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Sample records for nanosecond pulse discharges

  1. Pulsed hollow cathode discharge with nanosecond risetime

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, G.; Husoy, P.O.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1984-12-01

    This paper reports the operation of a cylindrical hollow cathode discharge with current risetimes of a few nanoseconds at current densities at the entrance of the cathode in the range of 50-560A x cm/sup -2/ and at voltages of 280-850 V. Time-dependent measurements of the impedance of the discharge are presented. They allow for the evaluation of discharge quantities such as risetime, delay time, discharge voltage, and current, depending on the operation parameters as applied voltage, pressure, and preionization. The power density in the active region of the hollow cathode exceeded 200 kW x cm/sup -3/.

  2. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-11-15

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  3. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-11-01

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  4. Characteristics of 2-heptanone decomposition using nanosecond pulsed discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakase, Yuki; Fukuchi, Yuichi; Wang, Douyan; Namihira, Takao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Kumamoto University Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) evaporate at room temperature. VOCs typically consist of toluene, benzene and ethyl acetate, which are used in cosmetics, dry cleaning products and paints. Exposure to elevated levels of VOCs may cause headaches, dizziness and irritation to the eyes, nose, and throat; they may also cause environmental problems such as air pollution, acid rain and photochemical smog. As such, they require prompt removal. Nanosecond pulsed discharge is a kind of non-thermal plasma consisting of a streamer discharge. Several advantages of nanosecond pulsed discharge plasma have been demonstrated by studies of our research group, including low heat loss, highly energetic electron generation, and the production of highly active radicals. These advantages have shown ns pulsed discharge plasma capable of higher energy efficiency for processes, such as air purification, wastewater treatment and ozone generation. In this research, nanosecond pulsed discharge plasma was employed to treat 2-heptanone, which is a volatile organic compound type and presents several harmful effects. Characteristics of treatment dependent on applied voltage, gas flow rate and input energy density were investigated. Furthermore, byproducts generated by treatment were also investigated.

  5. Localized pulsed nanosecond discharges in a counterflow nonpremixed flame environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Garcia, C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Miles, R. B.; Starikovskiy, A.

    2015-10-01

    A flame is a very unusual environment for the development of a gas discharge, since it presents strong gradients in temperature, composition, and pre-ionization. In this paper we examine how such an environment impacts the development of the plasma when using repetitive pulsed nanosecond discharges, one of the main strategies used in the field of plasma assisted combustion. Experiments were performed in a counterflow nonpremixed burner with parallel electrodes at the nozzle exits and nanosecond-resolved photography of the plasma emission is presented. It was shown that the discharge development in stratified media may take place in the form of a dielectric barrier discharge with a localized energy deposition. In the experiments presented the discharge energy was coupled to the flame front because of the high rate of chemi-ionization and the gas density decrease in the flame.

  6. Rotational CARS Temperature Measurements in Nanosecond Pulse Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzeek, Yvette; Takashima, Keisuke; Adamovich, Igor; Lempert, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Time-resolved and spatially resolved temperatures in repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharges in air and ethylene-air mixtures have been measured by purely rotational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Specroscopy (CARS). The experiments have been done in a capacitively coupled plane-to-plane discharge and in an atmospheric pressure near-surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD), both powered by repetitive nanosecond duration voltage pulses. Gated ICCD camera images demonstrated that the capacitively coupled discharge plasma remains diffuse and stable, with no sign of arc filaments. Comparison of the experimental results with plasma chemical kinetic modeling calculations shows good agreement. The results demonstrate that the rate of heating in the fuel-air plasma is significantly more rapid compared to the one in the air plasma. Kinetic model analysis shows that this occurs due to exothermic reactions of fuel with radical species generated in the plasma, such as O atoms. The present results provide additional insight into kinetics of hydrocarbon fuel oxidation in low-temperature plasmas and into the mechanism of localized heating of air flows by nanosecond DBD discharges.

  7. The discharge characteristics of surface dielectric barrier discharge sustained by repetitive nanosecond pulses in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Pang; Kun, He; Qiaogen, Zhang

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge (NPSDBD) is a promising method for flow control and combustion. We systematically investigated the influence of pulse parameters on the discharge characteristics of NPSDBD, especially on the conduction current of discharge and the energy deposition curves. Meanwhile, the differences of the characteristics of the discharge generated by positive pulses and negative pulses are focused in this paper. The underlying physics is also discussed. Four different discharge regimes of NPSDBD are presented, which can be distinguished by the temporal emission behaviors of discharge and the conduction current of discharge. The transitions of four discharge regimes were also investigated by changing the pulse amplitude, repetitive rate, and voltage polarity. It was found that it is easier to translate quasi-uniform discharge to filamentary discharge or transition mode for the repetitive pulses with a negative polarity. A phenomenological model was proposed to explain the differences between a positive repetitive pulse discharge and a negative repetitive pulse discharge.

  8. Numerical simulation of nanosecond-pulse electrical discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggie, J.; Adamovich, I.; Bisek, N.; Nishihara, M.

    2013-02-01

    Recent experiments with a nanosecond-pulse, dielectric barrier discharge at the stagnation point of a Mach 5 cylinder flow have demonstrated the formation of weak shock waves near the electrode edge, which propagate upstream and perturb the bow shock. This is a promising means of flow control, and understanding the detailed physics of the conversion of electrical energy into gas motion will aid in the design of efficient actuators based on the concept. In this work, a simplified configuration with planar symmetry was chosen as a vehicle to develop a physics-based model of nanosecond-pulse discharges, including realistic air kinetics, electron energy transport, and compressible bulk gas flow. A reduced plasma kinetic model (23 species and 50 processes) was developed to capture the dominant species and reactions for energy storage and thermalization in the discharge. The kinetic model included electronically and vibrationally excited species, and several species of ions and ground state neutrals. The governing equations included the Poisson equation for the electric potential, diffusion equations for each neutral species, conservation equations for each charged species, and mass-averaged conservation equations for the bulk gas flow. The results of calculations with this model highlighted the path of energy transfer in the discharge. At breakdown, the input electrical energy was transformed over a time scale on the order of 1 ns into chemical energy of ions, dissociation products, and vibrationally and electronically excited particles. About 30% of this energy was subsequently thermalized over a time scale of 10 µs. Since the thermalization time scale was faster than the acoustic time scale, the heat release led to the formation of weak shock waves originating near the sheath edge, consistent with experimental observations. The computed translational temperature rise (40 K) and nitrogen vibrational temperature rise (370 K) were of the same order of magnitude as

  9. Characteristics of Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges in Atmospheric Helium Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manish, Jugroot

    2016-10-01

    Microplasmas are very interesting due to their unique properties and achievable regimes maintained at atmospheric pressures. Due to the small scales, numerical modeling could contribute to the understanding of underlying phenomena as it provides access to local parameters—and complements experimental global characteristics. A self-consistent formalism, applied to nanosecond pulsed atmospheric non-equilibrium helium plasmas, reveals that several successive discharges can persist as a result of a combined volume and dielectric surface effects. The valuable insights provided by the spatiotemporal simulation results show the critical importance of coupled gas and plasma dynamics—namely gas heating and electric field reversals. supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) — Discovery Grant (No. 342369)

  10. Energy balance in nanosecond pulse discharges in nitrogen and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic modeling is used to analyze energy partition and energy transfer in nanosecond pulse discharges sustained between two spherical electrodes in nitrogen and air. The modeling predictions are compared with previous time-resolved temperature and {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(X {}1Σ\\text{g}+,v=0-9\\right) vibrational population measurements by picosecond broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and phase-locked Schlieren imaging. The model shows good agreement with experimental data, reproducing experimental discharge current pulse waveforms, as well as dominant processes of energy transfer in the discharge and the afterglow. Specifically, the results demonstrate that the temperature rise in the plasma occurs in two stages, (i) ‘rapid’ heating on sub-acoustic time scale, dominated by {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(A {}3Σ\\text{u}+\\right) energy pooling processes, N2(B 3Πg) and N(2P,2D) quenching (in nitrogen), and by quenching of excited electronic states of N2 molecules by O2 (in air), and (ii) ‘slow’ heating due to N2 vibrational relaxation by O atoms (in air), nearly completely missing in nitrogen. Comparison of the model predictions with N2 vibrational level populations confirms that the N2 vibrational temperature rises after the discharge pulse is caused by the ‘downward’ vibrational-vibrational exchange depopulating higher vibrational levels and populating vibrational level v  =  1. The model reproduces temporal dynamics of vibrational level populations and temperature in the discharge and the afterglow, indicating that energy partition among different modes (vibrational, electronic, dissociation, and ionization) is predicted accurately. At the present conditions, energy fraction coupled to the positive column of the discharge filament in air is approximately 50%, with the rest coupled to the cathode layer. Nearly 10% of the total pulse energy is spent on O atom generation, and about 10% is thermalized on a sub-acoustic time scale

  11. Nanosecond Pulse Discharges and Fast Ionization Wave Discharges: Fundamental Kinetic Processes and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovich, Igor

    2011-10-01

    Over the last two decades, nanosecond pulse discharges and Fast Ionization Wave (FIW) discharges have been studied extensively, both theoretically and experimentally. Current interest in characterization of these discharges is driven mainly by their potential for applications such as plasma chemical fuel reforming, plasma-assisted combustion, high-speed flow control, pumping of electric discharge excited lasers, and generation of high-energy electrons. A unique capability of FIW discharges to generate significant ionization and high concentrations of excited species at high pressures and over large distances, before ionization instabilities have time to develop, is very attractive for these applications. Recent advances in laser optical diagnostics offer an opportunity of making non-intrusive, spatially and time-resolved measurements of electron density and electric field distributions in high-speed ionization wave discharges, on nanosecond time scale. Insight into FIW formation and propagation dynamics also requires development of predictive kinetic models, and their experimental validation. Although numerical kinetic models may incorporate detailed kinetics of charged and neutral species in the propagating ionization wave front (including non-local electron kinetics), analytic models are also attractive due to their capability of elucidating fundamental trends of discharge development. The talk gives an overview of recent progress in experimental characterization and kinetic modeling of nanosecond pulse and fast ionization wave discharges in nitrogen and air over a wide range of pulse repetition rates, 0.1-40 kHz. FIW discharge plasmas sustained at high pulse repetition rates are diffuse and volume filling, with most of the power coupled to the plasma behind the wave, at E/N = 200-300 Td and energy loading of 1-2 meV/molecule/pulse. The results demonstrate significant potential of large volume, diffuse, high pulse repetition rate FIW discharges for novel plasma

  12. Electrical and mechanical characteristics of nanosecond pulsed sliding dielectric barrier discharges with different electrode gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayoda, K. D.; Benard, N.; Moreau, E.

    2015-10-01

    This study proposes the characterization of a surface sliding discharge that extends over a length of 80 mm. The gas ionization is caused by series of high voltage pulses with nanosecond rising and decaying times while ion drift is forced by a negative DC component. Different plasma diagnostics such as electrical measurements, iCCD visualizations and strioscopy have been performed. They highlight that a threshold mean electric field between both air-exposed electrodes is required to fully establish a sliding discharge. Compared to a single nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge, the sliding discharge results in an energy consumption increase. Moreover, the pressure wave induced by the discharge is strongly impacted.

  13. Electric field in an AC dielectric barrier discharge overlapped with a nanosecond pulse discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M.; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of ns discharge pulses on the AC barrier discharge in hydrogen in plane-to-plane geometry is studied using time-resolved measurements of the electric field in the plasma. The AC discharge was operated at a pressure of 300 Torr at frequencies of 500 and 1750 Hz, with ns pulses generated when the AC voltage was near zero. The electric field vector is measured by ps four-wave mixing technique, which generates coherent IR signal proportional to the square of electric field. Absolute calibration was done using an electrostatic (sub-breakdown) field applied to the discharge electrodes, when no plasma was generated. The results are compared with one-dimensional kinetic modeling of the AC discharge and the nanosecond pulse discharge, predicting behavior of both individual micro-discharges and their cumulative effect on the electric field distribution in the electrode gap, using stochastic averaging based on the experimental micro-discharge temporal probability distribution during the AC period. Time evolution of the electric field in the AC discharge without ns pulses, controlled by a superposition of random micro-discharges, exhibits a nearly ‘flat top’ distribution with the maximum near breakdown threshold, reproduced quite well by kinetic modeling. Adding ns pulse discharges on top of the AC voltage waveform changes the AC discharge behavior in a dramatic way, inducing transition from random micro-discharges to a more regular, near-1D discharge. In this case, reproducible volumetric AC breakdown is produced at a well-defined moment after each ns pulse discharge. During the reproducible AC breakdown, the electric field in the plasma exhibits a sudden drop, which coincides in time with a well-defined current pulse. This trend is also predicted by the kinetic model. Analysis of kinetic modeling predictions shows that this effect is caused by large-volume ionization and neutralization of surface charges on the dielectrics by ns discharge pulses. The present

  14. Discharge Characteristics of SF6 in a Non-Uniform Electric Field Under Repetitive Nanosecond Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Huijuan; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jue; Wang, Tao; Yan, Ping

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics of high pressure sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) discharges in a highly non-uniform electric field under repetitive nanosecond pulses are investigated in this paper. The influencing factors on discharge process, such as gas pressure, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and number of applied pulses, are analyzed. Experimental results show that the corona intensity weakens with the increase of gas pressure and strengthens with the increase of PRF or number of applied pulses. Spark discharge images suggest that a shorter and thicker discharge plasma channel will lead to a larger discharge current. The number of applied pulses to breakdown descends with the increase of PRF and ascends with the rise of gas pressure. The reduced electric field (E/p) decreases with the increase of PRF in all circumstances. The experimental results provide significant supplements to the dielectric characteristics of strongly electronegative gases under repetitive nanosecond pulses.

  15. Mach 5 bow shock control by a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihara, M.; Takashima, K.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2011-06-15

    Bow shock perturbations in a Mach 5 air flow, produced by low-temperature, nanosecond pulse, and surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), are detected by phase-locked schlieren imaging. A diffuse nanosecond pulse discharge is generated in a DBD plasma actuator on a surface of a cylinder model placed in air flow in a small scale blow-down supersonic wind tunnel. Discharge energy coupled to the actuator is 7.3-7.8 mJ/pulse. Plasma temperature inferred from nitrogen emission spectra is a few tens of degrees higher than flow stagnation temperature, T = 340 {+-} 30 K. Phase-locked Schlieren images are used to detect compression waves generated by individual nanosecond discharge pulses near the actuator surface. The compression wave propagates upstream toward the baseline bow shock standing in front of the cylinder model. Interaction of the compression wave and the bow shock causes its displacement in the upstream direction, increasing shock stand-off distance by up to 25%. The compression wave speed behind the bow shock and the perturbed bow shock velocity are inferred from the Schlieren images. The effect of compression waves generated by nanosecond discharge pulses on shock stand-off distance is demonstrated in a single-pulse regime (at pulse repetition rates of a few hundred Hz) and in a quasi-continuous mode (using a two-pulse sequence at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz). The results demonstrate feasibility of hypersonic flow control by low-temperature, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges.

  16. Experimental study of the hydrodynamic expansion following a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Da A.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Rusterholtz, Diane L.; Elias, Paul-Quentin; Stancu, Gabi D.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2011-09-01

    We report on an experimental study of the hydrodynamic expansion following a nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharge in atmospheric pressure air preheated up to 1000 K. Single-shot schlieren images starting from 50 ns after the discharge were recorded to show the shock-wave propagation and the expansion of the heated gas channel. The temporal evolution of the gas temperature behind the shock-front is estimated from the measured shock-wave velocity by using the Rankine-Hugoniot relationships. The results show that a gas temperature increase of up to 1100 K can be observed 50 ns after the nanosecond pulse.

  17. Nanosecond-pulse gliding discharges between point-to-point electrodes in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Yuanxiang

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, gliding discharges with a point-to-point electrode geometry were produced by a repetitively pulsed power supply with a rise time of ˜100 ns and a full-width at half-maximum of ˜200 ns. The characteristics of such discharges were investigated by measuring their voltage-current waveforms and taking photographs of their discharge images. Experimental results showed that once the breakdown occurred, the nanosecond-pulse gliding discharges went into a stable stage at all air gaps, behaving in a mode of repetitive sparks. Under certain conditions, a non-stable stage would appear some time after the discharge went into the stable stage, in which the gliding discharges transitioned from repetitive sparks to diffuse discharges. Furthermore, several factors (gap spacing, pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and gas flow rate) influencing the discharge characteristics were investigated. It was observed that both the breakdown voltage and ignition voltage increased with the gap spacing, and a diffuse discharge was absent when the gap spacing was less than 6 mm. The breakdown voltage decreased with the increase in the PRF and its decrease ratio was larger in large gap spacing than in small gap spacing. Discharges would transit from repetitive sparks to diffuse discharges as the flow rate increased. Furthermore, a comparison of nanosecond-pulse and ac gliding discharges was conducted with respect to the power supply. The consumption and energy, the relationship between the power supply and the load, and the time interval between two pulses were three main factors which could lead to different characteristics between the nanosecond-pulse and ac gliding discharges.

  18. Plasma-Enhanced Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Fuel Blends Using Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, Mark; Mungal, M Godfrey

    2014-10-28

    This project had as its goals the study of fundamental physical and chemical processes relevant to the sustained premixed and non-premixed jet ignition/combustion of low grade fuels or fuels under adverse flow conditions using non-equilibrium pulsed nanosecond discharges.

  19. Volume Diffuse Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Produced by Nanosecond High Voltage Pulse in Airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haicheng; Gao, Wei; Fan, Zhihui; Liu, Yidi; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Volume diffuse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced in subsonic airflow by nanosecond high-voltage pulse power supply with a plate-to-plate discharge cell at 6 mm air gap length. The discharge images, optical emission spectra (OES), the applied voltage and current waveforms of the discharge at the changed airflow rates are obtained. When airflow rate is increased, the transition of the discharge mode and the variations of discharge intensity, breakdown characteristics and the temperature of the discharge plasma are investigated. The results show that the discharge becomes more diffuse, discharge intensity is decreased accompanied by the increased breakdown voltage and time lag, and the temperature of the discharge plasma reduces when airflow of small velocity is introduced into the discharge gap. These phenomena are because that the airflow changes the spatial distribution of the heat and the space charge in the discharge gap. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51437002)

  20. Measurements and kinetic modeling of energy coupling in volume and surface nanosecond pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Yin, Zhiyao; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulse discharge plasma imaging, coupled pulse energy measurements, and kinetic modeling are used to analyze the mechanism of energy coupling in high repetition rate, spatially uniform, nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane geometry. Under these conditions, coupled pulse energy scales nearly linearly with pressure (number density), with energy coupled per molecule being nearly constant, in good agreement with the kinetic model predictions. In spite of high-peak reduced electric field reached before breakdown, E/N ˜ 500-700 Td, the reduced electric field in the plasma after breakdown is much lower, E/N ˜ 50-100 Td, predicting that a significant fraction of energy coupled to the air plasma, up to 30-40%, is loaded into nitrogen vibrational mode. A self-similar, local ionization kinetic model predicting energy coupling to the plasma in a surface ionization wave discharge produced by a nanosecond voltage pulse has been developed. The model predicts key discharge parameters such as ionization wave speed and propagation distance, electric field, electron density, plasma layer thickness, and pulse energy coupled to the plasma, demonstrating good qualitative agreement with experimental data and two-dimensional kinetic modeling calculations. The model allows an analytic solution and lends itself to incorporation into existing compressible flow codes, at very little computational cost, for in-depth analysis of the nanosecond discharge plasma flow control mechanism. The use of the model would place the main emphasis on coupling of localized thermal perturbations produced by the discharge with the flow via compression waves and would provide quantitative insight into the flow control mechanism on a long time scale.

  1. The role of molecular vibration in nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges and in DBDs in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, G.; D'Ammando, G.; Pietanza, L. D.

    2016-10-01

    A self-consistent state-to-state model of pure hydrogen has been used to investigate the development of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges and dielectric barrier discharges, the latter coupling the kinetic model with an equation for the circuit, thus mimicking an insulated electrode with an external capacitance. Vibrationally excited states play a fundamental role, affecting the degrees of dissociation and ionization, as well as internal and free-electron distributions.

  2. Plasma-Assisted Flame Ignition and Stabilization using Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, Christophe

    2007-10-01

    Ever more stringent environmental regulations are providing impetus for reducing pollutant emissions, in particular nitric oxides and soot, in internal combustion and aircraft engines. Lean or diluted combustible mixtures are of particular interest because they burn at lower flame temperatures than stoichiometric mixtures and thus produce lesser amounts of thermal nitric oxides. Over the past decade, high voltage nanosecond pulsed discharges have been demonstrated as energy efficient way to ignite such mixtures. However, the practical application of these discharges for ignition purposes is limited by the very high electric fields required, especially in high pressure combustion chambers. Moreover, stabilization requires a steady-state addition of energy that cannot be achieved with single or low repetition frequency pulses. In the present work, we investigate the applicability and effectiveness of high voltage nanosecond discharges with high pulse repetition frequencies, typically up to 100 kHz. The high repetition frequencies are chosen to exceed the recombination rate of chemically active species. In this way, the concentration of active species can build up between consecutive pulses, thus yielding significantly higher concentrations than with low frequency pulses. These discharges are investigated for two applications, the ignition of diluted air/propane mixtures at pressures up to several bars in a constant volume chamber, and the stabilization of atmospheric pressure lean premixed air/propane flames. Time-resolved electric and spectroscopic measurements are presented to analyze the discharge regimes, the energy deposition, the gas temperature evolution, the electron number density, and the production of excited species. The results show that nanosecond repetitive pulses produce ultrafast gas heating and atomic oxygen generation, both on nanosecond time scales, via excitation of molecular nitrogen followed by dissociative quenching of molecular oxygen. These

  3. Nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge control of premixed lean methane-air combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2012-10-01

    Two-dimensional kinetic simulations are carried out to investigate the effects of the discharge repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse widths are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns respectively, while the total power is held constant. The lower repetition rates, because of their higher pulse energies, produce a larger fraction of radicals such as O, H, and OH. Surprisingly, however, the effect on flame stabilization is found to be essentially the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronic states, but the varying effects on stabilization is also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.

  4. Modeling of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Likhanskii, Alexandre V.; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Macheret, Sergey O.; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-07-15

    A detailed physical model for an asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air driven by repetitive nanosecond voltage pulses is developed. In particular, modeling of DBD with high voltage repetitive negative and positive nanosecond pulses combined with positive dc bias is carried out. Operation at high voltage is compared with operation at low voltage, highlighting the advantage of high voltages, however the effect of backward-directed breakdown in the case of negative pulses results in a decrease of the integral momentum transferred to the gas. The use of positive repetitive pulses with dc bias is demonstrated to be promising for DBD performance improvement. The effects of the voltage waveform not only on force magnitude, but also on the spatial profile of the force, are shown. The crucial role of background photoionization in numerical modeling of ionization waves (streamers) in DBD plasmas is demonstrated.

  5. Pulsed Picosecond and Nanosecond Discharge Development in Liquids with Various Dielectric Permittivity Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of pulsed picosecond and nanosecond discharge development in liquid water, ethanol and hexane were investigated experimentally. Three possible mechanisms for the propagation of discharge in liquids play a different role depending on the pulse duration. The first case takes place when a ``long'' (microsecond) electric pulse applied in a non-conducting fluid: as a result of electrostatic repulsion, the formation of low density channels occurs. Consequently, the discharge propagates through the low-density regions. In the second case, under an ``intermediate'' (nanosecond) electric pulse conditions, the electrostatic forces support the expansion of nanoscale voids behind the front of the ionization wave; in the wave front the extreme electric field provides a strong negative pressure in the dielectric fluid due to the presence of electrostriction forces, forming the initial micro-voids in the continuous medium. Finally, in the third case, when a ``short'' (picosecond) electric pulse is utilized, the regions of reduced density cannot form because of the extremely short duration of the applied electric pulse. Ionization in the liquid phase occurs as a result of direct electron impact without undergoing a phase transition, occurring due to the acceleration of electrons by an external electric field comparable to the intra-molecular fields. The discharge propagates with a velocity comparable to the local speed of light.

  6. Nanosecond pulsed sliding dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for airflow control: Electrical, optical, and mechanical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayoda, K. D.; Benard, N.; Moreau, E.

    2015-08-01

    Plasma actuators used for active flow control are widely studied because they could replace mechanical actuators. Industrial applications of these plasma actuators sometimes require a large surface plasma sheet in view of increasing the interaction region between the discharge and the incoming flow. Instead of using a typical two-electrode nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for which the interaction region is limited to about 20 mm, this study proposes to characterize a nanosecond sliding discharge based on a three-electrode geometry in order to increase the extension length up to the electrode gap. This sliding discharge is compared to the typical nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge by means of electrical, optical, and mechanical diagnostics. Electrical characterization reveals that the deposited energy can be widely increased. Time-resolved Intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) images of the discharge development over the dielectric surface highlight that the intensity and the propagation velocity of streamers are strongly affected by the DC voltage applied at the third electrode. Finally, qualitative and quantitative characterizations of the pressure wave due to the surrounding gas heating are proposed by means of Schlieren visualizations and high frequency pressure measurements, respectively.

