoms indicate that the axial separation between the fullerenes is smaller than in the bulk crystal. The reduction of the inter-fullerene distance and also the structural relaxation of fullerenes result from a large internal pressure within the peapods. This naturally induced "static" pressure may qualify nanotubes as nanoscale autoclaves for chemical reactions. Combining total energy calculations with a search of phase space, I investigated the microscopic fusion mechanism of C60 fullerenes. I show that the (2+2) cycloaddition reaction, a necessary precursor for fullerene fusion, can be accelerated inside a nanotube. Fusion occurs along the minimum energy path as a finite sequence of Stone-Wales (SW) transformations. A detailed analysis of the transition states shows that Stone-Wales transformations are multi-step processes. I propose a new microscopic mechanism to explain the unusually fast fusion process of carbon nanotubes. The detailed pathway for two adjacent (5, 5) nanotubes to gradually merge into a (10, 10) tube, and the transition states have been identified. The propagation of the fused region is energetically favorable and proceeds in a morphology reminiscent of a Y-junction via a so called zipper mechanism, involving only SW bond rearrangements with low activation barriers. Using density functional theory, the equilibrium structure, stability, and electronic properties of nanostructured, hydrogen terminated diamond fragments have been

  11. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  13. Nanoscale refractive index fluctuations detected via sparse spectral microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, John E.; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Partial Wave Spectroscopic (PWS) Microscopy has proven effective at detecting nanoscale hallmarks of carcinogenesis in histologically normal-appearing cells. The current method of data analysis requires acquisition of a three-dimensional data cube, consisting of multiple images taken at different illumination wavelengths, limiting the technique to data acquisition on ~30 individual cells per slide. To enable high throughput data acquisition and whole-slide imaging, new analysis procedures were developed that require fewer wavelengths in the same 500-700nm range for spectral analysis. The nanoscale sensitivity of the new analysis techniques was validated (i) theoretically, using finite-difference time-domain solutions of Maxwell’s equations, as well as (ii) experimentally, by measuring nanostructural alterations associated with carcinogenesis in biological cells. PMID:27231596

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed.

  15. Instability of nanoscale metallic particles under electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhang, S. G.; Xia, M. X.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The stability of nano metallic glass under electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) was investigated. The most common voltage of TEM used in metallic materials characterization was either 200 kV or 300 kV. Both situations were investigated in this work. An amorphous metallic particle with a dimension of a few hundred nanometers was tested under 300 keV electron irradiation. New phase decomposed from the parent phase was observed. Moreover, a crystal particle with the same composition and dimension was tested under 200 keV irradiation. Decomposition process also occurred in this situation. Besides, crystal orientation modification was observed during irradiation. These results proved that the electron beam in TEM have an effect on the stability of nanoscale samples during long time irradiation. Atomic displacement was induced and diffusion was enhanced by electron irradiation. Thus, artifacts would be induced when a nanoscale metallic sample was characterized in TEM.

  16. Nanoscale refractive index fluctuations detected via sparse spectral microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chandler, John E; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    Partial Wave Spectroscopic (PWS) Microscopy has proven effective at detecting nanoscale hallmarks of carcinogenesis in histologically normal-appearing cells. The current method of data analysis requires acquisition of a three-dimensional data cube, consisting of multiple images taken at different illumination wavelengths, limiting the technique to data acquisition on ~30 individual cells per slide. To enable high throughput data acquisition and whole-slide imaging, new analysis procedures were developed that require fewer wavelengths in the same 500-700nm range for spectral analysis. The nanoscale sensitivity of the new analysis techniques was validated (i) theoretically, using finite-difference time-domain solutions of Maxwell's equations, as well as (ii) experimentally, by measuring nanostructural alterations associated with carcinogenesis in biological cells.

  17. Materials can be strengthened by nanoscale stacking faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Shen, Y. G.; Song, F.; Ke, F. J.; Bai, Y. L.; Lu, C.

