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Sample records for nanoscale structural engineering

  1. Nanoscale Engineering of Structures and Devices on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yitamben, Esmeralda

    2014-03-01

    The relentless increase in both density and speed that has characterized microelectronics, and now nanoelectronics, will require a new paradigm to continue beyond current technologies. One proposed such paradigm shift demands the ultimate control over the number and position of dopants in a device, which includes quantum information processing and variety of semiconductor device materials and architectures aimed at solving end-of-Moore's law issues. Such a work requires the development of a tool for the design of atomically precise devices on silicon and other surfaces, in hope of studying the effect of local interactions between atomic-scale structures, their microscopic behavior, and how quantum mechanical effects might influence nano-device behavior in very small structures. Demonstrations of remarkable 2D nanostructures down to single atom devices are reported here thanks to the development of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as an imaging and patterning tool. These include the formation of molecular chiral superstructures on metallic surfaces, as well as the atomic-scale depassivation of a hydrogen terminated surface with an STM, toward the incorporation of dopants in silicon. I will spend some time at the end, talking about my experience working at a national laboratory.

  2. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures. PMID:26856789

  3. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  4. Engineering Virus Capsids Into Biomedical Delivery Vehicles: Structural Engineering Problems in Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Saumya; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2015-01-01

    Virus capsids have evolved to protect the genome sequestered in their interior from harsh environmental conditions, and to deliver it safely and precisely to the host cell of choice. This characteristic makes them naturally perfect containers for delivering therapeutic molecules to specific locations. Development of an ideal virus-based nano-container for medical usage requires that the capsid be converted into a targetable protein cage which retains the original stability, flexibility and host cell penetrating properties of the native particles, without the associated immunogenicity, and is able to encapsulate large quantities of therapeutic or diagnostic material. In the last few years, several icosahedral, non-enveloped viruses, with a diameter of 25-90 nm-a size which conveniently falls within the 10-100 nm range desirable for biomedical nanoparticles-have been chemically or genetically engineered towards partial fulfilment of the above criteria. This review summarizes the approaches taken towards engineering viruses into biomedical delivery devices and discusses the challenges involved in achieving this goal. PMID:26301300

  5. Engineering Virus Capsids Into Biomedical Delivery Vehicles: Structural Engineering Problems in Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Saumya; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2015-01-01

    Virus capsids have evolved to protect the genome sequestered in their interior from harsh environmental conditions, and to deliver it safely and precisely to the host cell of choice. This characteristic makes them naturally perfect containers for delivering therapeutic molecules to specific locations. Development of an ideal virus-based nano-container for medical usage requires that the capsid be converted into a targetable protein cage which retains the original stability, flexibility and host cell penetrating properties of the native particles, without the associated immunogenicity, and is able to encapsulate large quantities of therapeutic or diagnostic material. In the last few years, several icosahedral, non-enveloped viruses, with a diameter of 25-90 nm-a size which conveniently falls within the 10-100 nm range desirable for biomedical nanoparticles-have been chemically or genetically engineered towards partial fulfilment of the above criteria. This review summarizes the approaches taken towards engineering viruses into biomedical delivery devices and discusses the challenges involved in achieving this goal.

  6. Nanoscale Engineering of Designer Cellulosomes.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Melissabye; Cazade, Pierre-André; Galera-Prat, Albert; Nash, Michael A; Czjzek, Mirjam; Cieplak, Marek; Alvarez, Beatriz; Aguilar, Marina; Karpol, Alon; Gaub, Hermann; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Bayer, Edward A; Thompson, Damien

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalysts showcase the upper limit obtainable for high-speed molecular processing and transformation. Efforts to engineer functionality in synthetic nanostructured materials are guided by the increasing knowledge of evolving architectures, which enable controlled molecular motion and precise molecular recognition. The cellulosome is a biological nanomachine, which, as a fundamental component of the plant-digestion machinery from bacterial cells, has a key potential role in the successful development of environmentally-friendly processes to produce biofuels and fine chemicals from the breakdown of biomass waste. Here, the progress toward so-called "designer cellulosomes", which provide an elegant alternative to enzyme cocktails for lignocellulose breakdown, is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to rational design via computational modeling coupled with nanoscale characterization and engineering tools. Remaining challenges and potential routes to industrial application are put forward. PMID:26748482

  7. Nanoscale materials for engineering and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Gunjan; Mallik, Nilanjan; Abot, Jandro; Song, Albert; Head, Emily; Dadhania, Mitul; Shanov, Vesselin; Jayasinghe, Chaminda; Salunke, Pravahan; Lee, Lucy; Hurd, Douglas; Yun, YeoHeung; Yarmolenko, Sergey; Sankar, Jag; Phillips, Paul; Komoroski, Richard A.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Bhattacharya, Amit; Watts, Nelson; Schulz, Mark J.

    2008-03-01

    Materials with nanoscale features have new or improved properties compared to bulk materials. These properties depend on the composition, size, and shape of the material, and include high specific strength and modulus, low melting point, high electrical and thermal conductivity, a large surface area to volume ratio, nearly defect-free structure, magnetic and optical properties, and sensing and actuation properties. This talk will discuss synthesis, processing, and application of nanoscale materials for engineering and medicine. Recent advances in nanoparticle synthesis include development of "Black Cotton" which is centimeter long carbon nanotubes grown in arrays, improved carbon nanofiber material, and development of carbon nanosphere chain material which has the morphology of carbon onions chained together. Applications of these materials under development include spinning Black Cotton into thread to produce a new smart material with reinforcement, sensing, and actuation properties, use of nanotube arrays for electrodes and biosensors, catalyst loaded nanotubes for medical contrast agents, and nanosphere chains for manufacturing composite materials. Overall, this paper shows that "Nanoizing" materials and structures is a hot new technological science that is going to improve many aspects of our lives. These new materials are also generating intellectual property and new opportunities for small companies and universities.

  8. Nanoscale Engineering in the Biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Daniel J.; Whitlow, Harry J.

    Biological matter is one of the most diverse and important classes of materials. Products of living organisms (wood, bone, cotton, wool, leather, coal, oil, drugs, etc.) are vital to humanity as foodstuffs, energy sources, engineering and construction materials, and chemicals; and by the way, they shape the environment of the biosphere.

  9. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  10. Structural transitions in nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Mina

    In this work I investigate three different materials: nanoscale carbon systems, ferrofluid systems, and molecular-electronic devices. In particular, my study is focused on the theoretical understanding of structural changes and the associated electronic, mechanical, and magnetic properties of these materials. To study the equilibrium packing of fullerenes in carbon nanotube peapods optimization techniques were applied. In agreement with experimental measurements, my results for nanotubes containing fullerenes with 60--84 atoms indicate that the axial separation between the fullerenes is smaller than in the bulk crystal. The reduction of the inter-fullerene distance and also the structural relaxation of fullerenes result from a large internal pressure within the peapods. This naturally induced "static" pressure may qualify nanotubes as nanoscale autoclaves for chemical reactions. Combining total energy calculations with a search of phase space, I investigated the microscopic fusion mechanism of C60 fullerenes. I show that the (2+2) cycloaddition reaction, a necessary precursor for fullerene fusion, can be accelerated inside a nanotube. Fusion occurs along the minimum energy path as a finite sequence of Stone-Wales (SW) transformations. A detailed analysis of the transition states shows that Stone-Wales transformations are multi-step processes. I propose a new microscopic mechanism to explain the unusually fast fusion process of carbon nanotubes. The detailed pathway for two adjacent (5, 5) nanotubes to gradually merge into a (10, 10) tube, and the transition states have been identified. The propagation of the fused region is energetically favorable and proceeds in a morphology reminiscent of a Y-junction via a so called zipper mechanism, involving only SW bond rearrangements with low activation barriers. Using density functional theory, the equilibrium structure, stability, and electronic properties of nanostructured, hydrogen terminated diamond fragments have been

  11. Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a tool for engineering and structural diagnostics of nanoscale electrochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Oleshko, Vladimir P; Lam, Thomas; Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Haney, Paul; Lezec, Henri J; Davydov, Albert V; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Cumings, John; Talin, A Alec

    2014-10-21

    Complex interfacial phenomena and phase transformations that govern the operation of Li-ion batteries require detailed nanoscale 3D structural and compositional characterization that can be directly related to their capacity and electrical transport properties. For this purpose, we have designed model miniature all solid-state radial heterostructure Li-ion batteries composed of LiCoO2 cathode, LiPON electrolyte and amorphous Si anode shells, which were deposited around metallized high-aspect-ratio Si nanowires as a scaffolding core. Such diagnostic batteries, the smallest, complete secondary Li-ion batteries realized to date, were specifically designed for in situ electrical testing in a field-emission scanning electron microscope and/or transmission electron microscope. The results of electrochemical testing were described in detail in a previous publication (Nano Lett., 2012, 12, 505-511). The model Li-ion batteries allow analysis of the correlations between electrochemical properties and their structural evolution during cycling in various imaging, diffraction and spectroscopic modes down to the atomic level. Employing multimode analytical scanning/transmission electron microscopy imaging coupled with correlative multivariate statistical analysis and tomography, we have analyzed and quantified the 3D morphological and structural arrangement of the batteries, including textured platelet-like LiCoO2 nanocrystallites, buried electrode-electrolyte interfaces and hidden internal defects to clarify effects of scaling on a battery's electrochemical performance. Characterization of the nanoscale interfacial processes using model heterostructure nanowire-based Li-ion batteries provides useful guidelines for engineering of prospective nano-sized building blocks in future electrochemical energy storage systems.

  12. Nanoscale magnetic heat pumps and engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Bretzel, Stefan; Brataas, Arne; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2010-01-01

    We present the linear-response matrix for a sliding domain wall in a rotatable magnetic nanowire, which is driven out of equilibrium by temperature and voltage bias, mechanical torque, and magnetic field. An expression for heat-current-induced domain-wall motion is derived. Application of Onsager’s reciprocity relation leads to a unified description of the Barnett and Einstein-de Haas effects as well as spin-dependent thermoelectric properties. We envisage various heat pumps and engines, such as coolers driven by magnetic fields or mechanical rotation as well as nanoscale motors that convert temperature gradients into useful work. All parameters (with the exception of mechanical friction) can be computed microscopically by the scattering theory of transport.

  13. Nanoscale characterization of engineered cementitious composites (ECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakulich, Aaron Richard Li, Victor C.

    2011-02-15

    Engineered cementitious composites (ECC) are ultra-ductile fiber-reinforced cementitious composites. The nanoscale chemical and mechanical properties of three ECC formulae (one standard formula, and two containing nanomaterial additives) were studied using nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Nanoindentation results highlight the difference in modulus between bulk matrix ({approx} 30 GPa) and matrix/fiber interfacial transition zones as well as between matrix and unreacted fly ash ({approx} 20 GPa). The addition of carbon black or carbon nanotubes produced little variation in moduli when compared to standard M45-ECC. The indents were observed by electron microscopy; no trace of the carbon black particles could be found, but nanotubes, including nanotubes bridging cracks, were easily located in ultrafine cracks near PVA fibers. Elemental analysis failed to show a correlation between modulus and chemical composition, implying that factors such as porosity have more of an effect on mechanical properties than elemental composition.

  14. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, N.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Teague, M. L.; Wang, J.-Q.; Boyd, D. A.; Chen, C.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simulations and nano-fabrication technology.

  15. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Ishimaru, Manabu; Varga, Tamas; Oda, Takuji; Hardiman, Christopher M.; Xue, Haizhou; Katoh, Yutai; Shannon, Steven; Weber, William J.

    2012-08-14

    Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the microstructure can remove point defects produced by irradiation. Engineered nanocrystalline SiC with a high-density of stacking faults (SFs) has significantly enhanced recombination of interstitials and vacancies, leading to selfhealing of irradiation-induced defects. While single crystal SiC readily undergoes an irradiationinduced crystalline to amorphous transformation at room temperature, the nano-engineered SiC with a high-density of SFs exhibits more than an order of magnitude increase in radiation resistance. Molecular dynamics simulations of collision cascades show that the nano-layered SFs lead to enhanced mobility of interstitial Si atoms. The remarkable radiation resistance in the nano-engineered SiC is attributed to the high-density of SFs within nano-sized grain structures that significantly enhance point defect annihilation.

  16. Nanoscale engineering of radiation tolerant silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanwen; Ishimaru, Manabu; Varga, Tamas; Oda, Takuji; Hardiman, Chris; Xue, Haizhou; Katoh, Yutai; Shannon, Steven; Weber, William J

    2012-10-14

    Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the microstructure can remove point defects produced by irradiation. Engineered nanocrystalline SiC with a high-density of stacking faults (SFs) has significantly enhanced recombination of interstitials and vacancies, leading to self-healing of irradiation-induced defects. While single crystal SiC readily undergoes an irradiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transformation at room temperature, the nano-engineered SiC with a high-density of SFs exhibits more than an order of magnitude increase in radiation resistance. Molecular dynamics simulations of collision cascades show that the nano-layered SFs lead to enhanced mobility of interstitial Si atoms. The remarkable radiation resistance in the nano-engineered SiC is attributed to the high-density of SFs within nano-sized grain structures that significantly enhance point defect annihilation.

  17. Nanoscale Engineering of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu; Varga, Tamas; Oda, Takuji; Hardiman, Chris; Xue, Haizhou; Katoh, Yutai; Shannon, Prof. Steven; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the microstructure can remove point defects produced by irradiation. Engineered nanocrystalline SiC with a high-density of stacking faults (SFs) has significantly enhanced recombination of interstitials and vacancies, leading to self-healing of irradiation-induced defects. While single crystal SiC readily undergoes an irradiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transformation at room temperature, the nano-engineered SiC with a high-density of SFs exhibits more than an order of magnitude increase in radiation resistance. Molecular dynamics simulations of collision cascades show that the nano-layered SFs lead to enhanced mobility of interstitial Si atoms. The remarkable radiation resistance in the nano-engineered SiC is attributed to the high-density of SFs within nano-sized grain structures that significantly enhance point defect annihilation.

  18. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G.; Jabbari, Esmaiel; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness the interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behaviors. Here, we review the nanoscale tissue engineering technologies for both two- and three-dimensional studies (2- and 3D), and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffolds technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D, however, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and the temporal changes in cellular microenvironment. PMID:21451238

  19. Current nanoscience and nanoengineering at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, A. M.; Singh, R. S.; Singh, V. P.

    2006-07-01

    The Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CeNSE) at the University of Kentucky is a multidisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff, with a shared vision and cutting-edge research facilities to study and develop materials and devices at the nanoscale. Current research projects at CeNSE span a number of diverse nanoscience thrusts in bio- engineering and medicine (nanosensors and nanoelectrodes, nanoparticle-based drug delivery), electronics (nanolithography, molecular electronics, nanotube FETs), nanotemplates for electronics and gas sensors (functionalization of carbon nanotubes, aligned carbon nanotube structures for gate-keeping, e-beam lithography with nanoscale precision), and nano--optoelectronics (nanoscale photonics for laser communications, quantum confinement in photovoltaic devices, and nanostructured displays). This paper provides glimpses of this research and future directions.

  20. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-04-07

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

  1. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepetit, Bruno; Lemoine, Didier; Márquez-Mijares, Maykel

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  2. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jianhua; Russell, Scott; Morishetti, Kiran; Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P.; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  3. Zipping and unzipping of nanoscale carbon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berashevich, Julia; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that hydrogenation and annealing applied to nanoscale carbon structures play a crucial role in determining the final shape of the system. In particular, graphene flakes characterized by linear and nonhydrogenated zigzag or armchair edges have a high propensity to merge into a bigger flake or a nanotube (the formation of a single carbon-carbon bond lowers the total energy of the system by up to 6.22 eV). Conversely, a line of sp2 carbon bonds (common for pure carbon structures such as graphene or a carbon nanotube) converted into sp3 type by hydrogenation shows an ability to disassemble the original structure by cutting it along the line of the modified bonds. These structural transformations provide us with an understanding of the behavior of mobile carbon structures in solution and a distinct scenario for how to preserve the original structure, which is a crucial issue for their application in carbon-based electronics.

  4. Nanoscale Structure at Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturchio, N. C.; Sturchio, N. C.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Park, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Nagy, K. L.; Schlegel, M. L.

    2001-12-01

    The nature of nanoparticles and their role in the natural environment is currently a subject of renewed interest. The high surface area (and surface area-to-volume ratio) of nanoparticles exerts a widespread influence on geochemical reactions and transport processes. A thorough understanding of the nanoscale world remains largely hypothetical, however, because of the challenges associated with characterizing nanoscale structures and processes. Recent insights gained from high-resolution synchrotron x-ray reflectivity measurements at the solid-fluid interfaces of macroscopic (i.e., mm-scale) mineral particles may provide relevant guidelines for expected nanoparticle surface structures. For example, at calcite-water and barite-water interfaces, undercoordinated surface cations bond with water species of variable protonation, and modest relaxations (to several hundredths of a nanometer) affect the outermost unit cells [1,2]. Undercoordinated tetrahedral ions at aluminosilicate surfaces also bond with water species, whereas interstitial or interlayer alkali or alkaline earth ions at the surface may readily exchange with hydronium or other ions; modest relaxations also affect the outermost unit cells [3,4]. Modulation of liquid water structure out to about one nanometer has been observed at the (001) cleavage surface of muscovite in deionized water, and may be present at other mineral-fluid interfaces [4]. Dissolution mechanisms at the orthoclase-water interface have been clarified by combining x-ray reflectivity and scanning force microscopy measurements [5]. Further progress in understanding nanoscale structures and processes at macroscopic mineral-water interfaces is likely to benefit nanoparticle studies. [1] Fenter et al. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 1221-1228. [2] Fenter et al. (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B 105(34), 8112-8119. [3] Fenter et al. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 3663-3673. [4] Cheng et al. (2001) Phys. Rev. Lett., (in press). [5] Teng et al

  5. 75 FR 30874 - National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Subcommittee, National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Technology; The National Nanotechnology.... SUMMARY: The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale...

  6. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A. Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2γ/R, with γ the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  7. Engineering nanoscale surface features to sustain microparticle rolling in flow.

    PubMed

    Kalasin, Surachate; Santore, Maria M

    2015-05-26

    Nanoscopic features of channel walls are often engineered to facilitate microfluidic transport, for instance when surface charge enables electro-osmosis or when grooves drive mixing. The dynamic or rolling adhesion of flowing microparticles on a channel wall holds potential to accomplish particle sorting or to selectively transfer reactive species or signals between the wall and flowing particles. Inspired by cell rolling under the direction of adhesion molecules called selectins, we present an engineered platform in which the rolling of flowing microparticles is sustained through the incorporation of entirely synthetic, discrete, nanoscale, attractive features into the nonadhesive (electrostatically repulsive) surface of a flow channel. Focusing on one example or type of nanoscale feature and probing the impact of broad systematic variations in surface feature loading and processing parameters, this study demonstrates how relatively flat, weakly adhesive nanoscale features, positioned with average spacings on the order of tens of nanometers, can produce sustained microparticle rolling. We further demonstrate how the rolling velocity and travel distance depend on flow and surface design. We identify classes of related surfaces that fail to support rolling and present a state space that identifies combinations of surface and processing variables corresponding to transitions between rolling, free particle motion, and arrest. Finally we identify combinations of parameters (surface length scales, particle size, flow rates) where particles can be manipulated with size-selectivity.

  8. PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Topical Conference on Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael S.; Lee, Gil U.

    2005-07-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology contains research papers contributed by the participants of the Fourth Topical Conference on Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the Annual Meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), which was held in Austin, Texas, USA, 7-12 November, 2004. This conference saw 284 oral presentations from institutions around the world, which is the highest number for this topical conference series to date. These presentations were organized into 64 sessions, covering the range of nanotechnology subject areas in which chemical engineers are currently engaged. These sessions included the following areas. • Fundamentals: thermodynamics at the nanoscale; applications of nanostructured fluids; transport properties in nanophase and nanoscale systems; molecular modelling methods; self and directed assembly at the nanoscale; nanofabrication and nanoscale processing; manipulation of nanophases by external fields; nanoscale systems; adsorption and transport in carbon nanotubes; nanotribology; making the transition from materials and phenomena to new technologies; operation of micro-and nano-systems. • Materials: nanoparticle synthesis and stabilization; nanoscale structure in polymers; nanotemplating of polymers; synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube-based materials; nanowires; nanoparticle assemblies and superlattices; nanoelectronic materials; self-assembly of templated inorganic materials; nanostructured hybrid organic/inorganic materials; gas phase synthesis of nanoparticles; multicomponent structured particles; nano energetic materials; liquid-phase synthesis of nanoparticles. • Energy: synthesis and characterization of nanostructured catalytic materials; nanomaterials and devices for energy applications. • Biotechnology: nanobiotechnology; nanotechnology for the biotechnology and pharmaceuticals industries; nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology for sensors; advances in biomaterials, bionanotechnology, biomimetic

  9. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  10. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  11. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  12. Nanoscale contact engineering for Silicon/Silicide nanowire devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yung-Chen

    Si nanowire shows an abrupt resistance reduction due to the spin ordering at ˜29.7 K. A negative magnetoresistance (MR) ˜1.8% under 5 Tesla at 1.6 K is achieved, demonstrating the ferromagnetic behavior of MnSi. Furthermore, using the MnSi/p-Si/MnSi heterostructure, we have studied the charge injection at various temperatures via the Schottky barrier, and the spin scattering was observed through magnetotransport studies of MnSi/p-Si/MnSi heterojunction. Our results represent the first report of magnetic contact fabrication through the formation of single crystal heterojunction nanowires and the first demonstration of spin injection and detection in such Si nanowire devices. The magnetic silicides approach thus opens a new pathway to create ferromagnetic/semiconductor junction with clean and sharp interface, and may significantly impact the future of spintronics. Beyond those applications, silicide phase control at nanoscale is investigated. Three nickel phases, Ni31Si12, Ni2Si and NiSi2 are observed in one step annealing at 550 °C. NiSi2 grows initially through the Si NW and then the area close to nickel pad transforms into the nickel-rich phase, Ni31Si12. With prolonged annealing over 5 minutes, the Ni2Si starts to show up in between Ni31 Si12 and NiSi2. The growth sequence is different from the thin film system where Ni2Si usually appears as the initial phase in the beginning as the annealing temperature is higher than 400 °C. Interfacial energy differences and surface free energy are believed to play an important role here at the nanoscale, which lead to the formation of normally unfavorable silicide phases in Si NWs. In addition, Si/SiOx core/shell NW structure is used to explore the phase transformation of silicides in the structure-confined nano environment. Nickel silicides in the structure-confined core/shell Si NW shares the similar phase formation sequences as those appeared in the bared SiNWs, while the growth rate is significantly retarded. This may be

  13. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  14. Nanoscale interfacial structure for Novel Opto-electronic and Ion-trapping Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin-Avila, Erick

    In this dissertation, we present contributions to the nanoscale engineering of electronic and geometrical structure of dielectric-metal interfaces. Such structure is designed to support the interaction of light and matter for useful scientific and technological applications. Among our interests are electromagnetic subwavelength localization, propagation and storage; photonic manipulation, modulation, synchronization and its use in the confinement of atomic systems. The latter is directed towards a new generation of scalable devices for quantum information processing (QIP) and surface science studies.

  15. 77 FR 61448 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Subcommittee Committee on Technology, National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET... Nanotechnology Initiative Strategic Plan: ``Develop tools and procedures for * * * international outreach and... Standridge at National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, by telephone (703-292-8103) or email (...

  16. The Vanderbilt University nanoscale science and engineering fabrication laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmelo, Anthony B.; Belbusti, Edward F.; Smith, Mark L.; Brice, Sean J.; Wheaton, Robert F.

    2005-08-01

    Vanderbilt University has realized the design and construction of a 1635 sq. ft. Class 10,000 cleanroom facility to support the wide-ranging research mission associated with the Vanderbilt Institute for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (VINSE). By design we have brought together disparate technologies and researchers formerly dispersed across the campus to work together in a small contiguous space intended to foster interaction and synergy of nano-technologies not often found in close proximity. The space hosts a variety of tools for lithographic patterning of substrates, the deposition of thin films, the synthesis of diamond nanostructures and carbon nanotubes, and a variety of reactive ion etchers for the fabrication of nanostructures on silicon substrates. In addition, a separate 911 sq. ft. chemistry laboratory supports nanocrystal synthesis and the investigation of biomolecular films. The design criteria required an integrated space that would support the scientific agenda of the laboratory while satisfying all applicable code and safety concerns. This project required the renovation of pre-existing laboratory space with minimal disruption to ongoing activities in a mixed-use building, while meeting the requirements of the 2000 edition of the International Building Code for the variety of potentially hazardous processes that have been programmed for the space. In this paper we describe how architectural and engineering challenges were met in the areas of mitigating floor vibration issues, shielding our facility against EMI emanations, design of the contamination control facility itself, chemical storage and handling, toxic gas use and management, as well as mechanical, electrical, plumbing, lab security, fire and laboratory safety issues.

  17. Instabilities of structured metal films on nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Nanyi; Wu, Yueying; Fowlkes, Jason; Rack, Philip; Kondic, Lou

    2014-11-01

    We consider instabilities of metal films on nanoscale, with particular focus on the interplay between the initial geometry and instability development. In experiments, metal films are deposited lithographically, allowing for precise control of the initial shape, and then exposed to laser pulses that liquefy them. The considered geometries involve various shapes (cylinders or prisms) superimposed on top of a flat film. We consider this problem within the framework of the long wave (lubrication) theory. Our simulations show that the main features of the instability development could be captured, as long as destabilizing liquid-solid interaction is considered in the model. We conclude by discussing the influence of the distance between the imposed perturbations, their shape, as well as experimental noise on the evolution. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET-1235710.

  18. Structural Engineering: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation presents the work of the Structural Engineering Division of the Engineering Directorate. The work includes: providing technical expertise and leadership for the development, evaluation, and operation of structural, mechanical, and thermal spaceflight systems.

  19. Applying systems engineering methodologies to the micro- and nanoscale realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison Darrin, M. Ann

    2012-06-01

    Micro scale and nano scale technology developments have the potential to revolutionize smart and small systems. The application of systems engineering methodologies that integrate standalone, small-scale technologies and interface them with macro technologies to build useful systems is critical to realizing the potential of these technologies. This paper covers the expanding knowledge base on systems engineering principles for micro and nano technology integration starting with a discussion of the drivers for applying a systems approach. Technology development on the micro and nano scale has transition from laboratory curiosity to the realization of products in the health, automotive, aerospace, communication, and numerous other arenas. This paper focuses on the maturity (or lack thereof) of the field of nanosystems which is emerging in a third generation having transitioned from completing active structures to creating systems. The emphasis of applying a systems approach focuses on successful technology development based on the lack of maturity of current nano scale systems. Therefore the discussion includes details relating to enabling roles such as product systems engineering and technology development. Classical roles such as acquisition systems engineering are not covered. The results are also targeted towards small-scale technology developers who need to take into account systems engineering processes such as requirements definition, verification, and validation interface management and risk management in the concept phase of technology development to maximize the likelihood of success, cost effective micro and nano technology to increase the capability of emerging deployed systems and long-term growth and profits.

  20. Nanoscale Building Blocks and Nanoassembly of Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkan, Cengiz

    2003-03-01

    Electronics and photonics industries are highly interested in developing new methods for nanofabrication in order to be able to continue their long-term trend of building ever smaller, faster and less expensive devices. Conventional patterning strategies must be augmented by new techniques in order to truly take advantage of the quantum nature of novel nanoscale devices. In our research, we are developing a bottom-up approach to fabricate building blocks, which can be used to assemble nanostructures and devices. This involves the assembly of atom- and molecule-like nanostructures into functional 2-D and 3-D units. This will take advantage of the unique optical, electronic, and size-tunable properties of nanostructures and permit the use of these properties for "real" applications in a larger system (> 10 nm and < 1 um). Here, we demonstrate a novel technique for the fabrication of nano-assemblies of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and quantum dots (QD) (CNT-QD conjugates) for the first time using a zero length cross-linker. CNT's are primarily functionalized with carboxylic end groups by oxidation in concentrated sulfuric acid. Thiol stabilized QD's in aqueous solution with amino end groups were prepared in the laboratory. The ethylene carbodiimide coupling reaction was used to achieve the CNT-QD conjugation. Sulfo-N-Hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) was used to enhance this coupling procedure. We present EDS and FTIR data for the chemical modification and SEM images of the first nano-building blocks. Current work includes the more complex 3-D assembly of QD's and nanotubes on Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) template for nanodevices. Potential future applications of our method include the fabrication of novel electronic and photonic devices, crystal displays and biosensors.

  1. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  2. Discovery during Hydrogen Annealing: Formation of Nanoscale Fluorocarbon Tubular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiuchun; Tanaka, Sinya; Masuda, Atsuhiko; Maenaka, Kazusuke; Higuchi, Kohei

    2013-09-01

    A novel fabrication method for nanoscale tubular structures is presented in this paper. The tubular structures can be obtained by heating single-crystal silicon trenches or pillars formed by the inductively coupled plasma reactive-ion etching (ICP-RIE) Bosch process in hydrogen ambient. The importance of initial vacuum in the reaction chamber for tube formation and the tube formation mechanism were discussed. The components and sidewall size of the tubular structure were also studied to verify that the tube is made of the fluorocarbon (CF) passivation layer deposited by the Bosch process. The CF tubular structure would be a promising structure for BioMEMS.

  3. Engineering photonics: from nanoscale sensing to full-field interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatam, Ralph P.

    2005-09-01

    This paper will present recent developments in optical fibre sensors and optical fibre based instrumentation research undertaken at Cranfield University. New sensor techniques based on nanoscale molecular coatings deposited on singlemode fibres containing long period gratings and the use of singlemode fibres and coherent imaging fibre bundles in full-field speckle interferometry and planar Doppler velocimetry will be presented.

  4. Nanoscale engineering of two-dimensional disordered hyperuniform block-copolymer assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Pesce, Giuseppe; Malafronte, Anna; Di Girolamo, Rocco; Ausanio, Giovanni; Vecchione, Antonio; Sasso, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Disordered hyperuniform (DH) media have been recognized as a new state of disordered matter that broadens our vision of material engineering. Here, long-range correlated disordered two-dimensional patterns are fabricated by self-assembling of spherical diblock-copolymer (BCP) micelles. Control of the self-assembling parameters leads to the formation of DH patterns of micelles that can host nanoscale material inclusions, therefore providing an effective strategy for fabricating multimaterial DH structures at molecular scale. Centroidal patterns are accurately determined by virtue of BCP micelles loaded with metal nanoparticles. Our analysis reveals the signature of nearly ideal DH BCP assemblies in the local density fluctuation and a dominant linear scaling in the local number fluctuation.

  5. Smaller and Faster: Nanoscale structures probed at radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Andrew N.

    2004-03-01

    We describe our development of a range of different nanomechanical and nanoelectronic structures, probed by radiofrequency electronics. These devices have permitted the development of integrated displacement sensors using quantum point contacts and single electron transistors, the development of mechanically suspended nanobolometers using superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) tunnel junction thermometers, and the development of radiofrequency nanoscale calorimeters. This talk will provide an overview to our past achievements, and point to possible future directions.

  6. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  7. Nanoscale modification of porous gelatin scaffolds with chondroitin sulfate for corneal stromal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jui-Yang; Li, Ya-Ting; Cho, Ching-Hsien; Yu, Ting-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies reflect the importance of using naturally occurring biopolymers as three-dimensional corneal keratocyte scaffolds and suggest that the porous structure of gelatin materials may play an important role in controlling nutrient uptake. In the current study, the authors further consider the application of carbodiimide cross-linked porous gelatin as an alternative to collagen for corneal stromal tissue engineering. The authors developed corneal keratocyte scaffolds by nanoscale modification of porous gelatin materials with chondroitin sulfate (CS) using carbodiimide chemistry. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the amount of covalently incorporated polysaccharide was significantly increased when the CS concentration was increased from 0% to 1.25% (w/v). In addition, as demonstrated by dimethylmethylene blue assays, the CS content in these samples was in the range of 0.078-0.149 nmol per 10 mg scaffold. When compared with their counterparts without CS treatment, various CS-modified porous gelatin membranes exhibited higher levels of water content, light transmittance, and amount of permeated nutrients but possessed lower Young's modulus and resistance against protease digestion. The hydrophilic and mechanical properties of scaffolds modified with 0.25% CS were comparable with those of native corneas. The samples from this group were biocompatible with the rabbit corneal keratocytes and showed enhanced proliferative and biosynthetic capacity of cultured cells. In summary, the authors found that the nanoscale-level modification has influence on the characteristics and cell-material interactions of CS-containing gelatin hydrogels. Porous membranes with a CS content of 0.112 ± 0.003 nmol per 10 mg scaffold may hold potential for use in corneal stromal tissue engineering. PMID:22403490

  8. Methods and devices for fabricating three-dimensional nanoscale structures

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jangung

    2010-04-27

    The present invention provides methods and devices for fabricating 3D structures and patterns of 3D structures on substrate surfaces, including symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns of 3D structures. Methods of the present invention provide a means of fabricating 3D structures having accurately selected physical dimensions, including lateral and vertical dimensions ranging from 10s of nanometers to 1000s of nanometers. In one aspect, methods are provided using a mask element comprising a conformable, elastomeric phase mask capable of establishing conformal contact with a radiation sensitive material undergoing photoprocessing. In another aspect, the temporal and/or spatial coherence of electromagnetic radiation using for photoprocessing is selected to fabricate complex structures having nanoscale features that do not extend entirely through the thickness of the structure fabricated.

  9. 78 FR 24241 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology, National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET... updated U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) Strategic Plan that is currently under development... and emphasis areas in the NNI goals, the objectives that support these goals, and the...

  10. 77 FR 13159 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET... ``2012 Regional, State, and Local (RSL) Initiatives in Nanotechnology Workshop'' on May 1-2, 2012. This... address a wide range of resource, organizational, and policy issues impacting RSL...

  11. 77 FR 56681 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology, National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and... suggestions related to the National Nanotechnology Initiative's (NNI) public Web site, Nano.gov . Nano.gov... (703) 292-7128, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office. Email: webinar@nnco.nano.gov . Ted...

  12. Laser-induced nanoscale superhydrophobic structures on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jagdheesh, R; Pathiraj, B; Karatay, E; Römer, G R B E; Huis in't Veld, A J

    2011-07-01

    The combination of a dual-scale (nano and micro) roughness with an inherent low-surface energy coating material is an essential factor for the development of superhydrophobic surfaces. Ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) machining/structuring is a promising technique for obtaining the dual-scale roughness. Sheets of stainless steel (AISI 304 L SS) and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were laser-machined with ultraviolet laser pulses of 6.7 ps, with different numbers of pulses per irradiated area. The surface energy of the laser-machined samples was reduced via application of a layer of perfluorinated octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS). The influence of the number of pulses per irradiated area on the geometry of the nanostructure and the wetting properties of the laser-machined structures has been studied. The results show that with an increasing number of pulses per irradiated area, the nanoscale structures tend to become predominantly microscale. The top surface of the microscale structures is seen covered with nanoscale protrusions that are most pronounced in Ti-6Al-4V. The laser-machined Ti-6Al-4V surface attained superhydrophobicity, and the improvement in the contact angle was >27% when compared to that of a nontextured surface.

  13. Nanoscale control of low-dimensional spin structures in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wang; Iftikhar, Ahmed Malik; Renrong, Liang; Wen, Huang; Renkui, Zheng; Jinxing, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Due to the upcoming demands of next-generation electronic/magnetoelectronic devices with low-energy consumption, emerging correlated materials (such as superconductors, topological insulators and manganites) are one of the highly promising candidates for the applications. For the past decades, manganites have attracted great interest due to the colossal magnetoresistance effect, charge-spin-orbital ordering, and electronic phase separation. However, the incapable of deterministic control of those emerging low-dimensional spin structures at ambient condition restrict their possible applications. Therefore, the understanding and control of the dynamic behaviors of spin order parameters at nanoscale in manganites under external stimuli with low energy consumption, especially at room temperature is highly desired. In this review, we collected recent major progresses of nanoscale control of spin structures in manganites at low dimension, especially focusing on the control of their phase boundaries, domain walls as well as the topological spin structures (e.g., skyrmions). In addition, capacitor-based prototype spintronic devices are proposed by taking advantage of the above control methods in manganites. This capacitor-based structure may provide a new platform for the design of future spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB920902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61306105 and 51572278), the Information Science and Technology (TNList) Cross-discipline Foundation from Tsinghua National Laboratory, China and the Fund from the State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

  14. Tuning the optical, magnetic, and electrical properties of ReSe2 by nanoscale strain engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengxue; Wang, Cong; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Hui; Li, Yan; Li, Shu-Shen; Suslu, Aslihan; Peeters, Francois M; Liu, Qian; Li, Jingbo; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2015-03-11

    Creating materials with ultimate control over their physical properties is vital for a wide range of applications. From a traditional materials design perspective, this task often requires precise control over the atomic composition and structure. However, owing to their mechanical properties, low-dimensional layered materials can actually withstand a significant amount of strain and thus sustain elastic deformations before fracture. This, in return, presents a unique technique for tuning their physical properties by "strain engineering". Here, we find that local strain induced on ReSe2, a new member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, greatly changes its magnetic, optical, and electrical properties. Local strain induced by generation of wrinkle (1) modulates the optical gap as evidenced by red-shifted photoluminescence peak, (2) enhances light emission, (3) induces magnetism, and (4) modulates the electrical properties. The results not only allow us to create materials with vastly different properties at the nanoscale, but also enable a wide range of applications based on 2D materials, including strain sensors, stretchable electrodes, flexible field-effect transistors, artificial-muscle actuators, solar cells, and other spintronic, electromechanical, piezoelectric, photonic devices.

  15. Nanoscale biomaterial interface modification for advanced tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, V.; Zykova, A.; Smolik, J.; Rogovska, R.; Donkov, N.; Goltsev, A.; Dubrava, T.; Rassokha, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, various stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have been found to have considerable potential for application in tissue engineering and future advanced therapies due to their biological capability to differentiate into specific lineages. Modified surface properties, such as composition, nano-roughness and wettability, affect the most important processes at the biomaterial interface. The aim of the present is work is to study the stem cells' (MSCs) adhesive potential, morphology, phenotypical characteristics in in vitro tests, and to distinguish betwen the different factors influencing the cell/biomaterial interaction, such as nano-topography, surface chemistry and surface free energy.

  16. “MICRO- AND NANOSCALE ENGINEERING OF CELL SIGNALING”

    PubMed Central

    Kam, L.C.; Shen, K.; Dustin, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasing recognized that cell signaling, as a chemical process, must be considered at the local, micrometer scale. Micro- and nano-fabrication techniques provide access to these dimensions, with the potential to capture and manipulate the spatial complexity of intracellular signaling in experimental models. This review focuses on recent advances in adapting surface engineering for use with biomolecular systems that interface with cell signaling, particularly with respect to surfaces that interact with multiple receptor systems on individual cells. The utility of this conceptual and experimental approach is demonstrated in the context of epithelial cells and T lymphocytes, two system for which the convergence and balance of multiple signaling pathways has dramatic impacts on the ability of these cells to provide their physiological function. PMID:23862677

  17. Pathogen-like particles: biomimetic vaccine carriers engineered at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Joseph A; Chen, Linxiao; Baker, Jenny L; Putnam, David; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2014-08-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are an essential component of vaccine design, helping to generate immunity to pathogen antigens in the absence of infection. Recent advances in nanoscale engineering have created a new class of particulate bionanotechnology that uses biomimicry to better integrate adjuvant and antigen. These pathogen-like particles, or PLPs, can come from a variety of sources, ranging from fully synthetic platforms to biologically derived, self-assembling systems. By employing molecularly engineered targeting and stimulation of key immune cells, recent studies utilizing PLPs as vaccine delivery platforms have shown great promise against high-impact, unsolved vaccine targets ranging from bacterial and viral pathogens to cancer and addiction. PMID:24832075

  18. Molecular Dynamics of Shock Wave Interaction with Nanoscale Structured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. Nano-structured materials have the potential to attenuate the strength of traveling shock waves because of their high surface-to-volume ratio. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Short Range Attractive interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either embedded atom potentials (target structure) or tethered potential (rigid piston, holding wall). Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this work we present results of the elastic behavior of solid structures subjected to shock wave impact and analysis of energy transport and absorption in porous materials. The results indicated that the presence of nano-porous material layers in front of a target wall reduced the stress magnitude detected inside and the energy deposited there by about 30 percent while, at the same time, its loading rate was decreased substantially.

  19. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  20. Understanding electronic structure and transport properties in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Kamal B.

    Understanding the electronic structure and the transport properties of nanoscale materials are pivotal for designing future nano-scale electronic devices. Nanoscale materials could be individual or groups of molecules, nanotubes, semiconducting quantum dots, and biomolecules. Among these several alternatives, organic molecules are very promising and the field of molecular electronics has progressed significantly over the past few decades. Despite these progresses, it has not yet been possible to achieve atomic level control at the metal-molecule interface during a conductance measurement, which hinders the progress in this field. The lack of atomic level information of the interface also makes it much harder for theorist to interpret the experimental results. To identify the junction configuration that possibly exists during the experimental measurement of conductance in molecular junction, we created an ensemble of Ruthanium-bis(terpyridine) molecular devices, and studied the transport behavior in these molecular junctions. This helps us identifying the junction geometry that yields the experimentally measured current-voltage characteristics. Today's electronic devices mostly ignore the spin effect of an electron. The inclusion of spin effect of an electron on solid-state transistor allows us to build more efficient electronic devices; this also alleviates the problem of huge heat dissipation in the nanoscale electronic devices. Different materials have been utilized to build three terminals spin transistor since its inception in 1950. In search of suitable candidates for the molecular spin transistor, we have recently designed a spin-valve transistor based on an organometallic molecule; a large amplification (320 %) in tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) is found to occur at an experimentally accessible gate field. This suggests that the organic molecules can be utilized for making the next generation three terminal spintronic devices. Similarly, we have designed a

  1. Characterization of the nanoscale structure of milk fat.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Pere Randy R; Peyronel, Fernanda; Marangoni, Alejandro G

    2016-07-15

    The nanoscale structure of milk fat (MF) crystal networks is extensively described for the first time through the characterization of milk fat-crystalline nanoplatelets (MF-CNPs). Removing oil by washing with cold isobutanol and breaking-down crystal aggregates by controlled homogenization allowed for the extraction and visualization of individual MF-CNPs that are mainly composed of high melting triacylglycerols (TAGs). By image analysis, the length and width of MF-CNPs were measured (600 nm × 200 nm-900 nm × 300 nm). Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), crystalline domain size, (i.e., thickness of MF-CNPs), was determined (27 nm (d001)). Through interpretation of ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) patterns of MF using Unified Fit and Guinier-Porod models, structural properties of MF-CNPs (smooth surfaces) and MF-CNP aggregations were characterized (RLCA aggregation of MF-CNPs to form larger structures that present diffused surfaces). Elucidation of MF-CNPs provides a new dimension of analysis for describing MF crystal networks and opens-up opportunities for modifying MF properties through nanoengineering.

  2. Engineered nano-scale ceramic supports for PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L; Blackmore, Karen J; Burrell, Anthony K; Henson, Neil J; Phillips, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    cell conditions must also exhibit high surface area as a necessary adjunct to obtaining high Pt dispersions and Pt utilization targets. Our goal in this work is to identify new synthesis approaches together with materials that will lead to ceramic supports with high surface areas and high Pt dispersions. Several strong candidates for use as PEMFC catalyst supports include: transition metal nitrides and substoichiometric titanium oxides, which hither to now have been prepared by other researcher groups with relatively low surface areas (ca. 1-50 m{sup 2}/g typical). To achieve our goals of engineering high surface area, conductive ceramic support for utilization in PEMFCs, a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with experience synthesizing and investigating these materials has been assembled. This team is headed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and includes Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of New Mexico. This report describes our fiscal year 2010 technical progress related to applying advanced synthetiC methods towards the development of new ceramic supports for Pt catalysts for PEM fuel cells.

  3. Nanoscale Control of Silks for Nanofibrous Scaffold Formation with Improved Porous Structure.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shasha; Lu, Guozhong; Liu, Shanshan; Bai, Shumeng; Liu, Xi; Lu, Qiang; Zuo, Baoqi; Kaplan, David L; Zhu, Hesun

    2014-05-01

    Silk-based porous scaffolds have been used extensively in tissue engineering because of their excellent biocompatibility, tunable biodegradability and robust mechanical properties. Although many silk-based scaffolds have been prepared through freeze-drying, a challenge remains to effectively control porous structures during this process. In the present study silk fibroin with different nanostructures were self-assembled in aqueous solution by repeated drying-dissolving process and then used to improve porous structure formation in lyophilization process. Viscosity, secondary structures and water interactions were also studied to exclude their influence on the formation and control of porous structures. Following nanofiber formation in aqueous solution, silk scaffolds with improved porous structure were directly formed after lyophilization and then stabilized with water or methanol annealing treatments. Compared to silk scaffolds derived from fresh solution, the nanofibrous scaffolds showed significantly better cell compatibility in vitro. Therefore, this nanoscale control of silk offers feasible way to regulate the matrix features including porous structure and nanostructure, which are important in regulating cell and tissue outcomes in tissue engineering and regeneration, and then achieve silk-based scaffolds with improved properties. PMID:24949200

  4. Imaging and manipulating the structural machinery of living cells on the micro- and nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Chown, Matthew G; Kumar, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    The structure, physiology, and fate of living cells are all highly sensitive to mechanical forces in the cellular microenvironment, including stresses and strains that originate from encounters with the extracellular matrix (ECM), blood and other flowing materials, and neighbouring cells. This relationship between context and physiology bears tremendous implications for the design of cellular micro-or nanotechnologies, since any attempt to control cell behavior in a device must provide the appropriate physical microenvironment for the desired cell behavior. Cells sense, process, and respond to biophysical cues in their environment through a set of integrated, multi-scale structural complexes that span length scales from single molecules to tens of microns, including small clusters of force-sensing molecules at the cell surface, micron-sized cell-ECM focal adhesion complexes, and the cytoskeleton that permeates and defines the entire cell. This review focuses on several key technologies that have recently been developed or adapted for the study of the dynamics of structural micro-and nanosystems in living cells and how these systems contribute to spatially-and temporally-controlled changes in cellular structure and mechanics. We begin by discussing subcellular laser ablation, which permits the precise incision of nanoscale structural elements in living cells in order to discern their mechanical properties and contributions to cell structure. We then discuss fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescent speckle microscopy, two live-cell fluorescence imaging methods that enable quantitative measurement of the binding and transport properties of specific proteins in the cell. Finally, we discuss methods to manipulate cellular structural networks by engineering the extracellular environment, including microfabrication of ECM distributions of defined geometry and microdevices designed to measure cellular traction forces at micron-scale resolution. Together

  5. Investigation of depth-resolved nanoscale structural changes in regulated cell proliferation and chromatin decondensation

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, Shikhar; Bista, Rajan K.; Staton, Kevin; Alexandrov, Sergey; Choi, Serah; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Brand, Randall E.; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    We present depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy, a simple approach that utilizes coherence gating to construct a depth-resolved structural feature vector quantifying sub-resolution axial structural changes at different optical depths within the sample. We show that this feature vector is independent of sample thickness variation, and identifies nanoscale structural changes in clinically prepared samples. We present numerical simulations and experimental validation to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. We also perform experiments using unstained cells to investigate the nanoscale structural changes in regulated cell proliferation through cell cycle and chromatin decondensation induced by histone acetylation. PMID:23577294

  6. Nanoscale imaging of the electronic and structural transitions in vanadium dioxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Qazilbash, M. M.; Tripathi, A.; Schafgans, A. A.; Kim, B.-J.; Kim, H.-T.; Cai, Z.; Holt, M. V.; Maser, J. M.; Keilmann, F.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Basov, D. N.

    2011-04-13

    We investigate the electronic and structural changes at the nanoscale in vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) in the vicinity of its thermally driven phase transition. Both electronic and structural changes exhibit phase coexistence leading to percolation. In addition, we observe a dichotomy between the local electronic and structural transitions. Nanoscale x-ray diffraction reveals local, nonmonotonic switching of the lattice structure, a phenomenon that is not seen in the electronic insulator-to-metal transition mapped by near-field infrared microscopy.

  7. Micro/nanoscale continuous printing: direct-writing of wavy micro/nano structures via electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Feiyu; Du, Zefeng; Zeng, Jun; Zhu, Ziming; Chen, Xin; Chen, Xindu; Lv, Yuanjun; Wang, Han

    2015-07-01

    Micro/nanofibers that are created by direct-writing using an electrospinning (ES) technique have aroused much recent attention, owing to their intriguing physical properties and great potential as building blocks for micro/nanoscale devices. In this work, a wavy direct-writing (WDW) process was developed to directly write wavy micro/nanostructures suitable for the fabrication of micro/nanoscale devices. The low voltage WDW technique is anticipated to be useful for a broad range of applications including flexible/stretchable electronics, micro optoelectronics, nano-antennas, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and biomedical engineering.

  8. Tuning nanoscale friction on Pt nanoparticles with engineering of organic capping layer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Young

    2011-03-15

    Nanoscale friction and adhesion on Pt colloid nanoparticles coated with different organic capping layers were probed with atomic/friction force microscopy. Platinum colloid nanoparticles with four types of capping layers have been synthesized and used as model lubricant systems: TTAB (tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide), HDA (hexadecylamine), HDT (hexadecylthiol), and PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)). Two-dimensional arrays of colloid nanoparticles were prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. We found that the friction and adhesion properties on colloid nanoparticles are lower than those on a silicon surface. The variation of friction when changing the capping layers is ∼30%, and it appears that the friction depends on the packing and ordering of the capping layers. Partial removal of the capping layers using ultraviolet light (UV)-ozone surface treatment resulted in increased friction. These results suggest a new method of tuning nanometer scale friction and adhesion by engineering organic capping layers on nanoparticles.

  9. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  10. Fabrication of a highly oriented line structure on an aluminum surface and the nanoscale patterning on the nanoscale structure using highly functional molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Kato, H.; Takemura, S.; Watanabe, H.; Hayakawa, K.; Kimura, S.; Okumura, D.; Sugiyama, T.; Hiramatsu, T.; Nanba, N.; Nishikawa, O.; Taniguchi, M.

    2009-07-15

    The surface of an Al plate was treated with a combination of chemical and electrochemical processes for fabrication of surface nanoscale structures on Al plates. Chemical treatments by using acetone and pure water under supersonic waves were conducted on an Al surface. Additional electrochemical process in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution created a finer and oriented nanoscale structure on the Al surface. Dynamic force microscopy (DFM) measurement clarified that the nanoscale highly oriented line structure was successfully created on the Al surface. The line distance was estimated approximately 30-40 nm. At the next stage, molecular patterning on the highly oriented line structure by functional molecules such as copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and fullerene C{sub 60} was also conducted. CuPc or C{sub 60} molecules were deposited on the highly oriented line structure on Al. A toluene droplet containing CuPc molecules was cast on the nanostructured Al plate and was extended on the surface. CuPc or C{sub 60} deposition on the nanostructured Al surface proceeded by evaporation of toluene. DFM and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements demonstrated that a unique molecular pattern was fabricated so that the highly oriented groove channels were filled with the functional molecules.

  11. Trapping and manipulation of isolated atoms using nanoscale plasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Chang, D E; Thompson, J D; Park, H; Vuletić, V; Zibrov, A S; Zoller, P; Lukin, M D

    2009-09-18

    We propose and analyze a scheme to interface individual neutral atoms with nanoscale solid-state systems. The interface is enabled by optically trapping the atom via the strong near-field generated by a sharp metallic nanotip. We show that under realistic conditions, a neutral atom can be trapped with position uncertainties of just a few nanometers, and within tens of nanometers of other surfaces. Simultaneously, the guided surface plasmon modes of the nanotip allow the atom to be optically manipulated, or for fluorescence photons to be collected, with very high efficiency. Finally, we analyze the surface forces, heating and decoherence rates acting on the trapped atom.

  12. Computational structural mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The computational structural mechanics (CSM) program at Lewis encompasses: (1) fundamental aspects for formulating and solving structural mechanics problems, and (2) development of integrated software systems to computationally simulate the performance/durability/life of engine structures. It is structured to mainly supplement, complement, and whenever possible replace, costly experimental efforts which are unavoidable during engineering research and development programs. Specific objectives include: investigate unique advantages of parallel and multiprocesses for: reformulating/solving structural mechanics and formulating/solving multidisciplinary mechanics and develop integrated structural system computational simulators for: predicting structural performances, evaluating newly developed methods, and for identifying and prioritizing improved/missing methods needed. Herein the CSM program is summarized with emphasis on the Engine Structures Computational Simulator (ESCS). Typical results obtained using ESCS are described to illustrate its versatility.

