Science.gov

Sample records for nanoscale metal clusters

  1. Nanoscale electrodeposition of low-dimensional metal phases and clusters.

    PubMed

    Staikov, Georgi

    2016-08-07

    The present status of the problem of electrochemical formation of low-dimensional metal phases is reviewed. The progress in this field achieved in the last two decades is discussed on the basis of experimental results obtained in selected electrochemical systems with well defined single crystal substrates. The influence of crystallographic orientation and surface inhomogeneities of foreign substrates on the mechanism of formation and the atomic structure of two-dimensional (2D) metal phases in the underpotential deposition range is considered. The localized electrodeposition of metal nanoclusters on solid state surfaces applying the STM-tip as a nanoelectrode is demonstrated.

  2. Nanoscale electrodeposition of low-dimensional metal phases and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staikov, Georgi

    2016-07-01

    The present status of the problem of electrochemical formation of low-dimensional metal phases is reviewed. The progress in this field achieved in the last two decades is discussed on the basis of experimental results obtained in selected electrochemical systems with well defined single crystal substrates. The influence of crystallographic orientation and surface inhomogeneities of foreign substrates on the mechanism of formation and the atomic structure of two-dimensional (2D) metal phases in the underpotential deposition range is considered. The localized electrodeposition of metal nanoclusters on solid state surfaces applying the STM-tip as a nanoelectrode is demonstrated.

  3. Monitoring the dissolution process of metals in the gas phase: reactions of nanoscale Al and Ga metal atom clusters and their relationship to similar metalloid clusters.

    PubMed

    Burgert, Ralf; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg

    2008-05-14

    in order to show that in this cluster only the central naked metal atoms are oxidized, and a smaller metalloid cluster results containing the entire protecting shell as the primary cluster. All the experimental results, supported by quantum chemical calculations, give a rough idea about the complex reaction cascades which occur during the dissolution and formation of metals. Furthermore, these results cast a critical light on many simplifying and generalizing rules in order to understand the bonding and structure of metal clusters. Finally, the experiments and some recent results provided by physical measurements on a crystalline Ga(84) compound build a bridge to nanoscience; i.e. they may be a challenge for chemistry in the next decades, since it has been shown that only with a perfect orientation of nanoscale metal clusters, e.g. in a crystal, can novel, unexpected properties (e.g. superconducting nanoscale materials) be obtained.

  4. Nanoscale metal-organic materials.

    PubMed

    Carné, Arnau; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic materials are found to be a fascinating novel class of functional nanomaterials. The limitless combinations between inorganic and organic building blocks enable researchers to synthesize 0- and 1-D metal-organic discrete nanostructures with varied compositions, morphologies and sizes, fabricate 2-D metal-organic thin films and membranes, and even structure them on surfaces at the nanometre length scale. In this tutorial review, the synthetic methodologies for preparing these miniaturized materials as well as their potential properties and future applications are discussed. This review wants to offer a panoramic view of this embryonic class of nanoscale materials that will be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working in chemistry, physics, medicine, nanotechnology, materials chemistry, etc., in the next years.

  5. Label-free colorimetric detection of mercury via Hg2+ ions-accelerated structural transformation of nanoscale metal-oxo clusters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; She, Shan; Zhang, Jiangwei; Bayaguud, Aruuhan; Wei, Yongge

    2015-01-01

    Mercury and its compounds are known to be extremely toxic but widely distributed in environment. Although many works have been reported to efficiently detect mercury, development of simple and convenient sensors is still longed for quick analyzing mercury in water. In this work, a nanoscale metal-oxo cluster, (n-Bu4N)2[Mo5NaO13(OCH3)4(NO)], (MLPOM), organically-derivatized from monolacunary Lindqvist-type polyoxomolybdate, is found to specifically react with Hg2+ in methanol/water via structural transformation. The MLPOM methanol solution displays a color change from purple to brown within seconds after being mixed with an aqueous solution containing Hg2+. By comparing the structure of polyoxomolybdate before and after reaction, the color change is revealed to be the essentially structural transformation of MLPOM accelerated by Hg2+. Based on this discovery, MLPOM could be utilized as a colorimetric sensor to sense the existence of Hg2+, and a simple and label-free method is developed to selectively detect aqueous Hg2+. Furthermore, the colorimetric sensor has been applied to indicating mercury contamination in industrial sewage. PMID:26559602

  6. Label-free colorimetric detection of mercury via Hg2+ ions-accelerated structural transformation of nanoscale metal-oxo clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kun; She, Shan; Zhang, Jiangwei; Bayaguud, Aruuhan; Wei, Yongge

    2015-11-01

    Mercury and its compounds are known to be extremely toxic but widely distributed in environment. Although many works have been reported to efficiently detect mercury, development of simple and convenient sensors is still longed for quick analyzing mercury in water. In this work, a nanoscale metal-oxo cluster, (n-Bu4N)2[Mo5NaO13(OCH3)4(NO)], (MLPOM), organically-derivatized from monolacunary Lindqvist-type polyoxomolybdate, is found to specifically react with Hg2+ in methanol/water via structural transformation. The MLPOM methanol solution displays a color change from purple to brown within seconds after being mixed with an aqueous solution containing Hg2+. By comparing the structure of polyoxomolybdate before and after reaction, the color change is revealed to be the essentially structural transformation of MLPOM accelerated by Hg2+. Based on this discovery, MLPOM could be utilized as a colorimetric sensor to sense the existence of Hg2+, and a simple and label-free method is developed to selectively detect aqueous Hg2+. Furthermore, the colorimetric sensor has been applied to indicating mercury contamination in industrial sewage.

  7. Electrochemical dynamics of nanoscale metallic inclusions in dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuchao; Gao, Peng; Li, Linze; Pan, Xiaoqing; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Choi, ShinHyun; Waser, Rainer; Valov, Ilia; Lu, Wei D

    2014-06-23

    Nanoscale metal inclusions in or on solid-state dielectrics are an integral part of modern electrocatalysis, optoelectronics, capacitors, metamaterials and memory devices. The properties of these composite systems strongly depend on the size, dispersion of the inclusions and their chemical stability, and are usually considered constant. Here we demonstrate that nanoscale inclusions (for example, clusters) in dielectrics dynamically change their shape, size and position upon applied electric field. Through systematic in situ transmission electron microscopy studies, we show that fundamental electrochemical processes can lead to universally observed nucleation and growth of metal clusters, even for inert metals like platinum. The clusters exhibit diverse dynamic behaviours governed by kinetic factors including ion mobility and redox rates, leading to different filament growth modes and structures in memristive devices. These findings reveal the microscopic origin behind resistive switching, and also provide general guidance for the design of novel devices involving electronics and ionics.

  8. Nanoscale chirality in metal and semiconductor nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jatish; Thomas, K George; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2016-10-18

    The field of chirality has recently seen a rejuvenation due to the observation of chirality in inorganic nanomaterials. The advancements in understanding the origin of nanoscale chirality and the potential applications of chiroptical nanomaterials in the areas of optics, catalysis and biosensing, among others, have opened up new avenues toward new concepts and design of novel materials. In this article, we review the concept of nanoscale chirality in metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots, then focus on recent experimental and theoretical advances in chiral metal nanoparticles and plasmonic chirality. Selected examples of potential applications and an outlook on the research on chiral nanomaterials are additionally provided.

  9. Nanoscale chirality in metal and semiconductor nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K. George

    2016-01-01

    The field of chirality has recently seen a rejuvenation due to the observation of chirality in inorganic nanomaterials. The advancements in understanding the origin of nanoscale chirality and the potential applications of chiroptical nanomaterials in the areas of optics, catalysis and biosensing, among others, have opened up new avenues toward new concepts and design of novel materials. In this article, we review the concept of nanoscale chirality in metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots, then focus on recent experimental and theoretical advances in chiral metal nanoparticles and plasmonic chirality. Selected examples of potential applications and an outlook on the research on chiral nanomaterials are additionally provided. PMID:27752651

  10. Mesoscale metallic pyramids with nanoscale tips.

    PubMed

    Henzie, Joel; Kwak, Eun-Soo; Odom, Teri W

    2005-07-01

    We report a simple procedure that can generate free-standing mesoscale metallic pyramids composed of one or more materials and having nanoscale tips (radii of curvature of less than 2 nm). Mesoscale holes (100-300 nm) in a chromium film are used as an etch mask to fabricate pyramidal pits and then as a deposition mask to form the metallic pyramids. We have fabricated two- and three-layered pyramids with control over their materials and chemical functionality.

  11. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  12. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A. Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2γ/R, with γ the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  13. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  14. Nanoscale Structure, Dynamics, and Aging Behavior of Metallic Glass Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J. A. J.; Holt, C. M. B.; Luber, E. J.; Fortin, D. C.; Popowich, G.; Zahiri, B.; Concepcion, P.; Mitlin, D.; Freeman, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy observations resolve the structure and dynamics of metallic glass Cu100−xHfx films and demonstrate scanning tunnelling microscopy control of aging at a metallic glass surface. Surface clusters exhibit heterogeneous hopping dynamics. Low Hf concentration films feature an aged surface of larger, slower clusters. Argon ion-sputtering destroys the aged configuration, yielding a surface in constant fluctuation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy can locally restore the relaxed state, allowing for nanoscale lithographic definition of aged sections. PMID:27498698

  15. Nanoscale uranium-based cage clusters inspired by uranium mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Peter C

    2011-02-01

    Taking advantage of the bent uranyl-peroxide-uranyl interaction found in studtite, 26 nanoscale clusters have been synthesized using uranyl hexagonal bipyramids. Sixteen of these clusters are built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids only. Eight contain pyrophosphate groups that bridge between uranyl polyhedra, and two contain oxalate groups that adopt a similar structural role. These clusters contain from 20 to 60 uranyl polyhedra and have diameters in the range ~1.5 to 3 nm. All spontaneously self-assemble in aqueous solution under ambient conditions.

  16. Nanoscale Cluster Detection in Massive Atom Probe Tomography Data

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K; Yoginath, Srikanth B; Miller, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in atom probe tomography (APT) have led to unprecedented data acquisition capabilities that routinely generate data sets containing hundreds of millions of atoms. Detecting nanoscale clusters of different atom types present in these enormous amounts of data and analyzing their spatial correlations with one another are fundamental to understanding the structural properties of the material from which the data is derived. Extant algorithms for nanoscale cluster detection do not scale to large data sets. Here, a scalable, CUDA-based implementation of an autocorrelation algorithm is presented. It isolates spatial correlations amongst atomic clusters present in massive APT data sets in linear time using a linear amount of storage. Correctness of the algorithm is demonstrated using large synthetically generated data with known spatial distributions. Benefits and limitations of using GPU-acceleration for autocorrelation-based APT data analyses are presented with supporting performance results on data sets with up to billions of atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first nanoscale cluster detection algorithm that scales to massive APT data sets and executes on commodity hardware.

  17. Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura; Xu, Jennifer C.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    A report describes the fabrication and testing of nanoscale metal oxide semiconductors (MOSs) for gas and chemical sensing. This document examines the relationship between processing approaches and resulting sensor behavior. This is a core question related to a range of applications of nanotechnology and a number of different synthesis methods are discussed: thermal evaporation- condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed, providing a processing overview to developers of nanotechnology- based systems. The results of a significant amount of testing and comparison are also described. A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. The TECsynthesized single-crystal nanowires offer uniform crystal surfaces, resistance to sintering, and their synthesis may be done apart from the substrate. The TECproduced nanowire response is very low, even at the operating temperature of 200 C. In contrast, the electrospun polycrystalline nanofiber response is high, suggesting that junction potentials are superior to a continuous surface depletion layer as a transduction mechanism for chemisorption. Using a catalyst deposited upon the surface in the form of nanoparticles yields dramatic gains in sensitivity for both nanostructured, one-dimensional forms. For the nanowire materials, the response magnitude and response rate uniformly increase with increasing operating temperature. Such changes are interpreted in terms of accelerated surface diffusional processes, yielding greater access to chemisorbed oxygen species and faster dissociative chemisorption, respectively. Regardless of operating temperature, sensitivity of the nanofibers is a factor of 10 to 100 greater than that of nanowires with the same catalyst for the same test condition. In summary, nanostructure appears critical to governing the reactivity, as measured by electrical

  18. Novel Metal Encapsulated Silicon Cage Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2002-03-01

    The discovery of novel nano-forms of carbon such as fullerenes and nanotubes created much interest in the search for similar novel structures of silicon for applications in nano-devices. However, these cage structures are not stable for silicon. Small silicon clusters having upto about 20 atoms are found to have prolate structures in which a 10-atom unit plays an important role. Here we report results of new findings(Vijay Kumar and Yoshiyuki Kawazoe, ``Metal-Encapsulated Fullerenelike and Cubic Caged Clusters of Silicon", Phys. Rev. Lett., 87[4] (2001), 045503-1-045503-4.) on a rich variety of caged silicon clusters that are realized by encapsulating a metal atom. The shape and size of these new clusters depend upon the metal atom which also determines their properties. As silicon is the most important material for devices, these findings offer new opportunities to design novel nano-silicon based devices. The results have been obtained by performing computer experiments using ab initio calculations in an effort to stabilize a silicon cage of 20 atoms. We have tried several metal atoms and used a cage shrinking approach. These led to the findings of fullerene and cubic type stable symmetric clusters in the range of 14 to 16 silicon atoms, depending on the encapsulated metal atom. A Frank-Kasper polyhedron, M@Si16 is found to be of lowest energy for M = Ti and Hf with exceptionally large gaps of about 2.35 eV that lie in the optical region. Further studies have been done to stabilize the smallest fullerene shape of 20 silicon atoms and to develop assemblies of clusters to form more interesting nano-scale structures like wires, which might be useful industrially to realize conducting atomic lines covered by semiconductor tubes.

  19. Deformation of a ceramic/metal interface at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lin; Hu, Tao; Yang, Hanry; Zhang, Dalong; Topping, Troy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical response of heterophase interfaces has attracted substantial attention in recent years. Here, we utilized an in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique to isolate an individual nanoscale ceramic/metal interface and characterize its nanomechanical response. The interface, at which there was a Mg-rich segregation nanolayer between the single crystal ceramic (B4C) and the polycrystalline metal (Al alloy, AA5083), was determined to have a bond strength greater than 1.5 GPa. Bimodal failure and metallic grain rotation occurred in the metallic region, allowing the interface to accommodate a deformation strain of 5.4%. The roles of elemental segregation and nanoscale dimensions on interfacial debonding mechanisms are discussed.The mechanical response of heterophase interfaces has attracted substantial attention in recent years. Here, we utilized an in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique to isolate an individual nanoscale ceramic/metal interface and characterize its nanomechanical response. The interface, at which there was a Mg-rich segregation nanolayer between the single crystal ceramic (B4C) and the polycrystalline metal (Al alloy, AA5083), was determined to have a bond strength greater than 1.5 GPa. Bimodal failure and metallic grain rotation occurred in the metallic region, allowing the interface to accommodate a deformation strain of 5.4%. The roles of elemental segregation and nanoscale dimensions on interfacial debonding mechanisms are discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02011a

  20. Gas phase metal cluster model systems for heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M

    2012-07-14

    Since the advent of intense cluster sources, physical and chemical properties of isolated metal clusters are an active field of research. In particular, gas phase metal clusters represent ideal model systems to gain molecular level insight into the energetics and kinetics of metal-mediated catalytic reactions. Here we summarize experimental reactivity studies as well as investigations of thermal catalytic reaction cycles on small gas phase metal clusters, mostly in relation to the surprising catalytic activity of nanoscale gold particles. A particular emphasis is put on the importance of conceptual insights gained through the study of gas phase model systems. Based on these concepts future perspectives are formulated in terms of variation and optimization of catalytic materials e.g. by utilization of bimetals and metal oxides. Furthermore, the future potential of bio-inspired catalytic material systems are highlighted and technical developments are discussed.

  1. Nanoscale segregation at a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igata, N.

    1996-03-01

    The properties of a surface are fundamentally controlled by the chemical composition of the nanoscale surface layer. Therefore nanoscale segregation at the surface is one of the most important problems in surface science and technology. The chemical analysis of the surface layer and the study of segregation have been developed by various methods, but mainly by AES and TOFAP since 0957-4484/7/1/003/img1. Surface segregation under irradiation is also an urgent problem to be solved and the same methods have been applied. In this paper, the results from TOFAP for segregation both under thermal equilibrium and under irradiation are introduced. As for theoretical aspects, both thermal segregation and segregation under irradiation are interpreted by atomistic theory.

  2. Cluster Dynamics: Laying the Foundations for Developing Nanoscale Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Technique to Study Delayed Ionization in Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry ," J. R. Stairs and A. W. Castleman, Jr., Int. J. Mass Spec., 216, 75-83 (2002...that has been observed in a few metal , fullerene and metal carbide systems. Generally, good candidates to display delayed ionization characteristics...are clusters containing a significant number of vibrational modes that have large bonding energies and low ionization potentials. The magnitude of the

  3. Instability of nanoscale metallic particles under electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhang, S. G.; Xia, M. X.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The stability of nano metallic glass under electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) was investigated. The most common voltage of TEM used in metallic materials characterization was either 200 kV or 300 kV. Both situations were investigated in this work. An amorphous metallic particle with a dimension of a few hundred nanometers was tested under 300 keV electron irradiation. New phase decomposed from the parent phase was observed. Moreover, a crystal particle with the same composition and dimension was tested under 200 keV irradiation. Decomposition process also occurred in this situation. Besides, crystal orientation modification was observed during irradiation. These results proved that the electron beam in TEM have an effect on the stability of nanoscale samples during long time irradiation. Atomic displacement was induced and diffusion was enhanced by electron irradiation. Thus, artifacts would be induced when a nanoscale metallic sample was characterized in TEM.

  4. Deformation of a ceramic/metal interface at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; Hu, Tao; Yang, Hanry; Zhang, Dalong; Topping, Troy; Lavernia, Enrique J; Schoenung, Julie M

    2016-05-19

    The mechanical response of heterophase interfaces has attracted substantial attention in recent years. Here, we utilized an in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique to isolate an individual nanoscale ceramic/metal interface and characterize its nanomechanical response. The interface, at which there was a Mg-rich segregation nanolayer between the single crystal ceramic (B4C) and the polycrystalline metal (Al alloy, AA5083), was determined to have a bond strength greater than 1.5 GPa. Bimodal failure and metallic grain rotation occurred in the metallic region, allowing the interface to accommodate a deformation strain of 5.4%. The roles of elemental segregation and nanoscale dimensions on interfacial debonding mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  6. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; ...

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore » both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  7. Nano-scale solute partitioning in devitrified bulk metalic glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Miller, M. K.; Wang, X. L.; Liu, C. T.; Stoica, A. D.; Ma, D.; Almer, J.; Shi, D.; ORNL; Univ. of Cincinnati; Univ. of Tennessee

    2009-01-01

    Devitrification of bulk metallic glass leads to a novel microstructure, with high-density nanoscale crystalline precipitates evenly distributed in a glassy matrix. Significant chemical segregation is revealed at unprecedented detail by atom-probe tomography. This level of detail is crucial for understanding the interference peaks observed in small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering experiments, an unsolved mystery for over a decade.

  8. Atomically precise arrays of fluorescent silver clusters: a modular approach for metal cluster photonics on DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Copp, Stacy M; Schultz, Danielle E; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-03-24

    The remarkable precision that DNA scaffolds provide for arraying nanoscale optical elements enables optical phenomena that arise from interactions of metal nanoparticles, dye molecules, and quantum dots placed at nanoscale separations. However, control of ensemble optical properties has been limited by the difficulty of achieving uniform particle sizes and shapes. Ligand-stabilized metal clusters offer a route to atomically precise arrays that combine desirable attributes of both metals and molecules. Exploiting the unique advantages of the cluster regime requires techniques to realize controlled nanoscale placement of select cluster structures. Here we show that atomically monodisperse arrays of fluorescent, DNA-stabilized silver clusters can be realized on a prototypical scaffold, a DNA nanotube, with attachment sites separated by <10 nm. Cluster attachment is mediated by designed DNA linkers that enable isolation of specific clusters prior to assembly on nanotubes and preserve cluster structure and spectral purity after assembly. The modularity of this approach generalizes to silver clusters of diverse sizes and DNA scaffolds of many types. Thus, these silver cluster nano-optical elements, which themselves have colors selected by their particular DNA templating oligomer, bring unique dimensions of control and flexibility to the rapidly expanding field of nano-optics.

  9. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    DOEpatents

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Marcus, Mathew A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  10. Metallic bonding and cluster structure

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Jose M.; Beltran, Marcela R.; Michaelian, Karo; Garzon, Ignacio L.; Ordejon, Pablo; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel

    2000-02-15

    Knowledge of the structure of clusters is essential to predict many of their physical and chemical properties. Using a many-body semiempirical Gupta potential (to perform global minimizations), and first-principles density functional calculations (to confirm the energy ordering of the local minima), we have recently found [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1600 (1998)] that there are many intermediate-size disordered gold nanoclusters with energy near or below the lowest-energy ordered structure. This is especially surprising because we studied ''magic'' cluster sizes, for which very compact-ordered structures exist. Here, we show how the analysis of the local stress can be used to understand the physical origin of this amorphization. We find that the compact ordered structures, which are very stable for pair potentials, are destabilized by the tendency of metallic bonds to contract at the surface, because of the decreased coordination. The amorphization is also favored by the relatively low energy associated to bondlength and coordination disorder in metals. Although these are very general properties of metallic bonding, we find that they are especially important in the case of gold, and we predict some general trends in the tendency of metallic clusters towards amorphous structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Structure stability and spectroscopy of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Theory based on self-consistent field-linear combinations of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital theory was applied to clusters. Four areas were covered: electronic structure, equilibrium geometries, and stability of charged clusters, interaction of metal clusters with H and halogen atoms, thermal stability of isolated clusters, and stability and optical properties of hetero-atomic clusters. (DLC)

  12. Surface plasmon mode analysis of nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanmin; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng; Kong, Jin Au

    2007-09-17

    A detailed study of guided modes in a nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide is presented by using the effective dielectric constant approach. The guided modes, including both traditional waveguide mode and surface plasmon mode, are investigated for the silver rectangular waveguide. The mode evolution in narrow waveguide is also discussed with the emphasis on the dependence of mode dispersion with waveguide height. Finally, the red-shift of the cutoff wavelength of the fundamental mode is observed when the waveguide height decreases, contrary to the behavior of regular metallic waveguide with PEC boundary. The comprehensive analysis can provide some guideline in the design of subwavelength optical devices based on the dispersion characteristics of metallic rectangular bore.

  13. NMR probe of metallic states in nanoscale topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Chasapis, Thomas C; Taylor, Robert E; Lake, Michael P; King, Danny; Jarenwattananon, Nanette N; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2013-01-11

    A 125Te NMR study of bismuth telluride nanoparticles as a function of particle size revealed that the spin-lattice relaxation is enhanced below 33 nm, accompanied by a transition of NMR spectra from the single to the bimodal regime. The satellite peak features a negative Knight shift and higher relaxivity, consistent with core polarization from p-band carriers. Whereas nanocrystals follow a Korringa law in the range 140-420 K, micrometer particles do so only below 200 K. The results reveal increased metallicity of these nanoscale topological insulators in the limit of higher surface-to-volume ratios.

  14. Improving proton therapy by metal-containing nanoparticles: nanoscale insights

    PubMed Central

    Schlathölter, Thomas; Eustache, Pierre; Porcel, Erika; Salado, Daniela; Stefancikova, Lenka; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, Francois; Mowat, Pierre; Biegun, Aleksandra K; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Remita, Hynd; Lacombe, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles to enhance the effect of radiation-based cancer treatments is a growing field of study and recently, even nanoparticle-induced improvement of proton therapy performance has been investigated. Aiming at a clinical implementation of this approach, it is essential to characterize the mechanisms underlying the synergistic effects of nanoparticles combined with proton irradiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of platinum- and gadolinium-based nanoparticles on the nanoscale damage induced by a proton beam of therapeutically relevant energy (150 MeV) using plasmid DNA molecular probe. Two conditions of irradiation (0.44 and 3.6 keV/μm) were considered to mimic the beam properties at the entrance and at the end of the proton track. We demonstrate that the two metal-containing nanoparticles amplify, in particular, the induction of nanosize damages (>2 nm) which are most lethal for cells. More importantly, this effect is even more pronounced at the end of the proton track. This work gives a new insight into the underlying mechanisms on the nanoscale and indicates that the addition of metal-based nanoparticles is a promising strategy not only to increase the cell killing action of fast protons, but also to improve tumor targeting. PMID:27143877

  15. Instabilities of structured liquid metal geometries on nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Nanyi; Wu, Yueying; Fowlkes, Jason; Rack, Philip; Kondic, Lou

    2014-03-01

    Directed assembly on nanoscale is one of quickly growing fields in materials science, and understanding basic physical mechanisms that lead to formation of desired patterns is crucial for future progress. This contribution, motivated by the experiments carried out with structured metal geometries liquefied by laser irradiation, centers on formulating simple but realistic models that allow to reach this understanding. The model is based on long-wave limit of Navier-Stokes equations relevant to evolution of liquid metals. Liquid-solid interaction forces are included and we show that these are crucial for instability development. We carry out fully nonlinear simulations of the derived model, and find that the computational results are fully consistent with the experimental ones, thus confirming that the main feature of the experiments could be captured by a simplified continuum model. In addition, our simulations suggest that stochastic effects, possibly due to thermal noise, may play an important role. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET-1235710

  16. Simple Methods for Production of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Films from Household Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Baliss, Michelle S.; Hinman, Jordan J.; Ziegenhorn, John W.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    Production of thin metal oxide films was recently explored as part of an outreach program with a goal of producing nanoscale structures with household items. Household items coated with various metals or titanium compounds can be heated to produce colorful films with nanoscale thicknesses. As part of a materials chemistry laboratory experiment…

  17. Dynamic microscopy of nanoscale cluster growth at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Williamson, M J; Tromp, R M; Vereecken, P M; Hull, R; Ross, F M

    2003-08-01

    Dynamic processes at the solid-liquid interface are of key importance across broad areas of science and technology. Electrochemical deposition of copper, for example, is used for metallization in integrated circuits, and a detailed understanding of nucleation, growth and coalescence is essential in optimizing the final microstructure. Our understanding of processes at the solid-vapour interface has advanced tremendously over the past decade due to the routine availability of real-time, high-resolution imaging techniques yielding data that can be compared quantitatively with theory. However, the difficulty of studying the solid-liquid interface leaves our understanding of processes there less complete. Here we analyse dynamic observations--recorded in situ using a novel transmission electron microscopy technique--of the nucleation and growth of nanoscale copper clusters during electrodeposition. We follow in real time the evolution of individual clusters, and compare their development with simulations incorporating the basic physics of electrodeposition during the early stages of growth. The experimental technique developed here is applicable to a broad range of dynamic phenomena at the solid-liquid interface.

  18. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, F.; Sogne, E.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Merlini, M.; Ducati, C.; Milani, P.

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  19. The equipment for the preparation of micro and nanoscale metallic glassy fibers.

    PubMed

    Ding, D W; Yi, J; Liu, G L; Sun, Y T; Zhao, D Q; Pan, M X; Bai, H Y; Wang, W H

    2014-10-01

    A supercooled liquid extraction method and apparatus for micro and nanoscale metallic glassy fiber preparation was developed. Using the fiber fabrication equipment, micro to nanoscale metallic glassy fibers with diameter ranging from 70 nm to 300 μm can be obtained by wire drawing in the supercooled liquid region of metallic glasses via superplastic deformation. The obtained metallic glassy fibers possess precisely designed and controlled sizes, high structural uniformity and high degree of surface smoothness.

  20. Reactive cluster model of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Travis E.; Miorelli, Jonathan; Eberhart, Mark E.

    2014-02-28

    Though discovered more than a half century ago metallic glasses remain a scientific enigma. Unlike crystalline metals, characterized by short, medium, and long-range order, in metallic glasses short and medium-range order persist, though long-range order is absent. This fact has prompted research to develop structural descriptions of metallic glasses. Among these are cluster-based models that attribute amorphous structure to the existence of clusters that are incommensurate with crystalline periodicity. Not addressed, however, are the chemical factors stabilizing these clusters and promoting their interconnections. We have found that glass formers are characterized by a rich cluster chemistry that above the glass transformation temperature promotes exchange as well as static and vibronic sharing of atoms between clusters. The vibronic mechanism induces correlated motions between neighboring clusters and we hypothesize that the distance over which these motions are correlated mediates metallic glass stability and influences critical cooling rates.

  1. Carbon nanotube-metal cluster composites: a new road to chemical sensors?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Q; Buongiorno Nardelli, M; Lu, W; Bernholc, J

    2005-05-01

    Novel carbon nanotube-metal cluster structures are proposed as prototype systems for molecular recognition at the nanoscale. Ab initio calculations show that already the bare nanotube cluster system displays some specificity because the adsorption of ammonia on a carbon nanotube-Al cluster system is easily detected electrically, while diborane adsorption does not provide an electrical signature. Since there are well-established procedures for attaching molecular receptors to metal clusters, these results provide a "proof-of-principle" for the development of novel, high-specificity molecular sensors.

  2. The mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multilayers: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.; Xie, J. Y.; Wang, F.; Huang, P.; Xu, K. W.; Lu, T. J.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multilayers (NMMs) has attracted much attention from both scientific and practical views. Compared with their monolithic counterparts, the large number of interfaces existing in the NMMs dictates the unique behavior of this special class of structural composite materials. While there have been a number of reviews on the mechanical mechanism of microlaminates, the rapid development of nanotechnology brought a pressing need for an overview focusing exclusively on a property-based definition of the NMMs, especially their size-dependent microstructure and mechanical performance. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date review on the microstructure, mechanical property and plastic deformation physics of NMMs. We hope this review could accomplish two purposes: (1) introducing the basic concepts of scaling and dimensional analysis to scientists and engineers working on NMM systems, and (2) providing a better understanding of interface behavior and the exceptional qualities the interfaces in NMMs display at atomic scale.

  3. Surface deposition and encapsulation of metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, Jared Franklin

    In this work metallic clusters are produced by both encapsulation in an aerogel matrix and deposition on a surface. Entrapment of metal clusters inside aerogels is accomplished though synthesis of a hydrogel precursor, washing it with an aqueous metal salt solution, and controlled reduction of the metal. Although the aerogel matrix stabilizes and prevents subsequent loss or aggregation of the clusters once they are produced, controlling the rate of reduction is key to the size and morphology of the clusters. In order to do this, both radiolytic and chemical reduction methods are used. The radiolytic technique for the formation of metal cluster aerogel composites utilizes gamma radiation to reduce the solution of Ag+ or [AuCl 4]- ions inside of the hydrogel precursor. After exposure to gamma rays, the previously colorless gels have the coloration typical of colloids of Au (pink) and Ag (yellow/brown) clusters. Typical gamma doses are between 2 to 3.5 kGy for hydrogels containing 10-4 to 10-3 mol·L-1 metal solutions. Subsequent characterization confirmed the presence of metal clusters with a fcc structure. The cluster diameters varied between 10 and 200nm, depending on the synthesis parameters. More conventional chemical reduction is also employed in this work to produce noble metal clusters in an aerogel matrix. Hydrogels were washed in a basic solution of Ag+ or [AuCl4]- ions, and formaldehyde was added to the solution. The reduction proceeded relatively slowly, allowing the formaldehyde to diffuse into the hydrogel before complete reduction took place. This procedure was also used to produce alloys of gold and silver clusters embedded in silica aerogels. Also included in this dissertation is the surface deposition of metallic clusters on a silicon surface. The apparatus built produces a cold beam of gas droplets that pick up evaporated metal clusters and deposit them on a surface. The gas clusters are produced by supersonic expansion of a gas (Ar, He, or N2

  4. Probing nanoscale interactions on biocompatible cluster-assembled titanium oxide surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Varun; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    We report on the investigation of the adhesive properties of cluster-assembled nanostructured TiO(x) (ns-TiO(x)) films against a Si3N4 AFM tip, in air and in water. The interacting AFM tip apex represents a model nanometer-sized probe, carrying both silanol (Si-OH) and silamine (Si2-NH) groups: it is therefore well suited to investigate biologically relevant molecular interactions with the biocompatible ns-TiO(x) surface. Coupling nanosphere lithography with supersonic cluster beam deposition we produced sub-micrometer patterns of ns-TiO(x) on a reference amorphous silica surface. These devices are ideal platforms for conducting comparative nanoscale investigations of molecular interactions between surfaces and specific groups. We have found that in the aqueous medium the adhesion is enhanced on ns-TiO(x) with respect to amorphous silica, opposed to the case of humid air. A comparative analysis of the different interactions channels (van der Waals, electrostatic, chemical bonding) led to the conclusion that the key for understanding this behavior can be the ability of incoming nucleophiles like nitrogen or oxygen on the Si3N4 tip to displace adsorbed molecules on ns-TiO(x) and link to Ti atoms via co-ordinate (dative covalent) bonding. This effect is likely enhanced on nanostructured TiO(x) with respect to crystalline or micro-porous TiO2, due to the greatly increased effective area and porosity. This study provides a clue for the understanding of interaction mechanisms of proteins with biocompatible ns-TiO(x), and in general with metal-oxide surfaces.

  5. Design and fabrication of memory devices based on nanoscale polyoxometalate clusters.

    PubMed

    Busche, Christoph; Vilà-Nadal, Laia; Yan, Jun; Miras, Haralampos N; Long, De-Liang; Georgiev, Vihar P; Asenov, Asen; Pedersen, Rasmus H; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Mirza, Muhammad M; Paul, Douglas J; Poblet, Josep M; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-11-27

    Flash memory devices--that is, non-volatile computer storage media that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed--are vital for portable electronics, but the scaling down of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) flash memory to sizes of below ten nanometres per data cell presents challenges. Molecules have been proposed to replace MOS flash memory, but they suffer from low electrical conductivity, high resistance, low device yield, and finite thermal stability, limiting their integration into current MOS technologies. Although great advances have been made in the pursuit of molecule-based flash memory, there are a number of significant barriers to the realization of devices using conventional MOS technologies. Here we show that core-shell polyoxometalate (POM) molecules can act as candidate storage nodes for MOS flash memory. Realistic, industry-standard device simulations validate our approach at the nanometre scale, where the device performance is determined mainly by the number of molecules in the storage media and not by their position. To exploit the nature of the core-shell POM clusters, we show, at both the molecular and device level, that embedding [(Se(IV)O3)2](4-) as an oxidizable dopant in the cluster core allows the oxidation of the molecule to a [Se(v)2O6](2-) moiety containing a {Se(V)-Se(V)} bond (where curly brackets indicate a moiety, not a molecule) and reveals a new 5+ oxidation state for selenium. This new oxidation state can be observed at the device level, resulting in a new type of memory, which we call 'write-once-erase'. Taken together, these results show that POMs have the potential to be used as a realistic nanoscale flash memory. Also, the configuration of the doped POM core may lead to new types of electrical behaviour. This work suggests a route to the practical integration of configurable molecules in MOS technologies as the lithographic scales approach the molecular limit.

  6. Optical Properties of Controlled Nanoscale Assemblies of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, S. L.; Oldenburg, S. J.; Lee, T. R.; Halas, N. J.

    1998-03-01

    The optical response of a metal nanoparticle in an assembly of nanoparticles is affected by scattering from the other nanoparticles in the assembly. In general, this interaction leads to the appearance of lower energy peaks in the absorption spectrum with their location dependent on the geometry of the assembly(M. Quinten and U. Kreibig, Surface Science 172), 557 (1986).. We construct two types of assemblies using functionalized silica nanoparticles as substrates for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles. First, surprisingly monodisperse clusters of small gold nanoparticles spontaneously form and attach to the silica nanoparticles under appropriate solvent conditions. Second, controlled aggregates of metal nanoparticles are synthesized using bifunctional molecular linkers in a step-by-step procedure. The distances between the constituent metallic nanoparticles, as well as the electronic properties of the region between the nanoparticles, are controlled by the choice of bifunctional molecular linker. As a result of either assembly method, metallic nanoparticles can be brought sufficiently close to each other so that interactions may be observed.

  7. STEM characterization of metal clusters in/on oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehraeen, Shareghe

    Dispersed metal clusters in or on a support matrix are key phenomenons in many technological fields. Two widely used examples of them which are investigated in this thesis are supported-metal clusters in heterogeneous catalysis and transition metal clusters in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) applied in spintronics. The catalytic activity and selectivity of catalysts often depend sensitively on structure parameters, such as particles size and shape. With the same analogy, the magnetic properties of DMS oxides are sensitively related to the crystal defects of the host material as a consequence of doping the transition metal. Therefore it is essential to develop and understand the correlation between nanostructure and function of these materials. STEM Z-contrast imaging is the best candidate for this type of study because of a high degree of resolution it provides and the unique ability it offers to detect and differentiate between the clusters and oxide matrix due to the large difference between their atomic numbers. Moreover the technique development in the STEM field fosters the conjugation of electron energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Z-contrast imaging and their widespread use for nearly atomic level chemical analysis at interface, second phases, and isolated defects. The advanced preparation method of supported clusters catalysts which is by carbonyl ligands offers a controlled cluster size and shape. MgO-supported Os clusters and SiO2-supported Ta clusters prepared by this method are adsorbed on oxide to convert into single-sized supported metal aggregates. The last step of preparation method is by removal of the ligands (decarbonylation) which is very important because it determines the final size distribution and shape of such clusters. Reaching carbonylated decaosmium clusters with the size of theoretically 0.295 nm and the tetrahedral-shape geometry are the aim of the preparation method. The size distribution measurements of sub-nanoclusters of

  8. A Simple MO Treatment of Metal Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Illustrates how a qualitative description of the geometry and electronic characteristics of homogeneous metal clusters can be obtained using semiempirical MO (molecular orbital theory) methods. Computer applications of MO methods to inorganic systems are also described. (CS)

  9. Structural evolution and metallicity of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Daniel A.; Shayeghi, Armin; Johnston, Roy L.; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Schäfer, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. They are compared to Kubo gaps, which are an indicator of the metallicity in finite particles. Both, experimental and theoretical data suggest that lead clusters are not metallic up to at least 36 atoms.The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps

  10. Metal-Organic Frameworks As Templates for Nanoscale NaAlH 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bhakta, Raghunandan K.; Herberg, Julie L.; Jacobs, Benjamin; Highley, Aaron; Behrens, Richard; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Allendorf, Mark D.

    2009-09-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional hard and soft templates for nanocluster synthesis because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and inherently understandable environment. We demonstrate that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides proposed for hydrogen storage and their reactive precursors, providing platform to test recent theoretical predictions that some of these materials can be destabilized with respect to hydrogen desorption by reducing their critical dimension to the nanoscale. With the MOF HKUST-1 as template, we show that NaAlH4 nanoclusters as small as eight formula units can be synthesized. The confinement of these clusters within the MOF pores dramatically accelerates the desorption kinetics, causing decomposition to occur at ~100 °C lower than bulk NaAlH4. However, using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry, we also show that the thermal decomposition mechanism of NaAlH4 is complex and may involve processes such as nucleation and growth in addition to the normally assumed two-step chemical decomposition reactions.

  11. Nanoscale temperature sensor based on Fano resonance in metal-insulator-metal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yan; Wei, Qi; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shouyu

    2017-02-01

    In order to realize temperature measurements with high sensitivity using compact structure, a nanoscale metal-insulator-metal waveguide based sensor combining with Fano resonance is proposed in this paper. Sealed ethanol in resonant cavity is adopted to further improve sensing performance. Additionally, dual resonant cavity based configuration is designed to generate a Fano-based sharp and asymmetric spectrum, providing high figure of merit in measurements. Moreover, structural parameters are optimized considering both transmission rate and spectral peak width. Certified by numerical calculation, sensitivity of 0.36 nm/°C is acquired with the optimized structure, indicating the designed sensor can play an important role in the nano-integrated plasmonic devices for high-accurate temperature detection.

  12. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Final Report

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1997-10-14

    A major portion of the project involved elucidating the relation between reactivity and the electronic structure of transition-metal (TM) clusters of 2--200 atoms, which required the construction and continuous development of two principal apparati; the Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) apparatus, and Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS). Together, these machines have enabled the most detailed probing of the structure and chemical reactivity of TM clusters. Clusters of all the transition metals were included in these studies. Fundamental aspects in chemisorption, reactivity, and heterogeneous catalysis have also become better understood as a result of these experiments for important classes of systems such as H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} adsorbed onto clusters of many of the metals listed above. In particular, a correlation was found between reactivity of H{sub 2} with Fe, Co, and Ni clusters and differences between the cluster IP and EA. As recounted in a previous technical report, the DOE`s role in the initial discovery of fullerenes at Rice was central, and from the start investigations were made into metal atoms trapped in the fullerenes cage. More recently, the authors have discovered that 2--4 atoms of La, Y, or Sc can be produced by laser vaporization of composite graphite/metal-oxide disks. This work was largely motivated by the prospects of using such endohedral TM metals for their catalytic activity without the well-known difficulties of effective support media and lack of control over particle size. Thus, while it will certainly be important to discover ways to efficiently scale up production (e.g., the solar generation method explored with DOE support), the efforts have concentrated more on characterization, purification, and manipulation of doped fullerenes. For the past two years, much of the group`s effort has involved the production, purification, and characterization of carbon nanotubes.

  13. Using Dynamic Quantum Clustering to Analyze Hierarchically Heterogeneous Samples on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Hume, Allison; /Princeton U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Dynamic Quantum Clustering (DQC) is an unsupervised, high visual data mining technique. DQC was tested as an analysis method for X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) data from the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) group. The TXM group images hierarchically heterogeneous materials with nanoscale resolution and large field of view. XANES data consists of energy spectra for each pixel of an image. It was determined that DQC successfully identifies structure in data of this type without prior knowledge of the components in the sample. Clusters and sub-clusters clearly reflected features of the spectra that identified chemical component, chemical environment, and density in the image. DQC can also be used in conjunction with the established data analysis technique, which does require knowledge of components present.

  14. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  15. Smaller is Plastic: Polymorphic Structures and Mechanism of Deformation in Nanoscale hcp Metals.

    PubMed

    Bhogra, Meha; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2015-06-10

    Using first-principles calculations, we establish the existence of highly stable polymorphs of hcp metals (Ti, Mg, Be, La and Y) with nanoscale structural periodicity. They arise from heterogeneous deformation of the hcp structure occurring in response to large shear stresses localized at the basal planes separated by a few nanometers. Through Landau theoretical analysis, we show that their stability derives from nonlinear coupling between strains at different length scales. Such multiscale hyperelasticity and long-period structures constitute a new mechanism of size-dependent plasticity and its enhancement in nanoscale hcp metals.

  16. Nanoscale structural evolution of electrically driven insulator to metal transition in vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Eugene Shukla, Nikhil; Datta, Suman; Stone, Greg; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Paik, Hanjong; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Cai, Zhonghou; Wen, Haidan; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2013-12-23

    The structural evolution of tensile strained vanadium dioxide thin films was examined across the electrically driven insulator-to-metal transition by nanoscale hard X-ray diffraction. A metallic filament with rutile (R) structure was found to be the dominant conduction pathway for an electrically driven transition, while the majority of the channel area remained in the monoclinic M1 phase. The filament dimensions were estimated using simultaneous electrical probing and nanoscale X-ray diffraction. Analysis revealed that the width of the conducting channel can be tuned externally using resistive loads in series, enabling the M1/R phase ratio in the phase coexistence regime to be tuned.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic application of nanoscale metal and metal oxide heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue

    Nanoscale metals or metal oxides with high surface area to volume ratios have been widely used as catalysts for various chemical reactions. A major challenge to utilize metal nanocatalysts commercially is their tendency to sinter under working reaction conditions. To overcome this, much research is being done to anchor metal nanocatalysts on various supports to prevent their agglomeration. Mesoporous silica, SBA-15 is an attractive support material candidate because of its high surface area, stable structure and chemical inertness. Scientists have anchored metal nanocatalysts onto the pore of SBA-15 and observed some improvement in the stability. However, the interactions between the nanocatalysts and SBA-15 are relatively weak and sintering still occurs resulting in a loss of activity. In order to impart enhanced robustness, a new type of stable metal/SBA-15 nanocomposite has been prepared by intercalating metal nanoparticles into the walls of mesoporous silica SBA-15 by a unique synthetic strategy using metal coordinating agents such as bis[3-(triethoxysilyl) propyl]-tetrasulfide (TESPTS). In this dissertation, systemic research on the preparation parameters and extension to other metals will be presented. The structure changes caused by addition of TESPTS to the preparation of mesoporous silica were investigated. The relationship between increasing amounts of TESPTS and the structural change was obtained. Afterwards, a new type of PdMS catalyst with Pd intercalated in the walls of SBA-15 was synthesized for the first time using a modified preparation pathway. These materials were characterized by N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma. The PdMS system was utilized as an active and robust catalyst for Heck reactions. Notably, after the catalytic reaction, the PdMS catalysts maintained its reactivity and size without undergoing any agglomeration due to the stable nanocomposite structure. Carbon

  18. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  19. Electrophobic interaction induced impurity clustering in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Long; Jiang, W.; Lu, Guang-Hong; Aguiar, J. A.; Liu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the concept of electrophobic interaction, analogous to hydrophobic interaction, for describing the behavior of impurity atoms in a metal, a 'solvent of electrons'. We demonstrate that there exists a form of electrophobic interaction between impurities with closed electron shell structure, which governs their dissolution behavior in a metal. Using He, Be and Ar as examples, we predict by first-principles calculations that the electrophobic interaction drives He, Be or Ar to form a close-packed cluster with a clustering energy that follows a universal power-law scaling with the number of atoms (N) dissolved in a free electron gas, as well as W or Al lattice, as Ec is proportional to (N2/3-N). This new concept unifies the explanation for a series of experimental observations of close-packed inert-gas bubble formation in metals, and significantly advances our fundamental understanding and capacity to predict the solute behavior of impurities in metals, a useful contribution to be considered in future material design of metals for nuclear, metallurgical, and energy applications.

  20. The structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    One metal atom surrounded by its 12 nearest neighbors is considered for both D(3d) (face-centered cubic-like) and D(3h) (hexagonal close-packed-like) geometries. For Al and Be, the neutral cluster and the positive and negative ions are considered for idealized (all bonds equal) and distorted geometries. The D(3d) geometry is found to be the lowest for Be13, while the D(3h) geometry is lower for Al13. This is the reverse of what is expected based upon the bulk metal structures, Be(hcp) and Al(fcc). Al13 is found to have only small distortions, while Be13 shows large distortions for both the D(3d) and D(3h) geometries. The ions have geometries which are similar to those found for the neutral systems. Both all-electron and effective core potential calculations were carried out on the X13 clusters; the agreement is very good.

  1. Recent applications of liquid metals featuring nanoscale surface oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Taylor V.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-05-01

    This proceeding describes recent efforts from our group to control the shape and actuation of liquid metal. The liquid metal is an alloy of gallium and indium which is non-toxic, has negligible vapor pressure, and develops a thin, passivating surface oxide layer. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be patterned and shaped into structures that do not minimize interfacial energy. The surface oxide can be selectively removed by changes in pH or by applying a voltage. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be 3D printed to form free-standing structures. It also allows for the liquid metal to be injected into microfluidic channels and to maintain its shape within the channels. The selective removal of the oxide results in drastic changes in surface tension that can be used to control the flow behavior of the liquid metal. The metal can also wet thin, solid films of metal that accelerates droplets of the liquid along the metal traces .Here we discuss the properties and applications of liquid metal to make soft, reconfigurable electronics.

  2. Magnetic impurities in small metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, G. M.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion of his 80th birthday]Magnetic impurities in small metallic clusters are investigated in the framework of the Anderson model by using exact diagonalization and geometry optimization methods.The singlet-triplet spin gap E shows a remarkable dependence as a function of band-filling, cluster structure, and impurity position that can be interpreted in terms of the environment-specific conduction-electron spectrum. The low-energy spin excitations involve similar energies as isomerizations. Interesting correlations between cluster structure and magnetic behavior are revealed. Finite-temperature properties such as specific heat, effective impurity moment, and magnetic susceptibility are calculated exactly in the canonical ensemble. A finite-size equivalent of the Kondo effect is identified and its structural dependence is discussed.

  3. Nanoscale size effects in crystallization of metallic glass nanorods.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sungwoo; Jung, Yeonwoong; Xie, Yujun; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan; Cha, Judy J

    2015-09-01

    Atomistic understanding of crystallization in solids is incomplete due to the lack of appropriate materials and direct experimental tools. Metallic glasses possess simple metallic bonds and slow crystallization kinetics, making them suitable to study crystallization. Here, we investigate crystallization of metallic glass-forming liquids by in-situ heating metallic glass nanorods inside a transmission electron microscope. We unveil that the crystallization kinetics is affected by the nanorod diameter. With decreasing diameters, crystallization temperature decreases initially, exhibiting a minimum at a certain diameter, and then rapidly increases below that. This unusual crystallization kinetics is a consequence of multiple competing factors: increase in apparent viscosity, reduced nucleation probability and enhanced heterogeneous nucleation. The first two are verified by slowed grain growth and scatter in crystallization temperature with decreasing diameters. Our findings provide insight into relevant length scales in crystallization of supercooled metallic glasses, thus offering accurate processing conditions for predictable metallic glass nanomolding.

  4. Nanoscale etching and flattening of metals with ozone water.

    PubMed

    Hatsuki, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Takatoki

    2012-06-13

    Etchants used for metal etching are generally harmful to the environment. We propose an environmentally friendly method that uses ozone water to etch metals. We measured the dependencies of ozone water etching on the temperature and ozone concentration for several metals and evaluated the surface roughness of the etched surfaces. The etching rate was proportional to the dissolved ozone concentration, and the temperature and the surfaces were smoothed by etching.

  5. Structure stability and spectroscopy of metal clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Theory based on self-consistent field-linear combinations of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital theory was applied to clusters. Four areas were covered: electronic structure, equilibrium geometries, and stability of charged clusters, interaction of metal clusters with H and halogen atoms, thermal stability of isolated clusters, and stability and optical properties of hetero-atomic clusters. (DLC)

  6. Micro/nanoscale patterning of nanostructured metal substrates for plasmonic applications.

    PubMed

    Shankar, S Shiv; Rizzello, Loris; Cingolani, Roberto; Rinaldi, Ross; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2009-04-28

    The ability to precisely control the pattern of different metals at the micro- and nanoscale, along with their topology, has been demonstrated to be essential for many applications, ranging from material science to biomedical devices, electronics, and photonics. In this work, we show a novel approach, based on a combination of lithographic techniques and galvanic displacement reactions, to fabricate micro- and nanoscale patterns of different metals, with highly controlled surface roughness, onto a number of suitable substrates. We demonstrate the possibility to exploit such metal films to achieve significant fluorescence enhancement of nearby fluorophores, while maintaining accurate spatial control of the process, from submicron resolution to centimeter-sized features. These patterns may be also exploited for a wide range of applications, including SERS, solar cells, DNA microarray technology, hydrophobic/hydrophilic substrates, and magnetic devices.

  7. Striped nanoscale phase separation at the metal-insulator transition of heteroepitaxial nickelates.

    PubMed

    Mattoni, G; Zubko, P; Maccherozzi, F; van der Torren, A J H; Boltje, D B; Hadjimichael, M; Manca, N; Catalano, S; Gibert, M; Liu, Y; Aarts, J; Triscone, J-M; Dhesi, S S; Caviglia, A D

    2016-11-02

    Nucleation processes of mixed-phase states are an intrinsic characteristic of first-order phase transitions, typically related to local symmetry breaking. Direct observation of emerging mixed-phase regions in materials showing a first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) offers unique opportunities to uncover their driving mechanism. Using photoemission electron microscopy, we image the nanoscale formation and growth of insulating domains across the temperature-driven MIT in NdNiO3 epitaxial thin films. Heteroepitaxy is found to strongly determine the nanoscale nature of the phase transition, inducing preferential formation of striped domains along the terraces of atomically flat stepped surfaces. We show that the distribution of transition temperatures is a local property, set by surface morphology and stable across multiple temperature cycles. Our data provide new insights into the MIT of heteroepitaxial nickelates and point to a rich, nanoscale phenomenology in this strongly correlated material.

  8. Striped nanoscale phase separation at the metal-insulator transition of heteroepitaxial nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoni, G.; Zubko, P.; Maccherozzi, F.; van der Torren, A. J. H.; Boltje, D. B.; Hadjimichael, M.; Manca, N.; Catalano, S.; Gibert, M.; Liu, Y.; Aarts, J.; Triscone, J.-M.; Dhesi, S. S.; Caviglia, A. D.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleation processes of mixed-phase states are an intrinsic characteristic of first-order phase transitions, typically related to local symmetry breaking. Direct observation of emerging mixed-phase regions in materials showing a first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) offers unique opportunities to uncover their driving mechanism. Using photoemission electron microscopy, we image the nanoscale formation and growth of insulating domains across the temperature-driven MIT in NdNiO3 epitaxial thin films. Heteroepitaxy is found to strongly determine the nanoscale nature of the phase transition, inducing preferential formation of striped domains along the terraces of atomically flat stepped surfaces. We show that the distribution of transition temperatures is a local property, set by surface morphology and stable across multiple temperature cycles. Our data provide new insights into the MIT of heteroepitaxial nickelates and point to a rich, nanoscale phenomenology in this strongly correlated material.

  9. A high fat diet containing saturated but not unsaturated fatty acids enhances T cell receptor clustering on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Boyle, Sarah; Edidin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Cell culture studies show that the nanoscale lateral organization of surface receptors, their clustering or dispersion, can be altered by changing the lipid composition of the membrane bilayer. However, little is known about similar changes in vivo, which can be effected by changing dietary lipids. We describe the use of a newly developed method, k-space image correlation spectroscopy, kICS, for analysis of quantum dot fluorescence to show that a high fat diet can alter the nanometer-scale clustering of the murine T cell receptor, TCR, on the surface of naive CD4(+) T cells. We found that diets enriched primarily in saturated fatty acids increased TCR nanoscale clustering to a level usually seen only on activated cells. Diets enriched in monounsaturated or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids had no effect on TCR clustering. Also none of the high fat diets affected TCR clustering on the micrometer scale. Furthermore, the effect of the diets was similar in young and middle aged mice. Our data establish proof-of-principle that TCR nanoscale clustering is sensitive to the composition of dietary fat.

  10. Nanoscale Nucleation and Growth of Electrodeposited Lithium Metal.

    PubMed

    Pei, Allen; Zheng, Guangyuan; Shi, Feifei; Li, Yuzhang; Cui, Yi

    2017-02-08

    Lithium metal has re-emerged as an exciting anode for high energy lithium-ion batteries due to its high specific capacity of 3860 mAh g(-1) and lowest electrochemical potential of all known materials. However, lithium has been plagued by the issues of dendrite formation, high chemical reactivity with electrolyte, and infinite relative volume expansion during plating and stripping, which present safety hazards and low cycling efficiency in batteries with lithium metal electrodes. There have been a lot of recent studies on Li metal although little work has focused on the initial nucleation and growth behavior of Li metal, neglecting a critical fundamental scientific foundation of Li plating. Here, we study experimentally the morphology of lithium in the early stages of nucleation and growth on planar copper electrodes in liquid organic electrolyte. We elucidate the dependence of lithium nuclei size, shape, and areal density on current rate, consistent with classical nucleation and growth theory. We found that the nuclei size is proportional to the inverse of overpotential and the number density of nuclei is proportional to the cubic power of overpotential. Based on this understanding, we propose a strategy to increase the uniformity of electrodeposited lithium on the electrode surface.

  11. Nano-scale mechanisms of metal rhizostabilization in mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorover, J.; Rushforth, R. R.; Hayes, S.; Root, R.; Maier, R.

    2010-12-01

    Desert mine tailings pose significant health risks to proximal communities and ecosystems because metal-laden particles in the un-vegetated landscapes are readily transported via wind and water erosion. Therefore, establishment of a bioactive, vegetated cover and associated root mass can contribute significantly to site remediation. As a result of delivery to the subsurface of labile forms of reduced carbon, the incipient rhizosphere presents a bioactive zone where geochemical disequilibria are strongly influenced by root-microbe-metal-mineral interactions. Infusion of biota and carbon affect local mineral transformations and the associated speciation of toxic metal(loid)s. We investigated biogeochemical transformations in Pb and Zn containing mine tailings from Klondyke State Superfund site (AZ) as affected by phytostabilization. The research approach was to combine instrumented column experiments with molecular spectroscopy of the solid phase. Pb LIII-edge and Zn K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, synchrotron-based XRF and XRD, and Raman microspectroscopy were employed to assess local coordination and mineralogy of Pb and Zn. Prior to plant introduction, contaminant Pb in the weathered surficial tailings was dominantly present in the minerals plumbojarosite (PbFe6(SO4)4(OH)12) and PbSO4, whereas Zn was dominantly present as hemimorphite (Zn4Si2O7(OH)2.H2O), Zn phyllosilicate, and ZnSO4(s). Column experiments showed that planted columns diminished pore water and effluent concentrations of both Pb and Zn, whereas transport of some other metals (e.g., Cu) was enhanced by complexation with dissolved organic matter. Spectroscopic studies of fine root tissues and root-microbe-metal associations revealed the formation of apparently biogenic Mn oxide plaques that were highly enriched in Zn and Pb.

  12. The chemistry and physics of transition metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, E.K.; Jellinek, J.; Knickelbein, M.B.; Riley, S.J.

    1994-06-01

    In this program the authors study the fundamental properties of isolated clusters of transition metal atoms. Experimental studies of cluster chemistry include determination of cluster structure, reactivity, and the nature of cluster-adsorbate interactions. Studies of physical properties include measurements of cluster ionization potentials and photoabsorption cross sections. Theoretical studies focus on the structure and dynamics of clusters, including isomers, phases and phase changes, interactions with molecules, and fragmentation process.

  13. Nanoscale limitations in metal oxide electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Pickrahn, Katie L; Luntz, Alan C; Bent, Stacey F; Nørskov, Jens K

    2014-10-08

    Metal oxides are attractive candidates for low cost, earth-abundant electrocatalysts. However, owing to their insulating nature, their widespread application has been limited. Nanostructuring allows the use of insulating materials by enabling tunneling as a possible charge transport mechanism. We demonstrate this using TiO2 as a model system identifying a critical thickness, based on theoretical analysis, of about ∼4 nm for tunneling at a current density of ∼1 mA/cm(2). This is corroborated by electrochemical measurements on conformal thin films synthesized using atomic layer deposition (ALD) identifying a similar critical thickness. We generalize the theoretical analysis deriving a relation between the critical thickness and the location of valence band maximum relative to the limiting potential of the electrochemical surface process. The critical thickness sets the optimum size of the nanoparticle oxide electrocatalyst and this provides an important nanostructuring requirement for metal oxide electrocatalyst design.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Nanoscale MgH2 Cluster Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhigang; Allendorf, Mark; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    We calculated the desorption energy of MgH2 clusters using the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, which can provide desorption energies with chemical accuracy (within 1 kcal/mol) and therefore a valuable benchmark for such hydrogen-storage simulations. Compared with these QMC results, the widely used density-functional-theory (DFT) computations cannot reach a consistent and suitable level of accuracy across the thermodynamically tunable range for MgH2 clusters, for a wide range of exchange-correlation functionals. Furthermore, our QMC calculations show that the DFT error depends substantially on cluster size. These results suggest that in simulating metal-hydride systems it is crucial to apply accurate methods that go beyond traditional mean-field approaches as a benchmark of their performance for a given material, and QMC is an appealing method for such a benchmark due to its high level of accuracy and favorable scaling (N^3) with number of electrons.