  7. Verification of antitumor effect in vivo using nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetamari, Kenta; Shirakawa, Yuki; Akiyama, Taketoshi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Cancer treatment using plasma has intensively studied these days. In this work, antitumor effect by nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge was investigated. Nanosecond pulsed streamer plasma was used as a plasma source, which can generate stable streamer discharge by using a nanosecond pulsed power supply. The rod electrode of 3 mm diameter is made of copper. Its end is formed into a semispherical shape of 1.5 mm curvature. The electrode is inserted into a quartz tube (inner diameter: 4 mm, thickness: 1 mm) concentrically, so any gas can be introduced. B16F10 cells were selected to perform in vivo antitumor study. These cells were injected under the skin of leg of mice to make cancer tumor. One week later from injections, plasma was applied to the cancer tumor. Mice were randomly assigned into three groups which were one control group and two plasma treatment groups. In the control group, mice were not treated. In the plasma treatment groups, plasma with dry N2 and wet O2 as a working gas were irradiated for 5 consecutive days. Processing time was 10 min and the gap distance between the electrode and tumor was 4 mm. After 5 days plasma treatment, antitumor effect was observed. The result indicates that the streamer discharge has a potential for cancer treatment.

  8. Numerical Simulation of a Nanosecond-Pulse Discharge for High-Speed Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggie, Jonathan; Adamovich, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Numerical calculations were carried out to examine the physics of the operation of a nanosecond-pulse, single dielectric barrier discharge in a configuration with planar symmetry. This simplified configuration was chosen as a vehicle to develop a physics based nanosecond discharge model, including realistic air plasma chemistry and compressible bulk gas flow. First, a reduced plasma kinetic model was developed by carrying out a sensitivity analysis of zero-dimensional plasma computations with an extended chemical kinetic model. Transient, one- dimensional discharge computations were then carried out using the reduced kinetic model, incorporating a drift-diffusion formulation for each species, a self-consistent computation of the electric potential using the Poisson equation, and a mass-averaged gas dynamic formulation for the bulk gas motion. Discharge parameters (temperature, pressure, and input waveform) were selected to be representative of recent experiments on bow shock control with a nanosecond discharge in a Mach 5 cylinder flow. The computational results qualitatively reproduce many of the features observed in the experiments, including the rapid thermalization of the input electrical energy and the consequent formation of a weak shock wave. At breakdown, input electrical energy is rapidly transformed (over roughly 1 ns) into ionization products, dissociation products, and electronically excited particles, with subsequent thermalization over a relatively longer time-scale (roughly 10 μs).

  9. Numerical simulation on a nanosecond-pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in near space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Xueke; Shao, Tao; Nie, Wansheng; Yan, Ping

    2012-04-01

    Lift-enhancement-drag-reduction technology is strongly required by near-space vehicles with low Reynolds number. It is known that a flow control method by a surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma can play an important role in this field. In order to obtain the discharge characteristics and evaluate the flow control effect of a SDBD actuator, the nanosecond-pulse discharge and induced flow field by the SDBD plasma are simulated at various altitudes using discharge-aerodynamics models. The results show that the ignition voltage decreases with altitude and it is very easy to discharge in near space. Compared with a SDBD at ground level, the plasma is produced on both sides of the exposed electrode and distributes more uniformly in near space. Although the body force generated by the SDBD actuator is less effective in inducing a jet with nanosecond-pulse excitation than that with alternating voltage excitation, the induced jet by body force is with longer extent, thicker profile and higher velocity in near space than at ground level. The plasma bulk heating should be taken into account for nanosecond-pulse excitation. The Joule heating of electrons is the main source of plasma bulk heating which acts as a micro-explosion and mainly induces pressure perturbation. The discharge at ground level is like a ‘point explosion’, but a ‘region explosion’ in near space, which indicates a diffuse distribution of energy, should be responsible for the fact that the effect of bulk heating is reduced in near space.

  10. A compact repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen; Ren, Baozhong; He, Kun

    2011-04-01

    Uniform and stable discharge plasma requires very short duration pulses with fast rise times. A repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge is presented in this paper. It is constructed with all solid-state components. Two-stage magnetic compression is used to generate a short duration pulse. Unlike in some reported studies, common commercial fast recovery diodes instead of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are used in our experiment that plays the role of SOS. The SOS-like effects of four different kinds of diodes are studied experimentally to optimize the output performance. It is found that the output pulse voltage is higher with a shorter reverse recovery time, and the rise time of pulse becomes faster when the falling time of reverse recovery current is shorter. The SOS-like effect of the diodes can be adjusted by changing the external circuit parameters. Through optimization the pulse generator can provide a pulsed voltage of 40 kV with a 40 ns duration, 10 ns rise time, and pulse repetition frequency of up to 5 kHz. Diffuse plasma can be formed in air at standard atmospheric pressure using the developed pulse generator. With a light weight and small packaging the pulse generator is suitable for gas discharge application.

  11. Studies of nanosecond pulse surface ionization wave discharges over solid and liquid dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Vitaly; Leonov, Sergey; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ionization wave discharges generated by high-voltage nanosecond pulses, propagating over a planar quartz surface and over liquid surfaces (distilled water and 1-butanol) have been studied in a rectangular cross section test cell. The discharge was initiated using a custom-made, alternating polarity, high-voltage nanosecond pulse plasma generator, operated at a pulse repetition rate of 100-500 Hz, with a pulse peak voltage and current of 10-15 kV and 7-20 A, respectively, a pulse FWHM of ˜100 ns, and a coupled pulse energy of 2-9 mJ/pulse. Wave speed was measured using a capacitive probe. ICCD camera images demonstrated that the ionization wave propagated predominantly over the quartz wall or over the liquid surface adjacent to the grounded waveguide placed along the bottom wall of the test cell. Under all experimental conditions tested, the surface plasma ‘sheet’ was diffuse and fairly uniform, both for positive and negative polarities. The parameters of ionization wave discharge propagating over distilled water and 1-butanol surfaces were close to those of the discharge over a quartz wall. No perturbation of the liquid surface by the discharge was detected. In most cases, the positive polarity surface ionization wave propagated at a higher speed and over a longer distance compared to the negative polarity wave. For all three sets of experiments (surface ionization wave discharge over quartz, water and 1-butanol), wave speed and travel distance decreased with pressure. Diffuse, highly reproducible surface ionization wave discharge was also observed over the liquid butanol-saturated butanol vapor interface, as well as over the distilled water-saturated water vapor interface, without buffer gas flow. No significant difference was detected between surface ionization discharges sustained using single-polarity (positive or negative), or alternating polarity high-voltage pulses. Plasma emission images yielded preliminary evidence of charge removal from the

  12. Comparison of atmospheric air plasmas excited by high-voltage nanosecond pulsed discharge and sinusoidal alternating current discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Wen-chun; Jiang, Peng-chao; Yang, De-zheng; Jia, Li; Wang, Sen

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, atmospheric pressure air discharge plasma in quartz tube is excited by 15 ns high-voltage nanosecond pulsed discharge (HVNPD) and sinusoidal alternating current discharge (SACD), respectively, and a comparison study of these two kinds of discharges is made through visual imaging, electrical characterization, optical detection of active species, and plasma gas temperature. The peak voltage of the power supplies is kept at 16 kV while the pulse repetition rate of nanosecond pulse power supply is 100 Hz, and the frequency of sinusoidal power supply is 10 kHz. Results show that the HVNPD is uniform while the SACD presents filamentary mode. For exciting the same cycles of discharge, the average energy consumption in HVNPD is about 1/13 of the SACD. However, the chemical active species generated by the HVNPD is about 2-9 times than that excited by the SACD. Meanwhile, the rotational and vibrational temperatures have been obtained via fitting the simulated spectrum of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-2) with the measured one, and the results show that the plasma gas temperature in the HVNPD remains close to room temperature whereas the plasma gas temperature in the SACD is about 200 K higher than that in HVNPD in the initial phase and continually increases as discharge exposure time goes on.

  13. Electric field measurements in a nanosecond pulse discharge by picosecond CARS/4-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Ben; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor; Lempert, Walter

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved electric field measurements in hydrogen by picosecond CARS/4-wave mixing are presented. Measurements are carried out in a high voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in hydrogen in plane-to-plane geometry, at pressures of up to several hundred Torr, and with a time resolution of 0.2 ns. Absolute calibration of the diagnostics is done using a sub-breakdown high voltage pulse of 12 kV/cm. A diffuse discharge is obtained by applying a peak high voltage pulse of 40 kV/cm between the electrodes. It is found that breakdown occurs at a lower field, 15--20 kV/cm, after which the field in the plasma is reduced rapidly due to plasma self shielding The experimental results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, showing good agreement between the measured and the predicted electric field.

  14. Modes of underwater discharge propagation in a series of nanosecond successive pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, I.; Guaitella, O.; Rousseau, A.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2013-11-01

    Initiation and development of nanosecond electric discharges in deionized water was studied by time-resolved shadowgraphy and emission imaging. Pulses of 4-10 kV in amplitude, 5 ns rise time and 30 ns duration were applied to a high-voltage (HV) pin-like electrode with the diameter of the pin tip about 2 µm. Two distinct bush-like and tree-like modes of the discharge propagation were observed in the same conditions already at the rising slope of HV pulse. Both the modes are supersonic. The probability of finding one of them depends on applied voltage. Bush-mode propagates at 4 km s-1 at the initial stage; the deposited energy is less than 0.05 mJ. For the tree-like mode, propagation velocity, number of branches and deposited energy show well-prononced dependence on applied voltage. It is suggested that the bush-like discharge ignites in the gaseous cavity, whereas the tree-like discharge propagates in bulk liquid. The role of electrostriciton in the initiation and propagation of two modes is discussed, and comparison with microsecond discharges is given. Transition from bush-like discharge to tree-like mode may occur in successive positive pulse coming 500 ns after initial pulse.

  15. The influencing factors of nanosecond pulse homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge in air.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Jia, Li; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-jie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a bipolar nanosecond high pulse voltage with 20 ns rising time was employed to generate homogeneous dielectric barrier discharges using the plate-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. The effects of pulse peak voltage, gas discharge gap, and dielectric plates made by different materials or thicknesses on the discharge homogeneity, voltage-current waveform, and optical emission spectra were investigated. Results show that aforementioned parameters have a strongly impact on the discharge homogeneity and the optical emission spectra, but it is hard to identify definitely their influences on the discharge voltage-current waveform. Homogeneous discharges were easily observed when using low permittivity dielectric plate and the emission intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) increases with the rising of pulse peak voltage and the permittivity of dielectric material but decreases with the increasing of gas discharge gap and the dielectric plate thickness. The rotational and vibrational temperatures (Trot and Tvib) were determined at Trot=350±5 K and Tvib=3045 K via fitting the simulative spectra of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-2) with the measured one.

  16. The influencing factors of nanosecond pulse homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge in air.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Jia, Li; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-jie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a bipolar nanosecond high pulse voltage with 20 ns rising time was employed to generate homogeneous dielectric barrier discharges using the plate-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. The effects of pulse peak voltage, gas discharge gap, and dielectric plates made by different materials or thicknesses on the discharge homogeneity, voltage-current waveform, and optical emission spectra were investigated. Results show that aforementioned parameters have a strongly impact on the discharge homogeneity and the optical emission spectra, but it is hard to identify definitely their influences on the discharge voltage-current waveform. Homogeneous discharges were easily observed when using low permittivity dielectric plate and the emission intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) increases with the rising of pulse peak voltage and the permittivity of dielectric material but decreases with the increasing of gas discharge gap and the dielectric plate thickness. The rotational and vibrational temperatures (Trot and Tvib) were determined at Trot=350±5 K and Tvib=3045 K via fitting the simulative spectra of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-2) with the measured one. PMID:24036046

  17. The influencing factors of nanosecond pulse homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jia, Li; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-jie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a bipolar nanosecond high pulse voltage with 20 ns rising time was employed to generate homogeneous dielectric barrier discharges using the plate-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. The effects of pulse peak voltage, gas discharge gap, and dielectric plates made by different materials or thicknesses on the discharge homogeneity, voltage-current waveform, and optical emission spectra were investigated. Results show that aforementioned parameters have a strongly impact on the discharge homogeneity and the optical emission spectra, but it is hard to identify definitely their influences on the discharge voltage-current waveform. Homogeneous discharges were easily observed when using low permittivity dielectric plate and the emission intensity of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) increases with the rising of pulse peak voltage and the permittivity of dielectric material but decreases with the increasing of gas discharge gap and the dielectric plate thickness. The rotational and vibrational temperatures (Trot and Tvib) were determined at Trot = 350 ± 5 K and Tvib = 3045 K via fitting the simulative spectra of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-2) with the measured one.

  18. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duten, X.; Redolfi, M.; Aggadi, N.; Vega, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  19. Nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure—the spark regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-12-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) spark discharges have been studied in atmospheric pressure air preheated to 1000 K. Measurements of spark initiation and stability, plasma dynamics, gas temperature and current-voltage characteristics of the spark regime are presented. Using 10 ns pulses applied repetitively at 30 kHz, we find that 2-400 pulses are required to initiate the spark, depending on the applied voltage. Furthermore, about 30-50 pulses are required for the spark discharge to reach steady state, following initiation. Based on space- and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, the spark discharge in steady state is found to ignite homogeneously in the discharge gap, without evidence of an initial streamer. Using measured emission from the N2 (C-B) 0-0 band, it is found that the gas temperature rises by several thousand Kelvin in the span of about 30 ns following the application of the high-voltage pulse. Current-voltage measurements show that up to 20-40 A of conduction current is generated, which corresponds to an electron number density of up to 1015 cm-3 towards the end of the high-voltage pulse. The discharge dynamics, gas temperature and electron number density are consistent with a streamer-less spark that develops homogeneously through avalanche ionization in volume. This occurs because the pre-ionization electron number density of about 1011 cm-3 produced by the high frequency train of pulses is above the critical density for streamer-less discharge development, which is shown to be about 108 cm-3.

  20. Simulations of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Soo Bak, Moon; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2013-03-21

    This paper describes simulations of nanosecond pulse plasma formation between planer electrodes covered by dielectric barriers in air at atmospheric pressure and 340 K. The plasma formation process starts as electrons detach from negative ions of molecular oxygen that are produced from the previous discharge pulse. An ionization front is found to form close to the positively biased electrode and then strengthens and propagates towards the grounded electrode with increasing gap voltage. Charge accumulation and secondary emission from the grounded electrode eventually lead to sheath collapse. One interesting feature is a predicted reversal in gap potential due to the accumulated charge, even when there is no reversal in applied potential. The simulation results are compared to recent measurement of mid-gap electric field under the same discharge conditions [Ito et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 065002 (2011)].

  1. Temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopic investigations on a nanosecond self-pulsing micro-thin-cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Beilei; Sadeghi, Nader; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Luggenhölscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2012-08-01

    At atmospheric pressure in Ar, a micro-thin-cathode discharge operates in a self-pulsing mode due to periodic ignition of a nanosecond spark discharge with a long living afterglow (several hundred nanoseconds). In this mode, optical emission spectra of the nanosecond spark and the afterglow are investigated. The electron density and temperature in the pure Ar discharge are measured by the Stark broadening and shift of the Ar 3p6 → 1s5 transition (415.859 nm). The nanosecond spark has an electron density of the order of 1017 cm-3 and an electron temperature of 5 eV. The gas temperature is obtained by analyzing the emission spectra of the N2 second positive system with an admixture of 0.5% N2. The measured gas temperature agrees very well with the result of a zero-dimensional kinetic simulation. The temporal development of the spatial distribution of separate emission lines shows that not only the nanosecond spark but the afterglow is also strongly localized. The temporal development of the emission spectrum provides powerful proof that the nanosecond spark discharge, due to thermionic emission, occurs in the self-pulsing mode with nanosecond current peaks.

  2. The formation of diffuse discharge by short-front nanosecond voltage pulses and the modification of dielectrics in this discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlovskii, V. M.; Panarin, V. A.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    The dynamics of diffuse discharge formation under the action of nanosecond voltage pulses with short fronts (below 1 ns) in the absence of a source of additional preionization and the influence of a dielectric film on this process have been studied. It is established that the diffuse discharge is induced by the avalanche multiplication of charge initiated by high-energy electrons and then maintained due to secondary breakdowns propagating via ionized gas channels. If a dielectric film (polyethylene, Lavsan, etc.) is placed on the anode, then multiply repeated discharge will lead to surface and bulk modification of the film material. Discharge-treated polyethylene film exhibits a change in the optical absorption spectrum in the near-IR range.

  3. Generating diffuse discharge via repetitive nanosecond pulses and line-line electrodes in atmospheric air.

    PubMed

    Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Ge, Ya-Feng; Bin, Yu; Huang, Jia-Jia; Lin, Fo-Chan

    2013-10-01

    Diffuse discharge in atmospheric air can generate extremely high power density and large-scale non-thermal plasma. An achievable method of generating diffuse discharge is reported in this paper. Based on the resonance theory, a compact high-voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator (HRNPG) has been developed as discharge excitation source. The HRNPG mainly consists of repetitive charging circuit, Tesla transformer and sharpening switch. With the voltage lower than 1.0 kV, the primary repetitive charging circuit comprises two fast thyristors as low-voltage switches. A spiral Tesla transformer is designed to provide a peak transformation ratio of more than 100. The HRNPG prototype is capable of generating a pulse with over 100 kV peak voltage and ~30 ns rise-time at the repetition frequency of 500 Hz. Using the copper line electrodes with a diameter of 0.4 mm, the gaps with highly non-uniform electric field are structured. With the suitable gap spacing and applied pulse, the glow-like diffuse discharge has been generated in line-type and ring-type electrode pairs. Some typical images are presented. PMID:24182161

  4. Generating diffuse discharge via repetitive nanosecond pulses and line-line electrodes in atmospheric air.

    PubMed

    Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Ge, Ya-Feng; Bin, Yu; Huang, Jia-Jia; Lin, Fo-Chan

    2013-10-01

    Diffuse discharge in atmospheric air can generate extremely high power density and large-scale non-thermal plasma. An achievable method of generating diffuse discharge is reported in this paper. Based on the resonance theory, a compact high-voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator (HRNPG) has been developed as discharge excitation source. The HRNPG mainly consists of repetitive charging circuit, Tesla transformer and sharpening switch. With the voltage lower than 1.0 kV, the primary repetitive charging circuit comprises two fast thyristors as low-voltage switches. A spiral Tesla transformer is designed to provide a peak transformation ratio of more than 100. The HRNPG prototype is capable of generating a pulse with over 100 kV peak voltage and ~30 ns rise-time at the repetition frequency of 500 Hz. Using the copper line electrodes with a diameter of 0.4 mm, the gaps with highly non-uniform electric field are structured. With the suitable gap spacing and applied pulse, the glow-like diffuse discharge has been generated in line-type and ring-type electrode pairs. Some typical images are presented.

  5. Generating diffuse discharge via repetitive nanosecond pulses and line-line electrodes in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Ge, Ya-Feng; Bin, Yu; Huang, Jia-Jia; Lin, Fo-Chan

    2013-10-01

    Diffuse discharge in atmospheric air can generate extremely high power density and large-scale non-thermal plasma. An achievable method of generating diffuse discharge is reported in this paper. Based on the resonance theory, a compact high-voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator (HRNPG) has been developed as discharge excitation source. The HRNPG mainly consists of repetitive charging circuit, Tesla transformer and sharpening switch. With the voltage lower than 1.0 kV, the primary repetitive charging circuit comprises two fast thyristors as low-voltage switches. A spiral Tesla transformer is designed to provide a peak transformation ratio of more than 100. The HRNPG prototype is capable of generating a pulse with over 100 kV peak voltage and ˜30 ns rise-time at the repetition frequency of 500 Hz. Using the copper line electrodes with a diameter of 0.4 mm, the gaps with highly non-uniform electric field are structured. With the suitable gap spacing and applied pulse, the glow-like diffuse discharge has been generated in line-type and ring-type electrode pairs. Some typical images are presented.

  6. High-voltage nanosecond pulses in a low-pressure radio-frequency discharge.

    PubMed

    Pustylnik, M Y; Hou, L; Ivlev, A V; Vasilyak, L M; Couëdel, L; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E; Fortov, V E

    2013-06-01

    An influence of a high-voltage (3-17 kV) 20 ns pulse on a weakly-ionized low-pressure (0.1-10 Pa) capacitively coupled radiofrequency (RF) argon plasma is studied experimentally. The plasma evolution after pulse exhibits two characteristic regimes: a bright flash, occurring within 100 ns after the pulse (when the discharge emission increases by 2-3 orders of magnitude over the steady-state level), and a dark phase, lasting a few hundreds μs (when the intensity of the discharge emission drops significantly below the steady-state level). The electron density increases during the flash and remains very large at the dark phase. 1D3V particle-in-cell simulations qualitatively reproduce both regimes and allow for detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. It is found that the high-voltage nanosecond pulse is capable of removing a significant fraction of plasma electrons out of the discharge gap, and that the flash is the result of the excitation of gas atoms, triggered by residual electrons accelerated in the electric field of immobile bulk ions. The secondary emission from the electrodes due to vacuum UV radiation plays an important role at this stage. High-density plasma generated during the flash provides efficient screening of the RF field (which sustains the steady-state plasma). This leads to the electron cooling and, hence, onset of the dark phase.

  7. Conversion of CH4 /CO2 by a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapinello, M.; Martini, L. M.; Dilecce, G.; Tosi, P.

    2016-02-01

    A possible way to store both renewable energy and CO2 in chemical energy is to produce value-added chemicals and fuels starting from CO2 and green electricity. This can be done by exploiting the non-equilibrium properties of gaseous electrical discharges. Discharges, in addition, can be switched on and off quickly, thus being suitable to be coupled with an intermittent energy source. In this study, we have used a nanosecond pulsed discharge to dissociate CO2 and CH4 in a 1:1 mixture at atmospheric pressure, and compared our results with literature data obtained by other discharges. The main products are CO, H2, C2H2, water and solid carbon. We estimate an energy efficiency of 40% for syngas (CO and H2) production, higher if other products are also considered. Such values are among the highest compared to other discharges, and, although not very high on an absolute scale, are likely improvable via possible routes discussed in the paper and by coupling to the discharge a heterogeneous catalysis stage.

  8. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  9. The Influence of Electrode Surface Mercury Film Deformation on the Breakdown Voltage of a Sub-Nanosecond Pulse Discharge Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Ming; Xu, Weijun; Wang, Rui

    2012-11-01

    A sub-nanosecond pulse discharge tube is a gas discharge tube which can generate a rapid high-voltage pulse of kilo-volts in amplitude and sub-nanoseconds in width. In this paper, the sub-nanosecond pulse discharge tube and its working principles are described. Because of the phenomenon that the deformation process of the mercury film on the electrode surface lags behind the charging process, the mercury film deformation process affects the dynamic breakdown voltage of the tube directly. The deformation of the mercury film is observed microscopically, and the dynamic breakdown voltage of the tube is measured using an oscillograph. The results show that all the parameters in the charging process, such as charging resistance, charging capacitance and DC power supply, affect the dynamic breakdown voltage of the tube. Based on these studies, the output pulse amplitude can be controlled continuously and individually by adjusting the power supply voltage. When the DC power supply is adjusted from 7 kV to 10 kV, the dynamic breakdown voltage ranges from 6.5 kV to 10 kV. According to our research, a kind of sub-nanosecond pulse generator is made, with a pulse width ranging from 0.5 ns to 2.5 ns, a rise time from 0.32 ns to 0.58 ns, and a pulse amplitude that is adjustable from 1.5 kV to 5 kV.