  13. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Lenz, Olaf; Meinhardt, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model.

  14. Nanoscale phase engineering of thermal transport with a Josephson heat modulator.

    PubMed

    Fornieri, Antonio; Blanc, Christophe; Bosisio, Riccardo; D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Macroscopic quantum phase coherence has one of its pivotal expressions in the Josephson effect, which manifests itself both in charge and energy transport. The ability to master the amount of heat transferred through two tunnel-coupled superconductors by tuning their phase difference is the core of coherent caloritronics, and is expected to be a key tool in a number of nanoscience fields, including solid-state cooling, thermal isolation, radiation detection, quantum information and thermal logic. Here, we show the realization of the first balanced Josephson heat modulator designed to offer full control at the nanoscale over the phase-coherent component of thermal currents. Our device provides magnetic-flux-dependent temperature modulations up to 40 mK in amplitude with a maximum of the flux-to-temperature transfer coefficient reaching 200 mK per flux quantum at a bath temperature of 25 mK. Foremost, it demonstrates the exact correspondence in the phase engineering of charge and heat currents, breaking ground for advanced caloritronic nanodevices such as thermal splitters, heat pumps and time-dependent electronic engines. PMID:26641530

  15. Nanoscale phase engineering of thermal transport with a Josephson heat modulator.

    PubMed

    Fornieri, Antonio; Blanc, Christophe; Bosisio, Riccardo; D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Macroscopic quantum phase coherence has one of its pivotal expressions in the Josephson effect, which manifests itself both in charge and energy transport. The ability to master the amount of heat transferred through two tunnel-coupled superconductors by tuning their phase difference is the core of coherent caloritronics, and is expected to be a key tool in a number of nanoscience fields, including solid-state cooling, thermal isolation, radiation detection, quantum information and thermal logic. Here, we show the realization of the first balanced Josephson heat modulator designed to offer full control at the nanoscale over the phase-coherent component of thermal currents. Our device provides magnetic-flux-dependent temperature modulations up to 40 mK in amplitude with a maximum of the flux-to-temperature transfer coefficient reaching 200 mK per flux quantum at a bath temperature of 25 mK. Foremost, it demonstrates the exact correspondence in the phase engineering of charge and heat currents, breaking ground for advanced caloritronic nanodevices such as thermal splitters, heat pumps and time-dependent electronic engines.

  16. Nanoscale phase engineering of thermal transport with a Josephson heat modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornieri, Antonio; Blanc, Christophe; Bosisio, Riccardo; D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Macroscopic quantum phase coherence has one of its pivotal expressions in the Josephson effect, which manifests itself both in charge and energy transport. The ability to master the amount of heat transferred through two tunnel-coupled superconductors by tuning their phase difference is the core of coherent caloritronics, and is expected to be a key tool in a number of nanoscience fields, including solid-state cooling, thermal isolation, radiation detection, quantum information and thermal logic. Here, we show the realization of the first balanced Josephson heat modulator designed to offer full control at the nanoscale over the phase-coherent component of thermal currents. Our device provides magnetic-flux-dependent temperature modulations up to 40 mK in amplitude with a maximum of the flux-to-temperature transfer coefficient reaching 200 mK per flux quantum at a bath temperature of 25 mK. Foremost, it demonstrates the exact correspondence in the phase engineering of charge and heat currents, breaking ground for advanced caloritronic nanodevices such as thermal splitters, heat pumps and time-dependent electronic engines.

  17. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs. PMID:27383387

  18. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3-0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs.

  19. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y M; Zeng, J F; Wang, S; Sun, B A; Wang, Q; Lu, J; Gravier, S; Bladin, J J; Wang, W H; Pan, M X; Liu, C T; Yang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3-0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs. PMID:27383387

  20. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs.

  1. Controlling magnetism by ultrashort laser pulses: from fundamentals to nanoscale engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossini, D.; Rasing, Th.

    2016-06-01

    From the discovery of sub-picosecond demagnetization over a decade ago [1] to the recent demonstration of magnetization reversal by a single 40 femtosecond laser pulse [2], the manipulation of spins by ultra-short laser pulses has become a fundamentally challenging topic with a potentially high impact for future spintronics, data storage and manipulation and quantum computation [3]. It was realized that the femtosecond laser induced all-optical switching (AOS) as observed in ferrimagnets exploits the laser induced strongly non-equilibrium dynamics and the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between their sublattices [4-6]. This opens the way to engineer new magnetic materials for AOS [7,8], though for real applications nanoscale control of inhomogeneities appears to be relevant [9]. Besides the intruiging technological implications of these observations, they broadened remarkably the frontiers of our fundamental knowledge of magnetic phenomena. The laser driven out-of-equilibrium states cannot be described in term of the well-established thermodynamical approach, which is based on the concepts of equilibrium and adiabatic transformations. Theoretical efforts, although in their infancy, have already demonstrated [5,6] that light-induced spin dynamics on the (sub)-picosecond time scale results in phenomena utterly forbidden in a thermodynamical framework. Another challenge is how to bring the optical manipulation of magnetic media to the required nanoscale. This is clearly a key element for the perspectives in terms of magnetic recording. In addition, it would allow to explore a novel regime of spin dynamics, since the investigation of magnets on the femtosecond time-scale and the nanometer length-scale simultaneously is unexplored. One experimental approach which may be successful makes use of wave-shaping techniques [10]. Recent results with engineered hybrid magnetic materials and nanofocusing via a plasmonic antenna showed the practical potential of AOS: the

  2. Quantum Oscillations of the Nanoscale Structural Inhomogeneities of the Domain Wall in Magnetic Bubble.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, A B; Barabash, M Yu

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that at low temperatures, quantum oscillations of nanoscale structural inhomogeneities (the vertical Bloch line and the Bloch point) occur in the domain walls of cylindrical magnetic domains formed in a uniaxial magnetic film with strong magnetic anisotropy. The conditions for the excitation of these oscillations are determined.

  3. Engine Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKnight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schrantz, S.; Hartle, M. S.; Bechtel, G. S.; Lewis, K.; Ridgway, M.; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the technical effort to develop: (1) geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts in finite element form, (2) component design tools for nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts which utilize the recipes and (3) an integrated design tool which combines the simulations of the nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts with the previously developed combustor, turbine blade, and turbine vane models for a total engine representation. These developments will be accomplished in cooperation and in conjunction with comparable efforts of NASA Glenn Research Center.

  4. The Identification of Nanoscale Structures According to a Parameters of Acoustic Structuroscopy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababkov, N. V.; Smirnov, A. N.; Bykova, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    The fracture surface of a destroyed steam turbine rotor is studied by acoustic structuroscopy method. The structural-phase state of the metal of the destroyed rotor of a steam turbine is studied using the methods of electron microscopy. It was established that in the areas of control, where the values of the acoustic characteristics have significant differences from the rest of the metal, detected nanocrystalline structure. The possibility of determining the structure of the nanoscale metal by acoustic structuroscopy is shown.

  5. Molecular engineering of nanoscale quadrupolar chromophores for two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porres, Laurent; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Ventelon, Lionel; Barzoukas, Marguerite; Moreaux, Laurent; Pons, Thomas; Mertz, Jerome

    2003-02-01

    Our aim has been the design of optimized NLO-phores with very high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections (s2) in the red-NIR region, while maintaining high linear transparency and high fluorescence quantum yield. Our molecular engineering strategy is based on the push-push or pull-pull functionalization of semi-rigid nanoscale conjugated systems. The central building blocks were selected as rigid units that may assist quadrupolar intramolecular charge transfer by acting either as a (weak) donor or acceptor core. Quadrupolar molecules derived either from a phenyl unit, a rigidified biphenyl moiety or a fused bithiophene unit have been considered. Conjugated oligomers made of phenylene-vinylene and/or phenylene-ethynylene units were selected as connecting spacers between the core and the electroactive end groups to ensure effective electronic conjugation while maintaining suitable transparency/fluorescence. The TPA cross-sections were determined by investigating the two-photon-excited fluorescence properties using a Ti:sapphire laser delivering fs pulses. Both the nature of the end groups and of the core moiety play an important role in determining the TPA spectra. In addition, by adjusting the length and nature of the conjugated extensor, both amplification and spectral tuning of TPA cross-sections can be achieved. As a result, push-push fluorophores which demonstrate giant TPA cross-sections (up to 3000 GM) in the visible red, high fluorescence quantum yields and good transparency in the visible range have been obtained.

  6. Monitoring of civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrsa, Valentin E.; Burtseva, Larisa P.; Rivas Lopez, Moises; Tyrsa, Vera V.

    2004-07-01

    Civil engineering structures require geometrical monitoring to assure their integrity during their life time. The monitoring by geodetic devices or according to GPS technology is not always appropriate, sometimes it is unrealizable. Means for monitoring based on automatic geodetic measurements applying optical scanners are proposed. The sensor for integrity and deformation control of the structure elements and components was designed.

  7. The Structure-Mapping Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkenhainer, Brian; And Others

    This paper describes the Structure-Mapping Engine (SME), a cognitive simulation program for studying human analogical processing. SME is based on Gentner's Structure-Mapping theory of analogy, and provides a "tool kit" for constructing matching algorithms consistent with this theory. This flexibility enhances cognitive simulation studies by…

  8. Toward Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Optical Parametric Amplification (SPOPA) with Engineered Nanoparticles: A Nanoscale Tunable Infrared Source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Zhou, Linan; Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Dong, Liangliang; Day, Jared K; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2016-05-11

    Active optical processes such as amplification and stimulated emission promise to play just as important a role in nanoscale optics as they have in mainstream modern optics. The ability of metallic nanostructures to enhance optical nonlinearities at the nanoscale has been shown for a number of nonlinear and active processes; however, one important process yet to be seen is optical parametric amplification. Here, we report the demonstration of surface plasmon-enhanced difference frequency generation by integration of a nonlinear optical medium, BaTiO3, in nanocrystalline form within a plasmonic nanocavity. These nanoengineered composite structures support resonances at pump, signal, and idler frequencies, providing large enhancements of the confined fields and efficient coupling of the wavelength-converted idler radiation to the far-field. This nanocomplex works as a nanoscale tunable infrared light source and paves the way for the design and fabrication of a surface plasmon-enhanced optical parametric amplifier. PMID:27089276

  9. Toward Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Optical Parametric Amplification (SPOPA) with Engineered Nanoparticles: A Nanoscale Tunable Infrared Source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Zhou, Linan; Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Dong, Liangliang; Day, Jared K; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2016-05-11

    Active optical processes such as amplification and stimulated emission promise to play just as important a role in nanoscale optics as they have in mainstream modern optics. The ability of metallic nanostructures to enhance optical nonlinearities at the nanoscale has been shown for a number of nonlinear and active processes; however, one important process yet to be seen is optical parametric amplification. Here, we report the demonstration of surface plasmon-enhanced difference frequency generation by integration of a nonlinear optical medium, BaTiO3, in nanocrystalline form within a plasmonic nanocavity. These nanoengineered composite structures support resonances at pump, signal, and idler frequencies, providing large enhancements of the confined fields and efficient coupling of the wavelength-converted idler radiation to the far-field. This nanocomplex works as a nanoscale tunable infrared light source and paves the way for the design and fabrication of a surface plasmon-enhanced optical parametric amplifier.

  10. Nanoscale surface structuring during ion bombardment of elemental semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzenberg, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    Nano-patterning of surfaces with uniform ion bombardment yields a rich phase-space of topographic patterns. Particle irradiation can cause surface ultra-smoothing or self-organized nanoscale pattern formation in surface topography. Topographic pattern formation has previously been attributed to the effects of the removal of target atoms by sputter erosion. In this thesis, the surface morphology evolution of Si(100) and Ge(100) during low energy ion bombardment of Ar+ and Kr+ ions, respectively, is studied. Our facilities for studies of surface processes at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) allow in-situ characterization of surface morphology evolution during ion bombardment using grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). This technique is used to measure in reciprocal space the kinetics of formation or decay of correlated nanostructures on the surface, effectively measuring the height-height correlations. A linear model is used to characterize the early time kinetic behavior during ion bombardment as a function of ion beam incidence angle. The curvature coefficients predicted by the widely used erosive model of Bradley and Harper are quantitatively negligible and of the wrong sign when compared to the observed effect in both Si and Ge. A mass-redistribution model explains the observed ultra-smoothing at low angles, exhibits an instability at higher angles, and predicts the observed 45° critical angle separating these two regimes in Si. The Ge surface evolution during Kr+ irradiation is qualitatively similar to that observed for Ar+ irradiation of Si at the same ion energy. However, the critical angle for Ge cannot be quantitatively reproduced by the simple mass redistribution model. Crater function theory, as developed by Norris et al., incorporates both mass redistributive and erosive effects, and predicts constraining relationships between curvature coefficients. These constraints are compared to experimental data of both Si and Ge

  11. Military engine computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Daniel E.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative (IHPTET) goals require a strong analytical base. Effective analysis of composite materials is critical to life analysis and structural optimization. Accurate life prediction for all material systems is critical. User friendly systems are also desirable. Post processing of results is very important. The IHPTET goal is to double turbine engine propulsion capability by the year 2003. Fifty percent of the goal will come from advanced materials and structures, the other 50 percent will come from increasing performance. Computer programs are listed.

  12. Nanoscale superstructures assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR): programmable construction, structural diversity, and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Hua; Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-11-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an essential tool in biotechnology laboratories and is becoming increasingly important in other areas of research. Extensive data obtained over the last 12 years has shown that the combination of PCR with nanoscale dispersions can resolve issues in the preparation DNA-based materials that include both inorganic and organic nanoscale components. Unlike conventional DNA hybridization and antibody-antigen complexes, PCR provides a new, effective assembly platform that both increases the yield of DNA-based nanomaterials and allows researchers to program and control assembly with predesigned parameters including those assisted and automated by computers. As a result, this method allows researchers to optimize to the combinatorial selection of the DNA strands for their nanoparticle conjugates. We have developed a PCR approach for producing various nanoscale assemblies including organic motifs such as small molecules, macromolecules, and inorganic building blocks, such as nanorods (NRs), metal, semiconductor, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). We start with a nanoscale primer and then modify that building block using the automated steps of PCR-based assembly including initialization, denaturation, annealing, extension, final elongation, and final hold. The intermediate steps of denaturation, annealing, and extension are cyclic, and we use computer control so that the assembled superstructures reach their predetermined complexity. The structures assembled using a small number of PCR cycles show a lower polydispersity than similar discrete structures obtained by direct hybridization between the nanoscale building blocks. Using different building blocks, we assembled the following structural motifs by PCR: (1) discrete nanostructures (NP dimers, NP multimers including trimers, pyramids, tetramers or hexamers, etc.), (2) branched NP superstructures and heterochains, (3) NP satellite-like superstructures, (4) Y-shaped nanostructures and DNA

  13. Physical principles of genomic regulation through cellular nanoscale structure and implications for initiation of carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Vadim

    2011-03-01

    Although compelling evidence suggests that cellular nanoarchitecture and nanoscale environment where molecular interactions take place would be expected to significantly affect macromolecular processes, biological ramifications of cellular nanoscale organization have been largely unexplored. This understanding has been hampered in part by the diffraction limited resolution of optical microscopy. The talk will discuss a novel optical microscopy technique, partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, that is capable of quantifying statistical properties of cell structure at the nanoscale. Animal and human studies demonstrated that an alteration in the statistical properties of the nanoscale mass density distribution in the cell nucleus (e.g. nuclear nanoarchitecture) is one of the earliest and ubiquitous events in carcinogenesis and precedes any other known morphological changes at larger length scales (e.g. microarchitecture). The talk will also discuss the physical principles of how the alteration in nuclear nanoarchitecture may modulate genomic processes and, in particular, gene transcription. Work done in collaboration with Hariharan Subramanian, Prabhakar Pradhan, Dhwanil Damania, Lusik Cherkezyan, Yolanda Stypula, Jun Soo Kim, Igal Szleifer, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, Hemant K. Roy, Northshore University HealthSystems, Evanston, IL

  14. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  15. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  16. First-principles mobility calculations and atomic-scale interface roughness in nanoscale structures.

    PubMed

    Evans, M H; Zhang, X-G; Joannopoulos, J D; Pantelides, S T

    2005-09-01

    Calculations of mobilities have so far been carried out using approximate methods that suppress atomic-scale detail. Such approaches break down in nanoscale structures. Here we report the development of a method to calculate mobilities using atomic-scale models of the structures and density functional theory at various levels of sophistication and accuracy. The method is used to calculate the effect of atomic-scale roughness on electron mobilities in ultrathin double-gate silicon-on-insulator structures. The results elucidate the origin of the significant reduction in mobility observed in ultrathin structures at low electron densities.

  17. First-Principles Mobility Calculations and Atomic-Scale Interface Roughness in Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Matthew H; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2005-01-01

    Calculations of mobilities have so far been carried out using approximate methods that suppress atomic-scale detail. Such approaches break down in nanoscale structures. Here we report the development of a method to calculate mobilities using atomic-scale models of the structures and density functional theory at various levels of sophistication and accuracy. The method is used to calculate the effect of atomic-scale roughness on electron mobilities in ultrathin double-gate silicon-on-insulator structures. The results elucidate the origin of the significant reduction in mobility observed in ultrathin structures at low electron densities.

  18. Nanoscale Distribution of Sulfonic Acid Groups Determines Structure and Binding of Water in Nafion Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The connection between the nanoscale structure of two chemically equivalent, yet morphologically distinct Nafion fuel‐cell membranes and their macroscopic chemical properties is demonstrated. Quantification of the chemical interactions between water and Nafion reveals that extruded membranes have smaller water channels with a reduced sulfonic acid head group density compared to dispersion‐cast membranes. As a result, a disproportionally large amount of non‐bulk water molecules exists in extruded membranes, which also exhibit larger proton conductivity and larger water mobility compared to cast membranes. The differences in the physicochemical properties of the membranes, that is, the chemical constitution of the water channels and the local water structure, and the accompanying differences in macroscopic water and proton transport suggest that the chemistry of nanoscale channels is an important, yet largely overlooked parameter that influences the functionality of fuel‐cell membranes. PMID:26895211

  19. Nanoscale Distribution of Sulfonic Acid Groups Determines Structure and Binding of Water in Nafion Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao; Bonn, Mischa; Parekh, Sapun H; Domke, Katrin F

    2016-03-14

    The connection between the nanoscale structure of two chemically equivalent, yet morphologically distinct Nafion fuel-cell membranes and their macroscopic chemical properties is demonstrated. Quantification of the chemical interactions between water and Nafion reveals that extruded membranes have smaller water channels with a reduced sulfonic acid head group density compared to dispersion-cast membranes. As a result, a disproportionally large amount of non-bulk water molecules exists in extruded membranes, which also exhibit larger proton conductivity and larger water mobility compared to cast membranes. The differences in the physicochemical properties of the membranes, that is, the chemical constitution of the water channels and the local water structure, and the accompanying differences in macroscopic water and proton transport suggest that the chemistry of nanoscale channels is an important, yet largely overlooked parameter that influences the functionality of fuel-cell membranes.

  20. Nanoscale Structure, Dynamics, and Aging Behavior of Metallic Glass Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J A J; Holt, C M B; Luber, E J; Fortin, D C; Popowich, G; Zahiri, B; Concepcion, P; Mitlin, D; Freeman, M R

    2016-01-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy observations resolve the structure and dynamics of metallic glass Cu100-xHfx films and demonstrate scanning tunnelling microscopy control of aging at a metallic glass surface. Surface clusters exhibit heterogeneous hopping dynamics. Low Hf concentration films feature an aged surface of larger, slower clusters. Argon ion-sputtering destroys the aged configuration, yielding a surface in constant fluctuation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy can locally restore the relaxed state, allowing for nanoscale lithographic definition of aged sections. PMID:27498698

  1. Nanoscale Structure, Dynamics, and Aging Behavior of Metallic Glass Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J. A. J.; Holt, C. M. B.; Luber, E. J.; Fortin, D. C.; Popowich, G.; Zahiri, B.; Concepcion, P.; Mitlin, D.; Freeman, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy observations resolve the structure and dynamics of metallic glass Cu100−xHfx films and demonstrate scanning tunnelling microscopy control of aging at a metallic glass surface. Surface clusters exhibit heterogeneous hopping dynamics. Low Hf concentration films feature an aged surface of larger, slower clusters. Argon ion-sputtering destroys the aged configuration, yielding a surface in constant fluctuation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy can locally restore the relaxed state, allowing for nanoscale lithographic definition of aged sections. PMID:27498698

  2. Nanoscale Structure, Dynamics, and Aging Behavior of Metallic Glass Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, J. A. J.; Holt, C. M. B.; Luber, E. J.; Fortin, D. C.; Popowich, G.; Zahiri, B.; Concepcion, P.; Mitlin, D.; Freeman, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy observations resolve the structure and dynamics of metallic glass Cu100-xHfx films and demonstrate scanning tunnelling microscopy control of aging at a metallic glass surface. Surface clusters exhibit heterogeneous hopping dynamics. Low Hf concentration films feature an aged surface of larger, slower clusters. Argon ion-sputtering destroys the aged configuration, yielding a surface in constant fluctuation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy can locally restore the relaxed state, allowing for nanoscale lithographic definition of aged sections.

  3. Fracture Control in Engineering Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherly, G. C.

    1980-07-01

    The three-day meeting "Fracture Control in Engineering Structures" was held at the 1979 C.I.M. Annual Conference of Metallurgists in Sudbury, Ontario, August 19-21, 1979. The meeting was organized by the Materials Engineering Section of C.I.M. and the Canadian Fracture Research Committee (CFRC), a non-profit organization and the national arm of the International Congress on Fracture. The objectives of CFRC are to promote research and conferences in Canada on the Strength & Fracture of Materials. To this end, CFRC holds (sometimes jointly) conferences every year.

  4. A poly(vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate blend monolith with nanoscale porous structure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2013-10-04

    A stimuli-responsive poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/sodium alginate (SA) blend monolith with nanoscale porous (mesoporous) structure is successfully fabricated by thermally impacted non-solvent induced phase separation (TINIPS) method. The PVA/SA blend monolith with different SA contents is conveniently fabricated in an aqueous methanol without any templates. The solvent suitable for the fabrication of the present blend monolith by TINIPS is different with that of the PVA monolith. The nanostructural control of the blend monolith is readily achieved by optimizing the fabrication conditions. Brunauer Emmett Teller measurement shows that the obtained blend monolith has a large surface area. Pore size distribution plot for the blend monolith obtained by the non-local density functional theory method reveals the existence of the nanoscale porous structure. Fourier transform infrared analysis reveals the strong interactions between PVA and SA. The pH-responsive property of the blend monolith is investigated on the basis of swelling ratio in different pH solutions. The present blend monolith of biocompatible and biodegradable PVA and SA with nanoscale porous structure has large potential for applications in biomedical and environmental fields.

  5. A poly(vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate blend monolith with nanoscale porous structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A stimuli-responsive poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/sodium alginate (SA) blend monolith with nanoscale porous (mesoporous) structure is successfully fabricated by thermally impacted non-solvent induced phase separation (TINIPS) method. The PVA/SA blend monolith with different SA contents is conveniently fabricated in an aqueous methanol without any templates. The solvent suitable for the fabrication of the present blend monolith by TINIPS is different with that of the PVA monolith. The nanostructural control of the blend monolith is readily achieved by optimizing the fabrication conditions. Brunauer Emmett Teller measurement shows that the obtained blend monolith has a large surface area. Pore size distribution plot for the blend monolith obtained by the non-local density functional theory method reveals the existence of the nanoscale porous structure. Fourier transform infrared analysis reveals the strong interactions between PVA and SA. The pH-responsive property of the blend monolith is investigated on the basis of swelling ratio in different pH solutions. The present blend monolith of biocompatible and biodegradable PVA and SA with nanoscale porous structure has large potential for applications in biomedical and environmental fields. PMID:24093494

  6. Nanoscale structural and functional mapping of nacre by scanning probe microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xilong; Miao, Hongchen; Li, Faxin

    2013-11-01

    Nacre has received great attention due to its nanoscale hierarchical structure and extraordinary mechanical properties. Meanwhile, the nanoscale piezoelectric properties of nacre have also been investigated but the structure-function relationship has never been addressed. In this work, firstly we realized quantitative nanomechanical mapping of nacre of a green abalone using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM). The modulus of the mineral tablets is determined to be ~80 GPa and that of the organic biopolymer no more than 23 GPa, and the organic-inorganic interface width is determined to be about 34 +/- 9 nm. Then, we conducted both AFAM and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) mapping in the same scanning area to explore the correlations between the nanomechanical and piezoelectric properties. The PFM testing shows that the organic biopolymer exhibits a significantly stronger piezoresponse than the mineral tablets, and they permeate each other, which is very difficult to reproduce in artificial materials. Finally, the phase hysteresis loops and amplitude butterfly loops were also observed using switching spectroscopy PFM, implying that nacre may also be a bio-ferroelectric material. The obtained nanoscale structural and functional properties of nacre could be very helpful in understanding its deformation mechanism and designing biomimetic materials of extraordinary properties.

  7. Nanoscale Structure of Organic Matter Could Explain Litter Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, G.; Adani, F.

    2014-12-01

    According to the literature biochemical catalyses are limited in their actions because of the complex macroscopic and, above all, microscopic structures of cell wall that limit mass transportation (i.e. 3D structure). Our study on energy crop showed that plant digestibility increased by modifying the 3D cell wall microstructure. Results obtained were ascribed to the enlargement, such as effectively measured, of the pore spaces between cellulose fibrils. Therefore we postulated that 3 D structure of plant residues drives degradability in soil determining its recalcitrance in short time. Here we focused on the drivers of short-term decomposition of organic matter (plant residues) in soils evaluating the architecture of plant tissues, captured via measurements of the microporosiy of the cell walls. Decomposition rates of a wide variety of biomass types were studied conducting experiments in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Different analytical approaches were applied in order to characterize biomass at both chemical and physical level. Combined statistical approaches were used to examine the relationships between carbon mineralization and chemical/physical characteristics. The results revealed that degradation was significantly and negatively correlated with the micro-porosity surface (MiS) (surface of pores of 0.3-1.5 nm of diameter). The multiple regressions performed by using partial least square model enabled describing biomass biodegradability under either aerobic and anaerobic condition by using micro-porosity and aromatic-C content (assumed to be representative of lignin) as independent variables (R2 =0.97, R2cv =0.95 for aerobic condition; R2 =0.99, R2cv =0.98 for anaerobic condition, respectively). These results corroborate the hypothesis that plant tissues are physically protected from enzymatic attack by a microporous "sheath" that limit penetration into cell wall, and demonstrate the key role played by aromatic carbon, because of its chemical

  8. Nanoscale insights on one- and two-dimensional material structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floresca, Herman Carlo

    The race for smaller, faster and more efficient devices has led researchers to explore the possibilities of utilizing nanostructures for scaling. These one-dimensional and two-dimensional materials have properties that are attractive for this purpose but are still not well controlled. Control comes with a complete understanding of the materials' electrical, thermal, optical and structural characteristics but is difficult to obtain due to their small scale. This work is intended to help researchers overcome the difficulty in studying nanostructures by providing techniques for analysis and insights of nanostructures that have not been previously available. Two nanostructures were studied: silicon nanowires and graphene. The nanowires were prepared for cross-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to discover the effects that controlled oxidation has on the dimensions and shape of the nanowires. Since cross-section TEM is not able to provide information about surface structure, a method for manipulating the wires with orientation control was developed. With this ability, all three orthogonal views of the nanowire were compiled for a comprehensive study on its structure in terms of shape and surface roughness. Graphene was used for a two-dimensional analytical technique that took advantage of customized computer programs for data acquisition, measurement and display. With the information provided, distinctions between grain boundary types in polycrystalline graphene were made and supported by statistical information from the software's output. It was also applied to a growth series of graphene samples in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps. The results help point to origins of graphene's polycrystalline nature. This dissertation concludes with a thought towards the future by highlighting a method that can help analyze nanostructures, which may become incorporated into the structures of large

  9. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  10. Communication: Nanoscale structure of tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium based ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettige, Jeevapani J.; Araque, Juan C.; Kashyap, Hemant K.; Margulis, Claudio J.

    2016-03-01

    In a recent communication [J. J. Hettige et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 111102 (2014)], we investigated the anomalous temperature dependence of the X-ray first sharp diffraction peak (or prepeak) in the tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide ionic liquid. Contrary to what was expected and often observed, the first sharp diffraction peak in this system was shown to increase in intensity with increasing temperature. This implies higher intermediate-range periodicity at a higher temperature. Is this counter-intuitive behavior specific to the combination of cation and anion? The current work analyzes the structural behavior of the same cation coupled with six different anions ranging from the small and spherically symmetric Cl- to the more structurally complex and charge-diffuse NTf2-. In all cases, the same temperature behavior trend for the prepeak is observed independent of anionic nature. We will show that the intensity increase in the prepeak region is associated with the structural behavior of charged liquid subcomponents. Instead, upon a temperature increase, the apolar subcomponents contribute to what would be an expected decrease of prepeak intensity.

  11. Nanoscale Engineering of Heterostructured Anode Materials for Boosting Lithium-Ion Storage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gen; Yan, Litao; Luo, Hongmei; Guo, Shaojun

    2016-09-01

    Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), as one of the most important electrochemical energy-storage devices, currently provide the dominant power source for a range of devices, including portable electronic devices and electric vehicles, due to their high energy and power densities. The interest in exploring new electrode materials for LIBs has been drastically increasing due to the surging demands for clean energy. However, the challenging issues essential to the development of electrode materials are their low lithium capacity, poor rate ability, and low cycling stability, which strongly limit their practical applications. Recent remarkable advances in material science and nanotechnology enable rational design of heterostructured nanomaterials with optimized composition and fine nanostructure, providing new opportunities for enhancing electrochemical performance. Here, the progress as to how to design new types of heterostructured anode materials for enhancing LIBs is reviewed, in the terms of capacity, rate ability, and cycling stability: i) carbon-nanomaterials-supported heterostructured anode materials; ii) conducting-polymer-coated electrode materials; iii) inorganic transition-metal compounds with core@shell structures; and iv) combined strategies to novel heterostructures. By applying different strategies, nanoscale heterostructured anode materials with reduced size, large surfaces area, enhanced electronic conductivity, structural stability, and fast electron and ion transport, are explored for boosting LIBs in terms of high capacity, long cycling lifespan, and high rate durability. Finally, the challenges and perspectives of future materials design for high-performance LIB anodes are considered. The strategies discussed here not only provide promising electrode materials for energy storage, but also offer opportunities in being extended for making a variety of novel heterostructured nanomaterials for practical renewable energy applications.

  12. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the

  13. Nanoscale Magnetic Structure of Ferromagnet/Antiferromagnet Manganite Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Niebieskikwiat, D.; Hueso, L. E.; Borchers, J. A.; Mathur, N. D.; Salamon, M. B.

    2007-12-14

    We use polarized neutron reflectometry and dc magnetometry to obtain a comprehensive picture of the magnetic structure of a series of La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3}/Pr{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO/PCMO) superlattices, with varying thickness of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) PCMO layers (0{<=}t{sub A}{<=}7.6 nm). While LSMO presents a few magnetically frustrated monolayers at the interfaces with PCMO, in the latter a magnetic contribution due to ferromagnetic (FM) inclusions within the AFM matrix is maximized at t{sub A}{approx}3 nm. This enhancement of FM moment occurs at the matching between layer thickness and cluster size, implying the possibility of tuning phase separation by imposing appropriate geometrical constraints which favor the accommodation of FM nanoclusters within the ''non-FM'' material.

  14. Performance assessment and optimization of an irreversible nano-scale Stirling engine cycle operating with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad-Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah

    2015-09-01

    Developing new technologies like nano-technology improves the performance of the energy industries. Consequently, emerging new groups of thermal cycles in nano-scale can revolutionize the energy systems' future. This paper presents a thermo-dynamical study of a nano-scale irreversible Stirling engine cycle with the aim of optimizing the performance of the Stirling engine cycle. In the Stirling engine cycle the working fluid is an Ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas. Moreover, two different strategies are proposed for a multi-objective optimization issue, and the outcomes of each strategy are evaluated separately. The first strategy is proposed to maximize the ecological coefficient of performance (ECOP), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F . Furthermore, the second strategy is suggested to maximize the thermal efficiency ( η), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F). All the strategies in the present work are executed via a multi-objective evolutionary algorithms based on NSGA∥ method. Finally, to achieve the final answer in each strategy, three well-known decision makers are executed. Lastly, deviations of the outcomes gained in each strategy and each decision maker are evaluated separately.

  15. Oxide films at the nanoscale: new structures, new functions, and new materials.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2011-11-15

    flexibility, electronic modifications, and nanoporosity) are now largely understood, thus paving the way for the rational design of new catalytic systems based on oxide ultrathin films. Many of the mechanisms involved (electron tunneling, work function changes, defects engineering, and so forth) are typical of semiconductor physics and allow a direct link between the two fields. A related conceptual framework, the "electronic theory of catalysis", was proposed a long time ago but has been largely neglected by the catalytic community. A renewed appreciation of this catalytic framework, together with spectacular advances in modeling and electronic structure methods, now makes it possible to combine theory with advanced experimental setups and meet the challenge of designing new materials with tailored properties. In this Account, we discuss some of the recent advances with nanoscale oxide films, highlighting contributions from our laboratory. Once mastered, ultrathin oxide films on metals will provide vast and unforeseen opportunities in heterogeneous catalysis as well as in other fields of science and technology.

  16. Soft embossing of nanoscale optical and plasmonic structures in glass.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jimin; Le, An-Phong; Schulmerich, Matthew V; Maria, Joana; Lee, Tae-Woo; Gray, Stephen K; Bhargava, Rohit; Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2011-07-26

    We describe here soft nanofabrication methods using spin-on glass (SOG) materials for the fabrication of both bulk materials and replica masters. The precision of soft nanofabrication using SOG is tested using features on size scales ranging from 0.6 nm to 1.0 μm. The performance of the embossed optics is tested quantitatively via replica patterning of new classes of plasmonic crystals formed by soft nanoimprinting of SOG. These crystals are found to offer significant improvements over previously reported plasmonic crystals fabricated using embossed polymeric substrate materials in several ways. The SOG structures are shown to be particularly robust, being stable in organic solvent environments and at high temperatures (∼450 °C), thus extending the capacities and scope of plasmonic crystal applications to sensing in these environments. They also provide a stable, and particularly high-performance, platform for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. We further illustrate that SOG embossed nanostructures can serve as regenerable masters for the fabrication of plasmonic crystals. Perhaps most significantly, we show how the design rules of plasmonic crystals replicated from a single master can be tuned during the embossing steps of the fabrication process to provide useful modifications of their optical responses. We illustrate how the strongest feature in the transmission spectrum of a plasmonic crystal formed using a single SOG master can be shifted precisely in a SOG replica between 700 and 900 nm for an exemplary design of a full 3D plasmonic crystal by careful manipulation of the process parameters used to fabricate the optical device.

  17. Soft Embossing of Nanoscale Optical and Plasmonic Structures in Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jimin; Le, An-Phong; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Maria, Joana; Lee, Tae-Woo; Gray, Stephen K.; Bhargava, Rohit; Rogers, John A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2011-07-26

    We describe here soft nanofabrication methods using spin-on glass (SOG) materials for the fabrication of both bulk materials and replica masters. The precision of soft nanofabrication using SOG is tested using features on size scales ranging from 0.6 nm to 1.0 μm. The performance of the embossed optics is tested quantitatively via replica patterning of new classes of plasmonic crystals formed by soft nanoimprinting of SOG. These crystals are found to offer significant improvements over previously reported plasmonic crystals fabricated using embossed polymeric substrate materials in several ways. The SOG structures are shown to be particularly robust, being stable in organic solvent environments and at high temperatures (~450 °C), thus extending the capacities and scope of plasmonic crystal applications to sensing in these environments. They also provide a stable, and particularly high-performance, platform for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. We further illustrate that SOG embossed nanostructures can serve as regenerable masters for the fabrication of plasmonic crystals. Perhaps most significantly, we show how the design rules of plasmonic crystals replicated from a single master can be tuned during the embossing steps of the fabrication process to provide useful modifications of their optical responses. We illustrate how the strongest feature in the transmission spectrum of a plasmonic crystal formed using a single SOG master can be shifted precisely in a SOG replica between 700 and 900 nm for an exemplary design of a full 3D plasmonic crystal by careful manipulation of the process parameters used to fabricate the optical device.

  18. Soft embossing of nanoscale optical and plasmonic structures in glass.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jimin; Le, An-Phong; Schulmerich, Matthew V; Maria, Joana; Lee, Tae-Woo; Gray, Stephen K; Bhargava, Rohit; Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2011-07-26

    We describe here soft nanofabrication methods using spin-on glass (SOG) materials for the fabrication of both bulk materials and replica masters. The precision of soft nanofabrication using SOG is tested using features on size scales ranging from 0.6 nm to 1.0 μm. The performance of the embossed optics is tested quantitatively via replica patterning of new classes of plasmonic crystals formed by soft nanoimprinting of SOG. These crystals are found to offer significant improvements over previously reported plasmonic crystals fabricated using embossed polymeric substrate materials in several ways. The SOG structures are shown to be particularly robust, being stable in organic solvent environments and at high temperatures (∼450 °C), thus extending the capacities and scope of plasmonic crystal applications to sensing in these environments. They also provide a stable, and particularly high-performance, platform for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. We further illustrate that SOG embossed nanostructures can serve as regenerable masters for the fabrication of plasmonic crystals. Perhaps most significantly, we show how the design rules of plasmonic crystals replicated from a single master can be tuned during the embossing steps of the fabrication process to provide useful modifications of their optical responses. We illustrate how the strongest feature in the transmission spectrum of a plasmonic crystal formed using a single SOG master can be shifted precisely in a SOG replica between 700 and 900 nm for an exemplary design of a full 3D plasmonic crystal by careful manipulation of the process parameters used to fabricate the optical device. PMID:21711004

  19. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed. PMID:26518526

  20. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed.

  1. Nanoscale lead and noble gas inclusions in aluminum: structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik; Andersen, Hans Henrik; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used for structural and physical characterization of nanoscale inclusions of lead and noble gases in aluminum. When the inclusion sizes approach nanoscale dimensions, many of their properties are seen to deviate from similar properties in bulk and in most cases the deviations will increase as the inclusion sizes decrease. Binary alloys of lead and noble gases with aluminum are characterized by extremely low mutual solubilities and inclusions will, therefore, exist as practically pure components embedded in the aluminum matrix. Furthermore, the thermal vacancy mobility in aluminum at and above room temperature is sufficiently high to accommodate volume strains associated with the inclusions thus leading to virtually strain free crystals. The inclusions grow in parallel cube alignment with the aluminum matrix and have a cuboctahedral shape, which reflects directly the anisotropy of the interfacial energies. Inclusions in grain boundaries can have single crystalline or bicrystalline morphology that can be explained from a generalized Wulff analysis such as the xi-vector construction. The inclusions have been found to display a variety of nanoscale features such as high Laplace pressure, size-dependent superheating during melting, deviations from the Wulff shape displaying magic size effects, a shape dependence of edge energy, and so on. All these effects have been observed and monitored by TEM using conventional imaging conditions and high-resolution conditions in combination with in-situ analysis at elevated temperatures.

  2. Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS) is the development of a specialized software system for the construction of geometric descriptive and discrete analytical models of engine parts, components, and substructures which can be transferred to finite element analysis programs such as NASTRAN. The NASA Lewis Engine Structures Program is concerned with the development of technology for the rational structural design and analysis of advanced gas turbine engines with emphasis on advanced structural analysis, structural dynamics, structural aspects of aeroelasticity, and life prediction. Fundamental and common to all of these developments is the need for geometric and analytical model descriptions at various engine assembly levels which are generated using ESMOSS.

  3. Implementation of nanoscale circuits using dual metal gate engineered nanowire MOSFET with high-k dielectrics for low power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles Pravin, J.; Nirmal, D.; Prajoon, P.; Ajayan, J.

    2016-09-01

    This work covers the impact of dual metal gate engineered Junctionless MOSFET with various high-k dielectric in Nanoscale circuits for low power applications. Due to gate engineering in junctionless MOSFET, graded potential is obtained and results in higher electron velocity of about 31% for HfO2 than SiO2 in the channel region, which in turn improves the carrier transport efficiency. The simulation is done using sentaurus TCAD, ON current, OFF current, ION/IOFF ratio, DIBL, gain, transconductance and transconductance generation factor parameters are analysed. When using HfO2, DIBL shows a reduction of 61.5% over SiO2. The transconductance and transconductance generation factor shows an improvement of 44% and 35% respectively. The gain and output resistance also shows considerable improvement with high-k dielectrics. Using this device, inverter circuit is implemented with different high-k dielectric material and delay have been decreased by 4% with HfO2 when compared to SiO2. In addition, a significant reduction in power dissipation of the inverter circuit is obtained with high-k dielectric Dual Metal Surround Gate Junctionless Transistor than SiO2 based device. From the analysis, it is found that HfO2 will be a better alternative for the future nanoscale device.

  4. Nanoscale interface engineering in ZnO twin nanorods for proposed phonon tunnel devices.

    PubMed

    Singh, Avanendra; Senapati, Kartik; Satpati, Biswarup; Kumar, Mohit; Sahoo, Pratap K

    2015-02-14

    Zinc oxide twin nanorods, with two identical crystalline sections connected by an amorphous layer, were reproducibly grown using a simple one-step hydrothermal technique. The thickness of the amorphous layer between the crystalline segments was tunable with growth parameters, as confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The photoluminescence spectra of these twin nanorods exhibit strong near band edge emission in the UV range, with convoluted phonon sidebands. De-convolution analyses of these spectra showed that the amorphous interlayers act as effective phonon barriers beyond a certain thickness. Such oriented grown individual crystalline-amorphous-crystalline structures may be a suitable test system for fundamental studies of phonon tunneling in the nanostructure. While physical vapor deposition techniques are seriously constrained in realizing crystalline-amorphous-crystalline structures, our results show the viability of engineering embedded interfaces via chemical routes. PMID:25572135

  5. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  6. Using nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy to engineer the optical response of three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael B; Blaber, Martin G; Schatz, George C

    2014-06-17

    The a priori ability to design electromagnetic wave propagation is crucial for the development of novel metamaterials. Incorporating plasmonic building blocks is of particular interest due to their ability to confine visible light. Here we explore the use of anisotropy in nanoscale and mesoscale plasmonic array architectures to produce noble metal-based metamaterials with unusual optical properties. We find that the combination of nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy leads to rich opportunities for metamaterials throughout the visible and near-infrared. The low volume fraction (<5%) plasmonic metamaterials explored herein exhibit birefringence, a skin depth approaching that of pure metals for selected wavelengths, and directionally confined waves similar to those found in optical fibres. These data provide design principles with which the electromagnetic behaviour of plasmonic metamaterials can be tailored using high aspect ratio nanostructures that are accessible via a variety of synthesis and assembly methods.

  7. Using nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy to engineer the optical response of three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Michael B.; Blaber, Martin G.; Schatz, George C.

    2014-06-01

    The a priori ability to design electromagnetic wave propagation is crucial for the development of novel metamaterials. Incorporating plasmonic building blocks is of particular interest due to their ability to confine visible light. Here we explore the use of anisotropy in nanoscale and mesoscale plasmonic array architectures to produce noble metal-based metamaterials with unusual optical properties. We find that the combination of nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy leads to rich opportunities for metamaterials throughout the visible and near-infrared. The low volume fraction (<5%) plasmonic metamaterials explored herein exhibit birefringence, a skin depth approaching that of pure metals for selected wavelengths, and directionally confined waves similar to those found in optical fibres. These data provide design principles with which the electromagnetic behaviour of plasmonic metamaterials can be tailored using high aspect ratio nanostructures that are accessible via a variety of synthesis and assembly methods.

  8. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    SciTech Connect

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  9. The Mathematical Disposition of Structural Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsburg, Julie

    2007-01-01

    This ethnographic study investigated the mathematical disposition of engineers. Structural engineers in two firms were observed in everyday practice. Observation and interview data were analyzed to elucidate the role of mathematics in solving engineering problems and the engineers' perceptions of the status of mathematics relative to other…

  10. Nanoscale assembly of lanthanum silica with dense and porous interfacial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, Benjamin; Motuzas, Julius; Miller, Christopher R.; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports on the nanoscale assembly of hybrid lanthanum oxide and silica structures, which form patterns of interfacial dense and porous networks. It was found that increasing the molar ratio of lanthanum nitrate to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in an acid catalysed sol-gel process alters the expected microporous metal oxide silica structure to a predominantly mesoporous structure above a critical lanthanum concentration. This change manifests itself by the formation of a lanthanum silicate phase, which results from the reaction of lanthanum oxide nanoparticles with the silica matrix. This process converts the microporous silica into the denser silicate phase. Above a lanthanum to silica ratio of 0.15, the combination of growth and microporous silica consumption results in the formation of nanoscale hybrid lanthanum oxides, with the inter-nano-domain spacing forming mesoporous volume. As the size of these nano-domains increases with concentration, so does the mesoporous volume. The absence of lanthanum hydroxide (La(OH)3) suggests the formation of La2O3 surrounded by lanthanum silicate.

  11. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori; Yonemura, Shigeru; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Miki, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-09

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment.

  12. Nanoscale assembly of lanthanum silica with dense and porous interfacial structures

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, Benjamin; Motuzas, Julius; Miller, Christopher R.; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the nanoscale assembly of hybrid lanthanum oxide and silica structures, which form patterns of interfacial dense and porous networks. It was found that increasing the molar ratio of lanthanum nitrate to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in an acid catalysed sol-gel process alters the expected microporous metal oxide silica structure to a predominantly mesoporous structure above a critical lanthanum concentration. This change manifests itself by the formation of a lanthanum silicate phase, which results from the reaction of lanthanum oxide nanoparticles with the silica matrix. This process converts the microporous silica into the denser silicate phase. Above a lanthanum to silica ratio of 0.15, the combination of growth and microporous silica consumption results in the formation of nanoscale hybrid lanthanum oxides, with the inter-nano-domain spacing forming mesoporous volume. As the size of these nano-domains increases with concentration, so does the mesoporous volume. The absence of lanthanum hydroxide (La(OH)3) suggests the formation of La2O3 surrounded by lanthanum silicate. PMID:25644988

  13. Integration of nano-scale components and supports in micromachined 3D silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Azimi, S.; Y Dang, Z.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a process for the three-dimensional (3D) machining of p-type silicon on a micro- and nano-scale using high-energy ion beam irradiation with one or more energies and fluences, followed by electrochemical anodization in hydrofluoric acid. We present a study of the dependence of our fabricated structures on irradiating ion energies, fluences, geometries and wafer resistivity. All these factors determine whether the micro- and nano-scale features are properly connected to the supports in the 3D silicon structures. If wrongly chosen, any of these factors may cause a breakage at the connection through localized over-etching. Under optimum irradiation and anodization conditions, free-standing patterned membranes can be fabricated with feature dimensions of 100 nm over areas of many square millimeters. This investigation is based on silicon structures but is relevant to any electro-assisted etching process for 3D fabrication, paving the way for achieving free-standing silicon photonics, mechanical resonators and micro-/nano-electromechanical systems.

  14. Nanoscale Bio-engineering Solutions for Space Exploration: The Nanopore Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Cozmuta, Ioana

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of biological systems at the molecular level and extraction of essential information for nano-engineering design to guide the nano-fabrication of solid-state sensors and molecular identification devices is a computational challenge. The alpha hemolysin protein ion channel is used as a model system for structural analysis of nucleic acids like DNA. Applied voltage draws a DNA strand and surrounding ionic solution through the biological nanopore. The subunits in the DNA strand block ion flow by differing amounts. Atomistic scale simulations are employed using NASA supercomputers to study DNA translocation, with the aim to enhance single DNA subunit identification. Compared to protein channels, solid-state nanopores offer a better temporal control of the translocation of DNA and the possibility to easily tune its chemistry to increase the signal resolution. Potential applications for NASA missions, besides real-time genome sequencing include astronaut health, life detection and decoding of various genomes.

  15. Teachers' incorporation of nanoscale science and engineering lessons into the classroom and factors that influence this incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Kelly M.

    Previous research has shown that teachers face a number of challenges when incorporating innovative science content into their curricula. These challenges include: lack of science equipment; lack of support from a professional development team; lack of time to plan and teach the lessons; weak teacher content knowledge; and problems created by teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning including, their beliefs about reform efforts (Peers, Diezmann, & Watters, 2003; Roehrig, Kruse, & Kern, 2007). One innovative and interdisciplinary science field currently under investigation is nanoscale science and engineering (NSE) due to its emerging prominence in society, the need to help students gain entry into the job market, and the need to educate informed citizens. As teachers and science educators begin to incorporate nanoscale science and engineering concepts into existing science curricula, many factors will influence the incorporation of the NSE concepts. This study was specifically designed to examine how middle- and high-school teachers incorporated NSE lessons into their current curricula and the factors that influenced how these lessons were incorporated. Interviews were the primary data source for this study, with teachers' reflective narratives and classroom observations contributing to the data. The constant comparative method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967; Patton, 2002) was used in analyzing the data to determine the themes that emerged. The results of this study demonstrated that although teachers indicated many factors that influenced their decision to incorporate NSE into the curriculum. Teachers' content knowledge, teachers' beliefs about student abilities, and teachers' beliefs about the fit of NSE lessons to the current science curriculum were the most influential factors in determining the way teachers' incorporated NSE lessons. If teachers did not have the content knowledge nor were confident in their content knowledge, NSE incorporation did not occur

  16. Molecular Organization of the Nanoscale Surface Structures of the Dragonfly Hemianax papuensis Wing Epicuticle

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Elena P.; Nguyen, Song Ha; Webb, Hayden K.; Hasan, Jafar; Truong, Vi Khanh; Lamb, Robert N.; Duan, Xiaofei; Tobin, Mark J.; Mahon, Peter J.; Crawford, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular organization of the epicuticle (the outermost layer) of insect wings is vital in the formation of the nanoscale surface patterns that are responsible for bestowing remarkable functional properties. Using a combination of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques, including Synchrotron-sourced Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS), we have identified the chemical components that constitute the nanoscale structures on the surface of the wings of the dragonfly, Hemianax papuensis. The major components were identified to be fatty acids, predominantly hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid, and n-alkanes with even numbered carbon chains ranging from C14 to C30. The data obtained from XPS depth profiling, in conjunction with that obtained from GCMS analyses, enabled the location of particular classes of compounds to different regions within the epicuticle. Hexadecanoic acid was found to be a major component of the outer region of the epicuticle, which forms the surface nanostructures, and was also detected in deeper layers along with octadecanoic acid. Aliphatic compounds were detected throughout the epicuticle, and these appeared to form a third discrete layer that was separate from both the inner and outer epicuticles, which has never previously been reported. PMID:23874463

  17. From the Cover: Shape insensitive optimal adhesion of nanoscale fibrillar structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huajian; Yao, Haimin

    2004-05-01

    Gecko and many insects have adopted nanoscale fibrillar structures on their feet as adhesion devices. Here, we consider adhesion between a single fiber and a substrate by van der Waals or electrostatic interactions. For a given contact area A, the theoretical pull-off force of the fiber is thA where th is the theoretical strength of adhesion. We show that it is possible to design an optimal shape of the tip of the fiber to achieve the theoretical pull-off force. However, such design tends to be unreliable at the macroscopic scale because the pull-off force is sensitive to small variations in the tip shape. We find that a robust design of shape-insensitive optimal adhesion becomes possible only when the diameter of the fiber is reduced to length scales on the order of 100 nm. In general, optimal adhesion could be achieved by a combination of size reduction and shape optimization. The smaller the size, the less important the shape. At large contact sizes, optimal adhesion could still be achieved if the shape can be manufactured to a sufficiently high precision. The robust design of optimal adhesion at nanoscale provides a plausible explanation for the convergent evolution of hairy attachment systems in biology.

  18. Nanoscale Internal Fields in a Biased Graphene-Insulator-Semiconductor Structure.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Sylvie; Kalyanikar, Malathi; Duan, Junxi; Liu, Gang; Bartynski, Robert Allen; Andrei, Eva Y; Feldman, Leonard; Garfunkel, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Measuring and understanding electric fields in multilayered materials at the nanoscale remains a challenging problem impeding the development of novel devices. At this scale, it is far from obvious that materials can be accurately described by their intrinsic bulk properties, and considerations of the interfaces between layered materials become unavoidable for a complete description of the system's electronic properties. Here, a general approach to the direct measurement of nanoscale internal fields is proposed. Small spot X-ray photoemission was performed on a biased graphene/SiO2/Si structure in order to experimentally determine the potential profile across the system, including discontinuities at the interfaces. Core levels provide a measure of the local potential and are used to reconstruct the potential profile as a function of the depth through the stack. It is found that each interface plays a critical role in establishing the potential across the dielectric, and the origin of the potential discontinuities at each interface is discussed. PMID:27530545

  19. Fabrication of a lotus-like micro-nanoscale binary structured surface and wettability modulation from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xufeng; Shi, Gaoquan

    2005-10-01

    We report a simple method for fabricating a lotus-like micro-nanoscale binary structured surface of copper phosphate dihydrate. The copper phosphate dihydrate nanosheets were generated by galvanic cell corrosion of a copper foil with aqueous phosphorus acid solution drops and dried in an oxygen gas atmosphere, and they self-organized into a film with a lotus-like micro-nanoscale binary structured surface. The wettability of this surface can be changed from superhydrophilic to highly hydrophobic or superhydrophobic by heating or modifying it with an n-dodecanethiol monolayer.