  15. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs. PMID:27383387

  16. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs.

  17. High Temperature In Situ Compression of Thermoplastically Formed Nano-scale Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, Sanghita; Arora, Harpreet Singh; Lefebvre, Joseph; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of nano-scale metallic glasses was investigated by in situ compression tests in a scanning electron microscope. Platinum-based metallic glass nano-pillars were fabricated by thermoplastic forming. The nano-pillars and corresponding bulk substrate were tested in compression over the range of room temperature to glass transition. Stress-strain curves of the nano-pillars were obtained along with in situ observation of their deformation behavior. The bulk substrate as well as nano-pillars showed an increase in elastic modulus with temperature which is explained by diffusive rearrangement of atomic-scale viscoelastic units.

  18. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zbib, Hussein M.; Bahr, David F.

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these

  19. Analysis of self-propagating intermetallic reaction in nanoscale multilayers of binary metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungjin

    2017-03-01

    Nanoscale multilayers of two different metals could exhibit super-fast intermetallic reaction wave that accompanies high level of exothermic heat release, while additional advantage is a very small ignition delay. They could be a promising candidate for the core technology in realizing micron-sized initiation device for explosives detonation or propellants ignition in various defense and civilian applications. This numerical investigation focuses on the numerical modeling and computations of the ignition and self-propagating reaction behaviors in nanoscale intermetallic multilayer structures made of alternating binary metal layers of boron and titanium. Due to thin film nature of metallic multilayers, intermetallic reaction propagation across the repeating bimetallic multilayers is approximated to the one-dimensional transient model of thermal diffusion and atomic species diffusion, and the intermetallic reaction between two metal species is assumed to follow Arrhenius dependence on temperature. The computational results show the details of ignition and propagation characteristics of intermetallic reaction wave by evaluating and discussing the effects of key parameters, such as multilayer thickness, excess of one metal species, and presence of atomic premixing at interface of boron and titanium layers, on ignition delay and propagation speed of self-sustaining reaction wave.

  20. Reduction-Triggered Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Molybdenum Oxide Molecular Clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Li, Tao; ...

    2016-07-26

    A 2.9 nm molybdenum oxide cluster {Mo132} (Formula: [MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]42-) can be obtained by reducing ammonium molybdate with hydrazine sulfate in weakly acidic CH3COOH/CH3COO- buffers. This reaction has been monitored by time-resolved UV-Vis, 1H-NMR, small angle X-ray/neutron scattering, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The growth of {Mo132} cluster shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a multi-step assembly mechanism for this reaction. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial MoVI centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {MoV2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {MoV2(acetate)} reaches a critical value,more » it triggers the assembly of MoV and MoVI species into {Mo132} clusters. Parameters such as the type and amount of reducing agent, the pH, the type of cation, and the type of organic ligand in the reaction buffer, have been studied for the roles they play in the formation of the target clusters.Understanding the formation mechanism of giant molecular clusters is essential for rational design and synthesis of cluster-based nanomaterials with required morphologies and functionalities. Here, typical synthetic reactions of a 2.9 nm spherical molybdenum oxide cluster, {Mo132} (formula: [MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]42), with systematically varied reaction parameters have been fully explored to determine the morphologies and concentration of products, reduction of metal centers, and chemical environments of the organic ligands. The growth of these clusters shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a general multistep self-assembly mechanism for the formation of giant molecular clusters. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial MoVI centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {MoV2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {MoV2(acetate)} reaches a

  1. Large area nanoscale metal meshes for use as transparent conductive layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuanhao; Li, Qunqing; Chen, Mo; Li, Guanhong; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Jiaping; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-10-01

    We report on the experimental realization of using super-aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) as etching masks for the fabrication of large area nanoscale metal meshes. This method can easily be extended to different metals on both rigid and flexible substrates. The as-fabricated metal meshes, including the ones made of gold, copper, and aluminum, are suitable for use as transparent conductive layers (TCLs). The metal meshes, which are similar to the SACNT networks in their dimensional features of tens of nanometers, exhibit compatible performance in terms of optical transmittance and sheet resistance. Moreover, because the metal meshes are fabricated as an integrated material, there is no junction resistance between the interconnected metal nanostructures, which markedly lowers their sheet resistance at high temperatures. The fabrication of such an effective etching mask involves a simple drawing process of the SACNT networks prepared and a common deposition process. This approach should be easy to extend to various research fields and has broad prospects in commercial applications.We report on the experimental realization of using super-aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) as etching masks for the fabrication of large area nanoscale metal meshes. This method can easily be extended to different metals on both rigid and flexible substrates. The as-fabricated metal meshes, including the ones made of gold, copper, and aluminum, are suitable for use as transparent conductive layers (TCLs). The metal meshes, which are similar to the SACNT networks in their dimensional features of tens of nanometers, exhibit compatible performance in terms of optical transmittance and sheet resistance. Moreover, because the metal meshes are fabricated as an integrated material, there is no junction resistance between the interconnected metal nanostructures, which markedly lowers their sheet resistance at high temperatures. The fabrication of such an effective etching mask involves a simple

  2. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; Berkum, J. G. M. van

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ∼0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  3. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; van Berkum, J. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ˜0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  4. Impact of biogenic nanoscale metals Fe, Cu, Zn and Se on reproductive LV chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiem Nguyen, Quy; Dieu Nguyen, Duy; Kien Nguyen, Van; Thinh Nguyen, Khac; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Tin Tran, Xuan; Nguyen, Huu Cuong; Tien Phung, Duc

    2015-09-01

    Using biogenic nanoscale metals (Fe, Cu, ZnO, Se) to supplement into diet premix of reproductive LV (a Vietnamese Luong Phuong chicken breed) chickens resulted in certain improvement of poultry farming. The experimental data obtained showed that the farming indices depend mainly on the quantity of nanocrystalline metals which replaced the inorganic mineral component in the feed premix. All four experimental groups with different quantities of the replacement nano component grew and developed normally with livability reaching 91 to 94%, hen’s bodyweight at 38 weeks of age and egg weight ranged from 2.53-2.60 kg/hen and 50.86-51.55 g/egg, respectively. All these farming indices together with laying rate, egg productivity and chick hatchability peaked at group 5 with 25% of nanoscale metals compared to the standard inorganic mineral supplement, while feed consumption was lowest. The results also confirmed that nanocrystalline metals Fe, Cu, ZnO and Se supplemented to chicken feed were able to decrease inorganic minerals in the diet premixes at least four times, allowing animals to more effectively absorb feed minerals, consequently decreasing environmental pollution risks.

  5. On the metallicity of open clusters. III. Homogenised sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Open clusters are known as excellent tools for various topics in Galactic research. For example, they allow accurately tracing the chemical structure of the Galactic disc. However, the metallicity is known only for a rather low percentage of the open cluster population, and these values are based on a variety of methods and data. Therefore, a large and homogeneous sample is highly desirable. Aims: In the third part of our series we compile a large sample of homogenised open cluster metallicities using a wide variety of different sources. These data and a sample of Cepheids are used to investigate the radial metallicity gradient, age effects, and to test current models. Methods: We used photometric and spectroscopic data to derive cluster metallicities. The different sources were checked and tested for possible offsets and correlations. Results: In total, metallicities for 172 open cluster were derived. We used the spectroscopic data of 100 objects for a study of the radial metallicity distribution and the age-metallicity relation. We found a possible increase of metallicity with age, which, if confirmed, would provide observational evidence for radial migration. Although a statistical significance is given, more studies are certainly needed to exclude selection effects, for example. The comparison of open clusters and Cepheids with recent Galactic models agrees well in general. However, the models do not reproduce the flat gradient of the open clusters in the outer disc. Thus, the effect of radial migration is either underestimated in the models, or an additional mechanism is at work. Conclusions: Apart from the Cepheids, open clusters are the best tracers for metallicity over large Galactocentric distances in the Milky Way. For a sound statistical analysis, a sufficiently large and homogeneous sample of cluster metallicities is needed. Our compilation is currently by far the largest and provides the basis for several basic studies such as the statistical

  6. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ilyar; Fang, Meng; Duan, Haiming

    2015-04-15

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures.

  7. Redox deposition of nanoscale metal oxides on carbon for next-generation electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Sassin, Megan B; Chervin, Christopher N; Rolison, Debra R; Long, Jeffrey W

    2013-05-21

    Transition metal oxides that mix electronic and ionic conductivity are essential active components of many electrochemical charge-storage devices, ranging from primary alkaline cells to more advanced rechargeable Li-ion batteries. In these devices, charge storage occurs via cation-insertion/deinsertion mechanisms in conjunction with the reduction/oxidation of metal sites in the oxide. Batteries that incorporate such metal oxides are typically designed for high specific energy, but not necessarily for high specific power. Electrochemical capacitors (ECs), which are typically composed of symmetric high-surface-area carbon electrodes that store charge via double-layer capacitance, deliver their energy in time scales of seconds, but at much lower specific energy than batteries. The fast, reversible faradaic reactions (typically described as "pseudocapacitance") of particular nanoscale metal oxides (e.g., ruthenium and manganese oxides) provide a strategy for bridging the power/energy performance gap between batteries and conventional ECs. These processes enhance charge-storage capacity to boost specific energy, while maintaining the few-second timescale of the charge-discharge response of carbon-based ECs. In this Account, we describe three examples of redox-based deposition of EC-relevant metal oxides (MnO2, FeOx, and RuO2) and discuss their potential deployment in next-generation ECs that use aqueous electrolytes. To extract the maximum pseudocapacitance functionality of metal oxides, one must carefully consider how they are synthesized and subsequently integrated into practical electrode structures. Expressing the metal oxide in a nanoscale form often enhances electrochemical utilization (maximizing specific capacitance) and facilitates high-rate operation for both charge and discharge. The "wiring" of the metal oxide, in terms of both electron and ion transport, when fabricated into a practical electrode architecture, is also a critical design parameter for

  8. Structural evolution of nanoscale metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion: A molecular dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S. D.; Jiao, W.; Jing, Q.; Qi, L.; Pan, S. P.; Li, G.; Ma, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Structural evolution in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the strong cooperation of shear transformations can be realized by high-pressure torsion in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses at room temperature. It is further shown that high-pressure torsion could prompt atoms to possess lower five-fold symmetries and higher potential energies, making them more likely to participate in shear transformations. Meanwhile, a higher torsion period leads to a greater degree of forced cooperative flow. And the pronounced forced cooperative flow at room temperature under high-pressure torsion permits the study of the shear transformation, its activation and characteristics, and its relationship to the deformations behaviors. This research not only provides an important platform for probing the atomic-level understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of high-pressure torsion in metallic glasses, but also leads to higher stresses and homogeneous flow near lower temperatures which is impossible previously.

  9. Structural evolution of nanoscale metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion: A molecular dynamics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, S. D.; Jiao, W.; Jing, Q.; Qi, L.; Pan, S. P.; Li, G.; Ma, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the strong cooperation of shear transformations can be realized by high-pressure torsion in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses at room temperature. It is further shown that high-pressure torsion could prompt atoms to possess lower five-fold symmetries and higher potential energies, making them more likely to participate in shear transformations. Meanwhile, a higher torsion period leads to a greater degree of forced cooperative flow. And the pronounced forced cooperative flow at room temperature under high-pressure torsion permits the study of the shear transformation, its activation and characteristics, and its relationship to the deformations behaviors. This research not only provides an important platform for probing the atomic-level understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of high-pressure torsion in metallic glasses, but also leads to higher stresses and homogeneous flow near lower temperatures which is impossible previously. PMID:27819352

  10. Redox Deposition of Nanoscale Metal Oxides on Carbon for Next-Generation Electrochemical Capacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    ruthenium and manganese oxides) provide a strategy for bridging the power/energy performance gap between batteries and conventional ECs. These processes...buffer is added to the electrolyte to bring the pH to ∼8.5.24 Ruthenium Oxide. Ruthenium dioxide (RuO2) is the performance champion among the...Redox Deposition of Nanoscale Metal Oxides Sassin et al. RuO2, with up to 704 F g(RuO2) 1 but only at lower oxide loadings (25 wt %). Ruthenium

  11. Revealing anelasticity and structural rearrangements in nanoscale metallic glass films using in situ TEM diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Ebner, Christian; Izadi, Ehsan; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used a novel diffraction-based method to extract the local, atomic-level elastic strain in nanoscale amorphous TiAl films during in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation, while simultaneously measuring the macroscopic strain. The complementary strain measurements revealed significant anelastic deformation, which was independently confirmed by strain rate experiments. Furthermore, the distribution of first nearest-neighbor distances became narrower during loading and permanent changes were observed in the atomic structure upon unloading, even in the absence of macroscopic plasticity. The results demonstrate the capability of in situ electron diffraction to probe structural rearrangements and decouple elastic and anelastic deformation in metallic glasses. PMID:28382229

  12. Reduction-Triggered Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Molybdenum Oxide Molecular Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Li, Tao; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Hong, Kunlun; Seifert, Soenke; Porcar, Lionel; Do, Changwoo; Keum, Jong Kahk

    2016-07-26

    A 2.9 nm molybdenum oxide cluster {Mo132} (Formula: [MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]42-) can be obtained by reducing ammonium molybdate with hydrazine sulfate in weakly acidic CH3COOH/CH3COO- buffers. This reaction has been monitored by time-resolved UV-Vis, 1H-NMR, small angle X-ray/neutron scattering, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The growth of {Mo132} cluster shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a multi-step assembly mechanism for this reaction. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial MoVI centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {MoV2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {MoV2(acetate)} reaches a critical value, it triggers the assembly of MoV and MoVI species into {Mo132} clusters. Parameters such as the type and amount of reducing agent, the pH, the type of cation, and the type of organic ligand in the reaction buffer, have been studied for the roles they play in the formation of the target clusters.Understanding the formation mechanism of giant molecular clusters is essential for rational design and synthesis of cluster-based nanomaterials with required morphologies and functionalities. Here, typical synthetic reactions of a 2.9 nm spherical molybdenum oxide cluster, {Mo132} (formula: [MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]42), with systematically varied reaction parameters have been fully explored to determine the morphologies and concentration of products, reduction of metal centers, and chemical environments of the organic ligands. The growth of these clusters shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a general

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nanoscale polymer films grafted to metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galabura, Yuriy

    Anchoring thin polymer films to metal surfaces allows us to alter, tune, and control their biocompatibility, lubrication, friction, wettability, and adhesion, while the unique properties of the underlying metallic substrates, such as magnetism and electrical conductivity, remain unaltered. This polymer/metal synergy creates significant opportunities to develop new hybrid platforms for a number of devices, actuators, and sensors. This present work focused on the synthesis and characterization of polymer layers grafted to the surface of metal objects. We report the development of a novel method for surface functionalization of arrays of high aspect ratio nickel nanowires/micronails. The polymer "grafting to" technique offers the possibility to functionalize different segments of the nickel nanowires/micronails with polymer layers that possess antagonistic (hydrophobic/hydrophilic) properties. This method results in the synthesis of arrays of Ni nanowires and micronails, where the tips modified with hydrophobic layer (polystyrene) and the bottom portions with a hydrophilic layer (polyacrylic acid). The developed modification platform will enable the fabrication of switchable field-controlled devices (actuators). Specifically, the application of an external magnetic field and the bending deformation of the nickel nanowires and micronails will make initially hydrophobic surface more hydrophilic by exposing different segments of the bent nanowires/micronails. We also investigate the grafting of thin polymer films to gold objects. The developed grafting technique is employed for the surface modification of Si/SiO2/Au microprinted electrodes. When electronic devices are scaled down to submicron sizes, it becomes critical to obtain uniform and robust insulating nanoscale polymer films. Therefore, we address the electrical properties of polymer layers of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP), and polystyrene (PS) grafted to

  14. Biologically activated noble metal alloys at the nanoscale: for lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, Youjin; Oh, Dahyun; Chen, Tiffany; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2010-07-14

    We report the synthesis and electrochemical activity of gold and silver noble metals and their alloy nanowires using multiple virus clones as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one versatility (E4 virus), noble metal nanowires of high-aspect ratio with diameters below 50 nm were successfully synthesized with control over particle sizes, morphologies, and compositions. The biologically derived noble metal alloy nanowires showed electrochemical activities toward lithium even when the electrodes were prepared from bulk powder forms. The improvement in capacity retention was accomplished by alloy formation and surface stabilization. Although the cost of noble metals renders them a less ideal choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study electrochemically induced transformation at the nanoscale. Given the demonstration of the electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.

  15. Nanoscale zero-valent metals: a review of synthesis, characterization, and applications to environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingyun; Hu, Jiwei; Shi, Xuedan; Fan, Mingyi; Luo, Jin; Wei, Xionghui

    2016-09-01

    Engineered nanoscale zero-valent metals (NZVMs) representing the forefront of technologies have been considered as promising materials for environmental remediation and antimicrobial effect, due to their high reducibility and strong adsorption capability. This review is focused on the methodology for synthesis of bare NZVMs, supported NZVMs, modified NZVMs, and bimetallic systems with both traditional and green methods. Recent studies have demonstrated that self-assembly methods can play an important role for obtaining ordered, controllable, and tunable NZVMs. In addition to common characterization methods, the state-of-the-art methods have been developed to obtain the properties of NZVMs (e.g., granularity, size distribution, specific surface area, shape, crystal form, and chemical bond) with the resolution down to subnanometer scale. These methods include spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A growing body of experimental data has proven that nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) is highly effective and versatile. This article discusses the applications of NZVMs to treatment of heavy metals, halogenated organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nutrients, radioelements, and microorganisms, using both ex situ and in situ methods. Furthermore, this paper briefly describes the ecotoxicological effects for NZVMs and the research prospects related to their synthesis, modification, characterization, and applications.

  16. Bottom-up synthesis of ordered metal/oxide/metal nanodots on substrates for nanoscale resistive switching memory

    PubMed Central

    Han, Un-Bin; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The bottom-up approach using self-assembled materials/processes is thought to be a promising solution for next-generation device fabrication, but it is often found to be not feasible for use in real device fabrication. Here, we report a feasible and versatile way to fabricate high-density, nanoscale memory devices by direct bottom-up filling of memory elements. An ordered array of metal/oxide/metal (copper/copper oxide/copper) nanodots was synthesized with a uniform size and thickness defined by self-organized nanotemplate mask by sequential electrochemical deposition (ECD) of each layer. The fabricated memory devices showed bipolar resistive switching behaviors confirmed by conductive atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrates that ECD with bottom-up growth has great potential to fabricate high-density nanoelectronic devices beyond the scaling limit of top-down device fabrication processes. PMID:27157385

  17. Star Clusters in M31. VII. Global Kinematics and Metallicity Subpopulations of the Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Romanowsky, Aaron J.

    2016-06-01

    We carry out a joint spatial-kinematical-metallicity analysis of globular clusters (GCs) around the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), using a homogeneous, high-quality spectroscopic data set. In particular, we remove the contaminating young clusters that have plagued many previous analyses. We find that the clusters can be divided into three major metallicity groups based on their radial distributions: (1) an inner metal-rich group ([Fe/H] > -0.4); (2) a group with intermediate metallicity (with median [Fe/H] = -1) and (3) a metal-poor group, with [Fe/H] < -1.5. The metal-rich group has kinematics and spatial properties like those of the disk of M31, while the two more metal-poor groups show mild prograde rotation overall, with larger dispersions—in contrast to previous claims of stronger rotation. The metal-poor GCs are the least concentrated group; such clusters occur five times less frequently in the central bulge than do clusters of higher metallicity. Despite some well-known differences between the M31 and Milky Way GC systems, our revised analysis points to remarkable similarities in their chemodynamical properties, which could help elucidate the different formation stages of galaxies and their GCs. In particular, the M31 results motivate further exploration of a metal-rich GC formation mode in situ, within high-redshift, clumpy galactic disks.

  18. Structure of overheated metal clusters: MD simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    The structure of overheated metal clusters appeared in condensation process was studied by computer simulation techniques. It was found that clusters with size larger than several tens of atoms have three layers: core part, intermediate dense packing layer and a gas- like shell with low density. The change of the size and structure of these layers with the variation of internal energy and the size of cluster is discussed.

  19. Nanoscale surface modifications of medically relevant metals: state-of-the art and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variola, Fabio; Brunski, John B.; Orsini, Giovanna; Tambasco de Oliveira, Paulo; Wazen, Rima; Nanci, Antonio

    2011-02-01

    Evidence that nanoscale surface properties stimulate and guide various molecular and biological processes at the implant/tissue interface is fostering a new trend in designing implantable metals. Cutting-edge expertise and techniques drawn from widely separated fields, such as nanotechnology, materials engineering and biology, have been advantageously exploited to nanoengineer surfaces in ways that control and direct these processes in predictable manners. In this review, we present and discuss the state-of-the-art of nanotechnology-based approaches currently adopted to modify the surface of metals used for orthopedic and dental applications, and also briefly consider their use in the cardiovascular field. The effects of nanoengineered surfaces on various in vitro molecular and cellular events are firstly discussed. This review also provides an overview of in vivo and clinical studies with nanostructured metallic implants, and addresses the potential influence of nanotopography on biomechanical events at interfaces. Ultimately, the objective of this work is to give the readership a comprehensive picture of the current advances, future developments and challenges in the application of the infinitesimally small to biomedical surface science. We believe that an integrated understanding of the in vitro and particularly of the in vivo behavior is mandatory for the proper exploitation of nanostructured implantable metals and, indeed, of all biomaterials.

  20. Layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale interlayer gaps as a stable host for lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dingchang; Liu, Yayuan; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Sun, Jie; Wang, Haotian; Yan, Kai; Xie, Jin; Cui, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Metallic lithium is a promising anode candidate for future high-energy-density lithium batteries. It is a light-weight material, and has the highest theoretical capacity (3,860 mAh g-1) and the lowest electrochemical potential of all candidates. There are, however, at least three major hurdles before lithium metal anodes can become a viable technology: uneven and dendritic lithium deposition, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and almost infinite relative dimension change during cycling. Previous research has tackled the first two issues, but the last is still mostly unsolved. Here we report a composite lithium metal anode that exhibits low dimension variation (˜20%) during cycling and good mechanical flexibility. The anode is composed of 7 wt% ‘lithiophilic’ layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale gaps that can host metallic lithium. The anode retains up to ˜3,390 mAh g-1 of capacity, exhibits low overpotential (˜80 mV at 3 mA cm-2) and a flat voltage profile in a carbonate electrolyte. A full-cell battery with a LiCoO2 cathode shows good rate capability and flat voltage profiles.

  1. Exploiting the interaction between a semiconductor nanosphere and a thin metal film for nanoscale plasmonic devices.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Xu, Y; Xiang, J; Li, X F; Zhang, C Y; Tie, S L; Lan, S

    2016-12-07

    The interaction of silicon (Si) nanospheres (NSs) with a thin metal film is investigated numerically and experimentally by characterizing their forward scattering properties. A sharp resonant mode and a zero-scattering dip are found to be introduced in the forward scattering spectrum of a Si NS by putting it on a 50-nm-thick gold film. It is revealed that the sharp resonant mode arises from a new magnetic dipole induced by the electric dipole and its mirror image while the zero-scattering dip originates from the destructive interference between the new magnetic dipole and the original one together with its mirror image. A significant enhancement in both electric and magnetic fields is achieved at the contact point between the Si NS and the metal film. More interestingly, the use of a thin silver film can lead to vivid scattering light with different color indices. It is demonstrated that a small change in the surrounding environment of Si NSs results in the broadening of the resonant mode and the disappearance of the zero-scattering dip. Our findings indicate that dielectric-metal hybrid systems composed of semiconductor NSs and thin metal films act as attractive platforms on which novel nanoscale plasmonic devices can be realized.

  2. Nanoscale surface modifications of medically-relevant metals: state-of-the art and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Variola, Fabio; Brunski, John; Orsini, Giovanna; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco; Wazen, Rima; Nanci, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Evidence that nanoscale surface properties stimulate and guide various molecular and biological processes at the implant/tissue interface is fostering a new trend in designing implantable metals. Cutting-edge expertise and techniques drawn from widely separated fields, such as nanotechnology, materials engineering and biology, have been advantageously exploited to nanoengineer surfaces in ways that control and direct these processes in predictable manners. In this review, we present and discuss the state-of-the-art of nanotechnology-based approaches currently used to modify the surface of metals used for orthopedic and dental applications, and also briefly consider their use in the cardiovascular field. The effects of nanoengineered surfaces on various in vitro molecular and cellular events are firstly discussed. Importantly, this review also provides an overview of in vivo and clinical studies with nanostructured metallic implants, and addresses the potential influence of nanotopography on biomechanical events at interfaces. Ultimately the objective of this work is to give the readership a comprehensive picture of the current advances, future developments and challenges in the application of the infinitesimally small to biomedical surface science. We believe that an integrated understanding of the in vitro and particularly of the in vivo behavior is mandatory for the proper exploitation of nanostructured implantable metals and, as a matter of fact, all biomaterials. PMID:20976359

  3. The investigation of nanoscale effects on schottky interfaces and the scattering rates of high resistivity metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durcan, Christopher

    Understanding the transport of electrons through materials and across interfaces is fundamental to modern day electronics. As electrons travel, interactions with defects within the crystal lattice induce scattering which gives rise to resistivity. At the interface between two materials, electrostatic barriers exist which can impede the flow of electrons. The work of this thesis is to further the understanding of electron transport by measuring the transport across metal-semiconductor interfaces at the nanoscale and measure scattering phenomena in metals. The measurement technique ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) was used due to its ability to probe the scattering processes within a metal film and across metal semiconductor interfaces with nanoscale resolution. It was discovered that the hot electron transmission of the W/Si(001) Schottky barrier decreases over a period of 21 days with the initial Schottky barrier height of 0.71eV decreasing to 0.62eV. The spatial map changes dramatically from 98% of the spectra able to be fit to only 27%. This is supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing the formation of a tungsten silicide which increases in thickness. It was discovered that the deposition of tungsten on silicon using electron beam evaporation and RF magnetron sputtering resulted in dramatic differences in the Schottky barrier height and transport of hot electrons. A difference of ˜70meV was measured in the Schottky barrier height's for both p-type and n-type silicon. Spatial maps show a uniform barrier height for the sputter film and varying barrier height for the e-beam film. Histograms show a symmetric gaussian profile for the sputtered film and an asymmetric profile for the evaporated film, arising from an increase in elastic scattering. The hot electron attenuation length of tungsten and chromium thin films were measured on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates. An attenuation length of 2.26nm was measured at 1.0V bias for tungsten

  4. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy Of Metal Cluster-Adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. M.; Kaldor, A.; Zakin, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    Recent development of the laser vaporization technique combined with mass-selective detection has made possible new studies of the fundamental chemical and physical properties of unsupported transition metal clusters as a function of the number of constituent atoms. A variety of experimental techniques have been developed in our laboratory to measure ionization threshold energies, magnetic moments, and gas phase reactivity of clusters. However, studies have so far been unable to determine the cluster structure or the chemical state of chemisorbed species on gas phase clusters. The application of infrared multiple photon dissociation IRMPD to obtain the IR absorption properties of metal cluster-adsorbate species in a molecular beam is described here. Specifically using a high power, pulsed CO2 laser as the infrared source, the IRMPD spectrum for methanol chemisorbed on small iron clusters is measured as a function of the number of both iron atoms and methanols in the complex for different methanol isotopes. Both the feasibility and potential utility of IRMPD for characterizing metal cluster-adsorbate interactions are demonstrated. The method is generally applicable to any cluster or cluster-adsorbate system dependent only upon the availability of appropriate high power infrared sources.

  5. Probing Stochastic Nano-Scale Inelastic Events in Stressed Amorphous Metal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Fu, X. L.; Wang, S.; Liu, Z. Y.; Ye, Y. F.; Sun, B. A.; Liu, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    One fundamental yet longstanding issue in materials science is how local inelasticity arises within an amorphous structure before yielding occurs. Although many possible scenarios were postulated or predicted by theories and simulations,however, direct experimental evidence has been lacking today due to the lack of a sensitive way to detect nano-scale inelasticity. Through the carefully designed microcompression method as coupled with the state-of-art nano-scale electric resistance measurement, we here unfold a stochastic inelastic deformation process in a Zr-based metallic glass, which takes place via the recurrence of two types of short-lived inelastic events causing structural damage and recovery, respectively, prior to yielding. Our current findings reveal that these stochastic events not only self-organize into sub-critical events due to elastic coupling, but also compete with each other in a way that enables the whole amorphous structure to self-heal as well as to sustain local damage. PMID:25331932

  6. Azobenzenes as light-controlled molecular electronic switches in nanoscale metal-molecule-metal junctions.

    PubMed

    Mativetsky, Jeffrey M; Pace, Giuseppina; Elbing, Mark; Rampi, Maria A; Mayor, Marcel; Samorì, Paolo

    2008-07-23

    Conductance switching associated with the photoisomerization of azobenzene-based (Azo) molecules was observed in nanoscopic metal-molecule-metal junctions. The junctions were formed by using a conducting atomic force microscope (C-AFM) approach, where a metallic AFM tip was used to electrically contact a gold-supported Azo self-assembled monolayer. The measured 30-fold increase in conductance is consistent with the expected decrease in tunneling barrier length resulting from the conformational change of the Azo molecule.

  7. Advanced Electrochemistry of Individual Metal Clusters Electrodeposited Atom by Atom to Nanometer by Nanometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2016-11-15

    Metal clusters are very important as building blocks for nanoparticles (NPs) for electrocatalysis and electroanalysis in both fundamental and applied electrochemistry. Attention has been given to understanding of traditional nucleation and growth of metal clusters and to their catalytic activities for various electrochemical applications in energy harvesting as well as analytical sensing. Importantly, understanding the properties of these clusters, primarily the relationship between catalysis and morphology, is required to optimize catalytic function. This has been difficult due to the heterogeneities in the size, shape, and surface properties. Thus, methods that address these issues are necessary to begin understanding the reactivity of individual catalytic centers as opposed to ensemble measurements, where the effect of size and morphology on the catalysis is averaged out in the measurement. This Account introduces our advanced electrochemical approaches to focus on each isolated metal cluster, where we electrochemically fabricated clusters or NPs atom by atom to nanometer by nanometer and explored their electrochemistry for their kinetic and catalytic behavior. Such approaches expand the dimensions of analysis, to include the electrochemistry of (1) a discrete atomic cluster, (2) solely a single NP, or (3) individual NPs in the ensemble sample. Specifically, we studied the electrocatalysis of atomic metal clusters as a nascent electrocatalyst via direct electrodeposition on carbon ultramicroelectrode (C UME) in a femtomolar metal ion precursor. In addition, we developed tunneling ultramicroelectrodes (TUMEs) to study electron transfer (ET) kinetics of a redox probe at a single metal NP electrodeposited on this TUME. Owing to the small dimension of a NP as an active area of a TUME, extremely high mass transfer conditions yielded a remarkably high standard ET rate constant, k(0), of 36 cm/s for outer-sphere ET reaction. Most recently, we advanced nanoscale

  8. Controlling terahertz radiation with nanoscale metal barriers embedded in nano slot antennas.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong-Ryeol; Bahk, Young-Mi; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Park, Q-Han; Kim, Dai-Sik; Martín-Moreno, Luis; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Bravo-Abad, Jorge

    2011-10-25

    Nanoscale metallic barriers embedded in terahertz (THz) slot antennas are shown to provide unprecedented control of the transition state arising at the crossover between the full- and half-wavelength resonant modes of such antennas. We demonstrate strong near-field coupling between two paired THz slot antennas separated by a 5 nm wide nanobarrier, almost fully inducing the shift to the resonance of the double-length slot antenna. This increases by a factor of 50 the length-scale needed to observe similar coupling strengths in conventional air-gap antennas (around 0.1 nm), making the transition state readily accessible to experiment. Our measurements are in good agreement with a quantitative theoretical modeling, which also provides a simple physical picture of our observations.

  9. Second harmonic generation in nanoscale films of transition metal chalcogenides: Taking into account multibeam interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, S. D.; Kudryavtsev, A. V.; Shestakova, A. P.; Kulyuk, L.; Mishina, E. D.

    2016-05-01

    Second harmonic generation is studied in structures containing nanoscale layers of transition metal chalcogenides that are two-dimensional semiconductors and deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate. The second harmonic generation intensity is calculated with allowance for multibeam interference in layers of dichalcogenide and silicon oxide. The coefficient of reflection from the SiO2-layer-based Fabry-Perot cavity is subsequently calculated for pump wave fields initiating nonlinear polarization at every point of dichalcogenide, which is followed by integration of all second harmonic waves generated by this polarization. Calculated second harmonic intensities are presented as functions of dichalcogenide and silicon oxide layer thicknesses. The dependence of the second harmonic intensity on the MoS2 layer thickness is studied experimentally in the layer of 2-140 nm. A good coincidence of the experimental data and numerical simulation results has been obtained.

  10. Mechanics of nanoscale metallic multilayers: from atomic-scale to micro-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Hoagland, Richard G; Misra, Amit

    2008-01-01

    Layered composites of Cu/Nb with incoherent interfaces achieve very high strength levels. Interfaces play a crucial role in materials strength by acting as barriers to slip. Atomistic models of Cu/Nb bilayers are used to explore the origins of this resistance. The models clearly show that dislocations near an interface experience an attraction toward the interface. This attraction is caused by shear of the interface induced by the stress field of the dislocation. More importantly, atomistic simulations also reveal that interfacial dislocations easily move in interfaces by both glide and climb. Integrating these findings into a micro-scale model, we develop a three-dimensional crystal elastic-plastic model to describe the mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multi layers.

  11. Direct in situ observation of metallic glass deformation by real-time nano-scale indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lin; Xu, Limei; Zhang, Qingsheng; Pan, Deng; Chen, Na; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Yao, Ke-Fu; Wang, Weihua; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    A common understanding of plastic deformation of metallic glasses (MGs) at room temperature is that such deformation occurs via the formation of runaway shear bands that usually lead to catastrophic failure of MGs. Here we demonstrate that inhomogeneous plastic flow at nanoscale can evolve in a well-controlled manner without further developing of shear bands. It is suggested that the sample undergoes an elasto-plastic transition in terms of quasi steady-state localized shearing. During this transition, embryonic shear localization (ESL) propagates with a very slow velocity of order of ~1 nm/s without the formation of a hot matured shear band. This finding further advances our understanding of the microscopic deformation process associated with the elasto-plastic transition and may shed light on the theoretical development of shear deformation in MGs.

  12. Quantitative binomial distribution analyses of nanoscale like-solute atom clustering and segregation in atom probe tomography data.

    PubMed

    Moody, Michael P; Stephenson, Leigh T; Ceguerra, Anna V; Ringer, Simon P

    2008-07-01

    The applicability of the binomial frequency distribution is outlined for the analysis of the evolution nanoscale atomic clustering of dilute solute in an alloy subject to thermal ageing in 3D atom probe data. The conventional chi(2) statistics and significance testing are demonstrated to be inappropriate for comparison of quantity of solute segregation present in two or more different sized system. Pearson coefficient, mu, is shown to normalize chi(2) with respect to sample size over an order of magnitude. A simple computer simulation is implemented to investigate the binomial analysis and infer meaning in the measured value of mu over a series of systems at different solute concentrations and degree of clustering. The simulations replicate the form of experimental data and demonstrate the effect of detector efficiency to significantly underestimate the measured segregation. The binomial analysis is applied to experimental atom probe data sets and complementary simulations are used to interpret the results.

  13. Probing Globular Cluster Formation in Low Metallicity Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Reines, Amy E.

    2008-12-01

    The ubiquitous presence of globular clusters around massive galaxies today suggests that these extreme star clusters must have been formed prolifically in the earlier universe in low-metallicity galaxies. Numerous adolescent and massive star clusters are already known to be present in a variety of galaxies in the local universe; however most of these systems have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) > 8, and are thus not representative of the galaxies in which today's ancient globular clusters were formed. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these massive clusters in environments with few heavy elements, we have targeted several low-metallicity dwarf galaxies with radio observations, searching for newly-formed massive star clusters still embedded in their birth material. The galaxies in this initial study are HS 0822+3542, UGC 4483, Pox 186, and SBS 0335-052, all of which have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) < 7.75. While no thermal radio sources, indicative of natal massive star clusters, are found in three of the four galaxies, SBS 0335-052 hosts two such objects, which are incredibly luminous. The radio spectral energy distributions of these intense star-forming regions in SBS 0335-052 suggest the presence of ~12,000 equivalent O-type stars, and the implied star formation rate is nearing the maximum starburst intensity limit.

  14. Chemical bonding and dynamic fluxionality of a B15(+) cluster: a nanoscale double-axle tank tread.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Jin; You, Xue-Rui; Chen, Qiang; Feng, Lin-Yan; Wang, Kang; Ou, Ting; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-06-21

    A planar, elongated B15(+) cationic cluster is shown to be structurally fluxional and functions as a nanoscale tank tread on the basis of electronic structure calculations, bonding analyses, and molecular dynamics simulations. The outer B11 peripheral ring behaves like a flexible chain gliding around an inner B4 rhombus core, almost freely at the temperature of 500 K. The rotational energy barrier is only 1.37 kcal mol(-1) (0.06 eV) at the PBE0/6-311+G* level, further refined to 1.66 kcal mol(-1) (0.07 eV) at the single-point CCSD(T)/6-311G*//CCSD/6-311G* level. Two soft vibrational modes of 166.3 and 258.3 cm(-1) are associated with the rotation, serving as double engines for the system. Bonding analysis suggests that the "island" electron clouds, both σ and π, between the peripheral ring and inner core flow and shift continuously during the intramolecular rotation, facilitating the dynamic fluxionality of the system with a small rotational barrier. The B15(+) cluster, roughly 0.6 nm in dimension, is the first double-axle nanoscale tank tread equipped with two engines, which expands the concepts of molecular wheels, Wankel motors, and molecular tanks.

  15. Properties and Chemisorptive Reactivity of Transition Metal Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-14

    structure of metal complexes that go beyond ligand field theory ideas, and of practical importance, in that it is crucial to understand how magnetic...aggregates or clusters of these metals with quntum mechanics, we will be able to develop a detailed understanding of metallic bonding. So far, we have...interactions between early and late TM’s in these so-called Engel-Brewer intermetallic compounds. The only theory that has attempted to explain the high

  16. Nanoscale capillary freezing of ionic liquids confined between metallic interfaces and the role of electronic screening.

    PubMed

    Comtet, Jean; Niguès, Antoine; Kaiser, Vojtech; Coasne, Benoit; Bocquet, Lydéric; Siria, Alessandro

    2017-03-27

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are new materials with fundamental importance for energy storage and active lubrication. They are unusual liquids, which challenge the classical frameworks of electrolytes, whose behaviour at electrified interfaces remains elusive, with exotic responses relevant to their electrochemical activity. Using tuning-fork-based atomic force microscope nanorheological measurements, we explore here the properties of confined RTILs, unveiling a dramatic change of the RTIL towards a solid-like phase below a threshold thickness, pointing to capillary freezing in confinement. This threshold is related to the metallic nature of the confining materials, with more metallic surfaces facilitating freezing. This behaviour is interpreted in terms of the shift of the freezing transition, taking into account the influence of the electronic screening on RTIL wetting of the confining surfaces. Our findings provide fresh views on the properties of confined RTIL with implications for their properties inside nanoporous metallic structures, and suggests applications to tune nanoscale lubrication with phase-changing RTILs, by varying the nature and patterning of the substrate, and application of active polarization.

  17. Carbonized nanoscale metal-organic frameworks as high performance electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shenlong; Yin, Huajie; Du, Lei; He, Liangcan; Zhao, Kun; Chang, Lin; Yin, Geping; Zhao, Huijun; Liu, Shaoqin; Tang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-23

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the key steps in clean and efficient energy conversion techniques such as in fuel cells and metal-air batteries; however, several disadvantages of current ORRs including the kinetically sluggish process and expensive catalysts hinder mass production of these devices. Herein, we develop carbonized nanoparticles, which are derived from monodisperse nanoscale metal organic frameworks (MIL-88B-NH3), as the high performance ORR catalysts. The onset potential and the half-wave potential for the ORR at these carbonized nanoparticles is up to 1.03 and 0.92 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH solution, respectively, which represents the best ORR activity of all the non-noble metal catalysts reported so far. Furthermore, when used as the cathode of the alkaline direct fuel cell, the power density obtained with the carbonized nanoparticles reaches 22.7 mW/cm2, 1.7 times higher than the commercial Pt/C catalysts.

  18. Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hu; Chen, Xianlang; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Xing; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-10-07

    Porous graphene, which is a novel type of defective graphene, shows excellent potential as a support material for metal clusters. In this work, the stability and electronic structures of metal clusters (Pd, Ir, Rh) supported on pristine graphene and graphene with different sizes of nanopore were investigated by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thereafter, CO adsorption and oxidation reaction on the Pd-graphene system were chosen to evaluate its catalytic performance. Graphene with nanopore can strongly stabilize the metal clusters and cause a substantial downshift of the d-band center of the metal clusters, thus decreasing CO adsorption. All binding energies, d-band centers, and adsorption energies show a linear change with the size of the nanopore: a bigger size of nanopore corresponds to a stronger metal clusters bond to the graphene, lower downshift of the d-band center, and weaker CO adsorption. By using a suitable size nanopore, supported Pd clusters on the graphene will have similar CO and O2 adsorption ability, thus leading to superior CO tolerance. The DFT calculated reaction energy barriers show that graphene with nanopore is a superior catalyst for CO oxidation reaction. These properties can play an important role in instructing graphene-supported metal catalyst preparation to prevent the diffusion or agglomeration of metal clusters and enhance catalytic performance. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973Program) (2013CB733501), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21176221, 21136001, 21101137, 21306169, and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational

  19. Charge transport in nanoscale "all-inorganic" networks of semiconductor nanorods linked by metal domains.

    PubMed

    Lavieville, Romain; Zhang, Yang; Casu, Alberto; Genovese, Alessandro; Manna, Liberato; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Krahne, Roman

    2012-04-24

    Charge transport across metal-semiconductor interfaces at the nanoscale is a crucial issue in nanoelectronics. Chains of semiconductor nanorods linked by Au particles represent an ideal model system in this respect, because the metal-semiconductor interface is an intrinsic feature of the nanosystem and does not manifest solely as the contact to the macroscopic external electrodes. Here we investigate charge transport mechanisms in all-inorganic hybrid metal-semiconductor networks fabricated via self-assembly in solution, in which CdSe nanorods were linked to each other by Au nanoparticles. Thermal annealing of our devices changed the morphology of the networks and resulted in the removal of small Au domains that were present on the lateral nanorod facets, and in ripening of the Au nanoparticles in the nanorod junctions with more homogeneous metal-semiconductor interfaces. In such thermally annealed devices the voltage dependence of the current at room temperature can be well described by a Schottky barrier lowering at a metal semiconductor contact under reverse bias, if the spherical shape of the gold nanoparticles is considered. In this case the natural logarithm of the current does not follow the square-root dependence of the voltage as in the bulk, but that of V(2/3). From our fitting with this model we extract the effective permittivity that agrees well with theoretical predictions for the permittivity near the surface of CdSe nanorods. Furthermore, the annealing improved the network conductance at cryogenic temperatures, which could be related to the reduction of the number of trap states.

  20. Metallic clusters on a model surface: Quantum versus geometric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, S. A.; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Kanhere, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    We determine the structure and melting behavior of supported metallic clusters using an ab initio density-functional-based treatment of intracluster interactions and an approximate treatment of the surface as an idealized smooth plane yielding an effective Lennard-Jones interaction with the ions of the cluster. We apply this model to determine the structure of sodium clusters containing from 4 to 22 atoms, treating the cluster-surface interaction strength as a variable parameter. For a strong cluster-surface interaction, the clusters form two-dimensional (2D) monolayer structures; comparisons with calculations of structure and dissociation energy performed with a classical Gupta interatomic potential show clearly the role of quantum shell effects in the metallic binding in this case, and evidence is presented that these shell effects correspond to those for a confined 2D electron gas. The thermodynamics and melting behavior of a supported Na20 cluster is considered in detail using the model for several cluster-surface interaction strengths. We find quantitative differences in the melting temperatures and caloric curve from density-functional and Gupta treatments of the valence electrons. A clear dimensional effect on the melting behavior is also demonstrated, with 2D structures showing melting temperatures above those of the bulk or (at very strong cluster-surface interactions) no clear meltinglike transition.

  1. Modeling of cluster organization in metal-doped oxide glasses irradiated by a train of femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetanina, Evgeniya; Chimier, Benoit; Petit, Yannick; Varkentina, Nadezda; Fargin, Evelyne; Hirsch, Lionel; Cardinal, Thierry; Canioni, Lionel; Duchateau, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    The formation of silver cluster structures at submicrometer spatial scales under the irradiation by high-power femtosecond laser pulses with high repetition rate was observed in various glasses containing silver ions. In order to account for the formation of these structures in metal-doped glasses, we present a theoretical model for the organization of noble metallic clusters induced by a train of femtosecond laser pulses. The model includes photoionization and laser heating of the sample, diffusion, kinetic reactions, and dissociation of metallic species. This model was applied to reproduce the formation of cluster structures in silver-doped phosphate glass. The parameters of the silver structures were obtained numerically under various incident pulse intensities and number of pulses. Numerical modeling shows that the involved microscopic physical and chemical processes naturally lead to the emergence of a silver cluster organization, together with charge migration and subsequent trapping giving rise to a strong static electric field buried in the irradiated area as experimentally observed. Based on this modeling, a theoretical basis is provided for the design of new metallic cluster structures with nanoscale size.

  2. Probing Metal Cluster and Metal Oxide Cluster Interactions with Organo-Sulfur and Organo-Phosphorous Molecules using Mass Spectrometry and Anion PES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    DATES COVERED Final 01 Dec 02 – 30 Nov 03 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Probing metal cluster and metal oxide cluster interactions with organo -sulfur and... Organo -phosphorous molecules using mass spectrometry and anion PES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS DAAD19-03-1-0009 6. AUTHOR(S) Caroline...298-102 Probing metal cluster and metal oxide cluster interactions with organo -sulfur and organo

  3. Metallic Clusters in Strong Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, P.-G.; Ullrich, Carsten A.

    1998-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron response of a Na_9^+ cluster excited by strong femtosecond laser pulses.(C. A. Ullrich, P.-G. Reinhard, and E. Suraud, J. Phys. B 30), 5043 (1997) Our approach is based on time-dependent density functional theory within the adiabatic local density approximation, including a recently developed self-interaction correction scheme. We investigate numerically the full electronic dipolar response and multiphoton ionization of the cluster and discuss the ionization mechanism. A strong correlation between induced electronic dipole oscillations and electron emission is observed, leading to a pronounced resonant enhancement of ionization at the frequency of the Mie plasmon.

  4. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters

    PubMed

    König; Rabin; Schulze; Ertl

    1996-11-22

    The agglomeration of copper or silver atoms in a matrix of noble gas atoms to form small clusters may be accompanied by the emission of visible light. Spectral analysis reveals the intermediate formation of electronically excited atoms and dimers as the source of the chemiluminescence. A mechanism is proposed, according to which the gain in binding energy upon cluster formation may even lead to the ejection of excited fragments as a result of unstable intermediate configurations. A similar concept was introduced in the field of nuclear reactions by Niels Bohr 60 years ago.

  5. Size to density coupling of supported metallic clusters.

    PubMed

    Gross, Elad; Asscher, Micha

    2009-01-28

    One of the difficulties in standard growth of metallic nano-clusters on oxide substrates as model catalysts is the strong coupling between clusters size and density. Employing multiple cycles, amorphous solid water-buffer layer assisted growth (ASW-BLAG) procedure, we demonstrate how the size to density coupling can be eliminated under certain conditions. In this study, gold clusters were deposited on a SiO2/Si(100) substrate in UHV, using ASW as a buffer layer assisting aggregation and growth. The clusters were imaged ex situ by tapping mode atomic force microscope (AFM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscope (HR-SEM). In situ Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurements have led to independent evaluation of the gold covered area. In order to increase the clusters density we have introduced a multiple BLAG procedure, in which, a BALG cycle is repeated up to 10 times. The cluster density can be increased this way by more than five fold without changing their size. Above a specific number of cycles, however, the cluster density reaches saturation and a gradual increase in clusters size is observed. Larger clusters correlate with lower saturation density following multiple BLAG cycles. This observation is explained in terms of long range cluster-cluster attraction between clusters already on the substrate and those approaching in the next BLAG cycle. This attraction is more pronounced as the clusters become larger. We have shown that at saturation density, inter-cluster distance can not be smaller than 20 nm for clusters 4 nm in diameter or larger. Employing two consecutive BLAG cycles, characterized by different parameters (metal dosage and buffer layer thickness) result in a bi-modal size distribution. Moreover, it is demonstrated that one can prepare this way co-adsorbed bi-metallic film of e.g. Au and Pd clusters, with specific density and size on the same substrate. The ASW-BLAG procedure is thus expected to introduce a new pathway for tailor made

  6. METAL PRODUCTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: THE NON-GALACTIC COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, Joel N.; Anderson, Michael E.; Dai Xinyu E-mail: michevan@umich.ed

    2010-06-10

    The metallicity in galaxy clusters is expected to originate from the stars in galaxies, with a population dominated by high-mass stars likely being the most important stellar component, especially in rich clusters. We examine the relationship between the metallicity and the prominence of galaxies as measured by the star-to-baryon ratio, M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. Counter to expectations, we rule out a metallicity that is proportional to M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, where the best fit has the gas-phase metallicity decreasing with M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, or the metallicity of the gas plus the stars being independent of M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. This implies that the population of stars responsible for the metals is largely proportional to the total baryonic mass of the cluster, not to the galaxy mass within the cluster. If generally applicable, most of the heavy elements in the universe were not produced within galaxies.

  7. Nanoscale Twinning and Martensitic Transformation in Shock-Deformed BCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L L

    2005-03-22

    Shock-induced twinning and martensitic transformation in BCC-based polycrystalline metals (Ta and U-6wt%Nb) have been observed and studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The length-scale of domain thickness for both twin lamella and martensite phase is found to be smaller than 100 nm. While deformation twinning of {l_brace}112{r_brace}<111>-type is found in Ta when shock-deformed at 15 GPa, both twinning and martensitic transformation are found in Ta when shock-deformed at 45 GPa. Similar phenomena of nanoscale twinning and martensitic transformation are also found in U6Nb shock-deformed at 30 GPa. Since both deformation twinning and martensitic transformation occurred along the {l_brace}211{r_brace}{sub b} planes associated with high resolved shear stresses, it is suggested that both can be regarded as alternative paths for shear transformations to occur in shock-deformed BCC metals. Heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms for shock-induced twinning and martensitic transformation are proposed and discussed.

  8. Nanoscale Metal-Organic Particles with Rapid Clearance for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Liu, Jingjing; Liang, Chao; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Dong, Ziliang; Chao, Yu; Li, Yonggang; Lu, Guang; Chen, Meiwan; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-02-23

    Nanoscale metal-organic particles (NMOPs) are constructed from metal ions and organic bridging ligands via the self-assembly process. Herein, we fabricate NMOPs composed of Mn(2+) and a near-infrared (NIR) dye, IR825, obtaining Mn-IR825 NMOPs, which are then coated with a shell of polydopamine (PDA) and further functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG). While Mn(2+) in such Mn-IR825@PDA-PEG NMOPs offers strong contrast in T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, IR825 with strong NIR optical absorbance shows efficient photothermal conversion with great photostability in the NMOP structure. Upon intravenous injection, Mn-IR825@PDA-PEG shows efficient tumor homing together with rapid renal excretion behaviors, as revealed by MR imaging and confirmed by biodistribution measurement. Notably, when irradiated with an 808 nm laser, tumors on mice with Mn-IR825@PDA-PEG injection are completely eliminated without recurrence within 60 days, demonstrating the high efficacy of photothermal therapy with this agent. This study demonstrates the use of NMOPs as a potential photothermal agent, which features excellent tumor-targeted imaging and therapeutic functions, together with rapid renal excretion behavior, the latter of which would be particularly important for future clinical translation of nanomedicine.

  9. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-01-24

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  10. Nonlinear plasmon response in highly excited metallic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Calvayrac, F.; Reinhard, P.G.; Suraud, E.

    1995-12-15

    We present a dynamical study of the electron response of metallic clusters in the nonlinear regime, as excited, e.g., in ion-cluster interactions or with intense laser beams. We use a quantal time-dependent local-density approximation in axial symmetry to describe the electron dynamics. Ions are either treated in a jellium approximation or explicitly. We find different dynamical regimes depending on the symmetries of the ionic background.

  11. Abundances for globular cluster giants. I. Homogeneous metallicities for 24 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretta, E.; Gratton, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    We have obtained high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio CCD echelle spectra of 10 bright red giants in 3 globular clusters (47 Tuc, NGC 6752 and NGC 6397) roughly spanning the whole range of metallicities of the galactic globular cluster system. The analysis of this newly acquired material reveals no significant evidence of star-to-star variation of the [Fe/H] ratio in these three clusters. Moreover, a large set of high quality literature data (equivalent widths from high dispersion CCD spectra) was re-analyzed in an homogeneous and self-consistent way to integrate our observations and derive new metal abundances for more than 160 bright red giants in 24 globular clusters (i.e. about 16% of the known population of galactic globulars). This set was then used to define a new metallicity scale for globular clusters which is the result of high quality, direct spectroscopic data, of new and updated model atmospheres from the grid of \\cite[Kurucz (1992)]{\\ref41}, and of a careful fine abundance analysis; this last, in turn, is based on a common set of both atomic and atmospheric parameters for all the stars examined. Given the very high degree of internal homogeneity, our new scale supersedes the offsets and discrepancies existing in previous attempts to obtain a metallicity scale. The internal uncertainty in [Fe/H] is very small: 0.06 dex (24 clusters) on average, and can be interpreted also as the mean precision of the c luster ranking. Compared to our system, metallicities on the widely used Zinn and West's scale are about 0.10 dex higher for [Fe/H]>-1, 0.23 dex lower for -1<[Fe/H]<-1.9 and 0.11 dex too high for [Fe/H]<-1.9. The non-linearity of the Zinn and West's scale is significant even at 3 sigma level. A quadratic transformation is given to correct older values to the new scale in the range of our calibrating clusters (-2.24 <= [Fe/H]ZW <= -0.51). A minor disagreement is found at low metallicities between the metallicity scale based on field and cluster

  12. Scattering of electrons on metal clusters and fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerchikov, Leonid G.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Connerade, Jean-Patrick; Greiner, Walter

    1997-09-01

    It is shown that the main contribution to the elastic cross section of fast electrons on metal clusters and fullerenes results from scattering on the frozen cluster potential, which is determined by the electron density distribution of the ground state of the target cluster. The specific shape of the electron distribution in fullerenes and metal clusters manifests itself in the diffraction behaviour of the elastic differential cross section. The analysis of the total elastic cross section dependence upon projectile velocity, the number of atoms in the cluster and its size is provided. The cross section of elastic scattering on a cluster surpasses the sum of the individual scattering cross sections on the equivalent number of isolated atoms. This occurs because of the coherent interaction of the projectile electron with electrons delocalized in the cluster volume. We have demonstrated that collective electron excitations sensitive to the many-electron correlations dominate inelastic scattering. The surface plasmon resonances can be observed in the differential cross section for inelastic scattering. We found a condition for the quadrupole and higher multipole plasmon excitations to contribute relatively little to the electron energy loss spectrum. The results obtained have been compared with experimental data for the electron - fullerene 0953-4075/30/18/013/img7 collision. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and experimental results is reported. We have also demonstrated that plasmon excitations provide the main contribution to the total inelastic cross section over a wide energy range. We have calculated the dependence of the total inelastic cross section on collision energy and compared the result obtained with the experimental data available, giving an interpretation for the plateau region in the cross section as caused by plasmon excitations rather than the cluster fragmentation process. We have shown that the single-particle jellium approximation fails to

  13. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  14. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  15. Reactivity of small transition-metal clusters with CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mats T.; Gronbeck, H.; Holmgren, L.; Rosen, Arne

    1995-09-01

    The size-dependent reactivity of several transition-metal clusters: Con, Nbn, Rhn, and Wn with CO has been investigated in a cluster beam experiment. The reactions occur at single-collision-like conditions and the results are evaluated in terms of the reaction probability (S) in a collision. For all the four metals, clusters with more than 10 - 15 atoms show a high reaction probability, S >= 0.4, rather independent of size. For smaller Nbn and Wn, the reaction probability is lower, and for Nbn, large variations in the CO reactivity are observed in the n equals 8 - 13 range with a distinct minimum at Nb10. Using an LCAO approach within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the adsorption of molecular CO on Nbn has also been investigated theoretically. The geometries of the bare clusters were optimized and two different sites for CO were investigated. The discussion is based on a detailed analysis of Nb4. The calculations show that compact structures with high coordination numbers are the most stable ones for the bare Nb clusters and hollow sites, also maximizing the coordination, are preferred for CO adsorption. The calculations indicate that a high CO-Nbn bond strength is obtained for clusters with a high density of states close to the Fermi level and for which the HOMO level has a symmetry that allows for an efficient back-donation of electrons to the 2(pi) *-orbital of CO. A particularly low chemisorption energy was calculated for the Nb10 cluster.

  16. Metal Optics Based nanoLEDs: In Search of a Fast, Efficient, Nanoscale Light Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Michael Scott

    Since the invention of the laser, stimulated emission has been the de facto king of optical communication. Lasers can be directly modulated at rates as high as 50GHz, much faster than a typical solid state light-emitting diode (LED) that is limited by spontaneous emission to <1GHz. Unfortunately, lasers have a severe scaling problem; they require large cavities operated at high power to achieve efficient lasing. A properly designed LED can be made arbitrarily small and still operate with high-efficiency. On-chip interconnects is an area that is in desperate need of a high-speed, low-power optical emitter that can enable on-chip links to replace current high-loss metal wires. In this work, I will show that by utilizing proper antenna design, a nanoLED can be created that is faster than a laser while still operating at >50% efficiency. I start by formulating an optical antenna circuit model whose elements are based completely off of antenna geometry. This allows for intuitive antenna design and suggests that rate enhancements up to ~3,000x are possible while keeping antenna efficiency >50%. Such a massive speed-up in spontaneous emission would enable an LED that can be directly modulated at 100's of GHz, much faster than any laser. I then use the circuit model to design an arch-dipole antenna, a dipole antenna with an inductive arch across the feedgap. I experimentally demonstrate a free-standing arch-dipole based nanoLED with rate enhancement of 115x and 66% antenna efficiency. Because the emitter is InGaAsP, a common III-V material, I experimentally show that this device can be easily and efficiently coupled into an InP waveguide. Experimental coupling efficiencies up to 70% are demonstrated and directional antennas are employed that offer front to back emission ratios of 3:1. Finally, I show that a nanoLED can still have high quantum yield by using a transition metal dichalcogenide, WSe2, as the emitter material. By coupling a monolayer of WSe2 to a cavity

  17. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  18. Variable Stars In the Unusual, Metal-Rich Globular Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have undertaken a search for variable stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6388 using time-series BV photometry. Twenty-eight new variables were found in this survey, increasing the total number of variables found near NGC 6388 to approx. 57. A significant number of the variables are RR Lyrae (approx. 14), most of which are probable cluster members. The periods of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae are shown to be unusually long compared to metal-rich field stars. The existence of these long period RRab stars suggests that the horizontal branch of NGC 6388 is unusually bright. This implies that the metallicity-luminosity relationship for RR Lyrae stars is not universal if the RR Lyrae in NGC 6388 are indeed metal-rich. We consider the alternative possibility that the stars in NGC 6388 may span a range in [Fe/H]. Four candidate Population II Cepheids were also found. If they are members of the cluster, NGC 6388 would be the most metal-rich globular cluster to contain Population II Cepheids. The mean V magnitude of the RR Lyrae is found to be 16.85 +/- 0.05 resulting in a distance of 9.0 to 10.3 kpc, for a range of assumed values of (M(sub V)) for RR Lyrae. We determine the reddening of the cluster to be E(B - V) = 0.40 +/- 0.03 mag, with differential reddening across the face of the cluster. We discuss the difficulty in determining the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 due to the unusual nature of their RR Lyrae, and address evolutionary constraints on a recent suggestion that they are of Oosterhoff type II.