  10. Improvement of Spatial Uniformity of Nanosecond-Pulse Diffuse Discharges in a Multi-Needle-to-Plane Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianwei; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale non-thermal plasmas generated by nanosecond-pulse discharges have been used in various applications, including surface treatment, biomedical treatment, flow control etc. In this paper, atmospheric-pressure diffuse discharge was produced by a homemade nanosecond-pulse generator with a full width at half maximum of 100 ns and a rise time of 70 ns. In order to increase the discharge area, multi-needle electrodes with a 3×3 array were designed. The electrical characteristics of the diffuse discharge array and optical images were investigated by the voltage-current waveforms and discharge images. The experimental results showed that the intensity of diffuse discharges in the center was significantly weaker than those at the margins, resulting in an inhomogeneous spatial uniformity in the diffuse discharge array. Simulation of the electric field showed that the inhomogeneous spatial uniformity was caused by the non-uniform distribution of the electric field in the diffuse discharge array. Moreover, the spatial uniformity of the diffuse discharge array could be improved by increasing the length of the needle in the centre of the array. Finally, the experimental results confirmed the simulation results, and the spatial uniformity of the nanosecond-pulse diffuse discharge array was significantly improved. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51222701, 51477164) and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB239505-3)

  11. Species and temperature measurements of methane oxidation in a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K; Guo, Peng; Rousso, Aric; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-08-13

    Speciation and temperature measurements of methane oxidation during a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in a low-temperature flow reactor have been performed. Measurements of temperature and formaldehyde during a burst of pulses were made on a time-dependent basis using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and measurements of all other major stable species were made downstream of a continuously pulsed discharge using gas chromatography. The major species for a stoichiometric methane/oxygen/helium mixture with 75% dilution are H(2)O, CO, CO(2), H(2), CH(2)O, CH(3)OH, C(2)H(6), C(2)H(4) and C(2)H(2). A modelling tool to simulate homogeneous plasma combustion kinetics is assembled by combining the ZDPlasKin and CHEMKIN codes. In addition, a kinetic model for plasma-assisted combustion (HP-Mech/plasma) of methane, oxygen and helium mixtures has been assembled to simulate the measurements. Predictions can accurately capture reactant consumption as well as production of the major product species. However, significant disagreement is found for minor species, particularly CH(2)O and CH(3)OH. Further analysis revealed that the plasma-activated low-temperature oxidation pathways, particularly those involving CH(3)O(2) radical reactions and methane reactions with O((1)D), are responsible for this disagreement. PMID:26170433

  12. Species and temperature measurements of methane oxidation in a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K; Guo, Peng; Rousso, Aric; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-01-01

    Speciation and temperature measurements of methane oxidation during a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in a low-temperature flow reactor have been performed. Measurements of temperature and formaldehyde during a burst of pulses were made on a time-dependent basis using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and measurements of all other major stable species were made downstream of a continuously pulsed discharge using gas chromatography. The major species for a stoichiometric methane/oxygen/helium mixture with 75% dilution are H2O, CO, CO2, H2, CH2O, CH3OH, C2H6, C2H4 and C2H2. A modelling tool to simulate homogeneous plasma combustion kinetics is assembled by combining the ZDPlasKin and CHEMKIN codes. In addition, a kinetic model for plasma-assisted combustion (HP-Mech/plasma) of methane, oxygen and helium mixtures has been assembled to simulate the measurements. Predictions can accurately capture reactant consumption as well as production of the major product species. However, significant disagreement is found for minor species, particularly CH2O and CH3OH. Further analysis revealed that the plasma-activated low-temperature oxidation pathways, particularly those involving CH3O2 radical reactions and methane reactions with O(1D), are responsible for this disagreement. PMID:26170433

  13. Time-resolved temperature and O atom measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in combustible mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, Suzanne; Bowman, Sherrie; Burnette, David; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents results of time-resolved rotational temperature measurements, by pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and absolute O atom number density measurements, by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The experiments were conducted in nanosecond pulse discharges in H2-O2-Ar and C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, initially at room temperature, operated at a high pulse repetition rate of 40 kHz, in a plane-to-plane double dielectric barrier geometry at a pressure of 40 Torr. Intensified charge-coupled device images show that O2-Ar and H2-O2-Ar plasmas remain diffuse and volume-filling during the entire burst. Images taken in C2H4-O2-Ar plasma demonstrate significant discharge filamentation and constriction along the center plane and in the corners of the test section. The experimental results demonstrate high accuracy of pure rotational psec CARS for thermometry measurements at low partial pressures of oxygen in nonequilibrium plasmas. The results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, using two different H2-O2 chemistry and C2H4-O2 chemistry mechanisms. In H2-O2-Ar mixtures, the kinetic modeling predictions are in fairly good agreement with the data, predicting temperature rise and O atom accumulation in long discharge bursts, up to 450 pulses. The results show that adding hydrogen to the mixture results in an additional temperature rise, due to its partial oxidation by radicals generated in the plasma, essentially without chain branching. In C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, the model consistently underpredicts both temperature and O atom number density. The most likely reason for the difference between the experimental data and model predictions is discharge filamentation developing when ethylene is added to the O2-Ar mixture, at fairly low temperatures.

  14. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20 ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390 K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency.

  15. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-15

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency.

  16. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to study temporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium sustained in two different configurations, (i) diffuse filament discharge between two spherical electrodes, and (ii) surface discharge over plane quartz surface. In the diffuse filament discharge, the experimental results are compared with the predictions of a 2D plasma fluid model. Electron densities are put on an absolute scale using pure rotational Raman spectra in nitrogen, taken without the plasma, for calibration. In the diffuse filament discharge, electron density and electron temperature increase rapidly after breakdown, peaking at n e  ≈  3.5 · 1015 cm-3 and T e  ≈  4.0 eV. After the primary discharge pulse, both electron density and electron temperature decrease (to n e ~ 1014 cm-3 over ~1 µs and to T e ~ 0.5 eV over ~200 ns), with a brief transient rise produced by the secondary discharge pulse. At the present conditions, the dominant recombination mechanism is dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular ions, \\text{He}2+ . In the afterglow, the electron temperature does not relax to gas temperature, due to superelastic collisions. Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) inferred from the Thomson scattering spectra are nearly Maxwellian, which is expected at high ionization fractions, when the shape of EEDF is controlled primarily by electron-electron collisions. The kinetic model predictions agree well with the temporal trends detected in the experiment, although peak electron temperature and electron density are overpredicted. Heavy species temperature predicted during the discharge and the early afterglow remains low and does not exceed T  =  400 K, due to relatively slow quenching of metastable He* atoms in two-body and three-body processes. In the surface discharge, peak electron density and electron temperature are n e  ≈  3 · 1014 cm3 and T e

  17. Production of atmospheric pressure diffuse nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge using the array needles-plate electrode in air

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Dezheng; Wang Wenchun; Jia Li; Nie Dongxia; Shi Hengchao

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a bidirectional high pulse voltage with 20 ns rising time is employed to generate an atmospheric pressure diffuse dielectric barrier discharge using the array needles-plate electrode configuration. Both double needle and multiple needle electrode configurations nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharges are investigated. It is found that a diffuse discharge plasma with low gas temperature can be obtained, and the plasma volume increases with the increase of the pulse peak voltage, but remains almost constant with the increase of the pulse repetition rate. In addition to showing the potential application on a topographically nonuniform surface treatment of the discharge, the multiple needle-plate electrode configuration with different needle-plate electrode gaps are also employed to generate diffuse discharge plasma.

  18. Nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in N2-O2 mixtures: inception cloud and streamer emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, She; Heijmans, L. C. J.; Zeng, Rong; Nijdam, S.; Ebert, U.

    2015-05-01

    We evaluate the nanosecond temporal evolution of tens of thousands of positive discharges in a 16 cm point-plane gap in high purity nitrogen 6.0 and in N2-O2 gas mixtures with oxygen contents of 100 ppm, 0.2%, 2% and 20%, for pressures between 66.7 and 200 mbar. The voltage pulses have amplitudes of 20 to 40 kV with rise times of 20 or 60 ns and repetition frequencies of 0.1 to 10 Hz. The discharges first rapidly form a growing cloud around the tip, then they expand much more slowly like a shell and finally after a stagnation stage they can break up into rapid streamers. The radius of cloud and shell in artificial air is about 10% below the theoretically predicted value and scales with pressure p as theoretically expected, while the observed scaling of time scales with p raises questions. We find characteristic dependences on the oxygen content. No cloud and shell stage can be seen in nitrogen 6.0, and streamers emerge immediately. The radius of cloud and shell increases with oxygen concentration. On the other hand, the stagnation time after the shell phase is maximal for the intermediate oxygen concentration of 0.1% and the number of streamers formed is minimal; here the cloud and shell phase seem to be particularly stable against destabilization into streamers.

  19. Simulation study on nitrogen vibrational kinetics in a single nanosecond pulse high voltage air discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-05-01

    We report a simulation study on nitrogen vibrational kinetics N 2 ( X 1 Σg + , v = 0 - 12 ) in a single nanosecond pulse high voltage discharge in dry-air at a pressure of 100 Torr. Apart from the usual processes such as vibrational-vibrational exchange and vibrational-translational relaxation, the state-specific vibrational kinetics take into account the electronic-vibrational (E-V) process and chemical-vibrational process. The vibrational kinetics, coupled with electron Boltzmann equation solver, plasma chemical kinetics, and gas thermal balance are used to model the 100 ns discharge and its subsequent 10 ms afterglow. The self-consistent model shows good agreement with recent experimental results, with regard to time-resolved vibrational and translational temperature. According to the modeling results, The E-V mechanism has a small but non-negligible effect (about 2%) in rising of vibrational quanta in the early afterglow from 100 ns to 1μs. Another possible reason is the convective transport associated with the gas dynamic expansion in time delays around 1μs to 10 μs.

  20. Optical emission characteristics of surface nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yun; Li Yinghong; Jia Min; Song Huimin; Liang Hua

    2013-01-21

    This paper reports an experimental study of the optical emission characteristics of the surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma excited by nanosecond pulsed voltage. N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}) rotational and vibrational temperatures are almost the same with upper electrode powered with positive polarity and lower electrode grounded or upper electrode grounded and lower electrode powered with positive polarity. While the electron temperature is 12% higher with upper electrode powered with positive polarity and lower electrode grounded. When the frequency is below 2000 Hz, there is almost no influence of applied voltage amplitude and frequency on N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}) rotational, vibrational temperature and electron temperature. As the pressure decreases from 760 Torr to 5 Torr, N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}) rotational temperature remains almost unchanged, while its vibrational temperature decreases initially and then increases. The discharge mode changes from a filamentary type to a glow type around 80 Torr. In the filamentary mode, the electron temperature remains almost unchanged. In the glow mode, the electron temperature increases while the pressure decreases.

  1. Nitric Oxide Studies in Low Temperature Plasmas Generated with a Nanosecond Pulse Sphere Gap Electrical Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, David Dean

    This dissertation presents studies of NO kinetics in a plasma afterglow using various nanosecond pulse discharges across a sphere gap. The discharge platform is developed to produce a diffuse plasma volume large enough to allow for laser diagnostics in a plasma that is rich in vibrationally-excited molecules. This plasma is characterized by current and voltage traces as well as ICCD and NO PLIF images that are used to monitor the plasma dimensions and uniformity. Temperature and vibrational loading measurements are performed via coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). Absolute NO concentrations are obtained by laser-induce fluorescence (LIF) measurements, and N and O densities are found using two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). For all dry air conditions studied, the NO behavior is characterized by a rapid rate of formation consistent with an enhanced Zeldovich process involving electronically-excited nitrogen species that are generated within the plasma. After several microseconds, the NO evolution is entirely controlled by the reverse Zeldovich process. These results show that under the chosen range of conditions and even in extreme instances of vibrational loading, there is no formation channel beyond ~2 musec. Both the NO formation and consumption mechanisms are strongly affected by the addition of fuel species, producing much greater NO concentrations in the afterglow.

  2. Ultrashort Two-Photon-Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Nanosecond-Duration, Repetitively Pulsed Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob Brian

    Absolute number densities of atomic species produced by nanosecond duration, repetitively pulsed electric discharges are measured by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). Relatively high plasma discharge pulse energies (=1 mJ/pulse) are used to generate atomic hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen in a variety of discharge conditions and geometries. Unique to this work is the development of femtosecond-laser-based TALIF (fs-TALIF). Fs-TALIF offers a number of advantages compared to more conventional ns-pulse-duration laser systems, including better accuracy of direct quenching measurements in challenging environments, significantly reduced photolytic interference including photo-dissociation and photo-ionization, higher signal and increased laser-pulse bandwidth, the ability to collect two-dimensional images of atomic species number densities with far greater spatial resolution compared with more conventional diagnostics, and much higher laser repetition rates allowing for more efficient and accurate measurements of atomic species number densities. In order to fully characterize the fs-TALIF diagnostic and compare it with conventional ns-TALIF, low pressure (100 Torr) ns-duration pulsed discharges are operated in mixtures of H2, O2, and N2 with different buffer gases including argon, helium, and nitrogen. These discharge conditions are used to demonstrate the capability for two-dimensional imaging measurements. The images produced are the first of their kind and offer quantitative insight into spatially and temporally resolved kinetics and transport in ns-pulsed discharge plasmas. The two-dimensional images make possible comparison with high-fidelity plasma kinetics models of the presented data. The comparison with the quasi-one-dimensional kinetic model show good spatial and temporal agreement. The same diagnostics are used at atmospheric pressure, when atomic oxygen fs-TALIF is performed in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ). Here, the

  3. Study on electrical characteristics of barrier-free atmospheric air diffuse discharge generated by nanosecond pulses and long wire electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Teng, Yun; Liu, Lun; Pan, Yuan

    2014-07-15

    In room-temperature atmospheric air, the large-scale diffuse plasmas can be generated via high-voltage nanosecond pulses with short rise-time and wire electrodes. Diffuse discharge with the wire electrode length up to 110.0 cm and the discharge spacing of several centimeters has been investigated in this paper. Electrical characteristics of diffuse discharge have been analyzed by their optical photographs and measuring of the voltage and current waveforms. Experimental results show the electrode spacing, and the length of wire electrodes can influence the intensity and mode transition of diffuse discharge. The characteristic of current waveforms is that there are several current oscillation peaks at the time of applied pulsed voltage peak, and at the tail of applied pulse, the conduction current component will compensate the displacement one so that the measured current is unidirectional in diffuse discharge mode. The transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge is always with the increasing of conduction current density. As for nanosecond pulses with long tail, the long wire electrodes are help for generating non-equilibrium diffuse plasmas.

  4. An atmospheric air gas-liquid diffuse discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container used for water sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tang, Kai; Song, Ying

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we report that the air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container with different bottom structures at atmospheric pressure. Optical diagnostic measurements show that bountiful chemically and biologically active species, which are beneficial for effective sterilization in some areas, are produced. Such diffuse plasmas are then used to treat drinking water containing the common microorganisms (Candida albicans and Escherichia coli). It is found that these plasmas can sterilize the microorganisms efficiently.

  5. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge in Water without Bubbles: A Fundamental Study of Initiation, Propagation and Plasma Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan

    The state of plasma is widely known as a gas-phase phenomenon, but plasma in liquids have also received significant attention over the last century. Generating plasma in liquids however is theoretically challenging, and this problem is often overcome via liquid-gas phase transition preceding the actual plasma formation. In this sense, plasma forms in gas bubbles in the liquid. Recent work at the Drexel Plasma Institute has shown that nanosecond pulsed electric fields can initiate plasma in liquids without any initial cavitation phase, at voltages below theoretical direct-ionization thresholds. This unique regime is poorly understood and does not fit into any current descriptive mechanisms. As with all new phenomena, a complete fundamental description is paramount to understanding its usefulness to practical applications. The primary goals of this research were to qualitatively and quantitatively understand the phenomenon of nanosecond pulsed discharge in liquids as a means to characterizing properties that may open up niche application possibilities. Analysis of the plasma was based on experimental results from non-invasive, sub-nanosecond time-resolved optical diagnostics, including direct imaging, transmission imaging (Schlieren and shadow), and optical emission spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of variations in the electric field amplitude and polarity, liquid permittivity, and pulse duration. It was found that the plasma size and emission intensity was dependent on the permittivity of the liquid, as well as the voltage polarity, and the structure and dynamics were explained by a 'cold-lightning' mechanism. The under-breakdown dynamics at the liquid-electrode interface were investigated by transmission imaging to provide evidence for a novel mechanism for initiation based on the electrostriction. This mechanism was proposed by collaborators on the project and developed alongside the experimental work in this

  6. Temporal evolution of temperature and OH density produced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in water vapour at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainct, F. P.; Lacoste, D. A.; Kirkpatrick, M. J.; Odic, E.; Laux, C. O.

    2014-02-01

    We report on an experimental study of the temporal evolution of OH density and gas temperature in spark discharges created by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in pure water vapour at 475 K and atmospheric pressure. The plasma was generated by 20 kV, 20 ns pulses, at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The temperature was measured during the discharge by optical emission spectroscopy of the second positive system of N2, and between two discharges by two-colour OH-planar laser induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF) using two pairs of rotational transitions. Between two successive discharges, the relative density of OH was measured by OH-PLIF and was found to decay very slowly, with a 1/e decay time of about 50 µs. With the use of a chemical kinetics model, the OH density was placed on an absolute scale.

  7. A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by nanosecond pulse under a double hexagon needle-array electrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Jiang, Peng-Chao

    2014-01-01

    A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse is generated under a double hexagon needle-array electrode at atmospheric pressure. The images of the diffuse discharge, electric characteristics, and the optical emission spectra emitted from the diffuse air discharge plasma are obtained. Based on the waveforms of pulse voltage and current, the power consumption, and the power density of the diffuse air discharge plasma are investigated under different pulse peak voltages. The electron density and the electron temperature of the diffuse plasma are estimated to be approximately 1.42×10(11) cm(-3) and 4.4 eV, respectively. The optical emission spectra are arranged to determine the rotational and vibrational temperatures by comparing experimental with simulated spectra. Meanwhile, the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the diffuse discharge plasma are also discussed under different pulse peak voltages and pulse repetition rates, respectively. In addition, the diffuse air discharge plasma can form an area of about 70×50 mm(2) on the surface of dielectric layer and can be scaled up to the required size.

  8. Laminar lean premixed methane/air combustion near the lean flammability limit using nanosecond repetitive pulsed discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Moon Soo; Do, Hyungrok; Mungal, Mark G.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2011-10-01

    Gas chromatographic and temperature measurements have been carried out to investigate the extent of premixed methane/air combustion with the application of nanosecond repetitive pulsed discharges around the lean flammability limit for laminar flows. The results show that the discharges lead to the complete combustion when the equivalence ratio is above 0.54, but when the ratio is below the limit, the combustion is quenched at the downstream flow. To investigate the kinetics in detail, 2-D simulations of plasma-induced combustion have been conducted for methane/air mixtures at below and above the lean flammability limit. The simulations reveal that methane is mostly combusted in the discharge region since the discharge repetition timescale is much shorter than the species diffusion and advection timescales, and so the discharge serves more as a heat and radical source rather than a small combustor, to flame hold near the lean flammability limit.

  9. Two-stage energy thermalization mechanism in nanosecond pulse discharges in air and hydrogen-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, Suzanne; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2015-04-01

    Time-resolved and spatially resolved temperature measurements, by pure rotational picosecond broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), and kinetic modeling calculations are used to study kinetics of energy thermalization in nanosecond pulse discharges in air and hydrogen-air mixtures. The diffuse filament, nanosecond pulse discharge (pulse duration ˜100 ns) is sustained between two spherical electrodes and is operated at a low pulse repetition rate to enable temperature measurements over a wide range of time scales after the discharge pulse. The experimental results demonstrate high accuracy of pure rotational ps CARS for thermometry measurements in highly transient non-equilibrium plasmas. Rotational-translational temperatures are measured for time delays after the pulse ranging from tens of ns to tens of ms, spanning several orders of magnitude of time scales for energy thermalization in non-equilibrium plasmas. In addition, radial temperature distributions across the plasma filament are measured for several time delays after the discharge pulse. Kinetic modeling calculations using a state-specific master equation kinetic model of reacting hydrogen-air plasmas show good agreement with experimental data. The results demonstrate that energy thermalization and temperature rise in these plasmas occur in two clearly defined stages, (i) ‘rapid’ heating, caused by collisional quenching of excited electronic states of N2 molecules by O2, and (ii) ‘slow’ heating, caused primarily by N2 vibrational relaxation by O atoms (in air) and by chemical energy release during partial oxidation of hydrogen (in H2-air). The results have major implications for plasma assisted combustion and plasma flow control.

  10. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(C3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2] > 10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron-ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t = 1-30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  11. Investigation of nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge using plate-to-plate electrode with asymmetric dielectric arrangement in airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haicheng; Fan, Zhihui; Liu, Yidi; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma is produced in airflow by applying nanosecond high voltage pulses with peak voltage about 35 kV and rising time about 40 ns on a plate-to-plate electrode arrangement. The effects of airflow rate (0-50 m/s) on the discharge characteristics are investigated under different barrier conditions (the bare anode case and the bare cathode case). For both cases, the breakdown voltage and the time lag increase distinctly and the discharge intensity decreases sharply when the airflow rate increases from 0 to 30 m/s, and then keep almost constant until the airflow rate is further increased to 50 m/s. For the bare anode case (the cathode is covered by dielectric plate), the discharge mode transforms gradually from filamentary to diffuse discharge with the increasing airflow rate. While for the bare cathode case, some micro-discharge channels are still excited, though the discharge becomes more diffuse when the airflow rate is higher than 30 m/s. By acquiring the time-resolved images of the discharge, it is proved that it is the primary discharge which becomes diffuse when airflow is introduced and the following two discharges of the same voltage pulse occur principally at the positions where the primary discharge is more intense. And in both cases, the plasma temperatures are reduced, but the degree is different. All the phenomena can be explained mainly by the variation of the space charge distribution when the airflow is introduced into the discharge gap. And it is indicated that the bare anode case has an advantage in obtaining diffuse discharge.

  12. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-05-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determined, with the notable result that there exists a minimum and maximum gap distance for its existence at a given ambient gas temperature. The minimum gap distance increases with decreasing gas temperature, whereas the maximum does not vary appreciably. To explain the experimental results, an analytical model is developed to explain the corona-to-glow (C-G) and glow-to-spark (G-S) transitions. The C-G transition is analyzed in terms of the avalanche-to-streamer transition and the breakdown field during the conduction phase following the establishment of a conducting channel across the discharge gap. The G-S transition is determined by the thermal ionization instability, and we show analytically that this transition occurs at a certain reduced electric field for the NRP discharges studied here. This model shows that the electrode geometry plays an important role in the existence of the NRP glow regime at a given gas temperature. We derive a criterion for the existence of the NRP glow regime as a function of the ambient gas temperature, pulse repetition frequency, electrode radius of curvature, and interelectrode gap distance.

  13. Plasma density enhancement in atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharges by high-voltage nanosecond pulse in the pulse-on period: a PIC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Wang, Dezhen

    2010-02-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) plus Monte Carlo collision simulation is employed to investigate how a sustainable atmospheric pressure single dielectric-barrier discharge responds to a high-voltage nanosecond pulse (HVNP) further applied to the metal electrode. The results show that the HVNP can significantly increase the plasma density in the pulse-on period. The ion-induced secondary electrons can give rise to avalanche ionization in the positive sheath, which widens the discharge region and enhances the plasma density drastically. However, the plasma density stops increasing as the applied pulse lasts over certain time; therefore, lengthening the pulse duration alone cannot improve the discharge efficiency further. Physical reasons for these phenomena are then discussed.

  14. Multiple current peaks in room-temperature atmospheric pressure homogenous dielectric barrier discharge plasma excited by high-voltage tunable nanosecond pulse in air

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-jie; Wang, Sen

    2013-05-13

    Room temperature homogenous dielectric barrier discharge plasma with high instantaneous energy efficiency is acquired by using nanosecond pulse voltage with 20-200 ns tunable pulse width. Increasing the voltage pulse width can lead to the generation of regular and stable multiple current peaks in each discharge sequence. When the voltage pulse width is 200 ns, more than 5 organized current peaks can be observed under 26 kV peak voltage. Investigation also shows that the organized multiple current peaks only appear in homogenous discharge mode. When the discharge is filament mode, organized multiple current peaks are replaced by chaotic filament current peaks.

  15. Numerical studies of nitric oxide formation in nanosecond-pulsed discharge-stabilized flames of premixed methane/air.

    PubMed

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A

    2015-08-13

    A simulation is developed to investigate the kinetics of nitric oxide (NO) formation in premixed methane/air combustion stabilized by nanosecond-pulsed discharges. The simulation consists of two connected parts. The first part calculates the kinetics within the discharge while considering both plasma/combustion reactions and species diffusion, advection and thermal conduction to the surrounding flow. The second part calculates the kinetics of the overall flow after mixing the discharge flow with the surrounding flow to account for the effect that the discharge has on the overall kinetics. The simulation reveals that the discharge produces a significant amount of atomic oxygen (O) as a result of the high discharge temperature and dissociative quenching of excited state nitrogen by molecular oxygen. This atomic oxygen subsequently produces hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The fractions of these O and OH then undergo Zel'dovich reactions and are found to contribute to as much as 73% of the total NO that is produced. The post-discharge simulation shows that the NO survives within the flow once produced. PMID:26170428

  16. Sub-nanosecond time resolved light emission study for diffuse discharges in air under steep high voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardiveau, P.; Magne, L.; Marode, E.; Ouaras, K.; Jeanney, P.; Bournonville, B.