  20. Fabrication of a lotus-like micro nanoscale binary structured surface and wettability modulation from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xufeng; Shi, Gaoquan

    2005-10-01

    We report a simple method for fabricating a lotus-like micro-nanoscale binary structured surface of copper phosphate dihydrate. The copper phosphate dihydrate nanosheets were generated by galvanic cell corrosion of a copper foil with aqueous phosphorus acid solution drops and dried in an oxygen gas atmosphere, and they self-organized into a film with a lotus-like micro-nanoscale binary structured surface. The wettability of this surface can be changed from superhydrophilic to highly hydrophobic or superhydrophobic by heating or modifying it with an n-dodecanethiol monolayer.

  1. Electron Microscopy and Analytical X-ray Characterization of Compositional and Nanoscale Structural Changes in Fossil Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatman, Elizabeth Marie

    The nanoscale structure of compact bone contains several features that are direct indicators of bulk tissue mechanical properties. Fossil bone tissues represent unique opportunities to understand the compact bone structure/property relationships from a deep time perspective, offering a possible array of new insights into bone diseases, biomimicry of composite materials, and basic knowledge of bioapatite composition and nanoscale bone structure. To date, most work with fossil bone has employed microscale techniques and has counter-indicated the survival of bioapatite and other nanoscale structural features. The obvious disconnect between the use of microscale techniques and the discernment of nanoscale structure has prompted this work. The goal of this study was to characterize the nanoscale constituents of fossil compact bone by applying a suite of diffraction, microscopy, and spectrometry techniques, representing the highest levels of spatial and energy resolution available today, and capable of complementary structural and compositional characterization from the micro- to the nanoscale. Fossil dinosaur and crocodile long bone specimens, as well as modern ratite and crocodile femurs, were acquired from the UC Museum of Paleontology. Preserved physiological features of significance were documented with scanning electron microscopy back-scattered imaging. Electron microprobe wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) revealed fossil bone compositions enriched in fluorine with a complementary loss of oxygen. X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrated that all specimens were composed of apatite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging revealed preserved nanocrystallinity in the fossil bones and electron diffraction studies further identified these nanocrystallites as apatite. Tomographic analyses of nanoscale elements imaged by TEM and small angle X-ray scattering were performed, with the results of each analysis further indicating that nanoscale structure is

  2. Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Felicie F.; Knudsen, Bjarne; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Frøhlich, Rikke F.; Krüger, Dinna; Bungert, Jörg; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert; Juul, Sissel; Veigaard, Christopher; Koch, Jørn; Rubinstein, John L.; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Hede, Marianne S.; Karlsson, Göran; Andersen, Anni H.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2008-01-01

    The inherent properties of DNA as a stable polymer with unique affinity for partner molecules determined by the specific Watson–Crick base pairing makes it an ideal component in self-assembling structures. This has been exploited for decades in the design of a variety of artificial substrates for investigations of DNA-interacting enzymes. More recently, strategies for synthesis of more complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D DNA structures have emerged. However, the building of such structures is still in progress and more experiences from different research groups and different fields of expertise are necessary before complex DNA structures can be routinely designed for the use in basal science and/or biotechnology. Here we present the design, construction and structural analysis of a covalently closed and stable 3D DNA structure with the connectivity of an octahedron, as defined by the double-stranded DNA helices that assembles from eight oligonucleotides with a yield of ∼30%. As demonstrated by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy analyses the eight-stranded DNA structure has a central cavity larger than the apertures in the surrounding DNA lattice and can be described as a nano-scale DNA cage, Hence, in theory it could hold proteins or other bio-molecules to enable their investigation in certain harmful environments or even allow their organization into higher order structures. PMID:18096620

  3. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate

  4. Fabrication of two-dimensional visible wavelength nanoscale plasmonic structures using hydrogen silsesquioxane based resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kyle Z.; Gadde, Akshitha; Kadiyala, Anand; Dawson, Jeremy M.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the global market for biosensors has continued to increase in combination with their expanding use in areas such as biodefense/detection, home diagnostics, biometric identification, etc. A constant necessity for inexpensive, portable bio-sensing methods, while still remaining simple to understand and operate, is the motivation behind novel concepts and designs. Labeled visible spectrum bio-sensing systems provide instant feedback that is both simple and easy to work with, but are limited by the light intensity thresholds required by the imaging systems. In comparison, label-free bio-sensing systems and other detection modalities like electrochemical, frequency resonance, thermal change, etc., can require additional technical processing steps to convey the final result, increasing the system's complexity and possibly the time required for analysis. Further decrease in the detection limit can be achieved through the addition of plasmonic structures into labeled bio-sensing systems. Nano-structures that operate in the visible spectrum have feature sizes typically in the order of the operating wavelength, calling for high aspect ratio nanoscale fabrication capabilities. In order to achieve these dimensions, electron beam lithography (EBL) is used due to its accurate feature production. Hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) based electron beam resist is chosen for one of its benefits, which is after exposure to oxygen plasma, the patterned resist cures into silicon dioxide (SiO2). These cured features in conjunction with nanoscale gold particles help in producing a high electric field through dipole generation. In this work, a detailed process flow of the fabrication of square lattice of plasmonic structures comprising of gold coated silicon dioxide pillars designed to operate at 560 nm wavelength and produce an intensity increase of roughly 100 percent will be presented.

  5. Scaling up nanoscale water-driven energy conversion into evaporation-driven engines and generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Goodnight, Davis; Gao, Zhenghan; Cavusoglu, Ahmet H.; Sabharwal, Nina; Delay, Michael; Driks, Adam; Sahin, Ozgur

    2015-06-01

    Evaporation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the natural environment and a dominant form of energy transfer in the Earth's climate. Engineered systems rarely, if ever, use evaporation as a source of energy, despite myriad examples of such adaptations in the biological world. Here, we report evaporation-driven engines that can power common tasks like locomotion and electricity generation. These engines start and run autonomously when placed at air-water interfaces. They generate rotary and piston-like linear motion using specially designed, biologically based artificial muscles responsive to moisture fluctuations. Using these engines, we demonstrate an electricity generator that rests on water while harvesting its evaporation to power a light source, and a miniature car (weighing 0.1 kg) that moves forward as the water in the car evaporates. Evaporation-driven engines may find applications in powering robotic systems, sensors, devices and machinery that function in the natural environment.

  6. Scaling up nanoscale water-driven energy conversion into evaporation-driven engines and generators

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Goodnight, Davis; Gao, Zhenghan; Cavusoglu, Ahmet H.; Sabharwal, Nina; DeLay, Michael; Driks, Adam; Sahin, Ozgur

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the natural environment and a dominant form of energy transfer in the Earth's climate. Engineered systems rarely, if ever, use evaporation as a source of energy, despite myriad examples of such adaptations in the biological world. Here, we report evaporation-driven engines that can power common tasks like locomotion and electricity generation. These engines start and run autonomously when placed at air–water interfaces. They generate rotary and piston-like linear motion using specially designed, biologically based artificial muscles responsive to moisture fluctuations. Using these engines, we demonstrate an electricity generator that rests on water while harvesting its evaporation to power a light source, and a miniature car (weighing 0.1 kg) that moves forward as the water in the car evaporates. Evaporation-driven engines may find applications in powering robotic systems, sensors, devices and machinery that function in the natural environment. PMID:26079632

  7. Scaling up nanoscale water-driven energy conversion into evaporation-driven engines and generators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Goodnight, Davis; Gao, Zhenghan; Cavusoglu, Ahmet H; Sabharwal, Nina; DeLay, Michael; Driks, Adam; Sahin, Ozgur

    2015-06-16

    Evaporation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the natural environment and a dominant form of energy transfer in the Earth's climate. Engineered systems rarely, if ever, use evaporation as a source of energy, despite myriad examples of such adaptations in the biological world. Here, we report evaporation-driven engines that can power common tasks like locomotion and electricity generation. These engines start and run autonomously when placed at air-water interfaces. They generate rotary and piston-like linear motion using specially designed, biologically based artificial muscles responsive to moisture fluctuations. Using these engines, we demonstrate an electricity generator that rests on water while harvesting its evaporation to power a light source, and a miniature car (weighing 0.1 kg) that moves forward as the water in the car evaporates. Evaporation-driven engines may find applications in powering robotic systems, sensors, devices and machinery that function in the natural environment.

  8. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  9. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  10. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  11. Structure of internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, N.; Endo, H.; Oshio, S.; Ebisudani, T.; Ito, M.; Mizukami, T.; Kishimoto, M.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes a structure of internal combustion engine, comprising a cylinder member formed with a cylinder which demarcates a combustion chamber in cooperation with a piston connected with a crankshaft, a crankcase provided in succession with the lower end of the cylinder member to accommodate the crankshaft, a valve actuating mechanism actuating valves provided in the combustion chamber in response to rotation of the crankshaft, at least a part of the valve actuating mechanism being accommodated in a rocker case provided on the upper end of the cylinder member, an oil return passage constituting means opening at one end into the rocker case, the other end being open into the crankcase at one side which is partitioned by a plane containing the cylinder axis of the cylinder member and the axis of the crankshaft and is occupied by a crank pin of the crankshaft when the piston rises, thereby constituting a passage for leading oil in the rocker case into the crankcase, and a restraining means provided in relation to the oil return passage constituting means so that an air flow around the axis of the crankshaft within the crankcase owing to the rotation of the crankshaft is restrained from entering into the passage through the opening of the other end.

  12. Atomic calligraphy: the direct writing of nanoscale structures using a microelectromechanical system.

    PubMed

    Imboden, Matthias; Han, Han; Chang, Jackson; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A; Lowell, Evan; Bishop, David J

    2013-07-10

    We present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist-free patterning of nanostructures. Using a focused ion beam to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures with features less than 50 nm in diameter on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20 × 20 μm(2). Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter positioned micrometers above the aperture enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. With this shutter, different-sized apertures can be opened and closed selectively for nanostructure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms. PMID:23782403

  13. Nanoscale calibration of n-type ZnO staircase structures by scanning capacitance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Laurent, J.; Chauveau, J. M.; Sallet, V.; Jomard, F.; Brémond, G.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-sectional scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) was performed on n-type ZnO multi-layer structures homoepitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy method. Highly contrasted SCM signals were obtained between the ZnO layers with different Ga densities. Through comparison with dopant depth profiles from secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurement, it is demonstrated that SCM is able to distinguish carrier concentrations at all levels of the samples (from 2 × 1017 cm-3 to 3 × 1020 cm-3). The good agreement of the results from the two techniques indicates that SCM can be a useful tool for two dimensional carrier profiling at nanoscale for ZnO nanostructure development. As an example, residual carrier concentration inside the non-intentionally doped buffer layer was estimated to be around 2 × 1016 cm-3 through calibration analysis.

  14. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  15. Size and shape of grain boundary network components and their atomic structures in polycrystalline nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tao; Li, Mo

    2015-10-28

    Microstructure in polycrystalline materials is composed of grain boundary plane, triple junction line, and vertex point. They are the integral parts of the grain boundary network structure and the foundation for the structure-property relations. In polycrystalline, especially nanocrystalline, materials, it becomes increasingly difficult to probe the atomistic structure of the microstructure components directly in experiment due to the size limitation. Here, we present a numerical approach using pair correlation function from atomistic simulation to obtain the detailed information for atomic order and disorder in the grain boundary network in nanocrystalline materials. We show that the atomic structures in the different microstructural components are related closely to their geometric size and shape, leading to unique signatures for atomic structure in microstructural characterization at nanoscales. The dependence varies systematically with the characteristic dimension of the microstructural component: liquid-like disorder is found in vertex points, but a certain order persists in triple junctions and grain boundaries along the extended dimensions of these microstructure components.

  16. Real time nanoscale structural evaluation of gold structures on Si (100) surface using in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, A. E-mail: ashutosh.phy@gmail.com E-mail: pvsatyam22@gmail.com; Juluri, R. R.; Satyam, P. V. E-mail: ashutosh.phy@gmail.com E-mail: pvsatyam22@gmail.com

    2014-05-14

    Transport behavior of gold nanostructures on Si(100) substrate during annealing under high vacuum has been investigated using in-situ real time transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A comparative study has been done on the morphological changes due to annealing under different vacuum environments. Au thin films of thickness ∼2.0 nm were deposited on native oxide covered silicon substrate by using thermal evaporation system. In-situ real time TEM measurements at 850 °C showed the isotropic growth of rectangular/square shaped gold-silicon alloy structures. During the growth, it is observed that the alloying occurs in liquid phase followed by transformation into the rectangular shapes. For similar system, ex-situ annealing in low vacuum (10{sup −2} millibars) at 850 °C showed the spherical gold nanostructures with no Au-Si alloy formation. Under low vacuum annealing conditions, the rate of formation of the oxide layer dominates the oxide desorption rate, resulting in the creation of a barrier layer between Au and Si, which restricts the inter diffusion of Au in to Si. This work demonstrates the important role of interfacial oxide layer on the growth of nanoscale Au-Si alloy structures during the initial growth. The time dependent TEM images are presented to offer a direct insight into the fundamental dynamics of the sintering process at the nanoscale.

  17. Versatile Particle-Based Route to Engineer Vertically Aligned Silicon Nanowire Arrays and Nanoscale Pores.

    PubMed

    Elnathan, Roey; Isa, Lucio; Brodoceanu, Daniel; Nelson, Adrienne; Harding, Frances J; Delalat, Bahman; Kraus, Tobias; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-10-28

    Control over particle self-assembly is a prerequisite for the colloidal templating of lithographical etching masks to define nanostructures. This work integrates and combines for the first time bottom-up and top-down approaches, namely, particle self-assembly at liquid-liquid interfaces and metal-assisted chemical etching, to generate vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) arrays and, alternatively, arrays of nanoscale pores in a silicon wafer. Of particular importance, and in contrast to current techniques, including conventional colloidal lithography, this approach provides excellent control over the nanowire or pore etching site locations and decouples nanowire or pore diameter and spacing. The spacing between pores or nanowires is tuned by adjusting the specific area of the particles at the liquid-liquid interface before deposition. Hence, the process enables fast and low-cost fabrication of ordered nanostructures in silicon and can be easily scaled up. We demonstrate that the fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can be used as in vitro transfection platforms for transfecting human primary cells.

  18. Design of Ternary Nanoalloy Catalysts: Effect of Nanoscale Alloying and Structural Perfection on Electrocatalytic Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Fang, Bin; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Zhu, Pengyu; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Chen, Yongsheng; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Yang, Lefu; Shao, Minhua; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-11-27

    The ability to tune the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in nanoalloy catalysts is essential for achieving the ultimate goal of high activity and stability of catalyst by design. This article demonstrates this ability with a ternary nanoalloy of platinum with vanadium and cobalt for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. The strategy is to enable nanoscale alloying and structural perfection through oxidative–reductive thermochemical treatments. The structural manipulation is shown to produce a significant enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity of the ternary nanoalloy catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction. Mass activities as high as 1 A/mg of Pt have been achieved by this strategy based on direct measurements of the kinetic currents from rotating disk electrode data. Using a synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction technique coupled with atomic pair function analysis and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in nanoalloy catalysts prepared by the oxidative–reductive thermochemical treatments were examined. A phase transition has been observed, showing an fcc-type structure of the as-prepared and the lower-temperature-treated particles into an fct-type structure for the particles treated at the higher temperature. The results reveal a thermochemically driven evolution of the nanoalloys from a chemically disordered state into chemically ordered state with an enhanced degree of alloying. The increase in the chemical ordering and shrinking of interatomic distances as a result of thermochemical treatment at increased temperature is shown to increase the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction, exhibiting an optimal activity at 600 °C. It is the alloying and structural perfection that allows the optimization of the catalytic performance in a controllable way, highlighting the significant role of atomic-scale structural and chemical

  19. Nanoscale stiffness topography reveals structure and mechanics of the transport barrier in intact nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    Labokha, Aksana A.; Osmanović, Dino; Liashkovich, Ivan; Orlova, Elena V.; Ford, Ian J.; Charras, Guillaume; Fassati, Ariberto; Hoogenboom, Bart W.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the gate for transport between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm. Small molecules cross the NPC by passive diffusion, but molecules larger than ~5 nm must bind to nuclear transport receptors to overcome a selective barrier within the NPC1. Whilst the structure and shape of the cytoplasmic ring of the NPC are relatively well characterized2-5, the selective barrier is situated deep within the central channel of the NPC and depends critically on unstructured nuclear pore proteins5,6, and is therefore not well understood. Here, we show that stiffness topography7 with sharp atomic force microscopy tips can generate nanoscale cross sections of the NPC. The cross sections reveal two distinct structures, a cytoplasmic ring and a central plug structure, which are consistent with the three-dimensional NPC structure derived from electron microscopy2-5. The central plug persists after reactivation of the transport cycle and resultant cargo release, indicating that the plug is an intrinsic part of the NPC barrier. Added nuclear transport receptors accumulate on the intact transport barrier and lead to a homogenization of the barrier stiffness. The observed nanomechanical properties in the NPC indicate the presence of a cohesive barrier to transport, and are quantitatively consistent with the presence of a central condensate of nuclear pore proteins in the NPC channel. PMID:25420031

  20. Structural Analysis of Nanoscale Self-Assembled Discoidal Lipid Bilayers by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Kijac, Aleksandra Z.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2006-01-01

    Nanodiscs are an example of discoidal nanoscale self-assembled lipid/protein particles similar to nascent high-density lipoproteins, which reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. The major protein component of high-density lipoproteins is human apolipoprotein A-I, and the corresponding protein component of Nanodiscs is membrane scaffold protein 1 (MSP1), a 200-residue lipid-binding domain of human apolipoprotein A-I. Here we present magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR studies of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled MSP1 in polyethylene glycol precipitated Nanodiscs. Two-dimensional MAS 13C-13C correlation spectra show excellent microscopic order of MSP1 in precipitated Nanodiscs. Secondary isotropic chemical shifts throughout the protein are consistent with a predominantly helical structure. Moreover, the backbone conformations of prolines derived from their 13C chemical shifts are consistent with the molecular belt model but not the picket fence model of lipid-bound MSP1. Overall comparison of experimental spectra and 13C chemical shifts predicted from several structural models also favors the belt model. Our study thus supports the belt model of Nanodisc structure and demonstrates the utility of MAS NMR to study the structure of high molecular weight lipid-protein complexes. PMID:16905610

  1. Conformational Switching and Nanoscale Assembly of Human Prion Protein into Polymorphic Amyloids via Structurally Labile Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Vijit; Arya, Shruti; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2015-12-29

    Conformational switching of the prion protein (PrP) from an α-helical normal cellular form (PrP(C)) to an aggregation-prone and self-propagating β-rich scrapie form (PrP(Sc)) underlies the molecular basis of pathogenesis in prion diseases. Anionic lipids play a critical role in the misfolding and conformational conversion of the membrane-anchored PrP into the amyloidogenic pathological form. In this work, we have used a diverse array of techniques to interrogate the early intermediates during amyloid formation from recombinant human PrP in the presence of a membrane mimetic anionic detergent such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. We have been able to detect and characterize two distinct types of interconvertible oligomers. Our results demonstrate that highly ordered large β-oligomers represent benign off-pathway intermediates that lack the ability to mature into amyloid fibrils. On the contrary, structurally labile small oligomers are capable of switching to an ordered amyloid-state that exhibits profound toxicity to mammalian cells. Our fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the partially disordered PrP serves as precursors to small amyloid-competent oligomers. These on-pathway oligomers are eventually sequestered into higher order supramolecular assemblies that conformationally mature into polymorphic amyloids possessing varied nanoscale morphology as evident by the atomic force microscopy imaging. The nanoscale diversity of fibril architecture is attributed to the heterogeneous ensemble of early obligatory oligomers and offers a plausible explanation for the existence of multiple prion strains in vivo. PMID:26645611

  2. Engineered Magnetic Core-Shell Structures.

    PubMed

    Alavi Nikje, Mir Mohammad; Vakili, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, engineered magnetic core-shell structures are playing an important role in the wide range of various applications. These magnetic core-shell structures have attracted considerable attention because of their unique properties and various applications. Also, the synthesis of engineered magnetic core-shell structures has attracted practical interest because of potential applications in areas such as ferrofluids, medical imaging, drug targeting and delivery, cancer therapy, separations, and catalysis. So far a large number of engineered magnetic core-shell structures have been successfully synthesized. This review article focuses on the recent progress in synthesis and characterization of engineered magnetic core-shell structures. Also, this review gives a brief description of the various application of these structures. It is hoped that this review will play some small part in helping future developments in important field. PMID:26377655

  3. Middle-and High-School Students' Interest in Nanoscale Science and Engineering Topics and Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Kelly; Bodner, George M.; Lynn, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that an increase in students' interest in science and engineering can have a positive effect on their achievement (Baird, 1986; Eccles & Wigfield, 2002; French, Immekus & Oakes, 2005; Schiefele, Krapp, & Winteler, 1992; Schwartz Bloom & Haplin, 2003; Weinburgh, 1995). Whereas many NSF-funded programs in materials…

  4. Nanoscale Interactions between Engineered Nanomaterials and Black Carbon (Biochar) in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the interactions between engineered nanomaterials (NMs) and soil constituents, and a comprehension of how these interactions may affect biological uptake and toxicity are currently lacking. Charcoal black carbon is a normal constituent of soils due to fire history, and can be pre...

  5. Nanoscale interactions between engineered nanomaterials and black carbon (Biochar) in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Engineered nanomaterials (NMs) enter agricultural soils directly as additives in agrichemical formulations1 and indirectly as contaminants in municipal sewage sludge.2 NIFA has a vested interest in developing predictive models for the fate and nanotoxicity of NMs in agroecosystems. An understanding ...

  6. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first. PMID:21875044

  7. Disruption of Thermally-Stable Nanoscale Grain Structures by Strain Localization

    PubMed Central

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals with average grain sizes of only a few nanometers have recently been observed to fail through the formation of shear bands. Here, we investigate this phenomenon in nanocrystalline Ni which has had its grain structure stabilized by doping with W, with a specific focus on understanding how strain localization drives evolution of the nanoscale grain structure. Shear banding was initiated with both microcompression and nanoindentation experiments, followed by site-specific transmission electron microscopy to characterize the microstructure. Grain growth and texture formation were observed inside the shear bands, which had a wide variety of thicknesses. These evolved regions have well-defined edges, which rules out local temperature rise as a possible formation mechanism. No structural evolution was found in areas away from the shear bands, even in locations where significant plastic deformation had occurred, showing that plastic strain alone is not enough to cause evolution. Rather, intense strain localization is needed to induce mechanically-driven grain growth in a thermally-stable nanocrystalline alloy. PMID:26030826

  8. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  9. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    DOE PAGES

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting “dome” in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare to the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length. Thus, we find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying amore » connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.« less

  10. An Optimized Table-Top Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Set-up for the Nanoscale Structural Analysis of Soft Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibillano, T.; de Caro, L.; Altamura, D.; Siliqi, D.; Ramella, M.; Boccafoschi, F.; Ciasca, G.; Campi, G.; Tirinato, L.; di Fabrizio, E.; Giannini, C.

    2014-11-01

    The paper shows how a table top superbright microfocus laboratory X-ray source and an innovative restoring-data algorithm, used in combination, allow to analyze the super molecular structure of soft matter by means of Small Angle X-ray Scattering ex-situ experiments. The proposed theoretical approach is aimed to restore diffraction features from SAXS profiles collected from low scattering biomaterials or soft tissues, and therefore to deal with extremely noisy diffraction SAXS profiles/maps. As biological test cases we inspected: i) residues of exosomes' drops from healthy epithelial colon cell line and colorectal cancer cells; ii) collagen/human elastin artificial scaffolds developed for vascular tissue engineering applications; iii) apoferritin protein in solution. Our results show how this combination can provide morphological/structural nanoscale information to characterize new artificial biomaterials and/or to get insight into the transition between healthy and pathological tissues during the progression of a disease, or to morphologically characterize nanoscale proteins, based on SAXS data collected in a room-sized laboratory.

  11. An Optimized Table-Top Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Set-up for the Nanoscale Structural Analysis of Soft Matter

    PubMed Central

    Sibillano, T.; De Caro, L.; Altamura, D.; Siliqi, D.; Ramella, M.; Boccafoschi, F.; Ciasca, G.; Campi, G.; Tirinato, L.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Giannini, C.

    2014-01-01

    The paper shows how a table top superbright microfocus laboratory X-ray source and an innovative restoring-data algorithm, used in combination, allow to analyze the super molecular structure of soft matter by means of Small Angle X-ray Scattering ex-situ experiments. The proposed theoretical approach is aimed to restore diffraction features from SAXS profiles collected from low scattering biomaterials or soft tissues, and therefore to deal with extremely noisy diffraction SAXS profiles/maps. As biological test cases we inspected: i) residues of exosomes' drops from healthy epithelial colon cell line and colorectal cancer cells; ii) collagen/human elastin artificial scaffolds developed for vascular tissue engineering applications; iii) apoferritin protein in solution. Our results show how this combination can provide morphological/structural nanoscale information to characterize new artificial biomaterials and/or to get insight into the transition between healthy and pathological tissues during the progression of a disease, or to morphologically characterize nanoscale proteins, based on SAXS data collected in a room-sized laboratory. PMID:25382272

  12. Micro- and nanoscale structures of mesiodens dentin: Combined study of FTIR and SAXS/WAXS techniques.

    PubMed

    Akgun, Ozlem Marti; Bayari, Sevgi Haman; Ide, Semra; Polat, Günseli Guven; Kalkhoran, Ilghar Orujalipoor

    2015-01-01

    A mesiodens is the most common type of supernumerary tooth present in conjunction to normal dentition. A mesiodens may commonly occur in the central region of the upper or lower jaw. A mesiodens is different from normal teeth in terms of structure and shape. The aim of this study is to evaluate the micro- and nanoscale structural properties of mesiodens dentin by combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Five freshly extracted, noncarious mesiodens and five normal dentin disks prepared from human incisor teeth were compared. Using FTIR, the phosphate-to-amide I, carbonate-to-phosphate, and carbonate-to-amide I band area ratios and the crystallinity index were quantified. SAXS/WAXS were used to study the nanostructure of mesiodens. An increase in the mineral content in the mesiodens dentin with respect to the normal group was found. Crystallinity was also significantly increased and the protein content decreased in the mesiodens dentin compared with that of normal dentin. SAXS/WAXS results revealed that mesiodens dentin has a more calcified tissue. Further, SAXS analysis revealed a nonuniform distribution of dentin fibrils in mesiodens.

  13. Chemically stable and mechanically durable superamphiphobic aluminum surface with a micro/nanoscale binary structure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shan; Yang, Xiaojun; Tian, Dong; Deng, Wenli

    2014-09-10

    We developed a simple fabrication method to prepare a superamphiphobic aluminum surface. On the basis of a low-energy surface and the combination of micro- and nanoscale roughness, the resultant surface became super-repellent toward a wide range of liquids with surface tensions of 25.3-72.1 mN m(-1). The applied approach involved (1) the formation of an irregular microplateau structure on an aluminum surface, (2) the fabrication of a nanoplatelet structure, and (3) fluorination treatment. The chemical stability and mechanical durability of the superamphiphobic surface were evaluated in detail. The results demonstrated that the surface presented an excellent chemical stability toward cool corrosive liquids (HCl/NaOH solutions, 25 °C) and 98% concentrated sulfuric acid, hot liquids (water, HCl/NaOH solutions, 30-100 °C), solvent immersion, high temperature, and a long-term period. More importantly, the surface also exhibited robust mechanical durability and could withstand multiple-fold, finger-touch, intensive scratching by a sharp blade, ultrasonication treatment, boiling treatment in water and coffee, repeated peeling by adhesive tape, and even multiple abrasion tests under 500 g of force without losing superamphiphobicity. The as-prepared superamphiphobic surface was also demonstrated to have excellent corrosion resistance. This work provides a simple, cost-effective, and highly efficient method to fabricate a chemically stable and mechanically robust superamphiphobic aluminum surface, which can find important outdoor applications.

  14. Can OCT be sensitive to nanoscale structural alterations in biological tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Norris, Sam C.P.; Çapoğlu, İlker R.; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of nanoscale tissue structures is crucial in understanding biological processes. Although novel optical microscopy methods have been developed to probe cellular features beyond the diffraction limit, nanometer-scale quantification remains still inaccessible for in situ tissue. Here we demonstrate that, without actually resolving specific geometrical feature, OCT can be sensitive to tissue structural properties at the nanometer length scale. The statistical mass-density distribution in tissue is quantified by its autocorrelation function modeled by the Whittle-Mateŕn functional family. By measuring the wavelength-dependent backscattering coefficient μb(λ) and the scattering coefficient μs, we introduce a technique called inverse spectroscopic OCT (ISOCT) to quantify the mass-density correlation function. We find that the length scale of sensitivity of ISOCT ranges from ~30 to ~450 nm. Although these sub-diffractional length scales are below the spatial resolution of OCT and therefore not resolvable, they are nonetheless detectable. The sub-diffractional sensitivity is validated by 1) numerical simulations; 2) tissue phantom studies; and 3) ex vivo colon tissue measurements cross-validated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, the 3D imaging capability of ISOCT is demonstrated with ex vivo rat buccal and human colon samples. PMID:23571994

  15. Structural tailoring of engine blades (STAEBL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. E.; Pratt, T. K.; Brown, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical optimization procedure was developed for the structural tailoring of engine blades and was used to structurally tailor two engine fan blades constructed of composite materials without midspan shrouds. The first was a solid blade made from superhybrid composites, and the second was a hollow blade with metal matrix composite inlays. Three major computerized functions were needed to complete the procedure: approximate analysis with the established input variables, optimization of an objective function, and refined analysis for design verification.

  16. Engineering protocells: prospects for self-assembly and nanoscale production-lines.

    PubMed

    Miller, David M; Gulbis, Jacqueline M

    2015-01-01

    The increasing ease of producing nucleic acids and proteins to specification offers potential for design and fabrication of artificial synthetic "organisms" with a myriad of possible capabilities. The prospects for these synthetic organisms are significant, with potential applications in diverse fields including synthesis of pharmaceuticals, sources of renewable fuel and environmental cleanup. Until now, artificial cell technology has been largely restricted to the modification and metabolic engineering of living unicellular organisms. This review discusses emerging possibilities for developing synthetic protocell "machines" assembled entirely from individual biological components. We describe a host of recent technological advances that could potentially be harnessed in design and construction of synthetic protocells, some of which have already been utilized toward these ends. More elaborate designs include options for building self-assembling machines by incorporating cellular transport and assembly machinery. We also discuss production in miniature, using microfluidic production lines. While there are still many unknowns in the design, engineering and optimization of protocells, current technologies are now tantalizingly close to the capabilities required to build the first prototype protocells with potential real-world applications. PMID:25815781

  17. Engineering Protocells: Prospects for Self-Assembly and Nanoscale Production-Lines

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David M.; Gulbis, Jacqueline M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing ease of producing nucleic acids and proteins to specification offers potential for design and fabrication of artificial synthetic “organisms” with a myriad of possible capabilities. The prospects for these synthetic organisms are significant, with potential applications in diverse fields including synthesis of pharmaceuticals, sources of renewable fuel and environmental cleanup. Until now, artificial cell technology has been largely restricted to the modification and metabolic engineering of living unicellular organisms. This review discusses emerging possibilities for developing synthetic protocell “machines” assembled entirely from individual biological components. We describe a host of recent technological advances that could potentially be harnessed in design and construction of synthetic protocells, some of which have already been utilized toward these ends. More elaborate designs include options for building self-assembling machines by incorporating cellular transport and assembly machinery. We also discuss production in miniature, using microfluidic production lines. While there are still many unknowns in the design, engineering and optimization of protocells, current technologies are now tantalizingly close to the capabilities required to build the first prototype protocells with potential real-world applications. PMID:25815781

  18. Nanoscale calibration of n-type ZnO staircase structures by scanning capacitance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. Laurent, J.; Brémond, G.; Chauveau, J. M.; Sallet, V.; Jomard, F.

    2015-11-09

    Cross-sectional scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) was performed on n-type ZnO multi-layer structures homoepitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy method. Highly contrasted SCM signals were obtained between the ZnO layers with different Ga densities. Through comparison with dopant depth profiles from secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurement, it is demonstrated that SCM is able to distinguish carrier concentrations at all levels of the samples (from 2 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} to 3 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}). The good agreement of the results from the two techniques indicates that SCM can be a useful tool for two dimensional carrier profiling at nanoscale for ZnO nanostructure development. As an example, residual carrier concentration inside the non-intentionally doped buffer layer was estimated to be around 2 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3} through calibration analysis.

  19. The structure and terahertz dynamics of water confined in nanoscale pools in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Turton, David A; Corsaro, Carmelo; Candelaresi, Marco; Brownlie, Angela; Seddon, Ken R; Mallamace, Francesco; Wynne, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    The behaviour of liquid water below its melting point is of great interest as it may hold clues to the properties of normal liquid water and of water in and on the surfaces of biomolecules. A second critical point, giving rise to a polyamorphic transition between high and low density water, may be hidden in the supercooled region but cannot be observed directly. Here it is shown that water can be locked up in nano-pools or worm-like structures using aqueous LiCl salt solutions and can be studied with terahertz spectroscopies. Very high dynamic range ultrafast femtosecond optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectroscopy is used to study the temperature-dependent behaviour of water in these nano-pools on timescales from 10 fs to 4 ns. These experiments are complemented by temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements, concentration-dependent Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) measurements, and temperature-dependent rheology. It is found that liquid water in the nanoscale pools undergoes a fragile-to-strong transition at about 220 K associated with a sharp increase in the inhomogeneity of translational dynamics.

  20. Nanoscale SiC production by ballistic ion beam mixing of C/Si multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistig, G.; Zolnai, Z.; Németh, A.; Panjan, P.; Menyhárd, M.

    2016-05-01

    The ion beam-induced mixing process using Ar+, Ga+, and Xe+ ion irradiation has been used to form SiC rich layers on the nanometer scale at the interfaces of C/Si/C/Si/C multilayer structures. The SiC depth distributions were determined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling and were compared to the results of analytical models developed for ballistic ion mixing and local thermal spike induced mixing. In addition, the measured SiC depth distributions were correlated to the Si and C mixing profiles simulated by the TRIDYN code which can follow the ballistic ion mixing process as a function of ion fluence. Good agreement has been found between the distributions provided by AES depth profiling and TRIDYN on the assumption that the majority of the Si (C) atoms transported to the neighboring C (Si) layer form the SiC compound. The ion beam mixing process can be successfully described by ballistic atomic transport processes. The results show that SiC production as a function of depth can be predicted, and tailored compound formation on the nanoscale becomes feasible, thus leading to controlled synthesis of protective SiC coatings at room temperature.

  1. High Performance Superconducting Wire in High Applied Magnetic Fields via Nanoscale Defect Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung Hun; Zuev, Yuri L; Cantoni, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) wires capable of carrying large critical currents with low dissipation levels in high applied magnetic fields are needed for a wide range of applications. In particular, for electric power applications involving rotating machinery, such as large-scale motors and generators, a high critical current, Ic, and a high engineering critical current density, JE, in applied magnetic fields in the range of 3 5 Tesla (T) at 65 K are required. In addition, exceeding the minimum performance requirements needed for these applications results in a lower fabrication cost, which is regarded as crucial to realize or enable many large-scale bulk applications of HTS materials. Here we report the fabrication of short segments of a potential superconducting wire comprised of a 4 m thick YBa2Cu3O7− (YBCO) layer on a biaxially textured substrate with a 50% higher Ic and JE than the highest values reported previously. The YBCO film contained columns of self-assembled nanodots of BaZrO3 (BZO) roughly oriented along the c-axis of YBCO. Although the YBCO film was grown at a high deposition rate, three-dimensional self-assembly of the insulating BZO nanodots still occurred. For all magnetic field orientations, minimum Ic and JE at 65 K, 3 T for the wire were 353 A cm−1 and 65.4 kA cm−2, respectively.

  2. RAPID COMMUNICATION: High performance superconducting wire in high applied magnetic fields via nanoscale defect engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sung Hun; Goyal, Amit; Zuev, Yuri L.; Cantoni, Claudia

    2008-09-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) wires capable of carrying large critical currents with low dissipation levels in high applied magnetic fields are needed for a wide range of applications. In particular, for electric power applications involving rotating machinery, such as large-scale motors and generators, a high critical current, Ic, and a high engineering critical current density, JE, in applied magnetic fields in the range of 3-5 Tesla (T) at 65 K are required. In addition, exceeding the minimum performance requirements needed for these applications results in a lower fabrication cost, which is regarded as crucial to realize or enable many large-scale bulk applications of HTS materials. Here we report the fabrication of short segments of a potential superconducting wire comprised of a 4 µm thick YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) layer on a biaxially textured substrate with a 50% higher Ic and JE than the highest values reported previously. The YBCO film contained columns of self-assembled nanodots of BaZrO3 (BZO) roughly oriented along the c-axis of YBCO. Although the YBCO film was grown at a high deposition rate, three-dimensional self-assembly of the insulating BZO nanodots still occurred. For all magnetic field orientations, minimum Ic and JE at 65 K, 3 T for the wire were 353 A cm-1 and 65.4 kA cm-2, respectively.

  3. Laboratory micro- and nanoscale X-ray tomographic investigation of Al–7 at.%Cu solidification structures

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, B.M. Henderson, K.C.; Gibbs, P.J.; Imhoff, S.D.; Clarke, A.J.

    2014-09-15

    X-ray computed tomography across multiple length scales provides an opportunity to non-destructively visualize and quantify the micro- to nano-scale microstructural features of solidification structures in three dimensions. Aluminum–7 at.%copper samples were directionally solidified at three cooling rates (0.44, 0.67, and 1.33 °C/s), resulting in systematic changes in the as-solidified microstructure, which are difficult to quantify using traditional microscopic techniques. The cooling rate of a material affects its ultimate microstructure, and characterizing that microstructure is key to predicting and understanding its bulk properties. Here, two different laboratory X-ray computed tomography instruments were used to characterize as-solidified microstructures, including micro-scale computed tomography with approximately 1 mm field-of-view, ∼ 1.7 μm resolution, and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography ∼ 65 μm FOV, 150 nm resolution. Micro-scale X-ray radiography and computed tomography enabled a quantitative investigation of changes in the primary dendritic solidification structure with increasing cooling rate. Nano-scale absorption contrast X-ray computed tomography resolved the distinct phases of the lamellar eutectic structure and three dimensional measurements of the ∼ 1 μm interlamellar spacing. It is found that the lamella eutectic structure thickness is inversely proportional to the cooling rate. Nano-scale Zernike phase contrast was also used to image voids at eutectic colony boundaries. The application and resolution of these two instruments are discussed with respect to the resolvable features of the solidification structures. - Highlights: • Al–Cu eutectic is a model system for studying solidification microstructure. • X-ray computed tomography provides a 3D picture of these complex structures. • Micro-scale tomography images the primary and secondary dendritic structures. • Nano-scale tomography images the eutectic lamella and

  4. Interface structure in nanoscale multilayers near continuous-to-discontinuous regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, P. C.; Majhi, A.; Nayak, M.; Mangla Nand, Rajput, P.; Shukla, D. K.; Biswas, A.; Rai, S. K.; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Phase, D. M.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial atomic diffusion, reaction, and formation of microstructure in nanoscale level are investigated in W/B4C multilayer (ML) system as functions of thickness in ultrathin limit. Hard x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and x-ray diffuse scattering in conjunction with x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in soft x-ray and hard x-ray regimes and depth profiling x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to precisely evaluate detailed interfacial structure by systematically varying the individual layer thickness from continuous-to-discontinuous regime. It is observed that the interfacial morphology undergoes an unexpected significant modification as the layer thickness varies from continuous-to-discontinuous regime. The interfacial atomic diffusion increases, the physical density of W layer decreases and that of B4C layer increases, and further more interestingly the in-plane correlation length decreases substantially as the layer thickness varies from continuous-to-discontinuous regime. This is corroborated using combined XRR and x-ray diffused scattering analysis. XANES and XPS results show formation of more and more tungsten compounds at the interfaces as the layer thickness decreases below the percolation threshold due to increase in the contact area between the elements. The formation of compound enhances to minimize certain degree of disorder at the interfaces in the discontinuous region that enables to maintain the periodic structure in ML. The degree of interfacial atomic diffusion, interlayer interaction, and microstructure is correlated as a function of layer thickness during early stage of film growth.

  5. Nanoscale surface modification of plastic substrates for advanced tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, N.; Safonov, V.; Zykova, A.; Smolik, J.; Rogovska, R.; Goltsev, A.; Dubrava, T.; Rossokha, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2012-12-01

    Modified surface properties such as composition, nano roughness, wettability have effect on the most important processes at biomaterial interface. The research of stem cells (MSCs) adhesive potential, morphology, phenotypical characteristics on oxide coated and plastic substrate with different surface parameters was made. The oxide coatings deposition on plastic substrates shifts the surface properties at the more hydrophilic region and results in next positive cell/ biomaterial response in vitro tests. The MSCs marker number increases on the oxide nano structural surface of plastic substrates.

  6. Unraveling the physics of vertical organic field effect transistors through nanoscale engineering of a self-assembled transparent electrode.

    PubMed

    Ben-Sasson, Ariel J; Tessler, Nir

    2012-09-12

    While organic transistors' performances are continually pushed to achieve lower power consumption, higher working frequencies, and higher current densities, a new type of organic transistors characterized by a vertical architecture offers a radically different design approach to outperform its traditional counterparts. Naturally, the distinct vertical architecture gives way to different governing physical ground rules and structural key features such as the need for an embedded transparent electrode. In this paper, we make use of a zero-frequency electric field-transparent patterned electrode produced through block-copolymer self-assembly based lithography to control the performances of the vertical organic field effect transistor (VOFET) and to study its governing physical mechanisms. Unlike other VOFET structures, this design, involving well-defined electrode architecture, is fully tractable, allowing for detailed modeling, analysis, and optimization. We provide for the first time a complete account of the physics underpinning the VOFET operation, considering two complementary mechanisms: the virtual contact formation (Schottky barrier lowering) and the induced potential barrier (solid-state triode-like shielding). We demonstrate how each mechanism, separately, accounts for the link between controllable nanoscale structural modifications in the patterned electrode and the VOFET performances. For example, the ON/OFF current ratio increases by up to 2 orders of magnitude when the perforations aspect ratio (height/width) decreases from ∼0.2 to ∼0.1. The patterned electrode is demonstrated to be not only penetrable to zero-frequency electric fields but also transparent in the visible spectrum, featuring uniformity, spike-free structure, material diversity, amenability with flexible surfaces, low sheet resistance (20-2000 Ω sq(-1)) and high transparency (60-90%). The excellent layer transparency of the patterned electrode and the VOFET's exceptional electrical

  7. Engineering single-molecule, nanoscale, and microscale bio-functional materials via click chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniele, Michael Angelo-Anthony

    To expand the design envelope and supplement the materials library available to biomaterials scientists, the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuCAAC) was explored as a route to design, synthesize and characterize bio-functional small-molecules, nanoparticles, and microfibers. In each engineered system, the use of click chemistry provided facile, bio-orthogonal control for materials synthesis; moreover, the results provided a methodology and more complete, fundamental understanding of the use of click chemistry as a tool for the synergy of biotechnology, polymer and materials science. Fluorophores with well-defined photophysical characteristics (ranging from UV to NIR fluorescence) were used as building blocks for small-molecule, fluorescent biosensors. Fluorophores were paired to exhibit fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) and used to probe the metabolic activity of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO). The FRET pair exhibited a significant variation in PL response with exposure to the lysate of Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10, an organism which can degrade variants of both the donor and acceptor fluorophores. Nanoparticle systems were modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry affinity tags for CARDO and were subsequently utilized for affinity based bioseparation of CARDO from crude cell lysate. The enzymes were baited with an azide-modified carbazolyl-moiety attached to a poly(propargyl acrylate) nanoparticle. Magnetic nanocluster systems were also modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry fluorescent imaging tags. The iron-oxide nanoclusters were coated with poly(acrylic acid-co-propargyl acrylate) to provide a clickable surface. Ultimately, alternate Cu-free click chemistries were utilized to produce biohybrid microfibers. The biohybrid microfibers were synthesized under benign photopolymerization conditions inside a microchannel, allowing the encapsulation of viable bacteria. By adjusting pre-polymer solutions and laminar flow rates within the

  8. Nanoscale Interfaces in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells: Physical Insights and Materials Engineering Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Kyle Wayne

    With growing global energy demand there will be an increased need for sources of renewable energy such as solar cells. To make these photovoltaic technologies more competitive with conventional energy sources such as coal and natural gas requires further reduction in manufacturing costs that can be realized by solution processing and roll-to-roll printing. Colloidal quantum dots are a bandgap tunable, solution processible, semiconductor material which may offer a path forward to efficient, inexpensive photovoltaics. Despite impressive progress in performance with these materials, there remain limitations in photocarrier collection that must be overcome. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of charge recombination and transport in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, and the application of this knowledge to the development of new and better materials. Core-shell, PbS-CdS, quantum dots were investigated in an attempt to achieve better surface passivation and reduce electronic defects which can limit performance. Optimization of this material led to improved open circuit voltage, exceeding 0.6 V for the first time, and record published performance of 6% efficiency. Using temperature-dependent and transient photovoltage measurements we explored the significance of interface recombination on the operation of these devices. Careful engineering of the electrode using atomic layer deposition of ZnO helped lead to better TiO2 substrate materials and allowed us to realize a nearly two-fold reduction in recombination rate and an enhancement upwards of 50 mV in open circuit voltage. Carrier extraction efficiency was studied in these devices using intensity dependent current-voltage data of an operational solar cell. By developing an analytical model to describe recombination loss within the active layer of the device we were able to accurately determine transport lengths ranging up to 90 nm. Transient absorption and photoconductivity techniques were used to study

  9. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  10. Cavity optomechanics in photonic and phononic crystals: engineering the interaction of light and sound at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenfield, Matthew

    The dynamic back-action caused by electromagnetic forces (radiation pressure) in optical and microwave cavities is of growing interest. Back-action cooling, for example, is being pursued as a means of achieving the quantum ground state of macroscopic mechanical oscillators. Work in the optical domain has revolved around millimeter- or micrometer-scale structures using the radiation pressure force. By comparison, in microwave devices, low-loss superconducting structures have been used for gradient-force-mediated coupling to a nanomechanical oscillator of picogram mass. In this thesis, two different nanometer-scale structures that use combinations of gradient and radiation pressure optical forces are described theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. These structures merge the fields of cavity optomechanics and nanomechanics into nano-optomechanical systsms (NOMS). The first device, the “Zipper” optomechanical cavity, consists of a pair of doubly-clamped nanoscale beams separated by approximately 100 nanometers, each beam having a mass of 20 picograms and being patterned with a quasi-1D photonic crystal bandgap cavity. The optical mode of the coupled system is exquisitely sensitive to differential motion of the beams, producing optomechanical coupling right at the fundamental limit set by optical diffraction. The mechanical modes of the beam probed with a background sensitivity only a factor of 4 above the standard quantum limit, and the application of less than a milliwatt of optical power is shown to increase the mechanical rigidity of the system by almost an order of magnitude. The second device focuses on just one of the doubly-clamped nanoscale beams of the Zipper. We show that, in addition to a photonic bandgap cavity, the periodic patterning of the beam also produces a phononic bandgap cavity with localized mechanical modes having frequencies in the microwave regime. We call these photonic and phononic crystal bandgap cavities optomechanical crystals

  11. Superior Dielectric Performance of Engineering Thermoplastic as a Result of In situ Embedding of Nanoscale Mixed-Phase Molybdenum Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Nilam; Shinde, Manish; Ratheesh, R.; Bhalerao, Anand; Kale, Bharat; Mulik, Uttam; Amalnerkar, Dinesh P.

    2015-07-01

    To facilitate in situ generation of single and mixed-phase molybdenum oxide on the nanoscale in a network of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), a novel polymer-inorganic solid-state reaction is proposed. Ammonium molybdate was homogeneously mixed with PPS in 1:1 molar ratio and heated at 285°C for different times (6 h, 24 h, or 48 h) under ambient conditions. The products were characterized by x-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Structural investigations revealed the co-existence of mix-phased molybdenum oxide, i.e. dominant orthorhombic α-MoO3, and minor monoclinic Mo8O23 phases, within the modified PPS matrix. The resulting molybdenum oxide nanostructures had rod and sheet-like morphology in the PPS matrix. Dielectric measurements on pellets prepared from the resulting nanocomposites revealed improvement of the dielectric properties compared with values reported for pure PPS. The resulting nano-composites may exhibit properties synergistically derived from those of their components (molybdenum oxide and PPS), i.e. lower dielectric constant and loss tangent, enabling application as relatively high-temperature capacitors.

  12. Designing, engineering, and testing wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce basic structural engineering concepts in a clear, simple manner while actively involving students. This project emphasizes the fact that a good design uses materials efficiently. The test structure in this experiment can easily be built and has various design options. Even when the structure is loaded to collapsing, only one or two pieces usually break, leaving the remaining pieces intact and reusable.

  13. Nanoscale structural and mechanical analysis of Bacillus anthracis spores inactivated with rapid dry heating.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yun; Li, Alex; Felker, Daniel L; Burggraf, Larry W

    2014-03-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating. PMID:24375142

  14. Nanoscale structural and mechanical analysis of Bacillus anthracis spores inactivated with rapid dry heating.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yun; Li, Alex; Felker, Daniel L; Burggraf, Larry W

    2014-03-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating.

  15. Skeleton of Euplectella sp.: Structural Hierarchy from the Nanoscale to the Macroscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Weaver, James C.; Thanawala, Monica S.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Morse, Daniel E.; Fratzl, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Structural materials in nature exhibit remarkable designs with building blocks, often hierarchically arranged from the nanometer to the macroscopic length scales. We report on the structural properties of biosilica observed in the hexactinellid sponge Euplectella sp. Consolidated, nanometer-scaled silica spheres are arranged in well-defined microscopic concentric rings glued together by organic matrix to form laminated spicules. The assembly of these spicules into bundles, effected by the laminated silica-based cement, results in the formation of a macroscopic cylindrical square-lattice cagelike structure reinforced by diagonal ridges. The ensuing design overcomes the brittleness of its constituent material, glass, and shows outstanding mechanical rigidity and stability. The mechanical benefits of each of seven identified hierarchical levels and their comparison with common mechanical engineering strategies are discussed.

  16. Modified structural and frequency dependent impedance formalism of nanoscale BaTiO3 due to Tb inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Manjit; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2016-05-01

    We report the effect of Tb-doping on the structural and high frequency impedance response of the nanoscale BaTiO3 (BT) systems. While exhibiting a mixed phase crystal structure, the nano-BT systems are found to evolve with edges, and facets. The interplanar spacing of crystal lattice fringes is ~0.25 nm. The Cole-Cole plots, in the impedance formalism, have demonstrated semicircles which are the characteristic feature of grain boundary resistance of several MΩ. A lowering of ac conductivity with doping was believed to be due to the manifestation of oxygen vacancies and vacancy ordering.

  17. Teaching Structural Design in Civil Engineering Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metwally, Ashraf

    This paper is a description of a college course in structural design, which in this case serves as the capstone of the program in Civil Engineering Technology at the College of Staten Island (New York). Fourteen weeks of class lecture topics, activities, and assignments are delineated. Coverage includes building codes, loads calculation,…

  18. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  19. Effect of ion beam parameters on engineering of nanoscale voids and their stability under post-growth annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooda, Sonu; Khan, S. A.; Satpati, B.; Stange, D.; Buca, D.; Bala, M.; Pannu, C.; Kanjilal, D.; Kabiraj, Debdulal

    2016-03-01

    Swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of damaged germanium (d-Ge) layer results in porous structure with voids aligned along ion trajectory due to local melting and resolidification during high electronic energy deposition. The present study focuses on the irradiation temperature- and incident angle-dependent growth dynamics and shape evolution of these voids due to 100 MeV Ag ions irradiation. The d-Ge layers were prepared by multiple low-energy Ar ion implantations in single crystalline Ge with damage formation of ~7 displacements per atom. Further, these d-Ge layers were irradiated using 100 MeV Ag ions at two different temperatures (77 and 300 K) and three different angles (7°, 30° and 45°). After SHI irradiation, substantial volume expansion of d-Ge layer is detected which is due to formation of nanoscale voids. The volume expansion is observed to be more in the samples irradiated at 77 K as compared to 300 K at a given irradiation fluence. It is observed that the voids are of spherical shape at low ion irradiation fluence. The voids grow in size and change their shape from spherical to prolate spheroid with increasing ion fluence. The major axis of spheroid is observed to be aligned approximately along the ion beam direction which has been confirmed by irradiation at three different angles. The change in shape is a consequence of combination of compressive strain and plastic flow developed due to thermal spike generated along ion track. Post-SHI irradiation annealing shows increase in size of voids and reversal of shape from prolate spheroid towards spherical through strain relaxation. The stability of voids was studied with the effect of post-growth annealing.