  19. The structure of deposited metal clusters generated by laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, P.; Brandstättner, M.; Ding, A.

    1991-09-01

    Metal clusters have been produced using a laser evaporation source. A Nd-YAG laser beam focused onto a solid silver rod was used to evaporate the material, which was then cooled to form clusters with the help of a pulsed high pressure He beam. TOF mass spectra of these clusters reveal a strong occurrence of small and medium sized clusters ( n<100). Clusters were also deposited onto grid supported thin layers of carbon-films which were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Very high resolution pictures of these grids were used to analyze the size distribution and the structure of the deposited clusters. The diffraction pattern caused by crystalline structure of the clusters reveals 3-and 5-fold symmetries as well as fcc bulk structure. This can be explained in terms of icosahedron and cuboctahedron type clusters deposited on the surface of the carbon layer. There is strong evidence that part of these cluster geometries had already been formed before the depostion process. The non-linear dependence of the cluster size and the cluster density on the generating conditions is discussed. Therefore the samples were observed in HREM in the stable DEEKO 100 microscope of the Fritz-Haber-Institut operating at 100 KV with the spherical aberration c S =0.5 mm. The quality of the pictures was improved by using the conditions of minimum phase contrast hollow cone illumination. This procedure led to a minimum of phase contrast artefacts. Among the well-crystallized particles were a great amount of five- and three-fold symmetries, icosahedra and cuboctahedra respectively. The largest clusters with five- and three-fold symmetries have been found with diameters of 7 nm; the smallest particles displaying the same undistorted symmetries were of about 2 mm. Even smaller ones with strong distortions could be observed although their classification is difficult. The quality of the images was improved by applying Fourier filtering techniques.

  20. Hitomi observations of the Perseus Cluster / Constant metallicity in the outskirts of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Norbert; Simionescu, Aurora; Urban, Ondrej; Allen, Steven

    2016-07-01

    X-ray observations with the Suzaku satellite reveal a remarkably homogeneous distribution of iron out to the virial radii of nearby galaxy clusters. Observations of the Virgo Cluster, that also allow us to measure the abundances of Si, S, and Mg out to the outskirts, show that the chemical composition of the intra-cluster medium is constant on large scales. These observations require that most of the metal enrichment and mixing of the intergalactic medium occurred before clusters formed, probably more than ten billion years ago, during the period of maximal star formation and black hole activity. We estimate the ratio between the number of SN Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 15-20%, generally consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy.

  1. Metal Structural Environment in ZnxNi1-xO Macroscale and Nanoscale Solid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, Matthea A.; Langell, Marjorie A.

    2014-08-21

    The metal structural environments in macroscale and nanoscale ZnxNi1–xO solid solutions were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD demonstrates that solid solutions form for both macroscale (bulk) and nanoscale crystallites, and that the lattice parameter increases linearly as the amount of zinc increases, an indication of a homogeneous solid solution. XAS for both the bulk material and the nanoparticles reveals that the zinc atoms are incorporated into the rocksalt lattice and do not form zinc oxide clusters. The X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) of the Zn k-edge region in the solid solution is similar to the Ni k-edge region of NiO, and not the Zn k-edge region of ZnO. XPS confirms that solid solutions are formed; Auger parameters for zinc are consistent with a different geometry than the tetrahedral coordination of wurtzite ZnO. Nanoscaled solid solutions show evidence of a lattice contraction relative to macroscale solutions of the same concentration. While the contraction persists across the entire concentration range, the nanoparticle lattice parameter approaches the bulk ZnxNi1–xO value as the concentration of zinc increases to predict ZnO rocksalt lattice parameters that are in agreement with observed ZnO data.

  2. Metallicity in the Galactic Center: The Arches Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, Francisco; Figer, Donald F.; Hillier, D. John; Kudritzki, Rolf P.

    2004-04-01

    We present a quantitative spectral analysis of five very massive stars in the Arches cluster, located near the Galactic center, to determine stellar parameters, stellar wind properties, and, most importantly, metallicity content. The analysis uses a new technique, presented here for the first time, and uses line-blanketed non-LTE wind/atmosphere models fitted to high-resolution near-infrared spectra of late-type nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet stars and OfI+ stars in the cluster. It relies on the fact that massive stars reach a maximum nitrogen abundance that is related to initial metallicity when they are in the WNL phase. We determine the present-day nitrogen abundance of the WNL stars in the Arches cluster to be 1.6% (mass fraction) and constrain the stellar metallicity in the cluster to be solar. This result is invariant to assumptions about the mass-luminosity relationship, the mass-loss rates, and rotation speeds. In addition, from this analysis, we find the age of the Arches cluster to be 2-2.5 Myr, assuming coeval formation.

  3. Hydride encapsulation by molecular alkali-metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Joanna; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2008-07-14

    The sequential treatment of group 12 and 13 Lewis acids with alkali-metal organometallics is well established to yield so-called ''ate' complexes, whereby the Lewis-acid metal undergoes nucleophilic attack to give an anion, at least one group 1 metal acting to counter this charge. However, an alternative, less well recognised, reaction pathway involves the Lewis acid abstracting hydride from the organolithium reagent via a beta-elimination mechanism. It has recently been shown that in the presence of N,N'-bidentate ligands this chemistry can be harnessed to yield a new type of molecular main-group metal cluster in which the abstracted LiH is effectively trapped, with the hydride ion occupying an interstitial site in the cluster core. Discussion focuses on the development of this field, detailing advances in our understanding of the roles of Lewis acid, organolithium, and amine substrates in the syntheses of these compounds. Structure-types are discussed, as are efforts to manipulate cluster geometry and composition as well as hydride-coordination. Embryonic mechanistic studies are reported, as well as attempts to generate hydride-encapsulation clusters under catalytic control.

  4. Nanoscale size dependence on pulsed laser sintering of hydroxyapatite/titanium particles on metal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Martin Yi; Cheng, Gary J.

    2010-12-01

    Nanoscale size effects on pulsed laser coating of hydroxyapatite/titanium nanoparticles (nanoTi) on metal substrate is discussed in this article. Laser coating method has recently been developed to coat bioceramics material on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Laser-coated bioceramics implants have several advantages due to the use of nanosized materials: strong interfacial bonding strength, good biocompatibility and potentially longer lifetime cycle. These advantages benefit from intrinsic properties of nanoparticles. Size effects on melting point, heat capacity, thermal, and electrical conductivities have been discussed. Multiphysics model is built to reveal the mechanism of laser coating process. Two submodules are included in the model: electromagnetic module to represent the laser-nanoparticle interactions and heat transfer module to simulate the heat conduction. Both simulation and experimental results showed that nanoTi, functioning as nanoheaters, effectively enhances the laser coating sinterability. For large nanoTi (>100 nm), sinterability enhancement mainly attributes to the stronger laser-particle interactions due to higher plasmon resonance; for small nanoparticles (<100 nm), not only stronger laser-nanoparticle interactions, reduction on melting point also contributes to sinterability enhancement.

  5. Identifying Deformation and Strain Hardening Behaviors of Nanoscale Metallic Multilayers Through Nano-wear Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Mara, Nathan A.; Schoeppner, R.; Schultz, Bradley M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2016-01-13

    In complex loading conditions (e.g. sliding contact), mechanical properties, such as strain hardening and initial hardness, will dictate the long-term performance of materials systems. With this in mind, the strain hardening behaviors of Cu/Nb nanoscale metallic multilayer systems were examined by performing nanoindentation tests within nanoscratch wear boxes and undeformed, as-deposited regions. Both the architecture and substrate influence were examined by utilizing three different individual layer thicknesses (2, 20, and 100 nm) and two total film thicknesses (1 and 10 μm). After nano-wear deformation, multilayer systems with thinner layers showed less volume loss as measured by laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, the hardness of the deformed regions significantly rose with respect to the as-deposited measurements, which further increased with greater wear loads. Strain hardening exponents for multilayers with thinner layers (2 and 20 nm, n ≈ 0.018 and n ≈ 0.022 respectively) were less than was determined for 100 nm systems (n ≈ 0.041). These results suggest that singledislocation based deformation mechanisms observed for the thinner systems limit the extent of achievable strain hardening. This conclusion indicates that impacts of both architecture strengthening and strain hardening must be considered to accurately predict multilayer performance during sliding contact across varying length scales.

  6. Identifying Deformation and Strain Hardening Behaviors of Nanoscale Metallic Multilayers Through Nano-wear Testing

    DOE PAGES

    Economy, David Ross; Mara, Nathan A.; Schoeppner, R.; ...

    2016-01-13

    In complex loading conditions (e.g. sliding contact), mechanical properties, such as strain hardening and initial hardness, will dictate the long-term performance of materials systems. With this in mind, the strain hardening behaviors of Cu/Nb nanoscale metallic multilayer systems were examined by performing nanoindentation tests within nanoscratch wear boxes and undeformed, as-deposited regions. Both the architecture and substrate influence were examined by utilizing three different individual layer thicknesses (2, 20, and 100 nm) and two total film thicknesses (1 and 10 μm). After nano-wear deformation, multilayer systems with thinner layers showed less volume loss as measured by laser scanning microscopy. Additionally,more » the hardness of the deformed regions significantly rose with respect to the as-deposited measurements, which further increased with greater wear loads. Strain hardening exponents for multilayers with thinner layers (2 and 20 nm, n ≈ 0.018 and n ≈ 0.022 respectively) were less than was determined for 100 nm systems (n ≈ 0.041). These results suggest that singledislocation based deformation mechanisms observed for the thinner systems limit the extent of achievable strain hardening. This conclusion indicates that impacts of both architecture strengthening and strain hardening must be considered to accurately predict multilayer performance during sliding contact across varying length scales.« less

  7. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses.

  8. Atomic resolution electron microscopy of small metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovin, J.-O.; Malm, J.-O.

    1991-03-01

    Atomic resolution imaging of cluster structures has been performed with high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Metal particles of the sizes 1 nanometer to tens of nanometers have been surface profile imaged on different supports; like zeolites, cordierite and amorphous carbon. It is shown that organic ligands in Schmid-clusters coordinated to the metal surface are desorbed or destroyed by the electron beam. Dynamic events on the surfaces and in the bulk of small metal particles have been recorded for small crystals of Au, Pt, Rh and Pb and can be classified under three headings; The smaller the crystals are the faster rearrangements of the crystal structure; “clouds” of atoms existing outside some surfaces are involved in extensive structural rearrangements of the surface or crystal surface growth; localized atom hopping on surfaces during crystal growth and desorption also occurs.

  9. Characterization of oxide supported metal carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John

    The chemisorption of [Ma 3(CO) 1 2] on silica (M = Ru and Os) and alumina (M = Os) has been studied by vibrational and X-ray absorption spectroscopies making close comparisons with model compounds. The results indicate that the first chemisorption species observed has the form [M 3H(CO) 10(O---O)]; the bridging hydride was observed directly for the silica systems as evidenced by the M-H-M bending vibration in the i.r. Also consistent with this structure are the EXAFS analysis of the Ru/SiOz material. This indicated an essentially equilateral ruthenium triangle and coordination to oxygen. The published low frequency Raman data on the Os/Al2Oa product was shown to match most closely with that of model compounds with a bidentate oxygen donor ligand (acac or O2CR). The tethered cluster [O s3H 2(CO) 9(PPh 2C 2H 4SIL)] was found to be a relatively short lived species on a silica surface. Under ambient conditions it reacts further and the i.r., EXAFS and 31P NMR data of this species suggest that the two osmium atoms not coordinated to the tethering phosphine become involved with a bidentate site from the surface.

  10. A silicon-based hybrid plasmonic waveguide with a metal cap for a nano-scale light confinement.

    PubMed

    Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2009-09-14

    A hybrid plasmonic waveguide with a metal cap on a silicon-on-insulator rib (or slab) is presented. There is a low-index material nano-layer between the Si layer and the metal layer. The field enhancement in the nano-layer provides a nano-scale confinement of the optical field (e.g., 50 nm x 5 nm) when operates at the optical wavelength lambda = 1550 nm. The theoretical investigation also shows that the present hybrid plasmonic waveguide has a low loss and consequently a relatively long propagation distance (on the order of several tens of lambda).

  11. Structure, optical properties and defects in nitride (III-V) nanoscale cage clusters.

    PubMed

    Shevlin, S A; Guo, Z X; van Dam, H J J; Sherwood, P; A Catlow, C R; Sokol, A A; Woodley, S M

    2008-04-14

    Density Functional Theory calculations are reported on cage structured BN, AlN, GaN and InN sub- and low nanosize stoichiometric clusters, including two octahedral families of T(d) and T(h) symmetry. The structures and energetics are determined, and we observe that BN clusters in particular show high stability with respect to the bulk phase. The cluster formation energy is demonstrated to include a constant term that we attribute to the curvature energy and the formation of six tetragonal defects. The (BN)(60) onion double-bubble structure was found to be particularly unstable. In contrast, similar or greater stability was found for double and single shell cages for the other nitrides. The optical absorption spectra have been first characterised by the one-electron Kohn-Sham orbital energies for all compounds, after which we concentrated on BN where we employed a recently developed Time Dependent Density Functional Theory approach. The one-electron band gaps do not show a strong and consistent size dependency, in disagreement with the predictions of quantum confinement theory. The density of excited bound states and absorption spectrum have been calculated for four smallest BN clusters within the first ionisation potential cut-off energy. The relative stability of different BN clusters has been further explored by studying principal point defects and their complexes including topological B-N bond rotational defects, vacancies, antisites and interstititials. The latter have the lowest energy of formation.

  12. Complex nanoscale cage clusters built from uranyl polyhedra and phosphate tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Ling, Jie; Qiu, Jie; Pressprich, Laura; Baranay, Melissa; Ward, Matthew; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-20

    Five cage clusters that self-assemble in alkaline aqueous solution have been isolated and characterized. Each is built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids with two or three equatorial edges occupied by peroxide, and three also contain phosphate tetrahedra. These clusters contain 30 uranyl polyhedra; 30 uranyl polyhedra and six pyrophosphate groups; 30 uranyl polyhedra, 12 pyrophosphate groups, and one phosphate tetrahedron; 42 uranyl polyhedra; and 40 uranyl polyhedra and three pyrophosphate groups. These clusters present complex topologies as well as a range of compositions, sizes, and charges. Two adopt fullerene topologies, and the others contain combinations of topological squares, pentagons, and hexagons. An analysis of possible topologies further indicates that higher-symmetry topologies are favored.

  13. Spectroscopy at metal cluster surfaces. Final report, September 15, 1993--September 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    The focus of this research program is the study of gas phase metal clusters to evaluate their potential as models for the fundamental interactions present in catalysis. To do this, the authors characterize the chemical bonding present between the component atoms in metal clusters as well as the bonding exhibited by {open_quotes}physisorption{close_quotes} on metal atom or metal cluster surfaces. Electronic spectra, vibrational frequencies and bond dissociation energies are measured for both neutral and ionized clusters with a variety of laser/mass spectrometry techniques. The authors are particularly interested in bimetallic cluster systems, and how their properties compare to those of corresponding pure metal clusters.

  14. Aggregation of nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides and corresponding effects on metal uptake, retention, and speciation: II. Temperature and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegemeier, J. P.; Reinsch, B. C.; Lentini, C. J.; Dale, J. G.; Kim, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation and growth of nanosized particles can greatly impact their capacity to sorb and retain dissolved metals, thus affecting metal fate and transport in contaminated systems. Aqueous suspensions of synthesized nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides were exposed to dissolved Zn(II) or Cu(II) and aged at room temperature (∼20 °C), 50 °C, and 75 °C for timeframes ranging from 0 to 96 h before sorbed metal ions were desorbed by lowering the suspension pH. Atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of supernatants both before and after the desorption step determined how temperature and time affect macroscopic metal uptake and retention capacities. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy analysis described the local binding environment of the sorbed/retained metals on the solid phase. With increasing aging temperature and time, the initial ∼5-nm oblong nanoparticles formed dense aggregates, lost reactive surface area, and retained progressively larger fractions of the initially-introduced Zn(II) and Cu(II) following the desorption step, with the copper species inhibiting the oriented aggregation of the nanoparticles into nanorods. Based on EXAFS analysis, the speciation of the sorbed metal species evolves with increasing time and temperature from surface-sorbed metal ions, which readily desorb and return to solution, to more strongly-bound, structurally-incorporated metal ions. These retained metals appear to associate intimately with the nanoparticle aggregates by substituting for iron in the nanoparticle lattice or by binding within nanoparticle aggregate pore spaces.

  15. Si clusters are more metallic than bulk Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Koblar; Jellinek, Julius

    2016-12-01

    Dipole polarizabilities were computed using density functional theory for silicon clusters over a broad range of sizes up to N = 147 atoms. The calculated total effective polarizabilities, which include contributions from permanent dipole moments of the clusters, are in very good agreement with recently measured values. We show that the permanent dipole contributions are most important for clusters in the intermediate size range and that the measured polarizabilities can be used to distinguish between energetically nearly degenerate cluster isomers at these sizes. We decompose the computed total polarizabilities α into the so-called dipole and charge transfer contributions, αp and αq, using a site-specific analysis. When the per-atom values of these quantities are plotted against N-1 /3, clear linear trends emerge that can be extrapolated to the large size limit (N-1 /3→0 ), resulting in a value for α/N of 30.5 bohrs3/atom that is significantly larger than the per-atom polarizability of semiconducting bulk Si, 25.04 bohrs3/atom. This indicates that Si clusters possess a higher degree of metallicity than bulk Si, a conclusion that is consistent with the strong electrostatic screening of the cluster interiors made evident by the analysis of the calculated atomic polarizabilities.

  16. The lifetime of electronic excitations in metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, M.; Díez Muiño, R.; Echenique, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    Density functional theory and the self-energy formalism are used to evaluate the lifetime of electronic excitations in metal clusters of nanometre size. The electronic structure of the cluster is obtained in the jellium model and spherical symmetry is assumed. Two effects that depend on the size of the clusters are discussed: the change in the number of final states to which the excitation can decay, and the modification in the screened interaction between electrons. For clusters with density parameter rs = 4 and diameter a few nanometres, a lifetime value of {\\approx }5 fs is reached for electronic excitations of {\\approx }1 eV. This value is of the same order of magnitude of that obtained in the bulk limit at the same level of approximation. For smaller clusters, a distinct non-monotonic behaviour of the lifetime as a function of the cluster size is found and the lifetime of excitations of {\\approx }1 eV can vary between 4 and 30 fs.

  17. Metallicity of Globular Cluster M13 from VI CCD Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Young-Jong

    2000-12-01

    From the VI images of M13, obtained by using 2K CCD camera and the BOAO 1.8m telescope, we derive the (V-I)-V CMD of M13. From the shapes of red giant branch, the magnitude of horizontal branch, and the giant branch bump on the constructed CMD, we determined the metallicity of the globular cluster to be 1.74 ~<[Fe/H]~< -1.41. The good agreement between our determination of [Fe/H] and those determined by using other methods implies that the morphology of red giant and horizontal branches on (V-I)-V CMD's can be good indirect metallicity indicators of Galactic globular clusters.

  18. Nanoscale zero-valent iron for metal/metalloid removal from model hydraulic fracturing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuqing; Lei, Cheng; Khan, Eakalak; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Lin, Daohui; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was tested for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), and As(V) in model saline wastewaters from hydraulic fracturing. Increasing ionic strength (I) from 0.35 to 4.10 M (Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters) increased Cu(II) removal (25.4-80.0%), inhibited Zn(II) removal (58.7-42.9%), slightly increased and then reduced Cr(VI) removal (65.7-44.1%), and almost unaffected As(V) removal (66.7-75.1%) by 8-h reaction with nZVI at 1-2 g L(-1). The removal kinetics conformed to pseudo-second-order model, and increasing I decreased the surface area-normalized rate coefficient (ksa) of Cu(II) and Cr(VI), probably because agglomeration of nZVI in saline wastewaters restricted diffusion of metal(loid)s to active surface sites. Increasing I induced severe Fe dissolution from 0.37 to 0.77% in DIW to 4.87-13.0% in Day-90 wastewater; and Fe dissolution showed a significant positive correlation with Cu(II) removal. With surface stabilization by alginate and polyvinyl alcohol, the performance of entrapped nZVI in Day-90 wastewater was improved for Zn(II) and Cr(VI), and Fe dissolution was restrained (3.20-7.36%). The X-ray spectroscopic analysis and chemical speciation modelling demonstrated that the difference in removal trends from Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters was attributed to: (i) distinctive removal mechanisms of Cu(II) and Cr(VI) (adsorption, (co-)precipitation, and reduction), compared to Zn(II) (adsorption) and As(V) (bidentate inner-sphere complexation); and (ii) changes in solution speciation (e.g., from Zn(2+) to ZnCl3(-) and ZnCl4(2-); from CrO4(2-) to CaCrO4 complex). Bare nZVI was susceptible to variations in wastewater chemistry while entrapped nZVI was more stable and environmentally benign, which could be used to remove metals/metalloids before subsequent treatment for reuse/disposal.

  19. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  20. The old, metal-poor, anticentre open cluster Trumpler 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P.; Cocozza, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Pancino, E.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrera, R.; Tosi, M.

    2015-01-01

    As part of a long-term programme, we analyse the evolutionary status and properties of the old and populous open cluster Trumpler 5 (Tr 5), located in the Galactic anticentre direction, almost on the Galactic plane. Tr 5 was observed with Wide Field Imager@MPG/ESO Telescope using the Bessel U, B, and V filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method, i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMD with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different stellar evolution sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). Age, reddening, and distance are derived through the synthetic CMD method using stellar evolutionary models with subsolar metallicity (Z = 0.004 or Z = 0.006). Additional spectroscopic observations with Ultraviolet VLT Echelle Spectrograph@Very Large Telescope of three red clump stars of the cluster were used to determine more robustly the chemical properties of the cluster. Our analysis shows that Tr 5 has subsolar metallicity, with [Fe/H] = -0.403 ± 0.006 dex (derived from spectroscopy), age between 2.9 and 4 Gyr (the lower age is found using stellar models without core overshooting), reddening E(B - V) in the range 0.60-0.66 mag complicated by a differential pattern (of the order of ˜±0.1 mag), and distance modulus (m - M)0 = 12.4 ± 0.1 mag.

  1. Metallic-like bonding in plasma-born silicon nanocrystals for nanoscale bandgap engineering.

    PubMed

    Vach, Holger; Ivanova, Lena V; Timerghazin, Qadir K; Jardali, Fatme; Le, Ha-Linh Thi

    2016-10-27

    Based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we show that small nanoclusters of about 1 nm size spontaneously generated in a low-temperature silane plasma do not possess tetrahedral structures, but are ultrastable. Apparently small differences in the cluster structure result in substantial modifications in their electric, magnetic, and optical properties, without the need for any dopants. Their non-tetrahedral geometries notably lead to electron deficient bonds that introduce efficient electron delocalization that strongly resembles the one of a homogeneous electron gas leading to metallic-like bonding within a semiconductor nanocrystal. As a result, pure hydrogenated silicon clusters that form by self-assembly in a plasma reactor possess optical gaps covering most of the solar spectrum from 1.0 eV to 5.2 eV depending simply on their structure and, in turn, on their degree of electron delocalization. This feature makes them ideal candidates for future bandgap engineering not only for photovoltaics, but also for many nano-electronic devices employing nothing else but silicon and hydrogen atoms.

  2. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than

  3. Unusual Electro-Optic Kerr Response in a Self-Stabilized Amorphous Blue Phase with Nanoscale Smectic Clusters.

    PubMed

    Le, Khoa V; Hafuri, Miho; Ocak, Hale; Bilgin-Eran, Belkız; Tschierske, Carsten; Sasaki, Takeo; Araoka, Fumito

    2016-05-18

    We investigated the electro-optic response in the "foggy" amorphous blue phase (BPIII) as well as in the isotropic phase. To the best of our knowledge, such a study has not yet been performed due to the very limited thermal range of BPIII. In this study, we used a single-component chiral bent-core liquid crystal with a self-stabilized BPIII, which is stable over a wide temperature range. The results show that the response time is on the order of hundreds of microseconds in the isotropic phase and increases to 1-2 ms in the BPIII (at TI-BP -T <1), then drastically increases up to a few tens of milliseconds upon further cooling in BPIII. Such an unusual behavior was explained on the basis of the high rotational viscosity and/or the existence of nanoscale smectic (Sm) clusters. The Kerr constant was also measured and found to be ∼500 pm V(-2) , which is the largest among bent-core BP systems reported so far and comparable with that of polymer-stabilized BPs.

  4. Multi-physics simulation of metal printing at micro/nanoscale using meniscus-confined electrodeposition: Effect of environmental humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsali, Seyedreza; Daryadel, Soheil; Zhou, Zhong; Behroozfar, Ali; Qian, Dong; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Capability to print metals at micro/nanoscale in arbitrary 3D patterns at local points of interest will have applications in nano-electronics and sensors. Meniscus-confined electrodeposition (MCED) is a manufacturing process that enables depositing metals from an electrolyte containing nozzle (pipette) in arbitrary 3D patterns. In this process, a meniscus (liquid bridge or capillary) between the pipette tip and the substrate governs the localized electrodeposition process. Fabrication of metallic microstructures using this process is a multi-physics process in which electrodeposition, fluid dynamics, and mass and heat transfer physics are simultaneously involved. We utilized multi-physics finite element simulation, guided by experimental data, to understand the effect of water evaporation from the liquid meniscus at the tip of the nozzle for deposition of free-standing copper microwires in MCED process.

  5. Nanoscale Positional Order Correlations: Swarms, Cybotactic Groups, Clusters, and Pretransitional Fluctuations in Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satyendra; Agra-Kooijman, Dena; Acharya, Bharat

    2012-02-01

    Short-range molecular associations in organic liquids were first described as ``cybotactic'' groups [1] followed by the development of the swarm theory [2] to explain the structure, strong light scattering, and flow behavior of the nematic (N) liquid crystal phase. However, these ideas became inconsequential with the advent of the Oseen-Frank's continuum theory [3]. In 1970, de Vries reinvoked cybotactic groups for the N phase of bis-(4'-n-octyloxybenzal)-2-chloro-l,4-phenylenediamine. These were eventually understood to be SmC pretransitional fluctuations, i.e., small correlated regions of the lower symmetry phase near the transition. Thermotropic biaxial mesophases have resurrected the faith in cybotacticity in the guise of a new word - ``clusters''. Previous x-ray studies of normal organic fluids, and calamitic, lyotropic, and bent-core mesogens show that these clusters fall into three groups depending on the relative contributions of normal liquid structure and pretransitional fluctuations. A comparison with other organic and inorganic fluids will also be made.[4pt] [1] G.W. Stewart, Phys. Rev. 35, 726 (1930).[0pt] [2] L.S. Ornestein and W. Kast, Trans. Farad. Soc. 29, 931 (1933).[0pt] [3] FC Frank, Discuss. Faraday Soc. 25, 19 (1958); W. Oseen, Ark. Mat., Astron. Fys. 19, 1 (1925).

  6. Electronic Principles Governing the Stability and Reactivity of Ligated Metal and Silicon Encapsulated Transition Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Marissa Baddick

    A thorough understanding of the underlying electronic principles guiding the stability and reactivity of clusters has direct implications for the identification of stable clusters for incorporation into clusters-assembled materials with tunable properties. This work explores the electronic principles governing the stability and reactivity of two types of clusters: ligated metal clusters and silicon encapsulated transition metal clusters. In the first case, the reactivity of iodine-protected aluminum clusters, Al13Ix - (x=0-4) and Al14Iy- (y=0-5), with the protic species methanol was studied. The symmetrical ground states of Al13Ix- showed no reactivity with methanol but reactivity was achieved in a higher energy isomer of Al 13I2- with iodines on adjacent aluminum atoms -- complementary Lewis acid-base active sites were induced on the opposite side of the cluster capable of breaking the O-H bond in methanol. Al 14Iy- (y=2-5) react with methanol, but only at the ligated adatom site. Reaction of methanol with Al14 - and Al14I- showed that ligation of the adatom was necessary for the reaction to occur there -- revealing the concept of a ligand-activated adatom. In the second case, the study focused heavily on CrSi12, a silicon encapsulated transition metal cluster whose stability and the reason for that stability has been debated heavily in the literature. Calculations of the energetic properties of CrSi n (n=6-16) revealed both CrSi12 and CrSi14 to have enhanced stability relative to other clusters; however CrSi12 lacks all the traditional markers of a magic cluster. Molecular orbital analysis of each of these clusters showed the CNFEG model to be inadequate in describing their stability. Because the 3dz2 orbital of Cr is unfilled in CrSi12, this cluster has only 16 effective valence electrons, meaning that the 18-electron rule is not applicable. The moderate stability of CrSi 12 can be accounted for by the crystal-field splitting of the 3d orbitals, which pushes the

  7. Metal Adatoms and Clusters on Ultrathin Zirconia Films

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of transition metals on zirconia has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Since STM requires electrical conductivity, ultrathin ZrO2 films grown by oxidation of Pt3Zr(0001) and Pd3Zr(0001) were used as model systems. DFT studies were performed for single metal adatoms on supported ZrO2 films as well as the (1̅11) surface of monoclinic ZrO2. STM shows decreasing cluster size, indicative of increasing metal–oxide interaction, in the sequence Ag < Pd ≈ Au < Ni ≈ Fe. Ag and Pd nucleate mostly at steps and domain boundaries of ZrO2/Pt3Zr(0001) and form three-dimensional clusters. Deposition of low coverages of Ni and Fe at room temperature leads to a high density of few-atom clusters on the oxide terraces. Weak bonding of Ag to the oxide is demonstrated by removing Ag clusters with the STM tip. DFT calculations for single adatoms show that the metal–oxide interaction strength increases in the sequence Ag < Au < Pd < Ni on monoclinic ZrO2, and Ag ≈ Au < Pd < Ni on the supported ultrathin ZrO2 film. With the exception of Au, metal nucleation and growth on ultrathin zirconia films follow the usual rules: More reactive (more electropositive) metals result in a higher cluster density and wet the surface more strongly than more noble metals. These bind mainly to the oxygen anions of the oxide. Au is an exception because it can bind strongly to the Zr cations. Au diffusion may be impeded by changing its charge state between −1 and +1. We discuss differences between the supported ultrathin zirconia films and the surfaces of bulk ZrO2, such as the possibility of charge transfer to the substrate of the films. Due to their large in-plane lattice constant and the variety of adsorption sites, ZrO2{111} surfaces are more reactive than many other oxygen-terminated oxide surfaces. PMID:27213024

  8. The Old, Super-Metal-Rich Open Cluster, NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G. G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-08-01

    Stellar evolution and Galactic evolution have both been greatly advanced by the study of star clusters. In addition the elemental abundance results from clusters have revealed information about Galactic chemical evolution and nucleosynthesis. The cluster, NGC 6791, has a number of bizarre properties that make it especially interesting for comparative cluster studies. It is old (8.3 Gyr) yet metal-rich ([Fe/H] = +0.30). It has a heliocentric distance of 4 kpc and a galactic latitude of +11 degrees which makes it 1 kpc above the galactic plane. Its boxy orbit has a high eccentricity (~0.5) with a perigalactic distance of 3 kpc and an apogalactic distance of 10 kpc. The orbital period of ~130 Myr indicates that it has crossed the Galactic plane several times yet has remained as an intact cluster. We have determined abundances from high-resolution (R = 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra of turn-off stars in this open cluster NGC 6791. We have a solid determination of [Fe/H] = +0.30 +/-0.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 Å and are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]n with a mean of -0.06 +/-0.02, indicating a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of old, metal-rich field stars. The Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, have values of [Cr/Fe] = +0.05 +/-0.02 and [Ni/Fe] = +0.04 +/-0.01. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis; this is consistent with the upper limits in this temperature range for turn-off/subgiant stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. We speculate that no stars in NGC 6791 have retained the Li with which they formed.

  9. Metallic-nanowire-loaded silicon-on-insulator structures: a route to low-loss plasmon waveguiding on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yusheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-03-14

    The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced down to the nanometer scale. Here we introduce a class of low-loss guiding schemes by integrating silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides with plasmon nanowire structures. The closely spaced silicon and metal configurations allow efficient light squeezing within the nanometer, low-index silica gaps between them, enabling deep-subwavelength light transmission with low modal attenuation. Optimizations of key structural parameters unravel the wide-range existence of the high-performance hybrid nanowire plasmon mode, which demonstrates improved guiding properties compared to the conventional hybrid and nanowire plasmon polaritons. The excitation strategy of the guided mode and the feasibility of the waveguide for compact photonic integration as well as active components are also discussed to lay the foundation for its practical implementation. The remarkable properties of these metallic-nanowire-loaded SOI waveguides potentially lend themselves to the implementation of high performance nanophotonic components, and open up promising opportunities for a variety of intriguing applications on the nanoscale.

  10. Protein-protected luminescent noble metal quantum clusters: an emerging trend in atomic cluster nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal quantum clusters (NMQCs) are the missing link between isolated noble metal atoms and nanoparticles. NMQCs are sub-nanometer core sized clusters composed of a group of atoms, most often luminescent in the visible region, and possess intriguing photo-physical and chemical properties. A trend is observed in the use of ligands, ranging from phosphines to functional proteins, for the synthesis of NMQCs in the liquid phase. In this review, we briefly overview recent advancements in the synthesis of protein protected NMQCs with special emphasis on their structural and photo-physical properties. In view of the protein protection, coupled with direct synthesis and easy functionalization, this hybrid QC-protein system is expected to have numerous optical and bioimaging applications in the future, pointers in this direction are visible in the literature.

  11. FURTHER DEFINITION OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AROUND BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Rothberg, Barry E-mail: harris@physics.mcmaster.ca E-mail: whitmore@stsci.edu

    2009-09-15

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass-metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our combined data sets show a mean trend for the metal-poor subpopulation that corresponds to a scaling of heavy-element abundance with cluster mass Z {approx} M {sup 0.30{+-}}{sup 0.05}. No trend is seen for the metal-rich subpopulation which has a scaling relation that is consistent with zero. We also find that the scaling exponent is independent of the GCS specific frequency and host galaxy luminosity, except perhaps for dwarf galaxies. We present new photometry in (g',i') obtained with Gemini/GMOS for the GC populations around the southern giant ellipticals NGC 5193 and IC 4329. Both galaxies have rich cluster populations which show up as normal, bimodal sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. We test the observed MMRs and argue that they are statistically real, and not an artifact caused by the method we used. We also argue against asymmetric contamination causing the observed MMR as our mean results are no different from other contamination-free studies. Finally, we compare our method to the standard bimodal fitting method (KMM or RMIX) and find our results are consistent. Interpretation of these results is consistent with recent models for GC formation in which the MMR is determined by GC self-enrichment during their brief formation period.

  12. Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen R.

    Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy (APES) and density functional theory (DFT) are applied to the study of structure and reactivity in small metal containing molecules. The studies described fall into two general categories: the study of bare metal clusters and the study of metal/organic ligand reactions. The current lack of spectroscopic data for small, bare gas-phase metal compounds makes the experimental study of such compounds important for understanding structure and bonding in open-shell metallic species. The heteronuclear diatomic anions MCu- (M = Cr, Mo) were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, and studied experimentally with APES. Anion and neutral vibrational frequencies and MCu electron affinities were obtained for both systems. The experiments were supplemented by DFT calculations. The combined use of experiment and theory allows for the assignment of both photoelectron spectra, including a reassignment of the CrCu ground state reported in the literature. Similarly, DFT was used to assign the anionic/neutral electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of Al3- and Al3O-. The study of partially ligated organometallic complexes offers a means of examining the interactions between metal atoms and individual ligand molecules. DFT was used to assign electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of NbC2H2-, NbC4H4 -NbC6H6- and VC6H 6-. Comparison of the NbnHn - (n = 2, 4, 6) spectra (obtained through the reaction of C2 H4 and Nb) with DFT results provides the first direct spectroscopic evidence of the conversion of ethylene to benzene by a gas phase metal atom. Experiments were used to probe the reactivity of Y with C2H 4 in an effort to examine the generality of the metal induced C 2H4 dehydrogenation/cyclization reactions. Some of the key products in the Y reactions were YC2H-, YC 2H2-, and YC6H5 -. However, the results

  13. An age difference of two billion years between a metal-rich and a metal-poor globular cluster.

    PubMed

    Hansen, B M S; Kalirai, J S; Anderson, J; Dotter, A; Richer, H B; Rich, R M; Shara, M M; Fahlman, G G; Hurley, J R; King, I R; Reitzel, D; Stetson, P B

    2013-08-01

    Globular clusters trace the formation history of the spheroidal components of our Galaxy and other galaxies, which represent the bulk of star formation over the history of the Universe. The clusters exhibit a range of metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium), with metal-poor clusters dominating the stellar halo of the Galaxy, and higher-metallicity clusters found within the inner Galaxy, associated with the stellar bulge, or the thick disk. Age differences between these clusters can indicate the sequence in which the components of the Galaxy formed, and in particular which clusters were formed outside the Galaxy and were later engulfed along with their original host galaxies, and which were formed within it. Here we report an absolute age of 9.9 ± 0.7 billion years (at 95 per cent confidence) for the metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tucanae, determined by modelling the properties of the cluster's white-dwarf cooling sequence. This is about two billion years younger than has been inferred for the metal-poor cluster NGC 6397 from the same models, and provides quantitative evidence that metal-rich clusters like 47 Tucanae formed later than metal-poor halo clusters like NGC 6397.

  14. Shell structure of magnesium and other divalent metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Diederich, Th.; Doeppner, T.; Fennel, Th.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.

    2005-08-15

    Clusters of the divalent metals magnesium, cadmium, and zinc have been grown in ultracold helium nanodroplets and studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry, with a special emphasis on magnesium. The mass spectra of all materials show similar characteristic features independent of the chosen ionization technique - i.e., electron impact ionization as well as nanosecond and femtosecond multiphoton excitation. In the lower-size range the abundance distributions can be explained by an electronic shell structure. The associated electron delocalization - i.e., metallic bonding - is found to set in at about N=20 atoms. For Mg{sub N} we have resolved crossings of electronic levels at the highest-occupied molecular orbital which result in additional magic numbers compared to the alkali metals: e.g., Mg{sub 40} with 80 electrons. This specific electronic shell structure is also present in the intensity pattern of doubly charged Mg{sub N}. For larger clusters (N{>=}92) a coexistence of electronic shell effects and geometrical packing is observed and a clear signature of icosahedral structure is present beyond N{>=}147.

  15. An anti-ultrasonic-stripping effect in confined micro/nanoscale cavities and its applications for efficient multiscale metallic patterning.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Quan; Chen, Yiqin; Li, Zhiqin; Bi, Kaixi; Zhang, Guanhua; Duan, Huigao

    2016-12-01

    We report a method to reliably and efficiently fabricate high-fidelity metallic structures from a ten-nanometer to a millimeter scale based on an anti-ultrasonic-stripping (AUS) effect in confined micro/nanoscale cavities. With this AUS effect, metallic structures, which are surrounded by the pre-patterned closed templates, could be defined through selectively removing the evaporated metallic layer at the top and outside of the templates by ultrasonic-cavitation-induced stripping. Because only pre-patterned templates are required for exposure in this multiscale patterning process, this AUS-based process enables much smaller and more reliable plasmonic nanogaps due to the mitigated proximity effect and allows rapid fabrication of multiscale metallic structures which require both tiny and large structures. With unprecedented efficiency and resolution down to a ten-nanometer scale, various metallic structures were fabricated using this AUS-effect-based multiscale patterning process. This AUS effect paves the way for direct writing of metallic structures with a high resolution over a large area for practical applications in plasmonics and nanogap-based electronics.

  16. The Sound Parameter Effect in Metal-Rich Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K

    1998-01-01

    Recent Hubble Space Telescope observations have found that the horizontal branches (HBs) in the metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 slope upward with decreasing B - V. Such a slope is not predicted by canonical HB models and cannot be produced by either a greater cluster age or enhanced mass loss along the red giant branch (RGB). The peculiar HB morphology in these clusters may provide an important clue for understanding the second-parameter effect. We have carried out extensive evolutionary calculations and numerical simulations in order to explore three noncanonical scenarios for explaining the sloped HBs in NGC 6388 and NGC 6441: (1) a high cluster helium abundance scenario, in which the HB evolution is characterized by long blue loops; (2) a rotation scenario, in which internal rotation during the RGB phase increases the HB core mass; and (3) a helium-mixing scenario, in which deep mixing on the RGB enhances the envelope helium abundance. All of these scenarios predict sloped HBs with anomalously bright RR Lyrae variables. We compare this prediction with the properties of the two known RR Lyrae variables in NGC 6388. Additional observational tests of these scenarios are suggested.

  17. Multiple populations in more metal-rich galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Maria J.

    In this thesis we present chemical abundances for bright stars in the intermediate metallicity globular cluster (GC) M5, and the relatively metal-rich GCs M71 and 47 Tuc with the goal of improving the understanding of chemical evolution in the metallicity regime sampled by these three GCs. The first chapter presents a brief historical overview in light element abundance variations in globular clusters. In the second chapter we present the results obtained for 47 Tuc, the most-metal rich cluster of my sample. 47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and GC formation in massive more metal-rich GCs since it is the closest massive GC. Chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu were determined for 164 red giant branch (RGB) stars in 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4-m telescope and the FLAMES multi-object spectrograph at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The average [Fe/H]= --0.79+/-0.09 dex is consistent with literature values, as well as over-abundances of alpha-elements ([alpha/Fe] ~ 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r-process dominated ([Eu/La]=+0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anti-correlation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ~ --0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A KS-test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of AGB nucleosynthesis yields

  18. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  19. Implementation of nanoscale circuits using dual metal gate engineered nanowire MOSFET with high-k dielectrics for low power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles Pravin, J.; Nirmal, D.; Prajoon, P.; Ajayan, J.

    2016-09-01

    This work covers the impact of dual metal gate engineered Junctionless MOSFET with various high-k dielectric in Nanoscale circuits for low power applications. Due to gate engineering in junctionless MOSFET, graded potential is obtained and results in higher electron velocity of about 31% for HfO2 than SiO2 in the channel region, which in turn improves the carrier transport efficiency. The simulation is done using sentaurus TCAD, ON current, OFF current, ION/IOFF ratio, DIBL, gain, transconductance and transconductance generation factor parameters are analysed. When using HfO2, DIBL shows a reduction of 61.5% over SiO2. The transconductance and transconductance generation factor shows an improvement of 44% and 35% respectively. The gain and output resistance also shows considerable improvement with high-k dielectrics. Using this device, inverter circuit is implemented with different high-k dielectric material and delay have been decreased by 4% with HfO2 when compared to SiO2. In addition, a significant reduction in power dissipation of the inverter circuit is obtained with high-k dielectric Dual Metal Surround Gate Junctionless Transistor than SiO2 based device. From the analysis, it is found that HfO2 will be a better alternative for the future nanoscale device.

  20. Mixed-metal chalcogenide tetrahedral clusters with an exo-polyhedral metal fragment.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, K; Roy, Dipak Kumar; Anju, V P; Mondal, Bijnaneswar; Varghese, Babu; Ghosh, Sundargopal

    2014-12-07

    The reaction of metal carbonyl compounds with group 6 and 8 metallaboranes led us to report the synthesis and structural characterization of several novel mixed-metal chalcogenide tetrahedral clusters. Thermolysis of arachno-[(Cp*RuCO)2B2H6], 1, and [Os3(CO)12] in the presence of 2-methylthiophene yielded [Cp*Ru(CO)2(μ-H){Os3(CO)9}S], 3, and [Cp*Ru(μ-H){Os3(CO)11}], 4. In a similar fashion, the reaction of [(Cp*Mo)2B5H9], 2, with [Ru3(CO)12] and 2-methylthiophene yielded [Cp*Ru(CO)2(μ-H){Ru3(CO)9}S], 5, and conjuncto-[(Cp*Mo)2B5H8(μ-H){Ru3(CO)9}S], 6. Both compounds 3 and 5 can be described as 50-cve (cluster valence electron) mixed-metal chalcogenide clusters, in which a sulfur atom replaces one of the vertices of the tetrahedral core. Compounds 3 and 5 possess a [M3S] tetrahedral core, in which the sulfur is attached to an exo-metal fragment, unique in the [M3S] metal chalcogenide tetrahedral arrangements. All the compounds have been characterized by mass spectrometry, IR, and (1)H, (11)B and (13)C NMR spectroscopy in solution, and the solid state structures were unequivocally established by crystallographic analysis of compounds 3, 5 and 6.

  1. Superatoms and Metal-Semiconductor Motifs for Cluster Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A. W.

    2013-10-11

    A molecular understanding of catalysis and catalytically active materials is of fundamental importance in designing new substances for applications in energy and fuels. We have performed reactivity studies and ultrafast ionization and coulomb explosion studies on a variety of catalytically-relevant materials, including transition metal oxides of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ti, V, Nb, and Ta. We demonstrate that differences in charge state, geometry, and elemental composition of clusters of such materials determine chemical reactivity and ionization behavior, crucial steps in improving performance of catalysts.

  2. Theory-guided design of nanoscale multi-metallic catalysts for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Balbuena, Perla B; Seminario, Jorge M

    2007-04-30

    Research goals This project aims to address the following aspects of the oxygen reduction reaction on multimetallic nanocatalysts: 1. Elucidate physical and chemical aspects of electron and proton transfer 2. Incorporate local and nonlocal field effects to the analysis 3. Investigate the performance of bimetallic and multimetallic nanocatalytic ensembles a. Explore combinations of Pt with other non-precious metals b. Explore theoretically the performance of active catalytic sites/substrate/proton-carrier systems towards maximizing oxygen reduction currents. c. Explore compatibility catalyst/substrate/ionic carrier. 4. Investigate nanocatalyst stability under the reaction conditions, effects of pH and overall composition; surface segregation phenomena in nanoclusters. 5. Carry out theory-guided experiments involving electron transfer as proof of concept. Specific objectives for the previous year: Determine trends for catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction and stability against dissolution of Pt-based alloy nanocatalysts exposed to acid medium. Reactivity and stability trends are sought as a function of surface composition and atomic distribution in the first 2-3 surface layers. Investigate possible mechanisms for metal dissolution. Developing and testing new computational approaches to characterize the catalytic interface. Significant achievements and results for the previous year: Catalytic activity: Variations in atomic distribution (mixed vs. ordered structures) analyzed in small clusters and extended surfaces of PtxPdy at fixed overall composition revealed polarization effects caused by specific electronic density distributions determining trends in reactivity. We studied other bimetallic and trimetallic systems to characterize the ability of various alloy elements for modifying Pt reactivity. We found an interesting parallelism between metalloenzymes and bimetallic nanocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Along the same lines, we are

  3. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX3) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ({T3R11}X15-type, P63/m), tetramers ({T4R16}X28{R4} (P-43m), {T4R16}X20 (P42/nnm), {T4R16}X24(RX3)4 (I41/a) and {T4R16}X23 (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ({Ru5La14}2Br39, Cc) of {TRr}n (n=2-5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (Xi) as well as outer (Xa) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i-i, i-a and/or a-i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of {TR6} octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the {TRr} clusters share common faces.

  4. Nano-Scale Metal Oxide Particles as Materials for Air Purification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-22

    carried out. Methods for preparing the nanoscale particles, including core/shell overlayer particles, have been worked out. Surface characterization...since these heteroatoms are notorious for catalyst poisoning. Solid reagents that might serve as effective destructive adsorbents must have high capacity...to basic and applied science. Further understanding of their Avadlab1i1ty Codem vRiI1 and/ar Dgst Specle. |~1 1 I] Pagr 3 synthesis , properties, and

  5. Direct-Liquid-Evaporation Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nanocrystalline Cobalt Metal for Nanoscale Copper Interconnect Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Gong, Xian; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2017-03-29

    In advanced microelectronics, precise design of liner and capping layers become critical, especially when it comes to the fabrication of Cu interconnects with dimensions lower than its mean free path. Herein, we demonstrate that direct-liquid-evaporation chemical vapor deposition (DLE-CVD) of Co is a promising method to make liner and capping layers for nanoscale Cu interconnects. DLE-CVD makes pure, smooth, nanocrystalline, and highly conformal Co films with highly controllable growth characteristics. This process allows full Co encapsulation of nanoscale Cu interconnects, thus stabilizing Cu against diffusion and electromigration. Electrical measurements and high-resolution elemental imaging studies show that the DLE-CVD Co encapsulation layer can improve the reliability and thermal stability of Cu interconnects. Also, with the high conductivity of Co, the DLE-CVD Co encapsulation layer have the potential to further decrease the power consumption of nanoscale Cu interconnects, paving the way for Cu interconnects with higher efficiency in future high-end microelectronics.

  6. Antiferromagnetic resonance in alkali-metal clusters in sodalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takehito; Tsugeno, Hajime; Hanazawa, Atsufumi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Nozue, Yasuo; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2013-11-01

    We have performed electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters incorporated in powder specimens of aluminosilicate sodalite at several microwave frequencies between 9 and 34 GHz. The K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ clusters are arrayed in a bcc structure and are known to show antiferromagnetic ordering below the Néel temperatures of TN ≃72 and ≃80 K, respectively, due to the exchange coupling between s electrons confined in the clusters. We have found sudden broadenings of ESR spectra in both samples below TN. The line shape of the spectra below TN is analyzed by powder pattern simulations of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) spectra. The calculated line shapes well reproduce the experimental ones at all the frequencies by assuming a biaxial magnetic anisotropy. We have evaluated extremely small anisotropy fields of approximately 1 Oe indicating that these materials are ideal Heisenberg antiferromagnets. We have also found that the magnetic anisotropy changes from easy-plane type to uniaxial type by changing into a heavier alkali-metal cluster and that the g value shifts to a large value beyond two below TN for K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters. These novel features of K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters incorporated in sodalite are discussed.

  7. Metallic-nanowire-loaded silicon-on-insulator structures: a route to low-loss plasmon waveguiding on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yusheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-02-01

    The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced down to the nanometer scale. Here we introduce a class of low-loss guiding schemes by integrating silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides with plasmon nanowire structures. The closely spaced silicon and metal configurations allow efficient light squeezing within the nanometer, low-index silica gaps between them, enabling deep-subwavelength light transmission with low modal attenuation. Optimizations of key structural parameters unravel the wide-range existence of the high-performance hybrid nanowire plasmon mode, which demonstrates improved guiding properties compared to the conventional hybrid and nanowire plasmon polaritons. The excitation strategy of the guided mode and the feasibility of the waveguide for compact photonic integration as well as active components are also discussed to lay the foundation for its practical implementation. The remarkable properties of these metallic-nanowire-loaded SOI waveguides potentially lend themselves to the implementation of high performance nanophotonic components, and open up promising opportunities for a variety of intriguing applications on the nanoscale.The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced

  8. Size control of noble metal clusters and metallic heterostructures through the reduction kinetics of metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevonkaev, Igor V.; Herein, Daniel; Jeske, Gerald; Goia, Dan V.

    2014-07-01

    Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties.Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03045a

  9. Sulphur in the metal poor globular cluster NGC 6397

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, A.; Caffau, E.

    2011-10-01

    Sulphur (S) is a non-refractory α-element that is not locked into dust grains in the interstellar medium. Thus no correction to the measured, interstellar sulphur abundance is needed and it can be readily compared to the S content in stellar photospheres. Here we present the first measurement of sulphur in the metal poor globular cluster (GC) NGC 6397, as detected in a MIKE/Magellan high signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectrum of one red giant star. While abundance ratios of sulphur are available for a larger number of Galactic stars down to an [Fe/H] of ~ -3.5 dex, no measurements in globular clusters more metal poor than -1.5 dex have been reported so far. We find aNLTE, 3-D abundance ratio of [S/Fe] = +0.52 ± 0.20 (stat.) ± 0.08 (sys.), based on theS I, Multiplet 1 line at 9212.8 Å. This value is consistent with a Galactic halo plateau as typical of other α-elements in GCs and field stars, but we cannot rule out its membership with a second branch of increasing [S/Fe] with decreasing [Fe/H], claimed in the literature, which leads to a large scatter at metallicities around - 2 dex. The [S/Mg] and [S/Ca] ratios in this star are compatible with a Solar value to within the (large) uncertainties. Despite the very large scatter in these ratios across Galactic stars between literature samples, this indicates that sulphur traces the chemical imprints of the other α-elements in metal poor GCs. Combined with its moderate sodium abundance ([S/Na]NLTE = 0.48), the [S/Fe] ratio in this GC extends a global, positive S-Na correlation that is not seen in field stars and might indicate that proton-capture reactions contributed to the production of sulphur in the (metal poor) early GC environments. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  10. Probing the History of Galaxy Clusters with Metallicity and Entropy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkholy, Tamer Yohanna

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects found today in our Universe. The gas they contain, the intra-cluster medium (ICM), is heated to temperatures in the approximate range of 1 to 10 keV, and thus emits X-ray radiation. Studying the ICM through the spatial and spectral analysis of its emission returns the richest information about both the overall cosmological context which governs the formation of clusters, as well as the physical processes occurring within. The aim of this thesis is to learn about the history of the physical processes that drive the evolution of galaxy clusters, through careful, spatially resolved measurements of their metallicity and entropy content. A sample of 45 nearby clusters observed with Chandra is analyzed to produce radial density, temperature, entropy and metallicity profiles. The entropy profiles are computed to larger radial extents than in previous Chandra analyses. The results of this analysis are made available to the scientific community in an electronic database. Comparing metallicity and entropy in the outskirts of clusters, we find no signature on the entropy profiles of the ensemble of supernovae that produced the observed metals. In the centers of clusters, we find that the metallicities of high-mass clusters are much less dispersed than those of low-mass clusters. A comparison of metallicity with the regularity of the X-ray emission morphology suggests that metallicities in low-mass clusters are more susceptible to increase from violent events such as mergers. We also find that the variation in the stellar-to-gas mass ratio as a function of cluster mass can explain the variation of central metallicity with cluster mass, only if we assume that there is a constant level of metallicity for clusters of all masses, above which the observed galaxies add more metals in proportion to their mass. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  11. A new nanomaterial synthesized from size-selected, ligand-free metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Wepasnick, K.; Tang, X.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Bowen, K. H.; Dollinger, A.; Strobel, C. H.; Huber, J.; Mangler, T.; Luo, Y.; Proch, S.; Gantefoer, G.

    2014-03-01

    Thins films are synthesized by deposition of size-selected Mon- cluster anions on an inert substrate. Scanning tunneling microscopy pictures indicate that the deposited material consists of individual particles with diameters corresponding to the size of the preformed clusters from the gas phase. Previous attempts to manufacture cluster materials from metals failed since these clusters coalesced at room temperature. Our data suggest the possibility to synthesize new nanomaterials from clusters of high fusing metals. This may prove to be the key to harness size-dependent and tuneable properties of clusters for creating novel classes of functional tailor-made materials.

  12. Study of globular cluster M53: new variables, distance, metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dékány, I.; Kovács, G.

    2009-11-01

    Aims: We study the variable star content of the globular cluster M53 to compute the physical parameters of the constituting stars and the distance of the cluster. Methods: Covering two adjacent seasons in 2007 and 2008, new photometric data are gathered for 3048 objects in the field of M53. By using the OIS (optimal image subtraction) method and subsequently TFA (trend filtering algorithm), we search for variables in the full sample by using discrete Fourier transformation and box-fitting least squares methods. We select variables based on the statistics related to these methods combined with visual inspection. Results: We identified 12 new variables (2 RR Lyrae stars, 7 short periodic stars - 3 of them are SX Phe stars - and 3 long-period variables). No eclipsing binaries were found in the present sample. Except for the 3 (hitherto unknown) Blazhko RR Lyrae (two RRab and an RRc) stars, no multiperiodic variables were found. We showed that after proper period shift, the PLC (period-luminosity-color) relation for the first overtone RR Lyrae sample tightly follows the one spanned by the fundamental stars. Furthermore, the slope is in agreement with that derived from other clusters. Based on the earlier Baade-Wesselink calibration of the PLC relations, the derived reddening-free distance modulus of M53 is 16.31±0.04 mag, corresponding to a distance modulus of 18.5 mag for the Large Magellanic Cloud. From the Fourier parameters of the RRab stars we obtained an average iron abundance of -1.58± 0.03 (error of the mean). This is ~0.5 dex higher than the overall abundance of the giants as given in the literature and derived in this paper from the three-color photometry of giants. We suspect that the source of this discrepancy (observable also in other, low-metallicity clusters) is the lack of a sufficient number of low-metallicity objects in the calibrating sample of the Fourier method. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Photometric data

  13. All-metal clusters that mimic the chemistry of halogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianshan; Li, Yawei; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2013-10-07

    Owing to their s(2)p(5) electronic configuration, halogen atoms are highly electronegative and constitute the anionic components of salts. Whereas clusters that contain no halogen atoms, such as AlH(4), mimic the chemistry of halogens and readily form salts (e.g., Na(+)(AlH(4))(-)), clusters that are solely composed of metal atoms and yet behave in the same manner as a halogen are rare. Because coinage-metal atoms (Cu, Ag, and Au) only have one valence electron in their outermost electronic shell, as in H, we examined the possibility that, on interacting with Al, in particular as AlX(4) (X=Cu, Ag, Au), these metal atoms may exhibit halogen-like properties. By using density functional theory, we show that AlAu(4) not only mimics the chemistry of halogens, but also, with a vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 3.98 eV in its anionic form, is a superhalogen. Similarly, analogous to XHX superhalogens (X=F, Cl, Br), XAuX species with VDEs of 4.65, 4.50, and 4.34 eV in their anionic form, respectively, also form superhalogens. In addition, Au can also form hyperhalogens, a recently discovered species that show electron affinities (EAs) that are even higher than those of their corresponding superhalogen building blocks. For example, the VDEs of M(AlAu(4))(2)(-) (M=Na and K) and anionic (FAuF)Au(FAuF) range from 4.06 to 5.70 eV. Au-based superhalogen anions, such as AlAu(4)(-) and AuF(2)(-), have the additional advantage that they exhibit wider optical absorption ranges than their H-based analogues, AlH(4)(-) and HF(2)(-). Because of the catalytic properties and the biocompatibility of Au, Au-based superhalogens may be multifunctional. However, similar studies that were carried out for Cu and Ag atoms have shown that, unlike AlAu(4), AlX(4) (X=Cu, Ag) clusters are not superhalogens, a property that can be attributed to the large EA of the Au atom.