    2016-10-01

    Pin-to-plane discharges in centimetre air gaps and standard conditions of pressure and temperature are generated under very high positive nanosecond scale voltage pulses. The experimental study is based on recordings of sub-nanosecond time resolved and Abel-processed light emission profiles and their complete correlation to electrical current waveforms. The effects of the voltage pulse features (amplitude between 20 and 90 kV, rise time between 2 and 5.2 ns, and time rate between 4 and 40 kV · ns‑1) and the electrode configuration (gap distance between 10 and 30 mm, pin radius between 10 and 200 µm, copper, molybdenum or tungsten pin material) are described. A three time period development can be found: a glow-like structure with monotonic light profiles during the first 1.5 ns whose size depends on time voltage rate, a shell-like structure with bimodal profiles whose duration and extension in space depends on rise time, and either diffuse or multi-channel regime for the connection to the cathode plane according to gap distance. The transition of the light from monotonic to bimodal patterns reveals the relative effects and dynamics of streamer space charge and external laplacian field. A classical 2D-fluid model for streamer propagation has been used and adapted for very high and steep voltage pulses. It shows the formation of a strong space charge (streamer) very close to the pin, but also a continuity of emission between the pin and the streamer, and electric fields higher than the critical ionization field (28 kV · cm‑1 in air) almost in the whole gap and very early in the discharge propagation.

  17. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(С3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2]  >  10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron–ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t  =  1–30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  18. Kinetics of excited states and radicals in a nanosecond pulse discharge and afterglow in nitrogen and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkurenkov, Ivan; Burnette, David; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-12-01

    The present kinetic modelling calculation results provide key new insights into the kinetics of vibrational excitation of nitrogen and plasma chemical reactions in nanosecond pulse, ‘diffuse filament’ discharges in nitrogen and dry air at a moderate energy loading per molecule, ˜0.1 eV per molecule. It is shown that it is very important to take into account Coulomb collisions between electrons because they change the electron energy distribution function and, as a result, strongly affect populations of excited states and radical concentrations in the discharge. The results demonstrate that the apparent transient rise of N2 ‘first level’ vibrational temperature after the discharge pulse, as detected in the experiments, is due to the net downward V-V energy transfer in N2-N2 collisions, which increases the N2(X 1Σ, v = 1) population. Finally, a comparison of the model's predictions with the experimental data shows that NO formation in the afterglow occurs via reactive quenching of multiple excited electronic levels of nitrogen molecule, N2\\ast , by O atoms. ) published in this volume, which focuses on the kinetic modelling of the experiments. This paper presents the results of the experiments.

  19. Temporal evolution of the electron density produced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in water vapor at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainct, Florent; Lacoste, Deanna; Kirkpatrick, Michael; Odic, Emmanuel; Laux, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    A study of plasma discharges produced by nanosecond repetitive pulses (NRP) in water vapor at 450 K and 1 atm is presented. The plasma was generated between two point electrodes with 20-ns duration, high-voltage (0--20 kV) pulses, at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz, in the spark regime (2 mJ/pulse). Atomic lines measured by optical emission spectroscopy were used to determine the electron number density in this non-equilibrium water-vapor plasma. The broadenings and shifts of the Hα and Hβ lines of the hydrogen Balmer series and of the atomic oxygen triplet at 777 nm were analyzed. For a maximum reduced electric field of about 200 Td, a maximum electron density of 2 × 1018 cm-3 was measured, corresponding to an ionization level of about 10 %. This ionization level is two orders of magnitude higher than the one obtained for similar NRP discharges in air at atmospheric pressure.

  20. Uniform and non-uniform modes of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air: fast imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electric field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander

    2014-06-25

    In this study, we report experimental results on fast ICCD imaging of development of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric air and spectroscopic measurements of electric field in the discharge. Uniformity of the discharge images obtained with nanosecond exposure times were analyzed using chi-square test. The results indicate that DBD uniformity strongly depends on applied (global) electric field in the discharge gap, and is a threshold phenomenon. We show that in the case of strong overvoltage on the discharge gap (provided by fast rise times), there is transition from filamentary to uniform DBD mode which correlates to the corresponding decrease of maximum local electric field in the discharge. PMID:25071294

  1. Uniform and non-uniform modes of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air: fast imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electric field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chong; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report experimental results on fast ICCD imaging of development of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric air and spectroscopic measurements of electric field in the discharge. Uniformity of the discharge images obtained with nanosecond exposure times were analyzed using chi-square test. The results indicate that DBD uniformity strongly depends on applied (global) electric field in the discharge gap, and is a threshold phenomenon. We show that in the case of strong overvoltage on the discharge gap (provided by fast rise times), there is transition from filamentary to uniform DBD mode which correlates to the corresponding decrease of maximum local electric field in the discharge. PMID:25071294

  2. Influence of air flow parameters on nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in a pin-annular electrode configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitz, Sylvain A.; Moeck, Jonas P.; Schuller, Thierry; Veynante, Denis; Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of various air flow parameters on the plasma regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges is investigated at atmospheric pressure. The two electrodes are in a pin-annular configuration, transverse to the mean flow. The voltage pulses have amplitudes up to 15 kV, a duration of 10 ns and a repetition frequency ranging from 15 to 30 kHz. The NRP corona to NRP spark (C-S) regime transition and the NRP spark to NRP corona (S-C) regime transition are investigated for different steady and harmonically oscillating flows. First, the strong effect of a transverse flow on the C-S and S-C transitions, as reported in previous studies, is verified. Second, it is shown that the azimuthal flow imparted by a swirler does not affect the regime transition voltages. Finally, the influence of low frequency harmonic oscillations of the air flow, generated by a loudspeaker, is studied. A strong effect of frequency and amplitude of the incoming flow modulation on the NRP plasma regime is observed. Results are interpreted based on the cumulative effect of the NRP discharges and an analysis of the residence times of fluid particles in the inter-electrode region.

  3. Ignition and afterglow dynamics of a high pressure nanosecond pulsed helium micro-discharge: II. Rydberg molecules kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Emile A. D.; Schregel, Christian-Georg; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experimental results presented in Schregel et al (2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 054003) on a high pressure micro-discharge operated in helium and driven by nanosecond voltage pulses. A simple global plasma chemistry model is developed to describe the ions, excited atomic and molecular species dynamics in the ignition and early afterglow regimes. The existing experimental data on high pressure helium kinetics is reviewed and critically discussed. It is highlighted that several inconsistencies in the branching ratio of neutral assisted associative and dissociative processes currently exist in the literature and need further clarification. The model allows to pinpoint the mechanisms responsible for the large amounts of Rydberg molecules produced in the discharge and for the helium triplet metastable state in the afterglow. The main losses of electrons are also identified. The fast quenching of excited He (n  >  3) states appears to be a significant source of Rydberg molecules which has been previously neglected. The plasma model finally draws a simplified, but still accurate description of high pressure helium discharges based on available experimental data for ion and neutral helium species.

  4. Modeling and simulation of plasma gas flow driven by a single nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. Y.; Cai, J. S.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    A simplified (7 species and 9 processes) plasma kinetic model is proposed to investigate the mechanism of the plasma aerodynamic actuation driven by nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD). The governing equations include conservation equations for each species, the Poisson equation for the electric potential, and Navier-Stokes equations for the gas dynamic flow. Numerical simulations of plasma discharge and flow actuation on NS-DBD plasma actuators have been carried out. Key discharge characteristics and the responses of the quiescent air were reproduced and compared to those obtained in experiments and numerical simulations. Results demonstrate that the reduced plasma kinetic model is able to capture the dominant species and reactions to predict the actuation in complicated hydrodynamics. For the one-dimensional planar and two-dimensional symmetric NS-DBD, the forming of the sheath collapse is mainly due to the charge accumulation and secondary emission from the grounded electrode. Rapid species number density rise and electric field drop occur at the edge of the plasma sheath, where the space charge density gradient peaks. For the aerodynamic actuation with typical asymmetry electrodes, discharge characteristics have a core area on the right edge of the upper electrode, where the value can be much higher. The formation and propagation of the compression waves generated through rapid heating have also been performed and compared to those measured in a recent experiment. Energy release leads to gas expansion and forms a cylindrical shock wave, centering at the upper electrode tip with low gas acceleration. For the present single pulsed 12 kV case, the mean temperature of gas heating reaches about 575 K at 1 μs and decreases to about 460 K at 10 μs.

  5. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Pei, X.; Hasnain, Q.; Nie, L.; Lu, X.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6 mm discharge gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using dry air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-Streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBD. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and discharge develops in streamer, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initial electron density by pre-ionization may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also found that the dependence of homogeneity upon PRF is a non-monotonic one.

  6. Surface charge dynamics and OH and H number density distributions in near-surface nanosecond pulse discharges at a liquid / vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Caroline; Petrishchev, Vitaly; Yin, Zhiyao; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2015-10-01

    The present work provides insight into surface charge dynamics and kinetics of radical species reactions in nanosecond pulse discharges sustained at a liquid-vapor interface, above a distilled water surface. The near-surface plasma is sustained using two different discharge configurations, a surface ionization wave discharge between two exposed metal electrodes and a double dielectric barrier discharge. At low discharge pulse repetition rates (~100 Hz), residual surface charge deposition after the discharge pulse is a minor effect. At high pulse repetition rates (~10 kHz), significant negative surface charge accumulation over multiple discharge pulses is detected, both during alternating polarity and negative polarity pulse trains. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and two-photon absorption LIF (TALIF) line imaging are used for in situ measurements of spatial distributions of absolute OH and H atom number densities in near-surface, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas. Both in a surface ionization wave discharge and in a double dielectric barrier discharge, peak measured H atom number density, [H] is much higher compared to peak OH number density, due to more rapid OH decay in the afterglow between the discharge pulses. Higher OH number density was measured near the regions with higher plasma emission intensity. Both OH and especially H atoms diffuse out of the surface ionization wave plasma volume, up to several mm from the liquid surface. Kinetic modeling calculations using a quasi-zero-dimensional H2O vapor / Ar plasma model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The results demonstrate the experimental capability of in situ radical species number density distribution measurements in liquid-vapor interface plasmas, in a simple canonical geometry that lends itself to the validation of kinetic models.

  7. A diffuse plasma generated by bipolar nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Li; Yang, De-Zheng; Shi, Heng-Chao; Wang, Wen-Chun; Wang, Sen

    2014-05-01

    In this study, a bipolar high-voltage pulse with 20 ns rising time is employed to generate diffuse dielectric barrier discharge plasma using wire-plate electrode configuration in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature of the plasma is determined by comparing the experimental and the best fitted optical emission spectra of the second positive bands of N2(C3Πu → B3 Πg, 0-2) and the first negative bands of N2+ (B2 Σu+ → X2 Σg+, 0-0). The effects of the concentration of argon and oxygen on the emission intensities of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm), OH (A 2Σ → X2Π, 0-0) and N2+ (B2 Σu+ → X2 Σg+, 0-0, 391.4 nm) are investigated. It is shown that the plasma gas temperature keeps almost constant with the pulse repetition rate and pulse peak voltage increasing. The emission intensities of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm), OH(A2Σ → X2Π, 0-0) and N2+ (B2 Σu+ → X2 Σg+, 0-0, 391.4 nm) rise with increasing the concentration of argon, but decrease with increasing the concentration of oxygen, and the influences of oxygen concentration on the emission intensities of N2(C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) and OH (A2Σ → X2Π, 0-0) are more greater than that on the emission intensity of N2+ (B2 Σu+ → X2 Σg+, 0-0, 391.4 nm).

  8. Freon destruction in a nanosecond corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedzhanov, R.A.; Vikharev, A.L.; Gorbachev, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    One of the main reasons for destruction of the ozone layer is high content of freon in the Earth atmosphere. The life time of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) in the stratosphere is tens of years, therefore, along with abandonment of the use of CFC compositions. of importance is the search for efficient ways to purify both industrial gaseous wastes and the atmosphere proper from pollution. Among various purification methods the most promising seems to be the method based on freon destruction during processes of dissociative electron attachment. Freon molecules in this case are destroyed selectively mainly at the stage of plasma decay by cold electrons, for which the constant of dissociative attachment is especially high (k{sub a} = 10{sup -7} - 10{sup -9}cm{sup 3}/s). By that, as the source of electrons we propose using nanosecond discharges with a high level of the reduced electric field, E/N, when the main share of the pulse energy goes into ionization, and gas heating is insignificant. These requirements are best met by the use of barrier and pulse corona discharge, which are widely employed for ozone generation and purification of gaseous wastes. Plasma of such discharges is composed of chaotically arising nanosecond microdischarges. The possibility to purify atmosphere from freons directly by means of a nanosecond microwave discharge produced the troposphere by ground-based sources is also studied. An important problem for the said applications, along with estimation of efficiency of freon destruction is determination of chemical composition of the products that appear at the post-discharge stage as the result of plasma chemical reaction. This presentation gives results of experimental studies of freon destruction in a pulse-periodic nanosecond corona discharge.

  9. A comparative study for the inactivation of multidrug resistance bacteria using dielectric barrier discharge and nano-second pulsed plasma.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kumar, Naresh; Park, Dae Hoon; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Neyts, Erik C; Verlackt, Christof C W; Bogaerts, Annemie; Kang, Min Ho; Uhm, Han Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can be inactivated through various physical and chemical means, and these have always been the focus of extensive research. To further improve the methodology for these ends, two types of plasma systems were investigated: nano-second pulsed plasma (NPP) as liquid discharge plasma and an Argon gas-feeding dielectric barrier discharge (Ar-DBD) as a form of surface plasma. To understand the sterilizing action of these two different plasma sources, we performed experiments with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria (wild type) and multidrug resistant bacteria (Penicillum-resistant, Methicillin-resistant and Gentamicin-resistant). We observed that both plasma sources can inactivate both the wild type and multidrug-resistant bacteria to a good extent. Moreover, we observed a change in the surface morphology, gene expression and β-lactamase activity. Furthermore, we used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the variation in functional groups (C-H/C-C, C-OH and C=O) of the peptidoglycan (PG) resulting from exposure to plasma species. To obtain atomic scale insight in the plasma-cell interactions and support our experimental observations, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of plasma species, such as OH, H2O2, O, O3, as well as O2 and H2O, on the dissociation/formation of above mentioned functional groups in PG. PMID:26351132

  10. Influence of pulsed nanosecond volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electrical characteristics of MCT epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Voitsekhovskii, Alexandr V.; Lozovoy, Kirill A.; Nesmelov, Sergey N.; Dzyadukh, Stanislav M.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was investigating the effect of volume nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the electro-physical properties of the HgCdTe (MCT) epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Hall measurements of electro-physical parameters of MCT samples after irradiation have shown that there is a layer of epitaxial films exhibiting n-type conductivity that is formed in the near-surface area. After more than 600 pulses of influence parameters and thickness of the resulting n-layer is such that the measured field dependence of Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of n-type conductivity. Also it is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electro-physical characteristics of MIS structures. This fact is demonstrated by increase in density of positive fixed charge, change in the hysteresis type of the capacitance-voltage characteristic, an increase in density of surface states. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies of the controlled change in the properties of MCT.

  11. A comparative study for the inactivation of multidrug resistance bacteria using dielectric barrier discharge and nano-second pulsed plasma

    PubMed Central

    Hoon Park, Ji; Kumar, Naresh; Hoon Park, Dae; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Neyts, Erik C.; Verlackt, Christof C. W.; Bogaerts, Annemie; Ho Kang, Min; Sup Uhm, Han; Ha Choi, Eun; Attri, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can be inactivated through various physical and chemical means, and these have always been the focus of extensive research. To further improve the methodology for these ends, two types of plasma systems were investigated: nano-second pulsed plasma (NPP) as liquid discharge plasma and an Argon gas-feeding dielectric barrier discharge (Ar-DBD) as a form of surface plasma. To understand the sterilizing action of these two different plasma sources, we performed experiments with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria (wild type) and multidrug resistant bacteria (Penicillum-resistant, Methicillin-resistant and Gentamicin-resistant). We observed that both plasma sources can inactivate both the wild type and multidrug-resistant bacteria to a good extent. Moreover, we observed a change in the surface morphology, gene expression and β-lactamase activity. Furthermore, we used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the variation in functional groups (C-H/C-C, C-OH and C=O) of the peptidoglycan (PG) resulting from exposure to plasma species. To obtain atomic scale insight in the plasma-cell interactions and support our experimental observations, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of plasma species, such as OH, H2O2, O, O3, as well as O2 and H2O, on the dissociation/formation of above mentioned functional groups in PG. PMID:26351132

  12. Atmospheric air diffuse array-needles dielectric barrier discharge excited by positive, negative, and bipolar nanosecond pulses in large electrode gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, De-zheng; Wang, Wen-chun; Liu, Zhi-jie; Wang, Sen; Jiang, Peng-chao; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, positive, negative, and bipolar nanosecond pulses are employed to generate stable and diffuse discharge plasma using array needles-plate electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. A comparison study of discharge images, electrical characteristics, optical emission spectra, and plasma vibrational temperature and rotational temperatures in three pulsed polarity discharges is carried on under different discharge conditions. It is found that bipolar pulse is beneficial to the excitation of diffuse dielectric barrier discharge, which can generate a room temperature plasma with more homogeneous and higher discharge intensity compared with unipolar discharges. Under the condition of 6 mm electrode gap distance, 26 kV pulse peak voltage, and 150 Hz pulse repetition rate, the emission intensity of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg) of the bipolar pulsed discharge is 4 times higher than the unipolar discharge (both positive and negative), while the plasma gas temperature is kept at 300 K, which is about 10-20 K lower than the unipolar discharge plasma.

  13. Influence of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on the stability of a swirled propane/air burner representative of an aeronautical combustor.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, S; Pilla, G; Lacoste, D A; Scouflaire, P; Ducruix, S; Laux, C O; Veynante, D

    2015-08-13

    This paper reports on an experimental study of the influence of a nanosecond repetitively pulsed spark discharge on the stability domain of a propane/air flame. This flame is produced in a lean premixed swirled combustor representative of an aeronautical combustion chamber. The lean extinction limits of the flame produced without and with plasma are determined and compared. It appears that only a low mean discharge power is necessary to increase the flame stability domain. Lastly, the effects of several parameters (pulse repetition frequency, global flowrate, electrode location) are studied. PMID:26170424

  14. Influence of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on the stability of a swirled propane/air burner representative of an aeronautical combustor

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, S.; Pilla, G.; Lacoste, D. A.; Scouflaire, P.; Ducruix, S.; Laux, C. O.; Veynante, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study of the influence of a nanosecond repetitively pulsed spark discharge on the stability domain of a propane/air flame. This flame is produced in a lean premixed swirled combustor representative of an aeronautical combustion chamber. The lean extinction limits of the flame produced without and with plasma are determined and compared. It appears that only a low mean discharge power is necessary to increase the flame stability domain. Lastly, the effects of several parameters (pulse repetition frequency, global flowrate, electrode location) are studied. PMID:26170424

  15. A simple method for experimental determination of electron temperature and electron density in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge used for excitation of high-power atomic and ionic metal and metal halide vapour lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    A simple method based on the time-resolved measurement of electrical discharge parameters, such as tube voltage and discharge current, is developed and applied for determination of electron temperature and electron density in the discharge period of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge, exciting high-power DUV Cu+ Ne-CuBr, He-Hg+ and He-Sr+ lasers.

  16. A compact nanosecond pulse modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Jizhang; Xue, Jianchao; Qiang, Bohan

    Two circuits of nanosecond pulse modulator which generate two different width rectangular pulses respectively are described. The basic configuration of the modulator is the Marx circuit, in which avalanche transistors are used as switching devices. In order to obtain the rectangular pulses a pulse-forming network (PFN) is introduced and fitted into the Marx. A multi-parallel arrangement of the Marx is used to satisfy the broad pulse requirement. Experiments have shown that the two different width rectangular pulses which have 130 V amplitudes and 30 and 200 ns widths respectively can be obtained at a 50 ohms load. The two pulses have steep front edges (3.6 ns and 10 ns respectively) and flat tops with less than + or - 5 percent ripples. Therefore, the modulator can meet the requirements of the nanosecond pulse radar.

  17. Ignition and afterglow dynamics of a high pressure nanosecond pulsed helium micro-discharge: I. Electron, Rydberg molecules and He (23S) densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schregel, Christian-Georg; Carbone, Emile A. D.; Luggenhölscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the results of Thomson scattering measurements, optical emission spectroscopy and laser absorption spectroscopy applied to a high pressure nanosecond pulsed helium micro-discharge. All data are recorded with high temporal resolution, giving an insight into the processes determining the discharge dynamics. From Thomson scattering measurements, the electron velocity distribution function is determined. Photo-ionization of helium Rydberg molecules presents a complication for the direct measurement of the electron density by Thomson scattering. Laser pulse energy variation measurements however allow to obtain absolute Rydberg state densities to be obtained. For the first time, the electron velocity distribution function and total Rydberg molecules density for a high-pressure pure helium discharge are reported in this paper. These measurements provide new insights into high pressure pure helium discharge chemical pathways.

  18. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    DOE PAGES

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronicmore » states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.« less

  19. Evolution of metastable state molecules N2(A3 Σu+) in a nanosecond pulsed discharge: A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Sun, Jizhong; Feng, Chunlei; Bai, Jing; Ding, Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    A particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo collisions method has been employed to investigate the nitrogen discharge driven by a nanosecond pulse power source. To assess whether the production of the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) can be efficiently enhanced in a nanosecond pulsed discharge, the evolutions of metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density and electron energy distribution function have been examined in detail. The simulation results indicate that the ultra short pulse can modulate the electron energy effectively: during the early pulse-on time, high energy electrons give rise to quick electron avalanche and rapid growth of the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density. It is estimated that for a single pulse with amplitude of -9 kV and pulse width 30 ns, the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density can achieve a value in the order of 109 cm-3. The N2(A3 Σu+) density at such a value could be easily detected by laser-based experimental methods.

  20. [A Time-Spatial Resolvable High Speed Spectrograph and Its Application on Spectrum Measurement of a Nanosecond Pulsed Underwater Spark Discharge].

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-wen; Yan, Xian-feng; Li, Shu-han; Wen, Xiao-qiong; Liu, Jin-yuan

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the diagnosis of the characteristic of pulsed underwater electrical discharges plasma have received significant attention. The measurement of a time-spatial resolved spectrum emitted from a single discharge pulse is important for understanding the time-spatial evolution characteristics of plasma generated by a pulsed high-voltage discharge in water. In this paper, a high speed time-spatial resolvable spectrograph for measuring the emission spectrum of a single electrical discharge pulse was reported. The high speed time-spatial resolvable spectrograph has been constructed by combining an ultrahigh-speed frame camera system with monochromator. Software for the spectral analyzing was also developed. The performance of the spectrograph was tested by using a 632.8 nm He-Ne laser beam at a 1 200 g x mm(-1) grating. The pixel resolution for 632.8 nm spectra is 0.013 nm. The instrument broadening for 632.8 nm spectra is (0.150 ± 0.009)nm when the exposure.time of the camera is 20 ns and the width of entrance slit is 0.2 mm, and increases with increasing the slit width. The change of exposure time of the camera has no influence on the instrument broadening, ensuring the spectrograph in a steady performance while adjusting the exposure time of the camera. With the spectrograph, time-spatial resolved spectra emitted from a single discharge pulse of an underwater nanoseconds spark discharge were obtained. It provides good data for investigating the time-spatial evolution characteristics of the discharge plasma during a single discharge pulse. The spectrograph developed in this work provides a technical approach for studying the time-spatial evolution characteristic of, plasma generated by a single electrical discharge pulse. PMID:26904843

  1. [A Time-Spatial Resolvable High Speed Spectrograph and Its Application on Spectrum Measurement of a Nanosecond Pulsed Underwater Spark Discharge].

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-wen; Yan, Xian-feng; Li, Shu-han; Wen, Xiao-qiong; Liu, Jin-yuan

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the diagnosis of the characteristic of pulsed underwater electrical discharges plasma have received significant attention. The measurement of a time-spatial resolved spectrum emitted from a single discharge pulse is important for understanding the time-spatial evolution characteristics of plasma generated by a pulsed high-voltage discharge in water. In this paper, a high speed time-spatial resolvable spectrograph for measuring the emission spectrum of a single electrical discharge pulse was reported. The high speed time-spatial resolvable spectrograph has been constructed by combining an ultrahigh-speed frame camera system with monochromator. Software for the spectral analyzing was also developed. The performance of the spectrograph was tested by using a 632.8 nm He-Ne laser beam at a 1 200 g x mm(-1) grating. The pixel resolution for 632.8 nm spectra is 0.013 nm. The instrument broadening for 632.8 nm spectra is (0.150 ± 0.009)nm when the exposure.time of the camera is 20 ns and the width of entrance slit is 0.2 mm, and increases with increasing the slit width. The change of exposure time of the camera has no influence on the instrument broadening, ensuring the spectrograph in a steady performance while adjusting the exposure time of the camera. With the spectrograph, time-spatial resolved spectra emitted from a single discharge pulse of an underwater nanoseconds spark discharge were obtained. It provides good data for investigating the time-spatial evolution characteristics of the discharge plasma during a single discharge pulse. The spectrograph developed in this work provides a technical approach for studying the time-spatial evolution characteristic of, plasma generated by a single electrical discharge pulse.