    2015-05-01

    In contrast to the strength of single crystals, stacking faults (SFs) are usually an unfavorable factor that weakens materials. Using molecular-dynamics simulations, we find that parallel-spaced SFs can dramatically enhance the strength of zinc-blende SiC nanorods, which is even beyond that of their single-crystal counterparts. Strengthening is achieved by restricting dislocation activities between nanoscale neighboring SFs and its overall upward trend is dominated by the volume fraction of SFs. The similar strengthening mechanism is also found in face-centered-cubic metals and their alloys. It is more promising than the traditional methods of decreasing nanoscale grains or twins due to the inverse Hall-Petch effect. This study sheds light on the structural design of nanomaterials with high strength.

  18. Nanoscale Strontium Titanate Photocatalysts for Overall Water Splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Troy K.; Browning, Nigel D.; Osterloh, Frank

    2012-08-28

    SrTiO3 (STO) is a large band gap (3.2 eV) semiconductor that catalyzes the overall water splitting reaction under UV light irradiation in the presence of a NiO cocatalyst. As we show here, the reactivity persists in nanoscale particles of the material, although the process is less effective at the nanoscale. To reach these conclusions, Bulk STO, 30 ± 5 nm STO, and 6.5 ± 1 nm STO were synthesized by three different methods, their crystal structures verified with XRD and their morphology observed with HRTEM before and after NiO deposition. In connection with NiO, all samples split water into stoichiometric mixtures of H2 and O2, but the activity is decreasing from 28 μmol H2 g–1 h–1 (bulk STO), to 19.4 μmol H2 g–1 h–1 (30 nm STO), and 3.0 μmol H2 g–1 h–1 (6.5 nm STO). The reasons for this decrease are an increase of the water oxidation overpotential for the smaller particles and reduced light absorption due to a quantum size effect. Overall, these findings establish the first nanoscale titanate photocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  19. Nanoscale capacitance: A quantum tight-binding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Feng; Wu, Jian; Li, Yang; Lu, Jun-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Landauer-Buttiker formalism with the assumption of semi-infinite electrodes as reservoirs has been the standard approach in modeling steady electron transport through nanoscale devices. However, modeling dynamic electron transport properties, especially nanoscale capacitance, is a challenging problem because of dynamic contributions from electrodes, which is neglectable in modeling macroscopic capacitance and mesoscopic conductance. We implement a self-consistent quantum tight-binding model to calculate capacitance of a nano-gap system consisting of an electrode capacitance C‧ and an effective capacitance Cd of the middle device. From the calculations on a nano-gap made of carbon nanotube with a buckyball therein, we show that when the electrode length increases, the electrode capacitance C‧ moves up while the effective capacitance Cd converges to a value which is much smaller than the electrode capacitance C‧. Our results reveal the importance of electrodes in modeling nanoscale ac circuits, and indicate that the concepts of semi-infinite electrodes and reservoirs well-accepted in the steady electron transport theory may be not applicable in modeling dynamic transport properties.

  20. Microscopic Current Flow Patterns in Nanoscale Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Na; Bushong, Neil; Hatcher, Ryan; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2006-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale conductors has been studied extensively mainly using the stationary scattering approach. However, the dynamical nature of transport, and in particular, the flow patterns of the microscopic current through a nanoscale junction, have remained poorly understood. We apply a novel time-dependent transport approach [1], which combines closed and finite geometries with time-dependent density functional theory,to study current flow patterns in nanoscale quantum point contacts [2]. The results of both atomistic and jellium calculations show that surface charges form dynamically at the junction-electrode interfaces in both abrupt and adiabatic junctions. The curr ent exhibits some characteristics of a classical hydrodynamic liquid but also displays unique patterns arising from the interaction with the surface charges. We also investigate the effect of the flow velocity, charge density, and lattice structures on the electron dynamics. If time permits we also discuss the effects of the viscosity of the electron liquid [3]. Work supported by DOE (DE-FG02-05ER46204). [1] M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] N. Bushong, N. Sai and, M. Di Ventra, Nano Lett. (in press). [3] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale, and M. Di Ventra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005 ).