  14. Observation of small metal clusters on graphite surface with scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian; Zhu, Changxin; Ma, Zili; Pang, Shijin; Xue, Zengquan

    The motivation for studying the dynamic behavior and morphology of small metal clusters on solid single crystal surface is the desire to understand the physical mechanisms evolving in the initial stages of thin-film growth. In the experiments we have used a scanning tunneling microscope to study the static morphology of small Pt and Ni clusters supported on clean graphite surfaces, as well as the dynamic behaviors of small Pt clusters in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. The metal deposition was fulfilled by controllable evaporation from ultra-pure superfine metal wires at room temperature in UHV. The STM images of small Pt and Ni clusters on graphite substrates with atomic resolution, as well as a series of STM images reveal some transformation processes of small metal clusters on the solid crystal surfaces, which provide us a better understanding on the procedure of atomic diffusion of metal clusters. All the STM images have been performed at room temperature.

  15. High-dispersion spectroscopy of giants in metal-poor globular clusters. I - Iron abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minniti, Dante; Geisler, Doug; Peterson, Ruth C.; Claria, Juan J.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, high-SNR CCD spectra have been obtained for 16 giants in eight metal-poor Galactic globular clusters. Fe abundances accurate to 0.15 dex have been determined by a fully consistent set of model atmospheres and spectrum synthesis techniques. A metallicity scale is presented for metal-poor clusters that should prove useful for calibrating a wide variety of photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic metallicity indicators.

  16. Effect of geometrical constraint condition on the formation of nanoscale twins in the Ni-based metallic glass composite

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M H; Kim, B S; Kim, D H; Ott, R T; Sansoz, F; Eckert, J

    2014-04-25

    We investigated the effect of geometrically constrained stress-strain conditions on the formation of nanotwins in alpha-brass phase reinforced Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 metallic glass (MG) matrix deformed under macroscopic uniaxial compression. The specific geometrically constrained conditions in the samples lead to a deviation from a simple uniaxial state to a multi-axial stress state, for which nanocrystallization in the MG matrix together with nanoscale twinning of the brass reinforcement is observed in localized regions during plastic flow. The nanocrystals in the MG matrix and the appearance of the twinned structure in the reinforcements indicate that the strain energy is highly confined and the local stress reaches a very high level upon yielding. Both the effective distribution of reinforcements on the strain enhancement of composite and the effects of the complicated stress states on the development of nanotwins in the second-phase brass particles are discussed.

  17. Performance of nanoscale metallic multilayer systems under mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economy, David Ross

    Reports of nanoscale metallic multilayers (NMM) performance show a relatively high strength and radiation damage resistance when compared their monolithic components. Hardness of NMMs has been shown to increase with increasing interfacial density (i.e. decreasing layer thickness). This interface density-dependent behavior within NMMs has been shown to deviate from Hall-Petch strengthening, leading to higher measured strengths during normal loading than those predicted by a rule of mixtures. To fully understand why this occurs, other researchers have looked at the influence of the crystal structures of the component layers, orientations, and compositions on deformation processes. Additionally, a limited number of studies have focused on the structural stability and possible performance variation between as-deposited systems and those exposed to mechanical and thermal loading. This dissertation identified how NMM as-deposited structures and performance are altered by mechanical loading (sliding/wear contact) and/or thermal (such as diffusion, relaxation) loading. These objectives were pursued by tracking hardness evolution during sliding wear and after thermal loading to as-deposited stress and mechanical properties. Residual stress progression was also examined during thermal loading and supporting data was collected to detail structural and chemical changes. All of these experimental observations were conducted using Cu/Nb NMMs with 2 nm, 20 nm, or 100 nm thick individual layers deposited with either 1 microm or 10 microm total thicknesses with two geometries (Cu/Nb and Nb/Cu) on (100) Si. Wear boxes were performed on Cu/Nb NMM using a nanoindentation system with a 1 microm conical diamond counterface. After nano-wear deformation, the hardness of the deformed regions significantly rose with respect to as-deposited measurements, which further increased with greater wear loads. Additionally, NMMs with thinner layers showed less volume loss as measured by laser

  18. Permanent excimer superstructures by supramolecular networking of metal quantum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Monguzzi, Angelo; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Prato, Mirko; Erratico, Silvia; Campione, Marcello; Lorenzi, Roberto; Pedrini, Jacopo; Santambrogio, Carlo; Torrente, Yvan; De Angelis, Filippo; Meinardi, Francesco; Brovelli, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Excimers are evanescent quasi-particles that typically form during collisional intermolecular interactions and exist exclusively for their excited-state lifetime. We exploited the distinctive structure of metal quantum clusters to fabricate permanent excimer-like colloidal superstructures made of ground-state noninteracting gold cores, held together by a network of hydrogen bonds between their capping ligands. This previously unknown aggregation state of matter, studied through spectroscopic experiments and ab initio calculations, conveys the photophysics of excimers into stable nanoparticles, which overcome the intrinsic limitation of excimers in single-particle applications—that is, their nearly zero formation probability in ultra-diluted solutions. In vitro experiments demonstrate the suitability of the superstructures as nonresonant intracellular probes and further reveal their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, which enhances their potential as anticytotoxic agents for biomedical applications.

  19. Are the Effects of Structure Formation Seen in the Central Metallicity of Galaxy Clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkholy, Tamer Y.; Bautz, Mark W.; Canizares, Claude R.

    2015-05-01

    A sample of 46 nearby clusters observed with Chandra is analyzed to produce radial density, temperature, entropy, and metallicity profiles, as well as other morphological measurements. The entropy profiles are computed to larger radii than in previous Chandra cluster sample analyses. We find that the iron mass fraction measured in the inner 0.15{{R}500} shows a larger dispersion across the sample of low-mass clusters than it does for the sample of high-mass clusters. We interpret this finding as the result of the mixing of more halos in large clusters than in small clusters, leading to an averaging of the metallicity in the large clusters, and thus less dispersion of metallicity. This interpretation lends support to the idea that the low-entropy, metal-rich gas of merging halos reaches the clusters’ centers, which explains observations of core-collapse supernova product metallicity peaks, and which is seen in hydrodynamical simulations. The gas in these merging halos would have to reach cluster centers without mixing in the outer regions. On the other hand, the metallicity dispersion does not change with mass in the outer regions of the clusters, suggesting that most of the outer metals originate from a source with a more uniform metallicity level, such as during pre-enrichment. We also measure a correlation between the metal content in low-mass clusters and the morphological disturbance of their intracluster medium, as measured by centroid shift. This suggests an alternative interpretation, whereby transitional metallicity boosts in the center of low-mass clusters account for the larger dispersion of their metallicities.

  20. Entrapment of Metal Clusters in MOF Channels by Extended Hooks Anchored at Open Metal Sites

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shou-Tian; Zhao, Xiang; Lau, Samuel; Fuhr, Addis; Feng, Pingyun; Bu, Xianhui

    2015-01-01

    Reported here is a new concept and its practical implementation that involves the novel utilization of open metal sites (OMS) for architectural pore design. Specifically, it is shown here that OMS can be used to run extended hooks (isonicotinate in this work) from the framework wall to channel centers to effect the capture of single metal ions or clusters, with the concurrent partition of the large channel space into multiple domains, alteration of host-guest charge relationship and associated guest-exchange properties, as well as the transfer of OMS from the wall to the channel centers. The concept of the extended hook, demonstrated here in the multi-component dual-metal and dual-ligand system, should be generally applicable to a range of framework types. PMID:23826752

  1. Different shades of oxide: from nanoscale wetting mechanisms to contact printing of gallium-based liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Doudrick, Kyle; Liu, Shanliangzi; Mutunga, Eva M; Klein, Kate L; Damle, Viraj; Varanasi, Kripa K; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-06-17

    Gallium-based liquid metals are of interest for a variety of applications including flexible electronics, soft robotics, and biomedical devices. Still, nano- to microscale device fabrication with these materials is challenging because, despite having surface tension 10 times higher than water, they strongly adhere to a majority of substrates. This unusually high adhesion is attributed to the formation of a thin oxide shell; however, its role in the adhesion process has not yet been established. In this work, we demonstrate that, dependent on dynamics of formation and resulting morphology of the liquid metal-substrate interface, GaInSn adhesion can occur in two modes. The first mode occurs when the oxide shell is not ruptured as it makes contact with the substrate. Because of the nanoscale topology of the oxide surface, this mode results in minimal adhesion between the liquid metal and most solids, regardless of substrate's surface energy or texture. In the second mode, the formation of the GaInSn-substrate interface involves rupturing of the original oxide skin and formation of a composite interface that includes contact between the substrate and pieces of old oxide, bare liquid metal, and new oxide. We demonstrate that in this latter mode GaInSn adhesion is dominated by the intimate contact between new oxide and substrate. We also show that by varying the pinned contact line length using varied degrees of surface texturing, the adhesion of GaInSn in this mode can be either decreased or increased. Lastly, we demonstrate how these two adhesion modes limit microcontact printing of GaInSn patterns but can be exploited to repeatedly print individual sub-200 nm liquid metal drops.

  2. Structure and mobility of metal clusters in MOFs: Au, Pd, and AuPd clusters in MOF-74.

    PubMed

    Vilhelmsen, Lasse B; Walton, Krista S; Sholl, David S

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the adsorption and mobility of metal-organic framework (MOF)-supported metal nanoclusters is critical to the development of these catalytic materials. We present the first theoretical investigation of Au-, Pd-, and AuPd-supported clusters in a MOF, namely MOF-74. We combine density functional theory (DFT) calculations with a genetic algorithm (GA) to reliably predict the structure of the adsorbed clusters. This approach allows comparison of hundreds of adsorbed configurations for each cluster. From the investigation of Au(8), Pd(8), and Au(4)Pd(4) we find that the organic part of the MOF is just as important for nanocluster adsorption as open Zn or Mg metal sites. Using the large number of clusters generated by the GA, we developed a systematic method for predicting the mobility of adsorbed clusters. Through the investigation of diffusion paths a relationship between the cluster's adsorption energy and diffusion barrier is established, confirming that Au clusters are highly mobile in the MOF-74 framework and Pd clusters are less mobile.

  3. Embedded cluster metal-polymeric micro interface and process for producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Menezes, Marlon E.; Birnbaum, Howard K.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2002-01-29

    A micro interface between a polymeric layer and a metal layer includes isolated clusters of metal partially embedded in the polymeric layer. The exposed portion of the clusters is smaller than embedded portions, so that a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an exposed portion of an individual cluster is smaller than a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an embedded portion of the individual cluster. At least half, but not all of the height of a preferred spherical cluster is embedded. The metal layer is completed by a continuous layer of metal bonded to the exposed portions of the discontinuous clusters. The micro interface is formed by heating a polymeric layer to a temperature, near its glass transition temperature, sufficient to allow penetration of the layer by metal clusters, after isolated clusters have been deposited on the layer at lower temperatures. The layer is recooled after embedding, and a continuous metal layer is deposited upon the polymeric layer to bond with the discontinuous metal clusters.

  4. Growth of Metal Nano-Clusters on Metal and Oxide Surfaces:. a Rheed Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zei, M. S.

    The powerful RHEED technique has been demonstrated for the structural determination of the nano-crystals grown on metal and oxide substrate surfaces. Pt was electrochemically deposited onto a Ru(10bar {1}0) electrode, while Pb and cobalt were vapor deposited onto Ag(111) and oxide film/NiAl(100), respectively under UHV conditions. At any Pt coverage, 3D-clusters develop for which the Pt clusters grow in (311) orientation on the Ru(10bar {1}0) substrate surface, where the [01bar {1}] atomic rows of the (311) facet are parallel to the [1bar {2}10] atomic rows of the Ru(10bar {1}0) surface. Due to the strong bonding at Pb/Ag(111) interface, the Pb deposit grows in 2D-islands with a (√ {3} × √ {3})R30o phase (Θ < 1 ML). On the other hand, the β-crystallites of ≈ 1 nm in diameter with inclusion of smaller-sized particles (D < 1 nm) are observed on Θ-Al2O3 after Co deposition at room temperature. Annealing at 900 K Co clusters (≈ 3 nm) grow larger at expense of small particles on thin oxide film on NiAl(100) and become better ordered, where the [110] axis of the Co(001) facet is parallel to the [100] direction of the (001)-oxide surface. The in-plane lattice constant of Co clusters is ca. 4 larger than that of bulk Co, yielding less strain at the (001)-oxide surface. These results demonstrate that both orientation and phase of metal nano-clusters are governed by surface structure of the substrate.

  5. Switching Plasmons: Gold Nanorod-Copper Chalcogenide Core-Shell Nanoparticle Clusters with Selectable Metal/Semiconductor NIR Plasmon Resonances.

    PubMed

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Döblinger, Markus; Rodríguez-Fernández, Jessica

    2015-09-16

    Exerting control over the near-infrared (NIR) plasmonic response of nanosized metals and semiconductors can facilitate access to unexplored phenomena and applications. Here we combine electrostatic self-assembly and Cd(2+)/Cu(+) cation exchange to obtain an anisotropic core-shell nanoparticle cluster (NPC) whose optical properties stem from two dissimilar plasmonic materials: a gold nanorod (AuNR) core and a copper selenide (Cu(2-x)Se, x ≥ 0) supraparticle shell. The spectral response of the AuNR@Cu2Se NPCs is governed by the transverse and longitudinal plasmon bands (LPB) of the anisotropic metallic core, since the Cu2Se shell is nonplasmonic. Under aerobic conditions the shell undergoes vacancy doping (x > 0), leading to the plasmon-rich NIR spectrum of the AuNR@Cu(2-x)Se NPCs. For low vacancy doping levels the NIR optical properties of the dually plasmonic NPCs are determined by the LPBs of the semiconductor shell (along its major longitudinal axis) and of the metal core. Conversely, for high vacancy doping levels their NIR optical response is dominated by the two most intense plasmon modes from the shell: the transverse (along the shortest transversal axis) and longitudinal (along the major longitudinal axis) modes. The optical properties of the NPCs can be reversibly switched back to a purely metallic plasmonic character upon reversible conversion of AuNR@Cu(2-x)Se into AuNR@Cu2Se. Such well-defined nanosized colloidal assemblies feature the unique ability of holding an all-metallic, a metallic/semiconductor, or an all-semiconductor plasmonic response in the NIR. Therefore, they can serve as an ideal platform to evaluate the crosstalk between plasmonic metals and plasmonic semiconductors at the nanoscale. Furthermore, their versatility to display plasmon modes in the first, second, or both NIR windows is particularly advantageous for bioapplications, especially considering their strong absorbing and near-field enhancing properties.

  6. Prominent thermodynamical interaction with surroundings on nanoscale memristive switching of metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Kazuki; Yanagida, Takeshi; Oka, Keisuke; Kanai, Masaki; Klamchuen, Annop; Rahong, Sakon; Meng, Gang; Horprathum, Mati; Xu, Bo; Zhuge, Fuwei; He, Yong; Park, Bae Ho; Kawai, Tomoji

    2012-11-14

    This study demonstrates the effect of surroundings on a memristive switching at nanoscale by utilizing an open top planar-type device. NiO(x) and CoO(x) planar-type devices have exhibited a memristive behavior under atmospheric pressure, whereas TiO(2-x) planar-type devices did not show a memristive switching even under the same surroundings. A memristive behavior of TiO(2-x) planar-type devices has emerged when reducing an ambient pressure and/or employing a SiO(2) passivation layer. These results reveal that a thermodynamical interaction with surroundings critically determines the occurrence of memristive switching via varying a stability of nonstoichiometry. Since this effect tends to be more significant for smaller devices with larger specific surface area, tailoring the surrounding effect by an appropriate passivation will be essential for high density devices.

  7. Simulation studies of electroless metal deposition using gold nano-clusters on polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lively, Mike; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Grabill, Chris; Kuebler, Stephen M.; Dutta, Aniruddha; Heinrich, Helge

    2010-03-01

    We report lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies of deposition of metallic silver on randomly distributed gold nano clusters on a polymeric surface. The gold nano-clusters act as seeds for further deposition of silver atoms. We assume ballistic growth for the growth of metallic silver on gold clusters but treat the lateral growth (which eventually form bridges among original clusters) with different rules and study the evolving morphologies of the deposited silver atoms as a function of the surface density and the size distribution of gold nano-clusters and compare simulation results with those obtained from TEM studies of the prepared samples.

  8. Pal 12 - A metal-rich globular cluster in the outer halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. G.; Frogel, J. A.; Persson, S. E.; Zinn, R.

    1980-01-01

    New optical and infrared observations of several stars in the distant globular cluster Pal 12 show that they have CO strengths and heavy element abundances only slightly less than in M 71, one of the more metal-rich globular clusters. Pal 12 thus has a metal abundance near the high end of the range over which globular clusters exist and lies in the outer galactic halo. Its red horizontal branch is not anomalous in view of the abundance that has been found.

  9. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: evidence from an optical study.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, N N; Kugel, K I; Bazhenov, A V; Fursova, T N; Löser, W; Xu, Y; Behr, G; Kusmartsev, F V

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb(2)PdSi(3). In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors.

  10. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors.

  11. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors. PMID:23189239

  12. Surface modification of metal and metal coated nanoparticles to induce clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, M. H.; Glembocki, O. J.; Geng, S.; Prokes, S. M.; Garces, N.; Caldwell, J. D.

    2010-08-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for the detection of submonolayer coverage of gold or silver surfaces. The magnitude of the effect and the spectral wavelength of the peak depend on the metal nanoparticles used and its geometry. In this paper we show that the use of chemicals that bind to gold or silver can lead to the clustering of nanoparticles. We used well defined Au nanoparticles in our experiments and add cysteamine to solutions containing the nanoparticles. The plasmonic response of the nanoparticles is measured by transmission Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. We observed significant changes to the SPR spectra that are characteristics of close coupled nanoparticles. The time evolution of these changes indicates the formation of gold nanoparticles clusters. The SERS response of these clustered nanoparticles is observed to red shift from the designed peak wavelength in the green to the red. In addition, the placement of these clusters on dielectric surfaces shifts the SPR even more into the red. The experimental results are supported by calculations of the electromagnetic fields using finite difference methods.

  13. In situ electron microscopy studies of electromechanical behavior in metals at the nanoscale using a novel microdevice-based system.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonmo; Beniam, Iyoel; Qidwai, Siddiq M

    2016-09-01

    Electrically assisted deformation (EAD) is an emerging technique to enhance formability of metals by applying an electric current through them. Despite its increasing importance in manufacturing applications, there is still an unresolved debate on the nature of the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying EAD, mainly between electroplasticity (non-thermal effects) and resistive heating (thermal effects). This status is due to two critical challenges: (1) a lack of experimental techniques to directly observe fundamental mechanisms of material deformation during EAD, and (2) intrinsic coupling between electric current and Joule heating giving rise to unwanted thermally activated mechanisms. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microdevice-based electromechanical testing system (MEMTS) to characterize nanoscale metal specimens in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our studies reveal that MEMTS eliminates the effect of Joule heating on material deformation, a critical advantage over macroscopic experiments, owing to its unique scale. For example, a negligible change in temperature (<0.02 °C) is predicted at ∼3500 A/mm(2). Utilizing the attractive features of MEMTS, we have directly investigated potential electron-dislocation interactions in single crystal copper (SCC) specimens that are simultaneously subjected to uniaxial loading and electric current density up to 5000 A/mm(2). Our in situ TEM studies indicate that for SCC, electroplasticity does not play a key role as no differences in dislocation activities, such as depinning and movement, are observed.

  14. In situ electron microscopy studies of electromechanical behavior in metals at the nanoscale using a novel microdevice-based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wonmo; Beniam, Iyoel; Qidwai, Siddiq M.

    2016-09-01

    Electrically assisted deformation (EAD) is an emerging technique to enhance formability of metals by applying an electric current through them. Despite its increasing importance in manufacturing applications, there is still an unresolved debate on the nature of the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying EAD, mainly between electroplasticity (non-thermal effects) and resistive heating (thermal effects). This status is due to two critical challenges: (1) a lack of experimental techniques to directly observe fundamental mechanisms of material deformation during EAD, and (2) intrinsic coupling between electric current and Joule heating giving rise to unwanted thermally activated mechanisms. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microdevice-based electromechanical testing system (MEMTS) to characterize nanoscale metal specimens in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our studies reveal that MEMTS eliminates the effect of Joule heating on material deformation, a critical advantage over macroscopic experiments, owing to its unique scale. For example, a negligible change in temperature (<0.02 °C) is predicted at ˜3500 A/mm2. Utilizing the attractive features of MEMTS, we have directly investigated potential electron-dislocation interactions in single crystal copper (SCC) specimens that are simultaneously subjected to uniaxial loading and electric current density up to 5000 A/mm2. Our in situ TEM studies indicate that for SCC, electroplasticity does not play a key role as no differences in dislocation activities, such as depinning and movement, are observed.

  15. Defining nanoscale metal features on an atomically clean silicon surface with a stencil.

    PubMed

    Linklater, A; Nogami, J

    2008-07-16

    Metal features with nanometer scale edge definition have been created on an atomically clean Si(001) surface with a stencil. These features were subsequently characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The stencil was brought into contact with the substrate while allowing the stencil to pivot so that it self-aligned parallel to the substrate surface. With this simple method, feature edge spreading was reduced to less than 10 nm in the best case. At the same time, atomic resolution images of the metal feature/silicon boundary showed significant spreading of a sub-monolayer of metal beyond the deposited area. This spreading may pose a limit on the ultimate resolution that can be achieved for metals deposited on atomically clean silicon surfaces.

  16. Origin of Selective Adsorption for Metal Nano-clusters on Graphene/Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lizhi; Sun, Jiatao; Huang, Li; Pan, Lida; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun

    2013-03-01

    These years, metal nano-clusters have attracted many interests because of their exciting properties and the potential applications in the catalysis industries, the information storage and so on. Recently, many groups composed the homogenous and size-controlled metal nano-clusters on graphene/Ru(0001) moiré template (G/Ru(0001)). However, the growth modes of these nano-clusters are not very clear. Here, we investigated the mechanism of selective adsorption of some transition metal (TM) atoms on G/Ru(0001) by DFT calculations, and proposed a criterion to estimate the growth mode of TM atoms on G/Ru(0001). We found that both the intensity of sp3 hybridization of carbon atoms in different regions of G/Ru(0001) and the electronic structure of the transition metal atoms influence the adsorption site and the selectivity of metal atoms on G/Ru(0001) at initio stage. According to the electronic structures of some other different G/metal systems, we also predicted that some other G/metal templates can be used to grow the metal nano-clusters. The growth mechanism agrees well with the experimental observations, and provides a way to select suitable metal atoms to form dispersed metal nano-clusters on the G/metal template.

  17. The SLUGGS survey: calcium triplet-based spectroscopic metallicities for over 900 globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Foster, Caroline; Spitler, Lee R.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Pota, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    Although the colour distribution of globular clusters in massive galaxies is well known to be bimodal, the spectroscopic metallicity distribution has been measured in only a few galaxies. After redefining the calcium triplet index-metallicity relation, we use our relation to derive the metallicity of 903 globular clusters in 11 early-type galaxies. This is the largest sample of spectroscopic globular cluster metallicities yet assembled. We compare these metallicities with those derived from Lick indices finding good agreement. In six of the eight galaxies with sufficient numbers of high-quality spectra we find bimodality in the spectroscopic metallicity distribution. Our results imply that most massive early-type galaxies have bimodal metallicity as well as colour distributions. This bimodality suggests that most massive early-type galaxies experienced two periods of star formation.

  18. Metal clusters and nanoparticles in dielectric matrices: Formation and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladskikh, I. A.; Vartanyan, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The optical properties of thin dielectric films with metal inclusions and their dependence on thermal and laser annealing are studied experimentally. Metal clusters (Ag, Au, and Cu) in dielectric materials (Al2O3 and SiO2) are obtained by simultaneous vacuum deposition of metal and dielectric on the surface of a corresponding dielectric substrate (sapphire and quartz). It is shown that, depending on the deposited dielectric material, on the weight ratio of deposited metal and dielectric, and on the subsequent thermal treatment, one can obtain different metal structures, from clusters with a small number of atoms to complex dendritic plasmonic structures.

  19. Performance enhancement of metal nanowire-based transparent electrodes by electrically driven nanoscale nucleation of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Yu-Jeng; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-07-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) electrodes have been considered to be promising materials for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. Despite the fact that a single AgNW has extremely high conductivities, the high junction resistance between nanowires limits the performance of the AgNW matrix. Therefore, post-treatments are usually required to approach better NW-NW contact. Herein, we report a novel linking method that uses joule heating to accumulate sol-gel ZnO near nanowire junctions. The nanoscale ZnO nucleation successfully restrained the thermal instability of the AgNW under current injection and acted as an efficient tightening medium to realize good NW-NW contacts. A low process temperature (<50 °C), and thus low energy consumption, are required for ZnO nucleation. This made the use of substrates with very low operating temperatures, such as PET and PEN, feasible. The optimized AgNW transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) fabricated using this promising linking method exhibited a low sheet resistance (13 Ω sq-1), a high transmission (92% at 550 nm), a high figure of merit (FOM; up to σDC/σOp = 340) and can be applied to wide range of next-generation flexible optoelectronic devices.Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) electrodes have been considered to be promising materials for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. Despite the fact that a single AgNW has extremely high conductivities, the high junction resistance between nanowires limits the performance of the AgNW matrix. Therefore, post-treatments are usually required to approach better NW-NW contact. Herein, we report a novel linking method that uses joule heating to accumulate sol-gel ZnO near nanowire junctions. The nanoscale ZnO nucleation successfully restrained the thermal instability of the AgNW under current injection and acted as an efficient tightening medium to realize good NW-NW contacts. A low process temperature (<50 °C), and thus

  20. Linear scaling explicitly correlated MP2-F12 and ONIOM methods for the long-range interactions of the nanoscale clusters in methanol aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei

    2013-01-07

    A linear scaling quantum chemistry method, generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach has been extended to the explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory F12 (MP2-F12) method and own N-layer integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics (ONIOM) method, in which GEBF-MP2-F12, GEBF-MP2, and conventional density functional tight-binding methods could be used for different layers. Then the long-range interactions in dilute methanol aqueous solutions are studied by computing the binding energies between methanol molecule and water molecules in gas-phase and condensed phase methanol-water clusters with various sizes, which were taken from classic molecular dynamics (MD) snapshots. By comparing with the results of force field methods, including SPC, TIP3P, PCFF, and AMOEBA09, the GEBF-MP2-F12 and GEBF-ONIOM methods are shown to be powerful and efficient for studying the long-range interactions at a high level. With the GEBF-ONIOM(MP2-F12:MP2) and GEBF-ONIOM(MP2-F12:MP2:cDFTB) methods, the diameters of the largest nanoscale clusters under studies are about 2.4 nm (747 atoms and 10 209 basis functions with aug-cc-pVDZ basis set) and 4 nm (3351 atoms), respectively, which are almost impossible to be treated by conventional MP2 or MP2-F12 method. Thus, the GEBF-F12 and GEBF-ONIOM methods are expected to be a practical tool for studying the nanoscale clusters in condensed phase, providing an alternative benchmark for ab initio and density functional theory studies, and developing new force fields by combining with classic MD simulations.

  1. Composite Hybrid Cluster Built from the Integration of Polyoxometalate and a Metal Halide Cluster: Synthetic Strategy, Structure, and Properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xiong; Ma, Xiang; Zheng, Wen-Xu; Qi, Yan-Jie; Zheng, Shou-Tian; Yang, Guo-Yu

    2016-09-06

    A step-by-step synthetic strategy, setting up a bridge between the polyoxometalate (POM) and metal halide cluster (MHC) systems, is demonstrated to construct an unprecedented composite hybrid cluster built up from one high-nuclearity cationic MHC [Cu8I6](2+) and eight Anderson-type anionic POMs [HCrMo6O18(OH)6](2-) cross-linked by a tripodal alcohol derivative.

  2. White Dwarfs in the Metal-Rich Open Cluster NGC 6253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, E. J.; Campos, F.; Romero, A.; Kepler, S. O.

    2017-03-01

    We have obtained 53 images with the g filter and 19 images with the i filter, each with 600-second exposures of the super metal rich open cluster NGC 6253 with the Gemini-South telescope to create deep images of the cluster to observe the cluster white dwarfs for the first time. We will analyze the white dwarf luminosity function to measure the cluster's white dwarf age, search for any anomalous features (as has been seen in the similarly metal rich cluster NGC 6791), and constrain the initial-final mass relation at high metallicities. We present an update on these observations and our program to study the formation of white dwarfs in super high metallicity environments.

  3. Color-magnitude diagrams for six metal-rich, low-latitude globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armandroff, Taft E.

    1988-01-01

    Colors and magnitudes for stars on CCD frames for six metal-rich, low-latitude, previously unstudied globular clusters and one well-studied, metal-rich cluster (47 Tuc) have been derived and color-magnitude diagrams have been constructed. The photometry for stars in 47 Tuc are in good agreement with previous studies, while the V magnitudes of the horizontal-branch stars in the six program clusters do not agree with estimates based on secondary methods. The distances to these clusters are different from prior estimates. Redding values are derived for each program cluster. The horizontal branches of the program clusters all appear to lie entirely redwards of the red edge of the instability strip, as is normal for their metallicities.

  4. A uniform metal distribution in the intergalactic medium of the Perseus cluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Werner, Norbert; Urban, Ondrej; Simionescu, Aurora; Allen, Steven W

    2013-10-31

    Most of the metals (elements heavier than helium) produced by stars in the member galaxies of clusters currently reside within the hot, X-ray-emitting intra-cluster gas. Observations of X-ray line emission from this intergalactic medium have suggested a relatively small cluster-to-cluster scatter outside the cluster centres and enrichment with iron out to large radii, leading to the idea that the metal enrichment occurred early in the history of the Universe. Models with early enrichment predict a uniform metal distribution at large radii in clusters, whereas those with late-time enrichment are expected to introduce significant spatial variations of the metallicity. To discriminate clearly between these competing models, it is essential to test for potential inhomogeneities by measuring the abundances out to large radii along multiple directions in clusters, which has not hitherto been done. Here we report a remarkably uniform iron abundance, as a function of radius and azimuth, that is statistically consistent with a constant value of ZFe = 0.306 ± 0.012 in solar units out to the edge of the nearby Perseus cluster. This homogeneous distribution requires that most of the metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium occurred before the cluster formed, probably more than ten billion years ago, during the period of maximal star formation and black hole activity.

  5. First examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lamei; Fan Yong; Wang Yan; Xiao Lina; Hu Yangyang; Peng Yu; Wang Tiegang; Gao Zhongmin; Zheng Dafang; Cui Xiaobing; Xu Jiqing

    2012-07-15

    Two new organic-inorganic compounds based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands: [BW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl](H{sub 2}4, 4 Prime -bpy){sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 3}O{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O (1) and [HPW{sub 12}O{sub 40}][Cd{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}](4, 4 Prime -bpy) (2) (Phen=1, 10-phenanthroline, bpy=bipyridine), have been prepared and characterized by IR, UV-vis, XPS, XRD and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Crystal structure analyses reveal that compound 1 is constructed from [BW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 5-}, metal halide clusters [Cu{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl]{sup +}and 4, 4 Prime -bpy ligands, while compound 2 is constructed from [PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-}, metal halide cluster [Cd{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}]{sup 2+} and 4, 4 Prime -bpy ligands. Compound 1 and compound 2 are not common hybrids based on polyoxometalates and metal halide clusters, they also contain dissociated organic ligands, therefore, compound 1 and 2 are the first examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. - Graphical Abstract: Two new compounds have been synthesized and characterized. Structure analyses revealed that the two compounds are the first examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two different kinds of metal halide clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Supramolecular structures based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybridization of three different of building blocks.

  6. Structure, dynamic and energetic of mixed transition metal clusters. A computational study of mixed clusters of silver and nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewage, J. W.; Rupika, W. L.; Amar, F. G.

    2012-11-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation (MD) with Sutton-Chen potential has been used to generate the minimum energy and to study the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of mixed transition metal cluster motifs of Ag n Ni(13- n) for n ≤ 13. Literature results of thirteen particle clusters of neat silver and nickel atoms were first reproduced before the successive replacement of the silver atom by nickel. Calculation was repeated for both silver-centred and nickel-centred clusters. It was found that the nickel-centred clusters were more stable than the silver-centred clusters. Heat capacities and hence the melting points of silver and nickel-centred clusters were determined by using the Histogram method. Species-centric order parameters developed by Hewage and Amar were used to understand the dynamic behaviour in the transition of silver-centred clusters to more stable nickel-centred clusters. This species-centric order parameter calculation further confirmed the stability of nickel-centred clusters over those of silver-centred species.

  7. Tetrahedral Clusters of GaMo 4S 8-Type Compounds: A Metal Bonding Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Beuze, A.; Loirat, H.; Zerrouki, M. C.; Lissillour, R.

    1995-11-01

    Extended Hückel tight binding calculations have been performed on ligated as well as on ligand-free Mo4 and Mo6 extended frames, in order to analyze the metal-metal bonding within the clusters and particularly the appreciable changes of the metal-metal bond lengths through the M4 tetrahedral units contained in GaM4X8 (M = Mo, Nb, V, Ta; X = S, Se, Te), Mo4S4Y4 (Y = Cl, Br, I). A comparison with the M6 octahedral units of the M Mo6X8 (M = Pb, Ag, La; X = S, Se) series is made. By means of DOS, COOP curves, and overlap populations, results clearly display the strong reorganization of the electronic structure of the bare metal clusters network while the ligand interactions occur, inducing a strong reduction of the strength of the metal-metal bonds. We outline the relationship between the metal-metal bond lengths and various parameters such as the valence electron count (VEC) per cluster and the nature of the ligands. Our results indicate that the two series M4 and M6 differ: M-M bond lengths are unaffected by the VEC in the regular M4 cluster, whereas some M-M bond lengths undergo a significant change when the VEC increases in the distorded M6 clusters. Likewise, it is worthy to note that metal d orbitals have a more significant effect in M4 cluster series. In contrast, the metal-ligand covalency induces similar elongations of metal-metal bonds in the two series.

  8. Probing the nanoscale Schottky barrier of metal/semiconductor interfaces of Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sangku; Lee, Seon Joo; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Youngkeun; Song, Hyunjoon; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-08-07

    The electrical nature of the nanoscale contact between metal nanodots and semiconductor rods has drawn significant interest because of potential applications for metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructures in energy conversion or heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we studied the nanoscale electrical character of the Pt/CdSe junction in Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells on connected Au islands by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy under ultra-high vacuum. Current-voltage plots measured in contact mode revealed Schottky barrier heights of individual nanojunctions of 0.41 ± 0.02 eV. The measured value of the Schottky barrier is significantly lower than that of planar thin-film diodes because of a reduction in the barrier width and enhanced tunneling probability at the interface.

  9. Computational Study of Tensile Deformation of a Constrained Nanoscale Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Jianjun; Tan, Ming-Jen; Liew, Kim-Meow

    In this study a nanometer-sized metallic glass (nano-MG) Ti50Cu50 was generated with constrained atoms at both ends and was extended until fracture under a tensile load by molecular dynamics simulation using the general embedded-atom model (GEAM) potential. Totally different mechanical behavior was observed in the nano-MG, such as strain hardening and necking, both of which have been discovered in a few real and simulated MGs and can be related to the generation of shear transformation zones (STZs). A dramatic drop in Young's modulus was found due to the surface effect. Such effect results from the large fraction of surface atoms which have a different surrounding configuration from bulk atoms. At fracture the nano-MG breaks by atomic separation as reported in metal nanowires. The fracture strain is as large as about 120%, indicating that nano-MGs are intrinsically ductile.

  10. Nanoscale Joule heating, Peltier cooling and current crowding at graphene-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Bae, Myung-Ho; Lian, Feifei; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2011-05-01

    The performance and scaling of graphene-based electronics is limited by the quality of contacts between the graphene and metal electrodes. However, the nature of graphene-metal contacts remains incompletely understood. Here, we use atomic force microscopy to measure the temperature distributions at the contacts of working graphene transistors with a spatial resolution of ~10 nm (refs 5, , , 8), allowing us to identify the presence of Joule heating, current crowding and thermoelectric heating and cooling. Comparison with simulation enables extraction of the contact resistivity (150-200 Ω µm2) and transfer length (0.2-0.5 µm) in our devices; these generally limit performance and must be minimized. Our data indicate that thermoelectric effects account for up to one-third of the contact temperature changes, and that current crowding accounts for most of the remainder. Modelling predicts that the role of current crowding will diminish and the role of thermoelectric effects will increase as contacts improve.

  11. Nanoscale Joule heating, Peltier cooling and current crowding at graphene-metal contacts.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Kyle L; Bae, Myung-Ho; Lian, Feifei; Pop, Eric; King, William P

    2011-05-01

    The performance and scaling of graphene-based electronics is limited by the quality of contacts between the graphene and metal electrodes. However, the nature of graphene-metal contacts remains incompletely understood. Here, we use atomic force microscopy to measure the temperature distributions at the contacts of working graphene transistors with a spatial resolution of ~ 10 nm (refs 5-8), allowing us to identify the presence of Joule heating, current crowding and thermoelectric heating and cooling. Comparison with simulation enables extraction of the contact resistivity (150-200 Ω µm²) and transfer length (0.2-0.5 µm) in our devices; these generally limit performance and must be minimized. Our data indicate that thermoelectric effects account for up to one-third of the contact temperature changes, and that current crowding accounts for most of the remainder. Modelling predicts that the role of current crowding will diminish and the role of thermoelectric effects will increase as contacts improve.

  12. Design and simulation of a nanoscale electro-plasmonic 1 × 2 switch based on asymmetric metal-insulator-metal stub filters.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Ahmad Naseri; Kaatuzian, Hassan

    2014-10-01

    A compact nanoscale electro-plasmonic 1 × 2 switch based on asymmetrical metal-insulator-metal stub filters is introduced. The structure is designed and analyzed based on the transmission line method, and the switching operation of the device is numerically simulated and verified by the finite element method. It is found that by adjusting the length of the stubs on each output branch of the structure the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are guided to only one of the output ports. By altering the refractive index of the electro-optical material (DAST) as the core of the structure with a 35 V applied voltage, the SPPs are steered to the opposite port. The reflected SPPs from one stub filter enhance the output intensity of another filter. The operating wavelength of the switch is the communication wavelength λ=1550 nm. Nevertheless, it can be easily redesigned for another wavelength in the range of 800-2000 nm. The insertion losses and the extinction ratios guarantee an almost symmetrical switching for two outputs. The overall size of the switch is 800 nm × 450 nm × 750 nm. The bandwidth of the switch is anticipated over 100 GHz.

  13. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES OF THE SUPER-METAL-RICH OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6253

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Jeffrey D.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Maderak, Ryan M.; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Twarog, Bruce E-mail: con@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: bjat@ku.edu

    2012-11-01

    High-resolution CTIO 4 m/HYDRA spectroscopy of the super-metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 ([Fe/H] = +0.43 {+-} 0.01) has been used to study the stellar lithium (Li) abundances near the cluster's turnoff. NGC 6253 greatly expands the range of [Fe/H] for clusters that have a Li abundance analysis. This is important for studying the complicated effects of, and potential correlations with, stellar Fe abundance on surface Li abundance. Comparisons to the younger and less-metal-rich Hyades and to the similarly aged but solar-metallicity M67 show that NGC 6253's Li abundances are qualitatively consistent with the prediction, from Standard Stellar Evolution Theory, that higher-metallicity stars have a greater Li depletion. Comparison with M67 provides evidence that the more-metal-rich NGC 6253 had a higher initial Li, which is consistent with expectations from models of Galactic Li production. NGC 6253 is also compared to the intermediate-aged NGC 3680, NGC 752, and IC 4651 open clusters. Comparison of the Li-gap positions in all six clusters shows that (1) the gap's position in T{sub eff} is independent of metallicity, but (2) higher-metallicity clusters have their gaps in higher-mass stars. In addition, the Li gap's position is shown not to evolve with age, which provides an important constraint for the non-standard depletion mechanisms that may create the Li gap.

  14. Self-Assembly of Silver Metal Clusters of Small Atomicity on Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cuerva, Miguel; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos; López-Quintela, M Arturo; Montenegro, Javier; Granja, Juan R

    2015-11-24

    Subnanometric noble metal clusters, composed by only a few atoms, behave like molecular entities and display magnetic, luminescent and catalytic activities. However, noncovalent interactions of molecular metal clusters, lacking of any ligand or surfactant, have not been seen at work. Theoretically attractive and experimentally discernible, van der Waals forces and noncovalent interactions at the metal/organic interfaces will be crucial to understand and develop the next generation of hybrid nanomaterials. Here, we present experimental and theoretical evidence of noncovalent interactions between subnanometric metal (0) silver clusters and aromatic rings and their application in the preparation of 1D self-assembled hybrid architectures with ditopic peptide nanotubes. Atomic force microscopy, fluorescence experiments, circular dichroism and computational simulations verified the occurrence of these interactions in the clean and mild formation of a novel peptide nanotube and metal cluster hybrid material. The findings reported here confirmed the sensitivity of silver metal clusters of small atomicity toward noncovalent interactions, a concept that could find multiple applications in nanotechnology. We conclude that induced supramolecular forces are optimal candidates for the precise spatial positioning and properties modulation of molecular metal clusters. The reported results herein outline and generalize the possibilities that noncovalent interactions will have in this emerging field.

  15. Sub-nanometre sized metal clusters: from synthetic challenges to the unique property discoveries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yizhong; Chen, Wei

    2012-05-07

    Sub-nanometre sized metal clusters, with dimensions between metal atoms and nanoparticles, have attracted more and more attention due to their unique electronic structures and the subsequent unusual physical and chemical properties. However, the tiny size of the metal clusters brings the difficulty of their synthesis compared to the easier preparation of large nanoparticles. Up to now various synthetic techniques and routes have been successfully applied to the preparation of sub-nanometre clusters. Among the metals, gold clusters, especially the alkanethiolate monolayer protected clusters (MPCs), have been extensively investigated during the past decades. In recent years, silver and copper nanoclusters have also attracted enormous interest mainly due to their excellent photoluminescent properties. Meanwhile, more structural characteristics, particular optical, catalytic, electronic and magnetic properties and the related technical applications of the metal nanoclusters have been discovered in recent years. In this critical review, recent advances in sub-nanometre sized metal clusters (Au, Ag, Cu, etc.) including the synthetic techniques, structural characterizations, novel physical, chemical and optical properties and their potential applications are discussed in detail. We finally give a brief outlook on the future development of metal nanoclusters from the viewpoint of controlled synthesis and their potential applications.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity estimates of M31 globular clusters (Galleti+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2010-04-01

    New empirical relations of [Fe/H] as a function of [MgFe] and Mg2 indices are based on the well-studied galactic globular clusters, complemented with theoretical model predictions for -0.2<=[Fe/H]<=+0.5. Lick indices for M31 clusters from various literature sources (225 clusters) and from new observations by our team (71 clusters) have been transformed into the Trager et al. (2000AJ....119.1645T) system, yielding new metallicity estimates for 245 globular clusters of M31. (3 data files).

  17. Nanoscale optical properties of metal nanoparticles probed by Second Harmonic Generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Nguyen, Ngoc; Gachet, David; Maillard, Vincent; Toury, Timothée; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-05-20

    We report spatial and vectorial imaging of local fields' confinement properties in metal nanoparticles with branched shapes, using Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy. Taking advantage of the coherent nature of this nonlinear process, the technique provides a direct evidence of the coupling between the excitation polarization and both localization and polarization specificities of local fields at the sub-diffraction scale. These combined features, which are governed by the nanoparticles' symmetry, are not accessible using other contrasts such as linear optical techniques or two-photon luminescence.

  18. Dynamic evolution of nanoscale shear bands in a bulk-metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Bing; Morrison, Mark L.; Liaw, Peter K.; Buchanan, Raymond A.; Wang Gongyao; Liu, Chain T.; Denda, Mitsunori

    2005-04-04

    Dynamic shear-band-evolution processes in a bulk-metallic glass (BMG), an emerging class of materials, were captured by a state-of-the-art, high-speed, infrared camera. Many shear bands initiated, propagated, and arrested before the final fracture in tension, each with decreasing temperature, and shear-strain profiles. A free-volume-exhaustion mechanism was proposed to explain the phenomena. The results contribute to understanding and improving the limited ductility of BMGs, which otherwise have superior mechanical properties.

  19. Attosecond physics at a nanoscale metal tip: strong field physics meets near-field optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, M.; Thomas, S.; Förster, M.; Maisenbacher, L.; Wachter, G.; Lemell, Chr.; Burgdörfer, J.; Hommelhoff, P.

    2013-03-01

    Attosecond physics, centering on the control of electronic matter waves within a single cycle of the optical laser's driving field, has led to tremendously successful experiments with atoms and molecules in the gas phase. We show that pivotal phenomena such as elastic electron rescattering at the parent matter, a strong carrier-evenlope phase sensitivity and electronic matter wave intereference also show up in few-cycle laser driven electron emission from nanometric sharp metal tips. Furthermore, we utilize spectral signatures to measure the enhanced near-field with a spatial resolution of 1nm.

  20. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    Small transition metal clusters were studied at a high level of approximation, including all the valence electrons in the calculation and extensive electron correlation, in order to understand the electronic structure of these small metal clusters. By comparison of dimers, trimers, and possibly higher clusters, the information obtained was used to provide insights into the electronic structure of bulk transition metals. Small metal clusters are currently of considerable experimental interest and some information is becomming available both from matrix electron spin resonance studies and from gas phase spectroscopy. Collaboration between theorists and experimentalists is thus expected to be especially profitable at this time since there is some experimental information which can serve to guide the theoretical work.

  1. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1987-01-01

    The results of ab-initio calculations are reported for (1) small transition metal clusters and (2) potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions important in hydrogen combustion and high temperature air chemistry.

  2. Hard X-ray-induced optical luminescence via biomolecule-directed metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Osakada, Yasuko; Pratx, Guillem; Sun, Conroy; Sakamoto, Masanori; Ahmad, Moiz; Volotskova, Olga; Ong, Qunxiang; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Harada, Yoshie; Xing, Lei; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-04-07

    Here, we demonstrate that biomolecule-directed metal clusters are applicable in the study of hard X-ray excited optical luminescence, promising a new direction in the development of novel X-ray-activated imaging probes.

  3. Inverse polarity of the resistive switching effect and strong inhomogeneity in nanoscale YBCO-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchly, M.; Plecenik, T.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Belogolovskii, M.; Dvoranova, M.; Kus, P.; Plecenik, A.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied a bipolar resistive switching phenomenon in c-axis oriented normal-state YBa2Cu3O7-c (YBCO) thin films at room temperature by scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques. The most striking experimental finding has been the opposite (in contrast to the previous room and low-temperature data for planar metal counter-electrode-YBCO bilayers) voltage-bias polarity of the switching effect in all SSRM and a number of STM measurements. We have assumed that the hysteretic phenomena in current-voltage characteristics of YBCO-based contacts can be explained by migration of oxygen-vacancy defects and, as a result, by the formation or dissolution of more or less conductive regions near the metal-YBCO interface. To support our interpretation of the macroscopic resistive switching phenomenon, a minimalist model that describes radical modifications of the oxygen-vacancy effective charge in terms of a charge-wind effect was proposed. It was shown theoretically that due to the momentum exchange between current carriers (holes in the YBCO compound) and activated oxygen ions, the direction in which oxygen vacancies are moving is defined by the balance between the direct electrostatic force on them and that caused by the current-carrier flow.

  4. Electrical properties of nanoscale metallic thin films on dielectric elastomer at various strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Ye, Zhihang; Chen, Zheng; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have significant applications in artificial muscle and other biomedical equipment and device fabrications. Metallic thin films by thin film transfer and sputter coating techniques can provide conductive surfaces on the DE samples, and can be used as electrodes for the actuators and other biomedical sensing devices. In the present study, 3M VHB 4910 tape was used as a DE for the coating and electrical characterization tests. A 150 nm thickness of gold was coated on the DE surfaces by sputter coating under vacuum with different pre-strains, ranging from 0 to 100%. Some of the thin films were transferred to the surface of the DEs. Sputter coating, and direct transferring gold leaf coating methods were studied and the results were analyzed in detail in terms of the strain rates and electrical resistivity changes. Initial studies indicated that the metallic surfaces remain conductive even though the DE films were considerably elongated. The coated DEs can be used as artificial muscle by applying electrical stimulation through the conductive surfaces. This study may provide great benefits to the readers, researchers, as well as companies involved in manufacturing of artificial muscles and actuators using smart materials.

  5. Chemical abundances in Virgo cluster spirals - what drives the environmental dependence of galaxy metallicity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara; Skillman, Evan; Chung, Aeree

    2009-08-01

    The Virgo cluster is not only our nearest massive cluster, but its dynamical infancy also renders it an ideal laboratory for studies of cluster formation and galaxy evolution. Given the intense interest in Virgo, it is astounding that only 9 out of over 100 spirals in its firmament have chemical abundance measurements. We propose to simultaneously address this gap in our fundamental knowledge of Virgo cluster spirals and investigate how the metallicity and abundance gradients of star forming galaxies are sensitive to environment. Our sample consists of 13 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies, preferentially gas-poor early types, which complement the existing metallicity measurements. We also sample a range of clustercentric distances (0.3 -- 3 Mpc from M87), local densities and include several galaxies which exhibit evidence for interactions with the intra-cluster medium.

  6. 24 electron cluster formulas as the 'molecular' units of ideal metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, L. J.; Chen, H.; Wang, Y. M.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Q.; Dong, C.; Häussler, P.

    2014-08-01

    It is known that ideal metallic glasses fully complying with the Hume-Rothery stabilization mechanism can be expressed by a universal cluster formula of the form [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. In the present work, it is shown, after a re-examination of the cluster-resonance model, that the number of electrons per unit cluster formula, e/u, is universally 24. The cluster formulas are then the atomic as well as the electronic structural units, mimicking the 'molecular' formulas for chemical substances. The origin of different electron number per atom ratios e/a is related to the total number of atoms Z in unit cluster formula, e/a = 24/Z. The 24 electron formulas are well confirmed in typical binary and ternary bulk metallic glasses.

  7. 25. Steenbock symposium -- Biosynthesis and function of metal clusters for enzymes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This symposium was held June 10--14, 1997 in Madison, Wisconsin. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biochemistry of enzymes that have an affinity for metal clusters. Attention is focused on the following: metal clusters involved in energy conservation and remediation; tungsten, molybdenum, and cobalt-containing enzymes; Fe proteins, and Mo-binding proteins; nickel enzymes; and nitrogenase.

  8. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine activation energies for the catalyst-assisted systems. PMID:22408484

  9. Infrared Probes of Metal Cluster Structure and Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    corresponding niobium and tantalum analogues of these clusters. Preliminary attempts were conducted for the production of other ligand- coated ...interactions. Prospects are evaluated for macroscopic synthesis of cluster materials and synthesis experiments employing ligand- coating strategies have been...experiments that isolate ligand- coated nanoclusters in solution were conducted using a new laser ablation flowtube reactor. Graduate and undergraduate

  10. Metal Sulfide Cluster Complexes and their Biogeochemical Importance in the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, George W.; Rickard, David T.

    2005-10-01

    Aqueous clusters of FeS, ZnS and CuS constitute a major fraction of the dissolved metal load in anoxic oceanic, sedimentary, freshwater and deep ocean vent environments. Their ubiquity explains how metals are transported in anoxic environmental systems. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations show that they have high stability in oxic aqueous environments, and are also a significant fraction of the total metal load in oxic river waters. Molecular modeling indicates that the clusters are very similar to the basic structural elements of the first condensed phase forming from aqueous solutions in the Fe-S, Zn-S and Cu-S systems. The structure of the first condensed phase is determined by the structure of the cluster in solution. This provides an alternative explanation of Ostwald's Rule, where the most soluble, metastable phases form before the stable phases. For example, in the case of FeS, we showed that the first condensed phase is nanoparticulate, metastable mackinawite with a particle size of 2 nm consisting of about 150 FeS subunits, representing the end of a continuum between aqueous FeS clusters and condensed material. These metal sulfide clusters and nanoparticles are significant in biogeochemistry. Metal sulfide clusters reduce sulfide and metal toxicity and help drive ecology. FeS cluster formation drives vent ecology and AgS cluster formation detoxifies Ag in Daphnia magna neonates. We also note a new reaction between FeS and DNA and discuss the potential role of FeS clusters in denaturing DNA.

  11. Decoration of Micro-/Nanoscale Noble Metal Particles on 3D Porous Nickel Using Electrodeposition Technique as Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Hang, Tao; Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Li, Ming

    2015-07-29

    Micro-/nanoscale noble metal (Ag, Au, and Pt) particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrodes for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline electrolyte are fabricated via galvanostatic electrodeposition technique. The developed electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements including Tafel polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is clearly shown that the enlarged real surface area caused by 3D highly porous dendritic structure has greatly reinforced the electrocatalytic activity toward HER. Comparative analysis of electrodeposited Ag, Au, and Pt particle-decorated porous nickel electrodes for HER indicates that both intrinsic property and size of the noble metal particles can lead to distinct catalytic activities. Both nanoscale Au and Pt particles have further reinforcement effect toward HER, whereas microscale Ag particles exhibit the reverse effect. As an effective 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, the nanoscale Pt-particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrode demonstrates the highest catalytic activity with an extremely low overpotential of -0.045 V for hydrogen production, a considerable exchange current density of 9.47 mA cm(-2) at 25 °C, and high durability in long-term electrolysis, all of which are attributed to the intrinsic catalytic property and the extremely small size of Pt particles.

  12. Nanoscale-phase-separated Pd-Rh boxes synthesized via metal migration: an archetype for studying lattice strain and composition effects in electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Brian T; Brodsky, Casey N; Kuo, Chun-Hong; Lamontagne, Leo K; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Yong; Tao, Franklin Feng; Huang, Weixin; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2013-10-02

    Developing syntheses of more sophisticated nanostructures comprising late transition metals broadens the tools to rationally design suitable heterogeneous catalysts for chemical transformations. Herein, we report a synthesis of Pd-Rh nanoboxes by controlling the migration of metals in a core-shell nanoparticle. The Pd-Rh nanobox structure is a grid-like arrangement of two distinct metal phases, and the surfaces of these boxes are {100} dominant Pd and Rh. The catalytic behaviors of the particles were examined in electrochemistry to investigate strain effects arising from this structure. It was found that the trends in activity of model fuel cell reactions cannot be explained solely by the surface composition. The lattice strain emerging from the nanoscale separation of metal phases at the surface also plays an important role.

  13. Local microstructure evolution at shear bands in metallic glasses with nanoscale phase separation

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Kaban, Ivan; Mattern, Norbert; Song, Kaikai; Sun, Baoan; Zhao, Jiuzhou; Kim, Do Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Greer, A. Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    At room temperature, plastic flow of metallic glasses (MGs) is sharply localized in shear bands, which are a key feature of the plastic deformation in MGs. Despite their clear importance and decades of study, the conditions for formation of shear bands, their structural evolution and multiplication mechanism are still under debate. In this work, we investigate the local conditions at shear bands in new phase-separated bulk MGs containing glassy nanospheres and exhibiting exceptional plasticity under compression. It is found that the glassy nanospheres within the shear band dissolve through mechanical mixing driven by the sharp strain localization there, while those nearby in the matrix coarsen by Ostwald ripening due to the increased atomic mobility. The experimental evidence demonstrates that there exists an affected zone around the shear band. This zone may arise from low-strain plastic deformation in the matrix between the bands. These results suggest that measured property changes originate not only from the shear bands themselves, but also from the affected zones in the adjacent matrix. This work sheds light on direct visualization of deformation-related effects, in particular increased atomic mobility, in the region around shear bands. PMID:27181922

  14. Second harmonic generation in nanoscale films of transition metal dichalcogenide: Accounting for multipath interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. V.; Lavrov, S. D.; Shestakova, A. P.; Kulyuk, L. L.; Mishina, E. D.

    2016-09-01

    The transfer matrix method has been widely used to calculate wave propagation through the layered structures consisting entirely of either linear or nonlinear optical materials. In the present work, we develop the transfer matrix method for structures consisting of alternating layers of linear and nonlinear optical materials. The result is presented in a form that allows one to directly substitute the values of material constants, refractive index and absorption coefficient, into the expressions describing the second harmonic generation (SHG) field. The model is applied to the calculation of second harmonic (SH) field generated in nano-thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides exfoliated on top of silicon oxide/silicon Fabry-Perot cavity. These structures are intensively studied both in view of their unique properties and perspective applications. A good agreement between experimental and numerical results can be achieved by small modification of optical constants, which may arise in an experiment due to a strong electric field of an incident focused pump laser beam. By considering the SHG effect, this paper completes the series of works describing the role of Fabry-Perot cavity in different optical effects (optical reflection, photoluminescence and Raman scattering) in 2D semiconductors that is extremely important for characterization of these unique materials.

  15. Porous metal-organic-framework nanoscale carriers as a potential platform for drug delivery and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horcajada, Patricia; Chalati, Tamim; Serre, Christian; Gillet, Brigitte; Sebrie, Catherine; Baati, Tarek; Eubank, Jarrod F.; Heurtaux, Daniela; Clayette, Pascal; Kreuz, Christine; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Young Kyu; Marsaud, Veronique; Bories, Phuong-Nhi; Cynober, Luc; Gil, Sophie; Férey, Gérard; Couvreur, Patrick; Gref, Ruxandra

    2010-02-01

    In the domain of health, one important challenge is the efficient delivery of drugs in the body using non-toxic nanocarriers. Most of the existing carrier materials show poor drug loading (usually less than 5wt% of the transported drug versus the carrier material) and/or rapid release of the proportion of the drug that is simply adsorbed (or anchored) at the external surface of the nanocarrier. In this context, porous hybrid solids, with the ability to tune their structures and porosities for better drug interactions and high loadings, are well suited to serve as nanocarriers for delivery and imaging applications. Here we show that specific non-toxic porous iron(III)-based metal-organic frameworks with engineered cores and surfaces, as well as imaging properties, function as superior nanocarriers for efficient controlled delivery of challenging antitumoural and retroviral drugs (that is, busulfan, azidothymidine triphosphate, doxorubicin or cidofovir) against cancer and AIDS. In addition to their high loadings, they also potentially associate therapeutics and diagnostics, thus opening the way for theranostics, or personalized patient treatments.

  16. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  17. Nanoscale heat transport from Ge hut, dome, and relaxed clusters on Si(001) measured by ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frigge, T. Hafke, B.; Tinnemann, V.; Krenzer, B.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2015-02-02

    The thermal transport properties of crystalline nanostructures on Si were studied by ultra-fast surface sensitive time-resolved electron diffraction. Self-organized growth of epitaxial Ge hut, dome, and relaxed clusters was achieved by in-situ deposition of 8 monolayers of Ge on Si(001) at 550 °C under UHV conditions. The thermal response of the three different cluster types subsequent to impulsive heating by fs laser pulses was determined through the Debye-Waller effect. Time resolved spot profile analysis and life-time mapping was employed to distinguish between the thermal response of the different cluster types. While dome clusters are cooling with a time constant of τ = 150 ps, which agrees well with numerical simulations, the smaller hut clusters with a height of 2.3 nm exhibit a cooling time constant of τ = 50 ps, which is a factor of 1.4 slower than expected.