  2. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  3. Topological structures of vortex flow on a flying wing aircraft, controlled by a nanosecond pulse discharge plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hai; Shi, Zhiwei; Cheng, Keming; Wei, Dechen; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Danjie; He, Haibo; Yao, Junkai; He, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    Vortex control is a thriving research area, particularly in relation to flying wing or delta wing aircraft. This paper presents the topological structures of vortex flow on a flying wing aircraft controlled by a nanosecond plasma dielectric barrier discharge actuator. Experiments, including oil flow visualization and two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV), were conducted in a wind tunnel with a Reynolds number of 0.5 × 106. Both oil and PIV results show that the vortex can be controlled. Oil topological structures on the aircraft surface coincide with spatial PIV flow structures. Both indicate vortex convergence and enhancement when the plasma discharge is switched on, leading to a reduced region of separated flow.

  4. Characteristics of nanosecond pulse needle-to-plane discharges at high pressure: a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sang Chaofeng; Sun Jizhong; Ren Chunsheng; Wang Dezhen

    2009-02-15

    A model of one dimensional in position and three dimensional in velocity space self-consistent particle in cell with Monte Carlo collision technique was employed to simulate the argon discharge between the needle and plane electrodes at high pressure, in which a nanosecond rectangular pulse was applied to the needle electrode. The work focused on the investigation of the spatiotemporal evolution of the discharge versus the needle tip size and working gas pressure. The simulation results showed that the discharge occurred mainly in the region near the needle tip at atmospheric pressure, and that the small radius of the needle tip led to easy discharge. Reducing the gas pressure gave rise to a transition from a corona discharge to a glowlike discharge along the needle-to-plane direction. The microscopic mechanism for the transition can arguably be attributed to the peak of high-energy electrons occurring before the breakdown; the magnitude of the number of these electrons determined whether the breakdown can take place.

  5. Targeted tissue ablation with nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Long, Gary; Shires, Peter K; Plescia, David; Beebe, Stephen J; Kolb, Juergen F; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2011-08-01

    In-vivo porcine studies on the effect of nanosecond high voltage pulses on liver tissue have shown that cell death can be induced in well-defined tissue volumes without damaging collagen-predominant structures. Comparison of the experimental results with the results of a three-dimensional finite element model allowed us to determine the threshold electric field for cell death. For 30, 100 nanosecond long pulses this was found to be in the range from 12 to 15 kV/cm. Modelling of the temperature distribution in the tissue using Pennes' bioheat equation showed that the lethal effect of nanosecond pulses on cells is non-thermal. Muscle contractions, generally caused by high voltage pulses, were significantly reduced for the 100 nanosecond pulses compared to microsecond long pulses. The results of these studies indicate that high voltage nanosecond pulses reliably kill normal liver cells in vivo and therefore may be useful for liver tumor treatments.

  6. Effect of Airflows on Repetitive Nanosecond Volume Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingfeng; Wei, Liqiu; Huo, Yuxin; Song, Jian; Yu, Daren; Zhang, Chaohai

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharges excited by repetitive nanosecond pulses have attracted significant attention for various applications. In this paper, a plate-plate discharge with airflows is excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse generator. Under different experiment conditions, the applied voltages, discharge currents, and discharge images are recorded. The plasma images presented here indicate that the volume discharge modes vary with airflow speeds, and a diffuse and homogeneous volume discharge occurs at the speed of more than 35 m/s. The role of airflows provides different effects on the 2-stage pulse discharges. The 1st pulse currents nearly maintain consistency for different airflow speeds. However, the 2nd pulse current has a change trend of first decreasing and then rapidly increasing, and the value difference for 2nd pulse currents is about 20 A under different airflows. In addition, the experimental results are discussed according to the electrical parameters and discharge images. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51006027, 51437002, and 51477035)

  7. Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond pulsed discharges in atmospheric-pressure N2 and N2/H2O mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Verreycken, T.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2012-08-01

    In this contribution, nanosecond pulsed discharges in N2 and N2/0.9% H2O at atmospheric pressure (at 300 K) are studied with time-resolved imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and Rayleigh scattering. A 170 ns high-voltage pulse is applied across two pin-shaped electrodes at a frequency of 1 kHz. The discharge consists of three phases: an ignition phase, a spark phase and a recombination phase. During the ignition phase the emission is mainly caused by molecular nitrogen (N2(C-B)). In the spark and recombination phase mainly atomic nitrogen emission is observed. The emission when H2O is added is very similar, except the small contribution of Hα and the intensity of the molecular N2(C-B) emission is less. The gas temperature during the ignition phase is about 350 K, during the discharge the gas temperature increases and is 1 µs after ignition equal to 750 K. The electron density is obtained by the broadening of the N emission line at 746 nm and, if water is added, the Hα line. The electron density reaches densities up to 4 × 1024 m-3. Addition of water has no significant influence on the gas temperature and electron density. The diagnostics used in this study are described in detail and the validity of different techniques is compared with previously reported results of other groups.

  8. STUDENT AWARD FINALIST: Simulation of the ignition of a H2-air mixture at atmospheric pressure by a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholin, Fabien; Bourdon, Anne

    2012-10-01

    Nanosecond repetitively Pulsed Discharges (NRPD) have a great potential for many applications at atmospheric pressure due to their ability to produce efficiently many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. Recent measurements have shown that in the ``spark'' regime of NRP discharges, an ultra-fast local heating of the gas could be obtained. This effect is of great interest for applications as flow control and plasma assisted combustion (PAC). In this work, we have carried out 2D numerical simulations of the coupling of the NRP discharge in air at atmospheric pressure in a point-point geometry with the background air. In particular, we have simulated shock waves generated by the NRPD in the spark regime and we have compared our results with experiments. Then, we have studied the production of active species by the NRP discharge in the spark regime. Finally, for plasma assisted combustion applications, we have simulated the ignition of a flame kernel in a lean H2-air mixture by a spark NRPD. Based on this work, the relative importance for the combustion ignition of gas heating and production of active species by the spark NRP is discussed.

  9. Effect of dielectric material on bipolar nanosecond pulse diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Wang, Wenchun; Yang, Dezheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Zhijie

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, dielectric plates made by ceramic, quartz and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) respectively are employed to generate low gas temperature, diffuse dielectric barrier discharge plasma by using a needle-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. Both discharge images and the optical emission spectra are obtained while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. Plasma gas temperature is also calculated by comparing the experimental emission spectra with the best fitted spectra of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg 1-3) and N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg 0-2). The effects of different pulse peak voltages and gas gap distances on the emission intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) and the plasma area on dielectric surface are investigated while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. It is found that the permittivity of dielectric material plays an important role in the discharge homogeneity, plasma gas temperature, emission spectra intensity of the discharge, etc. Dielectric with higher permittivity i.e., ceramic means brighter discharge luminosity and stronger emission spectra intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) among the three dielectric materials. However, more homogeneous, larger plasma area on dielectric surface and lower plasma gas temperature can be obtained under dielectric with lower permittivity i.e., PTFE. The emission spectra intensity and plasma gas temperature of the discharge while the dielectric plate is made by quartz are smaller than that while ceramic is used as dielectric material and bigger than that when PTFE is used as dielectric material.

  10. Effect of dielectric material on bipolar nanosecond pulse diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Wang, Wenchun; Yang, Dezheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Zhijie

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, dielectric plates made by ceramic, quartz and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) respectively are employed to generate low gas temperature, diffuse dielectric barrier discharge plasma by using a needle-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. Both discharge images and the optical emission spectra are obtained while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. Plasma gas temperature is also calculated by comparing the experimental emission spectra with the best fitted spectra of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg 1-3) and N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg 0-2). The effects of different pulse peak voltages and gas gap distances on the emission intensity of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) and the plasma area on dielectric surface are investigated while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. It is found that the permittivity of dielectric material plays an important role in the discharge homogeneity, plasma gas temperature, emission spectra intensity of the discharge, etc. Dielectric with higher permittivity i.e., ceramic means brighter discharge luminosity and stronger emission spectra intensity of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) among the three dielectric materials. However, more homogeneous, larger plasma area on dielectric surface and lower plasma gas temperature can be obtained under dielectric with lower permittivity i.e., PTFE. The emission spectra intensity and plasma gas temperature of the discharge while the dielectric plate is made by quartz are smaller than that while ceramic is used as dielectric material and bigger than that when PTFE is used as dielectric material.

  11. Effect of dielectric material on bipolar nanosecond pulse diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Wang, Wenchun; Yang, Dezheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Zhijie

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, dielectric plates made by ceramic, quartz and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) respectively are employed to generate low gas temperature, diffuse dielectric barrier discharge plasma by using a needle-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. Both discharge images and the optical emission spectra are obtained while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. Plasma gas temperature is also calculated by comparing the experimental emission spectra with the best fitted spectra of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg 1-3) and N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg 0-2). The effects of different pulse peak voltages and gas gap distances on the emission intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) and the plasma area on dielectric surface are investigated while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. It is found that the permittivity of dielectric material plays an important role in the discharge homogeneity, plasma gas temperature, emission spectra intensity of the discharge, etc. Dielectric with higher permittivity i.e., ceramic means brighter discharge luminosity and stronger emission spectra intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) among the three dielectric materials. However, more homogeneous, larger plasma area on dielectric surface and lower plasma gas temperature can be obtained under dielectric with lower permittivity i.e., PTFE. The emission spectra intensity and plasma gas temperature of the discharge while the dielectric plate is made by quartz are smaller than that while ceramic is used as dielectric material and bigger than that when PTFE is used as dielectric material. PMID:23673240

  12. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  13. Measurement of OH, O, and NO densities and their correlations with mouse melanoma cell death rate treated by a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Ippei; Shirakawa, Yuki; Hirakata, Kenta; Akiyama, Taketoshi; Yonemori, Seiya; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2015-10-01

    Mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium are treated using a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge plasma and the correlations between the rate of cell death and the densities of reactive species (OH, O, and NO) in the plasma are measured. The plasma is irradiated onto the culture medium surface with a vertical gas flow of an O2/N2 mixture from a glass tube at various gas flow rates and O2 concentrations. The densities of the reactive species are measured very close to the culture medium surface, where the reactive species interact with the culture medium, using laser-induced fluorescence. In the case of the N2 discharge (O2 = 0%), an increase in gas flow rate decreases OH density because it lowers the water vapor concentration by diluting the vapor, which is required for OH production. The increase in gas flow rate also leads to a decreased cell death rate. In the case of the O2/N2 discharge, on the other hand, an increase in O2 concentration at a fixed flow rate does not affect the rate of cell death, although it considerably changes the O and NO densities. These findings indicate that some reactive species derived from water vapor such as OH are responsible for the melanoma cell death, whereas those from O2, such as O and NO, are less likely responsible. They also indicate the importance of water evaporation from the culture medium surface in cell treatment.

  14. Time-resolved electron temperature and electron density measurements in a nanosecond pulse filament discharge in H2-He and O2-He mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Time evolution of electron density and electron temperature in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge in H2-He and O2-He mixtures at a pressure of 100 Torr is studied by Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering and kinetic modeling. The discharge is sustained between two spherical electrodes separated by a 1 cm gap and powered by high voltage pulses ~150 ns duration. Discharge energy coupled to the plasma filament 2-3 mm in diameter is 4-5 mJ/pulse, with specific energy loading of up to ~0.3 eV/molecule. At all experimental conditions, a rapid initial rise of electron temperature and electron density during the discharge pulse is observed, followed by the decay in the afterglow, over ~100 ns-1 µs. Electron density in the afterglow decays more rapidly as H2 or O2 fraction in the mixture is increased. In He/H2 mixtures, this is likely due to more rapid recombination of electrons in collisions with \\text{H}2+ and \\text{H}3+ ions, compared to recombination with \\text{He}2+ ions. In O2/He mixtures, electron density decay in the afterglow is affected by recombination with \\text{O}2+ and \\text{O}4+ ions, while the effect of three-body attachment is relatively minor. Peak electron number densities and electron temperatures are n e  =  (1.7-3.1) · 1014 cm-3 and T e  =  2.9-5.5 eV, depending on gas mixture composition. Electron temperature in the afterglow decays to approximately T e  ≈  0.3 eV, considerably higher compared to the gas temperature of T  =  300-380 K, inferred from O2 pure rotational Raman scattering spectra, due to superelastic collisions. The experimental results in helium and O2-He mixtures are compared with kinetic modeling predictions, showing good agreement.

  15. Kinetics of NO formation and decay in nanosecond pulse discharges in Air, H2-Air, and C2H4-Air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, David; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved, absolute NO and N atom number densities are measured by NO Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and N Two-Photon Absorption LIF in a diffuse plasma filament, nanosecond pulse discharge in dry air, hydrogen-air, and ethylene-air mixtures at 40 Torr, over a wide range of equivalence ratios. The results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations incorporating pulsed discharge dynamics, kinetics of vibrationally and electronically excited states of nitrogen, plasma chemical reactions, and radial transport. The results show that in air afterglow, NO decay occurs primarily by the reaction with N atoms, NO  +  N  →  N2  +  O. In the presence of hydrogen, this reaction is mitigated by reaction of N atoms with OH, N  +  OH  →  NO  +  H, resulting in significant reduction of N atom number density in the afterglow, additional NO production, and considerably higher NO number densities. In fuel-lean ethylene-air mixtures, a similar trend (i.e. N atom concentration reduction and NO number density increase) is observed, although [NO] increase on ms time scale is not as pronounced as in H2-air mixtures. In near-stoichiometric and fuel-lean ethylene-air mixtures, when N atom number density was below detection limit, NO concentration was measured to be lower than in air plasma. These results suggest that NO kinetics in hydrocarbon-air plasmas is more complex compared to air and hydrogen-air plasmas, additional NO reaction pathways may well be possible, and their analysis requires further kinetic modeling calculations.

  16. NO density and gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges by Mid-IR QCLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeni Simeni, Marien; Stancu, Gabi-Daniel; Laux, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a key species for many processes: in combustion, in human skin physiology... Recently, NO-ground state absolute density measurements produced by atmospheric pressure NRP discharges were carried out in air as a function of the discharge parameters, using Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. These measurements were space averaged and performed in the post-discharge region in a large gas volume. Here we present radial profiles of NO density and temperature measured directly in the discharge for different configurations. Small plasma volume and species densities, high temperature and EM noise environment make the absorption diagnostic challenging. For this purpose the QCLAS sensitivity was improved using a two-detector system. We conducted lateral absorbance measurements with a spatial resolution of 300 μm for two absorption features at 1900.076 and 1900.517 cm-1. The radial temperature and NO density distributions were obtained from the Abel inverted lateral measurements. Time averaged NO densities of about 1.E16 cm-3 and gas temperature of about 1000K were obtained in the center of the discharge. PLASMAFLAME Project (Grant No ANR-11-BS09-0025).

  17. Enhanced window breakdown dynamics in a nanosecond microwave tail pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chao; Zhu, Meng; Li, Shuang; Xie, Jialing; Yan, Kai; Luo, Tongding; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Verboncoeur, John

    2014-06-23

    The mechanisms of nanosecond microwave-driven discharges near a dielectric/vacuum interface were studied by measuring the time- and space-dependent optical emissions and pulse waveforms. The experimental observations indicate multipactor and plasma developing in a thin layer of several millimeters above interface. The emission brightness increases significantly after main pulse, but emission region widens little. The mechanisms are studied by analysis and simulation, revealing intense ionization concentrated in a desorbed high-pressure layer, leading to a bright light layer above surface; the lower-voltage tail after main pulse contributes to heat electron energy tails closer to excitation cross section peaks, resulting in brighter emission.

  18. Freon destruction in the decaying plasma of nanosecond microwave discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A.L.; Gorbachev, A.M.; Ivanov, O.A.

    1995-12-31

    The problem of freons acting destructively on the Earth ozone layer has been given much discussion recently, and various ways to purify the atmosphere have been suggested. One of such ways described is based on the use of a microwave discharge in the troposphere, which is produced with two short-pulse wave beams by ground-based antennas. Such a discharge produces in the atmosphere the plasma with electron density N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 10} - 10{sup 12}cm{sup -3}. After the microwave pulse, at the stage of plasma decay, electrons destroy freon molecules selectively due to high rate (kd = 10{sup -7} - 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3}/s) of dissociate attachment. Efficiency of purification (the number of freon molecules destroyed) depends significantly on the velocity of decay of the discharge plasma. The processes of death of electrons, which are not associated with attachment to freons (electron-ion recombination and attachment of electrons to oxygen molecules) lead to lower efficiency of purification. It is very important to achieve slow plasma decay when freon composition is low and air pressure is high, since then the frequency of dissociate electron attachment to freon molecules, is much lower than the frequency of three-body attachment to oxygen. Earlier studies of the microsecond microwave discharge showed that slow recombination decay of plasma in air may be realized at the high level of specific energy contribution. Such decay is explained by the processes of electrons` detachment from the negative oxygen ions when they collide with active particles formed in the discharge. At the same time, in terms of energy saving, promising for the considered purification method is the nanosecond discharge with high values of the reduced electric field, E/N, when the main share of the microwave energy is spared on gas ionization. This presentation contains the results of studying decay of the nanosecond microwave discharge plasma.

  19. Cell electrofusion using nanosecond electric pulses

    PubMed Central

    Rems, Lea; Ušaj, Marko; Kandušer, Maša; Reberšek, Matej; Miklavčič, Damijan; Pucihar, Gorazd

    2013-01-01

    Electrofusion is an efficient method for fusing cells using short-duration high-voltage electric pulses. However, electrofusion yields are very low when fusion partner cells differ considerably in their size, since the extent of electroporation (consequently membrane fusogenic state) with conventionally used microsecond pulses depends proportionally on the cell radius. We here propose a new and innovative approach to fuse cells with shorter, nanosecond (ns) pulses. Using numerical calculations we demonstrate that ns pulses can induce selective electroporation of the contact areas between cells (i.e. the target areas), regardless of the cell size. We then confirm experimentally on B16-F1 and CHO cell lines that electrofusion of cells with either equal or different size by using ns pulses is indeed feasible. Based on our results we expect that ns pulses can improve fusion yields in electrofusion of cells with different size, such as myeloma cells and B lymphocytes in hybridoma technology. PMID:24287643

  20. Subcellular effects of nanosecond electrical pulses.

    PubMed

    Schoenbach, Karl H; Joshi, Ravindra; Kolb, J; Buescher, Stephen; Beebe, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Electrical models for biological cells predict that reducing the duration of applied electrical pulses to values below the charging time of the outer membrane causes a strong increase in the probability for electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For electric field amplitudes exceeding MV/m such pulses are expected to cause electroporation of cell organelles, with the required electric field amplitude scaling linearly with the inverse of pulse duration. Experimental studies where human cells were exposed to pulsed electric field of up to 300 kV/cm amplitude with duration as short as 10 ns, have confirmed this hypothesis. The observed effects include the breaching of intracellular granule membranes without permanent damage to the cell membrane, abrupt rises in intracellular free calcium levels, and enhanced expression of genes. At increased electric fields, the application of nanosecond pulses induces apoptosis in biological cells, an effect that has been shown to reduce the growth of tumors.

  1. Nanosecond discharge in sulfur hexafluoride and the generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2008-06-01

    A discharge in the presence of a nonuniform electric field and the generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam (UAEB) are studied in the insulating gas SF6 at the pressures 0.01 2.50 atm. High-voltage nanosecond pulses (about 150 and 250 kV) and the voltage pulses with an amplitude of 25 kV and a duration of tens of nanoseconds are applied across the gap. An electron beam is obtained behind the AlBe foil with a thickness of 45 μm at a sulfur hexafluoride pressure in a gas-filled diode of up to 2 atm. It is demonstrated that, at relatively high pressures (greater than 1 atm) and in the presence of high-voltage nanosecond pulses across the gap, the UAEB pulse FWHM increases. The spectra of the diffuse and contracted discharges in sulfur hexafluoride are measured.

  2. Numerical simulation of regenerative amplification of nanosecond pulses in a CO/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonov, V.V.; Bunkin, F.V.; Sorochenko, V.R.; Firsov, K.N.; Shakir, Y.A.

    1982-04-01

    The results are given of a numerical simulation of regenerative amplification of nanosecond pulses in a high-power electric-discharge CO/sub 2/ laser. The finite contrast of the injected pulse is allowed for in a determination of the ranges of the injection energy and time in which regenerative amplification can be expected. It is shown that the shape of a small-signal pulse has a considerable influence on the energy and contrast of the output pulse. The optimal combinations of the parameters of a regenerative amplification system are determined so as to maximize the energy and contrast of nanosecond pulses.

  3. Characteristics of a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric air with a liquid electrolytic electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Shevera, I. V.; Kozak, Ya. Yu.; Kentesh, G. V.

    2014-06-01

    The spatial, electric, and radiative characteristics of a pulse-periodic nanosecond discharge between an electrode based on a system of blades and the distilled water surface as well as an aqueous solution of zinc sulfate in atmospheric air are considered.

  4. Ignition modes of nanosecond discharge with bubbles in distilled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Cha, Min Suk

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present the microscopic physical characteristics of nanosecond discharges with an array of bubbles in distilled water. In particular, applying a single high-voltage pulse, four delayed intensified charge-coupled device cameras successfully visualized four successive images during a single discharge event. We identified three distinctive modes of ignition inside a bubble, depending on the relative location of the bubble with respect to pin-to-hollow needle electrodes when a single bubble was located in an inter-electrode gap of 1 mm: anode-driven ignition, cathode-driven ignition, and co-ignition near both electrodes. Anode- and cathode-driven ignitions evolved into either a complete propagation of the streamer or an incomplete propagation, which were limited in location by proximity to an ignition location, while co-ignitions consistently showed complete propagation. When we increased the gap to 2 mm to accommodate multiple bubbles in the gap, an ignited bubble near the cathode was able to cause the ignition of an upper adjacent bubble. Bubble-bubble interface zones can also be spots of ignition, such that we observed simultaneous co-ignitions in the zones of bubble-bubble interfaces and near electrodes with triple bubbles. We compared the experimental results of discharge propagation with different ignition modes between Ar, He, and N2 bubbles. In addition, numerical simulations for static electric fields reasonably supported observed ignition behavior such that field intensity was locally enhanced.

  5. [Mechanism of ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric field].

    PubMed

    Cen, Chao; Chen, Xin-hua; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2015-11-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation has been widely applied in clinical cancer treatment, while its molecular mechanism is still unclear. Researchers have revealed that nanosecond pulsed electric field generates nanopores in plasma membrane, leading to a rapid influx of Ca²⁺; it has specific effect on intracellular organelle membranes, resulting in endoplasmic reticulum injuries and mitochondrial membrane potential changes. In addition, it may also change cellular morphology through damage of cytoskeleton. This article reviews the recent research advances on the molecular mechanism of cell membrane and organelle changes induced by nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation. PMID:26822052

  6. Nanosecond square pulse generation in fiber lasers with normal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. M.; Tang, D. Y.; Cheng, T. H.; Lu, C.

    2007-04-01

    We report on the generation of nanosecond square pulses in a passively mode-locked fiber ring laser made of purely normal dispersive fibers. Different to the noise-like pulse operation of the laser, the generated square pulses are stable and have no internal structures. We show that the formation of the square pulse is due to the combined action of the pulse peak clamping effect caused by the cavity and the almost linear pulse propagation in the normal dispersive fibers.

  7. Needle-array to Plate DBD Plasma Using Sine AC and Nanosecond Pulse Excitations for Purpose of Improving Indoor Air Quality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Dezheng; Wang, Wenchun; Wang, Sen; Yuan, Hao; Zhao, Zilu; Sang, Chaofeng; Jia, Li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, needle-array to plate electrode configuration was employed to generate an atmospheric air diffuse discharge using both nanosecond pulse and sine AC voltage as excitation voltage for the purpose of improving indoor air quality. Different types of voltage sources and electrode configurations are employed to optimize electrical field distribution and improve discharge stability. Discharge images, electrical characteristics, optical emission spectra, and plasma gas temperatures in both sine AC discharge and nanosecond pulse discharge were compared and the discharge stability during long operating time were discussed. Compared with the discharge excited by sine AC voltage, the nanosecond pulsed discharge is more homogenous and stable, besides, the plasma gas temperature of nanosecond pulse discharge is much lower. Using packed-bed structure, where γ- Al2O3 pellets are filled in the electrode gap, has obvious efficacy in the production of homogenous discharge. Furthermore, both sine AC discharge and nanosecond pulse discharge were used for removing formaldehyde from flowing air. It shows that nanosecond pulse discharge has a significant advantage in energy cost. And the main physiochemical processes for the generation of active species and the degradation of formaldehyde were discussed. PMID:27125663

  8. Needle-array to Plate DBD Plasma Using Sine AC and Nanosecond Pulse Excitations for Purpose of Improving Indoor Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Dezheng; Wang, Wenchun; Wang, Sen; Yuan, Hao; Zhao, Zilu; Sang, Chaofeng; Jia, Li

    2016-04-01

    In this study, needle-array to plate electrode configuration was employed to generate an atmospheric air diffuse discharge using both nanosecond pulse and sine AC voltage as excitation voltage for the purpose of improving indoor air quality. Different types of voltage sources and electrode configurations are employed to optimize electrical field distribution and improve discharge stability. Discharge images, electrical characteristics, optical emission spectra, and plasma gas temperatures in both sine AC discharge and nanosecond pulse discharge were compared and the discharge stability during long operating time were discussed. Compared with the discharge excited by sine AC voltage, the nanosecond pulsed discharge is more homogenous and stable, besides, the plasma gas temperature of nanosecond pulse discharge is much lower. Using packed-bed structure, where γ- Al2O3 pellets are filled in the electrode gap, has obvious efficacy in the production of homogenous discharge. Furthermore, both sine AC discharge and nanosecond pulse discharge were used for removing formaldehyde from flowing air. It shows that nanosecond pulse discharge has a significant advantage in energy cost. And the main physiochemical processes for the generation of active species and the degradation of formaldehyde were discussed.