  1. Nanoscale imaging in DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology has developed powerful techniques for the construction of precisely defined molecular structures and machines, and nanoscale imaging methods have always been crucial for their experimental characterization. While initially atomic force microscopy (AFM) was the most widely employed imaging method for DNA-based molecular structures, in recent years a variety of other techniques were adopted by researchers in the field, namely electron microscopy (EM), super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, and high-speed AFM. EM is now typically applied for the characterization of compact nanoobjects and three-dimensional (3D) origami structures, as it offers better resolution than AFM and can be used for 3D reconstruction from single-particle analysis. While the small size of DNA nanostructures had previously precluded the application of fluorescence microscopic methods, the development of super-resolution microscopy now facilities the application of fast and powerful optical methods also in DNA nanotechnology. In particular, the observation of dynamical processes associated with DNA nanoassemblies-e.g., molecular walkers and machines-requires imaging techniques that are both fast and allow observation under native conditions. Here single-molecule fluorescence techniques and high-speed AFM are beginning to play an increasingly important role. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2013-03-07

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ({sup 1}H and {sup 2}H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  3. Electrophoretic Separation of Single Particles Using Nanoscale Thermoplastic Columns.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha M; Uba, Franklin I; Oliver-Calixte, Nyoté J; Soper, Steven A

    2016-04-05

    Phenomena associated with microscale electrophoresis separations cannot, in many cases, be applied to the nanoscale. Thus, understanding the electrophoretic characteristics associated with the nanoscale will help formulate relevant strategies that can optimize the performance of separations carried out on columns with at least one dimension below 150 nm. Electric double layer (EDL) overlap, diffusion, and adsorption/desorption properties and/or dielectrophoretic effects giving rise to stick/slip motion are some of the processes that can play a role in determining the efficiency of nanoscale electrophoretic separations. We investigated the performance characteristics of electrophoretic separations carried out in nanoslits fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, devices. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were used as the model system with tracking of their transport via dark field microscopy and localized surface plasmon resonance. AgNPs capped with citrate groups and the negatively charged PMMA walls (induced by O2 plasma modification of the nanoslit walls) enabled separations that were not apparent when these particles were electrophoresed in microscale columns. The separation of AgNPs based on their size without the need for buffer additives using PMMA nanoslit devices is demonstrated herein. Operational parameters such as the electric field strength, nanoslit dimensions, and buffer composition were evaluated as to their effects on the electrophoretic performance, both in terms of efficiency (plate numbers) and resolution. Electrophoretic separations performed at high electric field strengths (>200 V/cm) resulted in higher plate numbers compared to lower fields due to the absence of stick/slip motion at the higher electric field strengths. Indeed, 60 nm AgNPs could be separated from 100 nm particles in free solution using nanoscale electrophoresis with 100 μm long columns.

  4. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  5. Nanoscale hepatoprotective herbal decoction attenuates hepatic stellate cell activity and chloroform-induced liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sherry; Chang, Shu-Jen; Yang, Miffy; Chen, Justin Jin-Ching; Chang, Walter H

    2011-01-01

    San-Huang-Xie-Xin-Tang (SHXXT) decoction, a traditional Chinese medicine containing Rhei rhizome, Coptidis rhizome, and Scutellariae radix, is widely used in hepatoprotective therapy. However, preparation of the decoction requires addition of boiling water that causes loss of numerous effective components. To improve the bioavailability of the decoction, nanoscale SHXXT was developed. Chloroform-induced liver injury and hepatic stellate cell activity in mice were used to demonstrate the hepatoprotective characteristics of nanoscale SHXXT decoction. Liver/body weight ratio and serum aspartate and alanine aminotranferase levels were recovered by the nanoscale SHXXT. TIMP-1 gene expression was inhibited and MMP-2 gene expression was accelerated in activated hepatic stellate cells. Nanoscale SHXXT decoction prepared in room temperature water could have preserved hepatoprotective ability. The results of this study indicate that nanoscale SHXXT could be extracted easily. The simple preparation of this herbal decoction is more convenient and energy-efficient.