  20. 46 CFR 11.505 - Engineer officer structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Engineer officer structure. 11.505 Section 11.505... OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.505 Engineer officer structure. The following diagram illustrates the engineering endorsement structure including cross over...

  1. 14 CFR 33.23 - Engine mounting attachments and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine mounting attachments and structure... mounting attachments and structure. (a) The maximum allowable limit and ultimate loads for engine mounting attachments and related engine structure must be specified. (b) The engine mounting attachments and...

  2. Structural Evolution of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI) in Anoxic Co2+Soultion : Interactional Performance and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, C.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The nanoscale particle and low oxidation reduction potential make nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) an efficient sorbent and reductant for treating many kinds of organic contaminants and heavy metals.The structures of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles are evolving in reactions, and the reactions are influenced by the evolved structures. In order to understand the detail removal process, it is important to investigate the interactions between reactions and structural evolution. In this work, reactions between nZVI and Co2+ at different initial concentrations in anoxic aqueous solutions (to eliminate the effects of O2) were tracked for 10 days using a variety of methods including inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Continuous removal and reduction of Co2+ by nZVI caused by structural evolution were revealed in reaction processes. The system pH (pH measured in mixture), which controls the stability of coprecipitation and the corrosion rate of nZVI, was deemed as the determining factors of structural evolutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that the formation and dissolution of sheet structure impacts on the ratio of Fe (0) on nZVI's surface and the surface reduction of Co2+. The cavity structure provides the possibility of Co migrating from surface to inside of nZVI leading a continuous removal. A subacidity condition could accelerate the evolution to improve the removal of Co2+ and the results of structural controlled reactions further indicated that the removal was suspended by sheet structure and enhanced by cavity structure. The results in this study revealed "structural influence" for fully and dynamically understanding nZVI's reactions.

  3. Engineering Nanoscale Multiferroic Composites for Memory Applications with Atomic Layer Deposition of Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Diana

    This work focuses on the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for lead zirconate titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O 3 (PZT). Leveraging the surface-reaction controlled process based on alternating self-limiting surface reactions, PZT can be synthesized not only with elemental precision to realize the desired composition (Zr/Ti = 52/48) but also with outstanding conformality. The latter enables the integration of PZT with a ferromagnetic phase to realize multiferroism (MF) and magnetoelectric (ME) effect. Since PZT is one of the best known ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials due the large displacements of the Pb ions at the morphotropic phase boundary, PZT based MF composites could lead to stronger ME coupling through strain coupling at the interface. Specifically, ALD PZT thin films were synthesized by using beta-diketonate metalorganic precursors Pb(TMHD)2, Zr(TMHD)4, and Ti(O.i-Pr) 2(TMHD)2 and H2O. The number of local cycles and global cycles were regulated to achieve the desired stoichiometry and thickness, respectively. ALD of PZT was studied to obtain (100) textured PZT on Pt (111) oriented platinized silicon substrates. In order to attain a highly oriented PZT thin film, a (100) textured PbTiO3 seed layer was required because PZT orientation is governed by nucleation. MF nanocomposites were engineered using ALD PZT thin films to achieve controlled complex nanoscale structures, enabling porosity to be studied as a new additional parameter for nanocomposite architectures to enhance ME effect. Specifically, 3--6 nm-thick ALD PZT thin films were deposited to uniformly coat the walls of mesoporous cobalt ferrite (CFO) template. The PZT/CFO nanocomposites were electrically poled ex-situ and the change in magnetic moment was measured. The inverse magnetoelectric coupling coefficient, a, was determined to be 85.6 Oe-cm/mV. The in-plane results show no significant change in magnetization (1--4%) as a function of electric field, which was expected due to the effect

  4. Integrated chemical and biological systems in nanowire structures towards nano-scale sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Rose M.

    Nanowires composed of metal and conducting polymers with integrated proteins and chemical systems have been investigated as building blocks for next-generation nano-scale sensors and assemblies. These nanowires were fabricated by combining chemical and electrochemical methods of synthesis of gold and conducting polymers in nanopores of anodized alumina membranes. Polymer nanowires were synthesized from buffer solutions as a mean to promote a biocompatible environment for the incorporation of proteins. A variety of proteins were incorporated into the polymer matrix by entrapment during polymerization that imparted the polymer material with biological functionality. Another class of composite nanowires containing electro-active conducting polymer junctions was developed for applications in chemical sensor arrays. The methodologies described in this thesis provide an inexpensive and straightforward approach to the synthesis of anisotropic nanoparticles incorporating a variety of biological and inorganic species that can be integrated to current microelectronic technologies for the development of nano-scale sensor arrays.

  5. Balancer structure for three-cylinder engines

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.

    1986-01-21

    This patent describes a balancer structure for a three-cylinder in-line engine. The in-line engine is indicated in the patent as having a crankshaft having crank arms configured at angles of 120/sup 0/ with respect to each other and operatively connected to a piston assembly within each of the cylinders. This crankshaft and assembly, which serves as a balancer structure as one of its applications, is further characterized in the patent as consisting of a number of component parts. The first component described is a single countershaft adjacent and parallel to the crankshaft. It is specified in the patent that this countershaft must rotate at the same speed as the crankshaft but in an opposite direction in order to fulfill its role in the balancer structure. The patent also details an element of the balancer structure which consists of a means utilizing counterweights mounted on the crankshaft at the first and third cylinder positions. These weights are indicated as partially balancing the inertia forces of reciprocating masses and the entire inertia forces of rotating masses present in the described engine. The required position of these counterweights is indicated as being a location more than 90/sup 0/ from the crank arm for the corresponding cylinder and perpendicular to the second cylinder crank arm. The last component described consists of two balancers mounted on both ends of the countershaft which balance the remainder of the inertia forces of reciprocating masses and the inertia of the crankshaft about axes perpendicular to itself.

  6. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapetek, P.; Koenders, L.

    2011-09-01

    This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2010 seminar held in Brno, Czech Republic. It was the 5th Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 9th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) and the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET. There were two workshops that were integrated into NanoScale 2010: first a workshop presenting the results obtained in NANOTRACE, a European Metrology Research Project (EMRP) on displacement-measuring optical interferometers, and second a workshop about the European metrology landscape in nanometrology related to thin films, scanning probe microscopy and critical dimension. The aim of this workshop was to bring together developers, applicants and metrologists working in this field of nanometrology and to discuss future needs. For more information see www.co-nanomet.eu. The articles in this special issue of Measurement Science and Technology cover some novel scientific results. This issue can serve also as a representative selection of topics that are currently being investigated in the field of European and world-wide nanometrology. Besides traditional topics of dimensional metrology, like development of novel interferometers or laser stabilization techniques, some novel interesting trends in the field of nanometrology are observed. As metrology generally reflects the needs of scientific and industrial research, many research topics addressed refer to current trends in nanotechnology, too, focusing on traceability and improved measurement accuracy in this field. While historically the most studied standards in nanometrology were related to simple geometric structures like step heights or 1D or 2D gratings, now we are facing tasks to measure 3D structures and many unforeseen questions arising from interesting physical

  7. Structural Evolution of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI) in Anoxic Co2+ Solution: Interactional Performance and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yalei; Chen, Wen; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Chuanlong; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-09-01

    The structures of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles evolving during reactions, and the reactions are influenced by the evolved structures. To understand the removal process in detail, it is important to investigate the relationships between the reactions and structural evolution. Using high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), typical evolved structures (sheet coprecipitation and cavity corrosion) of nZVI in anoxic Co2+ solutions were revealed. The system pH (pH measured in mixture), which controls the stability of coprecipitation and the nZVI corrosion rate, were found to be the determining factors of structural evolutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the formation and dissolution of sheet structure impacts on the ratio of Fe(0) on the nZVI surface and the surface Co2+ reduction. The cavity structure provides the possibility of Co migration from the surface to the bulk of nZVI, leading to continuous removal. Subacidity conditions could accelerate the evolution and improve the removal; the results of structurally controlled reactions further indicated that the removal was suspended by the sheet structure and enhanced by cavity structure. The results and discussion in this paper revealed the “structural influence” crucial for the full and dynamical understanding of nZVI reactions.

  8. Structural Evolution of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI) in Anoxic Co2+ Solution: Interactional Performance and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yalei; Chen, Wen; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Chuanlong; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-01-01

    The structures of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles evolving during reactions, and the reactions are influenced by the evolved structures. To understand the removal process in detail, it is important to investigate the relationships between the reactions and structural evolution. Using high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), typical evolved structures (sheet coprecipitation and cavity corrosion) of nZVI in anoxic Co2+ solutions were revealed. The system pH (pH measured in mixture), which controls the stability of coprecipitation and the nZVI corrosion rate, were found to be the determining factors of structural evolutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the formation and dissolution of sheet structure impacts on the ratio of Fe(0) on the nZVI surface and the surface Co2+ reduction. The cavity structure provides the possibility of Co migration from the surface to the bulk of nZVI, leading to continuous removal. Subacidity conditions could accelerate the evolution and improve the removal; the results of structurally controlled reactions further indicated that the removal was suspended by the sheet structure and enhanced by cavity structure. The results and discussion in this paper revealed the “structural influence” crucial for the full and dynamical understanding of nZVI reactions. PMID:26355955

  9. Structural Evolution of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI) in Anoxic Co(2+) Solution: Interactional Performance and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalei; Chen, Wen; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Chuanlong; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-01-01

    The structures of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles evolving during reactions, and the reactions are influenced by the evolved structures. To understand the removal process in detail, it is important to investigate the relationships between the reactions and structural evolution. Using high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), typical evolved structures (sheet coprecipitation and cavity corrosion) of nZVI in anoxic Co(2+) solutions were revealed. The system pH (pH measured in mixture), which controls the stability of coprecipitation and the nZVI corrosion rate, were found to be the determining factors of structural evolutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the formation and dissolution of sheet structure impacts on the ratio of Fe(0) on the nZVI surface and the surface Co(2+) reduction. The cavity structure provides the possibility of Co migration from the surface to the bulk of nZVI, leading to continuous removal. Subacidity conditions could accelerate the evolution and improve the removal; the results of structurally controlled reactions further indicated that the removal was suspended by the sheet structure and enhanced by cavity structure. The results and discussion in this paper revealed the "structural influence" crucial for the full and dynamical understanding of nZVI reactions. PMID:26355955

  10. Synthesis of Nanoscale TiO2 and Study of the Effect of Their Crystal Structure on Single Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Ismagilov, Z. R.; Shikina, N. V.; Mazurkova, N. A.; Tsikoza, L. T.; Tuzikov, F. V.; Ushakov, V. A.; Ishchenko, A. V.; Rudina, N. A.; Korneev, D. V.; Ryabchikova, E. I.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO2) on cell responses, we synthesized four modifications of the TiO2 (amorphous, anatase, brookite, and rutile) capable of keeping their physicochemical characteristics in a cell culture medium. The modifications of nanoscale TiO2 were obtained by hydrolysis of TiCl4 and Ti(i-OC3H7)4 (TIP) upon variation of the synthesis conditions; their textural, morphological, structural, and dispersion characteristics were examined by a set of physicochemical methods: XRD, BET, SAXS, DLS, AFM, SEM, and HR-TEM. The effect of synthesis conditions (nature of precursor, pH, temperature, and addition of a complexing agent) on the structural-dispersion properties of TiO2 nanoparticles was studied. The hydrolysis methods providing the preparation of amorphous, anatase, brookite, and rutile modifications of TiO2 nanoparticles 3–5 nm in size were selected. Examination of different forms of TiO2 nanoparticles interaction with MDCK cells by transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections revealed different cell responses after treatment with different crystalline modifications and amorphous form of TiO2. The obtained results allowed us to conclude that direct contact of the nanoparticles with cell plasma membrane is the primary and critical step of their interaction and defines a subsequent response of the cell. PMID:22623903

  11. Bacterial nanofluidic structures for medicine and engineering.

    PubMed

    Hesse, William R; Freedman, Kevin J; Yi, Dong Kee; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Minjun

    2010-04-23

    Bacteria are microscopic, single-celled organisms that utilize a variety of nanofluidic structures. One of the best known and widely used nanofluidic structures that are derived from bacteria is the alpha-hemolysin pore. This pore, which self-assembles in lipid bilayers, has been used for a wide variety of sensing applications, most notably, DNA sensing. Synthetic pores drilled in a wide variety of materials, such as silicon nitride and polymers have been developed that use inspiration from the alpha-hemolysin pore. Higher-aspect-ratio nanofluidic structures, akin to nanotubes, are also synthesized by bacteria. Examples of such structures include those that are associated with bacterial transport apparatus, such as pili, and are used by bacteria to facilitate the transfer of genetic material from one bacterium to another. Flagella, and its associated structures, such as the rod and hook, are also tubular nanostructures, through which the protein, flagellin, travels to assemble the flagellum. Genetic engineering allows for the creation of modified bacterial nanopores and nanotubes that can be used for a variety of medical and engineering purposes.

  12. A crystal engineering approach for the design of multicomponent crystals and assembly of nano-scale architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Evan Patrick

    The work presented in this thesis has demonstrated that supramolecular synthons can be used to make multicomponent crystals, and various synthons can be combined to make supermolecules. The synthons can also be used to construct nanoscale assemblies. Molecules containing single and multiple hydrogen-bond (HB) and halogen-bond (XB) acceptor sites have been synthesized in an effort to carry out supramolecular synthesis in order to establish a reliable hierarchy for intermolecular interactions. Pyrazole-based molecules have been made, combined with various carboxylic acids, and characterized using infrared (IR) spectroscopy to give a success rate of 55-70%. Reactions that gave a positive result were converted to solution experiments, and crystals were grown and characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). The co-crystals display infinite 1-D chains with the intended stoichiometry and structural landscape on 6/6 occasions. The salts, on the other hand, display unpredictable stoichiometry and structural landscape on 5/5 occasions. Furthermore, the electrostatic charge on the primary hydrogen-bond acceptor, N(pyz), can be altered by adding a nitro, R-NO 2, covalent handle to the backbone of the pyrazole molecule. Addition of a strongly electron withdrawing group significantly lowered the charge on the pyrazole nitrogen atom and, in turn, lowered the supramolecular yield to 10%. Ditopic molecules containing pyrazole and pyridine on the same molecular backbone were synthesized and characterized using 1H NMR. The molecules were co-crystallized with carboxylic acids, and the resulting solids were characterized using IR spectroscopy. The solids could then be classified as co-crystal or salt using specific markers in the IR spectrum. Single-crystal XRD was used to observe the intermolecular interactions in the co-crystals and salts, and the co-crystals were assigned to two groups: Group 1 (2) and Group 2 (2). The salts (4) show more unpredictability with

  13. Nanoscale probing of electron-regulated structural transitions in silk proteins by near-field IR imaging and nano-spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Nan; Zhang, Shaoqing; Jiang, Jianjuan; Corder, Stephanie Gilbert; Qian, Zhigang; Zhou, Zhitao; Lee, Woonsoo; Liu, Keyin; Wang, Xiaohan; Li, Xinxin; Shi, Zhifeng; Mao, Ying; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Xia, Xiaoxia; Marelli, Benedetto; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Liu, Mengkun; Tao, Tiger H.

    2016-01-01

    Silk protein fibres produced by silkworms and spiders are renowned for their unparalleled mechanical strength and extensibility arising from their high-β-sheet crystal contents as natural materials. Investigation of β-sheet-oriented conformational transitions in silk proteins at the nanoscale remains a challenge using conventional imaging techniques given their limitations in chemical sensitivity or limited spatial resolution. Here, we report on electron-regulated nanoscale polymorphic transitions in silk proteins revealed by near-field infrared imaging and nano-spectroscopy at resolutions approaching the molecular level. The ability to locally probe nanoscale protein structural transitions combined with nanometre-precision electron-beam lithography offers us the capability to finely control the structure of silk proteins in two and three dimensions. Our work paves the way for unlocking essential nanoscopic protein structures and critical conditions for electron-induced conformational transitions, offering new rules to design protein-based nanoarchitectures. PMID:27713412

  14. Nanoscale probing of electron-regulated structural transitions in silk proteins by near-field IR imaging and nano-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Nan; Zhang, Shaoqing; Jiang, Jianjuan; Corder, Stephanie Gilbert; Qian, Zhigang; Zhou, Zhitao; Lee, Woonsoo; Liu, Keyin; Wang, Xiaohan; Li, Xinxin; Shi, Zhifeng; Mao, Ying; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Xia, Xiaoxia; Marelli, Benedetto; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Liu, Mengkun; Tao, Tiger H.

    2016-10-01

    Silk protein fibres produced by silkworms and spiders are renowned for their unparalleled mechanical strength and extensibility arising from their high-β-sheet crystal contents as natural materials. Investigation of β-sheet-oriented conformational transitions in silk proteins at the nanoscale remains a challenge using conventional imaging techniques given their limitations in chemical sensitivity or limited spatial resolution. Here, we report on electron-regulated nanoscale polymorphic transitions in silk proteins revealed by near-field infrared imaging and nano-spectroscopy at resolutions approaching the molecular level. The ability to locally probe nanoscale protein structural transitions combined with nanometre-precision electron-beam lithography offers us the capability to finely control the structure of silk proteins in two and three dimensions. Our work paves the way for unlocking essential nanoscopic protein structures and critical conditions for electron-induced conformational transitions, offering new rules to design protein-based nanoarchitectures.

  15. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picotto, G. B.; Koenders, L.; Wilkening, G.

    2009-08-01

    Instrumentation and measurement techniques at the nanoscale play a crucial role not only in extending our knowledge of the properties of matter and processes in nanosciences, but also in addressing new measurement needs in process control and quality assurance in industry. Micro- and nanotechnologies are now facing a growing demand for quantitative measurements to support the reliability, safety and competitiveness of products and services. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments and measurement procedures as well as suitable calibration artefacts to ensure the quality of measurements and traceability to standards. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the Nanoscale 2008 seminar held at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Torino, in September 2008. This was the 4th Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 8th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized by the Nanometrology Group within EUROMET (The European Collaboration in Measurement Standards), the German Nanotechnology Competence Centre 'Ultraprecise Surface Figuring' (CC-UPOB), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and INRIM. A special event during the seminar was the 'knighting' of Günter Wilkening from PTB, Braunschweig, Germany, as the 1st Knight of Dimensional Nanometrology. Günter Wilkening received the NanoKnight Award for his outstanding work in the field of dimensional nanometrology over the last 20 years. The contributions in this special issue deal with the developments and improvements of instrumentation and measurement methods for scanning force microscopy (SFM), electron and optical microscopy, high-resolution interferometry, calibration of instruments and new standards, new facilities and applications including critical dimension (CD) measurements on small and medium structures and nanoparticle

  16. Fatigue Reliability of Gas Turbine Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of an investigation are described for fatigue reliability in engine structures. The description consists of two parts. Part 1 is for method development. Part 2 is a specific case study. In Part 1, the essential concepts and practical approaches to damage tolerance design in the gas turbine industry are summarized. These have evolved over the years in response to flight safety certification requirements. The effect of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods on these methods is also reviewed. Assessment methods based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, with regard to both crack initiation and crack growth, are outlined. Limit state modeling techniques from structural reliability theory are shown to be appropriate for application to this problem, for both individual failure mode and system-level assessment. In Part 2, the results of a case study for the high pressure turbine of a turboprop engine are described. The response surface approach is used to construct a fatigue performance function. This performance function is used with the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to determine the probability of failure and the sensitivity of the fatigue life to the engine parameters for the first stage disk rim of the two stage turbine. A hybrid combination of regression and Monte Carlo simulation is to use incorporate time dependent random variables. System reliability is used to determine the system probability of failure, and the sensitivity of the system fatigue life to the engine parameters of the high pressure turbine. 'ne variation in the primary hot gas and secondary cooling air, the uncertainty of the complex mission loading, and the scatter in the material data are considered.

  17. Engineering and building RF structures - the works

    SciTech Connect

    Schrage, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    The translation of the physics designs of linear accelerators into engineering and manufacturing requirements is discussed. The stages of conceptual design, prototyping, final design, construction, and installation are described for both superconducting (LANL {beta} = 0.175 Spoke Cavity) and normal-conducting (APT/LEDA 6.7 MeV RFQ) accelerators. An overview of codes which have linked accelerator cavity and thermal/structural analysis modules is provided. The linked RF/thermal/CFD/structural codes do work. Workers at laboratories throughout the world have been successful in predicting the thermal and structural performance of accelerator cavities using these codes. Use of these codes allows accurate prediction of resonant frequencies, Lorentz force de-tuning, tuning sensitivities and mechanical resonant frequencies. Most important, these codes allow cost-effective optimization of the cavity geometry and, for superconducting cavities, the location and shape of external stiffeners.

  18. Nanoscale Heterogeneity of the Molecular Structure of Individual hIAPP Amyloid Fibrils Revealed with Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    vandenAkker, Corianne C; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Schleeger, Michael; Velikov, Krassimir P; Deckert, Volker; Bonn, Mischa; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by the pathological deposition of fibrillized protein, known as amyloids. It is thought that oligomers and/or amyloid fibrils formed from human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) cause cell death by membrane damage. The molecular structure of hIAPP amyloid fibrils is dominated by β-sheet structure, as probed with conventional infrared and Raman vibrational spectroscopy. However, with these techniques it is not possible to distinguish between the core and the surface structure of the fibrils. Since the fibril surface crucially affects amyloid toxicity, it is essential to know its structure. Here the surface molecular structure and amino acid residue composition of hIAPP fibrils are specifically probed with nanoscale resolution using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The fibril surface mainly contains unordered or α-helical structures, in contrast to the β-sheet-rich core. This experimentally validates recent models of hIAPP amyloids based on NMR measurements. Spatial mapping of the surface structure reveals a highly heterogeneous surface structure. Finally, TERS can probe fibrils formed on a lipid interface, which is more representative of amyloids in vivo.

  19. Nanoscale 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenders, Ludger; Ducourtieux, Sebastien

    2014-04-01

    The accurate determination of the properties of micro- and nano-structures is essential in research and development. It is also a prerequisite in process control and quality assurance in industry. In most cases, especially at the nanometer range, knowledge of the dimensional properties of structures is the fundamental base, to which further physical properties are linked. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments, suitable measurement procedures as well as calibration artifacts and methods. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2013 seminar held in Paris, France, on 25 and 26 April. It was the 6th Seminar on NanoScale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 10th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais. Three satellite meetings related to nanometrology were coupled to the seminar. The first one was an open Symposium on Scanning Probe Microscopy Standardization organized by the ISO/TC 201/SC9 technical committee. The two others were specific meetings focused on two European Metrology Research Projects funded by the European Association of National Metrology Institutes (EURAMET) (see www.euramet.org), the first one focused on the improvement of the traceability for high accuracy devices dealing with sub-nm length measurement and implementing optical interferometers or capacitive sensors (JRP SIB08 subnano), the second one aiming to develop a new metrological traceability for the measurement of the mechanical properties of nano-objects (JRP NEW05 MechProNo). More than 100 experts from industry, calibration laboratories and metrology institutes from around the world joined the NanoScale 2013 Seminar to attend 23 oral and 64 poster

  20. Nanoscale probe of magnetism, orbital occupation, and structural distortions in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    Local probes of atomic and electronic structures with sub-nanometer spatial resolution can provide additional insights into the physics of iron-based superconductors (FBS) by resolving the influence of inhomogeneities that are typically averaged over by bulk-sensitive techniques. Here we apply aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy to a wide class of iron-based superconductors and parent compounds to decipher the interplay between crystal distortions, local magnetic moment, orbital occupancy, and charge doping in these complex materials. In addition to revealing universal trends for hole concentration and local magnetic moment across families of FBS, we directly observe the effects of magneto-elastic coupling in 122 arsenides at room temperature, well above the structural and antiferromagnetic transition. The presence of atomic displacements indicates that the C4 tetragonal symmetry is already broken at room temperature in unstrained crystals, lowering the symmetry to orthorhombic (I2mm), and that all of the crystals are twinned with domains the size of a few nanometers. By tracking these local atomic displacements as a function of doping level x, in Ba(Fe1-xCox)2 As2, we find that the domain size correlates with the magnitude of the dynamic Fe moment, and both are enhanced near optimal doping where the ordered moment is suppressed. The non-monotonic behavior of the local Fe magnetic moment is linked to the strong coupling between lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. Research supported by the Materials Sciences and Engineering Division Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A.; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-01

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors.

  2. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-17

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors. PMID:27313043

  3. Nanoscale energy-route selector consisting of multiple photo-switchable fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer structures on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ryo; Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun

    2015-04-01

    We report on a nanoscale energy-route selector consisting of multiple fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) structures switched by external signaling with multiple wavelengths of light. In each FRET structure, a specific activator molecule is incorporated to a FRET pair of a donor and an acceptor to control the activation of the acceptor. Owing to this configuration, the FRET structures are switched independently, and an energy route is selected. Two photo-switchable FRET structures, one consists of Alexa Fluor 568 (donor), Cy5 (acceptor), and Alexa Fluor 405 (activator), and the other consists of Alexa Fluor 568 (donor), Cy5.5 (acceptor), and Cy3 (activator), were constructed using DNA strands modified with fluorescence molecules. Switching rates for the individual FRET structures were measured as 64 and 49 %, respectively. An energy-route selector was then assembled with the FRET structures which share a single donor. Experimental results demonstrate that the energy route can be changed repeatedly by activation control using three wavelengths of light.

  4. Precipitation of nanoscale mercuric sulfides in the presence of natural organic matter: Structural properties, aggregation, and biotransformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh Le-Tuan; Morris, Amanda; Zhang, Tong; Ticknor, Jonathan; Levard, Clément; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2014-05-01

    Mercuric sulfide species are likely the predominant forms of mercury (Hg) in anoxic environments where the bioavailability of Hg is a key factor for the production of methylmercury (MeHg) by microorganisms. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is known to affect the formation, aggregation, and dissolution of HgS particles; however the connection of these processes to Hg bioavailability is not well understood. The objectives of this study were to gain insights into the molecular structure and aggregation properties of nanoscale HgS particles that were formed and aged in the presence of DOM and to link this information to bioavailability for methylating bacteria. Characterization of nanoscale HgS was performed with a series of techniques including transmission electron microscopy, photon scattering, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The characterization results indicated that the HgS precipitates formed were metacinnabar-like spherical nanoparticles that were 3-5 nm in diameter. Over the course of the aging process, HgS nanoparticles (nano-HgS) agglomerated to form mass-fractal aggregates, although the size of each primary particle within the aggregates remained unchanged. Furthermore, the crystallinity of nano-HgS increased as the particles aged. The methylation potential of nano-HgS by sulfate-reducing bacteria decreased during the aging process. No clear correlation was observed between the net productions of MeHg and the concentrations of dissolved Hg(II) in the culture media, suggesting that the decrease in the methylation potential of aged nano-HgS was not simply because of the slower supply of dissolved Hg(II) by nano-HgS. While the link between the aging of nano-HgS and decrease of methylation potential is not fully understood, the results of our study indicate that freshly formed HgS particles in DOM-rich water will include a variety of nanoscale structures that have a wide range of methylation potentials. This knowledge provides a basis for

  5. Metallic-nanowire-loaded silicon-on-insulator structures: a route to low-loss plasmon waveguiding on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yusheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-02-01

    The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced down to the nanometer scale. Here we introduce a class of low-loss guiding schemes by integrating silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides with plasmon nanowire structures. The closely spaced silicon and metal configurations allow efficient light squeezing within the nanometer, low-index silica gaps between them, enabling deep-subwavelength light transmission with low modal attenuation. Optimizations of key structural parameters unravel the wide-range existence of the high-performance hybrid nanowire plasmon mode, which demonstrates improved guiding properties compared to the conventional hybrid and nanowire plasmon polaritons. The excitation strategy of the guided mode and the feasibility of the waveguide for compact photonic integration as well as active components are also discussed to lay the foundation for its practical implementation. The remarkable properties of these metallic-nanowire-loaded SOI waveguides potentially lend themselves to the implementation of high performance nanophotonic components, and open up promising opportunities for a variety of intriguing applications on the nanoscale.The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced

  6. Mesoscale effects in electrochemical conversion: coupling of chemistry to atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron-based electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wiaderek, Kamila M; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Pereira, Nathalie; Ilavsky, Jan; Amatucci, Glenn G; Chupas, Peter J; Chapman, Karena W

    2014-04-30

    The complex coupling of atomic, chemical, and electronic transformations across multiple length scales underlies the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices. Here, the coupling of chemistry with atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron conversion electrodes is resolved by combining pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis for a series of Fe fluorides, oxyfluorides, and oxides. The data show that the anion chemistry of the initial electrode influences the abundance of atomic defects in the Fe atomic lattice. This, in turn, is linked to different atom mobilities and propensity for particle growth. Competitive nanoparticle growth in mixed anion systems contributes to a distinct nanostructure, without the interconnected metallic nanoparticles formed for single anion systems.

  7. From crystal and NMR structures, footprints and cryo-electron-micrographs to large and soft structures: nanoscale modeling of the nucleosomal stem

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sam; Becker, Nils B.; Syed, Sajad Hussain; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Shukla, Manu Shubhdarshan; Hayes, Jeffrey J.; Angelov, Dimitar; Bednar, Jan; Dimitrov, Stefan; Everaers, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of histone H1 with linker DNA results in the formation of the nucleosomal stem structure, with considerable influence on chromatin organization. In a recent paper [Syed,S.H., Goutte-Gattat,D., Becker,N., Meyer,S., Shukla,M.S., Hayes,J.J., Everaers,R., Angelov,D., Bednar,J. and Dimitrov,S. (2010) Single-base resolution mapping of H1-nucleosome interactions and 3D organization of the nucleosome. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 107, 9620–9625], we published results of biochemical footprinting and cryo-electron-micrographs of reconstituted mono-, di- and tri-nucleosomes, for H1 variants with different lengths of the cationic C-terminus. Here, we present a detailed account of the analysis of the experimental data and we include thermal fluctuations into our nano-scale model of the stem structure. By combining (i) crystal and NMR structures of the nucleosome core particle and H1, (ii) the known nano-scale structure and elasticity of DNA, (iii) footprinting information on the location of protected sites on the DNA backbone and (iv) cryo-electron micrographs of reconstituted tri-nucleosomes, we arrive at a description of a polymorphic, hierarchically organized stem with a typical length of 20 ± 2 base pairs. A comparison to linker conformations inferred for poly-601 fibers with different linker lengths suggests, that intra-stem interactions stabilize and facilitate the formation of dense chromatin fibers. PMID:21835779

  8. Functionalising surfaces at the nanoscale using plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Moore, R

    2009-01-01

    Plasma technology offers a highly effective toolbox for nanoscale surface engineering of materials. The potential variety of nanoscale features and new properties that can be achieved are reviewed here.

  9. Direct Nanoscale Imaging of Evolving Electric Field Domains in Quantum Structures

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Rudra Sankar; Razavipour, Seyed Ghasem; Dupont, Emmanuel; Xu, Chao; Laframboise, Sylvain; Wasilewski, Zbig; Hu, Qing; Ban, Dayan

    2014-01-01

    The external performance of quantum optoelectronic devices is governed by the spatial profiles of electrons and potentials within the active regions of these devices. For example, in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), the electric field domain (EFD) hypothesis posits that the potential distribution might be simultaneously spatially nonuniform and temporally unstable. Unfortunately, there exists no prior means of probing the inner potential profile directly. Here we report the nanoscale measured electric potential distribution inside operating QCLs by using scanning voltage microscopy at a cryogenic temperature. We prove that, per the EFD hypothesis, the multi-quantum-well active region is indeed divided into multiple sections having distinctly different electric fields. The electric field across these serially-stacked quantum cascade modules does not continuously increase in proportion to gradual increases in the applied device bias, but rather hops between discrete values that are related to tunneling resonances. We also report the evolution of EFDs, finding that an incremental change in device bias leads to a hopping-style shift in the EFD boundary – the higher electric field domain expands at least one module each step at the expense of the lower field domain within the active region. PMID:25431158

  10. Non-planar grain boundary structures in fcc metals and their role in nano-scale deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Laura; Farkas, Diana

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of a comparative molecular dynamics study showing that relaxed random grain boundary structures can be significantly non-planar at the nano-scale in fcc metals characterized by low stacking fault values. We studied the relaxed structures of random [1 1 0] tilt boundaries in a polycrystal using interatomic potentials describing Cu and Pd. Grain boundaries presenting non-planar features were observed predominantly for the Cu potential but not for the Pd potential, and we relate these differences to the stacking fault values. We also show that these non-planar structures can have a strong influence on dislocation emission from the grain boundaries as well as on grain boundary strain accommodation processes, such as grain boundary sliding. We studied the loading response in polycrystals of 40 nm grain size to a level of 9% strain and found that the non-planar grain boundaries favour dislocation emission as a deformation mechanism and hinder grain boundary sliding. This has strong implications for the mechanical behaviour of nano-crystalline materials, which is determined by the competition between dislocation activity and grain boundary accommodation of the strain. Thus, the two interatomic potentials for Cu and Pd considered in this work resulted in the same overall stress-strain curve, but significantly different fractions of the strain accommodated by the intergranular versus intragranular deformation mechanisms. Strain localization patterns are also influenced by the non-planarity of the grain boundary structures.

  11. Shear-stress-induced structural arrangement of water molecules in nanoscale Couette flow with slipping at wall boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jau-Wen

    2014-08-07

    This study investigated the structuring of water molecules in a nanoscale Couette flow with the upper plate subjected to lateral forces with various magnitudes and water slipping against a metal wall. It was found that when the upper plate is subjected to a force, the water body deforms into a parallelepiped. Water molecules in the channel are then gradually arranged into lattice positions, creating a layered structure. The structural arrangement of water molecules is caused by the water molecules accommodating themselves to the increase in energy under the application of a lateral force on the moving plate. The ordering arrangement of water molecules increases the rotational degree of freedom, allowing the molecules to increase their Coulomb potential energy through polar rotation that accounts for the energy input through the upper plate. With a force continuously applied to the upper plate, the water molecules in contact with the upper plate move forward until slip between the water and upper plate occurs. The relation between the structural arrangement of water molecules, slip at the wall, and the shear force is studied. The relation between the slip and the locking/unlocking of water molecules to metal atoms is also studied.

  12. Microscale Technologies and Modular Approaches for Tissue Engineering: Moving toward the Fabrication of Complex Functional Structures

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Robert; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Micro- and nanoscale technologies have emerged as powerful tools in the fabrication of engineered tissues and organs. Here we focus on the application of these techniques to improve engineered tissue architecture and function using modular and directed self-assembly and highlight the emergence of this new class of materials for biomedical applications. PMID:21627163

  13. Using Images To Teach the Beginnings of Structural Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindenberg, Henrique; Arevalo, Luis Alberto Tello

    Aiming at turning theory of structures into a captivating subject to civil engineering students and at helping them understand the link between the mathematical models and the real structures, a new experience is underway at the Department of Structural and Foundation Engineering of Excola Politecnica da Universidada de Sao Paulo: transparencies…

  14. Soft x-ray ptychography studies of nanoscale magnetic and structural correlations in thin SmCo5 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Shi, X.; Neu, V.; Elefant, D.; Lee, J. C. T.; Shapiro, D. A.; Farmand, M.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shiu, W.; Marchesini, S.; Roy, S.; Kevan, S. D.

    Soft x-ray ptychographic imaging was applied to probe an amorphous 50 nm thin SmCo5 film prepared by off-axis pulsed laser deposition and exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Amplitude and phase contrast images, retrieved at photon energies near the cobalt L3 resonance, were used to identify and characterize magnetic and structural features with a spatial resolution of about10 nm. Aside from the common magnetic labyrinth domain pattern, nanoscale structural inclusions were identified that are primarily located in close proximity to the magnetic domain walls. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests that these inclusions are nanocrystalline Sm2Co17 phases with nominally in-plane magnetic anisotropy. Our results indicate that x-ray ptychographic imaging enables fruitful studies of magnetic and structural correlations at length scales relevant to emerging magnetic and spintronic devices. Supported by the Director of the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231.

  15. Balancer structure for three-cylinder engines

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.

    1986-02-11

    This patent describes a balancer structure for a three-cylinder in-line engine having aligned three cylinders, a crankshaft having crank arms disposed at angles of 120/sup 0/ with respect to each other and operatively connected to the cylinders, respectively. This structure consists of: 1.) a single countershaft adjacent and parallel to and rotated at the same speed as the crankshaft but in the opposite direction; 2.) a counterweight is securely mounted on the crankshaft only at positions corresponding to the first and third cylinders for balancing a part of inertia force of reciprocating mases and the entire inertia force of rotating masses; 3.) at least one second counterweight securely mounted on the crankshaft substantially opposite to the crank arm corresponding to the second cylinder for balancing another part of the inertia force of the reciprocating masses; 4.) at least two balancers securely mounted on the countershaft at both ends for the balancing of the remainder of the inertia force of the reciprocating masses and a couple of inertia of the crankshaft about an axis perpendicular to the crankshaft.

  16. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting dome in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare with the Ginzburg–Landau coherence length. We find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying a connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.

  17. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting “dome” in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare to the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length. Thus, we find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying a connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.

  18. Thermodynamic and structural insights into nanocomposites engineering by comparing two materials assembly techniques for graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Huanan; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2013-06-25

    Materials assembled by layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly and vacuum-assisted flocculation (VAF) have similarities, but a systematic study of their comparative advantages and disadvantages is missing. Such a study is needed from both practical and fundamental perspectives aiming at a better understanding of structure-property relationships of nanocomposites and purposeful engineering of materials with unique properties. Layered composites from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and reduced graphene (RG) are made by both techniques. We comparatively evaluate their structure, mechanical, and electrical properties. LBL and VAF composites demonstrate clear differences at atomic and nanoscale structural levels but reveal similarities in micrometer and submicrometer organization. Epitaxial crystallization and suppression of phase transition temperatures are more pronounced for PVA in LBL than for VAF composites. Mechanical properties are virtually identical for both assemblies at high RG contents. We conclude that mechanical properties in layered RG assemblies are largely determined by the thermodynamic state of PVA at the polymer/nanosheet interface rather than the nanometer scale differences in RG packing. High and nearly identical values of toughness for LBL and VAF composites reaching 6.1 MJ/m(3) observed for thermodynamically optimal composition confirm this conclusion. Their toughness is the highest among all other layered assemblies from RG, cellulose, clay, etc. Electrical conductivity, however, is more than 10× higher for LBL than for VAF composites for the same RG contents. Electrical properties are largely determined by the tunneling barrier between RG sheets and therefore strongly dependent on atomic/nanoscale organization. These findings open the door for application-oriented methods of materials engineering using both types of layered assemblies.

  19. 46 CFR 11.505 - Engineer officer structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engineer officer structure. 11.505 Section 11.505 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.505 Engineer officer...

  20. 46 CFR 11.505 - Engineer officer structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Engineer officer structure. 11.505 Section 11.505 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.505 Engineer officer...

  1. 46 CFR 11.505 - Engineer officer structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Engineer officer structure. 11.505 Section 11.505 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.505 Engineer officer...

  2. Hard magnetism in structurally engineered silica nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyon-Min; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2016-09-21

    Creation of structural complexity by simple experimental control will be an attractive approach for the preparation of nanomaterials, as a classical bottom-up method is supplemented by a more efficient and more direct artificial engineering method. In this study, structural manipulation of MCM-41 type mesoporous silica is investigated by generating and imbedding hard magnetic CoFe2O4 nanoparticles into mesoporous silica. Depending on the heating rate and target temperature, mesoporous silica undergoes a transformation in shape to form hollow silica, framed silica with interior voids, or melted silica with intact mesostructures. Magnetism is governed by the major CoFe2O4 phase, and it is affected by antiferromagnetic hematite (α-Fe2O3) and olivine-type cobalt silicate (Co2SiO4), as seen in its paramagnetic behavior at the annealing temperature of 430 °C. The early formation of Co2SiO4 than what is usually observed implies the effect of the partial substitution of Fe in the sites of Co. Under slow heating (2.5 °C min(-1)) mesostructures are preserved, but with significantly smaller mesopores (d100 = 1.5 nm). In addition, nonstoichiometric CoxFe1-xO with metal vacancies at 600 °C, and spinel Co3O4 at 700 °C accompany major CoFe2O4. The amorphous nature of silica matrix is thought to contribute significantly to these structurally diverse and rich phases, enabled by off-stoichiometry between Si and O, and accelerated by the diffusion of metal cations into SiO4 polyhedra at an elevated temperature. PMID:27537252

  3. Hard magnetism in structurally engineered silica nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyon-Min; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2016-09-21

    Creation of structural complexity by simple experimental control will be an attractive approach for the preparation of nanomaterials, as a classical bottom-up method is supplemented by a more efficient and more direct artificial engineering method. In this study, structural manipulation of MCM-41 type mesoporous silica is investigated by generating and imbedding hard magnetic CoFe2O4 nanoparticles into mesoporous silica. Depending on the heating rate and target temperature, mesoporous silica undergoes a transformation in shape to form hollow silica, framed silica with interior voids, or melted silica with intact mesostructures. Magnetism is governed by the major CoFe2O4 phase, and it is affected by antiferromagnetic hematite (α-Fe2O3) and olivine-type cobalt silicate (Co2SiO4), as seen in its paramagnetic behavior at the annealing temperature of 430 °C. The early formation of Co2SiO4 than what is usually observed implies the effect of the partial substitution of Fe in the sites of Co. Under slow heating (2.5 °C min(-1)) mesostructures are preserved, but with significantly smaller mesopores (d100 = 1.5 nm). In addition, nonstoichiometric CoxFe1-xO with metal vacancies at 600 °C, and spinel Co3O4 at 700 °C accompany major CoFe2O4. The amorphous nature of silica matrix is thought to contribute significantly to these structurally diverse and rich phases, enabled by off-stoichiometry between Si and O, and accelerated by the diffusion of metal cations into SiO4 polyhedra at an elevated temperature.

  4. Talin determines the nanoscale architecture of focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jaron; Wang, Yilin; Goh, Wah Ing; Goh, Honzhen; Baird, Michelle A; Ruehland, Svenja; Teo, Shijia; Bate, Neil; Critchley, David R; Davidson, Michael W; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2015-09-01

    Insight into how molecular machines perform their biological functions depends on knowledge of the spatial organization of the components, their connectivity, geometry, and organizational hierarchy. However, these parameters are difficult to determine in multicomponent assemblies such as integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We have previously applied 3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy to probe the spatial organization of major FA components, observing a nanoscale stratification of proteins between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here we combine superresolution imaging techniques with a protein engineering approach to investigate how such nanoscale architecture arises. We demonstrate that talin plays a key structural role in regulating the nanoscale architecture of FAs, akin to a molecular ruler. Talin diagonally spans the FA core, with its N terminus at the membrane and C terminus demarcating the FA/stress fiber interface. In contrast, vinculin is found to be dispensable for specification of FA nanoscale architecture. Recombinant analogs of talin with modified lengths recapitulated its polarized orientation but altered the FA/stress fiber interface in a linear manner, consistent with its modular structure, and implicating the integrin-talin-actin complex as the primary mechanical linkage in FAs. Talin was found to be ∼97 nm in length and oriented at ∼15° relative to the plasma membrane. Our results identify talin as the primary determinant of FA nanoscale organization and suggest how multiple cellular forces may be integrated at adhesion sites. PMID:26283369

  5. Talin determines the nanoscale architecture of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jaron; Wang, Yilin; Goh, Wah Ing; Goh, Honzhen; Baird, Michelle A.; Ruehland, Svenja; Teo, Shijia; Bate, Neil; Critchley, David R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2015-01-01

    Insight into how molecular machines perform their biological functions depends on knowledge of the spatial organization of the components, their connectivity, geometry, and organizational hierarchy. However, these parameters are difficult to determine in multicomponent assemblies such as integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We have previously applied 3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy to probe the spatial organization of major FA components, observing a nanoscale stratification of proteins between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here we combine superresolution imaging techniques with a protein engineering approach to investigate how such nanoscale architecture arises. We demonstrate that talin plays a key structural role in regulating the nanoscale architecture of FAs, akin to a molecular ruler. Talin diagonally spans the FA core, with its N terminus at the membrane and C terminus demarcating the FA/stress fiber interface. In contrast, vinculin is found to be dispensable for specification of FA nanoscale architecture. Recombinant analogs of talin with modified lengths recapitulated its polarized orientation but altered the FA/stress fiber interface in a linear manner, consistent with its modular structure, and implicating the integrin–talin–actin complex as the primary mechanical linkage in FAs. Talin was found to be ∼97 nm in length and oriented at ∼15° relative to the plasma membrane. Our results identify talin as the primary determinant of FA nanoscale organization and suggest how multiple cellular forces may be integrated at adhesion sites. PMID:26283369

  6. Soft x-ray ptychography studies of nanoscale magnetic and structural correlations in thin SmCo5 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Fischer, P.; Neu, V.; Elefant, D.; Lee, J. C. T.; Shapiro, D. A.; Farmand, M.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shiu, H.-W.; Marchesini, S.; Roy, S.; Kevan, S. D.

    2016-02-01

    High spatial resolution magnetic x-ray spectromicroscopy at x-ray photon energies near the cobalt L3 resonance was applied to probe an amorphous 50 nm thin SmCo5 film prepared by off-axis pulsed laser deposition onto an x-ray transparent 200 nm thin Si3N4 membrane. Alternating gradient magnetometry shows a strong in-plane anisotropy and an only weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, which is confirmed by magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy images showing over a field of view of 10 μm a primarily stripe-like domain pattern but with local labyrinth-like domains. Soft x-ray ptychography in amplitude and phase contrast was used to identify and characterize local magnetic and structural features over a field of view of 1 μm with a spatial resolution of about 10 nm. There, the magnetic labyrinth domain patterns are accompanied by nanoscale structural inclusions that are primarily located in close proximity to the magnetic domain walls. Our analysis suggests that these inclusions are nanocrystalline Sm2Co17 phases with nominally in-plane magnetic anisotropy.

  7. Visualizing viral assemblies in a nanoscale biosphere.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Brian L; Showalter, Shannon P; Dukes, Madeline J; Tanner, Justin R; Demmert, Andrew C; McDonald, Sarah M; Kelly, Deborah F

    2013-01-21

    We present a novel microfluidic platform to examine biological assemblies at high-resolution. We have engineered a functionalized chamber that serves as a "nanoscale biosphere" to capture and maintain rotavirus double-layered particles (DLPs) in a liquid environment. The chamber can be inserted into the column of a transmission electron microscope while being completely isolated from the vacuum system. This configuration allowed us to determine the structure of biological complexes at nanometer-resolution within a self-contained vessel. Images of DLPs were used to calculate the first 3D view of macromolecules in solution. We refer to this new fluidic visualization technology as in situ molecular microscopy.

  8. Advanced fabrication techniques for cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved design for regeneratively cooled engine structures was identified. This design uses photochemically machined (PCM) coolant passages. It permits the braze joint to be placed in a relatively cool area, remote from the critical hot face sheet. The geometry of the passages at the face sheet also minimizes stress concentration and, therefore, enhances the low cycle fatigue performance. The two most promising alloys identified for this application are Inconel 617 and Nickel 201. Inconel 617 was selected because it has excellent creep rupture properties, while Nickel 201 was selected because of its predicted good performance under low cycle fatigue loading. The fabrication of the PCM coolant passages in both Inconel 617 and Nickel 201 was successfully developed. During fabrication of Inconel 617, undesirable characteristics were observed in the braze joints. A development program to resolve this condition was undertaken and led to definition of an isothermal solidification process for joining Inconel 617 panels. This process produced joints which approach parent metal strength and homogeneity.

  9. Balancer structure for three-cylinder engines

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.

    1987-04-21

    This patent describes a balancer structure for a three-cylinder in-line engine having three cylinders, the latter comprising a first and third cylinder and a second cylinder disposed between the first and third cylinders, a crankshaft having crank arms disposed at angles of 120/sup 0/ with respect to each other and operatively connected to a piston assembly within each of the cylinders, respectively, consisting of: a single crankshaft adjacent and parallel to and rotated at the same speed as the crankshaft but in the opposite direction, means comprising first counterweights securely mounted on the crankshaft only at positions thereof corresponding to the first and third cylinders for balancing of a part of inertia forces of rotating masses and a part of inertia forces of reciprocating masses; means comprising at least one second counterweight securely mounted on the crankshaft substantially opposite to the crank arm corresponding to the second cylinder for balancing of the remainder of the inertia forces of rotating masses; at least two balancers respectively securely mounted on the countershaft at both ends respectively thereof for the balancing of the remainder of the inertia forces of reciprocating masses, and of the couple of inertia of the crankshaft about axes perpendicular to the crankshaft.

  10. Fatigue reliability of cracked engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, David Bruce, Jr.

    1997-12-01

    This study investigates the reliability of engineering structures containing fatigue cracks. Stress concentrations and welded joints are probable locations for the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. Due to the many unknowns of loading, materials properties, crack sizes and crack shapes present at these locations, a statistics-based reliability analysis is valuable in the careful consideration of these many different random factors involved in a fatigue life analysis, several of which are expanded upon in this study. The basic problem of a crack near a stress concentration is first considered. A formulation for the aspect ratio (a/c) of a propagating semi-elliptical fatigue crack located at the toe of a welded T-joint is developed using Newman and Raju's stress intensity factor for a cracked flat plate with a weld magnification factor and compared to that of a cracked flat plate, and the reliability in terms of fatigue lifetime is calculated with the aid of Paris' crack propagation equation for membrane and bending loadings. Crack closure effects are then introduced in the consideration of short crack effects, where crack growth rates typically may exceed those found using traditional linear elastic fracture mechanics solutions for long cracks. The probability of a very small, microstructurally influenced crack growing to a size influenced by local plastic conditions is calculated utilizing the probability of a crack continuing to grow past an obstacle, such as a grain boundary. The result is then combined with the probability for failure defined using the crack closure-modified Paris equation to find an overall reliability for the structure. Last, the probability of fracture is determined when a crack front encounters regions of non-uniform toughness, such as typical in the heat affected zone of a welded joint. An expression for the effective crack lengths of the dissimilar regions is derived, and used in a weakest-link fracture model in the evaluation

  11. Intrinsic Nanoscience of δ Pu-Ga Alloys: Local Structure and Speciation, Collective Behavior, Nanoscale Heterogeneity, and Aging Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Conradson, Steven D.; Bock, Nicolas; Castro, Julio M.; Conradson, Dylan R.; Cox, Lawrence E.; Dmowski, Wojtek; Dooley, David E.; Egami, Takeshi; Espinosa-Faller, Francisco J.; Freibert, Franz J.; Garcia-Adeva, Angel J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Holmstrom, Erik; Howell, Rafael C.; Katz, Barbara A.; Lashley, Jason C.; Martinez, Raymond J.; Moore, David P.; Morales, Luis A.; Olivas, J David; Pereyra, Ramiro A.; Ramos, Michael; Terry, Jeff H.; Villella, Phillip M.

    2014-04-24

    Because diffraction measurements are sensitive only to the long range average arrangement of the atoms in the coherent portion of a crystal, complementary local structure measurements are required for a complete understanding of the structure of a complex material. This is particularly an issue in solid solutions where even random distributions of a solute will result in nanometer-scale fluctuations in the local composition. The structure will be further complicated if collective and cooperative phenomena organize the solute distribution via longer range interactions between non-bonded solute sites. If the solute affects the phase stability then the question is raised of whether the atoms in domains with local compositions outside the limits of the bulk phase will rearrange into the structure stable for that composition and temperature or if the resulting stress would prevent such a local phase transition. If the former, then phase separated, heterogeneous structures at or below the diffraction limit will form. This nanometerscale competition between the phase transition and the epitaxial mismatch – exacerbated by the added strain if the transition involves a volume change – raises the potential for the formation of novel structures that do not occur in bulk material, e.g., fcc Fe. This coupling over multiple scales between inhomogeneity ordering, elastic forces, phase competition, and texture in the form of coexisting structures is a hallmark of martensites, a class of complex materials that includes δ-stabilized PuGa and that often exhibit correlated atomic and electronic properties. The enigmatic and extreme nature of Pu is consistent with its exhibiting unusual structural behavior of this type, including nanoscale heterogeneity in δ-stabilized PuGa and its enhanced homogeneity on aging that has been suggested based on earlier X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray pair distribution function (pdf) measurements. Measurements on a

  12. 1. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing structure of Test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing structure of Test Stand 'B' (4215/E-16), also known as the 'Short Snorter.' California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering 'Structural Addition - Bldg. E-12, Edwards Test Station,' drawing no. E12/1-1, 8 August 1957. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand B, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Nanoscale Structural Engineering of Ferroelectric Polymers. Final Report for July 2001-June 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Adenwalla, S.