  18. Electrostatic effect of Au nanoparticles on near-infrared photoluminescence from Si/SiGe due to nanoscale metal/semiconductor contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yefei; Wang, Ze; Wang, Shuguang; Bai, Yujie; Jiang, Zuimin; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2017-04-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from Si and SiGe is comprehensively modified by Au NPs under excitation without surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the PL sensitively depends on the size of the Au NPs, the excitation power and the thickness of the Si layer between the Au NPs and SiGe. A model is proposed in terms of the electrostatic effects of Au NPs naturally charged by electron transfer through the nanoscale metal/semiconductor Schottky junction without an external bias or external injection of carriers. The model accounts well for all the unique PL features. It also reveals that Au NPs can substantially modify the energy band structures, distribution and transition of carriers in the nanoscale region below the Au NPs. Our results demonstrate that Au NPs on semiconductors can efficiently modulate light–matter interaction.

  19. Electrostatic effect of Au nanoparticles on near-infrared photoluminescence from Si/SiGe due to nanoscale metal/semiconductor contact.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yefei; Wang, Ze; Wang, Shuguang; Bai, Yujie; Jiang, Zuimin; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2017-04-18

    Photoluminescence (PL) from Si and SiGe is comprehensively modified by Au NPs under excitation without surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the PL sensitively depends on the size of the Au NPs, the excitation power and the thickness of the Si layer between the Au NPs and SiGe. A model is proposed in terms of the electrostatic effects of Au NPs naturally charged by electron transfer through the nanoscale metal/semiconductor Schottky junction without an external bias or external injection of carriers. The model accounts well for all the unique PL features. It also reveals that Au NPs can substantially modify the energy band structures, distribution and transition of carriers in the nanoscale region below the Au NPs. Our results demonstrate that Au NPs on semiconductors can efficiently modulate light-matter interaction.

  20. Near-infrared photometry of globular clusters towards the Galactic bulge: observations and photometric metallicity indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Roger E.; Moni Bidin, Christian; Mauro, Francesco; Bonatto, Charles; Geisler, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    We present wide-field JHKS photometry of 16 Galactic globular clusters located towards the Galactic bulge, calibrated on the Two Micron All-Sky Survey photometric system. Differential reddening corrections and statistical field star decontamination are employed for all of these clusters before fitting fiducial sequences to the cluster red giant branches (RGBs). Observed values and uncertainties are reported for several photometric features, including the magnitude of the RGB bump, tip, the horizontal branch (HB) and the slope of the upper RGB. The latest spectroscopically determined chemical abundances are used to build distance- and reddening-independent relations between observed photometric features and cluster metallicity, optimizing the sample size and metallicity baseline of these relations by supplementing our sample with results from the literature. We find that the magnitude difference between the HB and the RGB bump can be used to predict metallicities, in terms of both iron abundance [Fe/H] and global metallicity [M/H], with a precision of better than 0.1 dex in all three near-IR bandpasses for relatively metal-rich ([M/H] ≳ -1) clusters. Meanwhile, both the slope of the upper RGB and the magnitude difference between the RGB tip and bump are useful metallicity indicators over the entire sampled metallicity range (-2 ≲ [M/H] ≲ 0) with a precision of 0.2 dex or better, despite model predictions that the RGB slope may become unreliable at high (near-solar) metallicities. Our results agree with previous calibrations in light of the relevant uncertainties, and we discuss implications for clusters with controversial metallicities as well as directions for further investigation.

  1. Structures and stability of metal-doped GenM (n = 9, 10) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Xia, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Zang, Qing-Jun; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The lowest-energy structures of neutral and cationic GenM (n = 9, 10; M = Si, Li, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Au, Ag, Yb, Pm and Dy) clusters were studied by genetic algorithm (GA) and first-principles calculations. The calculation results show that doping of the metal atoms and Si into Ge9 and Ge10 clusters is energetically favorable. Most of the metal-doped Ge cluster structures can be viewed as adding or substituting metal atom on the surface of the corresponding ground-state Gen clusters. However, the neutral and cationic FeGe9,10,MnGe9,10 and Ge10Al are cage-like with the metal atom encapsulated inside. Such cage-like transition metal doped Gen clusters are shown to have higher adsorption energy and thermal stability. Our calculation results suggest that Ge9,10Fe and Ge9Si would be used as building blocks in cluster-assembled nanomaterials because of their high stabilities.

  2. Structures and stability of metal-doped GenM (n = 9, 10) clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Xia, Lin-Hua; ...

    2015-06-26

    The lowest-energy structures of neutral and cationic Ge nM (n = 9, 10; M = Si, Li, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Au, Ag, Yb, Pm and Dy) clusters were studied by genetic algorithm (GA) and first-principles calculations. The calculation results show that doping of the metal atoms and Si into Ge9 and Ge10 clusters is energetically favorable. Most of the metal-doped Ge cluster structures can be viewed as adding or substituting metal atom on the surface of the corresponding ground-state Gen clusters. However, the neutral and cationic FeGe9,10,MnGe9,10 and Ge10Al are cage-like with the metal atom encapsulated inside. Suchmore » cage-like transition metal doped Gen clusters are shown to have higher adsorption energy and thermal stability. Our calculation results suggest that Ge9,10Fe and Ge9Si would be used as building blocks in cluster-assembled nanomaterials because of their high stabilities.« less

  3. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Small transition metal clusters at a high level of approximation i.e. including all the valence electrons in the calculation and also including extensive electron correlation were studied. Perhaps the most useful end result of these studies is the qualitative information about the electronic structure of these small metal clusters, including the nature of the bonding. The electronic structure studies of the small clusters are directly applicable to problems in catalysis. From comparison of dimers, trimers and possibly higher clusters, it is possible to extrapolate the information obtained to provide insights into the electronic structure of bulk transition metals and their interaction with other atoms and molecules at both surface and interior locations.

  4. The Photo-Electric Effect in Metallic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krc, Eugene

    Small clusters of Silver atoms have been observed to yield about 100 times more photo-electrons than crystalline Silver (per unit area of surface) for photons with energy up to 1.5 ev above threshold. I have calculated the yield from Silver and Sodium clusters of up to 55 atoms using a Green's function formalism. A method of successive approximations takes into account the scattering of the electrons by the ion-cores as well as by the surface. The formalism is applied to an independent-electron model with a muffin -tin potential. Each electron feels the incident light wave and the polarization field of all the other electrons computed with the bulk dielectric function. Scattering of the photo-excited electron is included as a final step in the photo-emission process. The cross-sections calculated for Silver clusters are in good agreement with experiment; for Sodium clusters, however, the relevant experimental data are incomplete.

  5. Nucleoside modification with boron clusters and their metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Blazej A; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Lesnikowski, Zbigniew J

    2009-09-01

    General methods for the synthesis of nucleosides modified with borane clusters and metallacarborane complexes are presented. These include: (1) the click chemistry approach based on Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and (2) tethering of the metallacarborane group to the aglycone of a nucleoside via a dioxane ring opening in oxonium metallacarborane derivatives. The proposed methodologies broaden the availability of nucleoside-borane cluster conjugates and open up new areas for their applications.

  6. Age and metallicity of star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud from integrated spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, B.; Coelho, P.; Barbuy, B.; Kerber, L.; Idiart, T.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Analysis of ages and metallicities of star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds provide information for studies on the chemical evolution of the Clouds and other dwarf irregular galaxies. Aims: The aim is to derive ages and metallicities from integrated spectra of 14 star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud, including a few intermediate/old age star clusters. Methods: Making use of a full-spectrum fitting technique, we compared the integrated spectra of the sample clusters to three different sets of single stellar population models, using two fitting codes available in the literature. Results: We derive the ages and metallicities of 9 intermediate/old age clusters, some of them previously unstudied, and 5 young clusters. Conclusions: We point out the interest of the newly identified as intermediate/old age clusters HW1, NGC 152, Lindsay 3, Lindsay 11, and Lindsay 113. We also confirm the old ages of NGC 361, NGC 419, Kron 3, and of the very well-known oldest SMC cluster, NGC 121. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Bonding study in all-metal clusters containing Al4 units.

    PubMed

    Mandado, Marcos; Krishtal, Alisa; Van Alsenoy, Christian; Bultinck, Patrick; Hermida-Ramón, J M

    2007-11-22

    The nature of the bonding of a series of gas-phase all-metal clusters containing the Al4 unit attached to an alkaline, alkaline earth, or transition metal is investigated at the DFT level using Mulliken, quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), and Hirshfeld iterative (Hirshfeld-I) atomic partitionings. The characterization of ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds is done by means of charge polarization and multicenter electron delocalization. This Article uses for the first time Hirshfeld-I multicenter indices as well as Hirshfeld-I based atomic energy calculations. The QTAIM charges are in line with the electronegativity scale, whereas Hirshfeld-I calculations display deviations for transition metal clusters. The Mulliken charges fail to represent the charge polarization in alkaline metal clusters. The large ionic character of Li-Al and Na-Al bonds results in weak covalent bonds. On the contrary, scarcely ionic bonds (Be-Al, Cu-Al and Zn-Al) display stronger covalent bonds. These findings are in line with the topology of the electron density. The metallic character of these clusters is reflected in large 3-, 4- and 5-center electron delocalization, which is found for all the molecular fragments using the three atomic definitions. The previously reported magnetic inactivity (based on means of magnetic ring currents) of the pi system in the Al42- cluster contrasts with its large pi electron delocalization. However, it is shown that the different results not necessary contradict each other.

  8. Introduction: advances and opportunities in cluster research. [Neutral (metal) and ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of neutral and ionic clusters include these in the upper and lower atmosphere, interstellar grain formation, combustion, radiation physics and chemistry, surface bombardment, fission product transport in reactors, corrosion, etc. This paper is a brief overview of some recent developments in cluster research. (DLC)

  9. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.; Katz, Alexander

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  10. Generation and characterization of alkali metal clusters in Y-FAU zeolites. An ESR and MAS NMR spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, István; Béres, Attila; Nagy, János B.; Halász, János; Kiricsi, Imre

    1997-06-01

    Charged and neutral metal clusters of various compositions and sizes can be prepared by controlling the alkali metal content by the decomposition of alkali azides and the composition of the host zeolite by ion-exchange. ESR signals show that electron transfer from alkali metal atoms to alkali metal cations does occur, but in a direction opposite to that predicted by the gas-phase thermochemistry. Alkali metal clusters proved to be very active basic catalytic centers.

  11. Ligand-modified metal clusters for gas separation and purification

    DOEpatents

    Okrut, Alexander; Ouyang, Xiaoying; Runnebaum, Ron; Gates, Bruce C.; Katz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    Provided is an organic ligand-bound metal surface that selects one gaseous species over another. The species can be closely sized molecular species having less than 1 Angstrom difference in kinetic diameter. In one embodiment, the species comprise carbon monoxide and ethylene. Such organic ligand-bound metal surfaces can be successfully used in gas phase separations or purifications, sensing, and in catalysis.

  12. Age and metallicity of star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud from integrated spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Bruno; Coelho, Paula; Kerber, Leandro; Barbuy, Beatriz; Idiart, Thais

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of integrated spectra of star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds can bring important information for studies on the chemical evolution of the Clouds. The aim of the present work is to derive ages and metallicities from integrated spectra of 15 star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), some of them not studied so far. Making use of a full spectrum fitting technique, we compared the integrated spectra of the sample clusters to three different sets of single stellar population models available in the literature. We derived ages and metallicities for the sample clusters employing the codes STARLIGHT and ULySS. Out of the 15 clusters in our sample, 9 are old/intermediate age clusters and 6 are young clusters. We point out the results for the newly identified as old/intermediate age clusters HW1, NGC 152, Lindsay 3 and 11. We also confirm old ages for NGC 361, NGC 419 and Kron 3, and the oldest well-known SMC cluster NGC 121.

  13. Detecting and destroying cancer cells in more than one way with noble metals and different confinement properties on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Dreaden, Erik C; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2012-11-20

    Today, 1 in 2 males and 1 in 3 females in the United States will develop cancer at some point during their lifetimes, and 1 in 4 males and 1 in 5 females in the United States will die from the disease. New methods for detection and treatment have dramatically improved cancer care in the United States. However, as improved detection and increasing exposure to carcinogens has led to higher rates of cancer incidence, clinicians and researchers have not balanced that increase with a similar decrease in cancer mortality rates. This mismatch highlights a clear and urgent need for increasingly potent and selective methods with which to detect and treat cancers at their earliest stages. Nanotechnology, the use of materials with structural features ranging from 1 to 100 nm in size, has dramatically altered the design, use, and delivery of cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The unique and newly discovered properties of these structures can enhance the specificities with which biomedical agents are delivered, complementing their efficacy or diminishing unintended side effects. Gold (and silver) nanotechnologies afford a particularly unique set of physiological and optical properties which can be leveraged in applications ranging from in vitro/vivo therapeutics and drug delivery to imaging and diagnostics, surgical guidance, and treatment monitoring. Nanoscale diagnostic and therapeutic agents have been in use since the development of micellar nanocarriers and polymer-drug nanoconjugates in the mid-1950s, liposomes by Bangham and Watkins in the mid-1960s, and the introduction of polymeric nanoparticles by Langer and Folkman in 1976. Since then, nanoscale constructs such as dendrimers, protein nanoconjugates, and inorganic nanoparticles have been developed for the systemic delivery of agents to specific disease sites. Today, more than 20 FDA-approved diagnostic or therapeutic nanotechnologies are in clinical use with roughly 250 others in clinical development. The global

  14. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  15. First examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, La-Mei; Fan, Yong; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Li-Na; Hu, Yang-Yang; Peng, Yu; Wang, Tie-Gang; Gao, Zhong-Min; Zheng, Da-Fang; Cui, Xiao-Bing; Xu, Ji-Qing

    2012-07-01

    Two new organic-inorganic compounds based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands: [BW12O40]2[Cu2(Phen)4Cl](H24, 4'-bpy)4·H3O·5H2O (1) and [HPW12O40][Cd2(Phen)4Cl2](4, 4'-bpy) (2) (Phen=1, 10-phenanthroline, bpy=bipyridine), have been prepared and characterized by IR, UV-vis, XPS, XRD and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Crystal structure analyses reveal that compound 1 is constructed from [BW12O40]5-, metal halide clusters [Cu2(Phen)4Cl]+and 4, 4'-bpy ligands, while compound 2 is constructed from [PW12O40]3-, metal halide cluster [Cd2(Phen)4Cl2]2+ and 4, 4'-bpy ligands. Compound 1 and compound 2 are not common hybrids based on polyoxometalates and metal halide clusters, they also contain dissociated organic ligands, therefore, compound 1 and 2 are the first examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands.

  16. Electrochemical Synthesis and Catalytic Properties of Encapsulated Metal Clusters within Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengyuan; Liu, Jia; Liu, Chuanfang; Zheng, Bin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Jia, Mingjun; Zhu, Guangshan

    2016-11-07

    It is very interesting and also a big challenge to encapsulate metal clusters within microporous solids to expand their application diversity. For this target, herein, we present an electrochemical synthesis strategy for the encapsulation of noble metals (Au, Pd, Pt) within ZIF-8 cavities. In this method, metal precursors of AuCl4(2-) , PtCl6(2-) , and PdCl4(2-) are introduced into ZIF-8 crystals during the concurrent crystallization of ZIF-8 at the anode. As a consequence, very small metal clusters with sizes around 1.2 nm are obtained within ZIF-8 crystals after hydrogen reduction; these clusters exhibit high thermal stability, as evident from the good maintenance of their original sizes after a high-temperature test. The catalytic properties of the encapsulated metal clusters within ZIF-8 are evaluated for CO oxidations. Because of the small pore window of ZIF-8 (0.34 nm) and the confinement effect of small pores, about 80 % of the metal clusters (fractions of 0.74, 0.77, and 0.75 for Au, Pt, and Pd in ZIF-8, respectively) retain their catalytic activity after exposure to the organosulfur poison thiophene (0.46 nm), which is in contrast to their counterparts (fractions of 0.22, 0.25, and 0.20 for Au, Pt, and Pd on the SiO2 support). The excellent performances of metal clusters encapsulated within ZIF-8 crystals give new opportunities for catalytic reactions.

  17. Nanoscale decomposition of Nb-Ru-O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W.; Chen, Yen-Ting

    2016-11-01

    A correlative theoretical and experimental methodology has been employed to explore the decomposition of amorphous Nb-Ru-O at elevated temperatures. Density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations reveal that amorphous Nb-Ru-O is structurally modified within 10 ps at 800 K giving rise to an increase in the planar metal - oxygen and metal - metal population and hence formation of large clusters, which signifies atomic segregation. The driving force for this atomic segregation process is 0.5 eV/atom. This is validated by diffraction experiments and transmission electron microscopy of sputter-synthesized Nb-Ru-O thin films. Room temperature samples are amorphous, while at 800 K nanoscale rutile RuO2 grains, self-organized in an amorphous Nb-O matrix, are observed, which is consistent with our theoretical predictions. This amorphous/crystalline interplay may be of importance for next generation of thermoelectric devices.

  18. Controllable growth of nanoscale conductive filaments in solid-electrolyte-based ReRAM by using a metal nanocrystal covered bottom electrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Lv, Hangbing; Wang, Wei; Niu, Jiebin; Huo, Zongliang; Chen, Junning; Liu, Ming

    2010-10-26

    Resistive memory (ReRAM) based on a solid-electrolyte insulator is a promising nanoscale device and has great potentials in nonvolatile memory, analog circuits, and neuromorphic applications. The underlying resistive switching (RS) mechanism of ReRAM is suggested to be the formation and rupture of nanoscale conductive filament (CF) inside the solid-electrolyte layer. However, the random nature of the nucleation and growth of the CF makes their formation difficult to control, which is a major obstacle for ReRAM performance improvement. Here, we report a novel approach to resolve this challenge by adopting a metal nanocrystal (NC) covered bottom electrode (BE) to replace the conventional ReRAM BE. As a demonstration vehicle, a Ag/ZrO(2)/Cu NC/Pt structure is prepared and the Cu NC covered Pt BE can control CF nucleation and growth to provide superior uniformity of RS properties. The controllable growth of nanoscale CF bridges between Cu NC and Ag top electrode has been vividly observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). On the basis of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and elemental mapping analyses, we further confirm that the chemical contents of the CF are mainly Ag atoms. These testing/metrology results are consistent with the simulation results of electric-field distribution, showing that the electric field will enhance and concentrate on the NC sites and control location and orientation of Ag CFs.

  19. Structure and Dynamics in Metal-Containing Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-11

    increases but the basic nature of the vibration remains constant. A surprising development followed from this new spectroscopic study of titanium ...establishes that titanium -carbide nanocrystals are seeds present in the early phases of the formation of stardust. Titanium -carbide crystallites are actually...multi-metal sandwiches (M3-coronene2). In some species (e.g., iron with C6o or niobium with coronene), the metal inserts into the organic ring system

  20. Spherical Clusters of Simple Metals: Madelung Energies and Structure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    crystalline structures remain lower than those of the optimal structures even at cluster sizes of more than 90 atoms. Also the calculations of the...differ from crystalline structures up to clus- ter sizes of hundreds of atoms. Acknowledgements - The author would like to thank N.W. Ashcroft, J.W

  1. An aligned stream of low-metallicity clusters in the halo of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2002-07-26

    One of the long-standing problems in modern astronomy is the curious division of Galactic globular clusters, the "Oosterhoff dichotomy," according to the properties of their RR Lyrae stars. Here, we find that most of the lowest metallicity ([Fe/H] < -2.0) clusters, which are essential to an understanding of this phenomenon, display a planar alignment in the outer halo. This alignment, combined with evidence from kinematics and stellar population, indicates a captured origin from a satellite galaxy. We show that, together with the horizontal-branch evolutionary effect, the factor producing the dichotomy could be a small time gap between the cluster-formation epochs in the Milky Way and the satellite. The results oppose the traditional view that the metal-poorest clusters represent the indigenous and oldest population of the Galaxy.

  2. Low-metallicity Young Clusters in the Outer Galaxy. II. Sh 2-208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Chikako; Kobayashi, Naoto; Saito, Masao; Izumi, Natsuko

    2016-05-01

    We obtained deep near-infrared images of Sh 2-208, one of the lowest-metallicity H ii regions in the Galaxy, [O/H] = -0.8 dex. We detected a young cluster in the center of the H ii region with a limiting magnitude of K = 18.0 mag (10σ), which corresponds to a mass detection limit of ˜0.2 M⊙. This enables the comparison of star-forming properties under low metallicity with those of the solar neighborhood. We identified 89 cluster members. From the fitting of the K-band luminosity function (KLF), the age and distance of the cluster are estimated to be ˜0.5 Myr and ˜4 kpc, respectively. The estimated young age is consistent with the detection of strong CO emission in the cluster region and the estimated large extinction of cluster members (AV ˜ 4-25 mag). The observed KLF suggests that the underlying initial mass function (IMF) of the low-metallicity cluster is not significantly different from canonical IMFs in the solar neighborhood in terms of both high-mass slope and IMF peak (characteristic mass). Despite the very young age, the disk fraction of the cluster is estimated at only 27% ± 6%, which is significantly lower than those in the solar metallicity. Those results are similar to Sh 2-207, which is another star-forming region close to Sh 2-208 with a separation of 12 pc, suggesting that their star-forming activities in low-metallicity environments are essentially identical to those in the solar neighborhood, except for the disk dispersal timescale. From large-scale mid-infrared images, we suggest that sequential star formation is taking place in Sh 2-207, Sh 2-208, and the surrounding region, triggered by an expanding bubble with a ˜30 pc radius.

  3. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590)

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E. )

    1990-06-01

    BVRI photometry of the low metallicity globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590) was obtained with a CCD camera and the 2.2-m ESO telescope. The resulting BV color-magnitude diagrams are compared with the observations of McClure et al. (1987). The observations are also compared with theoretical isochrones, yielding a cluster age of 13 Gyr with a likely external uncertainty of 2 or 3 Gyr. 25 refs.

  4. Size and Charge Distributions of Stable Clusters Formed in Ion Sputtering of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. I.; Kapustin, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    A theory of ion sputtering of metals in the form of neutral and charged clusters with their subsequent fragmentation into the stable state is developed. The theory is based on simple physical assumptions and is in good agreement with experiment. Results are presented in the form of formulas convenient for practical application. As an example, calculations of the total yield of stable neutral and charged clusters of silver, indium, and niobium are carried out.

  5. METAL DEFICIENCY IN CLUSTER STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT Z = 2

    SciTech Connect

    Valentino, F.; Daddi, E.; Strazzullo, V.; Gobat, R.; Bournaud, F.; Juneau, S.; Zanella, A.; Renzini, A.; Arimoto, N.

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the environmental effect on the metal enrichment of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in the farthest spectroscopically confirmed and X-ray-detected cluster, CL J1449+0856 at z = 1.99. We combined Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 G141 slitless spectroscopic data, our thirteen-band photometry, and a recent Subaru/Multi-object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up to constrain the physical properties of SFGs in CL J1449+0856 and in a mass-matched field sample. After a conservative removal of active galactic nuclei, stacking individual MOIRCS spectra of 6 (31) sources in the cluster (field) in the mass range 10 ≤ log(M/M{sub ⊙}) ≤ 11, we find a ∼4σ lower [N ii]/Hα ratio in the cluster than in the field. Stacking a subsample of 16 field galaxies with Hβ and [O iii] in the observed range, we measure an [O iii]/Hβ ratio fully compatible with the cluster value. Converting these ratios into metallicities, we find that the cluster SFGs are up to 0.25 dex poorer in metals than their field counterparts, depending on the adopted calibration. The low metallicity in cluster sources is confirmed using alternative indicators. Furthermore, we observe a significantly higher Hα luminosity and equivalent width in the average cluster spectrum than in the field. This is likely due to the enhanced specific star formation rate; even if lower dust reddening and/or an uncertain environmental dependence on the continuum-to-nebular emission differential reddening may play a role. Our findings might be explained by the accretion of pristine gas around galaxies at z = 2 and from cluster-scale reservoirs, possibly connected with a phase of rapid halo mass assembly at z > 2 and of a high galaxy merging rate.

  6. Synthesis and catalytic properties of metal clusters encapsulated within small-pore (SOD, GIS, ANA) zeolites.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sarika; Wu, Zhijie; Zones, Stacey I; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-10-24

    The synthesis protocols for encapsulation of metal clusters reported here expand the diversity in catalytic chemistries made possible by the ability of microporous solids to select reactants, transition states, and products on the basis of their molecular size. We report a synthesis strategy for the encapsulation of noble metals and their oxides within SOD (Sodalite, 0.28 nm × 0.28 nm), GIS (Gismondine, 0.45 nm × 0.31 nm), and ANA (Analcime, 0.42 nm × 0.16 nm) zeolites. Encapsulation was achieved via direct hydrothermal synthesis for SOD and GIS using metal precursors stabilized by ammonia or organic amine ligands, which prevent their decomposition or precipitation as colloidal hydroxides at the conditions of hydrothermal synthesis (<380 K) and favor interactions between metal precursors and incipient aluminosilicate nuclei during self-assembly of microporous frameworks. The synthesis of ANA requires higher crystallization temperatures (~415 K) and high pH (>12), thereby causing precipitation of even ligand-stabilized metal precursors as hydroxides. As a result, encapsulation was achieved by the recrystallization of metal clusters containing GIS into ANA, which retained these metal clusters within voids throughout the GIS-ANA transformation.

  7. CO adsorption on transition metal clusters: Trends from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinalipour-Yazdi, Constantinos D.; Cooksy, Andrew L.; Efstathiou, Angelos M.

    2008-05-01

    This work reports for the first time the trends for carbon monoxide (CO) chemisorption on transition metal clusters present in supported metal catalysts. In particular, the energetic, structural and infrared adsorption characteristics of linearly (atop) CO adsorbed on transition metal nano-clusters of less than 10 Å in size were explored. Spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to explore the trends of CO adsorption energy (AM-CO) and C-O vibrational frequency (νCO) for clusters composed of Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt and Au. The effects of the transition metal electronic structure onto the adsorption energy of CO and the vibrational stretching frequency of C-O, and how these chemical parameters can be correlated to the catalytic activity of transition supported metal catalysts that involve the adsorption, surface diffusion, and C-O bond dissociation elementary steps in heterogeneous catalytic surface reactions, are discussed. Our findings show that an increase of the electronic d-shell occupancy and the principal quantum number (n) in transition metals causes an increase in the vibrational stretching frequency of the C-O bond. This trend is inconsistent with the classical Blyholder model for the metal-carbonyl bond.

  8. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. V. NONLINEAR ABSORPTION-LINE INDEX VERSUS METALLICITY RELATIONS AND BIMODAL INDEX DISTRIBUTIONS OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Kang, Yongbeom; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2013-05-10

    Recent spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of M31 with unprecedented precision witnessed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Such division of extragalactic GCs, so far asserted mainly by photometric color bimodality, has been viewed as the presence of merely two distinct metallicity subgroups within individual galaxies and forms a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Given that spectroscopy is a more detailed probe into stellar population than photometry, the discovery of index bimodality may point to the very existence of dual GC populations. However, here we show that the observed spectroscopic dichotomy of M31 GCs emerges due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and thus one does not necessarily have to invoke two separate GC subsystems. We take this as a close analogy to the recent view that metallicity-color nonlinearity is primarily responsible for observed GC color bimodality. We also demonstrate that the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line displays non-negligible metallicity-index nonlinearity and Balmer lines show rather strong nonlinearity. This gives rise to bimodal index distributions, which are routinely interpreted as bimodal metallicity distributions, not considering metallicity-index nonlinearity. Our findings give a new insight into the constitution of M31's GC system, which could change much of the current thought on the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.

  9. Evidence for nanoscale two-dimensional Co clusters in CoPt3 films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Cross, J O; Newville, M; Maranville, B B; Bordel, C; Hellman, F; Harris, V G

    2010-04-14

    The length scale of the local chemical anisotropy responsible for the growth-temperature-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of face-centered cubic CoPt(3) alloy films was investigated using polarized extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). These x-ray measurements were performed on a series of four (111) CoPt(3) films epitaxially grown on (0001) sapphire substrates. The EXAFS data show a preference for Co-Co pairs parallel to the film plane when the film exhibits magnetic anisotropy, and random chemical order otherwise. Furthermore, atomic pair correlation anisotropy was evidenced only in the EXAFS signal from the next neighbors to the absorbing Co atoms and from multiple scattering paths focused through the next neighbors. This suggests that the Co clusters are no more than a few atoms in extent in the plane and one monolayer in extent out of the plane. Our EXAFS results confirm the correlation between perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and two-dimensional Co segregation in CoPt(3) alloy films, and establish a length scale on the order of 10 Å for the Co clusters.

  10. Method of preparing size-selected metal clusters

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stair, Peter C.

    2010-05-11

    The invention provides a method for depositing catalytic clusters on a surface, the method comprising confining the surface to a controlled atmosphere; contacting the surface with catalyst containing vapor for a first period of time; removing the vapor from the controlled atmosphere; and contacting the surface with a reducing agent for a second period of time so as to produce catalyst-containing nucleation sites.

  11. A study of rotating globular clusters. The case of the old, metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. NGC 4372 is a poorly studied old, very metal-poor globular cluster (GC) located in the inner Milky Way halo. Aims: We present the first in-depth study of the kinematic properties and derive the structural parameters of NGC 4372 based on the fit of a Plummer profile and a rotating, physical model. We explore the link between internal rotation to different cluster properties and together with similar studies of more GCs, we put these in the context of globular cluster formation and evolution. Methods: We present radial velocities for 131 cluster member stars measured from high-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE observations. Their membership to the GC is additionally confirmed from precise metallicity estimates. We build a velocity dispersion profile and a systemic rotation curve using this kinematic data set. Additionally, we obtain an elliptical number density profile of NGC 4372 based on optical images using a Markov chain Monte Carlo fitting algorithm. From this, we derive the cluster's half-light radius and ellipticity as rh = 3.44' ± 0.04' and ɛ = 0.08 ± 0.01. Finally, we give a physical interpretation of the observed morphological and kinematic properties of this GC by fitting an axisymmetric, differentially rotating, dynamical model. Results: Our results show that NGC 4372 has an unusually high ratio of rotation amplitude to velocity dispersion (1.2 vs. 4.5 km s-1) for its metallicity. This puts it in line, however, with two other exceptional, very metal-poor GCs: M 15 and NGC 4590. We also find a mild flattening of NGC 4372 in the direction of its rotation. Given its old age, this suggests that the flattening is indeed caused by the systemic rotation rather than tidal interactions with the Galaxy. Additionally, we estimate the dynamical mass of the GC Mdyn = 2.0 ± 0.5 × 105M⊙ based on the dynamical model, which constrains the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 4372 between 1.4 and 2.3 M⊙/L⊙, representative of an old, purely stellar population. Based on

  12. Environmental Remediation and Application of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron and Its Composites for the Removal of Heavy Metal Ions: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yidong; Wang, Xiangxue; Khan, Ayub; Wang, Pengyi; Liu, Yunhai; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-07-19

    The presence of heavy metals in the industrial effluents has recently been a challenging issue for human health. Efficient removal of heavy metal ions from environment is one of the most important issues from biological and environmental point of view, and many studies have been devoted to investigate the environmental behavior of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) for the removal of toxic heavy metal ions, present both in the surface and underground wastewater. The aim of this review is to show the excellent removal capacity and environmental remediation of NZVI-based materials for various heavy metal ions. A new look on NZVI-based materials (e.g., modified or matrix-supported NZVI materials) and possible interaction mechanism (e.g., adsorption, reduction and oxidation) and the latest environmental application. The effects of various environmental conditions (e.g., pH, temperature, coexisting oxy-anions and cations) and potential problems for the removal of heavy metal ions on NZVI-based materials with the DFT theoretical calculations and EXAFS technology are discussed. Research shows that NZVI-based materials have satisfactory removal capacities for heavy metal ions and play an important role in the environmental pollution cleanup. Possible improvement of NZVI-based materials and potential areas for future applications in environment remediation are also proposed.

  13. Controlled insulator-to-metal transformation in printable polymer composites with nanometal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sankaran; Chia, Perq-Jon; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Chua, Lay-Lay; Ho, Peter K.-H.

    2007-02-01

    Although organic semiconductors have received the most attention, the development of compatible passive elements, such as interconnects and electrodes, is also central to plastic electronics. For this, ligand-protected metal-cluster films have been shown to anneal at low temperatures below 250∘C to highly conductive metal films, but they suffer from cracking and inadequate substrate adhesion. Here, we report printable metal-cluster-polymer nanocomposites that anneal to a controlled-percolation nanostructure without complete sintering of the metal clusters. This overcomes the previous challenges while still retaining the desired low transformation temperatures. Highly water- and alcohol-soluble gold clusters (75mgml-1) were synthesized and homogeneously dispersed into poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) to give a material with annealed d.c. conductivity tuneable between 10-4 and 105Scm-1. These composites can inject holes efficiently into all-printed polymer organic transistors. The insulator-metal transformation can also be electrically induced at 1MVcm-1, suggesting possible memory applications.

  14. Temporal stability of magic-number metal clusters: beyond the shell closing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desireddy, Anil; Kumar, Santosh; Guo, Jingshu; Bolan, Michael D.; Griffith, Wendell P.; Bigioni, Terry P.

    2013-02-01

    The anomalous stability of magic-number metal clusters has been associated with closed geometric and electronic shells and the opening of HOMO-LUMO gaps. Despite this enhanced stability, magic-number clusters are known to decay and react in the condensed phase to form other products. Improving our understanding of their decay mechanisms and developing strategies to control or eliminate cluster instability is a priority, to develop a more complete theory of their stability, to avoid studying mixtures of clusters produced by the decay of purified materials, and to enable technology development. Silver clusters are sufficiently reactive to facilitate the study of the ambient temporal stability of magic-number metal clusters and to begin to understand their decay mechanisms. Here, the solution phase stability of a series of silver:glutathione (Ag:SG) clusters was studied as a function of size, pH and chemical environment. Cluster stability was found to be a non-monotonic function of size. Electrophoretic separations showed that the dominant mechanism involved the redistribution of mass toward smaller sizes, where the products were almost exclusively previously known cluster sizes. Optical absorption spectra showed that the smaller clusters evolved toward the two most stable cluster sizes. The net surface charge was found to play an important role in cluster stabilization although charge screening had no effect on stability, contrary to DLVO theory. The decay mechanism was found to involve the loss of Ag+ ions and silver glutathionates. Clusters could be stabilized by the addition of Ag+ ions and destabilized by either the addition of glutathione or the removal of Ag+ ions. Clusters were also found to be most stable in near neutral pH, where they had a net negative surface charge. These results provide new mechanistic insights into the control of post-synthesis stability and chemical decay of magic-number metal clusters, which could be used to develop design principles

  15. Energies, charges, and sizes of clusters under ion sputtering of a metal

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, V. I. Kochkin, S. A.

    2010-04-15

    A theory of ion sputtering of a metal in the form of neutral and singly charged clusters with a number of atoms of N {>=} 5 has been developed. This theory is based on simple physical assumptions and agrees well with experiment. The results are presented in the form of expressions convenient for practical use. The energy spectra of clusters, charge distributions, ionization coefficients, and total yields of neutral and singly charged clusters at different target temperatures are calculated in terms of the proposed theory as an example.

  16. Heating and ionization of metal clusters in the field of an intense femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenko, O. F.; Andreev, N. E.

    2007-06-01

    Inverse bremsstrahlung heating and thermal electron-impact ionization of a metal cluster are analyzed with account for the spatial structure of the electromagnetic field. It is shown that, for a femtosecond IR radiation pulse with an intensity of ˜1018 W/cm2 and for an iron cluster with an optimum radius of ˜25 nm, the electron temperature is higher than 1 keV. In this case, the L shell of the ions is highly stripped. The X-ray bremsstrahlung yield from clusters with a radius greater than the skin depth is estimated.

  17. The N-heterocyclic carbene chemistry of transition-metal carbonyl clusters.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo

    2011-11-01

    In the last decade, chemists have dedicated many efforts to investigate the coordination chemistry of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs). Although most of that research activity has been devoted to mononuclear complexes, transition-metal carbonyl clusters have not escaped from these investigations. This critical review, which is focussed on the reactivity of NHCs (or their precursors) with transition-metal carbonyl clusters (mostly are of ruthenium and osmium) and on the transformations underwent by the NHC-containing species initially formed in those reactions, shows that the polynuclear character of these metallic compounds or, more precisely, the close proximity of one or more metal atoms to that which is or can be attached to the NHC ligand, is responsible for reactivity patterns that have no parallel in the NHC chemistry of mononuclear complexes (74 references).

  18. Nano-confinement inside molecular metal oxide clusters: Dynamics and modified encapsulation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe; Daemen, Luke L.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Mamontov, Eugene; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Hong, Kunlun; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Yin, Panchao

    2016-08-19

    Encapsulation behavior, as well as the presence of internal catalytically-active sites, has been spurring the applications of a 3 nm hollow spherical metal oxide cluster {Mo132} as an encapsulation host and a nano-reactor. Due to its well-defined and tunable cluster structures, and nano-scaled internal void space comparable to the volumes of small molecules, this cluster provides a good model to study the dynamics of materials under ultra-confinement. Neutron scattering studies suggest that bulky internal ligands inside the cluster show slower and limited dynamics compared to their counterparts in the bulk state, revealing the rigid nature of the skeleton of the internal ligands. Furthermore, NMR studies indicate that the rigid internal ligands that partially cover the interfacial pore on the molybdenum oxide shells are able to block some large guest molecules from going inside the capsule cluster, which provides a convincing protocol for size-selective encapsulation and separation.

  19. S-P coupling induced unusual open-shell metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Melko, Joshua J; Castleman, A W

    2014-04-02

    Metal clusters featuring closed supershells or aromatic character usually exhibit remarkably enhanced stability in their cluster series. However, not all stable clusters are subject to these fundamental constraints. Here, by employing photoelectron imaging spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we present experimental and theoretical evidence on the existence of unexpectedly stable open-shell clusters, which are more stable than their closed-shell and aromatic counterparts. The stabilization of these open-shell Al-Mg clusters is proposed to originate from the S-P molecular orbital coupling, leading to highly stable species with increased HOMO-LUMO gaps, akin to s-p hybridization in an organic carbon atom that is beneficial to form stable species. Introduction of the coupling effect highlighted here not only shows the limitations of the conventional closed-shell model and aromaticity but also provides the possibility to design valuable building blocks.

  20. Advanced use of high-performance liquid chromatography for synthesis of controlled metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niihori, Yoshiki; Matsuzaki, Miku; Uchida, Chihiro; Negishi, Yuichi

    2014-06-01

    Because the synthesis of metal clusters with multiple ligand types results in a distribution of ligands, high-resolution separation of each unique cluster from the mixture is required for precise control of the ligand composition. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography combined with appropriate transitioning of the mobile phase composition is an extremely effective means of separating ligand combinations when working with metal clusters protected by two different types of thiolates. We report herein advanced use of this method. The studies involving Au24Pd(SR1)18-x(SR2)x and Au24Pd(SR1)18-x(SeR2)x (SR1, SR2 = thiolate, SeR2 = selenolate) revealed the following. (1) In general, an increase in the difference between the polarities of the functional groups incorporated in the two types of ligands improves the separation resolution. A suitable ligand combination for separation can be predicted from the retention times of Au24Pd(SR1)18 and Au24Pd(SR2)18, which cause the terminal peaks in a series of peaks. (2) The use of a step-gradient program during the mobile phase substitution results in improved resolution compared to that achievable with the linear gradients applied in prior work. (3) This technique is also useful for the evaluation of the chemical compositions of metal clusters protected by two different types of ligands with similar molecular weights. These findings will provide clear design guidelines for the functionalization of metal clusters via control of the ligand composition, and will also improve our understanding of the high-resolution isolation of metal clusters.Because the synthesis of metal clusters with multiple ligand types results in a distribution of ligands, high-resolution separation of each unique cluster from the mixture is required for precise control of the ligand composition. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography combined with appropriate transitioning of the mobile phase composition is an extremely effective

  1. From linking of metal-oxide building blocks in a dynamic library to giant clusters with unique properties and towards adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Müller, Achim; Gouzerh, Pierre

    2012-11-21

    Following Nature's lessons, today chemists can cross the boundary of the small molecule world to construct multifunctional and highly complex molecular nano-objects up to protein size and even cell-like nanosystems showing responsive sensing. Impressive examples emerge from studies of the solutions of some oxoanions of the early transition metals especially under reducing conditions which enable the controlled linking of metal-oxide building blocks. The latter are available from constitutional dynamic libraries, thus providing the option to generate multifunctional unique nanoscale molecular systems with exquisite architectures, which even opens the way towards adaptive and evolutive (Darwinian) chemistry. The present review presents the first comprehensive report of current knowledge (including synthesis aspects not discussed before) regarding the related giant metal-oxide clusters mainly of the type {Mo(57)M'(6)} (M' = Fe(III), V(IV)) (torus structure), {M(72)M'(30)} (M = Mo, M' = V(IV), Cr(III), Fe(III), Mo(V)), {M(72)Mo(60)} (M = Mo, W) (Keplerates), {Mo(154)}, {Mo(176)}, {Mo(248)} ("big wheels"), and {Mo(368)} ("blue lemon") - all having the important transferable pentagonal {(M)M(5)} groups in common. These discoveries expanded the frontiers of inorganic chemistry to the mesoscopic world, while there is probably no collection of discrete inorganic compounds which offers such a versatile chemistry and the option to study new phenomena of interdisciplinary interest. The variety of different properties of the sphere- and wheel-type metal-oxide-based clusters can directly be related to their unique architectures: The spherical Keplerate-type capsules having 20 crown-ether-type pores and tunable internal functionalities allow the investigation of confined matter as well as that of sphere-surface-supramolecular and encapsulation chemistry - including related new aspects of the biologically important hydrophobic effects - but also of nanoscale ion transport and

  2. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  3. Phosphorus vacancy cluster model for phosphorus diffusion gettering of metals in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Renyu; Trzynadlowski, Bart; Dunham, Scott T.

    2014-02-07

    In this work, we develop models for the gettering of metals in silicon by high phosphorus concentration. We first performed ab initio calculations to determine favorable configurations of complexes involving phosphorus and transition metals (Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Ti, Mo, and W). Our ab initio calculations found that the P{sub 4}V cluster, a vacancy surrounded by 4 nearest-neighbor phosphorus atoms, which is the most favorable inactive P species in heavily doped Si, strongly binds metals such as Cu, Cr, Ni, and Fe. Based on the calculated binding energies, we build continuum models to describe the P deactivation and Fe gettering processes with model parameters calibrated against experimental data. In contrast to previous models assuming metal-P{sub 1}V or metal-P{sub 2}V as the gettered species, the binding of metals to P{sub 4}V satisfactorily explains the experimentally observed strong gettering behavior at high phosphorus concentrations.

  4. Advanced use of high-performance liquid chromatography for synthesis of controlled metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Niihori, Yoshiki; Matsuzaki, Miku; Uchida, Chihiro; Negishi, Yuichi

    2014-07-21

    Because the synthesis of metal clusters with multiple ligand types results in a distribution of ligands, high-resolution separation of each unique cluster from the mixture is required for precise control of the ligand composition. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography combined with appropriate transitioning of the mobile phase composition is an extremely effective means of separating ligand combinations when working with metal clusters protected by two different types of thiolates. We report herein advanced use of this method. The studies involving Au₂₄Pd(SR₁)₁₈-x(SR₂)x and Au₂₄Pd(SR₁)₁₈-x(SeR₂)x (SR₁, SR₂ = thiolate, SeR₂ = selenolate) revealed the following. (1) In general, an increase in the difference between the polarities of the functional groups incorporated in the two types of ligands improves the separation resolution. A suitable ligand combination for separation can be predicted from the retention times of Au₂₄Pd(SR₁)₁₈ and Au₂₄Pd(SR₂)₁₈, which cause the terminal peaks in a series of peaks. (2) The use of a step-gradient program during the mobile phase substitution results in improved resolution compared to that achievable with the linear gradients applied in prior work. (3) This technique is also useful for the evaluation of the chemical compositions of metal clusters protected by two different types of ligands with similar molecular weights. These findings will provide clear design guidelines for the functionalization of metal clusters via control of the ligand composition, and will also improve our understanding of the high-resolution isolation of metal clusters.

  5. The Effect of Metallicity on Surface Lithium Abundance in Hyades-Aged Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayetsky, Lisa; Cummings, J.; Deliyannis, C. P.; Steinhauer, A.; James, D.; Sarajedini, A.

    2007-12-01

    Two of the most important predictions from standard stellar evolution theory about the lithium depletion of solar-type F and G dwarfs are that it occurs primarily during the pre-main sequence and that it depends on metallicity. Abundant evidence from star clusters shows that Li depletion does indeed occur during the pre-main sequence, but then also continues during the main sequence, perhaps due to the effects of (non-standard) rotationally-induced or wave-induced mixing. However, little is known about whether Li depletion depends on metallicity. To test the predicted dependence of standard Li depletion on metallicity, a program has begun that compares the Li-Teff relation in Hyades-aged clusters of different metallicities. Here, we present high resolution results from WIYN/Hydra observations of IC 4756. We find, first, that our data qualitatively support the prediction that stars with higher metallicity have depleted more Li. Second, if a reasonable adjustment is made to the (unknown) initial cluster Li abundances that is consistent with knowledge of Galactic Li production from the field dwarf Li-Fe relation, then our data are also in good quantitative agreement with the metallicity-dependence of the Li depletion from standard theory. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-0452975 and AST-0206202.

  6. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopic studies of transition metal cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Timothy Paul

    The studies reported in this thesis were performed using a negative ion photoelectron spectrometer consisting of a cold cathode DC discharge ion source, a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, a magnetic sector mass analyzer, an argon ion laser for photodetachment and a hemispherical electron kinetic energy analyzer and microchannel plate detector for photoelectron spectrum generation. The 476.5 nm (2.601 eV), 488.0 nm (2.540 eV) and 514.5 nm (2.410 eV) negative ion photoelectron spectra of VMn are reported and compared to the previously studied spectra of isoelectronic Cr2.1 The photoelectron spectra are remarkably similar to those of Cr2 in electron affinity and vibrational frequencies. The 488.0 nm photoelectron spectra and electron affinities of Nb n- (n = 1 - 9) are reported with discussion of observed vibrational structure. There are transitions to several electronic states of Nb2 in the reported spectra with overlapping vibrational progressions. The spectra of Nb3, Nb4 and Nb6 show partially resolved vibrational structure in the transitions to the lowest observed electronic state of each cluster. There is a single distinct active vibrational mode in the transition to the ground state of Nb8. Spin-orbit energies of Nb- are also reported. The 488.0 nm negative ion photoelectron spectra of Nb3H(D) are reported and compared to those of Nb3. There is a single vibrational mode active in the spectra of Nb3H(D) which is very similar to the most distinct mode active in the spectrum of Nb3. The 488.0 nm photoelectron spectra of the NbxCyH(D) y- (x = 1, 2, 3, y = 2, 4, 6) dehydrogenated products of the reactions of ethylene with niobium cluster anions are reported. Temperature studies of some of these species give evidence for the presence of multiple isomers of each molecule in the ion beam. The spectra of NbC6H(D) 6 are identical to those obtained from the reactions of benzene with niobium clusters and indicate that benzene is being formed from ethylene in the flow

  7. Optical response and gas sequestration properties of metal cluster supported graphene nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2016-07-28

    The possibility of obtaining metal cluster (M3O(+), M = Li, Na, K) supported pristine, B-doped and BN-doped graphene nanoflakes (GR, BGR and BNGR, respectively) has been investigated by carrying out density functional theory (DFT) based calculations. Thermochemical analysis reveals the good stability of M3O(+)@GR/BGR/BNGR moieties. The dynamic stability of M3O(+)@GR/BGR/BNGR moieties is confirmed through an atom-centered density matrix propagation simulation at 298 K up to 500 fs. Orbital and electrostatic interactions play pivotal roles in stabilizing the metal-cluster supported graphene nanoflakes. The metal clusters lower the Fermi levels of the host nanoflakes and enable them to exhibit reasonably good optical response properties such as polarizability and static first hyperpolarizability. In particular, Na3O(+)/K3O(+)@BGR complexes exhibit very large first hyperpolarizability values at the static field limit. All the M3O(+)@BGR/BNGR moieties demonstrate broadband optical absorption encompassing the ultraviolet, visible as well as infrared domains. The metal-cluster supported graphene nanoflakes, in general, can sequestrate polar molecules, viz. CO, NO and CH3OH, in a thermodynamically more favorable way than GR, BGR and BNGR. In the adsorbed state, the CO, NO and CH3OH molecules, in general, attain an 'active' state as compared to their free counterparts.

  8. Glass formation and cluster evolution in the rapidly solidified monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Wen, Dadong; Tian, Zean; Liu, Rangsu

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to examine the glass formation and cluster evolution during the rapid solidification of monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure. The atomic structures in the systems are characterized by the radical distribution function (RDF), Honeycutt-Anderson (H-A) bond-type index method and cluster-type index method (CTIM). It is observed that the defective icosahedra play the critical role in the formation of Ta monatomic metallic glasses (MGs) rather than (12 0 12 0) perfect icosahedra, which have been identified as the basic local atomic units in many multi-component MGs. With the increase of pressure P, the fraction of icosahedral type clusters decreases remarkably in Ta MGs, while the fraction of bcc type clusters rises evidently. The evolution of vitrification degree (DSRO or DMRO) of the rapidly cooled metal Ta system further reveals that a higher pressure P is disadvantageous to the formation of Ta monatomic MGs. The weaker glass forming ability (GFA) of liquid metal Ta obtained under higher pressure P can be contributed to the decrease of DSRO or DMRO which is induced by increasing high pressure P to some extent.

  9. Carbonyl clusters of transition metals on oxide supports as heterogeneous catalysts for hydrocarbon synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Koval`chuk, V.I.

    1995-05-01

    The methods of preparation of heterogeneous catalysts by immobilization of carbonyl clusters of transition metals on oxide supports, as well as the study of the state of supported compounds and their catalytic properties in CO hydrogenation and olefin hydroformulation are briefly reviewed.

  10. STAR CLUSTERS IN M33: UPDATED UBVRI PHOTOMETRY, AGES, METALLICITIES, AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhou; De Grijs, Richard E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The photometric characterization of M33 star clusters is far from complete. In this paper, we present homogeneous UBVRI photometry of 708 star clusters and cluster candidates in M33 based on archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the galaxy's major axis. Our photometry includes 387, 563, 616, 580, and 478 objects in the UBVRI bands, respectively, of which 276, 405, 430, 457, and 363 do not have previously published UBVRI photometry. Our photometry is consistent with previous measurements (where available) in all filters. We adopted Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry for complementary purposes, as well as Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared JHK photometry where available. We fitted the spectral-energy distributions of 671 star clusters and candidates to derive their ages, metallicities, and masses based on the updated PARSEC simple stellar populations synthesis models. The results of our χ{sup 2} minimization routines show that only 205 of the 671 clusters (31%) are older than 2 Gyr, which represents a much smaller fraction of the cluster population than that in M31 (56%), suggesting that M33 is dominated by young star clusters (<1 Gyr). We investigate the mass distributions of the star clusters—both open and globular clusters—in M33, M31, the Milky Way, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Their mean values are log (M {sub cl}/M {sub ☉}) = 4.25, 5.43, 2.72, and 4.18, respectively. The fraction of open to globular clusters is highest in the Milky Way and lowest in M31. Our comparisons of the cluster ages, masses, and metallicities show that our results are basically in agreement with previous studies (where objects in common are available); differences can be traced back to differences in the models adopted, the fitting methods used, and stochastic sampling effects.

  11. Asymmetric partitioning of metals among cluster anions and cations generated via laser ablation of mixed aluminum/Group 6 transition metal targets.

    PubMed

    Waller, Sarah E; Mann, Jennifer E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-02-28

    While high-power laser ablation of metal alloys indiscriminately produces gas-phase atomic ions in proportion to the abundance of the various metals in the alloy, gas-phase ions produced by moderate-power laser ablation sources coupled with molecular beams are formed by more complicated mechanisms. A mass spectrometric study that directly compares the mass distributions of cluster anions and cations generated from laser ablation of pure aluminum, an aluminum/molybdenum mixed target, and an aluminum/tungsten mixed target is detailed. Mass spectra of anionic species generated from the mixed targets showed that both tungsten and molybdenum were in higher abundance in the negatively charged species than in the target material. Mass spectra of the cationic species showed primarily Al(+) and aluminum oxide and hydroxide cluster cations. No molybdenum- or tungsten-containing cluster cations were definitively assigned. The asymmetric distribution of aluminum and Group 6 transition metals in cation and anion cluster composition is attributed to the low ionization energy of atomic aluminum and aluminum suboxide clusters. In addition, the propensity of both molybdenum and tungsten to form metal oxide cluster anions under the same conditions that favor metallic aluminum cluster anions is attributed to differences in the optical properties of the surface oxide that is present in the metal powders used to prepare the ablation targets. Mechanisms of mixed metal oxide clusters are considered.

  12. Hollow/porous nanostructures derived from nanoscale metal-organic frameworks towards high performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Chen, Qianwang

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), owing to their high energy density, light weight, and long cycle life, have shown considerable promise for storage devices. The successful utilization of LIBs depends strongly on the preparation of nanomaterials with outstanding lithium storage properties. Recent progress has demonstrated that hollow/porous nanostructured oxides are very attractive candidates for LIBs anodes due to their high storage capacities. Here, we aim to provide an overview of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs)-templated synthesis of hollow/porous nanostructured oxides and their LIBs applications. By choosing some typical NMOFs as examples, we present a comprehensive summary of synthetic procedures for nanostructured oxides, such as binary, ternary and composite oxides. Hollow/porous structures are readily obtained due to volume loss and release of internally generated gas molecules during the calcination of NMOFs in air. Interestingly, the NMOFs-derived hollow/porous structures possess several special features: pores generated from gas molecules release will connect to each other, which are distinct from ``dead pores'' pore size often appears to be <10 nm; in terms of surface chemistry, the pore surface is hydrophobic. These structural features are believed to be the most critical factors that determine LIBs' performance. Indeed, it has been shown that these NMOFs-derived hollow/porous oxides exhibit excellent electrochemical performance as anode materials for LIBs, including high storage capacity, good cycle stability, and so on. For example, a high charge capacity of 1465 mA h g-1 at a rate of 300 mA g-1 was observed after 50 cycles for NMOFs-derived Co3O4 porous nanocages, which corresponds to 94.09% of the initial capacity (1557 mA h g-1), indicating excellent stability. The capacity of NMOFs-derived Co3O4 is higher than that of other Co3O4 nanostructures obtained by a conventional two-step route, including nanosheets (1450 mA h g-1 at 50 mA g-1

  13. Hollow/porous nanostructures derived from nanoscale metal-organic frameworks towards high performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lin; Chen, Qianwang

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), owing to their high energy density, light weight, and long cycle life, have shown considerable promise for storage devices. The successful utilization of LIBs depends strongly on the preparation of nanomaterials with outstanding lithium storage properties. Recent progress has demonstrated that hollow/porous nanostructured oxides are very attractive candidates for LIBs anodes due to their high storage capacities. Here, we aim to provide an overview of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs)-templated synthesis of hollow/porous nanostructured oxides and their LIBs applications. By choosing some typical NMOFs as examples, we present a comprehensive summary of synthetic procedures for nanostructured oxides, such as binary, ternary and composite oxides. Hollow/porous structures are readily obtained due to volume loss and release of internally generated gas molecules during the calcination of NMOFs in air. Interestingly, the NMOFs-derived hollow/porous structures possess several special features: pores generated from gas molecules release will connect to each other, which are distinct from "dead pores"; pore size often appears to be <10 nm; in terms of surface chemistry, the pore surface is hydrophobic. These structural features are believed to be the most critical factors that determine LIBs' performance. Indeed, it has been shown that these NMOFs-derived hollow/porous oxides exhibit excellent electrochemical performance as anode materials for LIBs, including high storage capacity, good cycle stability, and so on. For example, a high charge capacity of 1465 mA h g(-1) at a rate of 300 mA g(-1) was observed after 50 cycles for NMOFs-derived Co3O4 porous nanocages, which corresponds to 94.09% of the initial capacity (1557 mA h g(-1)), indicating excellent stability. The capacity of NMOFs-derived Co3O4 is higher than that of other Co3O4 nanostructures obtained by a conventional two-step route, including nanosheets (1450 mA h g(-1) at 50 m

  14. Molecular-dynamics simulations of collisions between energetic clusters of atoms and metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, H.; Averback, R.S. ); Sellers, H. ); Flynn, C.P. )

    1992-02-15

    The collisional dynamics between clusters of Cu, Ni, or Al atoms, with energies of 92 eV to 1.0 keV and sizes of 4 to 92 atoms, and substrates of these same metals were studied using molecular-dynamics computer simulations. A diverse behavior was observed, depending sensitively on the size and energy of the cluster, the elastic and chemical properties of the cluster-substrate combination, and the relative mass of the cluster and substrate atoms. For the 92-atom Cu clusters impacting a Cu substrate, the cluster can form a glob'' on the surface at low energy, while penetrating the substrate and heavily deforming it at high energies. When the cluster energy exceeds {approx}25 eV/atom, the substrate suffers radiation damage. The 92-atom Al clusters do not much deform Ni substrates, but rather tend to spread epitaxially over the surface, despite the 15% lattice mismatch. For 1-keV collisions, several Al atoms dissociate from the cluster, either reflecting into the vacuum or scattering over the surface. 326-eV Ni clusters embed themselves almost completely within Al substrates and form localized amorphous zones. The potentials for these simulations were derived from the embedded-atom method, although modified to treat the higher-energy events. IAb initioP linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals--molecular-orbitals calculations were employed to test these potentials over a wide range of energies. A simple model for the expected macroscopic behavior of cluster-solid interactions is included as an appendix for a comparison with the atomistic description offered by the simulations.

  15. Hydration process of alkaline-earth metal atoms in water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fuke, Kiyokazu

    2005-10-01

    Ionization potentials (IPs) of water clusters containing alkaline-earth metal atoms are measured by a photoionization threshold method to examine the hydration process of the metal atoms in clusters. IPs of Mg(H 2O) n and Ca(H 2O) n are found to decrease with increasing n and become constant at 3.18 eV for n ⩾ 9 and n ⩾ 8, respectively. The observed constant IP agrees with an estimated photoelectric threshold (3.2 eV) of bulk ice. From the comparison with the results on the theoretical calculations as well as the IPs for alkali atom-water clusters, the anomalous size dependence of IPs is ascribed to the formation of an ion-pair state.

  16. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E. )

    1991-07-01

    BVRI CCD photometry is presented in two overlapping fields in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372. The observations extend approximately 2 mag below the main-sequence turnoff to V about 21. By comparing the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with those of clusters with similar metallicities, it is found that E(B-V) = 0.50 {plus minus} 0.03, and (m-M)v = 14.75 {plus minus} 0.06. Comparison with theoretical isochrones leads to a value E(B-V) = 0.53 {plus minus} 0.03. Comparison of the CMD with that of bright stars published by other authors yields a value for Delta V(TO-HB) = 3.3 {plus minus} 0.3. The weighted mean value of the age of the cluster, derived from the four colors, is 15 {plus minus} 4 Gyr (estimated external uncertainty). 17 refs.

  17. Light-Induced In Situ Transformation of Metal Clusters to Metal Nanocrystals for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Xing; Zeng, Zhiping; Hsu, Shao-Hui; Hung, Sung-Fu; Chen, Hao Ming; Liu, Bin

    2015-12-30

    In situ transformation of glutathione-capped gold (Aux) clusters to gold (Au) nanocrystals under simulated solar light irradiation was achieved and utilized as a facile synthetic approach to rationally fabricate Aux/Au/TiO2 ternary and Au/TiO2 binary heterostructures. Synergistic interaction of Aux clusters and Au nanocrystals contributes to enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalysis.