  9. Needle-array to Plate DBD Plasma Using Sine AC and Nanosecond Pulse Excitations for Purpose of Improving Indoor Air Quality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Dezheng; Wang, Wenchun; Wang, Sen; Yuan, Hao; Zhao, Zilu; Sang, Chaofeng; Jia, Li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, needle-array to plate electrode configuration was employed to generate an atmospheric air diffuse discharge using both nanosecond pulse and sine AC voltage as excitation voltage for the purpose of improving indoor air quality. Different types of voltage sources and electrode configurations are employed to optimize electrical field distribution and improve discharge stability. Discharge images, electrical characteristics, optical emission spectra, and plasma gas temperatures in both sine AC discharge and nanosecond pulse discharge were compared and the discharge stability during long operating time were discussed. Compared with the discharge excited by sine AC voltage, the nanosecond pulsed discharge is more homogenous and stable, besides, the plasma gas temperature of nanosecond pulse discharge is much lower. Using packed-bed structure, where γ- Al2O3 pellets are filled in the electrode gap, has obvious efficacy in the production of homogenous discharge. Furthermore, both sine AC discharge and nanosecond pulse discharge were used for removing formaldehyde from flowing air. It shows that nanosecond pulse discharge has a significant advantage in energy cost. And the main physiochemical processes for the generation of active species and the degradation of formaldehyde were discussed. PMID:27125663

  10. Fast Rise Time and High Voltage Nanosecond Pulses at High Pulse Repetition Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth E.; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Picard, Julian; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is conducting research to decrease the rise time and increase the output voltage of the EHT Nanosecond Pulser product line, which allows for independently, user-adjustable output voltage (0 - 20 kV), pulse width (20 - 500 ns), and pulse repetition frequency (0 - 100 kHz). The goals are to develop higher voltage pulses (50 - 60 kV), decrease the rise time from 20 to below 10 ns, and maintain the high pulse repetition capabilities. These new capabilities have applications to pseudospark generation, corona production, liquid discharges, and nonlinear transmission line driving for microwave production. This work is supported in part by the US Navy SBIR program.

  11. Capacitor discharge pulse analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael Sean; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Tanner, Danelle Mary

    2013-08-01

    Capacitors used in firing sets and other high discharge current applications are discharge tested to verify performance of the capacitor against the application requirements. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, rise time, pulse width, peak current and current reversal must be verified to ensure that the capacitor will meet the application needs. This report summarizes an analysis performed on the discharge current data to extract these parameters by fitting a second-order system model to the discharge data and using this fit to determine the resulting performance metrics. Details of the theory and implementation are presented. Using the best-fit second-order system model to extract these metrics results in less sensitivity to noise in the measured data and allows for direct extraction of the total series resistance, inductance, and capacitance.

  12. Ignition in Ethanol-Containing Mixtures after Nanosecond Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, Ilya; Pakhomov, Aleksandr; Kindysheva, Svetlana; Aleksandrov, Nikolay; Starikovskiy, Andrey; MIPT Team; PU Team

    2013-09-01

    We study experimentally and numerically kinetics of ethanol ignition after a high-voltage nanosecond discharge. Active particles are produced in a high-voltage nanosecond discharge to favor the ignition of C2H5OH-containing mixtures at elevated gas temperatures. We consider stoichiometric (φ = 1) and lean (φ = 0.5) C2H5OH:O2 mixtures (10%) diluted with Ar (90%). The gas temperature behind a reflected shock wave ranges from 1100 to 2000 K and the corresponding pressure ranges from 0.2 to 1 atm; these parameters are obtained from measured shock wave velocity. The ignition delay time is measured behind a reflected shock wave with and without the discharge using detection of CH radiation. Generation of the discharge plasma is shown to lead to an order of magnitude decrease in ignition delay time. It is shown that the observed effect of nonequilibrium discharge plasma on ethanol ignition is induced by chain reaction acceleration due to active species generation in the discharge rather than due to fast gas heating. The calculated ignition delay times are compared with the experimental data.

  13. Energy distribution of runaway electrons generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Petin, V. K.; Rybka, D. V.; Shlyakhtun, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    The spectra of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air were investigated. The temporal characteristics of the beam current pulses, gap voltage, and discharge current in a gas diode were measured with a time resolution of ˜0.1 ns. A simple technique was developed for recovering electron spectra from the curves of beam attenuation by aluminum foils. The effect of the cathode design, electrode gap length, and generator parameters on the electron spectra were studied using seven setups. It is shown that generation of electrons with anomalously high energies requires the use of cathodes with increased curvature radius.

  14. A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained by nanosecond- and microsecond-pulse generators in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Zhongsheng; Zhou, Yixiao

    2014-10-15

    Power source is an important parameter that can affect the characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs), because it can play a key role on the discharge characteristics and ionization process of APPJs. In this paper, the characteristics of helium APPJs sustained by both nanosecond-pulse and microsecond-pulse generators are compared from the aspects of plume length, discharge current, consumption power, energy, and optical emission spectrum. Experimental results showed that the pulsed APPJ was initiated near the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, and then the stable helium APPJ could be observed when the applied voltage increased. Moreover, the discharge current of the nanosecond-pulse APPJ was larger than that of the microsecond-pulse APPJ. Furthermore, although the nanosecond-pulse generator consumed less energy than the microsecond-pulse generator, longer plume length, larger instantaneous power per pulse and stronger spectral line intensity could be obtained in the nanosecond-pulse excitation case. In addition, some discussion indicated that the rise time of the applied voltage could play a prominent role on the generation of APPJs.

  15. Enabling pulsed power technologies for the generation of intense, nanosecond electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jason M.

    This dissertation focuses on the design and implementation of pulsed power systems with an emphasis on systems that generate high peak powers on nanosecond and subnanosecond timescales. These systems are an enabling technology for many areas of scientific research focused on the effects of intense, nanosecond pulsed electric fields or pulsed discharges on physical processes. Researchers at USC use these systems in a variety of diverse application areas, including research into ignition and combustion using nanosecond discharges, research into the effects of pulsed electric fields on biological systems, and research into the efficacy of cold plasma discharges for disinfection. Each of these applications has its own set of pulsed power parameters, and in most cases these parameters necessitate that the systems be custom developed. The bulk of what follows will address the design methodologies, materials, and implementation techniques required for systems capable of generating high current (20 -- 500 Amperes), high voltage (1 kV -- 100 kV), nanosecond pulses. These principles culminate in the presentation of a new, compact, solid state architecture, which has been implemented into a system called the Rapid Pulser. This architecture uses diode opening switches at the output to switch inductively stored energy into a resistive load. To switch properly, these diodes must be pumped in the forward and reverse directions by a current, and this new architecture introduces a pumping circuit that significantly improves pulse shape as well as reduces amplitude jitter, time jitter, complexity, cost, and size. At 1.6 kg, this is the lightest pulsed power system developed at USC's Pulsed Power Lab, which is significant because minimizing size and weight is necessary for applications focused on the ignition and combustion of fuels. A summary of research focused on magnetic and dielectric materials for nonlinear energy compression will also be presented. Nonlinearities inherent to

  16. Characterization of a DBD-Based Plasma Jet Using a Variable Pulse Width Nanosecond Pulser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Timothy; Picard, Julian; Prager, James; Miller, Kenneth; Carscadden, John

    2015-11-01

    Most high voltage pulsers used to drive dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), produce a single pulse shape (width and voltage), thus making it challenging to assess the effect of pulse shape on the production of different chemical species during a discharge. Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) has developed a high voltage nanosecond pulser that enables independent control of the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency. This pulser has been specifically designed to drive dielectric barrier discharges (DBD). EHT has used this pulser to conduct a parametric investigation of a DBD-based jet utilizing spectroscopic diagnostics. A better understanding of this parameter dependency can allow for more targeted and effective application of plasma in medical, environmental, industrial, and other applications. Results comparing DBD voltage and current waveforms with plasma spectrographic measurements will be presented.

  17. Supershort avalanche electron beams and x-ray in high-pressure nanosecond discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. H.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2008-10-01

    The properties of a supershort avalanche electron beam (S AEB) and X-ray radiation produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. An electron beam of the runaway electrons with amplitude of ~ 50 A has been obtained in air atmospheric pressure. It is reported that S AEB is formed in the angle above 2π sr. Three groups of the runaway electrons are formed in a gas diode under atmospheric air pressure, when nanosecond voltage pulses with amplitude of hundreds of kilovolts are applied. The electron beam has been generated behind a 45 μm thick AlBe foil in SF6 and Xe under the pressure of 2 arm, and in He under the pressure of about 12 atm. The paper gives the analysis of a generation mechanism of SAEB.

  18. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Veiko, V P; Lednev, V N; Pershin, S M; Samokhvalov, A A; Yakovlev, E B; Zhitenev, I Yu; Kliushin, A N

    2016-06-01

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential "opening" radio pulses with a delay of 0.2-1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode. PMID:27370433

  19. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.; Samokhvalov, A. A.; Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential "opening" radio pulses with a delay of 0.2-1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  20. Discontinuity breakdown on shock wave interaction with nanosecond discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Znamenskaya, I. A.; Koroteev, D. A.; Lutsky, A. E.

    2008-05-15

    Discontinuity breakdown conditions were experimentally realized by instant energy input in front of a plane shock wave. A shock tube and a special type of transversal nanosecond electric discharge with plasma electrodes were used for this research. A two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation under experimental conditions has been undertaken. The pressure, density, temperature, and velocity fields have been examined. A comparison of numerical data and shadow images of a 2D flow after shock wave interaction with the discharge area was conducted. The geometry of the disturbed flowfield was found to be in good correspondence with one from numerical calculations. The results of the investigation also showed that, by using the described experimental setup, it is possible to achieve a special type of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability without applying an additional curved diaphragm.

  1. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Multichannel semiconductor nanosecond switch for excitation of copper vapor by a transverse discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V. M.; Buzhinskiĭ, O. I.; Grekhov, Igor'V.; Levinshteĭn, M. E.; Moshkunov, A. I.; Sergeev, V. G.

    1981-01-01

    A high-power semiconductor nanosecond switch, in the form of a thyristor structure activated by a laser pulse, was investigated. This switch could handle currents up to ~5×10 kA under voltages of gtrsim 5 kV in a time of ~1 nsec. The principle of its operation ensured synchronous of triggering of several switches with an accuracy of 0.1-0.01 nsec. These switches could be connected in series and could be used effectively to pump lasers excited by transverse discharges.

  2. Self-similar spatial structure of a streamer-free nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelin, V. I.; Tren'kin, A. A.

    2008-03-01

    The microstructure of a current channel is experimentally found under the conditions when homogeneous air gaps are subjected to nanosecond voltage pulses in an electric field insufficient for streamer generation. As a possible mechanism of microstructure formation, instability of the ionization process at the avalanche stage leading to the formation of a self-similar spatial structure is considered. The fractal dimension of this structure is determined. In inhomogeneous gaps, the avalanche is shown to be unstable as well. The energy benefit of structuring is considered. It is demonstrated that the microstructure of streamer discharges in homogeneous gaps can also be treated in terms of the model suggested.

  3. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berghoefer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H.; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-09-25

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  4. Towards acousto-optic tissue imaging with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Resink, S G; Hondebrink, E; Steenbergen, W

    2014-02-10

    We present a way to generate acousto-optical signals in timovssue-like media with nanosecond laser pulses. Our method is based on recording and analyzing speckle patterns formed by interaction of nanosecond laser pulses with tissue, without and with simultaneous application of ultrasound. Stroboscopic application allows visualizing the temporal behavior of speckles while the ultrasound is propagating through the medium. We investigate two ways of quantifying the acousto-optic effect, viz. adding and subtracting speckle patterns obtained at various ultrasound phases. Both methods are compared with the existing speckle contrast method using a 2D scan and are found to perform similarly. Our method gives outlook on overcoming the speckle decorrelation problem in acousto-optics, and therefore brings in-vivo acousto-optic measurements one step closer. Furthermore it enables combining acousto-optics and photoacoustics in one setup with a single laser.

  5. Skyrmion Creation and Manipulation by Nano-Second Current Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, H. Y.; Wang, X. R.

    2016-01-01

    Easy creation and manipulation of skyrmions is important in skyrmion based devices for data storage and information processing. We show that a nano-second current pulse alone is capable of creating/deleting and manipulating skyrmions in a spin valve with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and broken chiral symmetry. Interestingly, for an in-plane magnetized fixed layer, the free layer changes from a single domain at zero current to a Neel wall at an intermediate current density. Reverse the current polarity, the Neel wall changes to its image inversion. A properly designed nano-second current pulse, that tends to convert one type of Neel walls to its image inversion, ends up to create a stable skyrmion without assistance of external fields. For a perpendicularly magnetized fixed layer, the skyrmion size can be effectively tuned by a current density. PMID:26934954

  6. Nanosecond electric pulses penetrate the nucleus and enhance speckle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Nianyong Garner, Allen L.; Chen, George; Jing Yu; Deng Yuping; Swanson, R. James; Kolb, Juergen F.; Beebe, Stephen J.; Joshi, Ravindra P.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2007-12-14

    Nanosecond electric pulses generate nanopores in the interior membranes of cells and modulate cellular functions. Here, we used confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to observe Smith antigen antibody (Y12) binding to nuclear speckles, known as small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) or intrachromatin granule clusters (IGCs), in Jurkat cells following one or five 10 ns, 150 kV/cm pulses. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, we observed changes in nuclear speckle labeling that suggested a disruption of pre-messenger RNA splicing mechanisms. Pulse exposure increased the nuclear speckled substructures by {approx}2.5-fold above basal levels while the propidium iodide (PI) uptake in pulsed cells was unchanged. The resulting nuclear speckle changes were also cell cycle dependent. These findings suggest that 10 ns pulses directly influenced nuclear processes, such as the changes in the nuclear RNA-protein complexes.

  7. Four-wave mixing in nanosecond pulsed fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Fève, Jean-Philippe; Schrader, Paul E; Farrow, Roger L; Kliner, Dahv A V

    2007-04-16

    We present an experimental and theoretical analysis of four-wave mixing in nanosecond pulsed amplifiers based on double-clad ytterbium-doped fibers. This process leads to saturation of the amplified pulse energy at 1064 nm and to distortion of the spectral and temporal profiles. These behaviours are well described by a simple model considering both Raman and four-wave-mixing contributions. The role of seed laser polarization in birefringent fibers is also presented. These results point out the critical parameters and possible tradeoffs for optimization. PMID:19532710

  8. Nanosecond Glow and Spark Discharges in Ambient Air and in Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, Christophe; Rusterholtz, Diane; Sainct, Florent; Xu, Da; Lacoste, Deanna; Stancu, Gabi; Pai, David

    2013-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges are one of the most energy efficient ways to produce active species in atmospheric pressure gases. In both air and water vapor, three discharge regimes can be obtained: 1) corona, with light emission just around the anode, 2) glow, corresponding to a diffuse nonequilibrium plasma, and 3) spark, characterized by higher temperatures and higher active species densities. The glow regime was initially obtained in air preheated at 2000 K. Based on a model defining the transition between glow and spark, we recently succeeded in obtaining a stable glow in ambient air at 300 K, using a judicious combination of electrode geometry, pulse duration, pulse frequency, and applied voltage. We will present these results and describe the characteristics of the discharge obtained in room air. The spark regime was also studied. NRP sparks induce ultrafast gas heating (about 1000 K in 20 ns) and high oxygen dissociation (up to 50% dissociation of O2) . This phenomenon can be explained by a two-step process involving the excitation of molecular nitrogen followed by exothermic dissociative quenching of molecular oxygen. The characteristics of NRP discharges in water vapor will also be discussed. This work is supported by the ANR PREPA program (grant number ANR-09-BLAN-0043).

  9. Pulsed microhollow cathode discharge excimer sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, Mohamed; Shi, Wenhui; Strak, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are non-equilibrium, high-pressure gas discharges between perforated electrodes separated by a dielectric layer. Typical dimensions for the electrode foil thickness and hole diameter are 100 μm. Direct current experiments in xenon, argon, neon, helium, argon fluoride, and xenon chloride [1,2] have been performed. The excimer efficiency varies between 1 % and 9 %. Pulsed operation allowed us to increase the current from 8 mA (dc) to approximately 80 mA (pulsed with a pulse width of 700 μs), limited by the onset of instabilities. The total excimer power was found to increase linearly with current, however, the radiant emittance and efficiency stayed constant. Reducing the pulse duration into the nanosecond range allowed us to increase the current into the ampere range. The maximum measured excimer power was 2.75 W per microdischarge. The maximum radiant emittance was 15 W/cm^2 and the efficiency reached values of 20 %. This effect is assumed to be due to non-equilibrium electron heating in the high-pressure plasma [3]. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under grant # CTS0078618. 1. Karl H. Schoenbach, Ahmed El-Habachi, Mohamed M. Moselhy, Wenhui Shi, and Robert H. Stark, Physics of Plasmas 7, 2186 (2000). 2. P. Kurunczi, J. Lopez, H. Shah, and K. Becker, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 205, 277 (2001). 3. Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 3568 (2001).

  10. Discharge current and current of supershort avalanche E-beam at volume nanosecond discharge in non-uniform electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Rybka, Dmitrii V.; Baksht, Evgenii H.; Kostyrya, Igor'D.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.

    2008-01-01

    The gas diode current-voltage characteristics at the voltage pulses applied from the RADAN and SM-3NS pulsers, and generation of an supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) have been studied experimentally in an inhomogeneous electric field upon a nanosecond breakdown in an air gap at atmospheric pressure. Displacement currents with amplitude over 1 kA have been observed and monitored. It is shown that the displacement current amplitude gets increased due to movement of the dense plasma front and charging of a "capacitor" formed between plasma and anode. The SAEB generation time relatively to the discharge current pulses and the gap voltage were determined in the experiments. It is shown that the SAEB current maximum at the pulser voltages of hundreds kV is registered on the discharge current pulse front, before the discharge current peak of the gas diode capacitance, and the delay time of these peaks is determined by the value of an interelectrode spacing. The delay time in case of a gap of 16 mm and air breakdown at atmospheric pressure was ~100 ps, and in case of 10 mm it was less than 50 ps.

  11. Controlled electron emission and vacuum breakdown with nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seznec, B.; Dessante, Ph; Caillault, L.; Babigeon, J.-L.; Teste, Ph; Minea, T.

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum electron sources exploiting field emission are generally operated in direct current (DC) mode. The development of nanosecond and sub-nanosecond pulsed power supplies facilitates the emission of compact bunches of electrons of high density. The breakdown level is taken as the highest value of the voltage avoiding the thermo-emission instability. The effect of such ultra-fast pulses on the breakdown voltage and the emitted electron current is discussed as a result of the thermo-emission modelling applied to a significant protrusion. It is found that pulsing very rapidly the vacuum breakdown occurs at higher voltage values than for the DC case, because it rises faster than the heat diffusion. In addition, the electron emission current increases significantly regardless of the theoretical approach is used. A comparative study of this theoretical work is discussed for several different forms of the protrusion (elliptic and hyperbolic) and different metals (hence varying the melting point), particularly refractory (tungsten) versus conductor (titanium). Pulsed mode operation can provide an increase on breakdown voltage (up to 18%) and a significant increase (up to 330%) of the electron extracted current due to its high non-linear dependency with the voltage, for the case for the case with a hyperbolic protrusion.

  12. Evaluation of material dispersion using a nanosecond optical pulse radiator.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, M; Ohmori, Y; Miya, T

    1979-07-01

    To study the material dispersion effects on graded-index fibers, a method for measuring the material dispersion in optical glass fibers has been developed. Nanosecond pulses in the 0.5-1.7-microm region are generated by a nanosecond optical pulse radiator and grating monochromator. These pulses are injected into a GeO(2)-P(2)0(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber. Relative time delay changes between different wavelengths are used to determine material dispersion, core glass refractive index, material group index, and optimum profile parameter of the graded-index fiber. From the measured data, the optimum profile parameter on the GeO(2)-P(2)O(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber could be estimated to be 1.88 at 1.27 microm of the material dispersion free wavelength region and 1.82 at 1.55 microm of the lowest-loss wavelength region in silica-based optical fiber waveguides.

  13. TALIF measurements of oxygen atom density in the afterglow of a capillary nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, A. V.; Lemainque, J.; Booth, J. P.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    The atomic oxygen density has been measured in the afterglow of a capillary nanosecond discharge in 24-30 mbar synthetic air (N2 : O2 = 4 : 1) by the two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) technique, combined with absolute calibration by comparison with xenon TALIF. The discharge was initiated by a train of 30 ns FWHM pulses of alternating positive-negative-positive polarity, separated by 250 ns, with a train repetition frequency of 10 Hz. The amplitude of the first pulse was 10 kV in the cable. A flow of synthetic air through the tube provided complete gas renewal between pulse trains. The O-atom density measurements were made over the time interval 200 ns-2 µs after the initial pulse. The gas temperature was determined by analysis of the molecular nitrogen second positive system optical emission spectrum. The influence of the gas temperature on the atom density measurements, and the reactions producing O atoms, are discussed.

  14. Pulsed discharge production Ar* metastables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiande; Heaven, Michael C.; Emmons, Daniel; Perram, Glen P.; Weeks, David E.; Bailey, William F.

    2016-03-01

    The production of relatively high densities of Ar* metastables (>1012 cm-3) in Ar/He mixtures, at total pressures close to 1 atm, is essential for the efficient operation of an optically pumped Ar* laser. We have used emission spectroscopy and diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurements to observe the production and decay of Ar* in a parallel plate pulsed discharge. With discharge pulses of 1 μs duration we find that metastable production is dominated by processes occurring within the first 100 ns of the gas break-down. Application of multiple, closely spaced discharge pulses yields insights concerning conditions that favor metastable production. This information has been combined with time-resolved measurements of voltage and current. The experimental results and preliminary modeling of the discharge kinetics are presented.

  15. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10-6%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon-acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  16. Production of Picosecond, Kilojoule, and Petawatt Laser Pulses via Raman Amplification of Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Trines, R. M. G. M.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P. A.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2011-09-02

    Raman amplification in plasma has been promoted as a means of compressing picosecond optical laser pulses to femtosecond duration to explore the intensity frontier. Here we show for the first time that it can be used, with equal success, to compress laser pulses from nanosecond to picosecond duration. Simulations show up to 60% energy transfer from pump pulse to probe pulse, implying that multikilojoule ultraviolet petawatt laser pulses can be produced using this scheme. This has important consequences for the demonstration of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion.

  17. Nanosecond Mid-Infrared Detection for Pulse Radiolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grills,D.C.; Preses, J.M.; Wishart, J.F.; Cook, A.R.

    2009-07-12

    Pulse radiolysis, utilizing electron pulses from accelerators, is the definitive method for adding single positive or negative charges to molecules. It is also among the most effective means for creating free radicals. Such species are particularly important in applications such as redox catalysis relevant to solar energy conversion and advanced nuclear energy systems. Coupled with fast UV-visible detection, pulse radiolysis has become an extremely powerful method for monitoring the kinetics of the subsequent reactions of these species on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. However, in many important contexts the radicals formed are difficult to identify due to their broad and featureless UV-visible absorption spectra. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) absorption spectroscopy is a powerful structural probe of short-lived intermediates, which allows multiple transient species to be clearly identified and simultaneously monitored in a single process. Unfortunately, due to technical challenges the coupling of fast (sub-millisecond) TRIR with pulse radiolysis has received little attention, being confined to gas-phase studies. Taking advantage of recent developments in mid-IR laser technology, we have recently begun developing nanosecond TRIR detection methodologies for condensed-phase samples at our Laser Electron Accelerator Facility (LEAF). The results of preliminary pulse radiolysis-TRIR investigations on the formation of the one-electron reduced forms of CO{sub 2} reduction catalysts (e.g. see above) and their interactions with CO{sub 2} will be presented.