    2005-12-01

    This final report describes the interaction between multilavered films of polymer ferroelectrics, in our case the copolymers of PVDF formed with TrFE. Langmuir Blodgett deposition of these films allows the deposition of thin, uniform, highly crystalline films. Two type of multilayer stacks are made and characterized. The first consists of multilayer stacks of the copolymer films with 2 different TrFE contents-50% and 20%. By varying the period of the multilayer stacks we see evidence of interaction at short length scales, evidenced in the thermodynamic transition temperatures of the multilayer films. The second set consists of a P(VDF - TrFE) film sandwiched between two Cobalt electrodes. In these we see evidence of a large magnetoelectric coupling.

  14. Nanoscale structure and mechanical behavior of growth lines in shell of abalone Haliotis gigantea.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, Taro; Kakisawa, Hideki; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2011-04-01

    In the natural world, bottom-up hierarchical construction of complex structures results in materials with remarkable properties. A well known example is the nacre of mollusk shells, commonly called "mother of pearl", whose excellent strength and toughness has been the subject of research for many decades. A significant discovery has been the presence of periodic layers called "growth lines". These are thin distinct layers within the bulk of the shell which form periodically, with their structure affected by environmental changes. Studies of their formation and behavior offer valuable insight into the architecture of seashells. In this work, the structure and mechanical behavior of growth lines in shells of abalone Haliotis gigantea were investigated using electron microscopy and nanoindentation. Growth lines form directly out of nacre into layers of blocks and irregular particles. In comparison to nacre, they have basic structures, form rapidly, and are harder, which suggest that they serve a protective role during lifecycle transitions. This exemplifies how natural structures are able to closely control growth architecture in order to form different structures for different functions, all from the same base materials. PMID:21232604

  15. Effects of nanoscale surface texture and lubricant molecular structure on boundary lubrication in liquid.

    PubMed

    Al-Azizi, Ala' A; Eryilmaz, Osman; Erdemir, Ali; Kim, Seong H

    2013-11-01

    Nanoconfinement effects of boundary lubricants can significantly affect the friction behavior of textured solid interfaces. These effects were studied with nanotextured diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces using a reciprocating ball-on-flat tribometer in liquid lubricants with different molecular structures: n-hexadecane and n-pentanol for linear molecular structure and poly(α-olefin) and heptamethylnonane for branched molecular structure. It is well-known that liquid lubricants with linear molecular structures can readily form a long-range ordered structure upon nanoconfinement between flat solid surfaces. This long-range ordering, often called solidification, causes high friction in the boundary lubrication regime. When the solid surface deforms elastically due to the contact pressure and this deformation depth is larger than the surface roughness, even rough surfaces can exhibit the nanoconfinement effects. However, the liquid entrapped in the depressed region of the nanotextured surface would not solidify, which effectively reduces the solidified lubricant area in the contact region and decreases friction. When liquid lubricants are branched, the nanoconfinement-induced solidification does not occur because the molecular structure is not suitable for the long-range ordering. Surface texture, therefore, has an insignificant effect on the boundary lubrication of branched molecules.

  16. Effects of nanoscale surface texture and lubricant molecular structure on boundary lubrication in liquid.

    PubMed

    Al-Azizi, Ala' A; Eryilmaz, Osman; Erdemir, Ali; Kim, Seong H

    2013-11-01

    Nanoconfinement effects of boundary lubricants can significantly affect the friction behavior of textured solid interfaces. These effects were studied with nanotextured diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces using a reciprocating ball-on-flat tribometer in liquid lubricants with different molecular structures: n-hexadecane and n-pentanol for linear molecular structure and poly(α-olefin) and heptamethylnonane for branched molecular structure. It is well-known that liquid lubricants with linear molecular structures can readily form a long-range ordered structure upon nanoconfinement between flat solid surfaces. This long-range ordering, often called solidification, causes high friction in the boundary lubrication regime. When the solid surface deforms elastically due to the contact pressure and this deformation depth is larger than the surface roughness, even rough surfaces can exhibit the nanoconfinement effects. However, the liquid entrapped in the depressed region of the nanotextured surface would not solidify, which effectively reduces the solidified lubricant area in the contact region and decreases friction. When liquid lubricants are branched, the nanoconfinement-induced solidification does not occur because the molecular structure is not suitable for the long-range ordering. Surface texture, therefore, has an insignificant effect on the boundary lubrication of branched molecules. PMID:24156745

  17. Nanoscale electro-structural characterisation of ohmic contacts formed on p-type implanted 4H-SiC

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This work reports a nanoscale electro-structural characterisation of Ti/Al ohmic contacts formed on p-type Al-implanted silicon carbide (4H-SiC). The morphological and the electrical properties of the Al-implanted layer, annealed at 1700°C with or without a protective capping layer, and of the ohmic contacts were studied using atomic force microscopy [AFM], transmission line model measurements and local current measurements performed with conductive AFM. The characteristics of the contacts were significantly affected by the roughness of the underlying SiC. In particular, the surface roughness of the Al-implanted SiC regions annealed at 1700°C could be strongly reduced using a protective carbon capping layer during annealing. This latter resulted in an improved surface morphology and specific contact resistance of the Ti/Al ohmic contacts formed on these regions. The microstructure of the contacts was monitored by X-ray diffraction analysis and a cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and correlated with the electrical results. PMID:21711667

  18. Maximum efficiency of ideal heat engines based on a small system: correction to the Carnot efficiency at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Quan, H T

    2014-06-01

    We study the maximum efficiency of a heat engine based on a small system. It is revealed that due to the finiteness of the system, irreversibility may arise when the working substance contacts with a heat reservoir. As a result, there is a working-substance-dependent correction to the Carnot efficiency. We derive a general and simple expression for the maximum efficiency of a Carnot cycle heat engine in terms of the relative entropy. This maximum efficiency approaches the Carnot efficiency asymptotically when the size of the working substance increases to the thermodynamic limit. Our study extends Carnot's result of the maximum efficiency to an arbitrary working substance and elucidates the subtlety of thermodynamic laws in small systems.

  19. Maximum efficiency of ideal heat engines based on a small system: correction to the Carnot efficiency at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Quan, H T

    2014-06-01

    We study the maximum efficiency of a heat engine based on a small system. It is revealed that due to the finiteness of the system, irreversibility may arise when the working substance contacts with a heat reservoir. As a result, there is a working-substance-dependent correction to the Carnot efficiency. We derive a general and simple expression for the maximum efficiency of a Carnot cycle heat engine in terms of the relative entropy. This maximum efficiency approaches the Carnot efficiency asymptotically when the size of the working substance increases to the thermodynamic limit. Our study extends Carnot's result of the maximum efficiency to an arbitrary working substance and elucidates the subtlety of thermodynamic laws in small systems. PMID:25019751

  20. Metallurgical phases and their magnetism at the interface of nanoscale MgB2/Fe layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B.; Keune, W.; Kuncser, V.; Becker, H.-W.; Röhlsberger, R.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the characterization of metallurgical phases and their magnetism at the interfaces of nanoscale MgB2/Fe layered structures. MgB2/57Fe multilayers with varying layer thicknesses were prepared by vacuum deposition and investigated, before and after annealing by electrical resistance measurements, x-ray diffraction and 57Fe conversion-electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) down to 5 K. Interfacial Fe-B phases, such as Fe2B, were identified by CEMS. A superparamagnetic-to-ferromagnetic transition is observed with increasing 57Fe film thickness. Ultrahigh vacuum annealing at 500 °C of the multilayers leads to strong diffusion of Fe atoms into the boundary regions of the MgB2 layers. MgB2 in the as-grown multilayers is non-superconducting. Structural disorder and the effect of Fe interdiffusion contribute to the suppression of superconductivity in the MgB2 films of all the as-grown multilayers and the thinner annealed multilayers. However, an annealed MgB2/57Fe/MgB2 trilayer with thicker (500 Å) MgB2 layers is observed to be superconducting with an onset temperature of 25 K. At 5 K, the annealed trilayer can be conceived as being strongly chemically modulated, consisting of two partially Fe-doped superconducting MgB2 layers separated by an interdiffused weakly magnetic Fe-B interlayer, which is characterized by a low hyperfine magnetic field Bhf of ˜11 T. This chemically modulated layer structure of the trilayer after annealing was verified by Rutherford backscattering.

  1. Metallurgical phases and their magnetism at the interface of nanoscale MgB2/Fe layered structures.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, B; Keune, W; Kuncser, V; Becker, H-W; Röhlsberger, R

    2011-11-30

    We report on the characterization of metallurgical phases and their magnetism at the interfaces of nanoscale MgB(2)/Fe layered structures. MgB(2)/(57)Fe multilayers with varying layer thicknesses were prepared by vacuum deposition and investigated, before and after annealing by electrical resistance measurements, x-ray diffraction and (57)Fe conversion-electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) down to 5 K. Interfacial Fe-B phases, such as Fe(2)B, were identified by CEMS. A superparamagnetic-to-ferromagnetic transition is observed with increasing (57)Fe film thickness. Ultrahigh vacuum annealing at 500 °C of the multilayers leads to strong diffusion of Fe atoms into the boundary regions of the MgB(2) layers. MgB(2) in the as-grown multilayers is non-superconducting. Structural disorder and the effect of Fe interdiffusion contribute to the suppression of superconductivity in the MgB(2) films of all the as-grown multilayers and the thinner annealed multilayers. However, an annealed MgB(2)/(57)Fe/MgB(2) trilayer with thicker (500 Å) MgB(2) layers is observed to be superconducting with an onset temperature of 25 K. At 5 K, the annealed trilayer can be conceived as being strongly chemically modulated, consisting of two partially Fe-doped superconducting MgB(2) layers separated by an interdiffused weakly magnetic Fe-B interlayer, which is characterized by a low hyperfine magnetic field B(hf) of ∼11 T. This chemically modulated layer structure of the trilayer after annealing was verified by Rutherford backscattering.

  2. Optimization of hierarchical structure and nanoscale-enabled plasmonic refraction for window electrodes in photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing; Peng, Qiang; Li, Ruopeng; Rong, Qikun; Ding, Yang; Akinoglu, Eser Metin; Wu, Xueyuan; Wang, Xin; Lu, Xubing; Wang, Qianming; Zhou, Guofu; Liu, Jun-Ming; Ren, Zhifeng; Giersig, Michael; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Gao, Jinwei

    2016-09-01

    An ideal network window electrode for photovoltaic applications should provide an optimal surface coverage, a uniform current density into and/or from a substrate, and a minimum of the overall resistance for a given shading ratio. Here we show that metallic networks with quasi-fractal structure provides a near-perfect practical realization of such an ideal electrode. We find that a leaf venation network, which possesses key characteristics of the optimal structure, indeed outperforms other networks. We further show that elements of hierarchal topology, rather than details of the branching geometry, are of primary importance in optimizing the networks, and demonstrate this experimentally on five model artificial hierarchical networks of varied levels of complexity. In addition to these structural effects, networks containing nanowires are shown to acquire transparency exceeding the geometric constraint due to the plasmonic refraction.

  3. Effect of surface morphology and temperature on the structural stability of nanoscale wavy films.

    PubMed

    Adnan, A; Sun, C T

    2008-08-01

    The atomic scale structural stability of freestanding wavy gold (Au) nanofilms was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The waviness in the Au film was formed by cleaving sinusoidal surfaces from a [Formula: see text] bulk crystal. The degree of waviness was varied by changing the wavelength of the sinusoidal surface profile. Films were then equilibrated at different temperatures (between 10 and 1080 K) and their structural stability was monitored. The MD simulation results revealed that the stability of films depends on temperature as well as the waviness of the film surface. It was shown that the size-dependent melting point depression of Au plays the dominant role in causing the structural instability of wavy films. PMID:21828794

  4. Optimization of hierarchical structure and nanoscale-enabled plasmonic refraction for window electrodes in photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Peng, Qiang; Li, Ruopeng; Rong, Qikun; Ding, Yang; Akinoglu, Eser Metin; Wu, Xueyuan; Wang, Xin; Lu, Xubing; Wang, Qianming; Zhou, Guofu; Liu, Jun-Ming; Ren, Zhifeng; Giersig, Michael; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Gao, Jinwei

    2016-01-01

    An ideal network window electrode for photovoltaic applications should provide an optimal surface coverage, a uniform current density into and/or from a substrate, and a minimum of the overall resistance for a given shading ratio. Here we show that metallic networks with quasi-fractal structure provides a near-perfect practical realization of such an ideal electrode. We find that a leaf venation network, which possesses key characteristics of the optimal structure, indeed outperforms other networks. We further show that elements of hierarchal topology, rather than details of the branching geometry, are of primary importance in optimizing the networks, and demonstrate this experimentally on five model artificial hierarchical networks of varied levels of complexity. In addition to these structural effects, networks containing nanowires are shown to acquire transparency exceeding the geometric constraint due to the plasmonic refraction. PMID:27667099

  5. Effect of surface morphology and temperature on the structural stability of nanoscale wavy films.

    PubMed

    Adnan, A; Sun, C T

    2008-08-01

    The atomic scale structural stability of freestanding wavy gold (Au) nanofilms was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The waviness in the Au film was formed by cleaving sinusoidal surfaces from a [Formula: see text] bulk crystal. The degree of waviness was varied by changing the wavelength of the sinusoidal surface profile. Films were then equilibrated at different temperatures (between 10 and 1080 K) and their structural stability was monitored. The MD simulation results revealed that the stability of films depends on temperature as well as the waviness of the film surface. It was shown that the size-dependent melting point depression of Au plays the dominant role in causing the structural instability of wavy films.

  6. Exposure and Health Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Dioxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive - NOW IN PRINT IN THE JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels that are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (Ce02) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatin...

  7. Exposure, Health and Ecological Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Oxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coa...

  8. Reconstruction of explicit structural properties at the nanoscale via spectroscopic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum registered by a reflected-light bright-field spectroscopic microscope (SM) can quantify the microscopically indiscernible, deeply subdiffractional length scales within samples such as biological cells and tissues. Nevertheless, quantification of biological specimens via any optical measures most often reveals ambiguous information about the specific structural properties within the studied samples. Thus, optical quantification remains nonintuitive to users from the diverse fields of technique application. In this work, we demonstrate that the SM signal can be analyzed to reconstruct explicit physical measures of internal structure within label-free, weakly scattering samples: characteristic length scale and the amplitude of spatial refractive-index (RI) fluctuations. We present and validate the reconstruction algorithm via finite-difference time-domain solutions of Maxwell's equations on an example of exponential spatial correlation of RI. We apply the validated algorithm to experimentally measure structural properties within isolated cells from two genetic variants of HT29 colon cancer cell line as well as within a prostate tissue biopsy section. The presented methodology can lead to the development of novel biophotonics techniques that create two-dimensional maps of explicit structural properties within biomaterials: the characteristic size of macromolecular complexes and the variance of local mass density. PMID:26886803

  9. Reconstruction of explicit structural properties at the nanoscale via spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum registered by a reflected-light bright-field spectroscopic microscope (SM) can quantify the microscopically indiscernible, deeply subdiffractional length scales within samples such as biological cells and tissues. Nevertheless, quantification of biological specimens via any optical measures most often reveals ambiguous information about the specific structural properties within the studied samples. Thus, optical quantification remains nonintuitive to users from the diverse fields of technique application. In this work, we demonstrate that the SM signal can be analyzed to reconstruct explicit physical measures of internal structure within label-free, weakly scattering samples: characteristic length scale and the amplitude of spatial refractive-index (RI) fluctuations. We present and validate the reconstruction algorithm via finite-difference time-domain solutions of Maxwell's equations on an example of exponential spatial correlation of RI. We apply the validated algorithm to experimentally measure structural properties within isolated cells from two genetic variants of HT29 colon cancer cell line as well as within a prostate tissue biopsy section. The presented methodology can lead to the development of novel biophotonics techniques that create two-dimensional maps of explicit structural properties within biomaterials: the characteristic size of macromolecular complexes and the variance of local mass density.

  10. Pulse-biased etching of Si3N4-layer in capacitively-coupled plasmas for nano-scale patterning of multi-level resist structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyelim; Kim, Sechan; Choi, Gyuhyun; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2014-12-01

    Pulse-biased plasma etching of various dielectric layers is investigated for patterning nano-scale, multi-level resist (MLR) structures composed of multiple layers via dual-frequency, capacitively-coupled plasmas (CCPs). We compare the effects of pulse and continuous-wave (CW) biasing on the etch characteristics of a Si3N4 layer in CF4/CH2F2/O2/Aretch chemistries using a dual-frequency, superimposed CCP system. Pulse-biasing conditions using a low-frequency power source of 2 MHz were varied by controlling duty ratio, period time, power, and the gas flow ratio in the plasmas generated by the 27.12 MHz high-frequency power source. Application of pulse-biased plasma etching significantly affected the surface chemistry of the etched Si3N4 surfaces, and thus modified the etching characteristics of the Si3N4 layer. Pulse-biased etching was successfully applied to patterning of the nano-scale line and space pattern of Si3N4 in the MLR structure of KrF photoresist/bottom anti-reflected coating/SiO2/amorphous carbon layer/Si3N4. Pulse-biased etching is useful for tuning the patterning of nano-scale dielectric hard-mask layers in MLR structures. PMID:25971085

  11. Nanoscale structure and superhydrophobicity of sp2-bonded boron nitride aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Thang; Goldstein, Anna P.; Lewicki, James P.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Wang, Cheng; Russell, Thomas P.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alex

    2015-06-01

    Aerogels have much potential in both research and industrial applications due to their high surface area, low density, and fine pore size distribution. Here we report a thorough structural study of three-dimensional aerogels composed of highly crystalline sp2-bonded boron nitride (BN) layers synthesized by a carbothermic reduction process. The structure, crystallinity and bonding of the as-prepared BN aerogels are elucidated by X-ray diffraction, 11B nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, and resonant soft X-ray scattering. The macroscopic roughness of the aerogel's surface causes it to be superhydrophobic with a contact angle of ~155° and exhibit high oil uptake capacity (up to 1500 wt%). The oil can be removed from the BN aerogel by oxidizing in air without damaging the crystalline porous structure of the aerogel or diminishing its oil absorption capacity.Aerogels have much potential in both research and industrial applications due to their high surface area, low density, and fine pore size distribution. Here we report a thorough structural study of three-dimensional aerogels composed of highly crystalline sp2-bonded boron nitride (BN) layers synthesized by a carbothermic reduction process. The structure, crystallinity and bonding of the as-prepared BN aerogels are elucidated by X-ray diffraction, 11B nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, and resonant soft X-ray scattering. The macroscopic roughness of the aerogel's surface causes it to be superhydrophobic with a contact angle of ~155° and exhibit high oil uptake capacity (up to 1500 wt%). The oil can be removed from the BN aerogel by oxidizing in air without damaging the crystalline porous structure of the aerogel or diminishing its oil absorption capacity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: High resolution TEM images of different portions of sample, photos of aerogels in oil bath over time, thermal gravimetric analysis data of the aerogels, and

  12. Nanoscale structural heterogeneity in Ni-rich half-Heusler TiNiSn

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Jason E. Pollock, Tresa M.; Chater, Philip A.; Brown, Craig M.; Seshadri, Ram

    2014-10-28

    The structural implications of excess Ni in the TiNiSn half-Heusler compound are examined through a combination of synchrotron x-ray and neutron scattering studies, in conjunction with first principles density functional theory calculations on supercells. Despite the phase diagram suggesting that TiNiSn is a line compound with no solid solution, for small x in TiNi{sub 1+x}Sn there is indeed an appearance—from careful analysis of the scattering—of some solubility, with the excess Ni occupying the interstitial tetrahedral site in the half-Heusler structure. The analysis performed here would point to the excess Ni not being statistically distributed, but rather occurring as coherent nanoclusters. First principles calculations of energetics, carried out using supercells, support a scenario of Ni interstitials clustering, rather than a statistical distribution.

  13. Topography-Correlated Confocal Raman Microscopy with Cylindrical Vector Beams for Probing Nanoscale Structural Order.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Broch, Katharina; Scholz, Reinhard; Schreiber, Frank; Meixner, Alfred J; Zhang, Dai

    2014-04-01

    Cylindrical vector beams, such as radially or azimuthally polarized doughnut beams, are combined with topography studies of pentacene thin films, allowing us to correlate Raman spectroscopy with intermolecular interactions depending on the particular pentacene polymorph. Polarization-dependent Raman spectra of the C-H bending vibrations are resolved layer by layer within a thin film of ∼20 nm thickness. The variation of the Raman peak positions indicates changes in the molecular orientation and in the local environment at different heights of the pentacene film. With the assistance of a theoretical model based on harmonic oscillator and perturbation theory, our method reveals the local structural order and the polymorph at different locations within the same pentacene thin film, depending mainly on its thickness. In good agreement with the crystallographic structures reported in the literature, our observations demonstrate that the first few monolayers grown in a structure are closer to the thin-film phase, but for larger film thicknesses, the morphology evolves toward the crystal-bulk phase with a larger tilting angle of the pentacene molecules against the substrate normal.

  14. Magnonic crystals—Prospective structures for shaping spin waves in nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychły, J.; Gruszecki, P.; Mruczkiewicz, M.; Kłos, J. W.; Mamica, S.; Krawczyk, M.

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated theoretically band structure of spin waves in magnonic crystals with periodicity in one- (1D), two- (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). We have solved Landau-Lifshitz equation with the use of plane wave method, finite element method in frequency domain and micromagnetic simulations in time domain to find the dynamics of spin waves and spectrum of their eigenmodes. The spin wave spectra were calculated in linear approximation. In this paper we show usefulness of these methods in calculations of various types of spin waves. We demonstrate the surface character of the Damon-Eshbach spin wave in 1D magnonic crystals and change of its surface localization with the band number and wavenumber in the first Brillouin zone. The surface property of the spin wave excitation is further exploited by covering plate of the magnonic crystal with conductor. The band structure in 2D magnonic crystals is complex due to additional spatial inhomogeneity introduced by the demagnetizing field. This modifies spin wave dispersion, makes the band structure of magnonic crystals strongly dependent on shape of the inclusions and type of the lattice. The inhomogeneity of the internal magnetic field becomes unimportant for magnonic crystals with small lattice constant, where exchange interactions dominate. For 3D magnonic crystals, characterized by small lattice constant, wide magnonic band gap is found. We show that the spatial distribution of different materials in magnonic crystals can be explored for tailored effective damping of spin waves.

  15. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Qu, Zhihua; Braiman, Yehuda; Zhang, Zhenyu; Barhen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  16. Molecular-Scale Structural Controls on Nanoscale Growth Processes: Step-Specific Regulation of Biomineral Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Davis, K. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Orme, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    Deciphering the complex strategies by which organisms produce nanocrystalline materials with exquisite morphologies is central to understanding biomineralizing systems. One control on the morphology of biogenic nanoparticles is the specific interactions of their surfaces with the organic functional groups provided by the organism and the various inorganic species present in the ambient environment. It is now possible to directly probe the microscopic structural controls on crystal morphology by making quantitative measurements of the dynamic processes occurring at the mineral-water interface. These observations can provide crucial information concerning the actual mechanisms of growth that is otherwise unobtainable through macroscopic techniques. Here we use in situ molecular-scale observations of step dynamics and growth hillock morphology to directly resolve roles of principal impurities in regulating calcite surface morphologies. We show that the interactions of certain inorganic as well as organic impurities with the calcite surface are dependent upon the molecular-scale structures of step-edges. These interactions can assume a primary role in directing crystal morphology. In calcite growth experiments containing magnesium, we show that growth hillock structures become modified owing to the preferential inhibition of step motion along directions approximately parallel to the [010]. Compositional analyses have shown that Mg incorporates at different levels into the two types of nonequivalent steps, which meet at the hillock corner parallel to [010]. A simple calculation of the strain caused by this difference indicates that we should expect a significant retardation at this corner, in agreement with the observed development of [010] steps. If the low-energy step-risers produced by these [010] steps is perpendicular to the c-axis as seems likely from crystallographic considerations, this effect provides a plausible mechanism for the elongated calcite crystal

  17. High-performance computing in structural mechanics and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Adeli, H.; Kamat, M.P.; Kulkarni, G.; Vanluchene, R.D. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta Montana State Univ., Bozeman )

    1993-07-01

    Recent advances in computer hardware and software have made multiprocessing a viable and attractive technology. This paper reviews high-performance computing methods in structural mechanics and engineering through the use of a new generation of multiprocessor computers. The paper presents an overview of vector pipelining, performance metrics for parallel and vector computers, programming languages, and general programming considerations. Recent developments in the application of concurrent processing techniques to the solution of structural mechanics and engineering problems are reviewed, with special emphasis on linear structural analysis, nonlinear structural analysis, transient structural analysis, dynamics of multibody flexible systems, and structural optimization. 64 refs.

  18. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA-nanoparticle superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Vaccarezza, Victoria M.; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-05-01

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure-function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  19. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA-nanoparticle superlattices.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael B; Ku, Jessie C; Vaccarezza, Victoria M; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-05-01

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure-function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  20. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  1. Nanoscale resolved infrared probing of crystal structure and of plasmon-phonon coupling.

    PubMed

    Huber, A; Ocelic, N; Taubner, T; Hillenbrand, R

    2006-04-01

    We show that slight variations of a crystal lattice cause significant spectral modifications of phonon-polariton resonant near-field interaction between polar semiconductor crystals and a scanning metal tip. Exploiting the effect for near-field imaging a SiC polytype boundary, we establish infrared mapping of crystal structure and crystal defects at 20 nm spatial resolution (lambda/500). By spectroscopic probing of doped SiC polytypes, we find that phonon-polariton resonant near-field interaction is also sensitive to electronic properties due to plasmon-phonon coupling in the crystals.

  2. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGES

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  3. Generation of red color and near infrared bandpass filters using nano-scale plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokar, Ahmed A. Z.; Hutter, Franz X.; Burghartz, Joachim N.

    2015-05-01

    Extraordinary/Enhanced optical transmission (EOT) is studied in the realization of plasmonic based filters in the visible range and near infrared spectrum for the purpose of substituting the Bayer-pattern filter with a new CMOS-compatible filter which can be easily tuned to provide different filter spectra. The filters studied in this paper are based on nano-structured 150nm thick Aluminum (Al) layer sandwiched between silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers. The resonance wavelengths achieved by the filters are at 700nm and 950 nm. Three parameters are used for tuning the two filters, i.e., aperture area, the period, and the holes arrangement (square or rhombic lattice). The filter is based on the principle of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), where the electromagnetic waves of the incident light couples with the free charges of the metal at the metal-dielectric interface. EOT is observed when the metal is structured with apertures such as rectangular, circular, cross, bowtie, etc. The resonance frequency in that case depends on the shape of the aperture, material used, the size of the apertures, the period of the array, and the surrounding material. The fabricated two filters show EOT at wavelengths as designed and simulated with blueshift in the peak location.

  4. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  5. Localization of human hair structural lipids using nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Fiat, Françoise; Baghdadli, Nawel; Balooch, Guive; Luengo, Gustavo S

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been combined in a single instrument (AFM-IR) capable of producing IR spectra and absorption images at a sub-micrometer spatial resolution. This new device enables human hair to be spectroscopically characterized at levels not previously possible. In particular, it was possible to determine the location of structural lipids in the cuticle and cortex of hair. Samples of human hair were embedded, cross-sectioned, and mounted on ZnSe prisms. A tunable IR laser generating pulses of the order of 10 ns was used to excite sample films. Short duration thermomechanical waves, due to infrared absorption and resulting thermal expansion, were studied by monitoring the resulting excitation of the contact resonance modes of the AFM cantilever. Differences are observed in the IR absorbance intensity of long-chain methylene-containing functional groups between the outer cuticle, middle cortex, and inner medulla of the hair. An accumulation of structural lipids is clearly observed at the individual cuticle layer boundaries. This method should prove useful in the future for understanding the penetration mechanism of substances into hair as well as elucidating the chemical nature of alteration or possible damage according to depth and hair morphology.

  6. Nano-scale structure and mechanical properties of the human dentine-enamel junction.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y L; Ngan, A H W; King, N M

    2011-07-01

    Despite being an interface between two mechanically mismatched phases of the soft dentine and hard enamel, the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) in a human tooth is in general capable of withstanding a long working life of repeated dynamic loading. The current poor understanding of the structure and properties of the DEJ has presented a major obstacle to designing better therapeutic protocols for complications concerning the DEJ. In this investigation, it was discovered that the DEJ is a thin, but gradual interface with characteristics transiting from those of dentine to those of enamel. The collagen fibres in dentine enter into the enamel side of the DEJ and terminate in a region in which the hydroxyapatite crystals begin to show enamel characteristics. Using focused ion beam machining, micro-beams were fabricated from regions within 50 μm of the DEJ and were subjected to bend tests. In spite of the similarity in the flexural strength of the DEJ and enamel, fractographs revealed cracks in the DEJ that propagated along structures with dentine characteristics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the testing of the mechanical properties of the DEJ.

  7. Nanoscale structural and electronic characterization of α-RuCl3 layered compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziatdinov, Maxim; Maksov, Artem; Banerjee, Arnab; Zhou, Wu; Berlijn, Tom; Yan, Jiaqiang; Nagler, Stephen; Mandrus, David; Baddorf, Arthur; Kalinin, Sergei

    The exceptional interplay of spin-orbit effects, Coulomb interaction, and electron-lattice coupling is expected to produce an elaborate phase space of α-RuCl3 layered compound, which to date remains largely unexplored. Here we employ a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) for detailed evaluation of the system's microscopic structural and electronic orders with a sub-nanometer precision. The STM and STEM measurements are further supported by neutron scattering, X-Ray diffraction, density functional theory (DFT), and multivariate statistical analysis. Our results show a trigonal distortion of Cl octahedral ligand cage along the C3 symmetry axes in each RuCl3 layer. The lattice distortion is limited mainly to the Cl subsystem leaving the Ru honeycomb lattice nearly intact. The STM topographic and spectroscopic characterization reveals an intra unit cell electronic symmetry breaking in a spin-orbit coupled Mott insulating phase on the Cl-terminated surface of α-RuCl3. The associated long-range charge order (CO) pattern is linked to a surface component of Cl cage distortion. We finally discuss a fine structure of CO and its potential relation to variations of average unit cell geometries found in multivariate analysis of STEM data. The research was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Nanoscale and proximity effects on low-dimensional helical magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandratskii, Leonid; Fisher, J.; Park, S.; Ouazi, S.; Sander, D.; Kirschner, J.

    We combine symmetry arguments, first-principles calculations and spin-resolved STS measurements to study a 2D helical magnet of some nm extension in proximity to ferromagnetic Co and vacuum regions. Considering the prototypical helical 2D system, an Fe bilayer with intrinsic helical spin structure (1), we report a non-uniform distortion of the spin helix which depends on the lateral extension of the bilayer and on the proximity to either Co or vacuum. The proximity effect manifests itself in different modifications of the magnetic and electronic structures of Fe in vicinity of the interfaces with Co and vacuum. These nanosize and proximity effects have not been discussed before. We demonstrate that, in contrast to an ideal helix of infinite length, the lack of symmetry of the nm-long distorted Fe spin helix, induces an energy dependence of the direction of the electronic magnetization which is revealed in the measured energy dependence of the spin-asymmetry of the differential tunneling conductance. (1) Phark, S. H.; Fischer, J. A.; Corbetta, M.; Sander, D.; Nakamura, K. & Kirschner, J. Reduced-dimensionality-induced helimagnetism in iron nanoislands Nat Commun 5 (2014) 5183.

  9. Viscoelastic properties and nanoscale structures of composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Laura L; Taraban, Marc B; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y Bruce

    2012-03-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the coassembly of mutually attractive, but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already-existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the coassembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G' decreased from 90 to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 to 100%). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics, and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data, showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formed less stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  10. Nanoscale self-assembly of starch: Phase relations, formation, and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creek, John A.

    This project has been undertaken to develop a fundamental understanding of the spherulitic self-assembly of starch polymers from aqueous solution, both as a model for starch granule initiation in vivo and as a biologically-inspired material with applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Botanical starches were observed to form semi-crystalline spherulites from aqueous solution when cooled after a high temperature treatment, and the processes resulting in spherulite formation were investigated. Based on the influence of cooling rate on spherulite formation from a botanical starch, liquid-liquid demixing in competition with crystallization was proposed as the mechanism leading to spherulite formation (summarized in a hypothetical phase diagram). Study of amylose and amylopectin self-assembly demonstrated that the linear polymer plays the primary role in forming spherulites. As a result, the roles of degree of polymerization, concentration, and thermal processing conditions on amylose self-assembly were explored. Thermal properties, final system morphology, and crystalline allomorph were characterized. In all cases the experimental findings supported the proposed phase diagram. Finally, the crystalline nanostructure of the spherulites was probed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing a seemingly universal level of structure in crystalline starch materials. This was compared to an existing model of crystallization for synthetic polymers involving a transitional liquid crystalline-like ordering---a comparison that makes sense in light of the known helical structure of starch.

  11. Characterization of multi-scale porous structure of fly ash/phosphate geopolymer hollow sphere structures: from submillimeter to nano-scale.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruifeng; Wu, Gaohui; Jiang, Longtao; Sun, Dongli

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the porous structure of fly ash/phosphate geopolymer hollow sphere structures (FPGHSS), prepared by pre-bonding and curing technology, has been characterized by multi-resolution methods from sub-millimeter to nano-scale. Micro-CT and confocal microscopy could provide the macroscopic distribution of porous structure on sub-millimeter scale, and hollow fly ashes with sphere shape and several sub-millimeter open cells with irregular shape were identified. SEM is more suitable to illustrate the distribution of micro-sized open and closed cells, and it was found that the open cells of FPGHSS were mainly formed in the interstitial porosity between fly ashes. Mercury porosimeter measurement showed that the micro-sized open cell of FPGHSS demonstrated a normal/bimodal distribution, and the peaks of pore size distribution were mainly around 100 and 10 μm. TEM observation revealed that the phosphate geopolymer was mainly composed of the porous area with nano-pores and dense areas, which were amorphous Al-O-P phase and α-Al2O3 respectively. The pore size of nano-pores demonstrated a quasi-normal distribution from about 10 to 100 nm. Therefore, detailed information of the porous structure of FPGHSS could be revealed using multiple methods.

  12. Structure and mechanical properties of nanoscale multilayered CrN/ZrSiN coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. G.; Rapaud, O.; Allain, N.; Baraket, M.; Dong, C.; Coddet, C.

    2009-07-15

    Nanocrystalline/amorphous CrN/ZrSiN multilayer coatings with a bilayer thickness ranging from 11 to 153 nm were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering technique. The microstructure and mechanical properties of these thin films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nanoindentation. The formation of nanocrystalline CrN and nanocomposite ZiSiN in the single layer coatings was identified by XRD and FTIR. The periodic structure of the as-deposited multilayer coatings was confirmed by TEM observation. Nanoindentation tests showed that both the values of hardness (H) and reduced elastic modulus (E{sub r}) of CrN/ZrSiN multilayers remained almost constant despite varying the bilayer thickness. The multilayer coatings exhibited higher H of 30 GPa and higher resistance to plastic deformation when compared to the single layer CrN and ZrSiN coatings.

  13. Nanoscale deflection detection of a cantilever-based biosensor using MOSFET structure: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paryavi, Mohsen; Montazeri, Abbas; Tekieh, Tahereh; Sasanpour, Pezhman

    2016-10-01

    A novel method for detection of biological species based on measurement of cantilever deflection has been proposed and numerically evaluated. Employing the cantilever as a moving gate of a MOSFET structure, its deflection can be analyzed via current characterization of the MOSFET consequently. Locating the cantilever as a suspended gate of a MOSFET on a substrate, the distance between cantilever and oxide layer will change the carrier concentration. Accordingly, it will be resulted in different current voltage characteristics of the device which can be easily measured using simple apparatuses. In order to verify the proposed method, the performance of system has been theoretically analyzed using COMSOL platform. The simulation results have confirmed the performance and sensitivity of the proposed method.

  14. Templated synthesis of porous particles with tunable pore structures from nanoscale building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiwang

    Porous silica, carbon, titania and carbon/silica composite micro- or nano-materials have been synthesized by the templated self-assembly approaches through an aerosol-assisted process or hydrothermal technique. Porous silica particles with controllable hierarchical pore structure (from hexagonal to lamellar or hierarchical) have been prepared through tuning the hydrophilic and hydrophobic balance among silicate, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and hydrophobic poly(propylene oxide) (PPO, H[OCH(CH 3)CH2nOH) additives during a dynamic aerosol-assisted process. Aerosol-assisted self-assembly of hollow silica microspheres with microporous shell (HSMMS) are prepared by utilizing the block copolymer F127's aggregating behavior in basic solution and the self-assembly between silicate and amphiphilic tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH) molecules. Interactions of TPAOH with both F127 and silicate are necessary for avoiding the phase separation between silicate and F127 aggregates because of the lack of hydrogen bonding interactions. Therefore, F127 aggregates with various sizes act as the core template while TPAOH molecules or TPAOH aggregates formed by excessive TPAOH molecules stay in the silica shell. Removal of F127 and TPAOH by solvent extraction results in the HSMMS materials. Mesoporous carbon/silica composite with both meso- and molecular ordering has been synthesized by carbonization of as-synthesized phenylene/silica/surfactant hybrid by co-assembly of BTEB and Pluronic surfactant P123. Removal of silica from carbon/silica composite results in the mesoporous carbon which retains some of the meso-ordering and has many worm-like pores due to silica dissolution. This mesoporous carbon has potential applications in such field as hydrogen storage, catalysis, and other areas. Hollow carbon microspheres with micropores in the shell and carbon nanotubes on the outer surface have been prepared using resols as the carbon precursor and hydrophobic PPO additives as

  15. Nanoscale carbon materials from hydrocarbons pyrolysis: Structure, chemical behavior, utilisation for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, Serguei V.; Strokova, Natalia E.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Arkhipova, Ekaterina A.; Desyatov, Andrey V.; Hui, Xia; Aldoshin, Serguei M.; Lunin, Valery V.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • N-doped and regular carbon nanomaterials were obtained by pyrolitic technique. • Dynamic vapor sorption of different solvents reveals smaller S{sub BET} values. • Steric hindrance and specific chemical interactions are the reasons for this. • Nitrogen doping leads to raise of capacitance and coulombic efficiency with non-aqueous N-containing electrolyte. - Abstract: This work systematically studies adsorption properties of carbon nanomaterials that are synthesized through hydrocarbons that is a powerful technique to fabricate different kinds of carbon materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanoshells, onions, including nitrogen substituted. The adsorption properties of the as-synthesized carbons are achieved by low temperature nitrogen adsorption and organic vapors sorption. Heptane, acetonitrile, water, ethanol, benzene and 1-methylimidazole, which are of great importance for development of supercapacitors, are used as substrates. It is discovered that while nitrogen adsorption reveals a high specific surface area, this parameter for most of organic compounds is rather small depending not only on the size of its molecule but also on chemical interactions for a pair adsorbent–adsorbate. The experimental values of heat of adsorption for carbon and N-substituted structures, when Coulomb cross-coupling of nitrogen atoms in adsorbent and adsorbate takes place, confirms this supposition.

  16. Synthesis, structure, and opto-electronic properties of organic-based nanoscale heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezek, Bohuslav; Čermák, Jan; Kromka, Alexander; Ledinský, Martin; Hubík, Pavel; Mareš, Jiří J.; Purkrt, Adam; Cimrová, Vĕra; Fejfar, Antonín; Kočka, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Enormous research effort has been put into optimizing organic-based opto-electronic systems for efficient generation of free charge carriers. This optimization is mainly due to typically high dissociation energy (0.1-1 eV) and short diffusion length (10 nm) of excitons in organic materials. Inherently, interplay of microscopic structural, chemical, and opto-electronic properties plays crucial role. We show that employing and combining advanced scanning probe techniques can provide us significant insight into the correlation of these properties. By adjusting parameters of contact- and tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), we perform morphologic and mechanical characterizations (nanoshaving) of organic layers, measure their electrical conductivity by current-sensing AFM, and deduce work functions and surface photovoltage (SPV) effects by Kelvin force microscopy using high spatial resolution. These data are further correlated with local material composition detected using micro-Raman spectroscopy and with other electronic transport data. We demonstrate benefits of this multi-dimensional characterizations on (i) bulk heterojunction of fully organic composite films, indicating differences in blend quality and component segregation leading to local shunts of photovoltaic cell, and (ii) thin-film heterojunction of polypyrrole (PPy) electropolymerized on hydrogen-terminated diamond, indicating covalent bonding and transfer of charge carriers from PPy to diamond.

  17. Thickness dependence of structure and piezoelectric properties at nanoscale of polycrystalline lead zirconate titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, E. B.; Lima, E. C.; Bdikin, I. K.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2013-05-01

    Lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr0.50Ti0.50)O3 (PZT) thin films were deposited by a polymeric chemical method on Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates to understand the mechanisms of phase transformations and the effect of film thickness on the structure, dielectric, and piezoelectric properties in these films. PZT films pyrolyzed at temperatures higher than 350 °C present a coexistence of pyrochlore and perovskite phases, while only perovskite phase grows in films pyrolyzed at temperatures lower than 300 °C. For pyrochlore-free PZT thin films, a small (100)-orientation tendency near the film-substrate interface was observed. Finally, we demonstrate the existence of a self-polarization effect in the studied PZT thin films. The increase of self-polarization with the film thickness increasing from 200 nm to 710 nm suggests that Schottky barriers and/or mechanical coupling near the film-substrate interface are not primarily responsible for the observed self-polarization effect in our films.

  18. The electronic structure and ionic diffusion of nanoscale LiTiO2 anatase.

    PubMed

    Borghols, W J H; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Haake, U; van Eck, E R H; Mulder, F M; Wagemaker, M

    2009-07-21

    Upon lithium insertion in the pristine TiO2 anatase phase the theoretical maximum of LiTiO2 can be reached in crystallite sizes less than approximately 10 nm, whereas bulk compositions appear limited to Li(x) approximately 0.6TiO2 at room temperature. Both X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and ab initio calculations have been applied to probe the electronic structure of the newly formed LiTiO2 phase. These results indicate that a large majority of the Li-2s electrons reside at the Ti-3d(t2g)/4s hybridized site. About 10% of these electrons are transferred to non-localized states which makes this compound a good electronic conductor. Ionic conductivity is probed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation experiments indicating relatively small hopping rates between the Li-ion sites in LiTiO2. Formation of the poor ionic-conducting LiTiO2 at the surface of the particles explains why micro-anatase Li(x)TiO2 is not able to reach the theoretical maximum capacity at room temperature, and why this theoretical maximum capacity reached in nano-sized materials cannot be (dis)charged at high rates.

  19. First Principles Modeling of Phonon Heat Conduction in Nanoscale Crystalline Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sandip Mazumder; Ju Li

    2010-06-30

    of optical phonons, and (2) by developing a suite of numerical algorithms for solution of the BTE for phonons. The suite of numerical algorithms includes Monte Carlo techniques and deterministic techniques based on the Discrete Ordinates Method and the Ballistic-Diffusive approximation of the BTE. These methods were applied to calculation of thermal conductivity of silicon thin films, and to simulate heat conduction in multi-dimensional structures. In addition, thermal transport in silicon nanowires was investigated using two different first principles methods. One was to apply the Green-Kubo formulation to an equilibrium system. The other was to use Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD). Results of MD simulations showed that the nanowire cross-sectional shape and size significantly affects the thermal conductivity, as has been found experimentally. In summary, the project clarified the role of various phonon modes - in particular, optical phonon - in non-equilibrium transport in silicon. It laid the foundation for the solution of the BTE in complex three-dimensional structures using deterministic techniques, paving the way for the development of robust numerical tools that could be coupled to existing device simulation tools to enable coupled electro-thermal modeling of practical electronic/optoelectronic devices. Finally, it shed light on why the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires is so sensitive to its cross-sectional shape.

  20. Nanoscale Mo- MoO3 Entrapped in Engineering Thermoplastic: Inorganic Pathway to Bactericidal and Fungicidal Action.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Nilam; Chaudhari, Ravindra; Mane, Pramod; Shinde, Manish; Jadakar, Sandesh; Rane, Sunit; Kale, Bharat; Bhalerao, Anand; Amalnerkar, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    In our contemporary endeavor, metallic molybdenum (Mo) and semiconducting molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) nanostructures have been simultaneously generated via solid state reaction between molybdenum (III) chloride (MoCl3) and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) at 285 (°)C in unimolar ratio for different time durations, namely, 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h. The resultant nanocomposites (NCs) revealed formation of predominantly metallic Mo for all the samples. However, MoO3 gradually gained prominent position as secondary phase with rise in reaction time. The present study was intended to investigate the antibacterial potential of metal-metal oxide-polymer NCs, i.e., Mo- MoO3-PPS against microorganisms, viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The antibacterial activity of the NCs was evaluated by agar well diffusion investigation. Maximum sensitivity concentrations of NCs were determined by finding out minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration (MBC/MFC). Moreover, the NCs prepared at reaction time of 48 h exhibited best MBC values and were tested with time kill assay which revealed that the growth of S. aureus was substantially inhibited by Mo- MoO3-PPS NCs. This synchronized formation of Mo- MoO3 nanostructures in an engineering thermoplastic may have potential antimicrobial applications in biomedical devices and components. Prima facie results on antifungal activity are indicative of the fact that these materials can show anti-cancer behavior. PMID:27164597

  1. Component mode synthesis approach for quantum mechanical electrostatic and transport analysis of nanoscale structures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhe

    As the dimensions of commonly used semiconductor devices have shrunk into nanometer regime, it is recognized that the influence of quantum effects on their electrostatic and transport properties cannot be ignored. In the past few decades, various computational models and approaches have been developed to analyze these properties in nanostructures and devices. Among these computational models, the Schrodinger-Poisson model has been widely adopted for quantum mechanical electrostatic and transport analysis of nanostructures and devices such as quantum wires, metal--oxide--semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The numerical results allow for evaluations of the electrical properties such as charge concentration and potential profile in these structures. The emergence of MOSFETs with multiple gates, such as Trigates, FinFETs and Pi-gates, offers a superior electrostatic control of devices by the gates, which can be therefore used to reduce the short channel effects within those devices. Full 2-D electrostatic and transport analysis enables a better understanding of the scalability of devices, geometric effects on the potential and charge distribution, and transport characteristics of the transistors. The Schrodinger-Poisson model is attractive due to its simplicity and straightforward implementation by using standard numerical methods. However, as it is required to solve a generalized eigenvalue problem generated from the discretization of the Schrodinger equation, the computational cost of the analysis increases quickly when the system's degrees of freedom (DOFs) increase. For this reason, techniques that enable an efficient solution of discretized Schrodinger equation in multidimensional domains are desirable. In this work, we seek to accelerate the numerical solution of the Schrodinger equation by using a component mode synthesis (CMS) approach. In the CMS approach, a nanostructure is divided into a set of

  2. 15. Photocopy of Engineering Drawing, Structural Steel Details (from City ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of Engineering Drawing, Structural Steel Details (from City of Norton Shores) - William S. Antisdale Memorial State Reward Bridge, Spanning Mona Lake at Henry Street, Norton Shores, Muskegon County, MI

  3. The role of strain and structure on oxygen ion conduction in nanoscale zirconia and ceria thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), an all solid-state energy conversion device, are promising for their high efficiency and materials stability. The solid oxide electrolytes are a key component that must provide high ionic conductivity, which is especially challenging for intermediate temperature SOFCs operating between 500 °C - 700 °C. Doped zirconia and ceria are the most common solid electrolyte materials. Recent reports have suggested that nanoscale ytrria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films may provide better performance in this regard. However, the mechanism behind the increased conductivity of nanoscale thin films is still unclear and the reported experimental results are controversial. In the thesis presented here, the effects of mechanical strain and microstructure on the ionic conductivity have been investigated in ultrathin zirconia- and ceria-based thin films. Reactive RF co-sputtering with metal targets was used to prepare zirconia and ceria based thin films for high purity, modulated composition and thickness. The films were as thin as 10-20 atomic layers thick. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were the main tools to investigate the composition, crystal orientation and microstructure of these sputtered thin films. Microscale interdigitated Pt electrodes were prepared through a lift-off process using photolithography. The electrochemical properties of these sputtered doped zirconia and ceria thin films were investigated using impedance spectroscopy. YSZ thin films deposited on MgO (111) and, especially, MgO (100) showed highly variable crystal orientations, while MgO (110) offered much more stable growth. Regardless of whether the growth was epitaxial or highly disordered polycrystalline, 50 nm thick YSZ thin films on MgO (100), (110), and (111) substrates exhibited similar conductivity with YSZ single crystal. While decreasing the thickness further to 12 nm, the conductivities of YSZ thin films

  4. Aero/structural tailoring of engine blades (AERO/STAEBL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the Aero/Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (AERO/STAEBL) program, which is a computer code used to perform engine fan and compressor blade aero/structural numerical optimizations. These optimizations seek a blade design of minimum operating cost that satisfies realistic blade design constraints. This report documents the overall program (i.e., input, optimization procedures, approximate analyses) and also provides a detailed description of the validation test cases.

  5. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review.

    PubMed

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Wako, K; Xiong, Qihua

    2010-08-25

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C(60) and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  6. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Milton W.; Crespi, Vincent H.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E.; Gutierrez, Humberto R.; Kojima, K.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Rao, Apparao M.; Sofo, Jorge O.; Tachibana, M.; Wako, K.; Xiong, Qihua

    2010-08-01

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C60 and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  7. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review.

    PubMed

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Wako, K; Xiong, Qihua

    2010-08-25

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C(60) and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  8. Reduced thermal conductivity by nanoscale intergrowths in perovskite like layered structure La{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Khaliq, Jibran; Chen, Kan; Li, Chunchun; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; Grande, Antonio M.; Yan, Haixue; Reece, Michael J.

    2015-02-21

    The effect of substitution and oxidation-reduction on the thermal conductivity of perovskite-like layered structure (PLS) ceramics was investigated in relation to mass contrast and non-stoichiometry. Sr (acceptor) was substituted on the A site, while Ta (donor) was substituted on the B site of La{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Substitution in PLS materials creates atomic scale disorders to accommodate the non-stoichiometry. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and X ray diffraction revealed that acceptor substitution in La{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} produced nanoscale intergrowths of n = 5 layered phase, while donor substitution produced nanoscale intergrowths of n = 3 layered phase. As a result of these nanoscale intergrowths, the thermal conductivity value reduced by as much as ∼20%. Pure La{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} has a thermal conductivity value of ∼1.3 W/m K which dropped to a value of ∼1.12 W/m K for Sr doped La{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and ∼0.93 W/m K for Ta doped La{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} at 573 K.

  9. Parameter identification of civil engineering structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J. N.; Sun, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of an identification method required in determining structural parameter variations for systems subjected to an extended exposure to the environment. The concept of structural identifiability of a large scale structural system in the absence of damping is presented. Three criteria are established indicating that a large number of system parameters (the coefficient parameters of the differential equations) can be identified by a few actuators and sensors. An eight-bay-fifteen-story frame structure is used as example. A simple model is employed for analyzing the dynamic response of the frame structure.

  10. Structural dynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, L. P.; Jamison, G. T.; Mccutcheon, W. A.; Price, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    This structural dynamic analysis supports development of the SSME by evaluating components subjected to critical dynamic loads, identifying significant parameters, and evaluating solution methods. Engine operating parameters at both rated and full power levels are considered. Detailed structural dynamic analyses of operationally critical and life limited components support the assessment of engine design modifications and environmental changes. Engine system test results are utilized to verify analytic model simulations. The SSME main chamber injector assembly is an assembly of 600 injector elements which are called LOX posts. The overall LOX post analysis procedure is shown.