  18. Metal Chalcogenide Clusters with Closed Electronic Shells and the Electronic Properties of Alkalis and Halogens.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vikas; Reber, Arthur C; Khanna, Shiv N

    2017-02-08

    Clusters with filled electronic shells and a large gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) are generally energetically and chemically stable. Enabling clusters to become electron donors with low ionization energies or electron acceptors with high electron affinities usually requires changing the valence electron count. Here we demonstrate that a metal cluster may be transformed from an electron donor to an acceptor by exchanging ligands while the neutral form of the clusters has closed electronic shells. Our studies on Co6Te8(PEt3)m(CO)n (m + n = 6) clusters show that Co6Te8(PEt3)6 has a closed electronic shell and a low ionization energy of 4.74 eV, and the successive replacement of PEt3 by CO ligands ends with Co6Te8(CO)6 exhibiting halogen-like behavior. Both the low ionization energy Co6Te8(PEt3)6 and high electron affinity Co6Te8(CO)6 have closed electronic shells marked by high HOMO-LUMO gaps of 1.24 and 1.39 eV, respectively. Further, the clusters with an even number of ligands favor a symmetrical placement of ligands around the metal core.

  19. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  20. Theoretical research program to predict the properties of molecules and clusters containing transition metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S.

    1984-01-01

    The primary focus of this research has been the theoretical study of transition metal (TM) chemistry. A major goal of this work is to provide reliable information about the interaction of H atoms with iron metal. This information is needed to understand the effect of H atoms on the processes of embrittlement and crack propagation in iron. The method in the iron hydrogen studies is the cluster method in which the bulk metal is modelled by a finite number of iron atoms. There are several difficulties in the application of this approach to the hydrogen iron system. First the nature of TM-TM and TM-H bonding for even diatomic molecules was not well understood when these studies were started. Secondly relatively large iron clusters are needed to provide reasonable results.

  1. A Transition Metal Complex (Venus Flytrap Cluster) for Radioimmunodetection and Radioimmunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, Raymond J.; Beatty, Barbara G.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Varadarajan, Aravamuthan; Williams, Lawrence E.; Curtis, Frederick L.; Knobler, Carolyn B.; Beatty, J. David; Shiveley, John E.

    1991-04-01

    A novel transition metal complex, Venus flytrap cluster (VFC), is described for the preparation of radiolabeled antibodies. VFC contained 57Co, which was held tightly between the faces of two covalently bridged carborane ligands by cluster bonding of the metal with appropriate ligand orbitals. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody T84.66 was conjugated to 57Co-VFC with full retention of immunological activity. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen-producing tumors showed excellent tumor localization of 57Co-VFC-T84.66. The accumulation of radionuclide in normal liver was low and independent of dose, which may reflect the stability of the radionuclide complex. These results presage the use of VFC systems for binding transition metals that are clinically useful for radio-immunodiagnosis and radioimmunotherapy.

  2. On the Nature of Bonding in Parallel Spins in Monovalent Metal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason

    2016-05-27

    As we approach the Lewis model centennial, it may be timely to discuss novel bonding motifs. Accordingly, this review discusses no-pair ferromagnetic (NPFM) bonds that hold together monovalent metallic atoms using exclusively parallel spins. Thus, without any traditional electron-pair bonds, the bonding energy per atom in these clusters can reach 20 kcal mol(-1). This review describes the origins of NPFM bonding using a valence bond (VB) analysis, which shows that this bonding motif arises from bound triplet electron pairs that are delocalized over all the close neighbors of a given atom in the cluster. The VB model accounts for the tendency of NPFM clusters to assume polyhedral shapes with rather high symmetry and for the very steep rise of the bonding energy per atom. The advent of NPFM clusters offers new horizons in chemistry of highly magnetic species sensitive to magnetic and electric fields.

  3. Electronic charging of non-metallic clusters: size-selected Mo(x)S(y) clusters supported on an ultrathin alumina film on NiAl(110).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Camillone, Nicholas; White, Michael G

    2012-06-14

    Two photon photoemission was used to investigate the interfacial charge transfer for size-selected Mo(x)S(y) (x/y: 2/6, 4/6, 6/8, 7/10) clusters deposited on an ultrathin alumina film prepared on a NiAl(110) surface. The local work function of the surface increases with increasing cluster coverage, which is unexpected for charge transfer resulting from the formation of Mo-O bonds between the clusters and the alumina surface. By analogy with Au atoms and clusters on metal-supported ultrathin oxide films, we invoke electron tunneling from the NiAl substrate to explain the charge transfer to the Mo(x)S(y) clusters. Electron tunneling is favored by the large electron affinities of the Mo(x)S(y) clusters and the relatively low work function induced by the presence of the alumina film. The interfacial dipole moments derived from coverage-dependent measurements are cluster dependent and reflect differences in Mo(x)S(y) cluster structure and surface bonding. These results extend previous observations of electronic charging to non-metallic clusters, specifically, metal sulfides, and suggest a novel way to modify the electronic structure and reactivity of nanocatalysts for heterogeneous chemistry.

  4. Tidal stripping stellar substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Minhee; Jung, DooSeok; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spatial density configuration of stars around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge region using wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data obtained with the Wide Field Camera near-infrared array on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. A statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color–magnitude diagram is applied in order to sort cluster member candidates from the field star contamination. In two-dimensional isodensity contour maps of the clusters, we find that all four of the globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of tidally stripped stellar features beyond the tidal radius in the form of tidal tails or small density lobes/chunks. The orientations of the extended stellar substructures are likely to be associated with the effect of dynamic interaction with the Galaxy and the cluster's space motion. The observed radial density profiles of the four globular clusters also describe the extended substructures; they depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and have an overdensity feature with a break in the slope of the profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results could imply that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge region have experienced strong environmental effects such as tidal forces or bulge/disk shocks of the Galaxy during the dynamical evolution of globular clusters. These observational results provide further details which add to our understanding of the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  5. Spectroscopic age and metallicity for a sample of Globular Clusters from Stellar Population Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M. J.; Calderón, P.

    2009-05-01

    We present spectroscopic age and metallicity predictions for a sample of 20 Globular Clusters in the massive E0 galaxy NGC 1407 (data from Cenarro et al. 2007, AJ, 134, 391) and for the Galacic Globular Clusters data from the Library of Integrated Spectra of Galactic Globular Clusters (GGC's) from Schiavon et al. (2005, ApJS, 160, 163) including the widely studied 47 Tuc cluster. Using index-index plots we compared model Single Stellar Populations (SSP's) spectra to the integrated spectra of both samples of Globular Clusters using high resolution line strength indices (Stock, in prep.) and the syntethic SSP's models from P. Coelho (2007, private comm.) as well as the CB07 solar models. For the GC's in NGC1407, the predictions from the syntethic models's with [α /Fe]=0.4 are in good agreement with the results from Cenarro et al. (2007, AJ, 134, 391), taking into account that the dispersion is partially due to the fact that the mean [α/Fe] ratio of the sample is ≈ 0.3 dex, resulting in younger ages and lower metallicities (Thomas et al. 2003, A&A, 401, 429). We observe a bimodal distribution of the Fe4383+ index which is in turn an indicator of metallicity, also seen in Cenarro et al. (2005). The CB07 models predict ages that are widely spread over the plot yielding ages greater than 14 Gyrs. The metallicity derived from these models are very low for almost all the objects (Z < 0.008). The distribution of the GGC's on the syntethic model grid shows a trend in the sense that metal poor clusters are younger than metal rich ones, but this effect might not be real (de Angeli et al. 2005, AJ, 130, 116). For 47 Tuc we estimate an age of ≈ 10 Gyr, and metallicity Z < 0.011 (<[Fe/H]= -0.5) which are both comparable with the values reported in the literature (Carretta et al. 2000; Liu & Chaboyer 2000, ApJ, 544, 818; Schiavon et al. 2002, ApJ, 580, 873; Gratton et al. 2003, A&A, 408, 529).

  6. Catalytic Conversion of Short-Chain Alcohols on Atomically Dispersed Au and Pd Supported on Nanoscale Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongyang

    With the development of technologies for cellulosic biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, bio-alcohols are among the main alternative feedstocks to fossil fuels. The research pursued in my thesis was the investigation of gold and palladium as catalysts for the application of short aliphatic alcohols to hydrogen generation and value-added chemicals production. Specifically, selective methanol steam reforming and non-oxidative ethanol dehydrogenation to hydrogen and acetaldehyde were investigated in this thesis work. A major aim of the thesis was to develop atomically efficient catalysts with tuned surface chemistry for the desired reactions, using suitable synthesis methods. Methanol steam reforming (SRM) for hydrogen production has recently been investigated on gold catalysts to overcome the drawbacks of copper catalysts (deactivation, pyrophoricity). Previous work at Tufts University has shown that both CeO2 and ZnO are suitable supports for gold. In this thesis, nanoscale composite oxides ZnZrOx were prepared by a carbon hard-template method, which resulted in homogeneous distribution of Zn species in the matrix of ZrO2. Tunable surface chemistry of ZnZrO x was demonstrated by varying the Zn/Zr ratio to suppress the strong Lewis acidity of ZrO2, which leads to undesired production of CO through methanol decomposition. With atomic dispersion of gold, Au/ZnZrO x catalyzes the SRM reaction exclusively via the methanol self-coupling pathway up to 375°C. The activity of Au/ZnZrOx catalysts was compared to Au/TiO2, which is another catalyst system demonstrating atomic dispersion of gold. Similarity in the apparent activation energy of SRM on all the supported gold catalysts studied in this thesis and in the literature further confirms the same single-site Au-Ox-MO centers as active sites for SRM with indirect effects of the supports exploited. With this fundamental understanding of gold-catalyzed C1 alcohol reforming, the Au/ZnZrOx catalyst was evaluated for the

  7. The Second-Parameter Effect in Metal-Rich Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1999-01-01

    Recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations have shown that the metal-rich globular clusters (GCs) NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 exhibit a pronounced 2nd parameter effect. Ordinarily metal-rich GCs have only a red horizontal-branch (HB) clump. However, NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 also possess an unexpected population of blue HB stars, indicating that some 2nd parameter is operating in these clusters. Quite remarkably, the HBs in both clusters slope upward with decreasing B -V from the red clump to the top of the blue tail. We review the results of ongoing stellar evolution calculations which indicate (1) that NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 might provide a crucial diagnostic for understanding the origin of the 2nd parameter effect, (2) that differences in age or mass loss along the red-giant branch (RGB) - the two most prominent 2nd parameter candidates - cannot explain the HB morphology of these GCs, and (3) that noncanonical effects involving an enhanced helium abundance or rotation can produce upward sloping HBs. Finally we suggest a new metal-depletion scenario which might help to resolve a baffling conundrum concerning the surface gravities of the blue HB stars in these clusters.

  8. Cluster chemical reactions at mineral–liquid interface in metal leaching by photo-electroactive water-and-gas emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekisov, AG

    2017-02-01

    Possibility of cluster (inter-cluster) reactions at the interface of mineral and liquid phases in leaching of metals mainly in dispersed cluster form by photo-electrically activated water-and-gas emulsions is theoretically evaluated. The governing role of active clusters of water and clustered hydrate envelopes generated under dissolution of active oxygen forms is determined. The scope of the study covers possible processes of transformation of clustered gold in mineral substance under direct interaction with the components of the active water-and-gas emulsions.

  9. LOW-METALLICITY YOUNG CLUSTERS IN THE OUTER GALAXY. I. Sh 2-207

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Chikako; Kobayashi, Naoto; Izumi, Natsuko; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Saito, Masao

    2016-03-15

    To study star formation in low-metallicity environments ([M/H] ∼ −1 dex), we obtained deep near-infrared (NIR) images of Sh 2-207 (S207), which is an H ii region in the outer Galaxy with a spectroscopically determined metallicity of [O/H] ≃ −0.8 dex. We identified a young cluster in the western region of S207 with a limiting magnitude of K{sub S} = 19.0 mag (10σ) that corresponds to a mass detection limit of ≲0.1 M{sub ⊙} and enables the comparison of star-forming properties under low metallicity with those of the solar neighborhood. From the fitting of the K-band luminosity function (KLF), the age and distance of the S207 cluster are estimated at 2–3 Myr and ∼4 kpc, respectively. The estimated age is consistent with the suggestion of small extinctions of stars in the cluster (A{sub V} ∼ 3 mag) and the non-detection of molecular clouds. The reasonably good fit between the observed KLF and the model KLF suggests that the underlying initial mass function (IMF) of the cluster down to the detection limit is not significantly different from the typical IMFs in the solar metallicity. From the fraction of stars with NIR excesses, a low disk fraction (<10%) in the cluster with a relatively young age is suggested, as we had previously proposed.

  10. On the lithium dip in the metal poor open cluster NGC 2243

    SciTech Connect

    François, P.; Pasquini, L.; Palsa, R.; Biazzo, K.; Bonifacio, P.

    2014-05-02

    Lithium is a key element for studying the mixing mechanisms operating in stellar interiors. It can also be used to probe the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Measuring the abundance of Lithium in stars belonging to Open Clusters (hereafter OC) allows a detailed comparison with stellar evolutionary models. NGC 2243 is particularly interesting thanks to its relative low metallicity ([Fe/H]=−0.54 ± 0.10 dex). We performed a detailed analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object facility FLAMES at the VLT 8.2m telescope. Lithium abundance has been measured in 27 stars. We found a Li dip center of 1.06 M{sub ⊙}, which is significantly smaller than that observed in solar metallicity and metal-rich clusters. This finding confirms and strengthens the conclusion that the mass of the stars in the Li dip strongly depends on stellar metallicity. The mean Li abundance of the cluster is log n(Li) = 2.70 dex, which is substantially higher than that observed in 47 Tue. We derived an iron abundance of [Fe/H]=−0.54±0.10 dex for NGC 2243, in agreement (within the errors) with previous findings.

  11. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M.; Wisinger, Nina; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2015-02-23

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquid cell.

  12. Effect of nanoscale zero-valent iron and magnetite (Fe3O4) on the fate of metals during anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    PubMed

    Suanon, Fidèle; Sun, Qian; Mama, Daouda; Li, Jiangwei; Dimon, Biaou; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the most widely used processes to stabilize waste sewage sludge and produce biogas renewable energy. In this study, two different iron nanoparticles [nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and magnetite (Fe3O4)] were used in the mesophilic AD processes (37 ± 1 °C) to improve biogas production. In addition, changes of heavy metal (Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr) speciation during AD of sludge with and without iron nanoparticles have been investigated. Concentrations of metals in the initial sludge were as follows: 63.1, 73.4, 1102.2, 2060.3, 483.9 and 604.1 mg kg(-1) (dry sludge basis) for Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, respectively. Sequential fractionation showed that metals were predominantly bonded to organic matter and carbonates in the initial sludge. Compared with AD without iron nanoparticles, the application of iron nanoparticles (at dose of 0.5% in this study) showed positive impact not only on biogas production, but also on improvement of metals stabilization in the digestate. Metals were found concentrated in Fe-Mn bound and residual fractions and little was accumulated in the liquid digestate and most mobile fractions of solid digestate (water soluble, exchangeable and carbonates bound). Therefore, iron nanoparticles when properly used, could improve not only biogas yield, but also regulate and control the mobilization of metals during AD process. However, our study also observed that iron nanoparticles could promote the immobilization of phosphorus within the sludge during AD, and more research is needed to fully address the mechanism behind this phenomenon and the impact on future phosphorus reuse.

  13. Photon-Induced Thermal Desorption of CO from Small Metal-Carbonyl Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüttgens, G.; Pontius, N.; Bechthold, P. S.; Neeb, M.; Eberhardt, W.

    2002-02-01

    Thermal CO desorption from photoexcited free metal-carbonyl clusters has been resolved in real time using two-color pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy. Sequential energy dissipation steps between the initial photoexcitation and the final desorption event, e.g., electron relaxation and thermalization, have been resolved for Au2(CO)- and Pt2(CO)-5. The desorption rates for the two clusters differ considerably due to the different numbers of vibrational degrees of freedom. The unimolecular CO-desorption thresholds of Au2(CO)- and Pt2(CO)-5 have been approximated by means of a statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel calculation using the experimentally derived desorption rate constants.

  14. Filling the gap between the quantum and classical worlds of nanoscale magnetism: giant molecular aggregates based on paramagnetic 3d metal ions.

    PubMed

    Papatriantafyllopoulou, Constantina; Moushi, Eleni E; Christou, George; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J

    2016-03-21

    In this review, aspects of the syntheses, structures and magnetic properties of giant 3d and 3d/4f paramagnetic metal clusters in moderate oxidation states are discussed. The term "giant clusters" is used herein to denote metal clusters with nuclearity of 30 or greater. Many synthetic strategies towards such species have been developed and are discussed in this paper. Attempts are made to categorize some of the most successful methods to giant clusters, but it will be pointed out that the characteristics of the crystal structures of such compounds including nuclearity, shape, architecture, etc. are unpredictable depending on the specific structural features of the included organic ligands, reaction conditions and other factors. The majority of the described compounds in this review are of special interest not only for their fascinating nanosized structures but also because they sometimes display interesting magnetic phenomena, such as ferromagnetic exchange interactions, large ground state spin values, single-molecule magnetism behaviour or impressively large magnetocaloric effects. In addition, they often possess the properties of both the quantum and the classical world, and thus their systematic study offers the potential for the discovery of new physical phenomena, as well as a better understanding of the existing ones. The research field of giant clusters is under continuous evolution and their intriguing structural characteristics and magnetism properties that attract the interest of synthetic Inorganic Chemists promise a brilliant future for this class of compounds.

  15. Cu(Ir1 − xCrx)2S4: a model system for studying nanoscale phase coexistence at the metal-insulator transition

    PubMed Central

    Božin, E. S.; Knox, K. R.; Juhás, P.; Hor, Y. S.; Mitchell, J. F.; Billinge, S. J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, nanoscale phase coexistence and hidden broken symmetry states are being found in the vicinity of metal-insulator transitions (MIT), for example, in high temperature superconductors, heavy fermion and colossal magnetoresistive materials, but their importance and possible role in the MIT and related emergent behaviors is not understood. Despite their ubiquity, they are hard to study because they produce weak diffuse signals in most measurements. Here we propose Cu(Ir1 − xCrx)2S4 as a model system, where robust local structural signals lead to key new insights. We demonstrate a hitherto unobserved coexistence of an Ir4+ charge-localized dimer phase and Cr-ferromagnetism. The resulting phase diagram that takes into account the short range dimer order is highly reminiscent of a generic MIT phase diagram similar to the cuprates. We suggest that the presence of quenched strain from dopant ions acts as an arbiter deciding between the competing ground states. PMID:24518384

  16. Age and metallicity effects in single stellar populations: application to M 31 clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    1997-03-01

    We have recently calculated (Borges et al. 1995AJ....110.2408B) integrated metallicity indices for single stellar populations (SSP). Effects of age, metallicity and abundances were taken into account. In particular, the explicit dependence of the indices Mg_2_ and NaD respectively on the ratios [Mg/Fe] and [Na/Fe] was included in the calibration. We report in this work an application of those models to a sample of 12 globular clusters in M 31. A fitting procedure was used to obtain age, metallicity and the [Mg/Fe] ratio for each object, which best reproduce the data. The mean age of the sample is 15+/-2.8Gyr and the mean [Mg/Fe] ratio is 0.35+/-0.10. These values and the derived metallicity spread are comparable to those found in galactic counterparts.

  17. Electrochemistry at nanoscale electrodes: individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and SWNT-templated metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dudin, Petr V; Snowden, Michael E; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2011-12-27

    Individual nanowires (NWs) and native single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be readily used as well-defined nanoscale electrodes (NSEs) for voltammetric analysis. Here, the simple photolithography-free fabrication of submillimeter long Au, Pt, and Pd NWs, with sub-100 nm heights, by templated electrodeposition onto ultralong flow-aligned SWNTs is demonstrated. Both individual Au NWs and SWNTs are employed as NSEs for electron-transfer (ET) kinetic quantification, using cyclic voltammetry (CV), in conjunction with a microcapillary-based electrochemical method. A small capillary with internal diameter in the range 30-70 μm, filled with solution containing a redox-active mediator (FcTMA(+) ((trimethylammonium)methylferrocene), Fe(CN)(6)(4-), or hydrazine) is positioned above the NSE, so that the solution meniscus completes an electrochemical cell. A 3D finite-element model, faithfully reproducing the experimental geometry, is used to both analyze the experimental CVs and derive the rate of heterogeneous ET, using Butler-Volmer kinetics. For a 70 nm height Au NW, intrinsic rate constants, k(0), up to ca. 1 cm s(-1) can be resolved. Using the same experimental configuration the electrochemistry of individual SWNTs can also be accessed. For FcTMA(+/2+) electrolysis the simulated ET kinetic parameters yield very fast ET kinetics (k(0) > 2 ± 1 cm s(-1)). Some deviation between the experimental voltammetry and the idealized model is noted, suggesting that double-layer effects may influence ET at the nanoscale.

  18. Catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohol over solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiguchi, Satoshi; Okumura, Kazu; Nagashima, Sayoko; Chihara, Teiji

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters catalyzed the dehydrogenation of alcohol. • The dehydrogenation proceeded without the addition of any oxidants. • The catalytic activity developed when the cluster was activated at 300–500 °C in H{sub 2}. • The Lewis-acidic molybdenum atom and basic sulfur ligand were catalytically active. • The clusters function as bifunctional acid–base catalysts. - Abstract: Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework, the superconducting Chevrel phases, are applied to catalysis. A copper salt of a nonstoichiometric sulfur-deficient cluster, Cu{sub x}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8–δ} (x = 2.94 and δ ≈ 0.3), is stored in air for more than 90 days. When the oxygenated cluster is thermally activated in a hydrogen stream above 300 °C, catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of primary alcohols to aldehydes and secondary alcohols to ketones develops. The addition of pyridine or benzoic acid decreases the dehydrogenation activity, indicating that both a Lewis-acidic coordinatively unsaturated molybdenum atom and a basic sulfur ligand synergistically act as the catalytic active sites.

  19. MD simulation of cluster-surface impacts for metallic phases: soft landing, droplet spreading and implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo; Puzynin, Igor; Smith, William; Yasuoka, Kenji; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2001-11-01

    An optimized version of the DL_POLY molecular dynamics simulation code [K. Kholmurodov, W. Smith, K. Yasuoka, T. Ebisuzaki, Comput. Phys. Commun. 125 (2000) 167-192] has been used to study the cluster-surface impact processes for metallic phases. The interaction of an energetic cluster of atoms with a solid surface has been investigated using the Finnis-Sinclair many-body potential. The characteristics of the cluster-surface collisions were studied in a wide range of the cluster impact energies ( Einc=0.035-3.5 eV/atom). Modification of the surface, exposed to the cluster-beams, was studied by monitoring the molecular dynamics configurations of the system in real time. The density and temperature distributions in the system under the energetic irradiations has been investigated in detail. The three major channels of the impact yield (viz., soft landing, droplet spreading and implantation) were distinguished and estimated. Based on the density and temperature distributions data the low energy cluster-surface impact has been analyzed and a novel interpretation of droplet spreading process is given.

  20. First-principles studies on graphene-supported transition metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Sanjubala Khanna, Shiv N.; Gruner, Markus E.; Entel, Peter

    2014-08-21

    Theoretical studies on the structure, stability, and magnetic properties of icosahedral TM{sub 13} (TM = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters, deposited on pristine (defect free) and defective graphene sheet as well as graphene flakes, have been carried out within a gradient corrected density functional framework. The defects considered in our study include a carbon vacancy for the graphene sheet and a five-membered and a seven-membered ring structures for graphene flakes (finite graphene chunks). It is observed that the presence of defect in the substrate has a profound influence on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene-transition metal complexes, thereby increasing the binding strength of the TM cluster on to the graphene substrate. Among TM{sub 13} clusters, Co{sub 13} is absorbed relatively more strongly on pristine and defective graphene as compared to Fe{sub 13} and Ni{sub 13} clusters. The adsorbed clusters show reduced magnetic moment compared to the free clusters.

  1. Effect of promoter and noble metals and suspension pH on catalytic nitrate reduction by bimetallic nanoscale Fe(0) catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sungjun; Hamid, Shanawar; Jung, Junyoung; Sihn, Youngho; Lee, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of experimental factors (types of promotor and noble metals, H2 injection, and suspension pH) on catalytic nitrate reduction by bimetallic catalysts supported by nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI). NZVI without H2 injection showed 71% of nitrate reduction in 1 h. Cu/NZVI showed the almost complete nitrate reduction (96%) in 1 h, while 67% of nitrate was reduced by Ni/NZVI. The presence of noble metals (Pd and Pt) on Cu/NZVI without H2 injection resulted in the decrease of removal efficiency to 89% and 84%, respectively, due probably to the electron loss of NZVI for formation of metallic Pd and Pt. H2 injection into Cu-Pd/NZVI suspension significantly improved both catalytic nitrate reduction (>97% in 30 min) and N2 selectivity (18%), indicating that adsorbed H on active Pd sites played an important role for the enhanced nitrate reduction and N2 selectivity. The rapid passivation of NZVI surface resulted in a dramatic decrease in nitrate reduction (79-28%) with an increase in N2 selectivity (8-66%) as the suspension pH increased from 8 to 10.

  2. Trends in methanol decomposition on transition metal alloy clusters from scaling and Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Mehmood, Faisal; Rankin, Rees B.; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-05-15

    A combination of first principles Density Functional Theory calculations and thermochemical scaling relationships are employed to estimate the thermochemistry and kinetics of methanol decomposition on unsupported subnanometer metal clusters. The approach uses binding energies of various atomic and molecular species, determined on the pure metal clusters, to develop scaling relationships that are then further used to estimate the methanol decomposition thermodynamics for a series of pure and bimetallic clusters with four atoms per cluster. Additionally, activation energy barriers are estimated from Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi plots relating transition and final state energies on these clusters. The energetic results are combined with a simple, microkinetically-inspired rate expression to estimate reaction rates as a function of important catalytic descriptors, including the carbon and atomic oxygen binding energies to the clusters. Finally, based on these analyses, several alloy clusters are identified as promising candidates for the methanol decomposition reaction.

  3. AGES AND METALLICITIES OF CLUSTER GALAXIES IN A779 USING MODIFIED STROeMGREN PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha; Rakos, Karl D.; Hensler, Gerhard; Zeilinger, Werner W.; Odell, Andrew P.

    2012-03-01

    In the quest for the formation and evolution of galaxy clusters, Rakos and co-workers introduced a spectrophotometric method using modified Stroemgren photometry, but with the considerable debate toward the project's abilities, we re-introduce the system by testing for the repeatability of the modified Stroemgren colors and compare them with the Stroemgren colors, and check for the reproducibility of the ages and metallicities (using the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) technique and the GALEV models) for the six common galaxies in all three A779 data sets. As a result, a fair agreement between two filter systems was found to produce similar colors (with a precision of 0.09 mag in (uz - vz), 0.02 mag in (bz - yz), and 0.03 mag in (vz - vz)) and the generated ages and metallicities are also similar (with an uncertainty of 0.36 Gyr and 0.04 dex from PCA and 0.44 Gyr and 0.2 dex using the GALEV models). We infer that the technique is able to relieve the age-metallicity degeneracy by separating the age effects from the metallicity effects, but it is still unable to completely eliminate it. We further extend this paper to re-study the evolution of galaxies in the low mass, dynamically poor A779 cluster (as it was not elaborately analyzed by Rakos and co-workers in their previous work) by correlating the luminosity (mass), density, and radial distance with the estimated age, metallicity, and the star formation history. Our results distinctly show the bimodality of the young, low-mass, metal-poor population with a mean age of 6.7 Gyr ({+-} 0.5 Gyr) and the old, high-mass, metal-rich galaxies with a mean age of 9 Gyr ({+-} 0.5 Gyr). The method also observes the color evolution of the blue cluster galaxies to red (Butcher-Oemler phenomenon), and the downsizing phenomenon. Our analysis shows that modified Stroemgren photometry is very well suited for studying low- and intermediate-z clusters, as it is capable of observing deeper with better spatial resolution at

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity of the γ Vel cluster (Spina+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Randich, S.; Palla, F.; Sacco, G. G.; Magrini, L.; Franciosini, E.; Morbidelli, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Alfaro, E. J.; Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I.; Sousa, S. G.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Montes, D.; Tabernero, H.; Klutsch, A.; Gilmore, G.; Feltzing, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Jofre, P.; de Laverny, P.; Masseron, T.; Worley, C.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric parameters, radial velocities, lithium equivalent widths are products of the Gaia-ESO Survey that were used for our membership analysis of the 48 UVES targets observed in the Gamma Velorum fields. Also photometry from Jeffries et al. (2009MNRAS.393..538J) has been used. Iron abundances of these stars have been used to determine the metal content of the cluster. We also discussed the metallicity derived through the iron abundances of the 208 cluster members targeted with GIRAFFE and identified by Jeffries et al. (2014A&A...563A..94J). Stellar parameters of 39 stars targeted by both UVES and GIRAFFE have been used to check the quality of the data. (4 data files).

  5. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  6. Thermal Stabilization of Metal-Organic Framework-Derived Single-Site Catalytic Clusters through Nanocasting.

    PubMed

    Malonzo, Camille D; Shaker, Sammy M; Ren, Limin; Prinslow, Steven D; Platero-Prats, Ana E; Gallington, Leighanne C; Borycz, Joshua; Thompson, Anthony B; Wang, Timothy C; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Lu, Connie C; Chapman, Karena W; Myers, Jason C; Penn, R Lee; Gagliardi, Laura; Tsapatsis, Michael; Stein, Andreas

    2016-03-02

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) provide convenient systems for organizing high concentrations of single catalytic sites derived from metallic or oxo-metallic nodes. However, high-temperature processes cause agglomeration of these nodes, so that the single-site character and catalytic activity are lost. In this work, we present a simple nanocasting approach to provide a thermally stable secondary scaffold for MOF-based catalytic single sites, preventing their aggregation even after exposure to air at 600 °C. We describe the nanocasting of NU-1000, a MOF with 3 nm channels and Lewis-acidic oxozirconium clusters, with silica. By condensing tetramethylorthosilicate within the NU-1000 pores via a vapor-phase HCl treatment, a silica layer is created on the inner walls of NU-1000. This silica layer provides anchoring sites for the oxozirconium clusters in NU-1000 after the organic linkers are removed at high temperatures. Differential pair distribution functions obtained from synchrotron X-ray scattering confirmed that isolated oxozirconium clusters are maintained in the heated nanocast materials. Pyridine adsorption experiments and a glucose isomerization reaction demonstrate that the clusters remain accessible to reagents and maintain their acidic character and catalytic activity even after the nanocast materials have been heated to 500-600 °C in air. Density functional theory calculations show a correlation between the Lewis acidity of the oxozirconium clusters and their catalytic activity. The ability to produce MOF-derived materials that retain their catalytic properties after exposure to high temperatures makes nanocasting a useful technique for obtaining single-site catalysts suitable for high-temperature reactions.

  7. A Search For Planets in the Metal-Rich Open Cluster Praesepe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Russel

    The most promising way to distinguish between competing theories of planet formation and subsequent migration is to find and determine the basic properties of short period (< 1 yr) planets with well-determined ages younger than 1 billion years. Open clusters are the most promising locations to do this, but disappointingly no main sequence open cluster stars are known to harbor planets. This is primarily a consequence of most clusters being too distant for precise radial velocity measurements at visual wavelength. A better determined frequency of planets within open clusters would also clarify if this environment inhibits their formation, as has recently been suggested. If confirmed, that would imply that most stars will not have planets since most stars are believed to form in dense clusters. Here we request funding to support a 2-year program to search for radial velocity planets in the 600 Myr Praesepe open cluster. Praesepe is the most metal rich open cluster within 1000 pc of the sun. Based on known planet frequency - metallicity correlations, its high metallicity suggests a planet frequency enhanced by nearly a factor of 4 relative to sun- like stars; approximately 1 in 20 of its members should harbor a short period (3-10 day) hot Jupiter-like planet, and 1 in 400 of its members should have a transiting planet. The observations will be carried out using the Mayall 4-m/Echelle and Keck/HIRES facilities; nearly 100 Praesepe FGK stars will be surveyed over a 1+ year baseline. Precise radial velocities will be obtained using telluric features as a wavelength reference. We have demonstrated this technique achieves a precision of at least 50 m/s, and anticipate a final precision of 10 m/s, similar to what has been previously achieved. This precision and proposed temporal sampling will enable us to confidently identify nearly all Jupiter-sized planets with periods less than ~1 yr. The discovery of the first planets orbiting dwarf stars within an open cluster with a

  8. The ODD Old, Super-Metal-Rich Open Cluster, NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the composition of turn-off stars in the intriguing open cluster, NGC 6791, which is old, but super-metal-rich using Keck/HIRES spectra. We find [Fe/H] = +0.30 +/-0.02[O/Fe]n -0.06 +/-0.02,[Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] near solar and the two Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, are consistent with Fe.

  9. Precipitation of Ordered Phases in Metallic Solid Solutions: A Synergistic Clustering and Ordering Process (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    of such concurrent clustering and ordering processes in metallic solid solutions including Fe-Al [4], Ni-Al [5,6], Ni-Ti [7,8], and Cu -Ti [9,10...ordering reaction to take place. The proposition is that since the Cu -15Ni-8Sn alloy composition cannot undergo congruent ordering, spinodal...interpretation of their results. For example, Wendt and Hassan noted from [14] that in samples of the quenched alloy that have been briefly aged

  10. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Strader, Jay

    2012-11-10

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  11. The grape cluster, metal particle 63344,1. [in lunar coarse fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Axon, H. J.; Agrell, S. O.

    1975-01-01

    The grape cluster metal particle 63344,1 found in lunar coarse fines is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron microprobe, and an optical microscope. This metal particle is approximately 0.5 cm in its largest dimension and consists of hundreds of metallic globules welded together to form a structure somewhat like a bunch of grapes. Electron microprobe analysis for Fe, Ni, Co, P, and S in the metal was carried out using wavelength dispersive detectors. No primary solidification structure is observed in the globules, and the particle is slow cooled from the solidification temperature (nearly 1300 C) taking days to probably months to reach 600 C. Two mechanisms for the formation of globules are proposed. One mechanism involves the primary impact of an iron meteorite which produces a metallic liquid and vapor phase. The second mechanism involves the formation of a liquid pool of metal after impact of an iron meteorite projectile followed by a secondary impact in the liquid metal pool.

  12. Globular cluster system of the galaxy. II. The spatial and metallicity distributions, the second parameter phenomenon, and the formation of the cluster system

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, R.

    1980-10-15

    The metal abundance measurements that were collected for 84 globular clusters in the first paper of this series are used here to describe the cluster system. The ranking of the clusters by metallicity has been calibrated by a new (Fe/H) scale, which is based in part on the measurement of (Fe/H)=-1.2 for M71. According to this scale, the metal abundance gradient between the inner and outer halo clusters (i.e., R<9 kpc and 9< or =R< 40 kpc) is only a small fraction of that found with previous (Fe/H) scales. It is not clear, however, that the new scale is to be preferred over the old ones; consequently the size of this gradient remains in doubt. The most significant properties of the cluster system that do not depend on the validity of the (Fe/H) scale are the following; (i) there is a wide range in metal abundance among the cluster in the zone 9< or =R<40 kpc, but no evidence of a gradient with R or with distance from the galactic plane, Vertical BarZVertical Bar; (ii) among the clusters with R<9 kpc, there is a metal abundance gradient with Vertical BarZVertical Bar; and (iii) the magnitude of the second parameter effect increases with R, and if age is the second parameter, then over the range 0cluster age declines by approx.3 Gyr and the scatter in age increases from less than 1 Gyr to approx.2 Gyr.

  13. Electronic structure and stability of clusters, especially of alkali metals and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, N. H.

    1993-12-01

    The electronic structure of alkali metal atom clusters of various sizes is first discussed, using a spherically averaged pseudopotential model. The main technique employed is density functional theory, and a connection is established with predictions about dissociation energy from the theory of the inhomogeneous electron gas. This latter theory is then invoked explicitly to discuss the barrier to fission for doubly charged alkali metal atom clusters. In the case of asymmetric fission, comparison is made with experiment following the study of Garcias [F. Garcias, J.A. Alonso, J.M. Lopez and M. Barranco, Phys. Rev. B, 43 (1991) 9459], while for symmetric fission a connection is again made between fission barrier and concepts which follow from the general theory of the inhomogeneous electron gas. Finally, and more briefly, both density functional calculations and quantum-chemical studies of carbon clusters are referred to. After a summary of the work of Adamowicz on small linear C clusters [L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys., 94 (1991) 1241], results on C 60 and its singly and doubly charged anions, and on (C 60) 2, are summarized, the potential relevance to alkali doped buckminsterfullerene superconductivity being emphasized as an important direction for future work.

  14. ANISOTROPIC METAL-ENRICHED OUTFLOWS DRIVEN BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Cavagnolo, K. W.

    2011-04-20

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in 10 galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have experienced recent active galactic nucleus activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the BCG into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R{sub Fe} {proportional_to} P {sup 0.42}{sub jet}, with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting that this is a long-lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal-enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses substantially exceed 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}.

  15. Molecular heterometallic hydride clusters composed of rare-earth and d-transition metals.

    PubMed

    Shima, Takanori; Luo, Yi; Stewart, Timothy; Bau, Robert; McIntyre, Garry J; Mason, Sax A; Hou, Zhaomin

    2011-09-18

    Heteromultimetallic hydride clusters containing both rare-earth and d-transition metals are of interest in terms of both their structure and reactivity. However, such heterometallic complexes have not yet been investigated to a great extent because of difficulties in their synthesis and structural characterization. Here, we report the synthesis, X-ray and neutron diffraction studies, and hydrogen addition and release properties of a family of rare-earth/d-transition-metal heteromultimetallic polyhydride complexes of the core structure type 'Ln(4)MH(n)' (Ln = Y, Dy, Ho; M = Mo, W; n = 9, 11, 13). Monitoring of hydrogen addition to a hydride cluster such as [{(C(5)Me(4)SiMe(3))Y}(4)(μ-H)(9)Mo(C(5)Me(5))] in a single-crystal to single-crystal process by X-ray diffraction has been achieved for the first time. Density functional theory studies reveal that the hydrogen addition process is cooperatively assisted by the Y/Mo heteromultimetallic sites, thus offering unprecedented insight into the hydrogen addition and release process of a metal hydride cluster.

  16. Cluster synthesis via ligand-arrested solid growth: triethylphosphine-capped fragments of binary metal chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Nathan R M; Hee, Allan G; Long, Jeffrey R

    2002-12-18

    A new and potentially highly generalizable technique for synthesizing molecular fragments of binary solids is demonstrated through application to selected transition metal chalcogenides. Employing a metal atom reactor, the solids are evaporated with a tungsten heating boat, and the resulting vapor is co-condensed with triethylphosphine. Major cluster products identified from a survey of first-row transition metal sulfides include the known species Cr6S8(PEt3)6, Co6S8(PEt3)6, and Cu12S6(PEt3)8, as well as the unprecedented species Fe4S4(PBun3)4, Ni4S4(PEt3)8, and Cu6S4(PEt3)4. Reactions utilizing Cu2Se resulted in the much larger clusters Cu26Se13(PEt3)14 and Cu70Se35(PEt3)21. The core of the former has a Th-symmetry structure featuring a body-centered icosahedron of Se2- anions, while the latter adopts a triangular structure based on three hexagonal closest packed layers of Se2- anions. In both cases, the Cu+ cations occupy distorted tetrahedral or trigonal planar sites similar to those encountered in Cu2Se; however, emergence of the face-centered cubic anion lattice of the bulk solid is not yet apparent at these cluster sizes.

  17. Classification and identification of metal-accumulating plant species by cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenhao; Li, He; Zhang, Taoxiang; Sen, Lin; Ni, Wuzhong

    2014-09-01

    Identification and classification of metal-accumulating plant species is essential for phytoextraction. Cluster analysis is used for classifying individuals based on measured characteristics. In this study, classification of plant species for metal accumulation was conducted using cluster analysis based on a practical survey. Forty plant samples belonging to 21 species were collected from an ancient silver-mining site. Five groups such as hyperaccumulator, potential hyperaccumulator, accumulator, potential accumulator, and normal accumulating plant were graded. For Cd accumulation, the ancient silver-mining ecotype of Sedum alfredii was treated as a Cd hyperaccumulator, and the others were normal Cd-accumulating plants. For Zn accumulation, S. alfredii was considered as a potential Zn hyperaccumulator, Conyza canadensis and Artemisia lavandulaefolia were Zn accumulators, and the others were normal Zn-accumulating plants. For Pb accumulation, S. alfredii and Elatostema lineolatum were potential Pb hyperaccumulators, Rubus hunanensis, Ajuga decumbens, and Erigeron annuus were Pb accumulators, C. canadensis and A. lavandulaefolia were potential Pb accumulators, and the others were normal Pb-accumulating plants. Plant species with the potential for phytoextraction were identified such as S. alfredii for Cd and Zn, C. canadensis and A. lavandulaefolia for Zn and Pb, and E. lineolatum, R. hunanensis, A. decumbens, and E. annuus for Pb. Cluster analysis is effective in the classification of plant species for metal accumulation and identification of potential species for phytoextraction.

  18. First Detection of a Cluster-scale Gradient in the ISM metallicity of the Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anshu; Yuan, Tiantian; Tran, Kim-Vy; Martizzi, Davide; Taylor, Philip; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the effect of cluster environment on galaxy formation and evolution is a central topic in extragalactic astronomy. The interstellar medium (ISM) metallicity provides a powerful constraint on the complex interplay of star formation and the galactic inflow/outflow. Disentangling the effect of internal (stellar mass) and external (environment) processes on galaxy evolution is difficult because high mass galaxies tend to exist in dense environments. For the past decade, the difference between mass-metallicity relations in the cluster and field environment have been used to disentangle the effect of internal/external processes. Current observations of the mass-metallicity relation show minimal dependence on the large-scale environment. In this talk, I will present the radial distribution of ISM metallicity in galaxy clusters as an alternative method to study the impact of environment on galaxy evolution. I will present the first observation of cluster-scale negative abundance gradients in two CLASH clusters at z~0.35: MACS1115+0129 and RXJ1532+3021. Our observation presents the highest metallicity enhancement observed in a galaxy cluster on the mass-metallicity relation to date. Most strikingly, we discover that neither the radial metallicity gradient nor the offset on the mass-metallicity relation show any obvious dependence on the stellar mass of cluster members. I will discuss the different physical processes in the cluster environment such as disk truncation due to ram-pressure stripping and self-enrichment due to strangulation that can lead to the observed cluster-scale negative abundance gradient in ISM metallicity.In our follow-up work, we have performed simulations of the disk-truncation in cluster environment using a sample of CALIFA galaxies. Our analytical model of disk-truncation is based on the ram-pressure stripping of the cold gas component of the infalling galaxy in the cluster environment. I will present the simulated radial metallicity

  19. The Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Open Sites on Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigra, Michael Mark

    Coordinatively unsaturated corner and edge atoms have been hypothesized to have the highest activity of sites responsible for many catalytic reactions on a metal surface. Recent studies have validated this hypothesis in varied reaction systems. However, quantification of different types of coordinatively unsaturated sites, and elucidation of their individual catalytic rates has remained a largely unresolved challenge when understanding catalysis on metal surfaces. Yet such structure-function knowledge would be invaluable to the design of more active and selective metal-surface catalysts in the future. I investigated the catalytic contributions of undercoordinated sites such as corner and edge atoms are investigated in a model reaction system using organic ligands bound to the gold nanoparticle surface. The catalyst consisted of 4 nm gold nanoparticles on a metal oxide support, using resazurin to resorufin as a model reaction system. My results demonstrate that in this system, corner atom sites are the most undercoordinated sites, and are over an order of magnitude more active when compared to undercoordinated edge atom sites, while terrace sites remain catalytically inactive for the reduction reaction of resazurin to resorufin. Catalytic activity has been also demonstrated for calixarene-bound gold nanoparticles using the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. With the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction, a comparative study was undertaken to compare calixarene phosphine and calixarene thiol bound 4 nm gold particles. The results of the study suggested that a leached site was responsible for catalysis and not sites on the original gold nanoparticles. Future experiments with calixarene bound gold clusters could investigate ligand effects in reactions where the active site is not a leached or aggregated gold species, possibly in oxidation reactions, where electron-rich gold is hypothesized to be a good catalyst. The results that emphasize the enhanced catalytic activity of

  20. A very deep Chandra view of metals, sloshing and feedback in the Centaurus cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Taylor, G. B.; Russell, H. R.; Blundell, K. M.; Canning, R. E. A.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Walker, S. A.; Grimes, C. K.

    2016-03-01

    We examine deep Chandra X-ray observations of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies, Abell 3526. Applying a gradient magnitude filter reveals a wealth of structure, from filamentary soft emission on 100 pc (0.5 arcsec) scales close to the nucleus to features 10 s of kpc in size at larger radii. The cluster contains multiple high-metallicity regions with sharp edges. Relative to an azimuthal average, the deviations of metallicity and surface brightness are correlated, and the temperature is inversely correlated, as expected if the larger scale asymmetries in the cluster are dominated by sloshing motions. Around the western cold front are a series of ˜7 kpc `notches', suggestive of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The cold front width varies from 4 kpc down to close to the electron mean free path. Inside the front are multiple metallicity blobs on scales of 5-10 kpc, which could have been uplifted by AGN activity, also explaining the central metallicity drop and flat inner metallicity profile. Close to the nucleus are multiple shocks, including a 1.9-kpc-radius inner shell-like structure and a weak 1.1-1.4 Mach number shock around the central cavities. Within a 10 kpc radius are nine depressions in surface brightness, several of which appear to be associated with radio emission. The shocks and cavities imply that the nucleus has been repeatedly active on 5-10 Myr time-scales, indicating a tight balance between heating and cooling. We confirm the presence of a series of linear quasi-periodic structures. If they are sound waves, the ˜5 kpc spacing implies a period of 6 Myr, similar to the ages of the shocks and cavities. Alternatively, these structures may be Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, their associated turbulence or amplified magnetic field layers.

  1. Atmospheric parameters and metallicities for 2191 stars in the globular cluster M4

    SciTech Connect

    Malavolta, Luca; Piotto, Giampaolo; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Sneden, Christopher; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R. E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: milone@mso.anu.edu.au

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V ≤ 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = –1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain ([Fe/H]) = –1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  2. Atmospheric Parameters and Metallicities for 2191 Stars in the Globular Cluster M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, Luca; Sneden, Christopher; Piotto, Giampaolo; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R.; Nascimbeni, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V <= 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  3. Formation of the metal and energy-carrier price clusters on the world market of nonferrous metals in the postcrisis period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Shevelev, I. M.; Chernyi, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The laws of formation of price clusters are revealed upon statistical processing of the data on changing the quotation prices of nonferrous and precious metals, oil, black oil, gasoline, and natural gas in the postcrisis period from January 1, 2009 to November 1, 2013. It is found that the metal prices entering in the price cluster of nonferrous metals most strongly affect the formation of the nonferrous metal price and that the prices of precious metals and energy carriers correct the exchange price of the metal to some extent but do not determine its formation. Equations are derived to calculate the prices. The results of calculation by these equations agree well with the real nonferrous metal prices in the near future.

  4. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    DOE PAGES

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M.; Wisinger, Nina; ...

    2015-02-23

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquidmore » cell.« less

  5. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  6. Bonding with parallel spins: high-spin clusters of monovalent metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason

    2014-02-18

    Bonding is a glue of chemical matter and is also a useful concept for designing new molecules. Despite the fact that electron pairing remains the bonding mechanism in the great majority of molecules, in the past few decades scientists have had a growing interest in discovering novel bonding motifs. As this Account shows, monovalent metallic atoms having exclusively parallel spins, such as (11)Li10, (11)Au10, and (11)Cu10, can nevertheless form strongly bound clusters, without having even one traditional bond due to electron pairing. These clusters, which also can be made chiral, have high magnetic moments. We refer to this type as no-pair ferromagnetic (NPFM) bonding, which characterizes the (n+1)Mn clusters, which were all predicted by theoretical computations. The small NPFM alkali clusters that have been "synthesized" to date, using cold-atom techniques, support the computational predictions. In this Account, we describe the origins of NPFM bonding using a valence bond (VB) analysis, which shows that this bonding motif arises from bound triplet electron pairs that spread over all the close neighbors of a given atom in the cluster. The bound triplet pair owes its stabilization to the resonance energy provided by the mixing of the local ionic configurations, [(3)M(↑↑)(-)]M(+) and M(+)[(3)M(↑↑)(-)], and the various excited covalent configurations (involving pz and dz(2) atomic orbitals) into the repulsive covalent structure (3)(M↑↑M) with the s(1)s(1) electronic configuration. The NPFM bond of the bound triplet is described by a resonating wave function with "in-out" and "out-in" pointing hybrids. The VB model accounts for the tendency of NPFM clusters to assume polyhedral shapes with rather high symmetry. In addition, this model explains the very steep rise of the bonding energy per atom (De/n), which starts out small in the (3)M2 dimer (<1 kcal/mol) and reaches 12-19 kcal/mol for clusters with 10 atoms. The model further predicts that usage of

  7. Nano-confinement inside molecular metal oxide clusters: Dynamics and modified encapsulation behavior

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhe; Daemen, Luke L.; Cheng, Yongqiang; ...

    2016-08-19

    Encapsulation behavior, as well as the presence of internal catalytically-active sites, has been spurring the applications of a 3 nm hollow spherical metal oxide cluster {Mo132} as an encapsulation host and a nano-reactor. Due to its well-defined and tunable cluster structures, and nano-scaled internal void space comparable to the volumes of small molecules, this cluster provides a good model to study the dynamics of materials under ultra-confinement. Neutron scattering studies suggest that bulky internal ligands inside the cluster show slower and limited dynamics compared to their counterparts in the bulk state, revealing the rigid nature of the skeleton of themore » internal ligands. Furthermore, NMR studies indicate that the rigid internal ligands that partially cover the interfacial pore on the molybdenum oxide shells are able to block some large guest molecules from going inside the capsule cluster, which provides a convincing protocol for size-selective encapsulation and separation.« less

  8. Orbitals in inorganic chemistry: metal rings and clusters, hydronitrogens, and heterocyles.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    A chemical orbital theory is useful in inorganic chemistry. Some applications are described for understanding and designing of inorganic molecules. Among the topics included are: (1) valence electron rules to predict stabilities of three- and four-membered ring metals and for those of regular octahedral M(6) metal clusters solely by counting the number of valence electrons; (2) pentagon stability (stability of five- relative to six-membered rings in some classes of molecules), predicted and applied for understanding and designing saturated molecules of group XV elements; (3) properties of unsaturated hydronitrogens N( m )H( n ) in contrast to those of hydrocarbons C( m )H( n ); (4) unusually short nonbonded distances between metal atoms in cyclic molecules.

  9. Variable Stars in the Unusual, Metal-Rich Globular Cluster NGC-6441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a search for variable stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6441 using time-series BV photometry. The total number of variables found near NGC 6441 has been increased to approx. 104, with 48 new variables being found in this survey. A significant number of the variables are RR Lyrae stars (approx. 46), most of which are probable cluster members. As was noted by Layden et al. (1999), the periods of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae are unusually long compared to field stars of similar metallicity. The existence of these long period RRab stars is consistent with Sweigart & Catelan's (1998) prediction that the horizontal branch of NGC 6441 is unusually bright. This result implies that the metallicity-luminosity relationship for RR Lyrae stars is not universal. We discuss the difficulty in determining the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 6441 due to the unusual nature of its RR Lyrae. A number of ab-type RR Lyrae are found to be both brighter and redder than the other probable RRab found along the horizontal branch, which may be a result of blending with stars of redder color. A smaller than usual gap is found between the shortest period fundamental mode and the longest period first-overtone mode RR Lyrae. We determine the reddening of the cluster to be E(B - V) = 0.51 +/- 0.02 mag, with substantial differential reddening across the face of the cluster. The mean V magnitude of the RR Lyrae is found to be 17.51 +/- 0.02 resulting in a distance of 10.4 to 11.9 kpc, for a range of assumed values of < M(sub V)> for RR Lyrae stars. The possibility that stars in NGC 6441 may span a range in [Fe/H] is also discussed.

  10. Tunable nanoscale graphene magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Pisana, Simone; Braganca, Patrick M; Marinero, Ernesto E; Gurney, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    The detection of magnetic fields with nanoscale resolution is a fundamental challenge for scanning probe magnetometry, biosensing, and magnetic storage. Current technologies based on giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance are limited at small sizes by thermal magnetic noise and spin-torque instability. These limitations do not affect Hall sensors consisting of high mobility semiconductors or metal thin films, but the loss of magnetic flux throughout the sensor's thickness greatly limits spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we demonstrate graphene extraordinary magnetoresistance devices that combine the Hall effect and enhanced geometric magnetoresistance, yielding sensitivities rivaling that of state of the art sensors but do so with subnanometer sense layer thickness at the sensor surface. Back-gating provides the ability to control sensor characteristics, which can mitigate both inherent variations in material properties and fabrication-induced device-to-device variability that is unavoidable at the nanoscale.

  11. THE METALLICITY BIMODALITY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS: A TEST OF GALAXY ASSEMBLY AND OF THE EVOLUTION OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tonini, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    We build a theoretical model to study the origin of the globular cluster metallicity bimodality in the hierarchical galaxy assembly scenario. The model is based on empirical relations such as the galaxy mass-metallicity relation [O/H]-M {sub star} as a function of redshift, and on the observed galaxy stellar mass function up to redshift z {approx} 4. We make use of the theoretical merger rates as a function of mass and redshift from the Millennium simulation to build galaxy merger trees. We derive a new galaxy [Fe/H]-M {sub star} relation as a function of redshift, and by assuming that globular clusters share the metallicity of their original parent galaxy at the time of their formation, we populate the merger tree with globular clusters. We perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations of the galaxy hierarchical assembly, and study the properties of the final globular cluster population as a function of galaxy mass, assembly and star formation history, and under different assumptions for the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation. The main results and predictions of the model are the following. (1) The hierarchical clustering scenario naturally predicts a metallicity bimodality in the galaxy globular cluster population, where the metal-rich subpopulation is composed of globular clusters formed in the galaxy main progenitor around redshift z {approx} 2, and the metal-poor subpopulation is composed of clusters accreted from satellites, and formed at redshifts z {approx} 3-4. (2) The model reproduces the observed relations by Peng et al. for the metallicities of the metal-rich and metal-poor globular cluster subpopulations as a function of galaxy mass; the positions of the metal-poor and metal-rich peaks depend exclusively on the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation and the [O/Fe], both of which can be constrained by this method. In particular, we find that the galaxy [O/Fe] evolves linearly with redshift from a value of {approx}0.5 at redshift

  12. Chemical Abundances in NGC 5053: A Very Metal Poor and Dynamically Complex Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberg, Owen; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the spherical distribution expected from GCs. These features include a ˜6° tidal stream (Lauchner et al. 2006), and a possible, but still debated, bridge-like structure between it and its nearby neighbor NGC 5024 (Chun et al. 2010). These features suggest that the evolution of these clusters has not only been greatly affected by their gravitational interaction with the Galaxy, but possibly each other. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sgr dSph stream (Law & Majewski 2010). Using the WIYN-Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (S/N ˜75-90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch (RGB) stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of -2.46 with a standard deviation of 0.05 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal poor GCs in the Milky Way. The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of Milky Way halo stars at a similar metallicity, with high alpha values and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na-O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the Milky Way. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being a member of the Sgr dSph stream.

  13. Atomic Resolution of the Structure of a Metal Support Interface: Triosmium Clusters on MgO (110)

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, Nigel D.; Chi, Miaofang; Gates, Bruce C.; kulkarni, Apoorva; Ortalan, Volkan

    2010-01-01

    Aberration-corrected STEM images of MgO-supported triosmium clusters show that the osmium atoms reside atop magnesium atoms. On the basis of the results, structural models of the clusters that include the metal-support interaction are derived.

  14. Encapsulation of metal clusters within MFI via interzeolite transformations and direct hydrothermal syntheses and catalytic consequences of their confinement.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sarika; Zones, Stacey I; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-10-29

    The encapsulation of metal clusters (Pt, Ru, Rh) within MFI was achieved by exchanging cationic metal precursors into a parent zeolite (BEA, FAU), reducing them with H2 to form metal clusters, and transforming these zeolites into daughter structures of higher framework density (MFI) under hydrothermal conditions. These transformations required MFI seeds or organic templates for FAU parent zeolites, but not for BEA, and occurred with the retention of encapsulated clusters. Clusters uniform in size (1.3-1.7 nm) and exposing clean and accessible surfaces formed in BEA and FAU zeolites; their size remained essentially unchanged upon transformation into MFI. Encapsulation selectivities, determined from the relative hydrogenation rates of small (toluene) and large (alkyl arenes) molecules and defined as the ratio of the surface areas of all the clusters in the sample to that of external clusters, were very high (8.1-40.9) for both parent and daughter zeolites. Encapsulation into MFI via direct hydrothermal syntheses was unsuccessful because metal precursors precipitated prematurely at the pH and temperatures required for MFI synthesis. Delayed introduction of metal precursors and F(-) (instead of OH(-)) as the mineralizing agent in hydrothermal syntheses increased encapsulation selectivities, but they remained lower than those achieved via interzeolite transformations. These interconversions provide a general and robust strategy for encapsulation of metals when precursors can be introduced via exchange into a zeolite that can be transformed into target daughter zeolites with higher framework densities, whether spontaneously or by using seeds or structure-directing agents (SDA).

  15. Nanoscale Wicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jijie; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Mory; Noca, Flavio

    2003-11-01

    A wick is a bundle of fibers that by capillary attraction draws up to be burned a steady supply of the oil in lamps. In textile research, wicking is the process by which liquids are transported across or along fibers by capillary action (of relevance to perspiration). A similar phenomenon was recently discovered in our lab with mats of nanoscale fibers. A droplet containing a surfactant solution was placed on top of a well-aligned mat of carbon nanotubes: wicking was then observed as a film of liquid propagating within the nanocarpet, such as a stain or drop absorbed into a textile fabric. The nanoscale wicking process in carbon nano-arrays offers a simple and enabling technology for the processing (transport, mixing, filtering) of picoliters of fluids without any need for confinement (nanochannel) or bulky driving pressure apparatus. In this work, nanoscale wicking properties are quantified as a function of surfactant activity and carbon nanoarray geometry. The biomolecular sieving capability of the nanotube arrays is also put to test by the addition of biomolecules, while using the wicking process as the fluid driving force.

  16. Finite-difference analysis of plasmon-induced forces of metal nano-clusters by the Lorentz force formulation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masafumi

    2010-12-20

    We analyze light-induced forces on metal nano-spheres by using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method with the Lorentz force formulation. Convergent analysis of the force on metal nano-particle clusters has been achieved by integrating the Lorentz and the Coulomb forces over the volume of the metal particles. Comparison to the Mie theory of radiation pressure on metal spheres under a plane wave illumination has verified rigorously the accuracy of the numerical method. We also analyze separate two metal spheres in close proximity and the results of the induced forces are compared to those in previous publications. The present method allows analysis of forces on various irregular structures; we apply the method to touching metal spheres, forming a simple cluster with a slight deformation at the contact point, to analyze the forces induced by the plasmonic resonance of the clusters. We show that the fundamental resonance modes, which newly appear in an infrared range when spheres are touching, exhibit strong binding forces within the clusters. Based on the numerical analyses we identify the resonance modes and evaluate quantitatively the infrared-induced forces on metal nano-sphere clusters.