  6. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Guo, W.; Poplawsky, J. D.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility with intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. In conclusion, APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.

  7. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Guo, W.; Poplawsky, J. D.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility with intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. In conclusion, APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.

  8. Dynamics of nanoscale droplets on moving surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ritos, Konstantinos; Dongari, Nishanth; Borg, Matthew K; Zhang, Yonghao; Reese, Jason M

    2013-06-11

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the dynamic wetting of nanoscale water droplets on moving surfaces. The density and hydrogen bonding profiles along the direction normal to the surface are reported, and the width of the water depletion layer is evaluated first for droplets on three different static surfaces: silicon, graphite, and a fictitious superhydrophobic surface. The advancing and receding contact angles, and contact angle hysteresis, are then measured as a function of capillary number on smooth moving silicon and graphite surfaces. Our results for the silicon surface show that molecular displacements at the contact line are influenced greatly by interactions with the solid surface and partly by viscous dissipation effects induced through the movement of the surface. For the graphite surface, however, both the advancing and receding contact angles values are close to the static contact angle value and are independent of the capillary number; i.e., viscous dissipation effects are negligible. This finding is in contrast with the wetting dynamics of macroscale water droplets, which show significant dependence on the capillary number.

  9. Nanoscale pore formation dynamics during aluminum anodization.

    PubMed

    Thamida, Sunil Kumar; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of nanoscale pore formation during anodization reveals its fundamental instability mechanism to be a field focusing phenomenon when perturbations on the minima of the two oxide interfaces are in phase. Lateral leakage of the layer potential at high wave number introduces a layer tension effect that balances the previous destabilizing effect to produce a long-wave instability and a selected pore separation that scales linearly with respect to voltage. At pH higher than 1.77, pores do not form due to a very thick barrier layer. A weakly nonlinear theory based on long-wave expansion of double free surface problem yields two coupled interface evolution equations that can be reduced to one without altering the dispersion relationship by assuming an equal and in-phase amplitude for the two interfaces. This interface evolution equation faithfully reproduces the initial pore ordering and their dynamics. A hodograph transformation technique is then used to determine the interior dimension of the well-developed pores in two dimensions. The ratio of pore diameter to pore separation is found to be a factor independent of voltage but varies with the pH of the electrolyte. Both the predicted pH range where pores are formed and the predicted pore dimensions are favorably compared to experimental data. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Spectroscopic studies of nanoscale metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, P.

    2013-06-01

    The present article is intended to elucidate a range of novel spectroscopic studies of nanoscale metal clusters. Various bottom-up and top-down techniques have been utilized to synthesize the metal nanoclusters. Materials like metal nanoclusters of cobalt, silver or gold in various dielectric matrices facilitate to explore interesting phenomena through optical, photoluminescence and vibrational spectroscopy. Interaction of uv-visible light with free electrons of metal nanoclusters, for example, leads to fascinating colors of dielectric matrices through an optical effect known as surface-plasmon resonance. This effect of quantum-confinement of the electrons leads to large enhancements of local electric field in metal nanoclusters. Enhancements of Raman scattering from metal nanoclusters are attributed to the increase of local fields. Optical absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopy particularly have been highlighted here as powerful non-destructive experimental methods to study evolution of metal nanoclusters in different dielectric matrices. In relatively large metal nanoclusters, besides dipolar, quadrupolar surface-plasmon resonances have been observed.

  11. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  12. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; ...