  11. Precision structural engineering of self-rolled-up 3D nanomembranes guided by transient quasi-static FEM modeling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Koric, Seid; Yu, Xin; Hsia, K Jimmy; Li, Xiuling

    2014-11-12

    Micro- and nanoscale tubular structures can be formed by strain-induced self-rolled-up nanomembranes. Precision engineering of the shape and dimension determines the performance of devices based on this platform for electronic, optical, and biological applications. A transient quasi-static finite element method (FEM) with moving boundary conditions is proposed as a general approach to design diverse types of three-dimensional (3D) rolled-up geometries. This method captures the dynamic release process of membranes through etching driven by mismatch strain and accurately predicts the final dimensions of rolled-up structures. Guided by the FEM modeling, experimental demonstration using silicon nitride membranes was achieved with unprecedented precision including controlling fractional turns of a rolled-up membrane, anisotropic rolling to form helical structures, and local stress control for 3D hierarchical architectures.

  12. Structural Probability Concepts Adapted to Electrical Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Eric P.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    Through the use of equivalent variable analogies, the authors demonstrate how an electrical subsystem can be modeled by an equivalent structural subsystem. This allows the electrical subsystem to be probabilistically analyzed by using available structural reliability computer codes such as NESSUS. With the ability to analyze the electrical subsystem probabilistically, we can evaluate the reliability of systems that include both structural and electrical subsystems. Common examples of such systems are a structural subsystem integrated with a health-monitoring subsystem, and smart structures. Since these systems have electrical subsystems that directly affect the operation of the overall system, probabilistically analyzing them could lead to improved reliability and reduced costs. The direct effect of the electrical subsystem on the structural subsystem is of secondary order and is not considered in the scope of this work.

  13. Nanoscale chemical and structural study of Co-based FEBID structures by STEM-EELS and HRTEM

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nanolithography techniques in a scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam are very attractive tools for a number of synthetic processes, including the fabrication of ferromagnetic nano-objects, with potential applications in magnetic storage or magnetic sensing. One of the most versatile techniques is the focused electron beam induced deposition, an efficient method for the production of magnetic structures highly resolved at the nanometric scale. In this work, this method has been applied to the controlled growth of magnetic nanostructures using Co2(CO)8. The chemical and structural properties of these deposits have been studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy at the nanometric scale. The obtained results allow us to correlate the chemical and structural properties with the functionality of these magnetic nanostructures. PMID:22085532

  14. Engineering structure and function using thermoresponsive biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Pastuszka, Martha K; MacKay, J Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly enables exquisite control at the smallest scale and generates order among macromolecular-building blocks that remain too small to be manipulated individually. Environmental cues, such as heating, can trigger the organization of these materials from individual molecules to multipartixcle assemblies with a variety of compositions and functions. Synthetic as well as biological polymers have been engineered for these purposes; however, biological strategies can offer unparalleled control over the composition of these macromolecular-building blocks. Biologic polymers are macromolecules composed of monomeric units that can be precisely tailored at the genetic level; furthermore, they can often utilize endogenous biodegradation pathways, which may enhance their potential clinical applications. DNA (nucleotides), polysaccharides (carbohydrates), and proteins (amino acids) have all been engineered to self-assemble into nanostructures in response to a change in temperature. This focus article reviews the growing body of literature exploring temperature-dependent nano-assembly of these biological macromolecules, summarizes some of their physical properties, and discusses future directions.

  15. Nanoscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, D. G.; Ford, W. K.; Goodson, K. E.; Mahan, G. D.; Majumdar, A.; Maris, H. J.; Merlin, R.; Phillpot, S. R.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois; Intel Corp.; Stanford Univ.; Penn State Univ.; Univ. of California at Berkeley; Brown Univ.; Univ. of Michigan

    2003-01-15

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime--experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  16. Quantitatively probing propensity for structural transitions in engineered virus nanoparticles by single-molecule mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Milagros; Carrillo, Pablo J. P.; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2015-03-01

    Viruses are increasingly being studied from the perspective of fundamental physics at the nanoscale as biologically evolved nanodevices with many technological applications. In viral particles of the minute virus of mice (MVM), folded segments of the single-stranded DNA genome are bound to the capsid inner wall and act as molecular buttresses that increase locally the mechanical stiffness of the particle. We have explored whether a quantitative linkage exists in MVM particles between their DNA-mediated stiffening and impairment of a heat-induced, virus-inactivating structural change. A series of structurally modified virus particles with disrupted capsid-DNA interactions and/or distorted capsid cavities close to the DNA-binding sites were engineered and characterized, both in classic kinetics assays and by single-molecule mechanical analysis using atomic force microscopy. The rate constant of the virus inactivation reaction was found to decrease exponentially with the increase in elastic constant (stiffness) of the regions closer to DNA-binding sites. The application of transition state theory suggests that the height of the free energy barrier of the virus-inactivating structural transition increases linearly with local mechanical stiffness. From a virological perspective, the results indicate that infectious MVM particles may have acquired the biological advantage of increased survival under thermal stress by evolving architectural elements that rigidify the particle and impair non-productive structural changes. From a nanotechnological perspective, this study provides proof of principle that determination of mechanical stiffness and its manipulation by protein engineering may be applied for quantitatively probing and tuning the conformational dynamics of virus-based and other protein-based nanoassemblies.Viruses are increasingly being studied from the perspective of fundamental physics at the nanoscale as biologically evolved nanodevices with many technological

  17. Simultaneous analysis and design. [in structural engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optimization techniques are increasingly being used for performing nonlinear structural analysis. The development of element by element (EBE) preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) techniques is expected to extend this trend to linear analysis. Under these circumstances the structural design problem can be viewed as a nested optimization problem. There are computational benefits to treating this nested problem as a large single optimization problem. The response variables (such as displacements) and the structural parameters are all treated as design variables in a unified formulation which performs simultaneously the design and analysis. Two examples are used for demonstration. A seventy-two bar truss is optimized subject to linear stress constraints and a wing box structure is optimized subject to nonlinear collapse constraints. Both examples show substantial computational savings with the unified approach as compared to the traditional nested approach.

  18. Structural Requirements for the Space Propulsion Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin K.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2004, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was given a vision for Space Exploration by President Bush, setting our sight on a bold new path to go back to the Moon, then to Mars and beyond. As NASA gets ready to meet the vision set by President Bush, failures are not an option. Reliability of the propulsion engine systems will play an important role in establishing an overall safe and reliable operation of these new space systems. A new standard, NASA-STD-5012, Strength and Life Assessment for Space Propulsion System Engines, has been developed to provide structural requirements for assessment of the propulsion systems engine. This standard is a complement to the current NASA-wide standard NASA-STD-5001, Structural Design and Test Factors of Safety for Spaceflight Hardware, which excluded the requirement for the engine systems (rotatory structures) along with pressure vessels. As developed, this document builds on the heritage of the multiple industrial standards related to strength and life assessment of the structures. For assuring a safe and reliable operation of a product and/or mission, establishing a set of structural assessment requirements is a key ingredient. Hence, a concentrated effort was made to improve the requirements where there are known lessons learned during the design, test, and operation phases of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and other engine development programs. Requirements delineated in this standard are also applicable for the reusable and/or human missions. It shall be noted that "reliability of a system cannot be tested and inspected but can only be achieved if it is first designed into a system." Hence, these strength and life assessment requirements for the space propulsion system engines shall be used along with other good engineering practices, requirements, and policies.

  19. Structural Characteristics of University Engineering Students' Conceptions of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiufeng; Ebenezer, Jazlin; Fraser, Duncan M.

    2002-01-01

    Examines structural characteristics of university engineering students' conceptions of energy elicited through paragraph writing and their relations with categories of their conceptions specific to energy in solution processes identified through interviews. Reports that structures of students' conceptions are characterized primarily by…

  20. Quantitatively probing propensity for structural transitions in engineered virus nanoparticles by single-molecule mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Milagros; Carrillo, Pablo J P; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2015-03-19

    Viruses are increasingly being studied from the perspective of fundamental physics at the nanoscale as biologically evolved nanodevices with many technological applications. In viral particles of the minute virus of mice (MVM), folded segments of the single-stranded DNA genome are bound to the capsid inner wall and act as molecular buttresses that increase locally the mechanical stiffness of the particle. We have explored whether a quantitative linkage exists in MVM particles between their DNA-mediated stiffening and impairment of a heat-induced, virus-inactivating structural change. A series of structurally modified virus particles with disrupted capsid-DNA interactions and/or distorted capsid cavities close to the DNA-binding sites were engineered and characterized, both in classic kinetics assays and by single-molecule mechanical analysis using atomic force microscopy. The rate constant of the virus inactivation reaction was found to decrease exponentially with the increase in elastic constant (stiffness) of the regions closer to DNA-binding sites. The application of transition state theory suggests that the height of the free energy barrier of the virus-inactivating structural transition increases linearly with local mechanical stiffness. From a virological perspective, the results indicate that infectious MVM particles may have acquired the biological advantage of increased survival under thermal stress by evolving architectural elements that rigidify the particle and impair non-productive structural changes. From a nanotechnological perspective, this study provides proof of principle that determination of mechanical stiffness and its manipulation by protein engineering may be applied for quantitatively probing and tuning the conformational dynamics of virus-based and other protein-based nanoassemblies.

  1. Situated learning methodologies and assessment in civil engineering structures education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertz, Michael Davis

    This thesis describes an overarching study of civil engineering undergraduate structural education through student performance in recalling and applying basic structural engineering knowledge, and the viability of alternative situated learning environments for more effectively supporting the learning of this knowledge. To properly ground this study, a thorough investigation of related work in assessment, cognitive science, educational technology, and design education was completed, with connections and applications to civil engineering education highlighted. The experimental work of the thesis is organized into three parts: an assessment of civil engineering undergraduates' fundamental structural engineering knowledge and abilities; the development and testing of a software support environment for situated learning, the Civil Engineering Learning Library (CELL); and, the implementation and evaluation of the design studio, a pedagogical model for situated learning in the classroom. The results of the assessment study indicate that civil engineering seniors (and also students earlier in the curriculum) have difficulty retaining and applying basic knowledge of structural behavior, especially doing so in a flexible fashion in design situations. The survey also suggests that visualization plays an important role in understanding structural behavior. Tests with the CELL system show that a cognitively-flexible multimedia environment can support structural learning, but were inconclusive about whether the computer-based system helped the students to learn better than conventional classroom lecture. Two trial implementations of the design studio indicate that the studio model can serve as a powerful situated learning environment, and that it can be scaled up to reasonable class sizes. Significant requirements are associated with this model, however, primarily in faculty involvement, but also in physical resources and student time. In addition to these conclusions about the

  2. Comparative analysis of nanoscale MOS device architectures for RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranti, Abhinav; Armstrong, G. Alastair

    2007-05-01

    The suitability of nanoscale non-planar FinFETs and classical planar single and double gate SOI MOSFETs for rf applications is examined via extensive 3D device simulations and detailed interpretation. It is shown that although nanoscale FinFETs achieve higher values of intrinsic dc gain (nearly 20 dB higher than planar SG devices), they also present higher gate capacitance that severely undermines their rf performance. We also show that at large values of drain currents, well-designed conventional planar single and double gate SOI MOSFETs attain higher values of cut-off frequency compared to FinFETs, whereas at lower drain currents, a well-aligned planar double gate SOI MOSFET is the optimal structure. The reason for higher parasitic capacitance in FinFETs as compared to planar MOSFETs is examined in detail. An assessment of the impact of back gate misalignment on the rf performance of a 25 nm gate length planar double gate MOSFET indicates that a misalignment of 12 nm towards the source end is acceptable to give superior performance to a FinFET. The importance of source/drain extension region engineering in nanoscale FinFETs for ultra-low voltage analogue applications is also investigated. RF figures of merit for planar and vertical MOS devices are also compared based on layout-area calculations. The paper provides valuable design insights for optimizing device parameters for nanoscale planar and vertical MOSFETs.

  3. Structures, performance, benefit, cost study. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feder, E.

    1981-01-01

    Aircraft engine structures were studied to identify the advanced structural technologies that would provide the most benefits to future aircraft operations. A series of studies identified engine systems with the greatest potential for improvements. Based on these studies, six advanced generic structural concepts were selected and conceptually designed. The benefits of each concept were quantitatively assessed in terms of thrust specific fuel consumption, weight, cost, maintenance cost, fuel burned and direct operating cost plus interest. The probability of success of each concept was also determined. The concepts were ranked and the three most promising were selected for further study which consisted of identifying and comprehensively outlining the advanced technologies required to develop these concepts for aircraft engine application. Analytic, fabrication, and test technology developments are required. The technology programs outlined emphasize the need to provide basic, fundamental understanding of technology to obtain the benefit goals.

  4. Reverse engineering chemical structures from molecular descriptors : how many solutions?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-06-01

    Physical, chemical and biological properties are the ultimate information of interest for chemical compounds. Molecular descriptors that map structural information to activities and properties are obvious candidates for information sharing. In this paper, we consider the feasibility of using molecular descriptors to safely exchange chemical information in such a way that the original chemical structures cannot be reverse engineered. To investigate the safety of sharing such descriptors, we compute the degeneracy (the number of structure matching a descriptor value) of several 2D descriptors, and use various methods to search for and reverse engineer structures. We examine degeneracy in the entire chemical space taking descriptors values from the alkane isomer series and the PubChem database. We further use a stochastic search to retrieve structures matching specific topological index values. Finally, we investigate the safety of exchanging of fragmental descriptors using deterministic enumeration.

  5. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in thin films at reflecting substrates as a means to study nanoscale structure and dynamics at soft-matter interfaces.

    PubMed

    Täuber, Daniela; Radscheit, Kathrin; von Borczyskowski, Christian; Schulz, Michael; Osipov, Vladimir Al

    2016-07-01

    Structure and dynamics at soft-matter interfaces play an important role in nature and technical applications. Optical single-molecule investigations are noninvasive and capable to reveal heterogeneities at the nanoscale. In this work we develop an autocorrelation function (ACF) approach to retrieve tracer diffusion parameters obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments in thin liquid films at reflecting substrates. This approach then is used to investigate structure and dynamics in 100-nm-thick 8CB liquid crystal films on silicon wafers with five different oxide thicknesses. We find a different extension of the structural reorientation of 8CB at the solid-liquid interface for thin and for thick oxide. For the thin oxides, the perylenediimide tracer diffusion dynamics in general agrees with the hydrodynamic modeling using no-slip boundary conditions with only a small deviation close to the substrate, while a considerably stronger decrease of the interfacial tracer diffusion is found for the thick oxides. PMID:27575199

  6. Scanning Probe Microwave Reflectivity of Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Imaging of Electronic Structure and Quantum Behavior at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Seabron, Eric; MacLaren, Scott; Xie, Xu; Rotkin, Slava V; Rogers, John A; Wilson, William L

    2016-01-26

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are 1-dimensional nanomaterials with unique electronic properties that make them excellent candidates for next-generation device technologies. While nanotube growth and processing methods have progressed steadily, significant opportunities remain in advanced methods for their characterization, inspection, and metrology. Microwave near-field imaging offers an extremely versatile "nondestructive" tool for nanomaterials characterization. Herein, we report the application of nanoscale microwave reflectivity to study SWNT electronic properties. Using microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) combined with microwave impedance modulation microscopy (MIM(2)), we imaged horizontal SWNT arrays, showing the microwave reflectivity from individual nanotubes is extremely sensitive to their electronic properties and dependent on the nanotube quantum capacitance under proper experimental conditions. It is shown experimentally that MIM can be a direct probe of the nanotube-free carrier density and the details of their electronic band structure. We demonstrate spatial mapping of local SWNT impedance (MIM), the density of states (MIM(2)), and the nanotube structural morphology (AFM) simultaneously and with lateral resolution down to <50 nm. Nanoscale microwave reflectivity could have tremendous impact, enabling optimization of enriched growth processes and postgrowth purification of SWNT arrays while aiding in the analysis of the quantum physics of these important 1D materials. PMID:26688374

  7. Bio-Organic Nanotechnology: Using Proteins and Synthetic Polymers for Nanoscale Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Linda K.; Xu, Ting; Trent, Jonathan D.; Russell, Thomas P.

    2003-01-01

    While the ability of proteins to self-assemble makes them powerful tools in nanotechnology, in biological systems protein-based structures ultimately depend on the context in which they form. We combine the self-assembling properties of synthetic diblock copolymers and proteins to construct intricately ordered, three-dimensional polymer protein structures with the ultimate goal of forming nano-scale devices. This hybrid approach takes advantage of the capabilities of organic polymer chemistry to build ordered structures and the capabilities of genetic engineering to create proteins that are selective for inorganic or organic substrates. Here, microphase-separated block copolymers coupled with genetically engineered heat shock proteins are used to produce nano-scale patterning that maximizes the potential for both increased structural complexity and integrity.

  8. Electrical transport engineering of semiconductor superlattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Aliasghar

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of doping concentration on band structures of electrons and electrical transmission in a typical aperiodic semiconductor superlattice consisting of quantum well and barrier layers, theoretically. For this purpose, we assume that each unit cell of the superlattice contains alternately two types of material GaAs (as a well) and GaAlAs (as a barrier) with six sublayers of two materials. Our calculations are based on the generalized Kronig-Penny (KP) model and the transfer matrix method within the framework of the parabolic conductance band effective mass approximation in the coherent regime. This model reduces the numerical calculation time and enables us to use the transfer matrix method to investigate transport in the superlattices. We show that by varying the doping concentration and geometrical parameters, one can easily block the transmission of the electrons. The numerical results may be useful in designing of nanoenergy filter devices.

  9. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's. PMID:26518012

  10. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's.

  11. Atomistic Design and Simulations of Nanoscale Machines and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, William A., III; Cagin, Tahir; Walch, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Over the three years of this project, we made significant progress on critical theoretical and computational issues in nanoscale science and technology, particularly in:(1) Fullerenes and nanotubes, (2) Characterization of surfaces of diamond and silicon for NEMS applications, (3) Nanoscale machine and assemblies, (4) Organic nanostructures and dendrimers, (5) Nanoscale confinement and nanotribology, (6) Dynamic response of nanoscale structures nanowires (metals, tubes, fullerenes), (7) Thermal transport in nanostructures.

  12. Structural Optimization Methodology for Rotating Disks of Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.

    1995-01-01

    In support of the preliminary evaluation of various engine technologies, a methodology has been developed for structurally designing the rotating disks of an aircraft engine. The structural design methodology, along with a previously derived methodology for predicting low-cycle fatigue life, was implemented in a computer program. An interface computer program was also developed that gathers the required data from a flowpath analysis program (WATE) being used at NASA Lewis. The computer program developed for this study requires minimum interaction with the user, thus allowing engineers with varying backgrounds in aeropropulsion to successfully execute it. The stress analysis portion of the methodology and the computer program were verified by employing the finite element analysis method. The 10th- stage, high-pressure-compressor disk of the Energy Efficient Engine Program (E3) engine was used to verify the stress analysis; the differences between the stresses and displacements obtained from the computer program developed for this study and from the finite element analysis were all below 3 percent for the problem solved. The computer program developed for this study was employed to structurally optimize the rotating disks of the E3 high-pressure compressor. The rotating disks designed by the computer program in this study were approximately 26 percent lighter than calculated from the E3 drawings. The methodology is presented herein.

  13. Crystal chemistry and application development of uranyl extended structure and nanoscale materials and actinyl ion-substituted mineral phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Ernest M.

    The worldwide use of nuclear energy presents both significant advantages and challenges for society. Actinide research seeks to address these challenges and drive advancement in the fields of nuclear science and engineering. Here, key aspects of the fuel cycle are examined from both a fundamental and an applications-based perspective. Hydrothermal, ionothermal, room-temperature evaporation, and liquid diffusion synthesis techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction were used to study the structures of 18 uranyl compounds and six actinyl-doped mineral phases. These compounds represent a diverse group ranging from unique molecular clusters to novel and known extended structures isolated from aqueous and ionic liquid media. Ultrafiltration techniques were utilized to separate uranyl peroxide nanoclusters from complex aqueous solutions. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry were used to quantify elemental distributions in the feed and permeate solutions while Raman spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were used to define the characteristics of the cluster species across a range different solution conditions.

  14. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions. PMID:19072125

  15. Evaluation of engineering plastic for rollover protective structure (ROPS) mounting.

    PubMed

    Comer, R S; Ayers, P D; Liu, J

    2007-04-01

    Agriculture has one of the highest fatality rates of any industry in America. Tractor rollovers are a significant contributor to the high death rate. Rollover protective structures (ROPS) have helped lower these high fatality rates on full-size tractors. However, a large number of older tractors still do not use ROPS due to the difficulty of designing and creating a mounting structure. To help reduce this difficulty, engineering plastics were evaluated for use in a ROPS mounting structure on older tractors. The use of engineering plastics around axle housings could provide a uniform mounting configuration as well as lower costs for aftermarket ROPS. Various plastics were examined through shear testing, scale model testing, and compressive strength testing. Once a material was chosen based upon strength and cost, full-scale testing of the plastic's strength on axle housings was conducted. Finally, a mounting structure was tested in static ROPS tests, and field upset tests were performed in accordance with SAE Standard J2194. Initial tests revealed that the ROPS mounting structure and axle housing combination had higher torsional strength with less twisting than the axle housing alone. An engineering plastic ROPS mounting structure was easily successful in withstanding the forces applied during the static longitudinal and lateral ROPS tests. Field upset testing revealed that the mounting structure could withstand the impact loads seen during actual upsets without a failure. During both static testing and field upset testing, no permanent twisting of the mounting structure was found. Engineering plastic could therefore be a viable option for a universal ROPS mounting structure for older tractors.

  16. Nanoscale integration of two-dimensional materials by lateral heteroepitaxy.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Peter; Huang, Yuan; Sutter, Eli

    2014-08-13

    Materials integration in heterostructures with novel properties different from those of the constituents has become one of the most powerful concepts of modern materials science. Two-dimensional (2D) crystals represent a new class of materials from which such engineered structures can be envisioned. Calculations have predicted emergent properties in 2D heterostructures with nanoscale feature sizes, but methods for their controlled fabrication have been lacking. Here, we use sequential graphene and boron nitride growth on Ru(0001) to show that lateral heteroepitaxy, the joining of 2D materials by preferential incorporation of different atomic species into exposed 1D edges during chemical vapor deposition on a metal substrate, can be used for the bottom-up synthesis of 2D heterostructures with characteristic dimensions on the nanoscale. Our results suggest that on a proper substrate, this method lends itself to building nanoheterostructures from a wide range of 2D materials.

  17. STAEBL: Structural tailoring of engine blades, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, M. S.; Brown, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    The Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (STAEBL) program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center in 1980 to introduce optimal structural tailoring into the design process for aircraft gas turbine engine blades. The standard procedure for blade design is highly iterative with the engineer directly providing most of the decisions that control the design process. The goal of the STAEBL program has been to develop an automated approach to generate structurally optimal blade designs. The program has evolved as a three-phase effort with the developmental work being performed contractually by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. Phase 1 was intended as a proof of concept in which two fan blades were structurally tailored to meet a full set of structural design constraints while minimizing DOC+I (direct operating cost plus interest) for a representative aircraft. This phase was successfully completed and was reported in reference 1 and 2. Phase 2 has recently been completed and is the basis for this discussion. During this phase, three tasks were accomplished: (1) a nonproprietary structural tailoring computer code was developed; (2) a dedicated approximate finite-element analysis was developed; and (3) an approximate large-deflection analysis was developed to assess local foreign object damage. Phase 3 is just beginning and is designed to incorporated aerodynamic analyses directly into the structural tailoring system in order to relax current geometric constraints.

  18. Voltage control of nanoscale magnetoelastic elements: theory and experiments (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, Gregory P.

    2015-09-01

    Electromagnetic devices rely on electrical currents to generate magnetic fields. While extremely useful this approach has limitations in the small-scale. To overcome the scaling problem, researchers have tried to use electric fields to manipulate a magnetic material's intrinsic magnetization (i.e. multiferroic). The strain mediated class of multiferroics offers up to 70% of energy transduction using available piezoelectric and magnetoelastic materials. While strain mediated multiferroic is promising, few studies exist on modeling/testing of nanoscale magnetic structures. This talk presents motivation, analytical models, and experimental data on electrical control of nanoscale single magnetic domain structures. This research is conducted in a NSF Engineering Research Center entitled Translational Applications for Nanoscale Multiferroics TANMS. The models combine micromagnetics (Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert) with elastodynamics using the electrostatic approximation producing eight fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Qualitative and quantitative verification is achieved with direct comparison to experimental data. The modeling effort guides fabrication and testing on three elements, i.e. nanoscale rings (onion states), ellipses (single domain reorientation), and superparamagnetic elements. Experimental results demonstrate electrical and deterministic control of the magnetic states in the 5-500 nm structures as measured with Photoemission Electron Microscopy PEEM, Magnetic Force Microscopy MFM, or Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy TEM. These data strongly suggests efficient control of nanoscale magnetic spin states is possible with voltage.

  19. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    PubMed Central

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  20. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  1. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing.

    PubMed

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-27

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  2. Structural Modification and Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Magnetite Synthesised in the Presence of an Anionic Surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S.; Hewitt, I. J.; Powell, A. K.

    2014-07-01

    The earliest reported medical use of magnetite powder for internal applications was in the 10th century A.D. by the Persian physician and philosopher Avicenna of Bokhara [1,2]. Today magnetic nanoparticles are used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are potential colloidal mediators for cancer magnetic hyperthermia [3]. Twenty years ago magnetite (Fe3O4) was found to be present in the human brain [4] and more recently it has been reported that nanoscale biogenic magnetite (origin and formation uncertain) is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's [5]. Here we show that the synthesis of magnetite in the presence of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) gives rise to a variety of nanoscale morphologies, some of which look remarkably similar to magnetite found in organisms, suggesting that similar processes may be involved. Furthermore, these 1D materials with diameters of quantum confined size are of interest in the areas of biosensors [6] and biomedical imaging [7].

  3. Optical Engineering for Children--A Structured Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, John; Moore, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the application of a structured template, maximum impact flow (MIF), in order to encourage young students in the area of optics and optical engineering. MIF introduces a template in terms of individual steps and linked functionality and is shown to fuse separate learning tools together into a cohesive unit.…

  4. CAL Packages for Civil Engineering Hydraulics and Structural Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, W. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes computer assisted learning (CAL) packages written in FORTRAN IV and developed for use in a degree course in civil engineering dealing with hydraulics and structures. All are used in the interactive mode through a terminal with a keyboard and visual display unit. (Author/CMV)

  5. Abstraction and Concreteness in the Everyday Mathematics of Structural Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsburg, Julie

    The everyday mathematics processes of structural engineers were studied and analyzed in terms of abstraction. A main purpose of the study was to explore the degree to which the notion of a gap between school and everyday mathematics holds when the scope of practices considered "everyday" is extended. J. Lave (1988) promoted a methodology that…

  6. A New Degree Programme in Structural Engineering and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, J. B.; Popovic, O.; Tyas, A.

    Structural engineers and architects are educated completely independently. Although both play a major part in designing and building a nation's infrastructure, they are not encouraged to fully understand the work of each other which can result in a lack of collaboration and co-operation, often to the detriment of a project. This divide between the…

  7. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices.

  8. Amyloid at the nanoscale: AFM and single-molecule investigations of early steps of aggregation and mature fibril growth, structure, and mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vinod

    2013-03-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins into nanometer-scale fibrillar assemblies is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. We have investigated the self-assembly of the human intrinsically disordered protein alpha-synuclein, involved in Parkinson's disease, into amyloid fibrils. A particularly relevant question is the role of early oligomeric aggregates in modulating the dynamics of protein nucleation and aggregation. We have used single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize conformational transitions of alpha-synuclein, and to gain insights into the structure and composition of oligomeric aggregates of alpha-synuclein. Quantitative atomic force microscopy and nanomechanical investigations provide information on amyloid fibril polymorphism and on nanoscale mechanical properties of mature fibrillar species, while conventional optical and super-resolution imaging have yielded insights into the growth of fibrils and into the assembly of suprafibrillar structures. We thank the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), and the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology for support.

  9. Work extremum principle: structure and function of quantum heat engines.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Johal, Ramandeep S; Mahler, Guenter

    2008-04-01

    We consider a class of quantum heat engines consisting of two subsystems interacting with a work-source and coupled to two separate baths at different temperatures Th>Tc. The purpose of the engine is to extract work due to the temperature difference. Its dynamics is not restricted to the near equilibrium regime. The engine structure is determined by maximizing the extracted work under various constraints. When this maximization is carried out at finite power, the engine dynamics is described by well-defined temperatures and satisfies the local version of the second law. In addition, its efficiency is bounded from below by the Curzon-Ahlborn value 1-radical Tc/Th and from above by the Carnot value 1-(Tc/Th). The latter is reached-at finite power--for a macroscopic engine, while the former is achieved in the equilibrium limit Th-->Tc . The efficiency that maximizes the power is strictly larger than the Curzon-Ahloborn value. When the work is maximized at a zero power, even a small (few-level) engine extracts work right at the Carnot efficiency.

  10. Metal Structural Environment in ZnxNi1-xO Macroscale and Nanoscale Solid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, Matthea A.; Langell, Marjorie A.

    2014-08-21

    The metal structural environments in macroscale and nanoscale ZnxNi1–xO solid solutions were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD demonstrates that solid solutions form for both macroscale (bulk) and nanoscale crystallites, and that the lattice parameter increases linearly as the amount of zinc increases, an indication of a homogeneous solid solution. XAS for both the bulk material and the nanoparticles reveals that the zinc atoms are incorporated into the rocksalt lattice and do not form zinc oxide clusters. The X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) of the Zn k-edge region in the solid solution is similar to the Ni k-edge region of NiO, and not the Zn k-edge region of ZnO. XPS confirms that solid solutions are formed; Auger parameters for zinc are consistent with a different geometry than the tetrahedral coordination of wurtzite ZnO. Nanoscaled solid solutions show evidence of a lattice contraction relative to macroscale solutions of the same concentration. While the contraction persists across the entire concentration range, the nanoparticle lattice parameter approaches the bulk ZnxNi1–xO value as the concentration of zinc increases to predict ZnO rocksalt lattice parameters that are in agreement with observed ZnO data.

  11. Structural tailoring of engine blades (STAEBL) theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    This Theoretical Manual includes the theories included in the Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (STAEBL) computer program which was developed to perform engine fan and compressor blade numerical optimizations. These blade optimizations seek a minimum weight or cost design that satisfies practical blade design constraints, by controlling one to twenty design variables. The STAEBL constraint analyses include blade stresses, vibratory response, flutter, and foreign object damage. Blade design variables include airfoil thickness at several locations, blade chord, and construction variables: hole size for hollow blades, and composite material layup for composite blades.

  12. Structural tailoring of engine blades (STAEBL) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    This User's Manual contains instructions and demonstration case to prepare input data, run, and modify the Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (STAEBL) computer code. STAEBL was developed to perform engine fan and compressor blade numerical optimizations. This blade optimization seeks a minimum weight or cost design that satisfies realistic blade design constraints, by tuning one to twenty design variables. The STAEBL constraint analyses include blade stresses, vibratory response, flutter, and foreign object damage. Blade design variables include airfoil thickness at several locations, blade chord, and construction variables: hole size for hollow blades, and composite material layup for composite blades.

  13. Interdisciplinary and multilevel optimum design. [in aerospace structural engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1987-01-01

    Interactions among engineering disciplines and subsystems in engineering system design are surveyed and specific instances of such interactions are described. Examination of the interactions that a traditional design process in which the numerical values of major design variables are decided consecutively is likely to lead to a suboptimal design. Supporting numerical examples are a glider and a space antenna. Under an alternative approach introduced, the design and its sensitivity data from the subsystems and disciplines are generated concurrently and then made available to the system designer enabling him to modify the system design so as to improve its performance. Examples of a framework structure and an airliner wing illustrate that approach.

  14. Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sandra; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, Robert J; Hagenmüller, Henri; Nuss, Katja; Arras, Margarete; Müller, Ralph; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, David L; Merkle, Hans P; Meinel, Lorenz

    2013-09-01

    Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106-212 μm), medium (212-300 μm), and large pore diameter ranges (300-425 μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter, all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced, and bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation. PMID:23958323

  15. Molecular mechanistic origin of nanoscale contact, friction, and scratch in complex particulate systems.

    PubMed

    Jalilvand, Soroosh; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2015-02-11

    Nanoscale contact mechanisms, such as friction, scratch, and wear, have a profound impact on physics of technologically important particulate systems. Determining the key underlying interparticle interactions that govern the properties of the particulate systems has been long an engineering challenge. Here, we focus on particulate calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) as a model system and use atomistic simulations to decode the interplay between crystallographic directions, structural defects, and atomic species on normal and frictional forces. By exhibiting high material inhomogeneity and low structural symmetry, C-S-H provides an excellent system to explore various contact-induced nanoscale deformation mechanisms in complex particulate systems. Our findings provide a deep fundamental understanding of the role of inherent material features, such as van der Waals versus Coulombic interactions and the role of atomic species, in controlling the nanoscale normal contact, friction, and scratch mechanisms, thereby providing de novo insight and strategies for intelligent modulation of the physics of the particulate systems. This work is the first report on atomic-scale investigation of the contact-induced nanoscale mechanisms in structurally complex C-S-H materials and can potentially open new opportunities for knowledge-based engineering of several other particulate systems such as ceramics, sands, and powders and self-assembly of colloidal systems in general.

  16. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time.

  17. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  18. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  19. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  20. Cabin-fuselage-wing structural design concept with engine installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariotti, Scott; Garner, M.; Cepeda, A.; Vieira, J.; Bolton, D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a fuselage structural assembly and wing structural design that will be able to withstand the given operational parameters and loads provided by Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23 (FAR 23) and the Statement of Work (SOW). The goal is to provide a durable lightweight structure that will transfer the applied loads through the most efficient load path. Areas of producibility and maintainability of the structure will also be addressed. All of the structural members will also meet or exceed the desired loading criteria, along with providing adequate stiffness, reliability, and fatigue life as stated in the SOW. Considerations need to be made for control system routing and cabin heating/ventilation. The goal of the wing structure and carry through structure is also to provide a simple, lightweight structure that will transfer the aerodynamic forces produced by the wing, tailboom, and landing gear. These forces will be channeled through various internal structures sized for the pre-determined loading criteria. Other considerations were to include space for flaps, ailerons, fuel tanks, and electrical and control system routing. The difficulties encountered in the fuselage design include expanding the fuselage cabin to accept a third occupant in a staggered configuration and providing ample volume for their safety. By adding a third person the CG of aircraft will move forward so the engine needs to be moved aft to compensate for the difference in the moment. This required the provisions of a ring frame structure for the new position of the engine mount. The difficulties encountered in the wing structural design include resizing the wing for the increased capacity and weight, and compensating for a large torsion produced by the tail boom by placing a great number of stiffeners inside the boom, which will result in the relocation of the fuel tank. Finally, an adequate carry through structure for the wing and fuselage interface will be

  1. Structure, function, and engineering of enzymes in isoflavonoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2011-03-01

    Isoflavonoids are a large group of plant natural products and play important roles in plant defense. They also possess valuable health-promoting activities with significant health benefits for animals and humans. The isoflavonoids are identified primarily in leguminous plants and are synthesized through the central phenylpropanoid pathway and the specific isoflavonoid branch pathways in legumes. Structural studies of some key enzymes in the central phenylpropanoid pathway shed light on the early stages of the (iso)flavonoid biosynthetic process. Significant impact has also been made on structural studies of enzymes in the isoflavonoid branch pathways. Structures of isoflavonoid-specific NADPH-dependent reductases revealed how the (iso)flavonoid backbones are modified by reduction reactions and how enzymes specifically recognize isoflavonoids and catalyze stereo-specific reductions. Structural studies of isoflavonoid methyltransferases and glycosyltransferases revealed how isoflavonoids are further decorated with methyl group and sugars in different methylation and glycosylation patterns that determine their bioactivities and functions. In combination with mutagenesis and biochemical studies, the detailed structural information of these enzymes provides a basis for understanding the complex biosynthetic process, enzyme catalytic mechanisms, and substrate specificities. Structure-based homology modeling facilitates the functional characterization of these large groups of biosynthetic enzymes and their homologs. Structure-based enzyme engineering is becoming a new strategy for synthesis of bioactive isoflavonoids and also facilitates plant metabolic engineering towards improvement of quality and production of crop plants.

  2. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Influence of 700 °C vacuum annealing on fracture behavior of micro/nanoscale focused ion beam fabricated silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshima, Yoshiharu; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shozo; Namazu, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the influence of 700 °C vacuum annealing on strength and fracture behavior of micro- and nano-scale Si structures fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). Si nanowires (NWs) made from silicon-on-nothing (SON) membrane are fabricated using FIB. Microscale Si specimens are fabricated by conventional micromachining technologies and FIB. These specimens are tensioned to failure using specially developed microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device and thin-film tensile tester, respectively. The mean fracture strengths of the nano- and microscale specimens are 5.6 and 1.6 GPa, respectively, which decrease to 2.9 and 0.9 GPa after vacuum annealing at 700 °C for only 10 s. These strength values do not vary with increasing annealing time. Fracture origin and its behavior are discussed in the light of fracture surface and FIB damage layer observations.

  4. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  5. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  6. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the <span class=Nanoscale Silver Final report"> This final report presents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on...

  7. Organic Micro/Nanoscale Lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2016-09-20

    Micro/nanoscale lasers that can deliver intense coherent light signals at (sub)wavelength scale have recently captured broad research interest because of their potential applications ranging from on-chip information processing to high-throughput sensing. Organic molecular materials are a promising kind of ideal platform to construct high-performance microlasers, mainly because of their superiority in abundant excited-state processes with large active cross sections for high gain emissions and flexibly assembled structures for high-quality microcavities. In recent years, ever-increasing efforts have been dedicated to developing such organic microlasers toward low threshold, multicolor output, broadband tunability, and easy integration. Therefore, it is increasingly important to summarize this research field and give deep insight into the structure-property relationships of organic microlasers to accelerate the future development. In this Account, we will review the recent advances in organic miniaturized lasers, with an emphasis on tunable laser performances based on the tailorable microcavity structures and controlled excited-state gain processes of organic materials toward integrated photonic applications. Organic π-conjugated molecules with weak intermolecular interactions readily assemble into regular nanostructures that can serve as high-quality optical microcavities for the strong confinement of photons. On the basis of rational material design, a series of optical microcavities with different structures have been controllably synthesized. These microcavity nanostructures can be endowed with effective four-level dynamic gain processes, such as excited-state intramolecular charge transfer, excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, and excimer processes, that exhibit large dipole optical transitions for strongly active gain behaviors. By tailoring these excited-state processes with molecular/crystal engineering and external stimuli, people have effectively

  8. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  9. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242293

  10. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a ‘fracture safe design’ is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242293

  11. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  12. Hard X-ray polarizer to enable simultaneous three-dimensional nanoscale imaging of magnetic structure and lattice strain.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jonathan; Harder, Ross; Li, Luxi; Haskel, Daniel; Chen, Pice; Winarski, Robert; Fuesz, Peter; Schlagel, Deborah; Vine, David; Benson, Christa; McNulty, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress in the development of dichroic Bragg coherent diffractive imaging, a new technique for simultaneous three-dimensional imaging of strain and magnetization at the nanoscale, is reported. This progress includes the installation of a diamond X-ray phase retarder at beamline 34-ID-C of the Advanced Photon Source. The performance of the phase retarder for tuning X-ray polarization is demonstrated with temperature-dependent X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements on a gadolinium foil in transmission and on a Gd5Si2Ge2 crystal in diffraction geometry with a partially coherent, focused X-ray beam. Feasibility tests for dichroic Bragg coherent diffractive imaging are presented. These tests include (1) using conventional Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to determine whether the phase retarder introduces aberrations using a nonmagnetic gold nanocrystal as a control sample, and (2) collecting coherent diffraction patterns of a magnetic Gd5Si2Ge2 nanocrystal with left- and right-circularly polarized X-rays. Future applications of dichroic Bragg coherent diffractive imaging for the correlation of strain and lattice defects with magnetic ordering and inhomogeneities are considered. PMID:27577777

  13. Hard X-ray polarizer to enable simultaneous three-dimensional nanoscale imaging of magnetic structure and lattice strain

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Jonathan; Harder, Ross; Li, Luxi; Haskel, Daniel; Chen, Pice; Winarski, Robert; Fuesz, Peter; Schlagel, Deborah; Vine, David; Benson, Christa; McNulty, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of dichroic Bragg coherent diffractive imaging, a new technique for simultaneous three-dimensional imaging of strain and magnetization at the nanoscale, is reported. This progress includes the installation of a diamond X-ray phase retarder at beamline 34-ID-C of the Advanced Photon Source. The performance of the phase retarder for tuning X-ray polarization is demonstrated with temperature-dependent X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements on a gadolinium foil in transmission and on a Gd5Si2Ge2 crystal in diffraction geometry with a partially coherent, focused X-ray beam. Feasibility tests for dichroic Bragg coherent diffractive imaging are presented. These tests include (1) using conventional Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to determine whether the phase retarder introduces aberrations using a nonmagnetic gold nanocrystal as a control sample, and (2) collecting coherent diffraction patterns of a magnetic Gd5Si2Ge2 nanocrystal with left- and right-circularly polarized X-rays. Future applications of dichroic Bragg coherent diffractive imaging for the correlation of strain and lattice defects with magnetic ordering and inhomogeneities are considered. PMID:27577777

  14. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  15. Microfabrication of hierarchical structures for engineered mechanical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Canudas, Marc

    Materials found in nature present, in some cases, unique properties from their constituents that are of great interest in engineered materials for applications ranging from structural materials for the construction of bridges, canals and buildings to the fabrication of new lightweight composites for airplane and automotive bodies, to protective thin film coatings, amongst other fields. Research in the growing field of biomimetic materials indicates that the micro-architectures present in natural materials are critical to their macroscopic mechanical properties. A better understanding of the effect that structure and hierarchy across scales have on the material properties will enable engineered materials with enhanced properties. At the moment, very few theoretical models predict mechanical properties of simple materials based on their microstructures. Moreover these models are based on observations from complex biological systems. One way to overcome this challenge is through the use of microfabrication techniques to design and fabricate simple materials, more appropriate for the study of hierarchical organizations and microstructured materials. Arrays of structures with controlled geometry and dimension can be designed and fabricated at different length scales, ranging from a few hundred nanometers to centimeters, in order to mimic similar systems found in nature. In this thesis, materials have been fabricated in order to gain fundamental insight into the complex hierarchical materials found in nature and to engineer novel materials with enhanced mechanical properties. The materials fabricated here were mechanically characterized and compared to simple mechanics models to describe their behavior with the goal of applying the knowledge acquired to the design and synthesis of future engineered materials with novel properties.

  16. Structure and Management of an Engineering Senior Design Course.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Martin L; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2016-07-01

    The design of products and processes is an important area in engineering. Students in engineering schools learn fundamental principles in their courses but often lack an opportunity to apply these methods to real-world problems until their senior year. This article describes important elements that should be incorporated into a senior capstone design course. It includes a description of the general principles used in engineering design and a discussion of why students often have difficulty with application and revert to trial and error methods. The structure of a properly designed capstone course is dissected and its individual components are evaluated. Major components include assessing resources, identifying projects, establishing teams, understanding requirements, developing conceptual designs, creating detailed designs, building prototypes, testing performance, and final presentations. In addition to the course design, team management and effective mentoring are critical to success. This article includes suggested guidelines and tips for effective design team leadership, attention to detail, investment of time, and managing project scope. Furthermore, the importance of understanding business culture, displaying professionalism, and considerations of different types of senior projects is discussed. Through a well-designed course and proper mentoring, students will learn to apply their engineering skills and gain basic business knowledge that will prepare them for entry-level positions in industry.

  17. Controlling the Structural and Functional Anisotropy of Engineered Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bursac, N

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control the degree of structural and functional anisotropy in 3D engineered cardiac tissues would have high utility for both in vitro studies of cardiac muscle physiology and pathology as well as potential tissue engineering therapies for myocardial infarction. Here, we applied a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique to generate network-like tissue patches seeded with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Fabricating longer elliptical pores within the patch networks increased the overall cardiomyocyte and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment within the patch. Improved uniformity of cell and matrix alignment yielded an increase in anisotropy of action potential propagation and faster longitudinal conduction velocity (LCV). Cardiac tissue patches with a higher degree of cardiomyocyte alignment and electrical anisotropy also demonstrated greater isometric twitch forces. After two weeks of culture, specific measures of electrical and contractile function (LCV = 26.8 ± 0.8 cm/s, specific twitch force = 8.9 ± 1.1 mN/mm2 for the longest pores studied) were comparable to those of neonatal rat myocardium. We have thus described methodology for engineering of highly functional 3D engineered cardiac tissues with controllable degree of anisotropy. PMID:24717534

  18. Systematic Investigation of Nanoscale Adsorbate Effects at Organic Light-Emitting diode Interfaces. Interfacial Structure-Charge Injection-Luminance Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,Q.; Li, J.; Evmenenko, G.; Dutta, P.; Marks, T.

    2006-01-01

    Molecule-scale structure effects at indium tin oxide (ITO) anode-hole transport layer (HTL) interfaces in organic light-emitting diode (OLED) heterostructures are systematically probed via a self-assembly approach. A series of ITO anode-linked silyltriarylamine precursors differing in aryl group and linker density are synthesized for this purpose and used to probe the relationship between nanoscale interfacial chemical structure and charge-injection/electroluminescence properties. These precursors form conformal and largely pinhole-free self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the ITO anode surface with angstrom-level thickness control. Deposition of a HTL on top of the SAMs places the probe molecules precisely at the anode-HTL interface. OLEDs containing ITO/SAM/HTL configurations have dramatically varied hole-injection magnitudes and OLED responses. These can be correlated with the probe molecular structures and electrochemically derived heterogeneous electron-transfer rates for such triarylamine fragments. The large observed interfacial molecular structure effects offer an approach to tuning OLED hole-injection flux over 1-2 orders of magnitude, resulting in up to 3-fold variations in OLED brightness at identical bias and up to a 2 V driving voltage reduction at identical brightness. Very bright and efficient ({approx}70 000 cd/m{sup 2}, {approx}2.5% forward external quantum efficiency, {approx}11 lm/W power efficiency) Alq (tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum(III))-based OLEDs can thereby be fabricated.

  19. Fine structural features of nanoscale zero-valent iron characterized by spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM).

    PubMed

    Liu, Airong; Zhang, Wei-xian

    2014-09-21

    An angstrom-resolution physical model of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is generated with a combination of spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) on the Fe L-edge. Bright-field (BF), high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) and secondary electron (SE) imaging of nZVI acquired by a Hitachi HD-2700 STEM show near atomic resolution images and detailed morphological and structural information of nZVI. The STEM-EDS technique confirms that the fresh nZVI comprises of a metallic iron core encapsulated with a thin layer of iron oxides or oxyhydroxides. SAED patterns of the Fe core suggest the polycrystalline structure in the metallic core and amorphous nature of the oxide layer. Furthermore, Fe L-edge of EELS shows varied structural features from the innermost Fe core to the outer oxide shell. A qualitative analysis of the Fe L(2,3) edge fine structures reveals that the shell of nZVI consists of a mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III) phase close to the Fe (0) interface and a predominantly Fe(III) at the outer surface of nZVI.

  20. Structural engineering of three-dimensional phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpero, Tommaso; Schoenwald, Stefan; Zemp, Armin; Bergamini, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Artificially-structured materials are attracting the research interest of a growing community of scientists for the possibility to develop novel materials with advantageous properties that arise from the ability to tailor the propagation of elastic waves, and thus energy, through them. In this work, we propose a three-dimensional phononic crystal whose unit cell has been engineered to obtain a strong wave-attenuation band in the middle of the acoustic frequency range. The combination of its acoustic properties with the dimensions of the unit cell and its static mechanical properties makes it an interesting material for possibly several applications in civil and mechanical engineering, for instance as the core of an acoustically insulating sandwich panel. A sample of this crystal has been manufactured and experimentally tested with respect to its acoustic transmissibility. The performance of the phononic crystal core is remarkable both in terms of amplitude reduction in the transmissibility and width of the attenuation band. A parametric study has been finally conducted on selected geometrical parameters of the unit cell and on their effect on the macroscopic properties of the crystal. This work represents an application-oriented example of how the macroscopic properties of an artificially-structured material can be designed, according to specific needs, by a conventional engineering of its unit cell.

  1. Simulation of Aircraft Engine Blade-Out Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly; Gallardo, Vicente

    2001-01-01

    A primary concern of aircraft structure designers is the accurate simulation of the blade-out event and the subsequent windmilling of the engine. Reliable simulations of the blade-out event are required to insure structural integrity during flight as well as to guarantee successful blade-out certification testing. The system simulation includes the lost blade loadings and the interactions between the rotating turbomachinery and the remaining aircraft structural components. General-purpose finite element structural analysis codes such as MSC NASTRAN are typically used and special provisions are made to include transient effects from the blade loss and rotational effects resulting from the engine's turbomachinery. The present study provides the equations of motion for rotordynamic response including the effect of spooldown speed and rotor unbalance and examines the effects of these terms on a cantilevered rotor. The effect of spooldown speed is found to be greater with increasing spooldown rate. The parametric term resulting from the mass unbalance has a more significant effect on the rotordynamic response than does the spooldown term. The parametric term affects both the peak amplitudes as well as the resonant frequencies of the rotor.

  2. Simulation of Aircraft Engine Blade-Out Structural Dynamics. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly; Gallardo, Vicente

    2001-01-01

    A primary concern of aircraft structure designers is the accurate simulation of the blade-out event and the subsequent windmilling of the engine. Reliable simulations of the blade-out event are required to insure structural integrity during flight as well as to guarantee successful blade-out certification testing. The system simulation includes the lost blade loadings and the interactions between the rotating turbomachinery and the remaining aircraft structural components. General-purpose finite element structural analysis codes such as MSC NASTRAN are typically used and special provisions are made to include transient effects from the blade loss and rotational effects resulting from the engine's turbomachinery. The present study provides the equations of motion for rotordynamic response including the effect of spooldown speed and rotor unbalance and examines the effects of these terms on a cantilevered rotor. The effect of spooldown speed is found to be greater with increasing spooldown rate. The parametric term resulting from the mass unbalance has a more significant effect on the rotordynamic response than does the spooldown term. The parametric term affects both the peak amplitudes as well as the resonant frequencies of the rotor.

  3. Extracellular matrix, mechanotransduction and structural hierarchies in heart tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kevin K; Ingber, Donald E

    2007-08-29

    The spatial and temporal scales of cardiac organogenesis and pathogenesis make engineering of artificial heart tissue a daunting challenge. The temporal scales range from nanosecond conformational changes responsible for ion channel opening to fibrillation which occurs over seconds and can lead to death. Spatial scales range from nanometre pore sizes in membrane channels and gap junctions to the metre length scale of the whole cardiovascular system in a living patient. Synchrony over these scales requires a hierarchy of control mechanisms that are governed by a single common principle: integration of structure and function. To ensure that the function of ion channels and contraction of muscle cells lead to changes in heart chamber volume, an elegant choreography of metabolic, electrical and mechanical events are executed by protein networks composed of extracellular matrix, transmembrane integrin receptors and cytoskeleton which are functionally connected across all size scales. These structural control networks are mechanoresponsive, and they process mechanical and chemical signals in a massively parallel fashion, while also serving as a bidirectional circuit for information flow. This review explores how these hierarchical structural networks regulate the form and function of living cells and tissues, as well as how microfabrication techniques can be used to probe this structural control mechanism that maintains metabolic supply, electrical activation and mechanical pumping of heart muscle. Through this process, we delineate various design principles that may be useful for engineering artificial heart tissue in the future.