  18. Plasma Membrane Voltage Changes during Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Frey, W.; White, J. A.; Price, R. O.; Blackmore, P. F.; Joshi, R. P.; Nuccitelli, R.; Beebe, S. J.; Schoenbach, K. H.; Kolb, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    The change in the membrane potential of Jurkat cells in response to nanosecond pulsed electric fields was studied for pulses with a duration of 60 ns and maximum field strengths of ∼100 kV/cm (100 V/cell diameter). Membranes of Jurkat cells were stained with a fast voltage-sensitive dye, ANNINE-6, which has a subnanosecond voltage response time. A temporal resolution of 5 ns was achieved by the excitation of this dye with a tunable laser pulse. The laser pulse was synchronized with the applied electric field to record images at times before, during, and after exposure. When exposing the Jurkat cells to a pulse, the voltage across the membrane at the anodic pole of the cell reached values of 1.6 V after 15 ns, almost twice the voltage level generally required for electroporation. Voltages across the membrane on the side facing the cathode reached values of only 0.6 V in the same time period, indicating a strong asymmetry in conduction mechanisms in the membranes of the two opposite cell hemispheres. This small voltage drop of 0.6–1.6 V across the plasma membrane demonstrates that nearly the entire imposed electric field of 10 V/μm penetrates into the interior of the cell and every organelle. PMID:16513782

  19. Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Xinhua; Liu, Jie A; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma often evades effective therapy and recurrences are frequent. Recently, nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) ablation using pulse power technology has emerged as a local-regional, non-thermal, and non-drug therapy for skin cancers. In the studies reported here we use nsPEFs to ablate murine, rat and human HCCs in vitro and an ectopic murine Hepa 1-6 HCC in vivo. Using pulses with 60 or 300 ns and electric fields as high as 60 kV/cm, murine Hepa 1-6, rat N1S1 and human HepG2 HCC are readily eliminated with changes in caspase-3 activity. Interestingly caspase activities increase in the mouse and human model and decrease in the rat model as electric field strengths are increased. In vivo, while sham treated control mice survived an average of 15 days after injection and before humane euthanasia, Hepa 1-6 tumors were eliminated for longer than 50 days with 3 treatments using one hundred pulses with 100 ns at 55 kV/cm. Survival was 40% in mice treated with 30 ns pulses at 55 kV/cm. This study demonstrates that nsPEF ablation is not limited to effectively treating skin cancers and provides a rationale for treating orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma in pre-clinical applications and ultimately in clinical trials.

  20. Plasma membrane voltage changes during nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    PubMed

    Frey, W; White, J A; Price, R O; Blackmore, P F; Joshi, R P; Nuccitelli, R; Beebe, S J; Schoenbach, K H; Kolb, J F

    2006-05-15

    The change in the membrane potential of Jurkat cells in response to nanosecond pulsed electric fields was studied for pulses with a duration of 60 ns and maximum field strengths of approximately 100 kV/cm (100 V/cell diameter). Membranes of Jurkat cells were stained with a fast voltage-sensitive dye, ANNINE-6, which has a subnanosecond voltage response time. A temporal resolution of 5 ns was achieved by the excitation of this dye with a tunable laser pulse. The laser pulse was synchronized with the applied electric field to record images at times before, during, and after exposure. When exposing the Jurkat cells to a pulse, the voltage across the membrane at the anodic pole of the cell reached values of 1.6 V after 15 ns, almost twice the voltage level generally required for electroporation. Voltages across the membrane on the side facing the cathode reached values of only 0.6 V in the same time period, indicating a strong asymmetry in conduction mechanisms in the membranes of the two opposite cell hemispheres. This small voltage drop of 0.6-1.6 V across the plasma membrane demonstrates that nearly the entire imposed electric field of 10 V/mum penetrates into the interior of the cell and every organelle.

  1. Ablation of Myocardial Tissue With Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Varghese, Frency; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Philpott, Jonathan; Zemlin, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue is an essential tool for the treatment of arrhythmias, particularly of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technologies suffer from substantial recurrence rates, thermal side effects, and long procedure times. We demonstrate that ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) can potentially overcome these limitations. Methods We used optical mapping to monitor electrical activity in Langendorff-perfused New Zealand rabbit hearts (n = 12). We repeatedly inserted two shock electrodes, spaced 2–4 mm apart, into the ventricles (through the entire wall) and applied nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) (5–20 kV/cm, 350 ns duration, at varying pulse numbers and frequencies) to create linear lesions of 12–18 mm length. Hearts were stained either with tetrazolium chloride (TTC) or propidium iodide (PI) to determine the extent of ablation. Some stained lesions were sectioned to obtain the three-dimensional geometry of the ablated volume. Results In all animals (12/12), we were able to create nonconducting lesions with less than 2 seconds of nsPEF application per site and minimal heating (< 0.2°C) of the tissue. The geometry of the ablated volume was smoother and more uniform throughout the wall than typical for RF ablation. The width of the lesions could be controlled up to 6 mm via the electrode spacing and the shock parameters. Conclusions Ablation with nsPEFs is a promising alternative to radiofrequency (RF) ablation of AF. It may dramatically reduce procedure times and produce more consistent lesion thickness than RF ablation. PMID:26658139

  2. Fluid modeling of a high-voltage nanosecond pulsed xenon microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-07-01

    A computational modeling study of high-voltage nanosecond pulsed microdischarge in xenon gas at 10 atm is presented. The discharge is observed to develop as two streamers originating from the cathode and the anode, and propagating toward each other until they merge to form a single continuous discharge channel. The peak plasma density obtained in the simulations is ˜1024 m-3, i.e., the ionization degree of plasma does not exceed 1%. The influence of the initial gas pre-ionization is established. It is seen that an increase in the seeded plasma density results in an increase in the streamer propagation velocity and an increase in the plasma density obtained after the merging of two streamers.

  3. Spectroscopic and electrical characters of SBD plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Lu; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, an atmospheric surface barrier discharge (SBD) generated by annular electrodes in quartz tube is presented through employing bipolar nanosecond pulse voltage in air. The discharge images, waveforms of pulse voltage and discharge current, and optical emission spectra emitted from the discharges are recorded and calculated. A spectra simulation method is developed to separate the overlap of the secondary diffraction spectra which are produced by grating in monochromator, and N2 (B(3)Πg→A(3)Σu(+)) and O (3p(5)P→3s(5)S2(o)) are extracted. The effects of pulse voltage and discharge power on the emission intensities of OH (A(2)Σ(+)→X(2)Пi), N2(+) (B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+)), N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg), N2 (B(3)Πg→A(3)Σu(+)), and O (3p(5)P→3s(5)S2(o)) are investigated. It is found that increasing the pulse peak voltage can lead to an easier formation of N2(+) (B(2)Σu(+)) than that of N2 (C(3)Πu). Additionally, vibrational and rotational temperatures of the plasma are determined by comparing the experimental and simulated spectra of N2(+) (B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+)), and the results show that the vibrational and rotational temperatures are 3250±20K and 350±5K under the pulse peak voltage of 28kV, respectively. PMID:26924210

  4. Spectroscopic and electrical characters of SBD plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zi-Lu; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an atmospheric surface barrier discharge (SBD) generated by annular electrodes in quartz tube is presented through employing bipolar nanosecond pulse voltage in air. The discharge images, waveforms of pulse voltage and discharge current, and optical emission spectra emitted from the discharges are recorded and calculated. A spectra simulation method is developed to separate the overlap of the secondary diffraction spectra which are produced by grating in monochromator, and N2 (B3Πg → A3Σu+) and O (3p5P → 3s5S2o) are extracted. The effects of pulse voltage and discharge power on the emission intensities of OH (A2Σ+ → X2Пi), N2+ (B2Σu+ → X2Σg+), N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg), N2 (B3Πg → A3Σu+), and O (3p5P → 3s5S2o) are investigated. It is found that increasing the pulse peak voltage can lead to an easier formation of N2+ (B2Σu+) than that of N2 (C3Πu). Additionally, vibrational and rotational temperatures of the plasma are determined by comparing the experimental and simulated spectra of N2+ (B2Σu+ → X2Σg+), and the results show that the vibrational and rotational temperatures are 3250 ± 20 K and 350 ± 5 K under the pulse peak voltage of 28 kV, respectively.

  5. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  6. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystalmore » Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.« less

  7. On the electrostrictive mechanism of nanosecond-pulsed breakdown in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan; Pekker, Mikhail; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    In this study we have studied the initial stage of the nanosecond-pulsed discharge development in liquid phase. Modelling predicts that in the case of fast rising strong nonhomogeneous electric fields in the vicinity of high-voltage pin electrode a region saturated with nanoscale non-uniformities may be developed. This phenomenon is attributed to the electrostriction mechanisms and may be used to explain development of breakdown in liquid phase. In this work, schlieren method was used in order to demonstrate formation of negative pressure region in liquids with different dielectric permittivity constants: water, ethanol and ethanol-water mixture. It is shown that this density perturbation, formed at the raising edge of the high-voltage pulse, is followed by a generation of a shock wave propagating with the speed of sound away from the electrode, with negative pressure behind it.

  8. Fluorescence of silicon nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyang Sui, Xin; Yang, Fang; Ma, Wei; Li, Jishun; Xue, Yujun; Fu, Xing

    2014-03-15

    A pulsed laser fabrication method is used to prepare fluorescent microstructures on silicon substrates in this paper. A 355 nm nanosecond pulsed laser micromachining system was designed, and the performance was verified and optimized. Fluorescence microscopy was used to analyze the photoluminescence of the microstructures which were formed using the pulsed laser processing technique. Photoluminescence spectra of the microstructure reveal a peak emission around 500 nm, from 370 nm laser irradiation. The light intensity also shows an exponential decay with irradiation time, which is similar to attenuation processes seen in porous silicon. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the microstructure in the fabricated region was also analyzed with multifunction scanning electron microscopy. Spherical particles are produced with diameters around 100 nm. The structure is compared with porous silicon. It is likely that these nanoparticles act as luminescence recombination centers on the silicon surface. The small diameter of the particles modifies the band gap of silicon by quantum confinement effects. Electron-hole pairs recombine and the fluorescence emission shifts into the visible range. The chemical elements of the processed region are also changed during the interaction between laser and silicon. Oxidation and carbonization play an important role in the enhancement of fluorescence emission.

  9. Mechanism study of skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms in laser tissue ablation is essential to improve clinical laser applications by reducing collateral damage and laser pulse energy requirement. The motive of this dissertation is to study skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses in a wide spectral region from near-infrared to ultraviolet for a clear understanding of the mechanism that can be used to improve future design of the pulsed lasers for dermatology and plastic surgery. Multiple laser and optical configurations have been constructed to generate 9 to 12ns laser pulses with similar profiles at 1064. 532, 266 and 213nm for this study of skin tissue ablation. Through measurements of ablation depth as a function cf laser pulse energy, the 589nm spectral line in the secondary radiation from ablated skin tissue samples was identified as the signature of the occurrence of ablation. Subsequently, this spectral signature has been used to investigate the probabilistic process of the ablation near the threshold at the four wavelengths. Measurements of the ablation probability were conducted as a function of the electrical field strength of the laser pulse and the ablation thresholds in a wide spectral range from 1064nm to 213nm were determined. Histology analysis and an optical transmission method were applied in assessing of the ablation depth per pulse to study the ablation process at irradiance levels higher than threshold. Because more than 70% of the wet weight of the skin tissue is water, optical breakdown and backscattering in water was also investigated along with a nonlinear refraction index measurement using a z-scan technique. Preliminary studies on ablation of a gelatin based tissue phantom are also reported. The current theoretical models describing ablation of soft tissue ablation by short laser pulses were critically reviewed. Since none of the existing models was found capable of explaining the experimental results, a new plasma-mediated model was developed

  10. Effects of nanosecond pulse electric fields on cellular elasticity.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Diganta; Asmar, Anthony; Stacey, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the effects of a single 60 nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) of low (15 kV/cm) and high (60 kV/cm) field strengths on cellular morphology and membrane elasticity in Jurkat cells using fluorescent microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We performed force displacement measurements on cells using AFM and calculated the Young's modulus for membrane elasticity. Differential effects were observed depending upon pulsing conditions. We found that a single nsPEF of low field strength did not induce any apparent cytoskeletal breakdown and had minor morphological changes. Interestingly, force measurements and calculation of Young's modulus showed a significant decrease in membrane elasticity. A single nsPEF of high field strength induced stark morphological changes due to disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and a marked decrease in elasticity likely caused by irreversible membrane damage. We suggest that the cellular morphology is mainly dependent on stabilization by the actin cytoskeleton, while the elasticity changes are partially dependent on the cytoskeletal integrity.

  11. Considering effects of nanosecond pulsed electric fields on proteins.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Most, if not all, effects of intense, pulsed electric fields are analyzed in terms of electrical charging of plasma membranes and/or subcellular membranes. However, not all cell responses from nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are fully explained by poration of cell membranes. Observations that nsPEFs induce a Ca2-dependent dissipation of the mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm), which is enhanced when high frequency components are present in fast rise-fall waveforms, are not compatible with a poration event. Ca(2+) is shown to have little or no effect on propidium iodide uptake as a measure of plasma membrane poration and consequently intracellular membranes. Since most if not all Ca(2+)-regulated events are mediated by proteins, actions of nsPEFs on a protein(s) that regulate and/or affect the mitochondria membrane potential are possible. To show that nsPEFs can directly affect proteins, nsPEFs non-thermally inactivated the catalytic (phosphotransferase) activity of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, which is the prototype of the protein kinase superfamily that share a common catalytic mechanism and whose functions are highly dependent on their structure. These studies present indirect and direct evidences that nsPEFs can affect proteins and their functions, at least in part, by affecting their structure.

  12. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  13. An investigation into the cumulative breakdown process of polymethylmethacrylate in quasi-uniform electric field under nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang; Cang Su, Jian; Bo Zhang, Xi; Feng Pan, Ya; Min Wang, Li; Peng Fang, Jin; Sun, Xu; Lui, Rui

    2013-08-15

    A group of complete images on the discharge channel developed in PMMA in quasi-uniform electric field under nanosecond pulses are observed with an on-line transmission microscope. The characteristics of the cumulative breakdown process are also generalized, which include initiating from the vicinity of the cathode, developing to the anode with a branch-like shape, and taking on a wormhole appearance when final breakdown occurs. The concluded characteristics are explained by referring to the conceptions of “low density domain” and “free radical” and considering the initial discharge channel as a virtual needle. The characteristics are helpful for designers to enhance the lifetime of insulators employed on a nanosecond time scale.

  14. Retinal threshold studies for nanosecond and picosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Smith, Audrey B.; Rogers, Mark E.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for Minimum Visible Lesions (MVL) at the retina are reported for 60 picoseconds (ps) and 4 nanoseconds (ns), single laser pulses in rhesus monkey eyes using a visible wavelength of 532 nanometers (nm) from a doubled Nd:YAG laser. The 50% probability for damage (ED50) dosages are calculated for 1 hour and 24 hour post exposures using 95% fiducial limits. For both pulsewidths, the threshold values calculated by probit analysis decrease between the 1 hour and 24 hour ophthalmoscopic evaluations. The ED50 value determined for the 60 ps pulsewidth was less than half the value at 4 ns (0.43 (mu) J/60 ps vs. 0.90 (mu) J/4 ns at 24 hours) for both readings. Of the 136 exposures for pulse energies ranging from 0.03 to 5.0 (mu) J no hemorrhagic lesions were produced for either pulsewidth studied. However, at 6.6 (mu) J one intraretinal hemorrhagic lesion was observed for 60 ps. The slope of the probit curve was higher for 60 ps when compared with the 4 ns value (3.03 at 60 ps vs. 2.68 at 4 ns). MVL threshold doses calculated are comparable with those reported in the literature. However, the 4 ns MVL values is less than one order of magnitude (a factor 4.7) above the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) level as defined by the 'American National Standard For The Safe Use Of Lasers', ANSI Z136.1-19932. We present the current MVL data as it compares with previous data obtained for picosecond and femtosecond laser pulse thresholds and provide a preliminary assessment of how the ANSI MPE standard might be amended.

  15. Bipolar nanosecond electric pulses are less efficient at electropermeabilization and killing cells than monopolar pulses

    PubMed Central

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Ullery, Jody; Pakhomova, Olga N.; Roth, Caleb C.; Semenov, Iurri; Beier, Hope T.; Tarango, Melissa; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl; Pakhomov, Andrei G.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that bipolar (BP) electric pulses in the microsecond range are more effective at permeabilizing cells while maintaining similar cell survival rates as compared to monopolar (MP) pulse equivalents. In this paper, we investigated whether the same advantage existed for BP nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) as compared to MP nsPEF. To study permeabilization effectiveness, MP or BP pulses were delivered to single Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and the response of three dyes, Calcium Green-1, Propidium Iodide (PI), and FM1-43, was measured by confocal microscopy. Results show that BP pulses were less effective at increasing intracellular calcium concentration or PI uptake and cause less membrane reorganization (FM1-43) than MP pulses. Twenty-four hour survival was measured in three cell lines (Jurkat, U937, CHO) and over ten times more BP pulses were required to induce death as compared to MP pulses of similar magnitude and duration. Flow cytometry analysis of CHO cells after exposure (15 minutes) revealed that to achieve positive FITC-Annexin V and PI expression, ten times more BP pulses were required than MP pulses. Overall, unlike longer pulse exposures, BP nsPEF exposures proved far less effective at both membrane permeabilization and cell killing than MP nsPEF. PMID:24332942

  16. Bipolar nanosecond electric pulses are less efficient at electropermeabilization and killing cells than monopolar pulses.

    PubMed

    Ibey, Bennett L; Ullery, Jody C; Pakhomova, Olga N; Roth, Caleb C; Semenov, Iurii; Beier, Hope T; Tarango, Melissa; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl H; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2014-01-10

    Multiple studies have shown that bipolar (BP) electric pulses in the microsecond range are more effective at permeabilizing cells while maintaining similar cell survival rates as compared to monopolar (MP) pulse equivalents. In this paper, we investigated whether the same advantage existed for BP nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) as compared to MP nsPEF. To study permeabilization effectiveness, MP or BP pulses were delivered to single Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and the response of three dyes, Calcium Green-1, propidium iodide (PI), and FM1-43, was measured by confocal microscopy. Results show that BP pulses were less effective at increasing intracellular calcium concentration or PI uptake and cause less membrane reorganization (FM1-43) than MP pulses. Twenty-four hour survival was measured in three cell lines (Jurkat, U937, CHO) and over ten times more BP pulses were required to induce death as compared to MP pulses of similar magnitude and duration. Flow cytometry analysis of CHO cells after exposure (at 15 min) revealed that to achieve positive FITC-Annexin V and PI expression, ten times more BP pulses were required than MP pulses. Overall, unlike longer pulse exposures, BP nsPEF exposures proved far less effective at both membrane permeabilization and cell killing than MP nsPEF.

  17. Assessment of cytoplasm conductivity by nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Denzi, Agnese; Merla, Caterina; Palego, Cristiano; Paffi, Alessandra; Ning, Yaqing; Multari, Caroline R; Cheng, Xuanhong; Apollonio, Francesca; Hwang, James C M; Liberti, Micaela

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new method for the better assessment of cytoplasm conductivity, which is critical to the development of electroporation protocols as well as insight into fundamental mechanisms underlying electroporation. For this goal, we propose to use nanosecond electrical pulses to bypass the complication of membrane polarization and a single cell to avoid the complication of the application of the "mixing formulas." Further, by suspending the cell in a low-conductivity medium, it is possible to force most of the sensing current through the cytoplasm for a more direct assessment of its conductivity. For proof of principle, the proposed technique was successfully demonstrated on a Jurkat cell by comparing the measured and modeled currents. The cytoplasm conductivity was best assessed at 0.32 S/m and it is in line with the literature. The cytoplasm conductivity plays a key role in the understanding of the basis mechanism of the electroporation phenomenon, and in particular, a large error in the cytoplasm conductivity determination could result in a correspondingly large error in predicting electroporation. Methods for a good estimation of such parameter become fundamental.

  18. A high voltage nanosecond pulser with independently adjustable output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Carscadden, John; Slobodov, Ilia

    2014-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT) is developing a high voltage nanosecond pulser capable of generating microwaves and non-equilibrium plasmas for plasma medicine, material science, enhanced combustion, drag reduction, and other research applications. The EHT nanosecond pulser technology is capable of producing high voltage (up to 60 kV) pulses (width 20-500 ns) with fast rise times (<10 ns) at high pulse repetition frequency (adjustable up to 100 kHz) for CW operation. The pulser does not require the use of saturable core magnetics, which allows for the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency to be fully adjustable, enabling researchers to explore non-equilibrium plasmas over a wide range of parameters. A magnetic compression stage can be added to improve the rise time and drive lower impedance loads without sacrificing high pulse repetition frequency operation. Work supported in part by the US Navy under Contract Number N00014-14-P-1055 and the US Air Force under Contract Number FA9550-14-C-0006.

  19. Development of pulsed gas discharge lasers for shock hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Gerd; Tkotz, R.; Keusch, C.; Negendanck, Matthias; Christiansen, Jens; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    1996-08-01

    Shock hardening of metals (e.g. Ti, stainless steel) by pulsed lasers offers the possibility of large hardening depth (several millimeters) without serious damage to the surface of the workpiece. Previous investigations for shock hardening have mainly been performed with high power solid state lasers. The adaptation of commercial, high power gas discharge lasers to the shock hardening process could make this process relevant for industrial applications, as high repetition rates may be used. Two different laser systems have been investigated: a TEA carbon-dioxide laser and a XeCl laser. Both systems have pulse energies of some joule, a pulse length of several ten nanoseconds, and pulse repetition rates of up to 10 Hertz. The divergence of the beam was minimized to improve focusing properties. Systematic measurements of the laser induced pressure by means of piezo probes have been performed. An enhancement of the hardness of illuminated Ti(RT15) targets has been found and is reported.

  20. Numerical simulation of air-breathing mode laser propulsion by nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Zhao, Shanghong; Chu, Xingchun; Yu, Kanmin; Ma, Lihua; Zhan, Shengbao; Li, Yunxia

    2009-07-01

    Based on Navier-Stokes equations, numerical simulations of air-breathing mode laser propulsion by nanosecond laser pulse are carried out. An analytical model of the thruster's inner flow involving the simple processing of the ignition zone is established. The evolvement of the laser sustained plasma shockwaves is systemic analyzed; also the effects of pulse energy and thruster's structure such as focal length, scale and open angle on propulsion performance are researched. The simulated results show that the focal length dominates among the structural factors of thruster in the propulsion by nanosecond laser pulse. The larger focal length leads to better propulsion performance. It is also evident that for single pulse propulsion, nanosecond laser pulse is better than microsecond laser pulse, the momentum coupling efficient achieved by the former is 2~5 times of the latter's, which is highly agree with the existing experimental results.

  1. A nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge at elevated pressures: time-resolved electric field and efficiency of initiation of combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, I. N.; Khorunzhenko, V. I.; Mintoussov, E. I.; Sagulenko, P. N.; Popov, N. A.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    We study a nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) initiated by negative or positive polarity pulses 10-15 kV in amplitude in a cable, 25-30 ns FWHM, 5 ns rise time, in the regime of a single shot or 3 Hz repetitive frequency. Discharge parameters, namely spatial structure of the discharge and time- and space-resolved electric field are studied in a N2 : O2 = 4 : 1 mixture for P = 1-5 atm. The possibility of igniting a combustible mixture with the help of an SDBD is demonstrated using the example of a stoichiometric C2H6 : O2 mixture at ambient initial temperature and at 1 atm pressure. Flame propagation and ignited volume as a function of time are compared experimentally for two discharge geometries: SDBD and pin-to-pin configurations at the same shape and amplitude of the incident pulse. It is shown that the SDBD can be considered as a multi-point ignition system with maximum energy release near the high-voltage electrode. Numerical modeling of the discharge and subsequent combustion kinetics for the SDBD conditions is performed. The discharge action leads to the production of atoms and radicals as well as to fast gas heating, due to the relaxation of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. The calculated ignition delay time is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Diamondoid synthesis by nanosecond pulsed microplasmas generated in He at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauss, Sven; Shizuno, Tomoki; Oshima, Fumito; Pai, David Z.; Terashima, Kazuo

    2012-10-01

    Diamondoids are sp^3 hybridized carbon nanomaterials that possess interesting properties making them attractive for biotechnology, medicine, and opto- and nanoelectronics. So far, larger diamondoids have been synthesized using the smallest diamondoid (adamantane) as a precursor. For this electric discharges and pulsed laser plasmas generated in supercritical fluids, and hot filament chemical vapor deposition have been used, but these methods are difficult to realize or very time-consuming. We have developed a more convenient approach where diamondoids are synthesized by high-voltage nanosecond pulsed microplasmas (voltage 15 kVp-p, frequency 1 Hz, pulse width 10 ns) generated in He at atmospheric pressure using point-to-plane tungsten electrodes. Adamantane was used as a precursor, and synthesis was conducted for 10^5 pulses at gas temperatures of 297, 373 and 473 K. Energy dispersive X-ray and micro-Raman spectroscopy were conducted to determine the composition of the products, and gas chromatography - mass spectra indicated the formation of diamantane. It was found that synthesis is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperatures, and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy suggest that the chemical reactions take place in the afterglow.