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore » both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  13. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  14. Nanoscale martensitic phase transition at interfaces in shape memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Rebecca D.; Chen, Ying

    2017-01-01

    In polycrystalline shape memory materials, mechanical interactions between martensitic transformation and grain boundaries at small scales play a critical role. Using a cobalt-based shape memory alloy, instrumented nanoindentation that probes nanoscale behavior reveals that grain boundary regions are resistant to transformation and have an adverse effect on shape memory possibly because an increase in strain energy outweighs reduction in interface energy. When grain boundaries are replaced by a thin, intergranular layer of a ductile and more malleable phase, grain boundary constraints are greatly alleviated, and transformation nearby can be well accommodated. Statistical analysis of results from a large number of nanoindents shows a decrease in shape recovery near grain boundaries and an increase in shape recovery near the new grain boundary phase, compared to grain interior. This is corroborated by analysis of nanoscale hardness and energy dissipation. Nanoscale martensitic transformation near interfaces depends largely on how the material across the interface accommodates transformation displacement. Engineering interfaces and enhancing local compatibility could drastically alter the energetics for phase transition at interfaces favorable for shape memory.

  15. Detection of nanoscale magnetic activity using a single carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Soldano, Caterina; Kar, Swastik; Talapatra, Saikat; Nayak, Saroj; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2008-12-01

    The ultimate conductometric sensor for ferromagnetic activity of nanoscale magnetic materials could be a single carbon nanotube. We show that the electrical conductance of an individual carbon nanotube is sensitive to magnetic transitions of nanoscale magnets embedded inside it. To establish this, multiwall carbon nanotubes were impregnated with cobalt nanoclusters. Temperature dependence of conductance (5 K < T <300 K) of these nanotubes shows the usual Lüttinger-liquid power law behavior at higher temperatures and an onset of Coulomb blockade at lower temperatures. At the lowest temperature (T approximately 6 K), the differential conductance (dI/dV versus V) develops aperiodic fluctuations under an external magnetic field B, the rms amplitude of which grows with the magnitude of the field itself. Low-temperature magnetoconductance, studied as function of temperature and bias, can be interpreted in terms of weak antilocalization effects due to the presence of the magnetized clusters. The temperature dependence of magnetoconductance further presents a "peak"-like feature and slow dynamics around T =55 K, which depend on the magnitude and history of the applied B field. These observations indicate a sensitivity of electronic transport in the multiwall nanotubes to the dynamics of nanoscale magnets at low temperature.

  16. Characteristics for electrochemical machining with nanoscale voltage pulses.

    PubMed

    Lee, E S; Back, S Y; Lee, J T

    2009-06-01

    Electrochemical machining has traditionally been used in highly specialized fields, such as those of the aerospace and defense industries. It is now increasingly being applied in other industries, where parts with difficult-to-cut material, complex geometry and tribology, and devices of nanoscale and microscale are required. Electric characteristic plays a principal function role in and chemical characteristic plays an assistant function role in electrochemical machining. Therefore, essential parameters in electrochemical machining can be described current density, machining time, inter-electrode gap size, electrolyte, electrode shape etc. Electrochemical machining provides an economical and effective method for machining high strength, high tension and heat-resistant materials into complex shapes such as turbine blades of titanium and aluminum alloys. The application of nanoscale voltage pulses between a tool electrode and a workpiece in an electrochemical environment allows the three-dimensional machining of conducting materials with sub-micrometer precision. In this study, micro probe are developed by electrochemical etching and micro holes are manufactured using these micro probe as tool electrodes. Micro holes and microgroove can be accurately achieved by using nanoscale voltages pulses.

  17. Controlled propulsion and separation of helical particles at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Alcanzare, Maria Michiko T; Thakore, Vaibhav; Ollila, Santtu T T; Karttunen, Mikko; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2017-02-22

    Controlling the motion of nano and microscale objects in a fluid environment is a key factor in designing optimized tiny machines that perform mechanical tasks such as transport of drugs or genetic material in cells, fluid mixing to accelerate chemical reactions,