  17. Silver cluster formation, dynamics, and chemistry in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Houk, Ronald J T; Jacobs, Benjamin W; El Gabaly, Farid; Chang, Noel N; Talin, A Alec; Graham, Dennis D; House, Stephen D; Robertson, Ian M; Allendorf, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Synthetic methods used to produce metal nanoparticles typically lead to a distribution of particle sizes. In addition, creation of the smallest clusters, with sizes of a few to tens of atoms, remains very challenging. Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising solution to these problems, since their long-range crystalline order creates completely uniform pore sizes with the potential for both steric and chemical stabilization. We report a systematic investigation of silver nanocluster formation within MOFs using three representative MOF templates. The as-synthesized clusters are spectroscopically consistent with dimensions < or =1 nm, with a significant fraction existing as Ag(3) clusters, as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance. Importantly, we show conclusively that very rapid TEM-induced MOF degradation leads to agglomeration and stable, easily imaged particles, explaining prior reports of particles larger than MOF pores. These results solve an important riddle concerning MOF-based templates and suggest that heterostructures composed of highly uniform arrays of nanoparticles within MOFs are feasible.

  18. Infrared Array Photometry of Metal-Rich Globular Clusters.III.Two More Clusters and an Analysis of V-K Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchinski, Leslie E.; Frogel, Jay A.

    1995-12-01

    We present new JHK photometry for the disk globular clusters NGC 6440 and NUC 6624. These data are initially used to confirm and refine several important results from Kuchinski et al. [AJ, 109, 1131(1995)] for other disk globulars. First, we again demonstrate the ability to derive a reddening-independent estimate for the [Fe/H] of a cluster from the slope if its giant branch (GB) in a K, J - K color-magnitude diagram (CMD). Second, the reddening corrected J- K color and K magnitude of the center of the horizontal branch (HB) and the J - K color of its red edge are confirmed to be independent of [Fe/H] for these clusters. Thus these parameters can be used to estimate E(J - K) of metal-rich clusters with no knowledge of distance or [Fe/H] and to estimate (m - M) if one can first estimate the reddening. We also confirm that the reddening-independent quantities, the half width of a cluster's horizontal branch (HB), and the color difference between the center of the HB and the GB at the level of the HB, both appear to be insensitive to metallicity. The JHK colors of NGC 6440 are similar to those of Liller 1; in both cases these colors are unlike those seen for other globular clusters, field giants, or bulge giants. We have not been able to identify any other cluster parameter that would help to explain these anomalous colors. We have assembled V photometry from the literature for the clusters in our sample and VK photometry for two additional disk globular clusters from Davidge et al. [ApJS, 81, 251(1992)]. We conclude that K, J - K CMDs are preferable to K, V- K CMDs as tools to study basic cluster properties. Finally, we compare our data with theoretical isochrones for metal-rich clusters and present observational evidence that the dependence of the V- K color of the GB on [Fe/H] may be different for halo and disk globular clusters. This difference may be related to differences in the [0/Fe] values for the two cluster systems.

  19. Transition-Metal Planar Boron Clusters: a New Class of Aromatic Compounds with High Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with computational studies over the past decade has shown that boron clusters possess planar or quasi-planar structures, in contrast to that of bulk boron, which is dominated by three-dimensional cage-like building blocks. All planar or quasi-planar boron clusters are observed to consist of a monocyclic circumference with one or more interior atoms. The propensity for planarity has been found to be due to both σ and π electron delocalization throughout the molecular plane, giving rise to concepts of σ and π double aromaticity. We have found further that the central boron atoms can be substituted by transition metal atoms to form a new class of aromatic compounds, which consist of a central metal atom and a monocyclic boron ring (M B_n). Eight-, nine-, and ten-membered rings of boron have been observed, giving rise to octa-, ennea-, and deca-coordinated aromatic transition metal compounds [1-3]. References: [1] ``Aromatic Metal-Centered Monocyclic Boron Rings: Co B_9^- and Ru B_9^-" (Constantin Romanescu, Timur R. Galeev, Wei-Li Li, A. I. Boldyrev, and L. S. Wang), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. {50}, 9334-9337 (2011). [2] ``Transition-Metal-Centered Nine-Membered Boron Rings: M B_9 and M B_9^- (M = Rh, Ir)" (Wei-Li Li, Constantin Romanescu, Timur R. Galeev, Zachary Piazza, A. I. Boldyrev, and L. S. Wang), J. Am. Chem. Soc. {134}, 165-168 (2012). [3] ``Observation of the Highest Coordination Number in Planar Species: Decacoordinated Ta B10^- and Nb B_9^- Anions" (Timur R. Galeev, Constantin Romanescu, Wei-Li Li, L. S. Wang, and A. I. Boldyrev), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. {51}, 2101-2105 (2012).

  20. Redox-Inactive Metals Modulate the Reduction Potential in Heterometallic Manganese-Oxido Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Emily Y.; Tran, Rosalie; Yano, Junko; Agapie, Theodor

    2013-01-01

    Redox-inactive metals are found in biological and heterogeneous water oxidation catalysts, but their roles in catalysis are currently not well understood. A series of high oxidation state tetranuclear-dioxido clusters comprised of three manganese centers and a redox-inactive metal (M) of various charge is reported. Crystallographic studies show an unprecedented Mn3M(μ4-O)(μ2-O) core that remains intact upon changing M or the manganese oxidation state. Electrochemical studies reveal that the reduction potentials span a window of 700 mV, dependent upon the Lewis acidity of the second metal. With the pKa of the redox-inactive metal-aqua complex as a measure of Lewis acidity, these compounds display a linear dependence between reduction potential and acidity with a slope of ca. 100 mV per pKa unit. The Sr2+ and Ca2+ compounds show similar potentials, an observation that correlates with the behavior of the OEC, which is active only in the presence of one of these two metals. PMID:23511417

  1. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. III. A spectroscopic metallicity scale for the Revised Bologna Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We present a new homogeneous set of metallicity estimates based on Lick indices for the old globular clusters of the M 31 galaxy. The final aim is to add homogeneous spectroscopic metallicities to as many entries as possible of the Revised Bologna Catalog of M 31 clusters, by reporting Lick index measurements from any source (literature, new observations, etc.) on the same scale. Methods: New empirical relations of [Fe/H] as a function of [MgFe] and Mg2 indices are based on the well-studied galactic globular clusters, complemented with theoretical model predictions for -0.2≤ [Fe/H]≤ +0.5. Lick indices for M 31 clusters from various literature sources (225 clusters) and from new observations by our team (71 clusters) have been transformed into the Trager et al. system, yielding new metallicity estimates for 245 globular clusters of M 31. Results: Our values are in good agreement with recent estimates based on detailed spectral fitting and with those obtained from color magnitude diagrams of clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope. The typical uncertainty on individual estimates is ≃±0.25 dex, as resulted from the comparison with metallicities derived from color magnitude diagrams of individual clusters. Conclusions: The metallicity distribution of M 31 globular cluster is briefly discussed and compared with that of the Milky Way. Simple parametric statistical tests suggest that the distribution is probably not unimodal. The strong correlation between metallicity and kinematics found in previous studies is confirmed. The most metal-rich GCs tend to be packed into the center of the system and to cluster tightly around the galactic rotation curve defined by the HI disk, while the velocity dispersion about the curve increases with decreasing metallicity. However, also the clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.0 display a clear rotation pattern, at odds with their Milky Way counterparts. Based on observations made at La Palma, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque

  2. Water as an agent for the morphology modification of metal oxalate materials on the nanoscale: from sheets to rods

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minog; Kim, YooJin; Kwon, WonJong; Yoon, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    A number of approaches have been used to control the shape of metal oxalates, which often used as precursors for metal oxide nanomaterials. However, attempts to use water as a regulator have not been reported. Here in we report systematic studies on related topics: nanosheets, composed of 1-dimensional [M(C2O4)(EG)] (M = Zn or Co) polymeric structure, could be transformed into nanorods by using water as a shape-shifting agent because water can readily substitute EG ligand, leading alternation of inter-chain hydrogen bonding interactions. In addition, heat-treatment of these nanomaterials with diverse morphologies resulted in porous metal oxides with high degrees of shape retention. PMID:26763973

  3. Main sequence of the metal-poor globular cluster M30 (NGC 7099)

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1980-10-01

    We present photographic photometry for 673 stars in the metal-poor globular cluster M30 (NGC 7099). The Racine wedge was used with the CTIO 1-m Yale telescope (..delta..m=3/sup m/.60), the CTIO 4-m telescope (..delta..m=6/sup m/.83), and the ESO 3.6-m telescope (..delta..m=4/sup m/.12) to extend the photoelectric limit from Vapprox. =16.3 to Vapprox. =20.4. For the main-sequence turn-off, we have determined its position to lie at V=18.4 +- 0.1 (m.e.) and B-V=0.49 +- 0.03 (m.e.). From these values, we calculate the intrinsic values M/sub v/ =3.87 and (B-V)/sub 0/=0.47. For the cluster as a whole, we derive a distance modulus (m-M)/sub V/=14.53 +- 0.15 and reddening E(B-V)=0.02 +- 0.02. Using the models of Iben and Rood (Astrophys. J. 159, 605 (1970)) and the isochrones of Demarque and McClure ((1977), in Evolution of Galaxies and Stellar Populations, edited by B. Tinsley and R. B. Larson (Yale University Observatory, New Haven), p. 199), we deduce the cluster's age to be 14.5( +- 4.0) x 10/sup 9/ yr. The large uncertainty in this value emphasizes the dire need for more work on cluster evolution.

  4. Nanoscale Fluorescent Metal-Organic Framework@Microporous Organic Polymer Composites for Enhanced Intracellular Uptake and Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Weiqi; Zheng, Xiaohua; Li, Zhensheng; Xie, Zhigang

    2017-01-26

    Polymer-modified metal-organic frameworks combine the advantages of both soft polymers and crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). It is a big challenge to develop simple methods for surface modification of MOFs. In this work, MOF@microporous organic polymer (MOP) hybrid nanoparticles (UNP) have been synthesized by epitaxial growth of luminescent boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPYs)-imine MOPs on the surface of UiO-MOF seeds, which exhibit low cytotoxicity, smaller size distribution, well-retained pore integrity, and available functional sites. After folic acid grafting, the enhanced intracellular uptake and bioimaging was validated.

  5. Encapsulating Metal Clusters and Acid Sites within Small Voids: Synthetic Strategies and Catalytic Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Sarika

    The selective encapsulation of metal clusters within zeolites can be used to prepare clusters that are uniform in diameter and to protect them against sintering and contact with feed impurities, while concurrently allowing active sites to select reactants based on their molecular size, thus conferring enzyme-like specificity to chemical catalysis. The apertures in small and medium-pore zeolites preclude the use of post-synthetic protocols to encapsulate the relevant metal precursors because cationic or anionic precursors with their charge-balancing double layer and gaseous complexes cannot diffuse through their windows or channels. We have developed general strategies to encapsulate metal clusters within small-pore zeolites by using metal precursors stabilized by ammonia or organic amine ligands, which stabilize metal precursors against their premature precipitation at the high temperature and pH conditions required for the hydrothermal synthesis of the target zeolite structures and favor interactions between metal precursors and incipient aluminosilicate nuclei during the self-assembly of microporous frameworks. When synthesis temperatures were higher than 400 K, available ligands were unable to prevent the premature precipitation of the metal precursors. In such cases, encapsulation was achieved instead via interzeolite transformations after successfully encapsulating metal precursors or clusters via post-synthesis exchange or ligand protection into parent zeolites and subsequently converting them into the target structures while retaining the encapsulated clusters or precursors. Such strategies led to the successful selective encapsulation of a wide range of metal clusters (Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Ir, Re, and Ag) within small-pore (SOD (sodalite), LTA (Linde type A (zeolite A)), GIS (gismondine), and ANA (analcime)) and medium-pore (MFI (ZSM-5)) zeolites. These protocols provide novel and diverse mechanism-based strategies for the design of catalysts with protected

  6. The chiroptical signature of achiral metal clusters induced by dissymmetric adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; George, Christopher B; Zuber, Gérard; Naaman, Ron; Waldeck, David H; Wipf, Peter; Beratan, David N

    2006-01-07

    Using a dissymmetrically-perturbed particle-in-a-box model, we demonstrate that the induced optical activity of chiral monolayer protected clusters, such as Whetten's Au28(SG)16 glutathione-passivated gold nanoclusters (J. Phys. Chem. B, 2000, 104, 2630-2641), could arise from symmetric metal cores perturbed by a dissymmetric or chiral field originating from the adsorbates. This finding implies that the electronic states of the nanocluster core are chiral, yet the lattice geometries of these cores need not be geometrically distorted by the chiral adsorbates. Based on simple chiral monolayer protected cluster models, we rationalize how the adsorption pattern of the tethering sulfur atoms has a substantial effect on the induced CD in the NIR spectral region, and we show how the chiral image charge produced in the core provides a convenient means of visualizing dissymmetric perturbations to the achiral gold nanocluster core.

  7. The manufacturing of a metallic nano-cluster at a tip apex for field-sensitive microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Min; Chang, Mao-Nan; Lin, Yue-Sheng; Cheng, Chao-Chia

    2010-07-01

    Using a conductive atomic force microscopic setup, a metallic nano-cluster at a tip apex was successfully manufactured by an electrochemical redox process from an anodic aluminum oxide template. The diameter of the metallic nano-clusters ranged from 15 nm to 200 nm. The diameters of the nano-clusters could be well-controlled by adjusting the pore size of the templates. The formation of a variety of metallic nano-clusters at the tip apex was accomplished by preparing the electrolyte solution from different metallic salts. The formation mechanism for the nano-cluster is outlined and discussed. Moreover, we were able to enhance the performance of the nano-cluster tips for field-sensitive scanning probe microscopy, including electrostatic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy by laser annealing. Our experimental results indicated that for applications in field-sensitive scanning probe microscopy the stray field effect was significantly suppressed by the nano-cluster tip and hence the spatial resolution was improved.

  8. Structures and stability of metal-doped GenM (n = 9, 10) clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Xia, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Zang, Qing-Jun; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-06-26

    The lowest-energy structures of neutral and cationic Ge nM (n = 9, 10; M = Si, Li, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Au, Ag, Yb, Pm and Dy) clusters were studied by genetic algorithm (GA) and first-principles calculations. The calculation results show that doping of the metal atoms and Si into Ge9 and Ge10 clusters is energetically favorable. Most of the metal-doped Ge cluster structures can be viewed as adding or substituting metal atom on the surface of the corresponding ground-state Gen clusters. However, the neutral and cationic FeGe9,10,MnGe9,10 and Ge10Al are cage-like with the metal atom encapsulated inside. Such cage-like transition metal doped Gen clusters are shown to have higher adsorption energy and thermal stability. Our calculation results suggest that Ge9,10Fe and Ge9Si would be used as building blocks in cluster-assembled nanomaterials because of their high stabilities.

  9. Structures and stability of metal-doped Ge{sub n}M (n = 9, 10) clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Wei Xia, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Zang, Qing-Jun; Lu, Wen-Cai; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-06-15

    The lowest-energy structures of neutral and cationic Ge{sub n}M (n = 9, 10; M = Si, Li, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Au, Ag, Yb, Pm and Dy) clusters were studied by genetic algorithm (GA) and first-principles calculations. The calculation results show that doping of the metal atoms and Si into Ge{sub 9} and Ge{sub 10} clusters is energetically favorable. Most of the metal-doped Ge cluster structures can be viewed as adding or substituting metal atom on the surface of the corresponding ground-state Ge{sub n} clusters. However, the neutral and cationic FeGe{sub 9,10},MnGe{sub 9,10} and Ge{sub 10}Al are cage-like with the metal atom encapsulated inside. Such cage-like transition metal doped Ge{sub n} clusters are shown to have higher adsorption energy and thermal stability. Our calculation results suggest that Ge{sub 9,10}Fe and Ge{sub 9}Si would be used as building blocks in cluster-assembled nanomaterials because of their high stabilities.

  10. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN NGC 5053: A VERY METAL-POOR AND DYNAMICALLY COMPLEX GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2015-05-10

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the typical spherical distribution of GCs, suggesting that external tidal effects have played an important role in its evolution and current properties. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph) stream. Using the Wisconsin–Indiana–Yale–NOAO–Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (signal-to-noise ratio ∼ 75–90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of −2.45 with a standard deviation of 0.04 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal-poor GCs in the Milky Way (MW). The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of MW halo stars at a similar metallicity, with alpha-enhanced ratios and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na–O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the MW. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being associated with the Sgr dSph stream.

  11. Constraining Stellar Population Models. I. Age, Metallicity and Abundance Pattern Compilation for Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stéphane; Graves, Genevieve; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive literature compilation of age, metallicity, and chemical abundance pattern information for the 41 Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) studied by Schiavon et al. Our compilation constitutes a notable improvement over previous similar work, particularly in terms of chemical abundances. Its primary purpose is to enable detailed evaluations of and refinements to stellar population synthesis models designed to recover the above information for unresolved stellar systems based on their integrated spectra. However, since the Schiavon sample spans a wide range of the known GGC parameter space, our compilation may also benefit investigations related to a variety of astrophysical endeavors, such as the early formation of the Milky Way, the chemical evolution of GGCs, and stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. For instance, we confirm with our compiled data that the GGC system has a bimodal metallicity distribution and is uniformly enhanced in the α elements. When paired with the ages of our clusters, we find evidence that supports a scenario whereby the Milky Way obtained its globular clusters through two channels: in situ formation and accretion of satellite galaxies. The distributions of C, N, O, and Na abundances and the dispersions thereof per cluster corroborate the known fact that all GGCs studied so far with respect to multiple stellar populations have been found to harbor them. Finally, using data on individual stars, we verify that stellar atmospheres become progressively polluted by CN(O)-processed material after they leave the main sequence. We also uncover evidence which suggests that the α elements Mg and Ca may originate from more than one nucleosynthetic production site. We estimate that our compilation incorporates all relevant analyses from the literature up to mid-2012. As an aid to investigators in the fields named above, we provide detailed electronic tables of the data upon which our work is based at http

  12. Chemical Abundances in NGC 5053: A Very Metal-poor and Dynamically Complex Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2015-05-01

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the typical spherical distribution of GCs, suggesting that external tidal effects have played an important role in its evolution and current properties. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph) stream. Using the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO-Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (signal-to-noise ratio ˜ 75-90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of -2.45 with a standard deviation of 0.04 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal-poor GCs in the Milky Way (MW). The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of MW halo stars at a similar metallicity, with alpha-enhanced ratios and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na-O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the MW. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being associated with the Sgr dSph stream.

  13. First Principles Studies of Electronic and Optical Excitations in Noble Metal and Titania Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baishya, Kopinjol

    Clusters are metastable structures that form a bridge between the atomic and the bulk phase. Due to their small size, quantum confinement effects are very important in clusters. They also have large surface to volume ratio, and as such, surface effects are also important. Due to these effects the properties of clusters are quite different from those of the bulk. When the size of a cluster is increased, its properties change from atomic to bulk values usually in nontrivial ways, often displaying interesting effects. By studying the evolution of cluster properties as a function of size one can try to understand the evolution and origin of bulk properties. This thesis concentrates on two main topics, noble-metal clusters of Ag and Cu, and TiO2 nanocrystals. I present my study of the optical properties of these systems calculated using first principles methods. Noble metal clusters have intriguing physical and chemical properties due to their electronic structure that contains a fully filled and localized d orbital energetically and spatially very close to the half filled s orbital. In Chapters 3 and 4 of this thesis, I present a detailed study of the role of d electrons on the optical properties of Ag and Cu clusters. I also show that the optical spectra of these clusters can be explained remarkably well by the classical Mie-Gans theory which uses the bulk dielectric constant of the material to predict their optical absorption spectra. The fact that the concept of the bulk dielectric constant survives up to the sub-nanometer size range is one of the main findings of this thesis. TiO2 is arguably the most studied single-crystalline material in the field of surface science of metal oxides. In chapter 5 of this thesis I present results and analyses on the electronic and optical excitations in rutile TiO2 nanocrystals. The motivation for this study stems from the following observation: In modeling optical prooperties of DSSC configurations with various organic molecules

  14. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; Tomson, Neil C.; Anstey, Mitchell R.

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  15. Capturing local atomic environment dependence of activation barriers in metals using cluster expansion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Nimish; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that surface diffusion in metals can proceed via multiple mechanisms, such as hop, exchange and other types of concerted moves. However, the manner in which kinetic rates associated with a mechanism can depend sensitively on local atomic environment is relatively less understood. We describe recent attempts in our research group to capture the atomic environment dependence using the cluster expansion model (CEM). In particular, we focus on hop and exchange moves at the (001) surface in homoepitaxy, and show that while CEM can work remarkably well in most cases, it can sometimes provide inaccurate predictions for concerted moves.

  16. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; ...

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  17. Hydrogen activation by unsaturated mixed-metal cluster complexes: new directions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Captain, Burjor

    2008-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the chemistry of hydrogen as a result of the ever-increasing global demands for energy. Recent studies have revealed new electronically unsaturated polynuclear metal complexes containing bulky ligands that exhibit a variety of reactions with hydrogen, including facile addition and elimination under mild conditions. Materials and molecules that can reversibly absorb large quantities of hydrogen are very attractive for hydrogen storage and hydrogenation catalysis. This Minireview summarizes recent studies of reactions of hydrogen with unsaturated mixed-metal cluster complexes containing platinum and bulky phosphine ligands. Some related studies on bimetallic cooperativity and the synthesis of trimetallic nanoparticles on mesoporous supports that exhibit high activity and selectivity for catalytic hydrogenations are also discussed.

  18. Destructive Clustering of Metal Nanoparticles in Chalcogenide and Oxide Glassy Matrices.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, M V; Shpotyuk, O I; Cebulski, J; Kozyukhin, S

    2016-12-01

    The energetic χ-criterion is developed to parameterize difference in the origin of high-order optical non-linearity associated with metallic atoms (Cu, Ag, Au) embedded destructively in oxide- and chalcogenide glasses. Within this approach, it is unambiguously proved that covalent-bonded networks of soft semiconductor chalcogenides exemplified by binary As(Ge)-S(Se) glasses differ essentially from those typical for hard dielectric oxides like vitreous silica by impossibility to accommodate pure agglomerates of metallic nanoparticles. In an excellence according to known experimental data, it is suggested that destructive clustering of nanoparticles is possible in Cu-, Ag-, and Au-ion-implanted dielectric oxide glass media, possessing a strongly negative χ-criterion. Some recent speculations trying to ascribe equally this ability to soft chalcogenide glasses despite an obvious difference in the corresponding bond dissociation energies have been disclosed and criticized as inconclusive.

  19. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches in the study of metal atom clusters requires simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential (ECP) technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculation were examined. The ECP molecular integral formulae were modified to bring out the shell characteristics as a first step towards fulfilling the increasing need to speed up the computation of the ECP integrals. Work on the relationships among the derivatives of the molecular integrals that extends some of the techniques pioneered by Komornicki for the calculation of the gradients of the electronic energy was completed and a formulation of the ECP approach that quite naturally unifies the various state-of-the-art "shape- and Hamiltonian-consistent" techniques was discovered.

  20. Atomistic Design and Simulations of Nanoscale Machines and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, William A., III; Cagin, Tahir; Walch, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Over the three years of this project, we made significant progress on critical theoretical and computational issues in nanoscale science and technology, particularly in:(1) Fullerenes and nanotubes, (2) Characterization of surfaces of diamond and silicon for NEMS applications, (3) Nanoscale machine and assemblies, (4) Organic nanostructures and dendrimers, (5) Nanoscale confinement and nanotribology, (6) Dynamic response of nanoscale structures nanowires (metals, tubes, fullerenes), (7) Thermal transport in nanostructures.

  1. Using NV centers to probe magnetization dynamics in normal metal/magnetic insulator hybrid system at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Ku, Mark J. H.; Han, Minyong; Casola, Francesco; van der Sar, Toeno; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding magnetization dynamics induced by electric current is of great interest for both fundamental and practical reasons. Great endeavor has been dedicated to spin-orbit torques (SOT) in metallic structures, while quantitative study of analogous phenomena in magnetic insulators remains challenging where transport measurements are not feasible. Recently we have developed techniques using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to probe few-nanometre-scale correlated-electron magnetic excitations (i.e., spin waves). Here we demonstrate how this powerful tool can be implemented to study magnetization dynamics inside ferromagnetic insulator, Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with spin injection from electrical current through normal metal (Platinum in our case). Particularly our work will focus on NV magnetic detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of coherent auto-oscillations in Pt/YIG microdisc. Magnetic fluctuations and local temperature measurements, both with nearby NV centers, will also be interesting topics relevant to SOT physics in Pt/YIG hybrid system.

  2. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-resolution, Integrated-light Spectroscopy. II. Expanding the Metallicity Range for Old Clusters and Updated Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present abundances of globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way and Fornax from integrated-light (IL) spectra. Our goal is to evaluate the consistency of the IL analysis relative to standard abundance analysis for individual stars in those same clusters. This sample includes an updated analysis of seven clusters from our previous publications and results for five new clusters that expand the metallicity range over which our technique has been tested. We find that the [Fe/H] measured from IL spectra agrees to ∼0.1 dex for GCs with metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = ‑0.3, but the abundances measured for more metal-rich clusters may be underestimated. In addition we systematically evaluate the accuracy of abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for Na i, Mg i, Al i, Si i, Ca i, Ti i, Ti ii, Sc ii, V i, Cr i, Mn i, Co i, Ni i, Cu i, Y ii, Zr i, Ba ii, La ii, Nd ii, and Eu ii. The elements for which the IL analysis gives results that are most similar to analysis of individual stellar spectra are Fe i, Ca i, Si i, Ni i, and Ba ii. The elements that show the greatest differences include Mg i and Zr i. Some elements show good agreement only over a limited range in metallicity. More stellar abundance data in these clusters would enable more complete evaluation of the IL results for other important elements. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  3. Direct observation of nanoscale Peltier and Joule effects at metal-insulator domain walls in vanadium dioxide nanobeams.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Tela; Suh, Joonki; Vermeersch, Bjorn; Liu, Kai; Gu, Yijia; Chen, Long-Qing; Wang, Kevin X; Wu, Junqiao; Shakouri, Ali

    2014-05-14

    The metal to insulator transition (MIT) of strongly correlated materials is subject to strong lattice coupling, which brings about the unique one-dimensional alignment of metal-insulator (M-I) domains along nanowires or nanobeams. Many studies have investigated the effects of stress on the MIT and hence the phase boundary, but few have directly examined the temperature profile across the metal-insulating interface. Here, we use thermoreflectance microscopy to create two-dimensional temperature maps of single-crystalline VO2 nanobeams under external bias in the phase coexisting regime. We directly observe highly localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain boundaries, indicating the significance of the domain walls and band offsets. Utilizing the thermoreflectance technique, we are able to elucidate strain accumulation along the nanobeam and distinguish between two insulating phases of VO2 through detection of the opposite polarity of their respective thermoreflectance coefficients. Microelasticity theory was employed to predict favorable domain wall configurations, confirming the monoclinic phase identification.

  4. Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on reduced graphene oxides by using a plasma technique and their application for removal of heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Chen, Changlun; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on reduced graphene oxides (NZVI/rGOs) from spent graphene oxide (GO)-bound iron ions were developed by using a hydrogen/argon plasma reduction method to improve the reactivity and stability of NZVI. The NZVI/rGOs exhibited excellent water treatment performance with excellent removal capacities of 187.16 and 396.37 mg g(-1) for chromium and lead, respectively. Moreover, the NZVI/rGOs could be regenerated by plasma treatment and maintained high removal ability after four cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis results implied that the removal mechanisms could be attributed to adsorption/precipitation, reduction, or both. Such multiple removal mechanisms by the NZVI/rGOs were attributed to the reduction ability of the NZVI particles and the role of dispersing and stabilizing abilities of the rGOs. The results indicated that the NZVI/rGOs prepared by a hydrogen/argon plasma reduction method might be an effective composite for heavy-metal-ion removal.

  5. One-pot synthesis of multifunctional nanoscale metal-organic frameworks as an effective antibacterial agent against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Das, Balaram; Kumar, Amit; Tripathy, Satyajit; Roy, Somenath; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious threat to global public health. In particular, infections from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive bacteria (i.e. Staphylococcus aureus) are growing global health concerns. In this work, we report the first use of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) coencapsulating an antibiotic (vancomycin) and targeting ligand (folic acid) in one pot to enhance therapeutic efficacy against MDR S. aureus. Zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) NMOFs, which have globular morphologies coencapsulating vancomycin and folic acid, are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, ulltraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and dynamic light-scattering techniques. We determined that the presence of folic acid on the surface of the NMOFs is significant in the sense of effective uptake by MDR S. aureus through endocytosis. The functionalized NMOFs transport vancomycin across the cell wall of MDR S. aureus and enhance antibacterial activity, which has been confirmed from studies of the minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration, cytotoxicity of bacterial cells, and generation of reactive oxygen species. This work shows that functionalized NMOFs hold great promise for effective treatment of MDR S. aureus.

  6. Investigation of Device Performance and Negative Bias Temperature Instability of Plasma Nitrided Oxide in Nanoscale p-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, In-Shik; Ji, Hee-Hwan; Goo, Tae-Gyu; Yoo, Ook-Sang; Choi, Won-Ho; Na, Min-Ki; Kim, Yong-Goo; Park, Sung-Hyung; Lee, Heui-Seung; Kang, Young-Seok; Kim, Dae-Byung; Lee, Hi-Deok

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we investigated the device performance and negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation for thermally nitrided oxide (TNO) and plasma nitrided oxide (PNO) in nanoscale p-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (PMOSFET). PNOs show the improvement of dielectric performance compared to TNO with no change of the device performance. PNOs also show the improvement of NBTI immunity than TNO at low temperature stress, whereas NBTI immunity of PNO with high N concentration can be worse than TNO at high temperature stress. Recovery effect of NBTI degradation of PNO is lower than that of TNO and it is increased as the N concentration is increased in PNO because the dissociated Si dangling bonds and generated positive oxide charges are repassivated and neutralized, respectively. Moreover, complete recovery of ΔVth is dominated by neutralization of positive oxide charges. Therefore, N contents at polycrystalline Si/SiO2 interface as well as N contents at Si/SiO2 interface can affect significantly on NBTI degradation and recovery effect.

  7. One-pot synthesis of multifunctional nanoscale metal-organic frameworks as an effective antibacterial agent against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Das, Balaram; Kumar, Amit; Tripathy, Satyajit; Roy, Somenath; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2017-03-03

    Drug-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious threat to global public health. In particular, infections from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive bacteria (i.e. Staphylococcus aureus) are growing global health concerns. In this work, we report the first use of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) coencapsulating an antibiotic (vancomycin) and targeting ligand (folic acid) in one pot to enhance therapeutic efficacy against MDR S. aureus. Zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) NMOFs, which have globular morphologies coencapsulating vancomycin and folic acid, are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, ulltraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and dynamic light-scattering techniques. We determined that the presence of folic acid on the surface of the NMOFs is significant in the sense of effective uptake by MDR S. aureus through endocytosis. The functionalized NMOFs transport vancomycin across the cell wall of MDR S. aureus and enhance antibacterial activity, which has been confirmed from studies of the minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration, cytotoxicity of bacterial cells, and generation of reactive oxygen species. This work shows that functionalized NMOFs hold great promise for effective treatment of MDR S. aureus.

  8. A new method for measuring metallicities of young super star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gazak, J. Zachary; Kudritzki, Rolf; Bresolin, Fabio; Davies, Ben; Bastian, Nate; Bergemann, Maria; Plez, Bertrand; Evans, Chris; Patrick, Lee; Schinnerer, Eva

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate how the metallicities of young super star clusters (SSC) can be measured using novel spectroscopic techniques in the J-band. The near-infrared flux of SSCs older than ∼6 Myr is dominated by tens to hundreds of red supergiant stars. Our technique is designed to harness the integrated light of that population and produces accurate metallicities for new observations in galaxies above (M83) and below (NGC 6946) solar metallicity. In M83 we find [Z] = +0.28 ± 0.14 dex using a moderate resolution (R ∼ 3500) J-band spectrum and in NGC 6496 we report [Z] = -0.32 ± 0.20 dex from a low resolution spectrum of R ∼ 1800. Recently commissioned low resolution multiplexed spectrographs on the Very Large Telescope (KMOS) and Keck (MOSFIRE) will allow accurate measurements of SSC metallicities across the disks of star-forming galaxies up to distances of 70 Mpc with single night observation campaigns using the method presented in this paper.

  9. Electronic structures and water reactivity of mixed metal sulfide cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2014-08-21

    The electronic structures and chemical reactivity of the mixed metal sulfide cluster anion (MoWS{sub 4}{sup −}) have been investigated with density functional theory. Our study reveals the presence of two almost isoenergetic structural isomers, both containing two bridging sulfur atoms in a quartet state. However, the arrangement of the terminal sulfur atoms is different in the two isomers. In one isomer, the two metals are in the same oxidation state (each attached to one terminal S). In the second isomer, the two metals are in different oxidation states (with W in the higher oxidation state attached to both terminal S). The reactivity of water with the two lowest energy isomers has also been studied, with an emphasis on pathways leading to H{sub 2} release. The reactive behavior of the two isomers is different though the overall barriers in both systems are small. The origin of the differences are analyzed and discussed. The reaction pathways and barriers are compared with the corresponding behavior of monometallic sulfides (Mo{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup −} and W{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup −}) as well as mixed metal oxides (MoWO{sub 4}{sup −})

  10. Detection of second-generation asymptotic giant branch stars in metal-poor globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple stellar populations are actually known to be present in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). The first generation (FG) displays a halo-like chemical pattern, while the second generation (SG) one is enriched in Al and Na (depleted in Mg and O).Both generations of stars are found at different evolutionary stages like the main-sequence turnoff, the subgiant branch, and the red giant branch (RGB), but the SG seems to be absent - especially in metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) GCs - in more evolved evolutionary stages such as the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. This suggests that not all SG stars experience the AGB phase and that AGB-manqué stars may be quite common in metal-poor GCs, which represents a fundamental problem for the theories of GC formation and evolution and stellar evolution. Very recently, we have combined the H-band Al abundances obtained by the APOGEE survey with ground-based optical photometry, reporting the first detection of SG Al-rich AGB stars in several metal-poor GCs with different observational properties such as horizontal branch (HB) morphology, metallicity, and age. The APOGEE observations thus resolve the apparent problem for stellar evolution, supporting the existing horizontal branch star canonical models, and may help to discern the nature of the GC polluters.

  11. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  12. Nanoscale flexoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh D; Mao, Sheng; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Purohit, Prashant K; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-02-20

    Electromechanical effects are ubiquitous in biological and materials systems. Understanding the fundamentals of these coupling phenomena is critical to devising next-generation electromechanical transducers. Piezoelectricity has been studied in detail, in both the bulk and at mesoscopic scales. Recently, an increasing amount of attention has been paid to flexoelectricity: electrical polarization induced by a strain gradient. While piezoelectricity requires crystalline structures with no inversion symmetry, flexoelectricity does not carry this requirement, since the effect is caused by inhomogeneous strains. Flexoelectricity explains many interesting electromechanical behaviors in hard crystalline materials and underpins core mechanoelectric transduction phenomena in soft biomaterials. Most excitingly, flexoelectricity is a size-dependent effect which becomes more significant in nanoscale systems. With increasing interest in nanoscale and nano-bio hybrid materials, flexoelectricity will continue to gain prominence. This Review summarizes work in this area. First, methods to amplify or manipulate the flexoelectric effect to enhance material properties will be investigated, particularly at nanometer scales. Next, the nature and history of these effects in soft biomaterials will be explored. Finally, some theoretical interpretations for the effect will be presented. Overall, flexoelectricity represents an exciting phenomenon which is expected to become more considerable as materials continue to shrink.

  13. A comparative topological study of different metal-metal and metal-ligand interactions in polynuclear organometallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Maelen, Juan F.; García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The existence and characterization of a bond between the Zn atoms in the recently synthesized complex [Zn2(η5- C5Me5)2] (I), as well as between two of the three Ru atoms in [Ru3(μ- H )2(μ3- MeImCH )( CO9] (Me2Im = 1,3-dimethylimidazolin-2-ylidene) (II), are firmly based on low temperature X-ray synchrotron diffraction experiments. The multipolar refinement of the experimental electron densities and their topological analyses by means of the Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory reveal the details of the Zn-Zn and Ru-Ru bonds, such as their open-shell intermediate character. The results are consistent with a typical metal-metal single σ bond for the former, whereas a delocalized kind of bond involving 5c-6e is present in the latter. In addition, experimental results are compared with theoretical ab initio calculations of the DFT (density functional theory) and MP2 (Mo/ller-Plesset perturbation theory) electron densities, giving a coherent view of the bonding in both complexes. Many other topological properties of both compounds are also studied, in particular the different metal-ligand interactions.

  14. A comparative topological study of different metal-metal and metal-ligand interactions in polynuclear organometallic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Maelen, Juan F.; García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-01-22

    The existence and characterization of a bond between the Zn atoms in the recently synthesized complex [Zn{sub 2}(η{sup 5}−C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}] (I), as well as between two of the three Ru atoms in [Ru{sub 3}(μ−H){sub 2}(μ{sub 3}−MeImCH)(CO{sub 9}] (Me{sub 2}Im = 1,3-dimethylimidazolin-2-ylidene) (II), are firmly based on low temperature X-ray synchrotron diffraction experiments. The multipolar refinement of the experimental electron densities and their topological analyses by means of the Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory reveal the details of the Zn-Zn and Ru-Ru bonds, such as their open-shell intermediate character. The results are consistent with a typical metal-metal single σ bond for the former, whereas a delocalized kind of bond involving 5c-6e is present in the latter. In addition, experimental results are compared with theoretical ab initio calculations of the DFT (density functional theory) and MP2 (Mo/ller-Plesset perturbation theory) electron densities, giving a coherent view of the bonding in both complexes. Many other topological properties of both compounds are also studied, in particular the different metal-ligand interactions.

  15. Single electron transistors with hydrogen treatment of ALD SiO2 in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Karbasian, Golnaz; McConnell, Michael Steven; Orlov, Alexei; Nazarov, Alexei; Snider, Gregory

    2017-04-07

    Over the past five years, fabrication of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) single electron transistors (SET) featuring atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ultrathin tunnel barrier dielectrics (SiO2, Al2O3) has been reported. However, the performance of fabricated devices was significantly compromised by the presence of native metal oxide and problems associated with the nucleation of ALD dielectrics on metal substrates. To overcome the difficulty of dielectric ALD nucleation on metal substrates, we recently developed a fabrication technique in which the native metal oxide naturally forming in the presence of the ALD oxidant precursor is first used to promote the nucleation of ALD dielectrics, and then is chemically reduced by forming gas anneal (FGA) at temperatures near 400°C. However, despite the elimination of native oxide, low temperature characterization of the devices fabricated using FGA reveals excess "switching" noise of a very large magnitude resulting from charged defects within the junctions. It has been previously reported that remote hydrogen plasma (RHP) treatment of SiO2 thin films effectively eradicates fabrication defects. This work reports a comparative study of Ni-based MIM single electron transistors treated with FGA and/or RHP. We show that, using a combination of FGA and RHP treatments, it is possible to obtain MIM junctions free of switching noise and without a detectable contribution of native oxide.

  16. First principle investigation of the magnetic properties of transition metal doped (ZnS)n (n=1-16) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjot; Singh, Kanchan L.; Sharma, Hitesh

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic properties of (ZnS)n clusters (n = 1 - 16) due to 3d transition metals have been investigated using spin polarized density functional theory. The transition metals are more stable at Zn site than at the S site in (ZnS)n clusters. The binding energy of (ZnS)n clusters increases significantly on doping with transition metal indicating enhanced structural stability of the doped (ZnS)n clusters. All 3d transition metals induced magnetic moment of order 5μB-1μB per atom in all (ZnS)n clusters. The magnetic moment is mainly localized on the TM dopant. The magnetic moment increases gradually with the increase in number of electrons in 3d orbital which is in accordance with Hund's rule till Mn and decreases thereafter. All 3d TMs retain their atomic magnetic moment in ZnS clusters of all sizes. Ti, V, Cr and Mn interact anti-ferromagnetically with the surrounding S and Zn, whereas Sc, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu interact with ferromagnetic interactions.

  17. Prediction of the lowest-energy structures of rare-earth metallic clusters with a Moebius inversion pair potential

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, You-Hua; Wang, Yuzhu

    2001-07-01

    The Moebius inversion pair potential has been employed, in combination with genetic algorithms, to predict the lowest-energy structures of the rare-earth metallic clusters La{sub N}, Ce{sub N}, and Pr{sub N} (N=3--20). Results are given for the symmetries, binding energies, nearest-neighbor distances of these clusters, and lowest-energy configurations of Ce{sub N} clusters. Also, the calculated second finite difference of the total energy shows that for three species elements, the 13-atom clusters with I{sub d} symmetry are particularly stable. Some minor peaks are also found at size N=4, 6, 11, and 15, which indicates that the corresponding clusters are relatively stable in structure. Present work points out a route to studying clusters.

  18. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  19. The helium abundance in the metal-poor globular clusters M30 and NGC 6397

    SciTech Connect

    Mucciarelli, A.; Lovisi, L.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.

    2014-05-01

    We present the helium abundance of the two metal-poor clusters M30 and NGC 6397. Helium estimates have been obtained by using the high-resolution spectrograph FLAMES at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope and by measuring the He I line at 4471 Å in 24 and 35 horizontal branch (HB) stars in M30 and NGC 6397, respectively. This sample represents the largest data set of He abundances collected so far in metal-poor clusters. The He mass fraction turns out to be Y = 0.252 ± 0.003 (σ = 0.021) for M30 and Y = 0.241 ± 0.004 (σ = 0.023) for NGC 6397. These values are fully compatible with the cosmological abundance, thus suggesting that the HB stars are not strongly enriched in He. The small spread of the Y distributions are compatible with those expected from the observed main sequence splitting. Finally, we find a hint of a weak anticorrelation between Y and [O/Fe] in NGC 6397 in agreement with the prediction that O-poor stars are formed by (He-enriched) gas polluted by the products of hot proton-capture reactions.

  20. Atomic clusters triggering nucleation and solidification of the metallic glass melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gong; Zhang, Lijun; Zhan, Zaiji; Yu, Pengfei; Liaw, Peter K.; Liu, Riping

    2017-03-01

    The Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (atomic percent, at. %) melts embedded in a flux of the dehydrated B2O3 were under cooled by the repeated treatment of melting. The maximum melt undercooling of ΔT = 145 K achieved for this melt corresponds to a comparatively large relative undercooling of 0.15 times the melting-point temperature of Tm˜ about 953 K(ΔT/Tm = 0.15). The solidification and nucleation behaviors of the Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 undercooled melts triggered by Ni, Ti, Cu, and Zr clusters introduced by sputtering these pure metal targets are studied. An anomalous solidification triggered by Zr-atomic clusters above the Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 melting temperature of 140 K is observed. The instability of a metallic-glass (MG) liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature is present. The nucleation in the undercooled Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations and analyzed by the classical nucleation theory. This letter reveals an effective research method on investigating the instability of a MG liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature.

  1. Method/basis set dependence of NICS values among metallic nano-clusters and hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Badri, Zahra; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Rashidi-Ranjbar, Parviz

    2012-03-14

    The influence of various all-electron basis sets and effective core potentials employed along with several DFT functionals (B3LYP, B3PW91, BLYP, BP86 and M06) on the magnitude of nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) values in different metallic nano-clusters and hydrocarbons is studied. In general, it is demonstrated that the NICS values are very sensitive to the applied method/basis set; however, the method/basis set dependence is more prominent for computed NICS values in transition metal clusters. In hydrocarbons, medium-size basis sets perform roughly similar to large basis sets in most cases. It is also found that NICS(0) values are more sensitive to the method/basis set variation compared to the NICS values computed at 1 or 2 Å above the ring plane. However, in many cases, no broad-spectrum regulation is found for the effect of basis set/method on the magnitude of NICS values. A detailed study showed that bond length alternation in a molecule has an insignificant effect on the magnitude of NICS values so the influence of method/basis sets on the magnitude of NICS values mostly arises from the different predicted ring current intensities at various computational levels.

  2. Open cluster Dolidze 25: Stellar parameters and the metallicity in the Galactic anticentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, I.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Lorenzo, J.; Castro, N.; Herrero, A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The young open cluster Dolidze 25, in the direction of the Galactic anticentre, has been attributed a very low metallicity, with typical abundances between -0.5 and -0.7 dex below solar. Aims: We intend to derive accurate cluster parameters and accurate stellar abundances for some of its members. Methods: We have obtained a large sample of intermediate- and high-resolution spectra for stars in and around Dolidze 25. We used the fastwind code to generate stellar atmosphere models to fit the observed spectra. We derive stellar parameters for a large number of OB stars in the area, and abundances of oxygen and silicon for a number of stars with spectral types around B0. Results: We measure low abundances in stars of Dolidze 25. For the three stars with spectral types around B0, we find 0.3 dex (Si) and 0.5 dex (O) below the values typical in the solar neighbourhood. These values, even though not as low as those given previously, confirm Dolidze 25 and the surrounding H ii region Sh2-284 as the most metal-poor star-forming environment known in the Milky Way. We derive a distance 4.5 ± 0.3 kpc to the cluster (rG ≈ 12.3 kpc). The cluster cannot be older than ~3 Myr, and likely is not much younger. One star in its immediate vicinity, sharing the same distance, has Si and O abundances at most 0.15 dex below solar. Conclusions: The low abundances measured in Dolidze 25 are compatible with currently accepted values for the slope of the Galactic metallicity gradient, if we take into account that variations of at least ±0.15 dex are observed at a given radius. The area traditionally identified as Dolidze 25 is only a small part of a much larger star-forming region that comprises the whole dust shell associated with Sh2-284 and very likely several other smaller H ii regions in its vicinity. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, the Mercator Telescope, and the telescopes of the Isaac Newton Group.

  3. Ages and metallicities of LMC and SMC red clusters through H-beta and G band photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bica, E.; Dottori, H.; Pastoriza, M.

    1986-02-01

    The authors present narrow band integrated photometry of the Hβ and G band absorption features for 41 LMC and 10 SMC red star clusters. An age-metallicity calibration is provided for the color-color diagram. SWB types are derived between IV and VII for 23 unclassified clusters and their distribution in the ages vs metallicity plane is discussed. The authors study the chemical evolution of the Magellanic Clouds: the LMC presents a steeper chemical enrichment slope. An intrinsic metallicity dispersion is found in the LMC chemical evolution, indicating that the gas has been inhomogeneous at any time, prevailing a local enrichment over a global one. One zone models describe the evolution of both Clouds, being the efficiency of star cluster formation larger in the LMC. The LMC presents a burst of star cluster formation at t = 4.5×109yr. The authors also present new B-V data for fainter SMC clusters, providing an essentially complete color histogram for clusters with globular cluster appearance.

  4. Formation of x-ray Newton's rings from nano-scale spallation shells of metals in laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Noboru; Tomita, Takuro; Minami, Yasuo; Eyama, Takashi; Kakimoto, Naoya; Izutsu, Rui; Baba, Motoyoshi; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Suemoto, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    The initial stages of the femtosecond (fs) laser ablation process of gold, platinum, and tungsten were observed by single-shot soft x-ray imaging technique. The formation and evolution of soft x-ray Newton's rings (NRs) were found for the first time. The soft x-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer; they originate from the metal surface at pump energy fluence of around 1 J/cm2 and work as a flying soft x-ray beam splitter.

  5. Faujasite-supported Ir{sub 4} clusters: A density functional model study of metal-zeolite interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, A.M. |; Neyman, K.M.; Mayer, M.; Staufer, M.; Roesch, N.; Gates, B.C.

    1999-06-24

    The interaction of a metal cluster, Ir{sub 4}, and a zeolite support was investigated computationally with the aid of a density functional method and a cluster model of a zeolite, i.e., a six-ring consisting of six O atoms and six T (Si or Al) atoms facing a supercage of a faujasite framework. Structural parameters are reported for an Ir{sub 4} tetrahedron interacting with the zeolite six-ring. The calculations indicate two Ir-O distances, which match those reported on the basis of EXAFS spectroscopy at about 2.1--2.2 and 2.5--2.7 {angstrom} for various transition and noble metal clusters on zeolite (and metal oxide) supports, including Ir{sub 4} in the supercages of zeolite NaY. The calculations indicate an Ir-Ir distance of about 2.5 {angstrom}, only a few hundredths of an Angstrom more than the value calculated for the free Ir{sub 4} cluster, but about 0.2 {angstrom} less than the values observed repeatedly by EXAFS spectroscopy for zeolite-supported clusters approximated as Ir{sub 4}. The experimental distances characterizing the zeolite-supported clusters are in close agreement with the crystallographic and calculated value reported for the coordinatively saturated cluster Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 12} and favor the suggestion that the supported clusters investigated with EXAFS spectroscopy were not entirely ligand free (i.e., that their formation by decarbonylation of the parent Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 12} did not proceed by simple, complete removal of CO ligands). Consequently, calculations were performed for unsupported model clusters Ir{sub 4} with single H or C atoms as ligands; the results match the EXAFS data characterizing the Ir-Ir distance and favor the suggestion of carbon on the zeolite-supported clusters. The bonding of a single CO molecule to the supported Ir{sub 4} at the on-top site was also modeled to probe changes in the electronic structure of the metal cluster in comparison with an unsupported metal cluster. The results show that the interaction of the

  6. OPTICAL AND INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 1399: EVIDENCE FOR COLOR-METALLICITY NONLINEARITY

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; Martel, Andre R.; Cho, Hyejeon; Peng, Eric W.; Jordan, Andres

    2012-02-10

    We combine new Wide Field Camera 3 IR Channel (WFC3/IR) F160W (H{sub 160}) imaging data for NGC 1399, the central galaxy in the Fornax cluster, with archival F475W (g{sub 475}), F606W (V{sub 606}), F814W (I{sub 814}), and F850LP (z{sub 850}) optical data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The purely optical g{sub 475} - I{sub 814}, V{sub 606} - I{sub 814}, and g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors of NGC 1399's rich globular cluster (GC) system exhibit clear bimodality, at least for magnitudes I{sub 814} > 21.5. The optical-IR I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} color distribution appears unimodal, and this impression is confirmed by mixture modeling analysis. The V{sub 606} - H{sub 160} colors show marginal evidence for bimodality, consistent with bimodality in V{sub 606} - I{sub 814} and unimodality in I{sub 814} - H{sub 160}. If bimodality is imposed for I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} with a double Gaussian model, the preferred blue/red split differs from that for optical colors; these 'differing bimodalities' mean that the optical and optical-IR colors cannot both be linearly proportional to metallicity. Consistent with the differing color distributions, the dependence of I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} on g{sub 475} - I{sub 814} for the matched GC sample is significantly nonlinear, with an inflection point near the trough in the g{sub 475} - I{sub 814} color distribution; the result is similar for the I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} dependence on g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors taken from the ACS Fornax Cluster Survey. These g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors have been calibrated empirically against metallicity; applying this calibration yields a continuous, skewed, but single-peaked metallicity distribution. Taken together, these results indicate that nonlinear color-metallicity relations play an important role in shaping the observed bimodal distributions of optical colors in extragalactic GC systems.

  7. DNA-Protected Silver Clusters for Nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Gwinn, Elisabeth; Schultz, Danielle; Copp, Stacy M.; Swasey, Steven

    2015-01-01

    DNA-protected silver clusters (AgN-DNA) possess unique fluorescence properties that depend on the specific DNA template that stabilizes the cluster. They exhibit peak emission wavelengths that range across the visible and near-IR spectrum. This wide color palette, combined with low toxicity, high fluorescence quantum yields of some clusters, low synthesis costs, small cluster sizes and compatibility with DNA are enabling many applications that employ AgN-DNA. Here we review what is known about the underlying composition and structure of AgN-DNA, and how these relate to the optical properties of these fascinating, hybrid biomolecule-metal cluster nanomaterials. We place AgN-DNA in the general context of ligand-stabilized metal clusters and compare their properties to those of other noble metal clusters stabilized by small molecule ligands. The methods used to isolate pure AgN-DNA for analysis of composition and for studies of solution and single-emitter optical properties are discussed. We give a brief overview of structurally sensitive chiroptical studies, both theoretical and experimental, and review experiments on bringing silver clusters of distinct size and color into nanoscale DNA assemblies. Progress towards using DNA scaffolds to assemble multi-cluster arrays is also reviewed.

  8. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine an activation energy for the catalyst-assisted systems.

  9. Characterization and Adhesion in Cu/Ru/SiO2/Si Multilayer Nano-scale Structure for Cu Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, N.; Venkatesh, S. H.; Singh, D. R. P.; Alford, T. L.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we have characterized the microstructure, resistivity, and dynamic deformation behavior of Cu/Ru/SiO2 and Cu/SiO2 samples under scratch loading conditions. Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples showed higher elastic recovery and hardness when compared to the Cu/SiO2 samples. In the case of Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples, Ru acts as a glue layer between the Cu and the SiO2 substrate providing both strength and toughness against dynamic loading. Hence, the critical load for delamination is higher for Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples compared to Cu/SiO2 samples. Our results show that Cu/Ru/SiO2 thin films present significant potential to be used in Cu metallization.

  10. Nanoscale Transformations in Covellite (CuS) Nanocrystals in the Presence of Divalent Metal Cations in a Mild Reducing Environment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We studied the structural and compositional transformations of colloidal covellite (CuS) nanocrystals (and of djurleite (Cu1.94S) nanocrystals as a control) when exposed to divalent cations, as Cd2+ and Hg2+, at room temperature in organic solvents. All the experiments were run in the absence of phosphines, which are a necessary ingredient for cation exchange reactions involving copper chalcogenides, as they strongly bind to the expelled Cu+ ions. Under these experimental conditions, no remarkable reactivity was indeed seen for both CuS and Cu1.94S nanocrystals. On the other hand, in the covellite structure 2/3 of sulfur atoms form covalent S–S bonds. This peculiarity suggests that the combined presence of electron donors and of foreign metal cations can trigger the entry of both electrons and cations in the covellite lattice, causing reorganization of the anion framework due to the rupture of the S–S bonds. In Cu1.94S, which lacks S–S bonds, this mechanism should not be accessible. This hypothesis was proven by the experimental evidence that adding ascorbic acid increased the fraction of metal ions incorporated in the covellite nanocrystals, while it had no noticeable effect on the Cu1.94S ones. Once inside the covellite particles, Cd2+ and Hg2+ cations engaged in exchange reactions, pushing the expelled Cu+ ions toward the not-yet exchanged regions in the same particles, or out to the solution, from where they could be recaptured by other covellite nanoparticles/domains. Because no good solvating agent for Cu ions was present in solution, they essentially remained in the nanocrystals. PMID:26617434

  11. WIYN Open Cluster Study. LXXV. Testing the Metallicity Dependence of Stellar Lithium Depletion Using Hyades-aged Clusters. I. Hyades and Praesepe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Jeffrey D.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Maderak, Ryan M.; Steinhauer, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    WIYN/Hydra spectroscopy (at R ∼ 15,000) of the moderately metal-rich Praesepe and Hyades open clusters was used to study their main-sequence (MS) iron ([Fe/H]) and lithium (A(Li)) abundances. Self-consistent [Fe/H] and Li analyses of these clusters of consistent age, which we re-evaluate, confirms that they have consistent [Fe/H] and provides a foundation to investigate the poorly understood G-dwarf and F-dwarf Li-depletions. Neither phenomenon agrees with standard stellar evolution theory, but possible explanations abound. We supplement our A(Li) with previously published results placed on a uniform abundance scale. This creates the largest self-consistently analyzed sample of A(Li) in both the Hyades (90) and Praesepe (110). For each star, high-precision UBVRI photometry was used to determine a 10-color-based {T}{eff} and then to test for photometric peculiarities indicated by a large {σ }{Teff} (>75 K). The stars that have large {σ }{Teff} were predominantly found to be binaries or stars with peculiar (apparent) A(Li). When considering only proper-motion members that have low {σ }{Teff} and are also photometrically consistent with the cluster MS fiducial, each cluster has a more tightly defined Li morphology than previously observed and the two clusters’ A(Li) are indistinguishable. This suggests that clusters of consistent age and metallicity may have consistent Li-depletion trends across a broad range of {T}{eff}; no additional major parameters are required, at least for these two clusters. We propose that the combined Hyades and Praesepe data offer more rigorous constraints than does either cluster alone, and we discuss newly revealed features of the combined Li–{T}{eff} trend.

  12. Reducing Capsule Based on Electron Programming: Versatile Synthesizer for Size-Controlled Ultra-Small Metal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Tetsuya; Imaoka, Takane; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2016-11-07

    Controlled reducing capsules with a specific number of reducing electrons were achieved by appropriately placed BH3 units in the dendritic polyphenylazomethines (DPAs). Using the 1:1 coordination fashion on their basic branches with radius affinity gradient, the 4th generation DPA (DPAG4) possessing four BH3 units in the central positions was prepared as a template synthesizer for size-controlled ultra-small metal clusters. This was well-demonstrated by reduction of Ag, Pt, and other metal ions resulting in monodispersed ultra-small clusters.

  13. Synthesis and Electrospraying of Nanoscale MOF (Metal Organic Framework) for High-Performance CO2 Adsorption Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahiduzzaman; Allmond, Kelsey; Stone, John; Harp, Spencer; Mujibur, Khan

    2017-01-01

    We report the sonochemical synthesis of MOF (metal organic framework) nanoparticles of 30-200 nm in size and electrospraying of those particles on electrospun nanofibers to process a MOF-attached nanofibrous membrane. This membrane displayed significant selectivity towards CO2 and capacity of adsorbing with 4000-5000 ppm difference from a mixed gas flow of 1% CO2 and 99% N2. Applying ultrasonic waves during the MOF synthesis offered rapid dispersion and formation of crystalline MOF nanoparticles in room temperature. The MOF nanoparticles of 100-200 nm in size displayed higher surface area and adsorption capacity comparing to that of 30-60 nm in size. Nanofibrous membrane was produced by electrospinning of MOF blended PAN solution followed by electrospraying of additional MOF nanoparticles. This yielded uniform MOF deposition on nanofibers, occurred due to electrostatic attraction between highly charged nanoparticles and conductive nanofibers. A test bench for real-time CO2 adsorption at room temperature was built with non-dispersive Infrared (NDIR) CO2 sensors. Comparative tests were performed on the membrane to investigate its enhanced adsorption capacity. Three layers of the as-produced membranes displayed CO2 adsorption for approximately 2 h. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the membrane showed the thermal stability of the MOF and PAN up to 290 and 425 °C, respectively.

  14. Synthesis and Electrospraying of Nanoscale MOF (Metal Organic Framework) for High-Performance CO2 Adsorption Membrane.