  4. Radiative Decay Engineering 7: Tamm State-Coupled Emission Using a Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Descrovi, Emiliano; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    There is a continuing need to increase the brightness and photostability of fluorophores for use in biotechnology, medical diagnostics and cell imaging. One approach developed during the past decade is to use metallic surfaces and nanostructures. It is now known that excited state fluorophores display interactions with surface plasmons, which can increase the radiative decay rates, modify the spatial distribution of emission and result in directional emission. One important example is Surface Plasmon-Coupled Emission (SPCE). In this phenomenon the fluorophores at close distances from a thin metal film, typically silver, display emission over a small range of angles into the substrate. A disadvantage of SPCE is that the emission occur at large angles relative to the surface normal, and at angles which are larger than the critical angle for the glass substrate. The large angles make it difficult to collect all the coupled emission and have prevented use of SPCE with high-throughput and/or array applications. In the present report we describe a simple multi-layer metal-dielectric structure which allows excitation with light that is perpendicular (normal) to the plane and provides emission within a narrow angular distribution that is normal to the plane. This structure consist of a thin silver film on top of a multi-layer dielectric Bragg grating, with no nanoscale features except for the metal or dielectric layer thicknesses. Our structure is designed to support optical Tamm states, which are trapped electromagnetic modes between the metal film and the underlying Bragg grating. We used simulations with the transfer matrix method to understand the optical properties of Tamm states and localization of the modes or electric fields in the structure. Tamm states can exist with zero in-plane wavevector components and can be created without the use of a coupling prism. We show that fluorophores on top of the metal film can interact with the Tamm state under the metal film

  5. Nanoscale structure, dynamics and power conversion efficiency correlations in small molecule and oligomer-based photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Szarko, Jodi M; Guo, Jianchang; Rolczynski, Brian S; Chen, Lin X

    2011-01-01

    Photovoltaic functions in organic materials are intimately connected to interfacial morphologies of molecular packing in films on the nanometer scale and molecular levels. This review will focus on current studies on correlations of nanoscale morphologies in organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials with fundamental processes relevant to photovoltaic functions, such as light harvesting, exciton splitting, exciton diffusion, and charge separation (CS) and diffusion. Small molecule photovoltaic materials will be discussed here. The donor and acceptor materials in small molecule OPV devices can be fabricated in vacuum-deposited, multilayer, crystalline thin films, or spin-coated together to form blended bulk heterojunction (BHJ) films. These two methods result in very different morphologies of the solar cell active layers. There is still a formidable debate regarding which morphology is favored for OPV optimization. The morphology of the conducting films has been systematically altered; using variations of the techniques above, the whole spectrum of film qualities can be fabricated. It is possible to form a highly crystalline material, one which is completely amorphous, or an intermediate morphology. In this review, we will summarize the past key findings that have driven organic solar cell research and the current state-of-the-art of small molecule and conducting oligomer materials. We will also discuss the merits and drawbacks of these devices. Finally, we will highlight some works that directly compare the spectra and morphology of systematically elongated oligothiophene derivatives and compare these oligomers to their polymer counterparts. We hope this review will shed some new light on the morphology differences of these two systems.

  6. Optical/Electronic Heterogeneity of WSe2 at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Khatib, Omar; Kravtsov, Vasily; Ulbricht, Ronald; Clark, Genevieve; Xu, Xiaodong; Raschke, Markus

    Many classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as a potential platform for novel electronic and optical devices. However, the physical properties are strongly influenced by nanoscale heterogeneities in the form of nucleation sites, defects, strains, and edges. Here we demonstrate nano-optical imaging of the associated influence on structure and electronic properties with sub-20 nm spatial resolution from combined tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) and photoluminescence (TEPL) spectroscopy and imaging. In monolayer WSe2 micro-crystals grown by physical vapor deposition (PVD), we observe significant variations in TERS and TEPL near crystal edges and atomic-scale grain boundaries (GBs), consistent with variations in strain and/or exciton diffusion. Specifically, theoretical exciton diffusion lengths (25 nm) at GBs and heterogeneous nanoscale (30-80 nm) PL emission including a spectral blue-shift at edges are experimentally probed. Further, we are able to engineer the local bandgap of WSe2 crystals by dynamic AFM-control in reversible (24 meV) and irreversible (48 meV) fashions, enabling systematic in-situ studies of the coupling of mechanical degrees of freedom to the nanoscale electronic properties in layered 2D materials.

  7. Super resolution imaging and nanoscale magnetic detection in microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kangmook

    Nanoscale sensing and imaging tools are the most emerging techniques in fields of nanoscience research and engineering. To demonstrate nanoscale sensing and imaging tools, it is required to achieve high sensitivity and spatial resolution simultaneously. By fulfilling the requirements, this thesis describes mainly two different scanning applications employing quantum probes and nanoparticle positioning technique using fluid flow control. First, we develop a method that can systematically probe the distortion of an emitter's diffraction spot near a nanoparticle in a microfluidic device. The results provide a better fundamental understanding of near-field coupling between emitters and nanophotonic structures. We demonstrate that by monitoring the distortion of the diffraction spot we can perform highly accurate imaging of the nanoparticle with 8 nm spatial precision. Next, we develop a method to perform localized magnetometry in a microfluidic device with a 48 nm spatial precision. We map out the local field distribution of a magnetic nanoparticle by manipulating it in the vicinity of an immobilized single NV center and optically detecting the induced Zeeman shift with a magnetic field sensitivity of 17.5 muT Hz-1/2. Finally, we introduce a scanning magnetic field technique that employs multiple NV centers in diamond nanocrystals suspended in microfluidic channels. This technique has advantages of short acquisition time over wide-field with nanoscale spatial resolution. The advantages make our technique attractive to a wide range of magnetic imaging applications in fluidic environments and biophysical systems.

  8. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  9. Label-free colorimetric detection of mercury via Hg2+ ions-accelerated structural transformation of nanoscale metal-oxo clusters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; She, Shan; Zhang, Jiangwei; Bayaguud, Aruuhan; Wei, Yongge

    2015-01-01

    Mercury and its compounds are known to be extremely toxic but widely distributed in environment. Although many works have been reported to efficiently detect mercury, development of simple and convenient sensors is still longed for quick analyzing mercury in water. In this work, a nanoscale metal-oxo cluster, (n-Bu4N)2[Mo5NaO13(OCH3)4(NO)], (MLPOM), organically-derivatized from monolacunary Lindqvist-type polyoxomolybdate, is found to specifically react with Hg2+ in methanol/water via structural transformation. The MLPOM methanol solution displays a color change from purple to brown within seconds after being mixed with an aqueous solution containing Hg2+. By comparing the structure of polyoxomolybdate before and after reaction, the color change is revealed to be the essentially structural transformation of MLPOM accelerated by Hg2+. Based on this discovery, MLPOM could be utilized as a colorimetric sensor to sense the existence of Hg2+, and a simple and label-free method is developed to selectively detect aqueous Hg2+. Furthermore, the colorimetric sensor has been applied to indicating mercury contamination in industrial sewage. PMID:26559602

  10. Capillarity at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    van Honschoten, Joost W; Brunets, Nataliya; Tas, Niels R

    2010-03-01

    In this critical review we treat the phenomenon of capillarity in nanoscopic confinement, based on application of the Young-Laplace equation. In classical capillarity the curvature of the meniscus is determined by the confining geometry and the macroscopic contact angle. We show that in narrow confinement the influence of the disjoining pressure and the related wetting films have to be considered as they may significantly change the meniscus curvature. Nanochannel based static and dynamic capillarity experiments are reviewed. A typical effect of nanoscale confinement is the appearance of capillarity induced negative pressure. Special attention is paid to elasto-capillarity and electro-capillarity. The presence of electric fields leads to an extra stress term to be added in the Young-Laplace equation. A typical example is the formation of the Taylor cone, essential in the theory of electrospray. Measurements of the filling kinetics of nanochannels with water and aqueous salt solutions are discussed. These experiments can be used to characterize viscosity and apparent viscosity effects of water in nanoscopic confinement. In the final section we show four examples of appearances of capillarity in engineering and in nature (112 references).

  11. Structural Evaluation of Exo-Skeletal Engine Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuguoglu, Latife; Abumeri, Galib; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    The available computational simulation capability is used to demonstrate the structural viability of composite fan blades of innovative Exo-Skeletal Engine (ESE) developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for a subsonic mission. Full structural analysis and progressive damage evaluation of ESE composite fan blade is conducted through the NASA in-house computational simulation software system EST/BEST. The results of structural assessment indicate that longitudinal stresses acting on the blade are in compression. At a design speed of 2000 rpm, pressure and suction surface outer most ply stresses in longitudinal, transverse and shear direction are much lower than the corresponding composite ply strengths. Damage is initiated at 4870 rpm and blade fracture takes place at rotor speed of 7735 rpm. Damage volume is 51 percent. The progressive damage, buckling, stress and strength results indicate that the design at hand is very sound because of the factor of safety, damage tolerance, and buckling load of 6811 rpm.

  12. Structural and Machine Design Using Piezoceramic Materials: A Guide for Structural Design Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Cudney, Harley H.

    2000-01-01

    Using piezoceramic materials is one way the design engineer can create structures which have an ability to both sense and respond to their environment. Piezoceramic materials can be used to create structural sensors and structural actuators. Because piezoceramic materials have transduction as a material property, their sensing or actuation functions are a result of what happens to the material. This is different than discrete devices we might attach to the structure. For example, attaching an accelerometer to a structure will yield an electrical signal proportional to the acceleration at the attachment point on the structure. Using a electromagnetic shaker as an actuator will create an applied force at the attachment point. Active material elements in a structural design are not easily modeled as providing transduction at a point, but rather they change the physics of the structure in the areas where they are used. Hence, a designer must not think of adding discrete devices to a structure to obtain an effect, but rather must design a structural system which accounts for the physical principles of all the elements in the structure. The purpose of this manual is to provide practicing engineers the information necessary to incorporate piezoelectric materials in structural design and machine design. First, we will review the solid-state physics of piezoelectric materials. Then we will discuss the physical characteristics of the electrical-active material-structural system. We will present the elements of this system which must be considered as part of the design task for a structural engineer. We will cover simple modeling techniques and review the features and capabilities of commercial design tools that are available. We will then cover practical how-to elements of working with piezoceramic materials. We will review sources of piezoceramic materials and built-up devices, and their characteristics. Finally, we will provide two design examples using piezoceramic

  13. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The following tasks on the study of advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are described: (1) constructions of special elements which contain traction-free circular boundaries; (2) formulation of new version of mixed variational principles and new version of hybrid stress elements; (3) establishment of methods for suppression of kinematic deformation modes; (4) construction of semiLoof plate and shell elements by assumed stress hybrid method; and (5) elastic-plastic analysis by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  14. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  15. Overview of Lightweight Structures for Rotorcraft Engines and Drivetrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    This is an overview presentation of research being performed in the Advanced Materials Task within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project. This research is focused on technology areas that address both national goals and project goals for advanced rotorcraft. Specific technology areas discussed are: (1) high temperature materials for advanced turbines in turboshaft engines; (2) polymer matrix composites for lightweight drive system components; (3) lightweight structure approaches for noise and vibration control; and (4) an advanced metal alloy for lighter weight bearings and more reliable mechanical components. An overview of the technology in each area is discussed, and recent accomplishments are presented.

  16. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  17. Cabin fuselage structural design with engine installation and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, Tanapaal; Bishop, Mike; Gumus, Ilker; Gussy, Joel; Triggs, Mike

    1994-01-01

    Design requirements for the cabin, cabin system, flight controls, engine installation, and wing-fuselage interface that provide adequate interior volume for occupant seating, cabin ingress and egress, and safety are presented. The fuselage structure must be sufficient to meet the loadings specified in the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23. The critical structure must provide a safe life of 10(exp 6) load cycles and 10,000 operational mission cycles. The cabin seating and controls must provide adjustment to account for various pilot physiques and to aid in maintenance and operation of the aircraft. Seats and doors shall not bind or lockup under normal operation. Cabin systems such as heating and ventilation, electrical, lighting, intercom, and avionics must be included in the design. The control system will consist of ailerons, elevator, and rudders. The system must provide required deflections with a combination of push rods, bell cranks, pulleys, and linkages. The system will be free from slack and provide smooth operation without binding. Environmental considerations include variations in temperature and atmospheric pressure, protection against sand, dust, rain, humidity, ice, snow, salt/fog atmosphere, wind and gusts, and shock and vibration. The following design goals were set to meet the requirements of the statement of work: safety, performance, manufacturing and cost. To prevent the engine from penetrating the passenger area in the event of a crash was the primary safety concern. Weight and the fuselage aerodynamics were the primary performance concerns. Commonality and ease of manufacturing were major considerations to reduce cost.

  18. Spatially-resolved in-situ structural study of organic electronic devices with nanoscale resolution: the plasmonic photovoltaic case study.

    PubMed

    Paci, B; Bailo, D; Albertini, V Rossi; Wright, J; Ferrero, C; Spyropoulos, G D; Stratakis, E; Kymakis, E

    2013-09-14

    A novel high spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction stratigraphy technique has been applied in-situ to an integrated plasmonic nanoparticle-based organic photovoltaic device. This original approach allows for the disclosure of structure-property relations linking large scale organic devices to length scales of local nano/hetero structures and interfaces between the different components.

  19. Correlating high power conversion efficiency of PTB7:PC71BM inverted organic solar cells with nanoscale structures.

    PubMed

    Das, Sanjib; Keum, Jong K; Browning, James F; Gu, Gong; Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jihua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Hong, Kunlun; Rondinone, Adam J; Joshi, Pooran C; Geohegan, David B; Duscher, Gerd; Xiao, Kai

    2015-10-14

    Advances in material design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) compared to their "conventional" counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with a well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. We have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active layer to increase PCE. Using various characterization techniques, we demonstrate that the high PCEs of i-OSCs are due to the diffusion of electron-accepting PC71BM into the PFN layer, resulting in improved electron transport. The diffusion occurs when residual solvent molecules in the spun-cast film act as a plasticizer. Addition of DIO to the casting solution results in more PC71BM diffusion and therefore more efficient electron transport. This work provides important insight and guidance to further enhancement of i-OSC performance by materials and interface engineering.

  20. Catalytic activity of bimetallic catalysts highly sensitive to the atomic composition and phase structure at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Wu, Jinfang; Joseph, Pharrah; Skeete, Zakiya; Kim, Eunjoo; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-11-01

    The ability to determine the atomic arrangement in nanoalloy catalysts and reveal the detailed structural features responsible for the catalytically active sites is essential for understanding the correlation between the atomic structure and catalytic properties, enabling the preparation of efficient nanoalloy catalysts by design. Herein we describe a study of CO oxidation over PdCu nanoalloy catalysts focusing on gaining insights into the correlation between the atomic structures and catalytic activity of nanoalloys. PdCu nanoalloys of different bimetallic compositions are synthesized as a model system and are activated by a controlled thermochemical treatment for assessing their catalytic activity. The results show that the catalytic synergy of Pd and Cu species evolves with both the bimetallic nanoalloy composition and temperature of the thermochemical treatment reaching a maximum at a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50. The nanoalloys are characterized structurally by ex situ and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, including atomic pair distribution function analysis. The structural data show that, depending on the bimetallic composition and treatment temperature, PdCu nanoalloys adopt two different structure types. One features a chemically ordered, body centered cubic (B2) type alloy consisting of two interpenetrating simple cubic lattices, each occupied with Pd or Cu species alone, and the other structure type features a chemically disordered, face-centered cubic (fcc) type of alloy wherein Pd and Cu species are intermixed at random. The catalytic activity for CO oxidation is strongly influenced by the structural features. In particular, it is revealed that the prevalence of chemical disorder in nanoalloys with a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50 makes them superior catalysts for CO oxidation in comparison with the same nanoalloys of other bimetallic compositions. However, the catalytic synergy can be diminished if the Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys undergo phase

  1. Passive and active structural monitoring experience: Civil engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. D.; Westermo, B. D.; Crum, D. B.; Law, W. R.; Trombi, R. G.

    2000-05-01

    State Departments of Transportation and regional city government officials are beginning to view the long-term monitoring of infrastructure as being beneficial for structural damage accumulation assessment, condition based maintenance, life extension, and post-earthquake or -hurricane (-tornado, -typhoon, etc.) damage assessment. Active and passive structural monitoring systems were installed over the last few years to monitor concerns in a wide range of civil infrastructure applications. This paper describes the monitoring technologies and systems employed for such applications. Bridge system applications were directed at monitoring corrosion damage accumulation, composite reinforcements for life extension, general service cracking damage related to fatigue and overloads, and post-earthquake damage. Residential system applications were directed primarily at identifying damage accumulation and post-earthquake damage assessment. A professional sports stadium was monitored for isolated ground instability problems and for post-earthquake damage assessment. Internet-based, remote, data acquisition system experience is discussed with examples of long-term passive and active system data collected from many of the individual sites to illustrate the potential for both passive and active structural health monitoring. A summary of system-based operating characteristics and key engineering recommendations are provided to achieve specific structural monitoring objectives for a wide range of civil infrastructure applications.

  2. Additive manufacturing of ceramic structures by laser engineered net shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Fangyong; Wu, Dongjiang; Ma, Guangyi; Zhang, Bi

    2015-11-01

    Ceramic is an important material with outstanding physical properties whereas impurities and porosities generated by traditional manufacturing methods limits its further industrial applications. In order to solve this problem, direct fabrication of Al2O3 ceramic structures is conducted by laser engineered net shaping system and pure ceramic powders. Grain refinement strengthening method by doping ZrO2 and dispersion strengthening method by doping SiC are proposed to suppress cracks in fabricating Al2O3 structure. Phase compositions, microstructures as well as mechanical properties of fabricated specimens are then analyzed. The results show that the proposed two methods are effective in suppressing cracks and structures of single-bead wall, arc and cylinder ring are successfully deposited. Stable phase of α-Al2O3 and t-ZrO2 are obtained in the fabricated specimens. Micro-hardness higher than 1700 HV are also achieved for both Al2O3 and Al2O3/ZrO2, which are resulted from fine directional crystals generated by the melting-solidification process. Results presented indicate that additive manufacturing is a very attractive technique for the production of high-performance ceramic structures in a single step.

  3. Acoustic-Structure Interaction in Rocket Engines: Validation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Joji, Scott S.; Parks, Russel A.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    While analyzing a rocket engine component, it is often necessary to account for any effects that adjacent fluids (e.g., liquid fuels or oxidizers) might have on the structural dynamics of the component. To better characterize the fully coupled fluid-structure system responses, an analytical approach that models the system as a coupled expansion of rigid wall acoustic modes and in vacuo structural modes has been proposed. The present work seeks to experimentally validate this approach. To experimentally observe well-coupled system modes, the test article and fluid cavities are designed such that the uncoupled structural frequencies are comparable to the uncoupled acoustic frequencies. The test measures the natural frequencies, mode shapes, and forced response of cylindrical test articles in contact with fluid-filled cylindrical and/or annular cavities. The test article is excited with a stinger and the fluid-loaded response is acquired using a laser-doppler vibrometer. The experimentally determined fluid-loaded natural frequencies are compared directly to the results of the analytical model. Due to the geometric configuration of the test article, the analytical model is found to be valid for natural modes with circumferential wave numbers greater than four. In the case of these modes, the natural frequencies predicted by the analytical model demonstrate excellent agreement with the experimentally determined natural frequencies.

  4. Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Husaini, S.; Shima, D.; Ahirwar, P.; Rotter, T. J.; Hains, C. P.; Dang, T.; Bedford, R. G.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2013-02-11

    Effects of antimony crystallization on the surface of GaSb during low temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth are investigated. The geometry of these structures is studied via transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, which show the surface metal forms triangular-shaped, elongated nano-wires with a structured orientation composed entirely of crystalline antimony. By depositing antimony on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector, the field is localized within the antimony layer. Polarization dependent transmission measurements are carried out on these nano-structures deposited on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. It is shown that the antimony-based structures at the surface favor transmission of light polarized perpendicular to the wires.

  5. Correlating high power conversion efficiency of PTB7:PC71BM inverted organic solar cells with nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sanjib; Keum, Jong K.; Browning, James F.; Gu, Gong; Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jihua; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Hong, Kunlun; Rondinone, Adam J.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Geohegan, David B.; Duscher, Gerd; Xiao, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Advances in material design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) compared to their ``conventional'' counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with a well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. We have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active layer to increase PCE. Using various characterization techniques, we demonstrate that the high PCEs of i-OSCs are due to the diffusion of electron-accepting PC71BM into the PFN layer, resulting in improved electron transport. The diffusion occurs when residual solvent molecules in the spun-cast film act as a plasticizer. Addition of DIO to the casting solution results in more PC71BM diffusion and therefore more efficient electron transport. This work provides important insight and guidance to further enhancement of i-OSC performance by materials and interface engineering.Advances in material design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) compared to their ``conventional'' counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with a well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. We have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active

  6. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-04-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

  7. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

  8. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties. PMID:27087141

  9. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties. PMID:27087141

  10. Molding the flow of light on the nanoscale: from vortex nanogears to phase-operated plasmonic machinery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Efficient delivery of light into nanoscale volumes by converting free photons into localized charge-density oscillations (surface plasmons) enables technological innovation in various fields from biosensing to photovoltaics and quantum computing. Conventional plasmonic nanostructures are designed as nanoscale analogs of radioantennas and waveguides. Here, we discuss an alternative approach for plasmonic nanocircuit engineering that is based on molding the optical powerflow through ‘vortex nanogears’ around a landscape of local phase singularities ‘pinned’ to plasmonic nanostructures. We show that coupling of several vortex nanogears into transmission-like structures results in dramatic optical effects, which can be explained by invoking a hydrodynamic analogy of the ‘photon fluid’. The new concept of vortex nanogear transmissions (VNTs) provides new design principles for the development of complex multi-functional phase-operated photonics machinery and, therefore, generates unique opportunities for light generation, harvesting and processing on the nanoscale. PMID:22127488

  11. Correlating High Power Conversion Efficiency of PTB7:PC71BM Inverted Organic Solar Cells with Nanoscale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sanjib; Keum, Jong Kahk; Browning, Jim; Gu, Gong; Yang, Bin; Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Jihua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Hong, Kunlun; et al

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials design and device engineering led to inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs) with superior power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) to their conventional counterparts, in addition to the well-known better ambient stability. Despite the significant progress, however, it has so far been unclear how the morphologies of the photoactive layer and its interface with the cathode modifying layer impact device performance. Here, we report an in-depth morphology study of the i-OSC active and cathode modifying layers, employing a model system with the well-established bulk-heterojunction, PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer and poly-[(9,9-bis(3 -(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode surface modifying layer. Wemore » have also identified the role of a processing additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), used in the spin-casting of the active layer to increase PCE. Using a variety of characterization techniques, we demonstrate that the high PCEs of i-OSCs are due to the smearing (diffusion) of electron-accepting PC71BM into the PFN layer, resulting in improved electron transport. The PC71BM diffusion occurs after spin-casting the active layer onto the PFN layer, when residual solvent molecules act as a plasticizer. The DIO additive, with a higher boiling point than the host solvent, has a longer residence time in the spin-cast active layer, resulting in more PC71BM smearing and therefore more efficient electron transport. This work provides important insight and guidance to further enhancement of i-OSC performance by materials and interface engineering.« less

  12. A mechanical characterization of polymer scaffolds and films at the macroscale and nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Boffito, Monica; Bernardi, Ettore; Sartori, Susanna; Ciardelli, Gianluca; Sassi, Maria Paola

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials should be mechanically tested at both the nanoscale and macroscale under conditions simulating their working state, either in vitro or in vivo, to confirm their applicability in tissue engineering applications. In this article, polyester-urethane-based films and porous scaffolds produced by hot pressing and thermally induced phase separation respectively, were mechanically characterized at both the macroscale and nanoscale by tensile tests and indentation-type atomic force microscopy. All tests were conducted in wet state with the final aim of simulating scaffold real operating conditions. The films showed two distinct Young Moduli populations, which can be ascribed to polyurethane hard and soft segments. In the scaffold, the application of a thermal cooling gradient during phase separation was responsible for a nanoscale polymer chain organization in a preferred direction. At the macroscale, the porous matrices showed a Young Modulus of about 1.5 MPa in dry condition and 0.3 MPa in wet state. The combination of nanoscale and macroscale values as well as the aligned structure are in accordance with stiffness and structure required for scaffolds used for the regeneration of soft tissues such as muscles.

  13. Thermal Treatment of PtNiCo Electrocatalysts: Effects of Nanoscale Strain and Structure on the Activity and Stability for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Luo, Jin; Njoki, Peter; Mott, Derrick; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Shao, Minhua; Protsailo, Lesia; Kawamura, Tetsuo

    2010-10-21

    The ability to control the nanoscale size, composition, phase, and facet of multimetallic catalysts is important for advancing the design and preparation of advanced catalysts. This report describes the results of an investigation of the thermal treatment temperature on nanoengineered platinum-nickel-cobalt catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction, focusing on understanding the effects of lattice strain and surface properties on activity and stability. The thermal treatment temperatures ranged from 400 to 926 C. The catalysts were characterized by microscopic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical techniques for establishing the correlation between the electrocatalytic properties and the catalyst structures. The composition, size, and phase properties of the trimetallic nanoparticles were controllable by our synthesis and processing approach. The increase in the thermal treatment temperature of the carbon-supported catalysts was shown to lead to a gradual shrinkage of the lattice constants of the alloys and an enhanced population of facets on the nanoparticle catalysts. A combination of the lattice shrinkage and the surface enrichment of nanocrystal facets on the nanoparticle catalysts as a result of the increased temperature was shown to play a major role in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity for catalysts. Detailed analyses of the oxidation states, atomic distributions, and interatomic distances revealed a certain degree of changes in Co enrichment and surface Co oxides as a function of the thermal treatment temperature. These findings provided important insights into the correlation between the electrocatalytic activity/stability and the nanostructural parameters (lattice strain, surface oxidation state, and distribution) of the nanoengineered trimetallic catalysts.

  14. Thermal Treatment of PtNiCo Electrocatalysts: Effects of Nanoscale Strain and Structure on the Activity and Stability for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    B Wanjala; R Loukrakpam; J Luo; P Njoki; D Mott; C Zhong; M Shao; L Protsailo; T Kawamura

    2011-12-31

    The ability to control the nanoscale size, composition, phase, and facet of multimetallic catalysts is important for advancing the design and preparation of advanced catalysts. This report describes the results of an investigation of the thermal treatment temperature on nanoengineered platinum-nickel-cobalt catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction, focusing on understanding the effects of lattice strain and surface properties on activity and stability. The thermal treatment temperatures ranged from 400 to 926 C. The catalysts were characterized by microscopic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical techniques for establishing the correlation between the electrocatalytic properties and the catalyst structures. The composition, size, and phase properties of the trimetallic nanoparticles were controllable by our synthesis and processing approach. The increase in the thermal treatment temperature of the carbon-supported catalysts was shown to lead to a gradual shrinkage of the lattice constants of the alloys and an enhanced population of facets on the nanoparticle catalysts. A combination of the lattice shrinkage and the surface enrichment of nanocrystal facets on the nanoparticle catalysts as a result of the increased temperature was shown to play a major role in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity for catalysts. Detailed analyses of the oxidation states, atomic distributions, and interatomic distances revealed a certain degree of changes in Co enrichment and surface Co oxides as a function of the thermal treatment temperature. These findings provided important insights into the correlation between the electrocatalytic activity/stability and the nanostructural parameters (lattice strain, surface oxidation state, and distribution) of the nanoengineered trimetallic catalysts.

  15. Catalytic activity of bimetallic catalysts highly sensitive to the atomic composition and phase structure at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Wu, Jinfang; Joseph, Pharrah; Skeete, Zakiya; Kim, Eunjoo; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    The ability to determine the atomic arrangement in nanoalloy catalysts and reveal the detailed structural features responsible for the catalytically active sites is essential for understanding the correlation between the atomic structure and catalytic properties, enabling the preparation of efficient nanoalloy catalysts by design. Herein we describe a study of CO oxidation over PdCu nanoalloy catalysts focusing on gaining insights into the correlation between the atomic structures and catalytic activity of nanoalloys. PdCu nanoalloys of different bimetallic compositions are synthesized as a model system and are activated by a controlled thermochemical treatment for assessing their catalytic activity. The results show that the catalytic synergy of Pd and Cu species evolves with both the bimetallic nanoalloy composition and temperature of the thermochemical treatment reaching a maximum at a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50. The nanoalloys are characterized structurally by ex situ and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, including atomic pair distribution function analysis. The structural data show that, depending on the bimetallic composition and treatment temperature, PdCu nanoalloys adopt two different structure types. One features a chemically ordered, body centered cubic (B2) type alloy consisting of two interpenetrating simple cubic lattices, each occupied with Pd or Cu species alone, and the other structure type features a chemically disordered, face-centered cubic (fcc) type of alloy wherein Pd and Cu species are intermixed at random. The catalytic activity for CO oxidation is strongly influenced by the structural features. In particular, it is revealed that the prevalence of chemical disorder in nanoalloys with a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50 makes them superior catalysts for CO oxidation in comparison with the same nanoalloys of other bimetallic compositions. However, the catalytic synergy can be diminished if the Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys undergo

  16. Nanoscale heterogeneity, premartensitic nucleation, and a new plutonium structure in metastable δ fcc Pu-Ga alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradson, Steven D.; Bock, Nicolas; Castro, Julio M.; Conradson, Dylan R.; Cox, Lawrence E.; Dmowski, Wojciech; Dooley, David E.; Egami, Takeshi; Espinosa-Faller, Francisco J.; Freibert, Franz J.; Garcia-Adeva, Angel J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Holmström, Erik K.; Howell, Rafael C.; Katz, Barbara; Lashley, Jason C.; Martinez, Raymond J.; Moore, David P.; Morales, Luis A.; Olivas, J. David; Pereyra, Ramiro A.; Ramos, Michael; Rudin, Sven P.; Villella, Phillip M.

    2014-06-01

    The scientifically fascinating question of the spatial extent and bonding of the 5f orbitals of Pu and its six different phases extends to its δ-retained alloys and the mechanism by which Ga and a number of other unrelated elements stabilize its low density face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. This issue of phase stability is also important technologically because of its significance to Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship. Answering these questions requires information on the local order and structure around the Ga and its effects on the Pu. We have addressed this by characterizing the structures of a large number of Pu-Ga and two Pu-In and one Pu-Ce δ alloys, including a set of high purity δ Pu1-xGax materials with 1.7 ≤ x ≤ 6.4 at. % Ga that span the low [Ga] portion of the δ region of the phase diagram across the ˜3.3 at. % Ga metastability boundary, with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy that probes the element specific local structure, supplemented by x-ray pair distribution function analysis that gives the total local structure to longer distances, and x-ray diffraction that gives the long-range average structure of the periodic component of the materials. Detailed analyses indicate that the alloys at and below a nominal composition of ˜3.3 at. % Ga are heterogeneous and in addition to the δ phase also contain up to ˜20% of a novel, coexisting "σ" structure for Pu that forms in nanometer scale domains that are locally depleted in Ga. The invariance of the Ga EXAFS with composition indicates that this σ structure forms in Ga-depleted domains that result from the Ga atoms in the δ phase self-organizing into a quasi-intermetallic with a stoichiometry of Pu25-35Ga so that δ Pu-Ga is neither a random solid solution nor the more stable Pu3Ga + α. Above this 3.3 at. % Ga nominal composition, the δ Pu-Ga alloy is homogeneous, and no σ phase is present. These results that demonstrate that collective and cooperative

  17. DIET at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, G.; Boer-Duchemin, E.; Le Moal, E.; Mayne, A. J.; Riedel, D.

    2016-01-01

    We review the long evolution of DIET (Dynamics at surfaces Induced by Electronic Transitions) that began in the 1960s when Menzel, Gomer and Redhead proposed their famous stimulated desorption model. DIET entered the "nanoscale" in the 1990s when researchers at Bell Labs and IBM realized that the Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) could be used as an atomic size source of electrons to electronically excite individual atoms and molecules on surfaces. Resonant and radiant Inelastic Electron Tunneling (IET) using the STM have considerably enlarged the range of applications of DIET. Nowadays, "DIET at the nanoscale" covers a broad range of phenomena at the atomic-scale. This includes molecular dynamics (dissociation, desorption, isomerization, displacement, chemical reactions), vibrational spectroscopy and dynamics, spin spectroscopy and manipulation, luminescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and plasmonics. Future trends of DIET at the nanoscale offer exciting prospects for new methods to control light and matter at the nanoscale.

  18. Molecular Organization in the Native State of Wood Cell Walls: Studies of Nanoscale Structure and its Development

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R. H.

    2001-02-01

    With respect to cell wall biogenesis we have developed a theory concerning the formation of lignin in which the regulation of structure is attributed to the hemicelluloses; they are viewed as templates for the assembly of lignin. The key supporting evidence is derived from the symmetry of annual rings in trees free of reaction wood. This symmetry is interpreted to point to genetic encoding as the dominant factor in the pattern of interunit linkages in lignin. More recently, we have explored further the implications of annual ring symmetries within the contexts of systems and information theory and theories of organization of hierarchic structures. This has led us to proposed a unifying model for cell wall biogenesis that comprehends cell wall polysaccharides as well as lignin. The model is based on examining the implications of symmetries and of hierarchic relationships between different levels of structure, with respect to synchrony and coordination of the stages of formation of the individual constituents.

  19. MoSi2-Base Structural Composite Passed Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, Michael V.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    1999-01-01

    The intermetallic compound molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) is an attractive high-temperature structural material for advanced engine applications. It has excellent oxidation resistance, a high melting point, relatively low density, and high thermal conductivity; and it is easily machined. Past research at the NASA Lewis Research Center has resulted in the development of a hybrid composite consisting of a MoSi2 matrix reinforced with silicon nitride (Si3N4) particulate and silicon carbide (SiC) fibers. This composite has demonstrated attractive strength, toughness, thermal fatigue, and oxidation resistance, including resistance to "pest" oxidation. These properties attracted the interest of the Office of Naval Research and Pratt & Whitney, and a joint NASA/Navy/Pratt & Whitney effort was developed to continue to mature the MoSi2 composite technology. A turbine blade outer air seal, which was part of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) program, was chosen as a first component on which to focus.

  20. Structure and interfacial analysis of nanoscale TiNi thin film prepared by biased target ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Huilong; Hamilton, Reginald F. Horn, Mark W.

    2015-07-15

    Ultrathin, 65 nm thick, TiNi alloy films were fabricated by cosputtering Ti and Ni targets using the recently developed biased target ion beam deposition technique. Preheating the substrate by exposure to a low energy ion source resulted in as-deposited films with a pure B2 atomic crystal structure containing no secondary crystal structures or precipitates. Continuous films were produced with a smooth surface and minimal substrate/film interfacial diffusion. The diffusion layer was a small ratio of film thickness, which is a prerequisite for the B2 phase to undergo the martensitic transformation in ultrathin films.

  1. Nanoscale Cellular Structures at Phase Boundaries of Ni-Cr-Al-Ti and Ni-Cr-Mo-Al-Ti Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Dunand, David C.

    2015-06-01

    The microstructural evolution of Ni-20 pct Cr wires was studied during pack cementation where Al and Ti, with and without prior cementation with Mo, are deposited to the surface of the Ni-Cr wires and subsequently homogenized in their volumes. Mo deposition promotes the formation of Kirkendall pores and subsequent co-deposition of Al and Ti creates a triple-layered diffusional coating on the wire surface. Subsequent homogenization drives the alloying element to distribute evenly in the wires which upon further heat treatment exhibit the γ + γ' superalloy structure. Unexpectedly, formation of cellular structures is observed at some of the boundaries between primary γ' grains and γ matrix grains. Based on additional features ( i.e., ordered but not perfectly periodic structure, confinement at γ + γ' phase boundaries as a cellular film with ~100 nm width, as well as lack of topologically close-packed phases), and considering that similar, but much larger, microstructures were reported in commercial superalloys, it is concluded that the present cellular structure solidified as a thin film, composed of eutectic γ + γ' and from which the γ' phase was subsequently etched, which was created by incipient melting of a region near the phase boundary with high solute segregation.

  2. Band structure engineering in topological insulator based heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Menshchikova, T V; Otrokov, M M; Tsirkin, S S; Samorokov, D A; Bebneva, V V; Ernst, A; Kuznetsov, V M; Chulkov, E V

    2013-01-01

    The ability to engineer an electronic band structure of topological insulators would allow the production of topological materials with tailor-made properties. Using ab initio calculations, we show a promising way to control the conducting surface state in topological insulator based heterostructures representing an insulator ultrathin films on the topological insulator substrates. Because of a specific relation between work functions and band gaps of the topological insulator substrate and the insulator ultrathin film overlayer, a sizable shift of the Dirac point occurs resulting in a significant increase in the number of the topological surface state charge carriers as compared to that of the substrate itself. Such an effect can also be realized by applying the external electric field that allows a gradual tuning of the topological surface state. A simultaneous use of both approaches makes it possible to obtain a topological insulator based heterostructure with a highly tunable topological surface state.

  3. Engineering the shape and structure of materials by fractal cut

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yigil; Shin, Joong-Ho; Costa, Avelino; Kim, Tae Ann; Kunin, Valentin; Li, Ju; Lee, Su Yeon; Yang, Shu; Han, Heung Nam; Choi, In-Suk; Srolovitz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the transformation of a sheet of material into a wide range of desired shapes and patterns by introducing a set of simple cuts in a multilevel hierarchy with different motifs. Each choice of hierarchical cut motif and cut level allows the material to expand into a unique structure with a unique set of properties. We can reverse-engineer the desired expanded geometries to find the requisite cut pattern to produce it without changing the physical properties of the initial material. The concept was experimentally realized and applied to create an electrode that expands to >800% the original area with only very minor stretching of the underlying material. The generality of our approach greatly expands the design space for materials so that they can be tuned for diverse applications. PMID:25422433

  4. Engineering the shape and structure of materials by fractal cut.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yigil; Shin, Joong-Ho; Costa, Avelino; Kim, Tae Ann; Kunin, Valentin; Li, Ju; Lee, Su Yeon; Yang, Shu; Han, Heung Nam; Choi, In-Suk; Srolovitz, David J

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the transformation of a sheet of material into a wide range of desired shapes and patterns by introducing a set of simple cuts in a multilevel hierarchy with different motifs. Each choice of hierarchical cut motif and cut level allows the material to expand into a unique structure with a unique set of properties. We can reverse-engineer the desired expanded geometries to find the requisite cut pattern to produce it without changing the physical properties of the initial material. The concept was experimentally realized and applied to create an electrode that expands to >800% the original area with only very minor stretching of the underlying material. The generality of our approach greatly expands the design space for materials so that they can be tuned for diverse applications. PMID:25422433

  5. Crankshaft structure of two-cycle internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.

    1986-11-18

    This patent describes a crankshaft structure in a two-cycle internal combustion engine comprising a crank web and a crank journal rotatably supported in a crank case by a bearing means. The crank web includes a supporting part having a central bore for receiving the crank journal press-fit therein. The supporting part has a reduced outer diameter portion disposed adjacent the bearing means supporting the crank journal and at an axial position overlying a press-fit part of the crank journal in the central bore of the crank web supporting part. The reduced outer diameter portion of the supporting part has a sealing member disposed on the outer periphery thereof.

  6. Crankshaft supporting structure for multicylinder internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuo, K.; Ito, T.; Ichida, K.

    1988-03-08

    A crankshaft supporting structure in a multicylinder internal combustion engine is described including a bearing caps secured respectively to journal walls integral with a crankcase of a cylinder block, a crankshaft rotatably supported between the journal walls and the bearing caps, at least one counterweight on the crankshaft, and a bridge interconnecting the bearing caps. The bridge includes integral baffle plates extending between locations of the bearing caps and curved along a path of outer peripheral surfaces of each counterweight on the crankshaft. The bridge includes an oil supply gallery which extends substantially along a length of the bridge and generally parallel to the crankshaft and branch passages are provided in the bridge and the bearing caps extending from the gallery to a bearing hole defined by each journal wall and bearing cap.

  7. Crankshaft supporting structure for multicylinder internal combustion combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuo, K.; Chosa, M.; Kazama, A.; Anno, N.; Kusakabe, Y.

    1988-06-28

    A crankshaft support structure is described for a multicylinder engine, comprising, a cylinder block of a lightweight material having a first coefficient of thermal expansion, the cylinder block extending longitudinally along the crankshaft and having a plurality of lateral extending and longitudinally spaced journal walls. Bearing caps of heavyweight material have a second coefficient of thermal expansion different from the first coefficient, a bearing cap mounted on each journal wall, the bearing caps and journal walls define bearing holes therebetween for supporting the crankshaft, a bridge of a lightweight material having a coefficient of thermal expansion which is substantially equal to the first coefficient, the bridge extending longitudinally over the bearing caps, and means mounting the bridge and bearing caps of the journal walls whereby the cylinder block and bridge undergo a substantially equal amount of thermal expansion and the bearing caps undergo a different amount of thermal expansion which is accommodated by the cylinder block and bridge.

  8. Engineering metal oxide structures for efficient photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concina, Isabella; Selopal, Gurpreet S.; Milan, Riccardo; Vomiero, Alberto; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    Metal oxide-based photoanodes are critical components of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), which are photoelectrochemical cells for the conversion of solar energy, promising to have several benefits as compared with their traditional counterparts. A careful engineering of the wide band gap metal oxide composing the photoanode, as well as their process design, is strategic for improving device performances and for planning a near future production scale up, especially devoted to reducing the environmental impact of the device fabrication. Herein, we present the application of ZnO hierarchical structures as efficient materials to be applied as photoanodes in DSSC, in the perspective of looking for alternative to TiO2 nanoparticles, currently the most exploited metal oxide in these devices.

  9. Novel preparation of graded porous structures for medical engineering.

    PubMed

    Muthutantri, Anushini; Huang, Jie; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2008-12-01

    The gradation of porosity in a biomaterial can be very useful for a variety of medical engineering applications such as filtration, bone replacement and implant development. However, the preparation of such structures is not a technologically trivial task and replication methods do not offer an easy solution. In this work, we elucidate the preparation of structures having a graded porosity by electrohydrodynamic spraying, using zirconia (ZrO2), which is widely used in biomedical and other applications. The processes are generic and can be achieved using other bioactive ceramics with similar particle characteristics. The pores on the sprayed surface, the innermost surface and lengthwise cross sections have been analysed in addition to the change in depth of penetration as a function of spraying time. Control of porosity, pore size and depth of penetration has been obtained by varying parameters such as the spraying time, sintering temperature and the sacrificial template. It has been possible to obtain structures with interconnected pore networks of pore size greater than 100microm as well as scattered pores smaller than 10microm in size.

  10. Electrostatics at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Walker, David A; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2011-04-01

    Electrostatic forces are amongst the most versatile interactions to mediate the assembly of nanostructured materials. Depending on experimental conditions, these forces can be long- or short-ranged, can be either attractive or repulsive, and their directionality can be controlled by the shapes of the charged nano-objects. This Review is intended to serve as a primer for experimentalists curious about the fundamentals of nanoscale electrostatics and for theorists wishing to learn about recent experimental advances in the field. Accordingly, the first portion introduces the theoretical models of electrostatic double layers and derives electrostatic interaction potentials applicable to particles of different sizes and/or shapes and under different experimental conditions. This discussion is followed by the review of the key experimental systems in which electrostatic interactions are operative. Examples include electroactive and "switchable" nanoparticles, mixtures of charged nanoparticles, nanoparticle chains, sheets, coatings, crystals, and crystals-within-crystals. Applications of these and other structures in chemical sensing and amplification are also illustrated.

  11. Nanoscale Electrostatics in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, L. John; West, Patrick Michael

    2001-04-01

    Primitive biological cells had to divide with very little biology. This work simulates a physicochemical mechanism, based upon nanoscale electrostatics, which explains the anaphase A poleward motion of chromosomes. In the cytoplasmic medium that exists in biological cells, electrostatic fields are subject to strong attenuation by Debye screening, and therefore decrease rapidly over a distance equal to several Debye lengths. However, the existence of microtubules within cells changes the situation completely. Microtubule dimer subunits are electric dipolar structures, and can act as intermediaries that extend the reach of the electrostatic interaction over cellular distances. Experimental studies have shown that intracellular pH rises to a peak at mitosis, and decreases through cytokinesis. This result, in conjunction with the electric dipole nature of microtubule subunits and the Debye screened electrostatic force is sufficient to explain and unify the basic events during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) assembly of asters, (2) motion of the asters to poles, (3) poleward motion of chromosomes (anaphase A), (4) cell elongation, and (5) cytokinesis. This paper will focus on a simulation of the dynamics if anaphase A motion based on this comprehensive model. The physicochemical mechanisms utilized by primitive cells could provide important clues regarding our understanding of cell division in modern eukaryotic cells.

  12. Structurally embedded fiber Bragg gratings: civil engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellen, Philipp M.; Broennimann, Rolf; Frank, Andreas; Mauron, Pascal; Sennhauser, Urs J.

    1999-12-01

    In civil engineering it is of interest to monitor long-term performance of structures made of new lightweight materials like glass or carbon fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP/CFRP). In contrast to surface applied optical fiber sensors, embedded sensors are expected to be better protected against rough handling and harsh environmental conditions. We report on two recently done fiber optical sensor applications in civil engineering. Both include structurally embedded fiber Bragg grating (BG) arrays but have different demands with respect to their operation. For the first application fiber BGs were embedded in GFRP rockbolts of 3 - 5 m in length either of 3, 8, or 22 mm diameter. The sensor equipped rockbolts are made for distributed measurements of boulder motion during tunnel construction and operation and should withstand strain up to 1.6%. Rockbolt sensors were field tested in a tunnel near Sargans in Switzerland. For a second application fiber BGs were embedded in CFRP wires of 5 mm diameter used for the pre- stressing cables of a 56 m long bridge near Lucerne in Switzerland. The permanent load on the cable corresponds to 0.8% strain. Due to the embedded sensors, strain decay inside the cable anchoring heads could be measured for the first time during loading and operation of the cables. For both applications mechanical and thermal loading tests were performed to assess the function of these new elements. Also, temperature and strain sensitivity were calibrated. Reliability studies with respect to stress transfer, fiber mechanical failure, and wavelength shift caused by thermal BG decay as well as monitoring results of both applications are presented.

  13. Predicting the Influence of Nano-Scale Material Structure on the In-Plane Buckling of Orthotropic Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-scale analysis of the structural stability of a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material is developed. The influence of intrinsic molecular structure, such as nanotube length, volume fraction, orientation and chemical functionalization, is investigated by assessing the relative change in critical, in-plane buckling loads. The analysis method relies on elastic properties predicted using the hierarchical, constitutive equations developed from the equivalent-continuum modeling technique applied to the buckling analysis of an orthotropic plate. The results indicate that for the specific composite materials considered in this study, a composite with randomly orientated carbon nanotubes consistently provides the highest values of critical buckling load and that for low volume fraction composites, the non-functionalized nanotube material provides an increase in critical buckling stability with respect to the functionalized system.

  14. pH-Manipulated Underwater-Oil Adhesion Wettability Behavior on the Micro/Nanoscale Semicircular Structure and Related Thermodynamic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tie, Lu; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2015-05-20

    Controlling oil of wettability behavior in response to the underwater out stimulation has shown promising applications in understanding and designing novel micro- or nanofluidic devices. In this article, the pH-manipulated underwater-oil adhesion wetting phenomenon and superoleophobicity on the micro- and nanotexture copper mesh films (CMF) were investigated. It should be noted that the surface exhibits underwater superoleophobicity under different pH values of the solution; however, the underwater-oil adhesion behavior on the surface is dramatically influenced by the pH value of the solution. On the basis of the thermodynamic analysis, a plausible mechanism to explain the pH-controllable underwater-oil adhesion and superoleophobic wetting behavior observed on a micro- and nanoscale semicircular structure has been revealed. Furthermore, variation of chemistry (intrinsic oil contact angle (OCA)) of the responsive surface that due to the carboxylic acid groups is protonated or deprotonated by the acidic or basic solution on free energy (FE) with its barrier (FEB) and equilibrium oil contact angle (EOCA) with it hysteresis (OCAH) are discussed. The result shows that a critical intrinsic OCA on the micro- and nano- semicircular texture is necessary for conversion from the oil Cassie impregnating to oil Cassie wetting state. In a water/oil/solid system, the mechanism reveals that the differences between the underwater OCA and oil adhesive force of the responsive copper mesh film under different pH values of solution are ascribed to the different oil wetting state that results from combining the changing intrinsic OCA and micro-/nanosemicircular structures. These results are well in agreement with the experiment.

  15. Structural design of Stirling engine with free pistons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusov, Jozef; Gavlas, Stanislav; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    Stirling engine is a device that converts thermal energy to mechanical work, which is mostly used to drive a generator of electricity. Advantage of Stirling engine is that it works with closed-cycle, where working medium is regularly cooled and heated, which acts on the working piston. This engine can be made in three modifications - alpha, beta, gamma. This paper discusses the design of the gamma Stirling engine with free pistons.

  16. Annealing Temperature and Initial Iron Valence Ratio Effects on the Structural Characteristics of Nanoscale Nickel Zinc Ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, S.; Shultz, M; Glowzenski, L; Carpenter, E

    2010-01-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite (NZFO) nanoparticles were synthesized via a reverse micelle method with a nonionic surfactant. Three different initial Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratios were employed along with three different firing temperatures (200, 500, 1000 C) to investigate the effects on the NZFO system. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results reveal zinc loss at high annealing temperatures; at 1000 C, the loss is nearly total for Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratios other than 10:90. Annealing at 500 C, however, appears necessary for fully incorporating the zinc and nickel into the spinel phase. The best nanoferrite was thus obtained using an initial Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratio of 10:90 and a moderate firing temperature of 500 C. This sample exhibits a room temperature saturation magnetization of 58 emu/g as measured via vibrating sample magnetometry, comparable with bulk values and greater than that of confirmed nano-NZFOs found in the literature. EXAFS also indicates that in all cases in which the elements adopted a spinel structure, the nickel occupies only octahedral sites and the zinc primarily tetrahedral sites.

  17. Development and fabrication of structural components for a scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1990-01-01

    A program broadly directed toward design and development of long-life (100 hours and 1,000 cycles with a goal of 1,000 hours and 10,000 cycles) hydrogen-cooled structures for application to scramjets is presented. Previous phases of the program resulted in an overall engine design and analytical and experimental characterization of selected candidate materials and concepts. The latter efforts indicated that the basic life goals for the program can be reached with available means. The main objective of this effort was an integrated, experimental evaluation of the results of the previous program phases. The fuel injection strut was selected for this purpose, including fabrication development and fabrication of a full-scale strut. Testing of the completed strut was to be performed in a NASA-Langley wind tunnel. In addition, conceptual designs were formulated for a heat transfer test unit and a flat panel structural test unit. Tooling and fabrication procedures required to fabricate the strut were developed, and fabrication and delivery to NASA of all strut components, including major subassemblies, were completed.

  18. Nanoscale integration is the next frontier for nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel T

    2009-01-01

    ways, from exploiting field-effect transistor devices and low power complementary logic to enable the electronic watch and hand calculator in the 1970's, to today's microprocessors and memories with billions of devices and a computational power not imagined a few decades ago. The manipulation of charges on a chip, the new concepts in combining devices for logic functions, and the new approaches to computation, information processing, and imaging have all emerged from Kilby and Noyce's simple concept of integrating devices on a single chip. Moving from hard to soft materials, a second more recent example of integration is the DNA microarray. These microarrays, with up to millions of elements in a planar array that can be optically read out, can simultaneously measure the expression of 10's of thousands of genes to study the effects of disease and treatment, or screen for single nucleotide polymorphisms for uses ranging from forensics to predisposition to disease. While still at an early stage, microarrays have revolutionized biosciences by providing the means to interrogate the complex genetic control of biological functions. Just as integrated circuits and microarrays have led to completely new functionalities and performance, the integration of nanoscale materials and structures is anticipated to lead to new performance and enable the design of new functionalities not previously envisioned. The fundamental questions underlying integration go beyond just complex fabrication or the engineering of known solutions; they lead to new discoveries and new science. The scientific challenges around nanoscale integration necessitate the development of new knowledge that is central to the advance of nanotechnology. To move forward one must address key science questions that arise in nanoscience integration and go beyond a single system or materials area. New science and discoveries especially await around three questions. How does one: (1) Control energy transfer and other

  19. Controlled fabrication of advanced functional structures on the nanoscale by means of electron beam-induced processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Foucher, Johann; Penzkofer, Christian; Irmer, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    The controlled deposition of materials by means of electron beam induced processing (EBIP) is a well-established patterning method, which allows for the fabrication of nanostructures with high spatial resolution in a highly precise and flexible manner. Applications range from the production of ultrathin coatings and nanoscaled conductivity probes to super sharp atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips, to name but a few. The latter are typically deposited at the very end of silicon or silicon-nitride tips, which are fabricated with MEMS technologies. EBIP therefore provides the unique ability to converge MEMS to NEMS in a highly controllable way, and thus represents an encouraging opportunity to refine or even develop further MEMS-based features with advanced functionality and applicability. In this paper, we will present and discuss exemplary application solutions, where we successfully applied EBIP to overcome dimensional and/or functional limitations. We therefore show the fabrication stability and accuracy of "T-like-shaped" AFM tips made from high density, diamond-like carbon (HDC/DLC) for the investigation of undercut structures on the base of CDR30-EBD tips. Such aggressive CD-AFM tip dimensions are mandatory to fulfill ITRS requirements for the inspection of sub-28nm nodes, but are unattainable with state-of-art Si-based MEMS technologies today. In addition to that, we demonstrate the ability of EBIP to realize field enhancement in sensor applications and the fabrication of cold field emitters (CFE). For example: applying the EBIP approach allows for the production of CFEs, which are characterized by considerably enhanced imaging resolution compared to standard thermal field emitters and stable operation properties at room temperature without the need for periodic cathode flashing - unlike typical CFEs. Based on these examples, we outline the strong capabilities of the EBIP approach to further downscale functional structures in order to meet future demands in the

  20. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  1. Nanoscale Silicon as a Catalyst for Graphene Growth: Mechanistic Insight from in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Share, Keith; Carter, Rachel E.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hooper, Daylong; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Rao, Rahul; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Maruyama, Benji; et al

    2016-06-08

    Nanoscale carbons are typically synthesized by thermal decomposition of a hydrocarbon at the surface of a metal catalyst. Whereas the use of silicon as an alternative to metal catalysts could unlock new techniques to seamlessly couple carbon nanostructures and semiconductor materials, stable carbide formation renders bulk silicon incapable of the precipitation and growth of graphitic structures. In this article, we provide evidence supported by comprehensive in situ Raman experiments that indicates nanoscale grains of silicon in porous silicon (PSi) scaffolds act as catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition and growth of few-layered graphene at temperatures as low as 700 K. Self-limiting growthmore » kinetics of graphene with activation energies measured between 0.32–0.37 eV elucidates the formation of highly reactive surface-bound Si radicals that aid in the decomposition of hydrocarbons. Nucleation and growth of graphitic layers on PSi exhibits striking similarity to catalytic growth on nickel surfaces, involving temperature dependent surface and subsurface diffusion of carbon. Lastly, this work elucidates how the nanoscale properties of silicon can be exploited to yield catalytic properties distinguished from bulk silicon, opening an important avenue to engineer catalytic interfaces combining the two most technologically important materials for modern applications—silicon and nanoscale carbons.« less

  2. Structural and nanoindentation studies of stem cell-based tissue-engineered bone.

    PubMed

    Pelled, Gadi; Tai, Kuangshin; Sheyn, Dima; Zilberman, Yoram; Kumbar, Sangamesh; Nair, Lakshmi S; Laurencin, Cato T; Gazit, Dan; Ortiz, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapy and tissue engineering have been shown to be an efficient method for the regeneration of critical-sized bone defects. Despite being an area of active research over the last decade, no knowledge of the intrinsic ultrastructural and nanomechanical properties of such bone tissue exists. In this study, we report the nanomechanical properties of engineered bone tissue derived from genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) overexpressing the rhBMP2 gene, grown in vivo in the thigh muscle of immunocompetent mice for 4 weeks, compared to femoral bone adjacent to the transplantation site. The two types of bone had similar mineral contents (61 and 65 wt% for engineered and femoral bone, respectively), overall microstructures showing lacunae and canaliculi (both measured by back-scattered electron microscopy), chemical compositions (measured by energy dispersive X-ray analysis), and nanoscale topographical morphologies (measured by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy imaging or TMAFM). Nanoindentation experiments revealed that the small length scale mechanical properties were statistically different with the femoral bone (indented parallel to the bone long axis) being stiffer and harder (apparent elastic modulus, E approximately 27.3+/-10.5 GPa and hardness, H approximately 1.0+/-0.7G Pa) than the genetically engineered bone (E approximately 19.8+/-5.6 GPa, H approximately 0.9+/-0.4G Pa). TMAFM imaging showed clear residual indents characteristic of viscoelastic plastic deformation for both types of bone. However, fine differences in the residual indent area (smaller for the engineered bone), pile up (smaller for the engineered bone), and fracture mechanisms (microcracks for the engineered bone) were observed with the genetically engineered bone behaving more brittle than the femoral control.

  3. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: A novel analytical thermal model for multilevel nano-scale interconnects considering the via effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhang-Ming; Li, Ru; Hao, Bao-Tian; Yang, Yin-Tang

    2009-11-01

    Based on the heat diffusion equation of multilevel interconnects, a novel analytical thermal model for multilevel nano-scale interconnects considering the via effect is presented, which can compute quickly the temperature of multilevel interconnects, with substrate temperature given. Based on the proposed model and the 65 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process parameter, the temperature of nano-scale interconnects is computed. The computed results show that the via effect has a great effect on local interconnects, but the reduction of thermal conductivity has little effect on local interconnects. With the reduction of thermal conductivity or the increase of current density, however, the temperature of global interconnects rises greatly, which can result in a great deterioration in their performance. The proposed model can be applied to computer aided design (CAD) of very large-scale integrated circuits (VLSIs) in nano-scale technologies.

  4. Engine-induced structural-borne noise in a general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, J. F.; Scheidt, D. C.; Pomerening, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Structural borne interior noise in a single engine general aviation aircraft was studied to determine the importance of engine induced structural borne noise and to determine the necessary modeling requirements for the prediction of structural borne interior noise. Engine attached/detached ground test data show that engine induced structural borne noise is a primary interior noise source for the single engine test aircraft, cabin noise is highly influenced by responses at the propeller tone, and cabin acoustic resonances can influence overall noise levels. Results from structural and acoustic finite element coupled models of the test aircraft show that wall flexibility has a strong influence on fundamental cabin acoustic resonances, the lightweight fuselage structure has a high modal density, and finite element analysis procedures are appropriate for the prediction of structural borne noise.

  5. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  6. Influence of the chemical surface structure on the nanoscale friction in plasma nitrided and post-oxidized ferrous alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Freislebem, Márcia; Menezes, Caren M.; Cemin, Felipe; Costi, Fernanda B.; Ferreira, Patrícia A.; Aguzzoli, César; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Alvarez, Fernando; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2014-09-15

    Friction is a ubiquitous phenomenon in everyday activities spanning from vehicles where efficient brakes are mandatory up to mechanical devices where its minimum effects are pursued for energy efficiency issues. Recently, theoretical models succeed correlating the friction behavior with energy transference via phonons between sliding surfaces. Therefore, considering that the energy losses by friction are prompted through phonons, the chemical surface structure between sliding surfaces is very important to determine the friction phenomenon. In this work, we address the issue of friction between a conical diamond tip sliding on different functionalized flat steel surfaces by focusing the influence of the chemical bonds in the outermost layers on the sliding resistance. This geometry allows probing the coupling of the sharp tip with terminator species on the top and underneath material surface at in-depth friction measurements from 20 to 200 nm. Experimentally, the friction coefficient decreases when nitrogen atoms are substituted for oxygen in the iron network. This effect is interpreted as due to energy losses through phonons whilst lower vibrational frequency excitation modes imply lower friction coefficients and a more accurate adjustment is obtained when a theoretical model with longitudinal adsorbate vibration is used.

  7. Multi-functional antireflective surface-relief structures based on nanoscale porous germanium with graded refractive index profiles.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jung Woo; Yu, Jae Su

    2013-03-21

    We fabricated the multi-stacked graded refractive index (GRIN) porous amorphous germanium (a-Ge) films with linear, quintic, and Gaussian index profiles for their refractive indices at a wavelength of 1.33 μm by e-beam evaporation with a glancing angle deposition technique. The porous a-Ge films with inclined nanocolumnar structures were deposited on Ge substrates at incident vapor flux angles of 40, 55, and 75°. The surface wetting behaviour of the porous a-Ge films was explored, exhibiting the hydrophilic surfaces with water contact angles below 78°. Their optical reflectance properties were investigated, together with the theoretical analysis using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis simulation. For the GRIN a-Ge films with a quintic index profile, a low reflectance band of <2% was shifted towards the longer wavelength with increasing the total thickness (ttotal) of GRIN a-Ge layers. For the GRIN a-Ge films with optimized ttotal values of 350, 333, and 225 nm for linear, quintic, and Gaussian index profiles, respectively, the low reflectance spectra of <10% were obtained at wavelengths of 1.1-1.7 μm, which yielded the lowest average reflectance value (Ravg) of ∼2.2% for Gaussian index profile (compared to the Ravg ∼ 3.7 and 4% for linear and quintic ones, respectively). The angle-dependent reflectance characteristics were also studied at incident angles of 15-85° for s- and p-polarized lights at a wavelength of 1.33 μm. The calculated results showed similar trends to the experimental data.

  8. Combination of metamorphism and deformation affect the nano-scale pore structures and macromolecule characteristics of high-rank deformed coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Li, H.; Ju, Y.

    2013-12-01

    experiments indicates that adsorption/desorption capacity shows a 'U' type with nano-pores volume and specific surface area, coals with best adsorption capacity contained both vitrinite and inertinite with an approximate ratio of 4:1 or 1:4, the increase of aromatic and aliphatic content individually facilitated the adsorption of CBM. Generally speaking, the adsorption/desorption capacity of ductile deformed coals is higher than that of brittle ones, but metamorphism could dramatically affects the final results. To enhance CBM production and reduce carbon emission, the appropriate coal-bearing strata need to be chosen. Our research shows that metamorphism and deformation affect the nano-scale pore structures and macromolecule characteristics of different coals. Therefore brittle-ductile superposed zone with medium-high rank coals has high gas content and permeability which is promising to exploit and helpful to environmental protection.

  9. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-11-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  10. Innovative tissue engineering structures through advanced manufacturing technologies.

    PubMed

    Ciardelli, Gianluca; Chiono, Valeria; Cristallini, Caterina; Barbani, Niccoletta; Ahluwalia, Arti; Vozzi, Giovanni; Previti, Antonino; Tantussi, Giovanni; Giusti, Paolo

    2004-04-01

    Awide range of rapid prototyping (RP) techniques for the construction of three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds for tissue engineering has been recently developed. In this study, we report and compare two methods for the fabrication of poly-(epsilon-caprolactone) and poly-(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly-(oxyethylene)-poly-(epsilon-caprolactone) copolymer scaffolds. The first technique is based on the use of a microsyringe and a computer-controlled three-axis micropositioner, which regulates motor speed and position. Polymer solutions are extruded through the needle of the microsyringe by the application of a constant pressure of 10-300 mm Hg, resulting in controlled polymer deposition of 5-600 microm lateral dimensions. The second method utilises the heating energy of a laser beam to sinter polymer microparticles according to computer-guided geometries. Materials may be fed either as dry powder or slurry of microparticles. Both powder granulometry and laser working parameters influence resolution (generally 300 microm x 700 microm), accuracy of sintering and surface and bulk properties of the final structures. The two RP methods allow the fabrication of 3-D scaffolds with a controlled architecture, providing a powerful means to study cell response to an environment similar to that found

  11. Crankshaft supporting structure for multicylinder internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuo, K.; Chosa, M.

    1988-01-26

    A crankshaft supporting structure for a cylinder block of an internal combustion engine is described, comprising, journal walls extending laterally across the cylinder block and being longitudinally spaced along the crankshaft, a recess formed in each journal wall with inwardly and downwardly facing first mating surfaces at an upper extremity of the recess. The cylinder block has skirt portions extending downwardly from the recesses on each lateral end of the journal walls, a bearing cap mounted in the recess in each journal wall and having means cooperating with the journal wall for rotatably supporting the crankshaft, each bearing cap having outwardly and upwardly facing first mating surfaces for engaging the journal wall first mating surfaces, mating inwardly facing vertical surfaces on each skirt portion and outwardly facing vertical surfaces on each bearing cap, a longitudinally extending bridge, a pair of vertical bolts extending through the bridge and each bearing cap and threadedly engaging the journal wall, horizontal bolts extending through the skirt portions and threadedly engaging each lateral side of each bearing cap, and the bridge having a main oil gallery defined therein for passage of lubricating oil therethrough and communicating with lubricating oil passages formed through the bridge and the bearing caps for communicating oil to the crankshaft.

  12. Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Foss, Peter; Wyzgoski, Michael; Trantina, Gerry; Kunc, Vlastimil; Schutte, Carol; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-23

    This report summarizes our FY 2009 research activities for the project titled:"Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures." These activities include (i) the completion of the development of a fiber length attrition model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs), (ii) development of the a fatigue damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iii) development of an impact damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iv) development of characterization methods for fatigue testing, (v) characterization of creep and fatigue responses of glass-fiber/polyamide (PA6,6) and glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP), (vi) characterization of fiber length distribution along the flow length of glass/PA6,6 and glass-fiber/PP, and (vii) characterization of impact responses of glass-fiber/PA6,6. The fiber length attrition model accurately captures the fiber length distribution along the flow length of the studied glass-fiber/PP material. The fatigue damage model is able to predict the S-N and stiffness reduction data which are valuable to the fatigue design of LFTs. The impact damage model correctly captures damage accumulation observed in experiments of glass-fiber/PA6,6 plaques.Further work includes validations of these models for representative LFT materials and a complex LFT part.

  13. Optical coherent sensor for monitoring and measurement of engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukaszewski, Dariusz; Sałbut, Leszek; Dziuban, Jan A.

    2010-05-01

    Among many coherent optical methods one should distinguished Grating Interferometry (GI) which allows accurate in-plane displacement measurements and Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) used for in-plane and out-of-plane measurements. Development of sensors based on both methods mentioned above as complementary ones will provide user universal group of sensors from which depending on measurement requirements such as measuring range, object surface profile and measurement conditions the most appropriate can be chosen. In-plane displacement measurements are of interested of different branches of industry - from micro (i.e.: characterization of MEMS or MOEMS) to civil engineering (i.e.: Structural Health Monitoring systems). In the paper the new optical coherent sensor for in-plane displacement and strain measurements is presented. The sensor combines GI and DSPI methods in one device which can be used for testing of objects with different types of surfaces. GI requires the specimen grating attached at the surface but provides very good measurement accuracy however DSPI can be applied for testing of objects with rough surfaces but due to higher noise gives lower accuracy. The sensor can work in three modes: as GI only, DSPI only and both GI and DSPI simultaneously. The third mode can by useful when the specimen grating is attached on the part of object under test only. In the paper the theoretical background of the sensor is presented. For confirmation of GI/DSPI sensor possibilities the specially designed demonstrator is described and the exemplary results obtained during its laboratory tests are shown. Successful application of proposed sensor is possible due to its miniaturization, simplicity of operation by user (compact structure and automation of measurement procedure) and low cost. The last mentioned condition will be possible due to low cost replication techniques with usage of silicon technology.

  14. Nanoscale control designs for systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yue

    2014-02-01

    Nanoscale control is the science of the control of objects at dimensions with 100 nm or less and the manipulation of them at this level of precision. The desired attributes of systems under nanoscale control design are extreme high resolution, accuracy, stability, and fast response. An important perspective of investigation in nanoscale control design includes system modeling and precision control devices and materials at a nanoscale dimension, i.e., design of nanopositioners. Nanopositioners are mechatronic systems with an ultraprecise resolution down to a fraction of an atomic diameter and developed to move objects over a small range in nanoscale dimension. After reviewing a lot of existing literatures for nanoscale control designs, the way to successful nanoscale control is accurate position sensing and feedback control of the motion. An overview of nanoscale identification, linear, and nonlinear control technologies, and devices that are playing a key role in improving precision, accuracy, and response of operation of these systems are introduced in this research.

  15. High electron mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN HEMT structure with a nano-scale AlN interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Chun; Chen, Wen-Ray; Hsu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Jia-Ching; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Lin, Wen-Jen

    2012-10-01

    Epitaxies of AlGaN/AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with different thickness of nano-scale AlN interlayers have been realized by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology. After epitaxy, high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), temperature-dependent Hall Effect and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were used to characterize the properties of these samples. First, it was found that the Al composition of AlGaN layer increases from 21.6 to 34.2% with increasing the thickness of AlN interlayer from 0 to 5 nm under the same AlGaN growth conditions. This result may due to the influences of compressive stress and Al incorporation induced by the AlN interlayer. Then, we also found that the room-temperature (RT) electron mobility stays higher than 1500 cm2/Vs in the samples within AlN interlayer thickness range of 1.5 nm, on the other hand, the low-temperature (80K) electron mobility drops dramatically from 8180 to 5720 cm2/Vs in the samples with AlN interlayer thickness increasing from 1 to 1.5 nm. Furthermore, it was found that the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density increases from 1.15×1013 to 1.58×1013 cm-2 beyond the AlN interlayer thickness of 1 nm. It was also found that the temperature independent 2DEG densities are observed in the samples with AlN interlayer thickness of 0.5 and 1 nm. The degenerated characteristics of the samples with AlN thickness thicker than 1.5 nm show the degraded crystalline quality which matched the observation of surface defects and small cracks formations from their AFM images. Finally, the 2DEG mobilities of the proposed structures can be achieved as high as 1705 and 8180 cm2/Vs at RT and 80K, respectively.

  16. 14 CFR 25.865 - Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25.865 Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure. Essential flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structures located in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire protection of flight controls,...

  17. 14 CFR 25.865 - Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25.865 Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure. Essential flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structures located in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire protection of flight controls,...

  18. 14 CFR 25.865 - Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25.865 Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure. Essential flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structures located in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire protection of flight controls,...

  19. 14 CFR 25.865 - Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25.865 Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure. Essential flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structures located in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire protection of flight controls,...

  20. 14 CFR 25.865 - Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25.865 Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure. Essential flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structures located in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire protection of flight controls,...

  1. Weibull-Based Design Methodology for Rotating Aircraft Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)-Engine) is used as the basis of a Weibull-based life and reliability analysis. Each component's life and thus the engine's life is defined by high-cycle fatigue (HCF) or low-cycle fatigue (LCF). Knowing the cumulative life distribution of each of the components making up the engine as represented by a Weibull slope is a prerequisite to predicting the life and reliability of the entire engine. As the engine Weibull slope increases, the predicted lives decrease. The predicted engine lives L(sub 5) (95 % probability of survival) of approximately 17,000 and 32,000 hr do correlate with current engine maintenance practices without and with refurbishment. respectively. The individual high pressure turbine (HPT) blade lives necessary to obtain a blade system life L(sub 0.1) (99.9 % probability of survival) of 9000 hr for Weibull slopes of 3, 6 and 9, are 47,391 and 20,652 and 15,658 hr, respectively. For a design life of the HPT disks having probable points of failure equal to or greater than 36,000 hr at a probability of survival of 99.9 %, the predicted disk system life L(sub 0.1) can vary from 9,408 to 24,911 hr.

  2. Collagen Fibrils: Nanoscale Ropes

    PubMed Central

    Bozec, Laurent; van der Heijden, Gert; Horton, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibrils from staggered repeats of individual molecules has become “accepted” wisdom. However, for over thirty years now, such a model has failed to resolve several structural and functional questions. In a novel approach, it was found, using atomic force microscopy, that tendon collagen fibrils are composed of subcomponents in a spiral disposition—that is, their structure is similar to that of macroscale ropes. Consequently, this arrangement was modeled and confirmed using elastic rod theory. This work provides new insight into collagen fibril structure and will have wide application—from the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering and a better understanding of pathogenesis of diseases of bone and tendon, to the conservation of irreplaceable parchment-based museum exhibits. PMID:17028135

  3. Partitioning the effects of an ecosystem engineer: kangaroo rats control community structure via multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Prugh, Laura R; Brashares, Justin S

    2012-05-01

    1. Ecosystem engineers impact communities by altering habitat conditions, but they can also have strong effects through consumptive, competitive and other non-engineering pathways. 2. Engineering effects can lead to fundamentally different community dynamics than non-engineering effects, but the relative strengths of these interactions are seldom quantified. 3. We combined structural equation modelling and exclosure experiments to partition the effects of a keystone engineer, the giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), on plants, invertebrates and vertebrates in a semi-arid California grassland. 4. We separated the effects of burrow creation from kangaroo rat density and found that kangaroo rats increased the diversity and abundance of other species via both engineering and non-engineering pathways. 5. Engineering was the primary factor structuring plant and small mammal communities, whereas non-engineering effects structured invertebrate communities and increased lizard abundance. 6. These results highlight the importance of the non-engineering effects of ecosystem engineers and shed new light on the multiple pathways by which strong-interactors shape communities.

  4. River valley construction as hazard for engineering structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postolenko, Galina

    2010-05-01

    It is common knowledge that for designing of engineering structure at river valleys it is necessary to investigate base of dam rock with a view to find out the structure disposition and nature of bottom rocks. It is important with relation to structural and economic calculation. One object of that investigation is alluvium. At present due to achievement of large success in geomorphology it is known that river valleys are constructed very complex. They have buried alluvium. Buried alluvium one can find both in plain and mountain valleys. It differs by thickness, composition and age. Since the Quaternary geological body is local, it is very important to know its chronological successive rise and the regularity of its spatial disposal. The investigative base consists in the stratigraphic and genetic research of the mellow deposit. Earlier the chronological determination depended on the hypsometric criteria . Complex of geomorphologic, biostratigraphic, lithologic, and physical data established the history of relief development and the spatial distribution of different age and genetic homogeneous relief fragments and sediment. These data show that relief and correlative sediment are formed as a result of the complex cyclical, non-one-trend geomorphologic processes at the Quaternary period. The several stages of relief and sediment development are established at the Quaternary period. They differed in process intensity, character and duration. This is the cause that the morpholithogenetic results of these stages are different. These are different sizes of valleys deepening and increasing of the relief height amplitude at the instructive stage, the different correlative sediment capacity at the constructive stage of relief development. These indexes are so significant, that river terraces of something stages turned out buried by the alluvium those stages that have the smaller alluvium capacity. Consequences of such valleys development lie in

  5. 6-T SRAM cell design with nanoscale double-gate SOI MOSFETs: impact of source/drain engineering and circuit topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashmi; Kranti, Abhinav; Armstrong, G. Alastair

    2008-07-01

    The impact of source/drain engineering on the performance of a six-transistor (6-T) static random access memory (SRAM) cell, based on 22 nm double-gate (DG) SOI MOSFETs, has been analyzed using mixed-mode simulation, for three different circuit topologies for low voltage operation. The trade-offs associated with the various conflicting requirements relating to read/write/standby operations have been evaluated comprehensively in terms of eight performance metrics, namely retention noise margin, static noise margin, static voltage/current noise margin, write-ability current, write trip voltage/current and leakage current. Optimal design parameters with gate-underlap architecture have been identified to enhance the overall SRAM performance, and the influence of parasitic source/drain resistance and supply voltage scaling has been investigated. A gate-underlap device designed with a spacer-to-straggle (s/σ) ratio in the range 2 3 yields improved SRAM performance metrics, regardless of circuit topology. An optimal two word-line double-gate SOI 6-T SRAM cell design exhibits a high SNM ~ 162 mV, Iwr ~ 35 µA and low Ileak ~ 70 pA at VDD = 0.6 V, while maintaining SNM ~ 30%VDD over the supply voltage (VDD) range of 0.4 0.9 V.

  6. Interfacial band alignment and structural properties of nanoscale TiO{sub 2} thin films for integration with epitaxial crystallographic oriented germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, N.; Zhu, Y.; Hudait, M. K.; Maurya, D.; Varghese, R.; Priya, S.

    2014-01-14

    We have investigated the structural and band alignment properties of nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films deposited on epitaxial crystallographic oriented Ge layers grown on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited at low temperature by physical vapor deposition were found to be amorphous in nature, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed a sharp heterointerface between the TiO{sub 2} thin film and the epitaxially grown Ge with no traceable interfacial layer. A comprehensive assessment on the effect of substrate orientation on the band alignment at the TiO{sub 2}/Ge heterointerface is presented by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. A band-gap of 3.33 ± 0.02 eV was determined for the amorphous TiO{sub 2} thin film from the Tauc plot. Irrespective of the crystallographic orientation of the epitaxial Ge layer, a sufficient valence band-offset of greater than 2 eV was obtained at the TiO{sub 2}/Ge heterointerface while the corresponding conduction band-offsets for the aforementioned TiO{sub 2}/Ge system were found to be smaller than 1 eV. A comparative assessment on the effect of Ge substrate orientation revealed a valence band-offset relation of ΔE{sub V}(100) > ΔE{sub V}(111) > ΔE{sub V}(110) and a conduction band-offset relation of ΔE{sub C}(110) > ΔE{sub C}(111) > ΔE{sub C}(100). These band-offset parameters are of critical importance and will provide key insight for the design and performance analysis of TiO{sub 2} for potential high-κ dielectric integration and for future metal-insulator-semiconductor contact applications with next generation of Ge based metal-oxide field-effect transistors.

  7. Trends in electrocatalysis: from extended to nanoscale surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Stamenkovic, V. R.; Mun, B. S.; Arenz, M.; Lucas, C. A.; Wang, G.; Ross, P. N.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California at Berkeley; Technical Univ.; Univ. of Liverpool; Univ. of South Carolina

    2007-01-01

    One of the key objectives in fuel-cell technology is to improve and reduce Pt loading as the oxygen-reduction catalyst. Here, we show a fundamental relationship in electrocatalytic trends on Pt{sub 3}M (M=Ni, Co, Fe, Ti, V) surfaces between the experimentally determined surface electronic structure (the d-band centre) and activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction. This relationship exhibits 'volcano-type' behavior, where the maximum catalytic activity is governed by a balance between adsorption energies of reactive intermediates and surface coverage by spectator (blocking) species. The electrocatalytic trends established for extended surfaces are used to explain the activity pattern of Pt{sub 3}M nanocatalysts as well as to provide a fundamental basis for the catalytic enhancement of cathode catalysts. By combining simulations with experiments in the quest for surfaces with desired activity, an advanced concept in nanoscale catalyst engineering has been developed.

  8. Trends in electrocatalysis : from extended to nanoscale surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Stamenkovic, V. R.; Mun, B. S.; Arenz, M.; Mayrhofer, K. J. J.; Lucas, C. A.; Wang, G.; Ross, P. N.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab.; Technical Univ. Munich; Univ. of Liverpool; Univ. of South Carolina

    2007-01-01

    One of the key objectives in fuel-cell technology is to improve and reduce Pt loading as the oxygen-reduction catalyst. Here, we show a fundamental relationship in electrocatalytic trends on Pt{sub 3}M (M=Ni, Co, Fe, Ti, V) surfaces between the experimentally determined surface electronic structure (the d-band centre) and activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction. This relationship exhibits 'volcano-type' behavior, where the maximum catalytic activity is governed by a balance between adsorption energies of reactive intermediates and surface coverage by spectator (blocking) species. The electrocatalytic trends established for extended surfaces are used to explain the activity pattern of Pt{sub 3}M nanocatalysts as well as to provide a fundamental basis for the catalytic enhancement of cathode catalysts. By combining simulations with experiments in the quest for surfaces with desired activity, an advanced concept in nanoscale catalyst engineering has been developed.

  9. The mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multilayers: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.; Xie, J. Y.; Wang, F.; Huang, P.; Xu, K. W.; Lu, T. J.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multilayers (NMMs) has attracted much attention from both scientific and practical views. Compared with their monolithic counterparts, the large number of interfaces existing in the NMMs dictates the unique behavior of this special class of structural composite materials. While there have been a number of reviews on the mechanical mechanism of microlaminates, the rapid development of nanotechnology brought a pressing need for an overview focusing exclusively on a property-based definition of the NMMs, especially their size-dependent microstructure and mechanical performance. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date review on the microstructure, mechanical property and plastic deformation physics of NMMs. We hope this review could accomplish two purposes: (1) introducing the basic concepts of scaling and dimensional analysis to scientists and engineers working on NMM systems, and (2) providing a better understanding of interface behavior and the exceptional qualities the interfaces in NMMs display at atomic scale.

  10. Structured system engineering methodologies used to develop a nuclear thermal propulsion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corban, R.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    To facilitate the development of a space nuclear thermal propulsion engine for manned flights to Mars, requirements must be established early in the technology development cycle. The long lead times for the acquisition of the engine system and nuclear test facilities demands that the engine system size, performance and safety goals be defined at the earliest possible time. These systems are highly complex and require a large multidisciplinary systems engineering team to develop and track requirements, and to ensure that the as-built system reflects the intent of the mission. A methodology has been devised which uses sophisticated computer tools to effectively develop and interpret functional requirements, and furnish these to the specification level for implementation.

  11. Advanced methods for 3-D inelastic structural analysis for hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional Inelastic Analysis Methods are described. These methods were incorporated into a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, specialty finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of hot engine structures such as: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain) and global (displacements, frequencies, amplitudes, buckling) structural behavior of the three respective components. The methods and the three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics Of Materials Model), MHOST (MARC-Hot Section Technology), and BEST3D (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described.

  12. Oxides on Nanoscale Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Daniel; Komanicky, Vladimir; Pierce, Michael S.; Chang, Kee-Chul; You, Hoydoo

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate the existence of oxide layers on nanoscale Pt interfaces annealed in an oxygen environment. The sample is a Pt single crystal cut at the midpoint between the 100 and 111 crystal directions; annealing in Ar produces a smooth surface, while annealing in air produces ~ 10 nm-sized 100 and 111 facets. Synchrotron x-ray crystal truncation rod (CTR) measurements indicate a bilayer Pt oxide structure on the nanofacets. Fitted Pt occupancies are consistent with a nearest-neighbor avoidance structure of the surface oxygen atoms. Electrochemical cycling of the faceted surface in CO-saturated solution removes the oxide and leaves clean, ordered facets. Pt single crystals of 100 and 111 surface orientations prepared the same way did not support an oxide layer. Work at ANL is supported by DOE-BES and work at SU by VEGA.

  13. Democratization of Nanoscale Imaging and Sensing Tools Using Photonics.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Euan; Wei, Qingshan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-07-01

    Providing means for researchers and citizen scientists in the developing world to perform advanced measurements with nanoscale precision can help to accelerate the rate of discovery and invention as well as improve higher education and the training of the next generation of scientists and engineers worldwide. Here, we review some of the recent progress toward making optical nanoscale measurement tools more cost-effective, field-portable, and accessible to a significantly larger group of researchers and educators. We divide our review into two main sections: label-based nanoscale imaging and sensing tools, which primarily involve fluorescent approaches, and label-free nanoscale measurement tools, which include light scattering sensors, interferometric methods, photonic crystal sensors, and plasmonic sensors. For each of these areas, we have primarily focused on approaches that have either demonstrated operation outside of a traditional laboratory setting, including for example integration with mobile phones, or exhibited the potential for such operation in the near future.

  14. Democratization of Nanoscale Imaging and Sensing Tools Using Photonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Providing means for researchers and citizen scientists in the developing world to perform advanced measurements with nanoscale precision can help to accelerate the rate of discovery and invention as well as improve higher education and the training of the next generation of scientists and engineers worldwide. Here, we review some of the recent progress toward making optical nanoscale measurement tools more cost-effective, field-portable, and accessible to a significantly larger group of researchers and educators. We divide our review into two main sections: label-based nanoscale imaging and sensing tools, which primarily involve fluorescent approaches, and label-free nanoscale measurement tools, which include light scattering sensors, interferometric methods, photonic crystal sensors, and plasmonic sensors. For each of these areas, we have primarily focused on approaches that have either demonstrated operation outside of a traditional laboratory setting, including for example integration with mobile phones, or exhibited the potential for such operation in the near future. PMID:26068279

  15. Sensing at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    label-free detection of DNA at concentrations as low as 1-10 fM, a sensitivity comparable to the best signal amplification-assisted electrochemical sensors reported [12]. In another study actin-conjugated gold and silver nanorods are used to detect ATP, a common indicator of cell viability [13]. They show how aggregation induced by ATP-induced polymerization of the G-actin gives rise to a measurable change in the plasmon resonance absorbance of the nanorods. A review of the use of fluorescent silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications is provided by researchers at Dublin City University in Ireland [14]. The first scanning tunnelling microscope in the early 1980s and subsequent scanning probe developments brought the world of nanoscale structures into view in a manner that gorged the imaginations of scientists and the public. New ways of probing structures at this scale revealed a wealth of curious properties that triggered a surge of research activity in nanotechnology, now a multibillion dollar industry. One good turn deserves another and in fact nanostructures provide the perfect tools for the type of sensing and imaging applications that brought such widespread research interest to nanotechnology. This special issue highlights just how broad and innovative the range of sensing nanotechnologies has grown. References [1] Zappa D, Comini E and Sberveglieri G 2013 Thermally-oxidized zinc oxide nanowires chemical sensors Nanotechnology 24 444008 [2] Kemmler J A, Pokhrel S, Mädler L, Weimar U and Barsan N 2013 Flame spray pyrolysis for sensing at the nanoscale Nanotechnology 24 442001 [3] Bache M et al 2013 Nanomechanical recognition of prognostic biomarker suPAR with DVD-ROM optical technology Nanotechnology 24 444011 [4] Hu C-F, Wang J-Y, Liu Y-C, Tsai M-H and Fang W 2013 Development of 3D carbon nanotubes interdigitated finger electrodes on polymer substrate for flexible capacitive sensor application Nanotechnology 24 444006 [5] Neumann C, Volk C, Engels S and

  16. Direct temperature mapping of nanoscale plasmonic devices.

    PubMed

    Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2014-02-12

    Side by side with the great advantages of plasmonics in nanoscale light confinement, the inevitable ohmic loss results in significant joule heating in plasmonic devices. Therefore, understanding optical-induced heat generation and heat transport in integrated on-chip plasmonic devices is of major importance. Specifically, there is a need for in situ visualization of electromagnetic induced thermal energy distribution with high spatial resolution. This paper studies the heat distribution in silicon plasmonic nanotips. Light is coupled to the plasmonic nanotips from a silicon nanowaveguide that is integrated with the tip on chip. Heat is generated by light absorption in the metal surrounding the silicon nanotip. The steady-state thermal distribution is studied numerically and measured experimentally using the approach of scanning thermal microscopy. It is shown that following the nanoscale heat generation by a 10 mW light source within a silicon photonic waveguide the temperature in the region of the nanotip is increased by ∼ 15 °C compared with the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we also perform a numerical study of the dynamics of the heat transport. Given the nanoscale dimensions of the structure, significant heating is expected to occur within the time frame of picoseconds. The capability of measuring temperature distribution of plasmonic structures at the nanoscale is shown to be a powerful tool and may be used in future applications related to thermal plasmonic applications such as control heating of liquids, thermal photovoltaic, nanochemistry, medicine, heat-assisted magnetic memories, and nanolithography.

  17. Materials and structural aspects of advanced gas-turbine helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Acurio, J.

    1979-01-01

    The key to improved helicopter gas turbine engine performance lies in the development of advanced materials and advanced structural and design concepts. The modification of the low temperature components of helicopter engines (such as the inlet particle separator), the introduction of composites for use in the engine front frame, the development of advanced materials with increased use-temperature capability for the engine hot section, can result in improved performance and/or decreased engine maintenance cost. A major emphasis in helicopter engine design is the ability to design to meet a required lifetime. This, in turn, requires that the interrelated aspects of higher operating temperatures and pressures, cooling concepts, and environmental protection schemes be integrated into component design. The major material advances, coatings, and design life-prediction techniques pertinent to helicopter engines are reviewed; the current state-of-the-art is identified; and when appropriate, progress, problems, and future directions are assessed.

  18. Surface nanoscale axial photonics.

    PubMed

    Sumetsky, M; Fini, J M

    2011-12-19

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. Extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration has intriguing potential applications in filtering, switching, slowing light, and sensing.

  19. Role of structural noise in aircraft pressure cockpit from vibration action of new-generation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of new-generation aircraft engines is transitioning from a bypass ratio of 4-6 to an increased ratio of 8-12. This is leading to substantial broadening of the vibration spectrum of engines with a shift to the low-frequency range due to decreased rotation speed of the fan rotor, in turn requiring new solutions to decrease structural noise from engine vibrations to ensure comfort in the cockpits and cabins of aircraft.

  20. Electroanalysis at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Karen; O'Riordan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of silicon chip-based nanoelectrochemical devices for sensing applications. We first describe analyte mass transport to nanoscale electrodes and emphasize understanding the importance of mass transport for the design of nanoelectrode arrays. We then describe bottom-up and top-down approaches to nanoelectrode fabrication and integration at silicon substrates. Finally, we explore recent examples of on-chip nanoelectrodes employed as sensors and diagnostics, finishing with a brief look at future applications.

  1. Enhancing electric-field control of ferromagnetism through nanoscale engineering of high-Tc MnxGe1−x nanomesh

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Tianxiao; Tang, Jianshi; Kou, Xufeng; Gen, Yin; Lee, Shengwei; Zhu, Xiaodan; He, Qinglin; Chang, Li-Te; Murata, Koichi; Fan, Yabin; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage control of magnetism in ferromagnetic semiconductor has emerged as an appealing solution to significantly reduce the power dissipation and variability beyond current CMOS technology. However, it has been proven to be very challenging to achieve a candidate with high Curie temperature (Tc), controllable ferromagnetism and easy integration with current Si technology. Here we report the effective electric-field control of both ferromagnetism and magnetoresistance in unique MnxGe1−x nanomeshes fabricated by nanosphere lithography, in which a Tc above 400 K is demonstrated as a result of size/quantum confinement. Furthermore, by adjusting Mn doping concentration, extremely giant magnetoresistance is realized from ∼8,000% at 30 K to 75% at 300 K at 4 T, which arises from a geometrically enhanced magnetoresistance effect of the unique mesh structure. Our results may provide a paradigm for fundamentally understanding the high Tc in ferromagnetic semiconductor nanostructure and realizing electric-field control of magnetoresistance for future spintronic applications. PMID:27762320

  2. Biomimetic structural engineering of P22 virus-like particles for catalysis and immune modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Benjamin

    Within biology molecules are arranged in hierarchical structures that coordinate and control the many processes that allow for complex organisms to exist. Proteins and other functional macromolecules are often studied outside their natural nanostructural context because it remains difficult to create controlled arrangements of proteins at this size scale. Viruses are elegantly simple nano-systems that exist at the interface of living organisms and non-living biological machines. Studied and viewed primarily as pathogens to be combatted, viruses have emerged as models of structural efficiency at the nanoscale and have spurred the development of biomimetic nanoparticle systems. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are noninfectious protein cages derived from viruses or other cage-forming systems. VLPs provide incredibly regular scaffolds for building at the nanoscale. In this work I have utilized the VLP derived from the bacteriophage P22 as a platform for the organization of enzymes, antigens, and immune-stimulating proteins inside and outside the capsid through purely genetic means. In the case of enzymes, encapsulation of a two-enzyme pathway has led to the development of metabolic nanoparticle catalysts and an expanded understanding of the control that structure exerts on metabolic flux. These same structural elements applied to the delivery of protein subunit antigens directed at cytotoxic T cell immunity result in drastically enhanced antigen processing and lasting immunological memory. Lastly, presentation of immune-stimulating proteins from the Tumor Necrosis Factor Super Family on the surface of the P22 VLP enhances the cell signaling efficiency of these compounds 50-fold and provides strategies for the application of these proteins as immune modulatory oncology therapeutics. In all of these cases, the reintroduction of nanostructure to these protein systems, reminiscent of their natural environment, has led to both new technologies and a better understanding of the

  3. Effect of structural flexibility on the design of vibration-isolating mounts for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Previous analyses of the design of vibration-isolating mounts for a rear-mounted engine to decouple linear and rotational oscillations are extended to take into account flexibility of the engine-mount structure. Equations and curves are presented to allow the design of mount systems and to illustrate the results for a range of design conditions.

  4. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Cognitive Structures Regarding Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacioglu, Yasemin; Yamak, Havva; Kavak, Nusret

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal pre-service science teachers' cognitive structures regarding Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and science education. The study group of the study consisted of 192 pre-service science teachers. A Free Word Association Test (WAT) consisting of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and…

  5. The use of plasmon spectroscopy and imaging in a transmission electron microscope to probe physical properties at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Oleshko, Vladimir P

    2012-11-01

    Valence EELS and energy-filtering TEM appear to be powerful tools to explore diverse nanoscale phenomena. The techniques enable real-time information on the band structure, bonding, dielectric and optical response and phase compositions of nanostructured materials. Furthermore, electron beam-induced excitations in the 0 to 50 eV energy loss range dominated by plasmons are sensitive to valence electron states primarily responsible for intrinsic materials properties. We used universality and scaling in relationships between the volume plasmon energy and cohesive energy, elastic moduli and hardness to derive analytical expressions for quantitative determination of the properties. Based on this approach, cohesive and elastic properties of metastable nanoprecipitates in structural alloys and hardness of diesel engine soot nanoparticles have been evaluated. Spatially-resolved plasmon spectroscopic imaging techniques offer possibilities to determine and image in situ multiple physical properties of nanoscale materials and to monitor their changes during dynamic transformations, thus establishing new capabilities for material research.

  6. Nanoscale ear drum: Graphene based nanoscale sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Gomes da Rocha, Claudia; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2012-05-01

    The difficulty in determining the mass of a sample increases as its size diminishes. At the nanoscale, there are no direct methods for resolving the mass of single molecules or nanoparticles and so more sophisticated approaches based on electromechanical phenomena are required. More importantly, one demands that such nanoelectromechanical techniques could provide not only information about the mass of the target molecules but also about their geometrical properties. In this sense, we report a theoretical study that illustrates in detail how graphene membranes can operate as nanoelectromechanical mass-sensor devices. Wide graphene sheets were exposed to different types and amounts of molecules and molecular dynamic simulations were employed to treat these doping processes statistically. We demonstrate that the mass variation effect and information about the graphene-molecule interactions can be inferred through dynamical response functions. Our results confirm the potential use of graphene as a mass detector device with remarkable precision in estimating variations in mass at the molecular scale and other physical properties of the dopants.

  7. Slave finite elements for nonlinear analysis of engine structures, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1991-01-01

    A 336 degrees of freedom slave finite element processing capability to analyze engine structures under severe thermomechanical loading is presented. Description of the theoretical development and demonstration of that element is presented in this volume.

  8. Nanoscale metal-organic materials.

    PubMed

    Carné, Arnau; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic materials are found to be a fascinating novel class of functional nanomaterials. The limitless combinations between inorganic and organic building blocks enable researchers to synthesize 0- and 1-D metal-organic discrete nanostructures with varied compositions, morphologies and sizes, fabricate 2-D metal-organic thin films and membranes, and even structure them on surfaces at the nanometre length scale. In this tutorial review, the synthetic methodologies for preparing these miniaturized materials as well as their potential properties and future applications are discussed. This review wants to offer a panoramic view of this embryonic class of nanoscale materials that will be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working in chemistry, physics, medicine, nanotechnology, materials chemistry, etc., in the next years.

  9. NASA Lewis Research Center/University Graduate Research Program on Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center established a graduate research program in support of the Engine Structures Research activities. This graduate research program focuses mainly on structural and dynamics analyses, computational mechanics, mechanics of composites and structural optimization. The broad objectives of the program, the specific program, the participating universities and the program status are briefly described.

  10. Stress Engineering of Multi-pass Welds of Structural Steel to Enhance Structural Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Supriyo; Sule, Jibrin; Yakubu, Mustapha Y.

    2016-08-01

    In multi-pass welding, the weld metal and the associated heat-affected zone are subjected to repeated thermal cycling from successive deposition of filler metals. The thermal straining results into multi-mode deformation of the weld metal which causes a variably distributed residual stress field through the thickness and across the weld of a multi-pass weldment. In addition to this, the as-welded fusion zone microstructure shows dendritic formation of grains and segregation of alloying element. This may result in formation of micro-corrosion cells and the problem would aggravate in case of highly alloyed materials. Local mechanical tensioning is an effective way of elimination of the weld tensile residual stress. It has been shown that application of cold rolling is capable not only of removing the residual stress, but depending on its magnitude it may also form beneficial compressive stress state. Multi-pass structural steel welds used as structural alloy in general engineering and structural applications. Such alloys are subjected to severe in-service degradation mechanisms e.g., corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Welds and the locked-in residual stress in the welded area often initiate the defect which finally results in failure. In the present study, a multi-pass structural steel weld metal was first subjected to post-weld cold rolling which was followed by controlled heating by a fiber laser. Cold straining resulted in redistribution of the internal stress through the thickness and controlled laser processing helps in reforming of the grain structure. However, even with controlled laser, processing the residual stress is reinstated. Therefore, a strategy has been adopted to roll the metal post-laser processing so as to obtain a complete stress-free and recrystallized microstructure.

  11. Stress Engineering of Multi-pass Welds of Structural Steel to Enhance Structural Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Supriyo; Sule, Jibrin; Yakubu, Mustapha Y.

    2016-05-01

    In multi-pass welding, the weld metal and the associated heat-affected zone are subjected to repeated thermal cycling from successive deposition of filler metals. The thermal straining results into multi-mode deformation of the weld metal which causes a variably distributed residual stress field through the thickness and across the weld of a multi-pass weldment. In addition to this, the as-welded fusion zone microstructure shows dendritic formation of grains and segregation of alloying element. This may result in formation of micro-corrosion cells and the problem would aggravate in case of highly alloyed materials. Local mechanical tensioning is an effective way of elimination of the weld tensile residual stress. It has been shown that application of cold rolling is capable not only of removing the residual stress, but depending on its magnitude it may also form beneficial compressive stress state. Multi-pass structural steel welds used as structural alloy in general engineering and structural applications. Such alloys are subjected to severe in-service degradation mechanisms e.g., corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Welds and the locked-in residual stress in the welded area often initiate the defect which finally results in failure. In the present study, a multi-pass structural steel weld metal was first subjected to post-weld cold rolling which was followed by controlled heating by a fiber laser. Cold straining resulted in redistribution of the internal stress through the thickness and controlled laser processing helps in reforming of the grain structure. However, even with controlled laser, processing the residual stress is reinstated. Therefore, a strategy has been adopted to roll the metal post-laser processing so as to obtain a complete stress-free and recrystallized microstructure.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  13. Structural Engineering of Microwave Antennas, Chapters 1-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses computer-aided design procedures for antenna reflector structures and related components. Examples in the paper illustrate effective design improvement for structures with several thousand degrees of freedom and within reasonable computing times.

  14. Probing and manipulating magnetization at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarth, Nitin

    2012-02-01

    Combining semiconductors with magnetism in hetero- and nano-structured geometries provides a powerful means of exploring the interplay between spin-dependent transport and nanoscale magnetism. We describe two recent studies in this context. First, we use spin-dependent transport in ferromagnetic semiconductor thin films to provide a new window into nanoscale magnetism [1]: here, we exploit the large anomalous Hall effect in a ferromagnetic semiconductor as a nanoscale probe of the reversible elastic behavior of magnetic domain walls and gain insight into regimes of domain wall behavior inaccessible to more conventional optical techniques. Next, we describe novel ways to create self-assembled hybrid semiconductor/ferromagnet core-shell nanowires [2] and show how magnetoresistance measurements in single nanowires, coupled with micromagnetic simulations, can provide detailed insights into the magnetization reversal process in nanoscale ferromagnets [3]. The work described here was carried out in collaboration with Andrew Balk, Jing Liang, Nicholas Dellas, Mark Nowakowski, David Rench, Mark Wilson, Roman Engel-Herbert, Suzanne Mohney, Peter Schiffer and David Awschalom. This work is supported by ONR, NSF and the NSF-MRSEC program.[4pt] [1] A. L. Balk et al., Phys. Rev.Lett. 107, 077205 (2011).[0pt] [2] N. J. Dellas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 072505 (2010).[0pt] [3] J. Liang et al., in preparation.

  15. Engineering approaches to illuminating brain structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Deisseroth, Karl; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2013-10-30

    Historical milestones in neuroscience have come in diverse forms, ranging from the resolution of specific biological mysteries via creative experimentation to broad technological advances allowing neuroscientists to ask new kinds of questions. The continuous development of tools is driven with a special necessity by the complexity, fragility, and inaccessibility of intact nervous systems, such that inventive technique development and application drawing upon engineering and the applied sciences has long been essential to neuroscience. Here we highlight recent technological directions in neuroscience spurred by progress in optical, electrical, mechanical, chemical, and biological engineering. These research areas are poised for rapid growth and will likely be central to the practice of neuroscience well into the future.

  16. Engineered Minichromosomes in Plants: Structure, Function, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Graham, Nathaniel D; Cody, Jon P; Swyers, Nathan C; McCaw, Morgan E; Zhao, Changzeng; Birchler, James A

    2015-01-01

    Engineered minichromosomes are small chromosomes that contain a transgene and selectable marker, as well as all of the necessary components required for maintenance in an organism separately from the standard chromosome set. The separation from endogenous chromosomes makes engineered minichromosomes useful in the production of transgenic plants. Introducing transgenes to minichromosomes does not have the risk of insertion within a native gene; additionally, transgenes on minichromosomes can be transferred between lines without the movement of linked genes. Of the two methods proposed for creating engineered minichromosomes, telomere-mediated truncation is more reliable in plant systems. Additionally, many plants contain a supernumerary, or B chromosome, which is an excellent starting material for minichromosome creation. The use of site-specific recombination systems in minichromosomes can increase their utility, allowing for the addition or subtraction of transgenes in vivo. The creation of minichromosomes with binary bacterial artificial chromosome vectors provides the ability to introduce many transgenes at one time. Furthermore, coupling minichromosomes with haploid induction systems can facilitate transfer between lines. Minichromosomes can be introduced to a haploid-inducing line and crossed to target lines. Haploids of the target line that then contain a minichromosome can then be doubled. These homozygous lines will contain the transgene without the need for repeated introgressions. PMID:26315884

  17. Nanoscale material design for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hua

    /nanowire array solar cells. Phonon-assisted electron decay in semiconductor quantum dots is also investigated in this work. In semiconductor solar cell, a large portion of energy loss is by the fast hot electron cooling, in which a high energy electron decays to the electronic band gap by creating a series of phonons. The excessive electrical energy is then converted to heat and wasted, so that the total photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency is limited. The electron decay rate reduces in semiconductor quantum dots, due to the discrete electron energy levels created by quantum confinement. To design quantum dots with the slowest decay rate, we use the non-adiabatic molecular dynamics to perform real-time simulations of the phonon-assisted electron decay process. This method is based on time-dependent density functional theory, and can directly predict the phonon-assisted electron decay time using the initial quantum dot structure as the only input. The numerical simulation shows that the phonon-induced electron decay can be slowed down in a small PbSe quantum dot. The temperature-dependent relaxation in this quantum dot is also studied, which helps us to propose a multi-channel relaxation mechanism. This mechanism provides new insights to the understanding of electron decay process in quantum dots. The results from this study have potentially important applications in solar energy harvesting and radiative thermal management. It offers a new perspective of nanoscale engineering of materials to achieve more efficient photovoltaic energy conversion.

  18. Nanoscale heat engine beyond the Carnot limit.

    PubMed

    Roßnagel, J; Abah, O; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Singer, K; Lutz, E

    2014-01-24

    We consider a quantum Otto cycle for a time-dependent harmonic oscillator coupled to a squeezed thermal reservoir. We show that the efficiency at maximum power increases with the degree of squeezing, surpassing the standard Carnot limit and approaching unity exponentially for large squeezing parameters. We further propose an experimental scheme to implement such a model system by using a single trapped ion in a linear Paul trap with special geometry. Our analytical investigations are supported by Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal. For realistic trap parameters, an increase of the efficiency at maximum power of up to a factor of 4 is reached, largely exceeding the Carnot bound.

  19. Strain properties analysis and wireless collection system of PVDF for structural local health monitoring of civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Wang, Yang; Dong, Weijie; Jin, Yajing; Ou, Jinping

    2009-07-01

    For large civil engineering structures and base establishments, for example, bridges, super-high buildings, long-span space structures, offshore platforms and pipe systems of water & gas supply, their lives are up to a few decades or centuries. Damaged by environmental loads, fatigue effects, corrosion effects and material aging, these structures experience inevitably such side effects as damage accumulation, resistance reduction and even accidents. The traditional civil structure is a kind of passive one, whose performance and status are unpredictable to a great extent, but the informatics' introduction breaks a new path to obtain the status of the structure, thus it is an important research direction to evaluate and improve reliability of civil structures by the use of monitoring and health diagnosis technique, and this also assures the security of service for civil engineering structures. Smart material structure, originated from the aerospace sector, has been a research hotspot in civil engineering, medicine, shipping, and so on. For structural health monitoring of civil engineering, the research about high-performance sensing unit of smart material structure is very important, and this will possibly push further the development and application of monitoring and health diagnosis techniques. At present, piezoelectric materials are one of the most widely used sensing materials among the research of smart material structures. As one of the piezoelectric materials, PVDF(Polyvinylidene Fluoride)film is widely considered for the advantages of low cost, good mechanical ability, high sensibility, the ability of being easily placed and resistance of corrosion. However, only a few studies exit about building a mature monitoring system using PVDF. In this paper, for the sake of using PVDF for sensing unit for structural local monitoring of civil engineering, the strain sensing properties of PVDF are studied in detail. Firstly, the operating mechanism of PVDF is analyzed

  20. Mapping plasmonic topological states at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Ivan S.; Mukhin, Ivan S.; Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P.; Poddubny, Alexander N.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Samusev, Anton K.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of topological edge states in zigzag chains of plasmonic nanodisks. We demonstrate that such edge states can be selectively excited with the linear polarization of the incident light, and visualize them directly by near-field scanning optical microscopy. Our work provides experimental verification of a novel paradigm for manipulating light at the nanoscale in topologically nontrivial structures.We report on the first experimental observation of topological edge states in zigzag chains of plasmonic nanodisks. We demonstrate that such edge states can be selectively excited with the linear polarization of the incident light, and visualize them directly by near-field scanning optical microscopy. Our work provides experimental verification of a novel paradigm for manipulating light at the nanoscale in topologically nontrivial structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00231a