    PubMed

    Wahiduzzaman; Allmond, Kelsey; Stone, John; Harp, Spencer; Mujibur, Khan

    2017-12-01

    We report the sonochemical synthesis of MOF (metal organic framework) nanoparticles of 30-200 nm in size and electrospraying of those particles on electrospun nanofibers to process a MOF-attached nanofibrous membrane. This membrane displayed significant selectivity towards CO2 and capacity of adsorbing with 4000-5000 ppm difference from a mixed gas flow of 1% CO2 and 99% N2. Applying ultrasonic waves during the MOF synthesis offered rapid dispersion and formation of crystalline MOF nanoparticles in room temperature. The MOF nanoparticles of 100-200 nm in size displayed higher surface area and adsorption capacity comparing to that of 30-60 nm in size. Nanofibrous membrane was produced by electrospinning of MOF blended PAN solution followed by electrospraying of additional MOF nanoparticles. This yielded uniform MOF deposition on nanofibers, occurred due to electrostatic attraction between highly charged nanoparticles and conductive nanofibers. A test bench for real-time CO2 adsorption at room temperature was built with non-dispersive Infrared (NDIR) CO2 sensors. Comparative tests were performed on the membrane to investigate its enhanced adsorption capacity. Three layers of the as-produced membranes displayed CO2 adsorption for approximately 2 h. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the membrane showed the thermal stability of the MOF and PAN up to 290 and 425 °C, respectively.

  15. Assessment of PM10 and heavy metals concentration in a Ceramic Cluster (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen Vicente, Ana; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teofilo; Bech, Joan

    2013-04-01

    Environmental pollution control is one of the most important goals in pollution risk assessment today. The aim of this study is conducting a retrospective view of the evolution of particulate matter (PM10) and heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni and Pb) at different localities in the Spanish cluster ceramic in the period between January 2007 and December 2011. The study area is in the province of Castellón. This province is a strategical area in the framework of European Union Pollution control. Approximately 80% of European ceramic tiles and ceramic frits manufacturers are concentrated in two areas, forming the so-called "Ceramics Clusters"; one is in Modena (Italy) and the other in Castellón (Spain). In this kind of areas, there are a lot of pollutants from this industry that represent an important contribution to soil contamination so it is necessary to control the air quality in them. These atmospheric particles are deposited in the ground through both dry and wet deposition. Soil is a major sink for heavy metals released into the environment. The level of pollution of soils by heavy metals depends on the retention capacity of the soil, especially on physical-chemical properties (mineralogy, grain size, organic matter) affecting soil particle surfaces and also on the chemical properties of the metal. The most direct consequences on the ground of air pollutants are acidification, salinization and the pollutions that can cause heavy metals as components of suspended particulate matter. For this purpose the levels of PM10 in ambient air and the corresponding annual and weekly trend were calculated. The results of the study show that the PM10 and heavy metals concentrations are below the limit values recommended by European Union Legislation for the protection of human health and ecosystems in the study period. There is an important reduction of them from 2009 in all control stations due to the economic crisis. References Moral, R., Gilkes, R.J., Jordán, M.M., 2005

  16. Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO -- a phenomenon related to defects?

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Zhou, S.; Potzger, K.; Talut, G.; Reuther, H.; Kuepper, K.; Grenzer, J.; Xu, Q.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-03-12

    We investigated ZnO(0001) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction.

  17. Folate-targeted pH-responsive calcium zoledronate nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Turning a bone antiresorptive agent into an anticancer therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Au, Kin Man; Satterlee, Andrew; Min, Yuanzeng; Tian, Xi; Kim, Young Seok; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Huang, Leaf; Wang, Andrew Z

    2016-03-01

    Zoledronate (Zol) is a third-generation bisphosphonate that is widely used as an anti-resorptive agent for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis. While there is preclinical data indicating that bisphosphonates such as Zol have direct cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, such effect has not been firmly established in the clinical setting. This is likely due to the rapid absorption of bisphosphonates by the skeleton after intravenous (i.v.) administration. Herein, we report the reformulation of Zol using nanotechnology and evaluation of this novel nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nMOFs) formulation of Zol as an anticancer agent. The nMOF formulation is comprised of a calcium zoledronate (CaZol) core and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface. To preferentially deliver CaZol nMOFs to tumors as well as facilitate cellular uptake of Zol, we incorporated folate (Fol)-targeted ligands on the nMOFs. The folate receptor (FR) is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types, including head-and-neck, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers. We demonstrated that these targeted CaZol nMOFs possess excellent chemical and colloidal stability in physiological conditions. The release of encapsulated Zol from the nMOFs occurs in the mid-endosomes during nMOF endocytosis. In vitro toxicity studies demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are more efficient than small molecule Zol in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in FR-overexpressing H460 non-small cell lung and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our findings were further validated in vivo using mouse xenograft models of H460 and PC3. We demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are effective anticancer agents and increase the direct antitumor activity of Zol by 80-85% in vivo through inhibition of tumor neovasculature, and inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

  18. Fabrication of Nanoscale Circuits on Inkjet-Printing Patterned Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuoran; Su, Meng; Zhang, Cong; Gao, Meng; Bao, Bin; Yang, Qiang; Su, Bin; Song, Yanlin

    2015-07-08

    Nanoscale circuits are fabricated by assembling different conducting materials (e.g., metal nanoparticles, metal nano-wires, graphene, carbon nanotubes, and conducting polymers) on inkjet-printing patterned substrates. This non-litho-graphy strategy opens a new avenue for integrating conducting building blocks into nanoscale devices in a cost-efficient manner.

  19. Gas-phase catalysis by atomic and cluster metal ions: the ultimate single-site catalysts.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Diethard K; Schwarz, Helmut

    2005-04-15

    Gas-phase experiments with state-of-the-art techniques of mass spectrometry provide detailed insights into numerous elementary processes. The focus of this Review is on elementary reactions of ions that achieve complete catalytic cycles under thermal conditions. The examples chosen cover aspects of catalysis pertinent to areas as diverse as atmospheric chemistry and surface chemistry. We describe how transfer of oxygen atoms, bond activation, and coupling of fragments can be mediated by atomic or cluster metal ions. In some cases truly unexpected analogies of the idealized gas-phase ion catalysis can be drawn with related chemical transformations in solution or the solid state, and so improve our understanding of the intrinsic operation of a practical catalyst at a strictly molecular level.

  20. WIYN Open Cluster Study. LXXII. A uvbyCaHβ CCD Analysis of the Metal-deficient Open Cluster NGC 2506

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Twarog, Bruce A.

    2016-12-01

    Precision uvbyCaHβ photometry of the metal-deficient, old open cluster NGC 2506 is presented. The survey covers an area of 20\\prime × 20\\prime and extends to V˜ 18 for b - y and Hβ and to V˜ 17.0 for c 1 and hk. For V brighter than 16.0, photometric scatter among the indices leads to the recovery of six known variables within the cluster core and five new variables in the outer 5\\prime of the survey field. Proper motions, radial velocities, and precise multicolor indices are used to isolate a highly probable sample of cluster members from the very rich color-magnitude diagram. From 257 highly probable members at the cluster turnoff, we derive a reddening estimate of E(b-y)=0.042+/- 0.001 (E(B-V)=0.058+/- 0.001), where the errors refer to the internal standard errors of the mean. [Fe/H] is derived from the A/F dwarf members using both m 1 and hk, leading to [Fe/H] = -0.296 ± 0.011 (sem) and -0.317 ± 0.004 (sem), respectively. The weighted average, heavily dominated by hk, is [Fe/H] = -0.316 ± 0.033. Based on red giant members, we place an upper limit of ±0.010 on the variation in the reddening across the face of the cluster. We also identify two dozen potential red giant cluster members outside the cluster core. Victoria-Regina isochrones on the Strömgren system produce an excellent match to the cluster for an apparent modulus of (m-M)=12.75+/- 0.1 and an age of 1.85 ± 0.05 Gyr.

  1. Alkali metal-cationized serine clusters studied by sonic spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Sokol, Ewa; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-05-01

    Serine solutions containing salts of alkali metals yield magic number clusters of the type (Ser(4)+C)(+), (Ser(8)+C)(+), (Ser(12)+C)(+), and (Ser(17)+2C)(+2) (where C = Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)), in relative abundances which are strongly dependent on the cation size. Strong selectivity for homochirality is involved in the formation of serine tetramers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). This is also the case for the octamers cationized by the smaller alkalis but there is a strong preference for heterochirality in the octamers cationized by the larger alkali cations. Tandem mass spectrometry shows that the octamers and dodecamers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) dissociate mainly by the loss of Ser(4) units, suggesting that the neutral tetramers are the stable building blocks of the observed larger aggregates, (Ser(8)+C)(+) and (Ser(12)+C)(+). Remarkably, although the Ser(4) units are formed with a strong preference for homochirality, they aggregate further regardless of their handedness and, therefore, with a preference for the nominally racemic 4D:4L structure and an overall strong heterochiral preference. The octamers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+) therefore represent a new type of cluster ion that is homochiral in its internal subunits, which then assemble in a random fashion to form octamers. We tentatively interpret the homochirality of these tetramers as a consequence of assembly of the serine molecules around a central metal ion. The data provide additional evidence that the neutral serine octamer is homochiral and is readily cationized by smaller ions.

  2. Nanoscale 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenders, Ludger; Ducourtieux, Sebastien

    2014-04-01

    The accurate determination of the properties of micro- and nano-structures is essential in research and development. It is also a prerequisite in process control and quality assurance in industry. In most cases, especially at the nanometer range, knowledge of the dimensional properties of structures is the fundamental base, to which further physical properties are linked. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments, suitable measurement procedures as well as calibration artifacts and methods. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2013 seminar held in Paris, France, on 25 and 26 April. It was the 6th Seminar on NanoScale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 10th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais. Three satellite meetings related to nanometrology were coupled to the seminar. The first one was an open Symposium on Scanning Probe Microscopy Standardization organized by the ISO/TC 201/SC9 technical committee. The two others were specific meetings focused on two European Metrology Research Projects funded by the European Association of National Metrology Institutes (EURAMET) (see www.euramet.org), the first one focused on the improvement of the traceability for high accuracy devices dealing with sub-nm length measurement and implementing optical interferometers or capacitive sensors (JRP SIB08 subnano), the second one aiming to develop a new metrological traceability for the measurement of the mechanical properties of nano-objects (JRP NEW05 MechProNo). More than 100 experts from industry, calibration laboratories and metrology institutes from around the world joined the NanoScale 2013 Seminar to attend 23 oral and 64 poster

  3. Equilibrium properties of transition-metal ion-argon clusters via simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asher, Robert L.; Micha, David A.; Brucat, Philip J.

    1992-01-01

    The geometrical structures of M(+) (Ar)n ions, with n = 1-14, have been studied by the minimization of a many-body potential surface with a simulated annealing procedure. The minimization method is justified for finite systems through the use of an information theory approach. It is carried out for eight potential-energy surfaces constructed with two- and three-body terms parametrized from experimental data and ab initio results. The potentials should be representative of clusters of argon atoms with first-row transition-metal monocations of varying size. The calculated geometries for M(+) = Co(+) and V(+) possess radial shells with small (ca. 4-8) first-shell coordination number. The inclusion of an ion-induced-dipole-ion-induced-dipole interaction between argon atoms raises the energy and generally lowers the symmetry of the cluster by promoting incomplete shell closure. Rotational constants as well as electric dipole and quadrupole moments are quoted for the Co(+) (Ar)n and V(+) (Ar)n predicted structures.

  4. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picotto, G. B.; Koenders, L.; Wilkening, G.

    2009-08-01

    Instrumentation and measurement techniques at the nanoscale play a crucial role not only in extending our knowledge of the properties of matter and processes in nanosciences, but also in addressing new measurement needs in process control and quality assurance in industry. Micro- and nanotechnologies are now facing a growing demand for quantitative measurements to support the reliability, safety and competitiveness of products and services. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments and measurement procedures as well as suitable calibration artefacts to ensure the quality of measurements and traceability to standards. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the Nanoscale 2008 seminar held at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Torino, in September 2008. This was the 4th Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 8th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized by the Nanometrology Group within EUROMET (The European Collaboration in Measurement Standards), the German Nanotechnology Competence Centre 'Ultraprecise Surface Figuring' (CC-UPOB), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and INRIM. A special event during the seminar was the 'knighting' of Günter Wilkening from PTB, Braunschweig, Germany, as the 1st Knight of Dimensional Nanometrology. Günter Wilkening received the NanoKnight Award for his outstanding work in the field of dimensional nanometrology over the last 20 years. The contributions in this special issue deal with the developments and improvements of instrumentation and measurement methods for scanning force microscopy (SFM), electron and optical microscopy, high-resolution interferometry, calibration of instruments and new standards, new facilities and applications including critical dimension (CD) measurements on small and medium structures and nanoparticle

  5. An extended basis set {ital ab} {ital initio} study of alkali metal cation--water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.; Glendening, E.D.; Woon, D.E.; Feyereisen, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Ionic clusters comprised of a single alkali metal cation and up to eight water molecules were studied at the Hartree--Fock and correlated levels of theory using the correlation consistent sequence of basis sets. Estimates of the degree of convergence in the computed properties with respect to the complete basis set limit were facilitated by the underlying systematic manner in which the correlation consistent sets approach completeness. In favorable cases, improved property values could be obtained by fitting finite basis set results with a simple analytical expression in order to extrapolate to the complete basis set limit. The sensitivity of structures and binding energies were analyzed with regard to the inclusion of valence and core-valence correlation recovery at the MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory. The replacement of metal core electrons and the introduction of relativistic contributions via effective core potentials was compared to corresponding all-electron results. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. Effects of Carbonyl Bond and Metal Cluster Dissociation and Evaporation Rates on Predictions of Nanotube Production in HiPco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) uses iron pentacarbonyl as the source of iron for catalyzing the Boudouard reaction. Attempts using nickel tetracarbonyl led to no production of SWNTs. This paper discusses simulations at a constant condition of 1300 K and 30 atm in which the chemical rate equations are solved for different reaction schemes. A lumped cluster model is developed to limit the number of species in the models, yet it includes fairly large clusters. Reaction rate coefficients in these schemes are based on bond energies of iron and nickel species and on estimates of chemical rates for formation of SWNTs. SWNT growth is measured by the co-formation of CO2. It is shown that the production of CO2 is significantly greater for FeCO due to its lower bond energy as compared with that ofNiCO. It is also shown that the dissociation and evaporation rates of atoms from small metal clusters have a significant effect on CO2 production. A high rate of evaporation leads to a smaller number of metal clusters available to catalyze the Boudouard reaction. This suggests that if CO reacts with metal clusters and removes atoms from them by forming MeCO, this has the effect of enhancing the evaporation rate and reducing SWNT production. The study also investigates some other reactions in the model that have a less dramatic influence.

  7. A new family of Ln₇ clusters with an ideal D(3h) metal-centered trigonal prismatic geometry, and SMM and photoluminescence behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mazarakioti, Eleni C; Poole, Katye M; Cunha-Silva, Luis; Christou, George; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2014-08-14

    The first use of the flexible Schiff base ligand N-salicylidene-2-aminocyclohexanol in metal cluster chemistry has afforded a new family of Ln7 clusters with ideal D(3h) point group symmetry and metal-centered trigonal prismatic topology; solid-state and solution studies revealed SMM and photoluminescence behaviors.

  8. New Insights in Catalytic Sites: Characterization of Spectroscopy and Reactivity of Metal Oxide Clusters with Anion Slow Electron Velocity-Map Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-08

    in heterogeneous catalysts , many of which comprise complex transition metal oxides. Size-selected transition metal oxide clusters can serve as...tractable model systems for the analogous bulk catalyst . This research program has focused on developing novel spectroscopic probes of such clusters...materials, with extensive applications as catalysts , catalyst supports, photocatalysts, dielectric materials, and corrosion resistant materials

  9. The Development of a Model for Estimating the Costs Associated with the Delivery of a Metals Cluster Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Charles R.

    A study developed a model to assist school administrators to estimate costs associated with the delivery of a metals cluster program at Norfolk State College, Virginia. It sought to construct the model so that costs could be explained as a function of enrollment levels. Data were collected through a literature review, computer searches of the…

  10. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  11. Unusual structures and reactivity of mixed metal cluster complexes containing the palladium/platinum tri-t-butylphosphine grouping.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Captain, Burjor

    2009-03-17

    Polynuclear metal carbonyl complexes have a range of applications in chemical research: for example, they can serve as surface models to probe features of heterogeneous catalysis and can perform novel transformations of organic molecules in solutions. Mixed metal complexes can demonstrate bimetallic cooperativity and synergism and can also serve as precursors to multimetallic heterogeneous catalysts that have superior activities and selectivities. This Account describes the results of our recent comprehensive study of the chemistry of mixed metal cluster complexes containing the sterically encumbered M(PBu(t)(3)), M = Pd or Pt, group. This grouping readily adds to the metal-metal bonds of metal carbonyl cluster complexes and modifies their reactivity. We have prepared new, highly electronically unsaturated mixed metal complexes that exhibit unusually high reactivity toward hydrogen. The platinum atom of the Pt(PBu(t)(3)) grouping can bond to as many as five metal atoms, and it can interconvert, sometimes rapidly, between the different bonding modes. The large steric effects of the PBu(t)(3) ligand allowed us to prepare highly unsaturated, stable, mixed-metal complexes, and these complexes react with hydrogen, sometimes reversibly, under very mild conditions to yield polyhydride complexes. Strong evidence suggests that the Pt(PBu(t)(3)) group can also activate metal-hydrogen bonds in other complexes. In the future, we expect that researchers will prepare a greater variety of mixed metal complexes containing the Pd/Pt(PBu(t)(3)) group or other similar bulky groups, and that some of these complexes will exhibit even more unusual chemistry than what we have observed so far.

  12. Exciton-plasmon interaction in hybrid quantum dot/metal cluster structures fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyamkina, A. A.; Moshchenko, S. P.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Toropov, A. I.; Shamirzaev, T. S.

    2014-04-01

    Hybrid structures consisting of InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots and In clusters on the surface separated by an AlGaAs spacer with a specified thickness are investigated. The enhancement of the photoluminescence signal in the long-wavelength region manifesting itself in the appearance of a new narrow emission line is observed. This line is absent in the control structure with a quantum-dot array and no metal clusters. It also disappears with increasing thickness of the dielectric spacer between the layers. These results are explained in terms of a model taking into account the resonance interaction of excitons in quantum dots with localized surface plasmons in metal clusters.

  13. UB CCD Photometry of the Old, Metal-rich, Open Clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 7142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.; Buzzoni, A.; Bertone, E.; Buson, L.

    2013-11-01

    We report on a UV-oriented imaging survey in the fields of the old, metal-rich open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 7142. With their super-solar metallicity and ages >~ 3-8 Gyr, these three clusters represent both very near and ideal stellar aggregates to match the distinctive properties of the evolved stellar populations, as in elliptical galaxies and bulges of spirals. Following a first discussion of NGC 6791 observations in an accompanying paper, here we complete our analysis, also presenting for NGC 6819 and NGC 7142 the first-ever U CCD photometry. The color-magnitude diagram of the three clusters is analyzed in detail, with special emphasis on the hot stellar component. We report, in this regard, one new extreme horizontal-branch star candidate in NGC 6791. For NGC 6819 and 7142, the stellar luminosity function clearly points to a looser radial distribution of faint lower main sequence stars, either as a consequence of cluster dynamical interaction with the Galaxy or as an effect of an increasing fraction of binary stars toward the cluster core, as also observed in NGC 6791. Compared to a reference theoretical model for the Galaxy disk, the analysis of the stellar field along the line of sight of each cluster indicates that a more centrally concentrated thick disk, on a scale length shorter than ~2.8 kpc, might better reconcile the lower observed fraction of bright field stars and their white-dwarf progeny.

  14. UB CCD PHOTOMETRY OF THE OLD, METAL-RICH, OPEN CLUSTERS NGC 6791, NGC 6819, AND NGC 7142

    SciTech Connect

    Carraro, G.; Buzzoni, A.; Bertone, E.; Buson, L. E-mail: alberto.buzzoni@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: lucio.buson@oapd.inaf.it

    2013-11-01

    We report on a UV-oriented imaging survey in the fields of the old, metal-rich open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 7142. With their super-solar metallicity and ages ∼> 3-8 Gyr, these three clusters represent both very near and ideal stellar aggregates to match the distinctive properties of the evolved stellar populations, as in elliptical galaxies and bulges of spirals. Following a first discussion of NGC 6791 observations in an accompanying paper, here we complete our analysis, also presenting for NGC 6819 and NGC 7142 the first-ever U CCD photometry. The color-magnitude diagram of the three clusters is analyzed in detail, with special emphasis on the hot stellar component. We report, in this regard, one new extreme horizontal-branch star candidate in NGC 6791. For NGC 6819 and 7142, the stellar luminosity function clearly points to a looser radial distribution of faint lower main sequence stars, either as a consequence of cluster dynamical interaction with the Galaxy or as an effect of an increasing fraction of binary stars toward the cluster core, as also observed in NGC 6791. Compared to a reference theoretical model for the Galaxy disk, the analysis of the stellar field along the line of sight of each cluster indicates that a more centrally concentrated thick disk, on a scale length shorter than ∼2.8 kpc, might better reconcile the lower observed fraction of bright field stars and their white-dwarf progeny.

  15. A Wide-Field Photometric Survey for Extratidal Tails Around Five Metal-Poor Globular Clusters in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Park, Jang-Hyun; Han, Wonyong; Kim, Ho-Il; Lee, Young-Wook; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Sang-Gak; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2010-02-01

    Wide-field deep g'r'i' images obtained with the Megacam of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the spatial configuration of stars around five metal-poor globular clusters M15, M30, M53, NGC 5053, and NGC 5466, in a field-of-view ~3°. Applying a mask filtering algorithm to the color-magnitude diagrams of the observed stars, we sorted cluster's member star candidates that are used to examine the characteristics of the spatial stellar distribution surrounding the target clusters. The smoothed surface density maps and the overlaid isodensity contours indicate that all of the five metal-poor globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of extratidal overdensity features over their tidal radii, in the form of extended tidal tails around the clusters. The orientations of the observed extratidal features show signatures of tidal tails tracing the clusters' orbits, inferred from their proper motions, and effects of dynamical interactions with the Galaxy. Our findings include detections of a tidal bridge-like feature and an envelope structure around the pair of globular clusters M53 and NGC 5053. The observed radial surface density profiles of target clusters have a deviation from theoretical King models, for which the profiles show a break at 0.5-0.7rt , extending the overdensity features out to 1.5-2rt . Both radial surface density profiles for different angular sections and azimuthal number density profiles confirm the overdensity features of tidal tails around the five metal-poor globular clusters. Our results add further observational evidence that the observed metal-poor halo globular clusters originate from an accreted satellite system, indicative of the merging scenario of the formation of the Galactic halo. Based on observations carried out at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique de France, and the University of Hawaii. This is part of the

  16. Carbonyl substitution chemistry of some trimetallic transition metal cluster complexes with polyfunctional ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Lindsay T.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Skelton, Brian W.; Torabi, A. Asgar; White, Allan H.; Wild, S. Bruce

    2008-11-03

    The trimetallic clusters [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppm)], [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] and [RuCo{sub 2}(CO){sub 11}] react with a number of multifunctional secondary phosphine and tertiary arsine ligands to give products consequent on carbonyl substitution and, in the case of the secondary phosphines, PH activation. The reaction with the unresolved mixed P/S donor, 1-phenylphosphino-2-thio(ethane), HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PHPh ({double_bond}LH{sub 2}), gave two products under various conditions which have been characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic means. These two complexes [Ru{sub 3}({mu}dppm)(H)(CO){sub 7}(LH)] and [Ru{sub 3}({mu}-dppm)(H)(CO){sub 8}(LH)Ru{sub 3}({mu}-dppm)(CO){sub 9}], show the versatility of the ligand, with it chelating in the former and bridging two Ru{sub 3} units in the latter. The stereogenic centres in the molecules gave rise to complicated spectroscopic data which are consistent with the presence of diastereoisomers. In the case of [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] the reaction with LH{sub 2} gave a poor yield of a tetranuclear butterfly cluster, [Ru{sub 4}(CO){sub 10}(L){sub 2}], in which two of the ligands bridge opposite hinge wingtip bonds of the cluster. A related ligand, HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}AsMe(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}OMe), reacted with [RuCo{sub 2}(CO){sub 11}] to give a low yield of the heterobimetallic Ru-Co adduct, [RuCo(CO){sub 6}(SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}AsMe(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}OMe))], which appears to be the only one of its type so far structurally characterized. The secondary phosphine, HPMe(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH{sub 2}OMe)) and its oxide HP(O)Me(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH{sub 2}OMe)) also react with the cluster [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppm)] to give carbonyl substitution products, [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 5}(dppm)({mu}{sub 2}-PMe(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}OMe)){sub 4}], and [Ru{sub 3}H(CO){sub 7}(dppm)({mu}{sub 2},{eta}{sup 1}P({double_bond}O)Me(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}OMe))]. The former consists of an open Ru{sub 3} triangle with four

  17. The extreme chemistry of multiple stellar populations in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4833

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Gratton, R. G.; D'Orazi, V.; Lucatello, S.; Momany, Y.; Sollima, A.; Bellazzini, M.; Catanzaro, G.; Leone, F.

    2014-04-01

    Our FLAMES survey of Na-O anticorrelation in globular clusters (GCs) is extended to NGC 4833, a metal-poor GC with a long blue tail on the horizontal branch (HB). We present the abundance analysis for a large sample of 78 red giants based on UVES and GIRAFFE spectra acquired at the ESO-VLT. We derived abundances of Na, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Ba, La, and Nd. This is the first extensive study of this cluster from high resolution spectroscopy. On the scale of our survey, the metallicity of NGC 4833 is [Fe/H] = -2.015 ± 0.004 ± 0.084 dex (rms = 0.014 dex) from 12 stars observed with UVES, where the first error is from statistics and the second one refers to the systematic effects. The iron abundance in NGC 4833 is homogeneous at better than 6%. On the other hand, the light elements involved in proton-capture reactions at high temperature show the large star-to-star variations observed in almost all GCs studied so far. The Na-O anticorrelation in NGC 4833 is quite extended, as expected from the high temperatures reached by stars on the HB, and NGC 4833 contains a conspicuous fraction of stars with extreme [O/Na] ratios. More striking is the finding that large star-to-star variations are also seen for Mg, which spans a range of more than 0.5 dex in this GC. Depletions in Mg are correlated to the abundances of O and anti-correlated with Na, Al, and Si abundances. This pattern suggests the action of nuclear processing at unusually high temperatures, producing the extreme chemistry observed in the stellar generations of NGC 4833. These extreme changes are also seen in giants of the much more massive GCs M 54 and ω Cen, and our conclusion is that NGC 4833 has probably lost a conspicuous fraction of its original mass due to bulge shocking, as also indicated by its orbit. Based on observations collected at ESO telescopes under programmes 083.D-0208 and 68.D-0265.Full Tables 2, 6-11 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  18. A study into the role of surface capping on energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Dipankar; Paramanik, Bipattaran; Sadhu, Suparna; Patra, Amitava

    2015-12-01

    Metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposite materials remain a frontier area of research for the development of optoelectronic, photovoltaic and light harvesting devices because metal nanoclusters and semiconductor QDs are promising candidates for photon harvesting. Here, we have designed well defined metal cluster-semiconductor nanostructures using different surface capped negatively charged Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) and positively charged cysteamine capped CdTe quantum dots using electrostatic interactions. The main focus of this article is to address the impact of surface capping agents on the photophysical properties of Au cluster-CdTe QD hybrid nanocomposites. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic studies reveal that photoluminescence quenching, radiative and nonradiative rate, and energy transfer between Au nanoclusters and CdTe QDs have been influenced by the nature of the capping agent. We have calculated the energy transfer related parameters such as the overlap integral, distance between donor and acceptor, Förster distance, efficiency of energy transfer and rate of energy transfer from CdTe QDs to three different Au NCs. Photoluminescence quenching varies from 73% to 43% when changing the capping agents from bovine serum albumin (BSA) to glutathione (GSH). The efficiency of the energy transfer from CdTe QDs to BSA-capped Au NCs is found to be 83%, for Cys-capped Au NCs it was 46% and for GSH-capped Au NCs it was 35%. The efficiency depends on the number of Au clusters attached per QD. This reveals that the nature of capping ligands plays a crucial role in the energy transfer phenomena from CdTe QDs to Au NCs. Interesting findings reveal that the efficient energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.Metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposite materials remain a frontier area of research for the development of optoelectronic

  19. Selective electrodesorption based atomic layer deposition (SEBALD): a novel electrochemical route to deposit metal clusters on Ag(111).

    PubMed

    Innocenti, M; Bellandi, S; Lastraioli, E; Loglio, F; Foresti, M L

    2011-09-20

    The possibility of synergic effects of some metals on the catalytic activity of silver led us to study the way to perform controlled deposition on silver. In fact, many metals of technological interest such as Co, Ni, and Fe cannot be deposited at underpotential on silver, and any attempt to control the deposition at overpotential, even at potentials slightly negative of the Nernst value, did not allow an effective control. However, due to the favorable energy gain involved in the formation of the corresponding sulfides, these metals can be deposited at underpotential on sulfur covered silver. The deposition is surface limited and the successive electrodesorption of sulfur leaves confined clusters of metals. The method can also be used to obtain metal clusters of different size. In fact, the alternate underpotential deposition of elements that form a compound is the basis of the electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (ECALE), and the reiteration of the basic cycle allows us to obtain sulfide deposits whose thickness increases with the number of cycles. Therefore, the successive selective desorption of sulfur leaves increasing amounts of metals.

  20. Robust MOFs of 'tsg' Topology Based on Trigonal Prismatic Organic and Metal Cluster SBUs: Single Crystal-to-Single Crystal Postsynthetic Metal Exchange and Selective CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Narasimha Jarugu; Chandrasekhar, Pujari; Savitha, Govardhan

    2017-04-03

    The self-assembly of a rigid and trigonal prismatic triptycene-hexaacid H6THA with Co(NO3)2 and Mn(NO3)2 leads to isostructural MOFs that are sustained by 6-c metal cluster [M3(μ3-O)(COO)6] SBUs. The Co- and Mn-MOFs, constructed from organic and metal-cluster building blocks that are both trigonal prismatic, correspond to the heretofore unknown 'tsg' topology. Due to the rigidity and concave attributes of H6THA, the networks in Co- and Mn-MOFs are highly porous and undergo 3-fold interpenetration. The interpenetration imparts permanent microporosity and high thermal stability to the MOFs to permit postsynthetic metal exchange (PSME) and gas sorption. The PSME occurs in a SC-SC fashion when the crystals of Co- and Mn-MOFs are immersed in a solution of Cu(NO3)2 in MeOH/H2O. Further, the isostructural robust MOFs exhibit significant gas sorption and remarkable selectivity for CO2 over N2 (ca. 100 fold) at ambient conditions. In fact, the postsynthetically-engineered Cu-THA exhibits better CO2 sorption than Co-THA and Mn-THA. A composite of effects that include pore dimensions (ca. 0.7 nm), unsaturated metal centers and basic environments conferred by the quinoxaline nitrogen atoms appears to be responsible for the observed high CO2 capture and selectivity. The high-symmetry and structural attributes of the organic linker seemingly dictate adoption of the trigonal-prismatic metal cluster SBU by the metal ions in the MOFs.

  1. Novel linear transition metal clusters of a heptadentate bis-beta-diketone ligand.

    PubMed

    Aromí, Guillem; Gamez, Patrick; Krzystek, J; Kooijman, Huub; Spek, Anthony L; MacLean, Elizabeth J; Teat, Simon J; Nowell, Harriott

    2007-04-02

    The synthesis and the structure of the new potentially heptadentate ligand 1,3-bis-(3-oxo-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-propionyl)-2-methoxybenzene (H5L) is described. The reaction in pyridine or DMF of this ligand with various M(AcO)2 salts (M = NiII, CoII, MnII) leads to very different products depending on the metal. Thus, the dinuclear complexes [M2(H3L)2(py)4] (M = NiII, 1; CoII, 2) or the linear zigzag tetranuclear clusters [Mn4(H2L)2(AcO)2(py)5] (3) and [Mn4(H2L)2(AcO)2(dmf)4] (4) have been synthesized and characterized crystallographically. Slow oxidation of complex 3 leads to the formation of the novel mixed-valence linear complex [Mn3(HL)2(py)6] (5), displaying an unprecedented asymmetric MnIIIMnIIIMnII topology. The coordination geometry of complexes 1 to 5 has been analyzed and discussed by means of continuous shape measures. Magnetic measurements of 3 and 5 demonstrate that the metals within these complexes weakly interact magnetically with coupling constants of J1 = -1.13 cm-1 and J2 = -0.43 cm-1 (S = 0) for complex 3 and J1 = -5.4 cm-1 and J2 = -0.4 cm-1 (S = 5/2) for complex 5 (using the H = -Sigma2JijSiSj convention). These results are consistent with X-band EPR measurements on these compounds.

  2. First-principles simulation of light propagation and exciton dynamics in metal cluster nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisinetskaya, Polina G.; Röhr, Merle I. S.; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical approach for the simulation of the electric field and exciton propagation in ordered arrays constructed of molecular-sized noble metal clusters bound to organic polymer templates. In order to describe the electronic coupling between individual constituents of the nanostructure we use the ab initio parameterized transition charge method which is more accurate than the usual dipole-dipole coupling. The electronic population dynamics in the nanostructure under an external laser pulse excitation is simulated by numerical integration of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation employing the fully coupled Hamiltonian. The solution of the TDSE gives rise to time-dependent partial point charges for each subunit of the nanostructure, and the spatio-temporal electric field distribution is evaluated by means of classical electrodynamics methods. The time-dependent partial charges are determined based on the stationary partial and transition charges obtained in the framework of the TDDFT. In order to treat large plasmonic nanostructures constructed of many constituents, the approximate self-consistent iterative approach presented in (Lisinetskaya and Mitrić in Phys Rev B 89:035433, 2014) is modified to include the transition-charge-based interaction. The developed methods are used to study the optical response and exciton dynamics of Ag3+ and porphyrin-Ag4 dimers. Subsequently, the spatio-temporal electric field distribution in a ring constructed of ten porphyrin-Ag4 subunits under the action of circularly polarized laser pulse is simulated. The presented methodology provides a theoretical basis for the investigation of coupled light-exciton propagation in nanoarchitectures built from molecular size metal nanoclusters in which quantum confinement effects are important.

  3. A Differential Chemical Element Analysis of the Metal-poor Globular Cluster NGC 6397

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; McWilliam, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    We present chemical abundances in three red giants and two turnoff (TO) stars in the metal-poor Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6397 based on spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle high-resolution spectrograph on the Magellan 6.5 m Clay telescope. Our results are based on a line-by-line differential abundance analysis relative to the well-studied red giant Arcturus and the Galactic halo field star Hip 66815. At a mean of -2.10 ± 0.02 (stat.) ±0.07 (sys.), the differential iron abundance is in good agreement with other studies in the literature based on gf-values. As in previous differential works we find a distinct departure from ionization equilibrium in that the abundances of Fe I and Fe II differ by ~0.1 dex, with opposite signs for the red giant branch (RGB) and TO stars. The α-element ratios are enhanced to 0.4 (RGB) and 0.3 dex (TO), respectively, and we also confirm strong variations in the O, Na, and Al/Fe abundance ratios. Accordingly, the light-element abundance patterns in one of the red giants can be attributed to pollution by an early generation of massive Type II supernovae. TO and RGB abundances are not significantly different, with the possible exception of Mg and Ti, which are, however, amplified by the patterns in one TO star additionally belonging to this early generation of GC stars. We discuss interrelations of these light elements as a function of the GC metallicity. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  4. A DIFFERENTIAL CHEMICAL ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THE METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6397

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; McWilliam, Andrew E-mail: andy@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2011-08-15

    We present chemical abundances in three red giants and two turnoff (TO) stars in the metal-poor Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6397 based on spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle high-resolution spectrograph on the Magellan 6.5 m Clay telescope. Our results are based on a line-by-line differential abundance analysis relative to the well-studied red giant Arcturus and the Galactic halo field star Hip 66815. At a mean of -2.10 {+-} 0.02 (stat.) {+-}0.07 (sys.), the differential iron abundance is in good agreement with other studies in the literature based on gf-values. As in previous differential works we find a distinct departure from ionization equilibrium in that the abundances of Fe I and Fe II differ by {approx}0.1 dex, with opposite signs for the red giant branch (RGB) and TO stars. The {alpha}-element ratios are enhanced to 0.4 (RGB) and 0.3 dex (TO), respectively, and we also confirm strong variations in the O, Na, and Al/Fe abundance ratios. Accordingly, the light-element abundance patterns in one of the red giants can be attributed to pollution by an early generation of massive Type II supernovae. TO and RGB abundances are not significantly different, with the possible exception of Mg and Ti, which are, however, amplified by the patterns in one TO star additionally belonging to this early generation of GC stars. We discuss interrelations of these light elements as a function of the GC metallicity.

  5. Nature of the interaction between rare gas atoms and transition metal doped silicon clusters: the role of shielding effects.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Vu Thi; Janssens, Ewald; Claes, Pieterjan; Fielicke, André; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Lievens, Peter

    2015-07-21

    Mass spectrometry experiments show an exceptionally weak bonding between Si7Mn(+) and rare gas atoms as compared to other exohedrally transition metal (TM) doped silicon clusters and other SinMn(+) (n = 5-10) sizes. The Si7Mn(+) cluster does not form Ar complexes and the observed fraction of Xe complexes is low. The interaction of two cluster series, SinMn(+) (n = 6-10) and Si7TM(+) (TM = Cr, Mn, Cu, and Zn), with Ar and Xe is investigated by density functional theory calculations. The cluster-rare gas binding is for all clusters, except Si7Mn(+) and Si7Zn(+), predominantly driven by short-range interaction between the TM dopant and the rare gas atoms. A high s-character electron density on the metal atoms in Si7Mn(+) and Si7Zn(+) shields the polarization toward the rare gas atoms and thereby hinders formation of short-range complexes. Overall, both Ar and Xe complexes are similar except that the larger polarizability of Xe leads to larger binding energies.

  6. A study into the role of surface capping on energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Bain, Dipankar; Paramanik, Bipattaran; Sadhu, Suparna; Patra, Amitava

    2015-12-28

    Metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposite materials remain a frontier area of research for the development of optoelectronic, photovoltaic and light harvesting devices because metal nanoclusters and semiconductor QDs are promising candidates for photon harvesting. Here, we have designed well defined metal cluster-semiconductor nanostructures using different surface capped negatively charged Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) and positively charged cysteamine capped CdTe quantum dots using electrostatic interactions. The main focus of this article is to address the impact of surface capping agents on the photophysical properties of Au cluster-CdTe QD hybrid nanocomposites. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic studies reveal that photoluminescence quenching, radiative and nonradiative rate, and energy transfer between Au nanoclusters and CdTe QDs have been influenced by the nature of the capping agent. We have calculated the energy transfer related parameters such as the overlap integral, distance between donor and acceptor, Förster distance, efficiency of energy transfer and rate of energy transfer from CdTe QDs to three different Au NCs. Photoluminescence quenching varies from 73% to 43% when changing the capping agents from bovine serum albumin (BSA) to glutathione (GSH). The efficiency of the energy transfer from CdTe QDs to BSA-capped Au NCs is found to be 83%, for Cys-capped Au NCs it was 46% and for GSH-capped Au NCs it was 35%. The efficiency depends on the number of Au clusters attached per QD. This reveals that the nature of capping ligands plays a crucial role in the energy transfer phenomena from CdTe QDs to Au NCs. Interesting findings reveal that the efficient energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.

  7. Mass-loss on the red giant branch: the value and metallicity dependence of Reimers' η in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    The impact of metallicity on the mass-loss rate from red giant branch (RGB) stars is studied through its effect on the parameters of horizontal branch (HB) stars. The scaling factors from Reimers and Schröder and Cuntz are used to measure the efficiency of RGB mass-loss for typical stars in 56 well-studied Galactic globular clusters (GCs). The median values among clusters are, respectively, η _R = 0.477 ± 0.070 ^{+0.050}_{-0.062} and η _SC = 0.172 ± 0.024 ^{+0.018}_{-0.023} (standard deviation and systematic uncertainties, respectively). Over a factor of 200 in iron abundance, η varies by ≲30 per cent, thus mass-loss mechanisms on the RGB have very little metallicity dependence. Any remaining dependence is within the current systematic uncertainties on cluster ages and evolution models. The low standard deviation of η among clusters (≈14 per cent) contrasts with the variety of HB morphologies. Since η incorporates cluster age, this suggests that age accounts for the majority of the `second parameter problem', and that a Reimers-like law provides a good mass-loss model. The remaining spread in η correlates with cluster mass and density, suggesting helium enrichment provides the third parameter explaining HB morphology of GCs. We close by discussing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) mass-loss, finding that the AGB tip luminosity is better reproduced and η has less metallicity dependence if GCs are more co-eval than generally thought.

  8. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan Balasubramanian

    2009-07-18

    methods with all-electron Douglas-Kroll relativistic methods. We have the capabilities for computing full CI extrapolations including spin-orbit effects and several one-electron properties and electron density maps including spin-orbit effects. We are continuously collaborating with several experimental groups around the country and at National Labs to carry out computational studies on the DOE-BES funded projects. The past work in the last 3 years was primarily motivated and driven by the concurrent or recent experimental studies on these systems. We were thus significantly benefited by coordinating our computational efforts with experimental studies. The interaction between theory and experiment has resulted in some unique and exciting opportunities. For example, for the very first time ever, the upper spin-orbit component of a heavy trimer such as Au{sub 3} was experimentally observed as a result of our accurate computational study on the upper electronic states of gold trimer. Likewise for the first time AuH{sub 2} could be observed and interpreted clearly due to our computed potential energy surfaces that revealed the existence of a large barrier to convert the isolated AuH{sub 2} back to Au and H{sub 2}. We have also worked on yet to be observed systems and have made predictions for future experiments. We have computed the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal carbides transition metal clusters and compared our electronic states to the anion photodetachment spectra of Lai Sheng Wang. Prof Mike Morse and coworkers(funded also by DOE-BES) and Prof Stimle and coworkers(also funded by DOE-BES) are working on the spectroscopic properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides. Our predictions on the excited states of transition metal clusters such as Hf{sub 3}, Nb{sub 2}{sup +} etc., have been confirmed experimentally by Prof. Lombardi and coworkers using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have also been studying larger complexes critical to the

  9. THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN THE CONTEXT OF NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICTY RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, John P.; Cantiello, Michele; Peng, Eric W.

    2010-02-10

    Two recent empirical developments in the study of extragalactic globular cluster (GC) populations are the color-magnitude relation of the blue GCs (the 'blue tilt') and the nonlinearity of the dependence of optical GC colors on metallicity. The color-magnitude relation, interpreted as a mass-metallicity relation, is thought to be a consequence of self-enrichment. Nonlinear color-metallicity relations have been shown to produce bimodal color distributions from unimodal metallicity distributions. We simulate GC populations including both a mass-metallicity scaling relation and nonlinear color-metallicity relations motivated by theory and observations. Depending on the assumed range of metallicities and the width of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we find that the simulated populations can have bimodal color distributions with a 'blue tilt' similar to observations, even though the metallicity distribution appears unimodal. The models that produce these features have the relatively high mean GC metallicities and nearly equal blue and red peaks characteristic of giant elliptical galaxies. The blue tilt is less apparent in the models with metallicities typical of dwarf ellipticals; the narrower GCLF in these galaxies has an even bigger effect in reducing the significance of their color-magnitude slopes. We critically examine the evidence for nonlinearity versus bimodal metallicities as explanations for the characteristic double-peaked color histograms of giant ellipticals and conclude that the question remains open. We discuss the prospects for further theoretical and observational progress in constraining the models presented here and for uncovering the true metallicity distributions of extragalactic GC systems.

  10. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T.

    2013-11-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution.Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster

  11. FORMATION OF METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James

    2012-09-20

    The size, mass, luminosity, and space density of Ly{alpha} emitting (LAE) galaxies observed at intermediate to high redshift agree with expectations for the properties of galaxies that formed metal-poor halo globular clusters (GCs). The low metallicity of these clusters is the result of their formation in low-mass galaxies. Metal-poor GCs could enter spiral galaxies along with their dwarf galaxy hosts, unlike metal-rich GCs, which form in the spirals themselves. Considering an initial GC mass larger than the current mass to account for multiple stellar populations, and considering the additional clusters that are likely to form with massive clusters, we estimate that each GC with a mass today greater than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} was likely to have formed among a total stellar mass {approx}> 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, a molecular mass {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, and 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} of older stars, depending on the relative gas fraction. The star formation rate would have been several M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} lasting for {approx}10{sup 7} yr, and the Ly{alpha} luminosity would have been {approx}> 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. Integrating the LAE galaxy luminosity function above this minimum, considering the average escape probability for Ly{alpha} photons (25%), and then dividing by the probability that a dwarf galaxy is observed in the LAE phase (0.4%), we find agreement between the comoving space density of LAEs and the average space density of metal-poor GCs today. The local galaxy WLM, with its early starburst and old GC, could be an LAE remnant that did not get into a galaxy halo because of its remote location.

  12. Variable stars in metal-rich globular clusters. IV. Long-period variables in NGC 6496

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Mohamad A.; Layden, Andrew C.; Guldenschuh, Katherine A.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; Nysewander, M. C.; LaCluyze, A. P.; Welch, Douglas L. E-mail: laydena@bgsu.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present VI-band photometry for stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6496. Our time-series data were cadenced to search for long-period variables (LPVs) over a span of nearly two years, and our variability search yielded the discovery of 13 new variable stars, of which 6 are LPVs, 2 are suspected LPVs, and 5 are short-period eclipsing binaries. An additional star was found in the ASAS database, and we clarify its type and period. We argue that all of the eclipsing binaries are field stars, while five to six of the LPVs are members of NGC 6496. We compare the period–luminosity distribution of these LPVs with those of LPVs in the Large Magellanic Cloud and 47 Tucanae, and with theoretical pulsation models. We also present a VI color–magnitude diagram, display the evolutionary states of the variables, and match isochrones to determine a reddening of E(B−V)= 0.21±0.02 mag and apparent distance modulus of 15.60±0.15 mag.

  13. Tribological coatings for complex mechanical elements produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of metal dichalcogenide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzoni, C.; Buttery, M.; Hampson, M. R.; Roberts, E. W.; Ducati, C.; Lenardi, C.; Cavaliere, F.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2015-07-01

    Fullerene-like MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of fluid and solid lubricants. Metal dichalcogenide films have a very low friction coefficient in vacuum, therefore they have mostly been used as solid lubricants in space and vacuum applications. Unfortunately, their use is significantly hampered by the fact that in the presence of humidity, oxygen and moisture, the low-friction properties of these materials rapidly degrade due to oxidation. The use of closed-cage MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles may eliminate this problem, although the fabrication of lubricant thin films starting from dichalcogenide nanoparticles is, to date, a difficult task. Here we demonstrate the use of supersonic cluster beam deposition for the coating of complex mechanical elements (angular contact ball bearings) with nanostructured MoS2 and WS2 thin films. We report structural and tribological characterization of the coatings in view of the optimization of tribological performances for aerospace applications.

  14. Effects of charging and tunnelling in a structure based on magic and non-magic metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Pogosov, V V; Vasyutin, E V

    2006-07-28

    The effects of charging and single-electron tunnelling in a metal cluster structure are investigated theoretically. In the framework of the particle-in-a-box model for spherical and disc-shaped gold clusters, the electron spectrum and the temperature dependence of the electron chemical potential are calculated. The difference between the electron chemical potentials of massive electrodes and islands leads to the noticeable charging of the electrode. We show that the effective residual charge is equal to the non-integer value of the elementary charge e and depends on the shape of the cluster. The equations for the analysis of the current-voltage characteristic are used under the conditions of conservation of the total energy of the structure, taking into account the contact potential difference. Restrictions associated with the Coulomb instability of a cluster are introduced into the theory in a simple way. It is shown that the critical charge of the cluster in an open electron system is close to the effective residual charge. For single-electron molecular transistors based on small gold clusters the current gap and its voltage asymmetry are computed. We demonstrate that the current gap exhibits non-monotonic size dependences which are related to the quantization of the electron spectrum and the Coulomb blockade.

  15. Computer simulation structure and vibrations of small metal cluster on the Cu (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Svetlana D.; Rusina, Galina G.

    2015-10-01

    Vibrational properties of the small tetrahedral cluster of Co on the Cu (111) surface are studied by using tight-binding second moment approximation interatomic interaction potentials. It was shown that interaction of the clusters with substrate leads to arising of frustrated translation and frustrated rotation in-plane polarized vibrational modes localized on the cluster atoms. The Co4 cluster on the surface the high frequency modes remain strongly localized and mixed with the nearest neighbor atoms vibrations.

  16. Computer simulation structure and vibrations of small metal cluster on the Cu (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, Svetlana D. Rusina, Galina G.

    2015-10-27

    Vibrational properties of the small tetrahedral cluster of Co on the Cu (111) surface are studied by using tight-binding second moment approximation interatomic interaction potentials. It was shown that interaction of the clusters with substrate leads to arising of frustrated translation and frustrated rotation in-plane polarized vibrational modes localized on the cluster atoms. The Co{sub 4} cluster on the surface the high frequency modes remain strongly localized and mixed with the nearest neighbor atoms vibrations.

  17. Influence of 3 d metal atoms on the geometry, electronic structure, and stability of a Mg13H26 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelyapina, M. G.; Siretskiy, M. Yu.

    2010-09-01

    This paper reports on the results of the theoretical investigation of magnesium hydride nanoclusters doped with 3 d metals (from Sc to Zn). The influence of transition metal atoms on the geometry, electronic structure, and energy characteristics of the clusters has been analyzed. The results of the performed calculations have been compared with the available experimental data. This comparison has made it possible to predict which 3 d transition elements can serve as the most effective catalysts for the improvement of the thermodynamic characteristics of MgH2.

  18. Design and Formation of a Large, Tetrahedral, Metal-ligand Cluster Using 1,1'-Binaphthyl Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Biros, Shannon M.; Yeh, Robert M.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-03-13

    Many chemists have been fascinated with the development of discrete supramolecular structures that encapsulate guest molecules. These structures can be assembled through covalent or hydrogen bonds, electrostatic or metal-ligand interactions. These host structures have provided valuable insight into the forces involved in small molecule recognition. Our work has focused on the design and study of metal-ligand clusters of varying sizes. The naphthalene [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} cluster 1, shown in Figure 1, has demonstrated diastereoselective guest binding and chiral induction properties as well as the ability to catalyze reactions carried out inside the cavity in an enzyme-like manner. However, the size of the cavity (ca. 300-500 {angstrom}{sup 3}) has often limited the scope of substrates for these transformations.

  19. DERIVING METALLICITIES FROM THE INTEGRATED SPECTRA OF EXTRAGALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS USING THE NEAR-INFRARED CALCIUM TRIPLET

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Caroline; Forbes, Duncan A.; Proctor, Robert N.; Spitler, Lee R.; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P.

    2010-04-15

    The Ca II triplet (CaT) feature in the near-infrared has been employed as a metallicity indicator for individual stars as well as integrated light of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) and galaxies with varying degrees of success, and sometimes puzzling results. Using the DEIMOS multi-object spectrograph on Keck we obtain a sample of 144 integrated light spectra of GCs around the brightest group galaxy NGC 1407 to test whether the CaT index can be used as a metallicity indicator for extragalactic GCs. Different sets of single stellar population models make different predictions for the behavior of the CaT as a function of metallicity. In this work, the metallicities of the GCs around NGC 1407 are obtained from CaT index values using an empirical conversion. The measured CaT/metallicity distributions show unexpected features, the most remarkable being that the brightest red and blue GCs have similar CaT values despite their large difference in mean color. Suggested explanations for this behavior in the NGC 1407 GC system are (1) the CaT may be affected by a population of hot blue stars, (2) the CaT may saturate earlier than predicted by the models, and/or (3) color may not trace metallicity linearly. Until these possibilities are understood, the use of the CaT as a metallicity indicator for the integrated spectra of extragalactic GCs will remain problematic.

  20. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators.

    PubMed

    Agio, Mario

    2012-02-07

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate sub-wavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review the designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interactions, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  1. Auger electron nanoscale mapping and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with gas cluster ion beam sputtering to study an organic bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Heon Kim, Seong; Heo, Sung; Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Yun, Sungyoung; Hwan Park, Jong; Chung, Yeonji; Lee, Eunha; Park, Gyeongsu; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2014-06-16

    The lateral and vertical distributions of organic p/n bulk heterojunctions for an organic solar cell device are, respectively, investigated using nanometer-scale Auger electron mapping and using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering. The concentration of sulfur, present only in the p-type material, is traced to verify the distribution of p-type (donor) and n-type (acceptor) materials in the blended structure. In the vertical direction, a considerable change in atomic sulfur concentration is observed using XPS depth profiling with Ar GCIB sputtering. In addition, Auger electron mapping of sulfur reveals the lateral 2-dimensional distribution of p- and n-type materials. The combination of Auger electron mapping with Ar GCIB sputtering should thereby allow the construction of 3-dimensional distributions of p- and n-type materials in organic photovoltaic cells.

  2. Mixed-metal cluster chemistry. 28. Core enlargement of tungsten-iridium clusters with alkynyl, ethyndiyl, and butadiyndiyl reagents.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Gulliver T; Viau, Lydie; Waterman, Susan M; Humphrey, Mark G; Bruce, Michael I; Low, Paul J; Roberts, Rachel L; Willis, Anthony C; Koutsantonis, George A; Skelton, Brian W; White, Allan H

    2005-05-02

    Reaction of [WIr3(mu-CO)3(CO)8(eta-C5Me5)] (1c) with [W(C[triple bond]CPh)(CO)3(eta-C5H5)] afforded the edge-bridged tetrahedral cluster [W2Ir3(mu4-eta2-C2Ph)(mu-CO)(CO)9(eta-C5H5)(eta-C5Me5)] (3) and the edge-bridged trigonal-bipyramidal cluster [W3Ir3(mu4-eta2-C2Ph)(mu-eta2-C=CHPh)(Cl)(CO)8(eta-C5Me5)(eta-C5H5)2] (4) in poor to fair yield. Cluster 3 forms by insertion of [W(C[triple bond]CPh)(CO)3(eta-C5H5)] into Ir-Ir and W-Ir bonds, accompanied by a change in coordination mode from a terminally bonded alkynyl to a mu4-eta2 alkynyl ligand. Cluster 4 contains an alkynyl ligand interacting with two iridium atoms and two tungsten atoms in a mu4-eta2 fashion, as well as a vinylidene ligand bridging a W-W bond. Reaction of [WIr3(CO)11(eta-C5H5)] (1a) or 1c with [(eta-C5H5)(CO)2 Ru(C[triple bond]C)Ru(CO)2(eta-C5H5)] afforded [Ru2WIr3(mu5-eta2-C2)(mu-CO)3(CO)7(eta-C5H5)2(eta-C5R5)] [R = H (5a), Me (5c)] in low yield, a structural study of 5a revealing a WIr3 butterfly core capped and spiked by Ru atoms; the diruthenium ethyndiyl precursor has undergone Ru-C scission, with insertion of the C2 unit into a W-Ir bond of the cluster precursor. Reaction of [W2Ir2(CO)10(eta-C5H5)2] with the diruthenium ethyndiyl reagent gave [RuW2Ir2{mu4-eta2-(C2C[triple bond]C)Ru(CO)2(eta-C5H5)}(mu-CO)2(CO)6(eta-C5H5)3] (6) in low yield, a structural study of 6 revealing a butterfly W2Ir2 unit capped by a Ru(eta-C5H5) group resulting from Ru-C scission; the terminal C2 of a new ruthenium-bound butadiyndiyl ligand has been inserted into the W-Ir bond. Reaction between 1a, [WIr3(CO)11(eta-C5H4Me)] (1b), or 1c and [(eta-C5H5)(CO)3W(C[triple bond]CC[triple bond]C)W(CO)3(eta-C5H5)] afforded [W2Ir3{mu4-eta2-(C2C[triple bond]C)W(CO)3(eta-C5H5)}(mu-CO)2(CO)2(eta-C5H5)(eta-C5R5)] [R = H (7a), Me (7c); R5 = H4Me (7b)] in good yield, a structural study of 7c revealing it to be a metallaethynyl analogue of 3.

  3. Low-temperature electronic transport in one-dimensional hybrid systems: Metal cluster embedded carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldano, Caterina

    The investigation of the electronic and magnetotransport properties at low temperature in individual MWNT with embedded clusters are here presented. The majority of studies of transport in MWNT reported in literature has been carried out on arc-discharge grown tubes, generally considered "clean" and defect-free. In this project, individual MWNT grown in alumina template are used; these tubes are highly disordered compared for example to arc-discharge ones, conditions that dramatically will impact the charge transport. As-fabricated devices are in general highly resistive. A large decrease in the value of the device resistance can be achieved through a controlled and fast high-bias sweep method (HBT) across the sample. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that this method induces a metal (platinum) decoration of the MWNT surface as a consequence of the large amount of Joule heating developed during the sweep. Temperature dependence study (5

  4. Nanoscale force induced size-selective separation and self-assembly of metal nanoparticles: sharp colloidal stability thresholds and hcp ordering.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanhui; Lalander, Cecilia H; Bach, Udo

    2010-11-14

    A simple and versatile nanoscale force induced precipitation approach for the separation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. The AuNPs show sharp size-dependent colloidal stability thresholds as a function of salt concentration. Upon separation, the AuNPs were electrostatically self-assembled onto silicon substrates by fine-tuning interparticle and particle-substrate forces, forming 2D AuNP networks with a high degree of hexagonal closest pack (hcp) superstructures.

  5. SMC west halo: a slice of the galaxy that is being tidally stripped?. Star clusters trace age and metallicity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, B.; Kerber, L.; Barbuy, B.; Bica, E.; Ortolani, S.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The evolution and structure of the Magellanic Clouds is currently under debate. The classical scenario in which both the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC) are orbiting the Milky Way has been challenged by an alternative in which the LMC and SMC are in their first close passage to our Galaxy. The clouds are close enough to us to allow spatially resolved observation of their stars, and detailed studies of stellar populations in the galaxies are expected to be able to constrain the proposed scenarios. In particular, the west halo (WH) of the SMC was recently characterized with radial trends in age and metallicity that indicate tidal disruption. Aims: We intend to increase the sample of star clusters in the west halo of the SMC with homogeneous age, metallicity, and distance derivations to allow a better determination of age and metallicity gradients in this region. Positions are compared with the orbital plane of the SMC from models. Methods: Comparisons of observed and synthetic V(B-V) colour-magnitude diagrams were used to derive age, metallicity, distance, and reddening for star clusters in the SMC west halo. Observations were carried out using the 4.1 m SOAR telescope. Photometric completeness was determined through artificial star tests, and the members were selected by statistical comparison with a control field. Results: We derived an age of 1.23 ± 0.07 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.87 ± 0.07 for the reference cluster NGC 152, compatible with literature parameters. Age and metallicity gradients are confirmed in the WH: 2.6 ± 0.6 Gyr/° and -0.19 ± 0.09 dex/°, respectively. The age-metallicity relation for the WH has a low dispersion in metallicity and is compatible with a burst model of chemical enrichment. All WH clusters seem to follow the same stellar distribution predicted by dynamical models, with the exception of AM-3, which should belong to the counter-bridge. Brück 6 is the youngest cluster in our sample. It is only 130 ± 40 Myr old and

  6. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of "dynamic structural disorder" (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bon