  3. Widely tunable repetition-rate and pulse-duration nanosecond pulses from two spectral beam combined fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Man; Zheng, Ye; Yang, Yifeng; Chen, Xiaolong; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Kai; Wang, Jianhua; Qi, Yunfeng; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Nanosecond pulses with a widely tunable repetition-rate and pulse-duration at 1 μm wavelength are obtained by spectrally combining two pulse fiber amplifiers using a home-made polarization-independent multilayer dielectric reflective diffraction grating. The width of the combined pulses can be tuned from 4 ns to 800 ns, and the pulse repetition-rate can be ranged from 1 MHz to 200 MHz. Thanks to the spectral beam combining system, the maximum repetition-rate and pulse-duration of the combined pulses are doubled, compared to the single pulse fiber amplifier, by setting a proper temporal delay between the two pulse channels.

  4. Fluid and hybrid modeling of nanosecond surface discharges: effect of polarity and secondary electrons emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Tereshonok, Dmitry V.; Naidis, George V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of nanosecond pulsed surface discharges of positive and negative polarity using a 2D fluid and fluid-Monte Carlo simulation. The streamers propagate along the dielectric surface in an asymmetric actuator geometry. The essential difference between the streamers of positive and negative polarities is observed. For positive polarity the intense sheath region is formed near the surface having high values of the electric field. The negative streamer has a lower field at the streamer front and in the sheath region. The disparity between the positive and negative surface streamers increases when electron Monte Carlo simulation is used that treats the energetic secondary electrons in a fully kinetic way. We also found that for a negative polarity applied to the exposed electrode, a thin layer of precursor electrons ahead of a streamer is formed having a shape of a narrow protruding needle. The effect is attributed to the production and trapping of fast secondary electrons in the narrow anodic sheath region.

  5. Cellular response to high pulse repetition rate nanosecond pulses varies with fluorescent marker identity.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary A; Tolstykh, Gleb P; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2016-09-23

    Nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP's) are a well-studied phenomena in biophysics that cause substantial alterations to cellular membrane dynamics, internal biochemistry, and cytoskeletal structure, and induce apoptotic and necrotic cell death. While several studies have attempted to measure the effects of multiple nanosecond pulses, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) has received little attention, especially at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. In this study, uptake of Propidium Iodide, FM 1-43, and YO-PRO-1 fluorescent dyes in CHO-K1 cells was monitored across a wide range of PRRs (5 Hz-500 KHz) using a laser-scanning confocal microscope in order to better understand how high frequency repetition rates impact induced biophysical changes. We show that frequency trends depend on the identity of the dye under study, which could implicate transmembrane protein channels in the uptake response due to their chemical selectivity. Finally, YO-PRO-1 fluorescence was monitored in the presence of Gadolinium (Gd(3+)), Ruthenium Red, and in calcium-free solution to elucidate a mechanism for its unique frequency trend. PMID:27553279

  6. Supression of laser breakdown by pulsed nonequilibrium ns discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, A. Y.; Semenov, I. E.; Shneider, M. N.

    2016-10-01

    The avalanche ionization induced by infrared laser pulses was investigated in a pre-ionized argon gas. Pre-ionization was created by a high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge developed in the form of a fast ionization wave. Then, behind the front of ionization wave additional avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused Nd-YAG laser pulse. It was shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation. It was demonstrated that the suppression of laser spark development in the case of strong gas pre-ionization is because of fast electron energy transfer from the laser beam focal region. The main mechanism of this energy transfer is free electrons diffusion.

  7. Pulsed Power Discharges in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratel, Axel Wolf Hendrik

    An Electrohydraulic Discharge Process (EHD) for the treatment of hazardous chemical wastes in water has been developed. Liquid waste in a 4 L EHD reactor is directly exposed to high-energy pulsed electrical discharges between two submerged electrodes. The high-temperature (> 14,000 K) plasma channel created by an EHD discharge emits ultraviolet radiation, and produces an intense shock wave as it expands against the surrounding water. A simulation of the EHD process is presented along with experimental results. The simulation assumes a uniform plasma channel with a plasma that obeys the ideal gas law and the Spitzer conductivity law. The results agree with previously published data. The simulation is used to predict the total energy efficiency, energy partitioning, maximum plasma channel temperature and pressure for the Caltech Pulsed Power Facility (CPPF). The simulation shows that capacitance, initial voltage and gap length can be used to control the efficiency of the discharge. The oxidative degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4 -CP), 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA), and 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) in an EHD reactor was explored. The initial rates of degradation for the three substrates are described by a first-order rate equation, where k_{ it 0/} is the zero-order rate constant that accounts for direct photolysis; and k_ {it 1/} is the first-order term that accounts for oxidation in the plasma channel region. For 4-CP in the 4.0 L reactor, the values of these two rate constants are k_{it 0/} = 0.73 +/- 0.08 mu M, and k_{ it 1/} =(9.4 +/- 1.4) times 10^{-4}. For a 200 mu M 4-CP solution this corresponds to an overall intrinsic zero-order rate constant of 0.022 M s^{it -1/} , and a G-value of 4.45 times 10^{-3}. Ozone increases the rate and extent of degradation of the substrates in the EHD reactor. Combined EHD/ozone treatment of a 160 mu M TNT solution resulted in the complete degradation of TNT, and a 34% reduction of the total organic carbon (TOC). The intrinsic

  8. Effect of Pulse Length on Engraving Efficiency in Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Engraving of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Matti; Hirvimäki, Marika; Poutiainen, Ilkka; Salminen, Antti

    2015-10-01

    Dependency of laser pulse length on the effectiveness of laser engraving 304 stainless steel with nanosecond pulses was investigated. Ytterbium fiber laser with pulse lengths from 4 to 200 ns was used at a constant average power of 20 W. Measured criteria for effective laser engraving were high material removal rate (MRR), good visual quality of the engraved surface, and low processing temperature. MRR was measured by weighing the samples prior and after the engraving process. Visual quality was evaluated from magnified images. Surface temperature of the samples was measured by two laser spot-welded K-type thermocouples near the laser-processed area. It was noticed that MRR increases significantly with longer pulse lengths, while the quality decreases and processing temperature increases. Some peculiar process behavior was noticed. With short pulses (<20 ns), the process temperature steadily increased as the engraving process continued, whereas with longer pulses the process temperature started to decrease after initially jumping to a specific level. From visually analyzing the samples, it was noticed that the melted and resolidified bottom structure had cracks and pores on the surface when 50 ns or longer pulse lengths were used.

  9. Color center generation in sodium-calcium silicate glass by nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siiman, Leo A.; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2005-12-01

    It was found that high purity soda lime glass shows a markedly different induced absorption spectra when exposed to different types of ionizing radiation such as UV lamp or femtosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. The following irradiation was used in the experiments: nanosecond pulses at the fundamental and harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064, 532, 355, and 266 nm), femtosecond pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser operating at λ = 780 nm, ultraviolet rays from a high pressure Xe lamp, X-rays, and Gamma rays. Features of radiation defect generations are discussed.

  10. High peak power sub-nanosecond mode-locked pulse characteristics of Nd:GGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jia; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Tao; Li, Yufei; Yang, Kejian; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Qiao, Wenchao; Feng, Chuansheng; Wang, Yonggang

    2015-10-01

    Based on the dual-loss modulation, i.e. electro-optic (EO) modulator and GaAs saturable absorber, a sub-nanosecond mode-locked pulsed Nd:GGG laser with kHz repetition rates is presented for the first time. The repetition rate (0.5-10 kHz) of this pulsed laser is controlled by the modulation rate of EO modulator, so high stability can be obtained. The sub-nanosecond pulse width depends on the mode-locked pulse underneath the Q-switched envelope in the Q-switched mode-locked (QML) laser and high peak power can be generated. The condition on the generation of sub-nanosecond pulse and the needed threshold power for different modulation rates of EO are given. The average output power, the pulse width and the peak power versus pump power for different repetition rates are demonstrated. The shortest pulse width is 426 ps and the highest peak power reaches 239.4 kW. The experimental results show that the dual-loss modulation technology with EO and GaAs saturable absorber in QML laser is an efficient method to generate sub-nanosecond mode-locked pulsed laser with kHz repetition rates.

  11. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields and the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlke, Megan A.

    Exposure to nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) can cause poration of external and internal cell membranes, DNA damage, and disassociation of cytoskeletal components, all of which are capable of disrupting a cell's ability to replicate. The phase of the cell cycle at the time of exposure is linked to differential sensitivities to nsPEFs across cell lines, as DNA structure, membrane elasticity, and cytoskeletal structure change dramatically during the cell cycle. Additionally, nsPEFs are capable of activating cell cycle checkpoints, which could lead to apoptosis or slow population growth. NsPEFs are emerging as a method for treating tumors via apoptotic induction; therefore, investigating the relevance of nsPEFs and the cell cycle could translate into improved efficacy in tumor treatment. Populations of Jurkat and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were examined post-exposure (10 ns pulse trains at 150kV/cm) by analysis of DNA content via propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis at various time points (1, 6, and 12h post-exposure) to determine population distribution in cell cycle phases. Additionally, CHO and Jurkat cells were synchronized in G1/S and G2/M phases, pulsed, and analyzed to evaluate the role of cell cycle phase in survival of nsPEFs. CHO populations appeared similar to sham populations post-nsPEFs but exhibited arrest in the G1 phase at 6h after exposure. Jurkat cells exhibited increased cell death after nsPEFs compared to CHO cells but did not exhibit checkpoint arrest at any observed time point. The G1/S phase checkpoint is partially controlled by the action of p53; the lack of an active p53 response in Jurkat cells could contribute to their ability to pass this checkpoint and resist cell cycle arrest. Both cell lines exhibited increased sensitivity to nsPEFs in G2/M phase. Live imaging of CHO cells after nsPEF exposure supports the theory of G1/S phase arrest, as a reduced number of cells undergo mitosis within 24 h when

  12. Time evolution of nanosecond runaway discharges in air and helium at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-12-15

    Time- and space-resolved fast framing photography was employed to study the discharge initiated by runaway electrons in air and He gas at atmospheric pressure. Whereas in the both cases, the discharge occurs in a nanosecond time scale and its front propagates with a similar velocity along the cathode-anode gap, the later stages of the discharge differ significantly. In air, the main discharge channels develop and remain in the locations with the strongest field enhancement. In He gas, the first, diode 'gap bridging' stage, is similar to that obtained in air; however, the development of the discharge that follows is dictated by an explosive electron emission from micro-protrusions on the edge of the cathode. These results allow us to draw conclusions regarding the different conductivity of the plasma produced in He and air discharges.

  13. Influence of positive slopes on ultrafast heating in an atmospheric nanosecond-pulsed plasma synthetic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yifei; Wu, Yun; Jia, Min; Liang, Hua; Li, Jun; Li, Yinghong

    2015-02-01

    The influence of positive slopes on the energy coupling and hydrodynamic responses in an atmospheric nanosecond-pulsed plasma synthetic jet (PSJ) was investigated using a validated dry air plasma kinetics model. Based on a 1D simulation of the energy transfer mechanism in ultrafast gas heating, and with reasonable simplification, a 2D model of a PSJ was developed to investigate the discharge characteristics and hydrodynamic responses under different rise times. In the 1D simulation, a shorter voltage rise time results in a higher electric field in less time, reduces the time of ionization front propagation and produces stronger ionization. The energy transfer efficiency of ultrafast heating is approximately 60% but a steeper positive slope could raise local heating power density and make input energy 77% higher at the cost of 2.4% lower energy transfer efficiency under the same voltage amplitude and pulse width. The quench heating power density is always 27-30 times higher than that of ion collision in most discharge regions, while ion collision heating power density is 10-103 times higher in the sheath region. In 2D PSJ simulation, spatial-temporal distribution of electron density, reduced electric field and deposited energy were calculated for the first time. Heating energy increases sharply with voltage rise time decrease in the time scale of 20-50 ns. Jet velocity increases by 100 m s-1 when the rise time is reduced by 20 ns. A shorter voltage rise time also leads to higher orifice pressure and temperature, but their peak values are limited by the structure of the orifice and the discharge cavity.

  14. A Nanosecond Pulsed Plasma Brush for Surface Decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuber, Johanna; Malik, Muhammad; Song, Shutong; Jiang, Chunqi

    2015-11-01

    This work optimizes a non-thermal, atmospheric pressure plasma brush for surface decontamination. The generated plasma plumes with a maximum length of 2 cm are arranged in a 5 cm long, brush-like array. The plasma was generated in ambient air with <= 10 kV, 200 ns pulses at a repetition rate of 1.5 kHz. The energy per pulse and average power are in the range of 1-3 mJ and 0.5-1.5 W, respectively. Helium containing varying concentrations of water vapor was evaluated as the carrier gas and was fed into the plasma chamber at a rate varying between 1 to 7 SLPM. Optimization of the cold plasma brush for surface decontamination was tested in a study of the plasma inactivation of two common pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii. Laminate surfaces inoculated with over-night cultured bacteria were subject to the plasma treatment for varying water concentrations in He, flow rates and discharge voltages. It was found that increasing the water content of the feed gas greatly enhanced the bactericidal effect. Emission spectroscopy was performed to identify the reactive plasma species that contribute to this variation. Additional affiliation: Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics

  15. Compact nanosecond pulsed power technology with applications to biomedical engineering, biology, and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xianyue

    Pulsed power refers to a technology that is suited to drive applications requiring very large power pulses in short bursts. Its recent emerging applications in biology demand compact systems with high voltage electric pulses in nanosecond time range. The required performance of a pulsed power system is enabled by the combined efforts in its design at three levels: efficient and robust devices at the component level, novel circuits and architecture at the system level, and effective interface techniques to deliver fast pulses at the application level. At the component level we are concerned with the power capability of switches and the energy storage density of capacitors. We compare semiconductor materials - Si, GaAs, GaN and SiC - for high voltage, high current, fast FET-type switches, and study the effects of their intrinsic defects on electrical characteristics. We present the fabrication of BST film capacitors on silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition, and investigate their potential application to high voltage, high energy density capacitors. At the system level, a nanosecond pulse generator is developed for electroperturbation of biological cells. We model and design a Blumlein PFN (Pulse Forming Network) to deliver nanosecond pulses to a cuvette load. The resonant circuit employs four parallel 100 A MOSFET switches and charges the PFN to 8 kV within 350 ns. At the application level, in order to controllably deliver nanosecond electric pulses into tumors, we have designed, fabricated, and tested impulse catheter devices. Frequency responds, breakdown voltages and effective volumes of catheters are evaluated. With comparison of simulation and experimental results, we further develop dielectric dispersion models for RPMI. This thesis presents a set of strongly interdisciplinary studies based on pulsed power technology and towards biomedical applications. Addressed issues include from fundamental materials studies to application engineering designs that

  16. Characterization of acoustic shockwaves generated by exposure to nanosecond electrical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Maswadi, Saher; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2014-03-01

    Despite 30 years of research, the mechanism behind the induced breakdown of plasma membranes by electrical pulses, termed electroporation, remains unknown. Current theories treat the interaction between the electrical field and the membrane as an entirely electrical event pointing to multiple plausible mechanisms. By investigating the biophysical interaction between plasma membranes and nanosecond electrical pulses (nsEP), we may have identified a non-electric field driven mechanism, previously unstudied in nsEP, which could be responsible for nanoporation of plasma membranes. In this investigation, we use a non-contact optical technique, termed probe beam deflection technique (PBDT), to characterize acoustic shockwaves generated by nsEP traveling through tungsten wire electrodes. We conclude these acoustic shockwaves are the result of the nsEP exposure imparting electrohydraulic forces on the buffer solution. When these acoustic shockwaves occur in close proximity to lipid bilayer membranes, it is possible that they impart a sufficient amount of mechanical stress to cause poration of that membrane. This research establishes for the first time that nsEP discharged in an aqueous medium generate measureable pressure waves of a magnitude capable of mechanical deformation and possibly damage to plasma membranes. These findings provide a new insight into the longunanswered question of how electric fields cause the breakdown of plasma membranes.

  17. Plasma Discharge Process in a Pulsed Diaphragm Discharge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianjin; Hu, Jue; Zhang, Chao; Wen, Yuanbin; Meng, Yuedong; Zhang, Chengxu

    2014-12-01

    As one of the most important steps in wastewater treatment, limited study on plasma discharge process is a key challenge in the development of plasma applications. In this study, we focus on the plasma discharge process of a pulsed diaphragm discharge system. According to the analysis, the pulsed diaphragm discharge proceeds in seven stages: (1) Joule heating and heat exchange stage; (2) nucleated site formation; (3) plasma generation (initiation of the breakdown stage); (4) avalanche growth and plasma expansion; (5) plasma contraction; (6) termination of the plasma discharge; and (7) heat exchange stage. From this analysis, a critical voltage criterion for breakdown is obtained. We anticipate this finding will provide guidance for a better application of plasma discharges, especially diaphragm plasma discharges.

  18. Supershort avalanche electron beams and x-ray in high-pressure nanosecond discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V.

    2008-07-01

    Since 2003, an interest to investigation of e-beams generation in gas-filled diodes with high pressures has been rekindled. In 2005, the advanced recording methods of electron beams and the use of digital oscilloscopes with wide bandwidth provided the measurements of the beam current duration with time resolution of sim 100 ps. In this paper, the recent measurement results on duration and amplitude of a beam, generated at a nanosecond discharge in different gases have been summarized (Tarasenko et al. 2005, Baksht et al. 2007, Tarasenko et al. 2008). Voltage pulses sim 25, sim 150 and sim 250 kV in amplitude were applied to the gas gap with inhomogeneous electric field. It is presented that the current of supershort avalanche electrons beam (SAEB) recording through a area with a small diameter the pulse duration behind a foil from the gas diode with air at atmospheric pressure is no more than 90 ps. For recording, the pulse shape it is necessary to use a small-sized coaxial collector, loaded to a high-frequency cable, and the same collector is used for taking the charge density distribution over the foil surface in order to determine the SAEB amplitude. The electron distribution over the foil section should be compared with a per pulse distribution. In these experiments, we have compared the distributions obtained per pulse on a RF-3 and luminophore films, placed behind a foil. Besides that, intensity distribution of X-ray radiation at the gas diode output was recorded by using a multi-channel detection device based on microstrip arsenide-gallium detectors of ionizing radiation. An analysis of those data shows that at the beam current duration (FWHM) of sim 90 ps the beam current amplitude behind the 10- mu m thickness Al-foil at atmospheric pressure of air is sim 50 A. Discharge formation and SAEB generation in sulfur hexafluoride and xenon at pressure of 0.01-2.5 atm and helium of 10^-4 - 12 atm have been investigated. The beam of runaway electrons behind 45 mu m

  19. Processes of carbon disulfide degradation under the action of a pulsed corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, D. L.; Filatov, I. E.; Uvarin, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on decomposition of carbon disulfide CS2 in air under the action of a pulsed nanosecond corona discharge have been carried out. The energetic efficiency of the degradation amounted to 290-340 g (kW h)-1, which is significantly higher than with the use of a corona discharge at a constant voltage. The main degradation products are sulfur dioxide SO2, carbonyl sulfide COS, sulfuric acid, and carbon dioxide. Processes occurring in pulsed corona discharge plasma and leading to carbon disulfide degradation are considered. Different methods of air purification from carbon disulfide are compared.

  20. Investigation of capillary nanosecond discharges in air at moderate pressure: comparison of experiments and 2D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Andrei V.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-01

    Nanosecond electrical discharges in the form of ionization waves are of interest for rapidly ionizing and exciting complex gas mixtures to initiate chemical reactions. Operating with a small discharge tube diameter can significantly increase the specific energy deposition and so enable optimization of the initiation process. Analysis of the uniformity of energy release in small diameter capillary tubes will aid in this optimization. In this paper, results for the experimentally derived characteristics of nanosecond capillary discharges in air at moderate pressure are presented and compared with results from a two-dimensional model. The quartz capillary tube, having inner and outer diameters of 1.5 and 3.4 mm, is about 80 mm long and filled with synthetic dry air at 27 mbar. The capillary tube with two electrodes at the ends is inserted into a break of the central wire of a long coaxial cable. A metal screen around the tube is connected to the cable ground shield. The discharge is driven by a 19 kV 35 ns voltage pulse applied to the powered electrode. The experimental measurements are conducted primarily by using a calibrated capacitive probe and back current shunts. The numerical modelling focuses on the fast ionization wave (FIW) and the plasma properties in the immediate afterglow after the conductive plasma channel has been established between the two electrodes. The FIW produces a highly focused region of electric field on the tube axis that sustains the ionization wave that eventually bridges the electrode gap. Results from the model predict FIW propagation speed and current rise time that agree with the experiment.

  1. Dynamics of a wire-to-cylinder atmospheric pressure high-voltage nanosecond discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-08-15

    The dynamics of a wire-to-cylinder atmospheric pressure high-voltage nanosecond discharge is studied by the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collisions model in cylindrical coordinates. The x-ray photons emitted from the anode are found to be inconsequential to the generation of dense plasma in the gap. Rather, the electron impact ionization resulting from acceleration of naturally occurring background electrons in the discharge gap are enough to explain the generation of high-density (∼10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3}) non-equilibrium plasma. The influence of the high-voltage rise time on the plasma parameters is discussed.

  2. Nanosecond Responses of Proteins to Ultra-High Temperature Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Bradley C.; McKenzie, David R.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Nosworthy, Neil J.; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.

    2006-01-01

    Observations of fast unfolding events in proteins are typically restricted to <100°C. We use a novel apparatus to heat and cool enzymes within tens of nanoseconds to temperatures well in excess of the boiling point. The nanosecond temperature spikes are too fast to allow water to boil but can affect protein function. Spikes of 174°C for catalase and ∼290°C for horseradish peroxidase are required to produce irreversible loss of enzyme activity. Similar temperature spikes have no effect when restricted to 100°C or below. These results indicate that the “speed limit” for the thermal unfolding of large proteins is shorter than 10−8 s. The unfolding rate at high temperature is consistent with extrapolation of low temperature rates over 12 orders of magnitude using the Arrhenius relation. PMID:16844754

  3. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    PubMed

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  4. Numerical simulation of impurity desorption induced by nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Yinsheng; Lin Xiaohui; Chen Minhua; Chen Yunfei

    2006-08-01

    A model based on a stochastic process was developed to study the impurity molecule desorption from a substrate induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers. The dynamics of adsorbed molecules irradiated by the laser pulses can be considered to be a Brownian motion in the bath of excited energy carriers. A two-step model was used to describe the nonequilibrium heating process induced by the femtosecond laser pulses. The difference between the desorption processes induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers was discussed based on the numerical results for the desorption of CO molecules from a Ru surface. Results indicate that the femtosecond laser is a much better tool for desorption than the nanosecond laser.

  5. Device for generation of pulsed corona discharge

    DOEpatents

    Gutsol, Alexander F.; Fridman, Alexander; Blank, Kenneth; Korobtsev, Sergey; Shiryaevsky, Valery; Medvedev, Dmitry

    2012-05-08

    The invention is a method and system for the generation of high voltage, pulsed, periodic corona discharges capable of being used in the presence of conductive liquid droplets. The method and system can be used, for example, in different devices for cleaning of gaseous or liquid media using pulsed corona discharge. Specially designed electrodes and an inductor increase the efficiency of the system, permit the plasma chemical oxidation of detrimental impurities, and increase the range of stable discharge operations in the presence of droplets of water or other conductive liquids in the discharge chamber.

  6. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J; Petrik, Nikolay G; Smith, R Scott; Joly, Alan G; Tonkyn, Russell G; Kay, Bruce D; Kimmel, Greg A

    2016-04-28

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ∼10(10) K/s for temperature increases of ∼100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (∼5 × 10(9) K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ∼±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ∼±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  7. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J; Petrik, Nikolay G; Smith, R Scott; Joly, Alan G; Tonkyn, Russell G; Kay, Bruce D; Kimmel, Greg A

    2016-04-28

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ∼10(10) K/s for temperature increases of ∼100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (∼5 × 10(9) K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ∼±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ∼±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces. PMID:27131543

  8. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ˜1010 K/s for temperature increases of ˜100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (˜5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ˜±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ˜±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  9. Production of picosecond, kilojoule, petawatt laser pulses via Raman amplification of nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Fiúza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Cairns, R. A.

    2011-10-01

    The demonstration of fast-ignition (FI) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires the delivery of 40 kJ - 100 kJ of laser energy to the hot spot within 16 ps. In addition, third harmonic conversion to 351 nm is needed to optimize Iλ2 to obtain the correct hot electron energy. High-energy picosecond petawatt beams at 351 nm are difficult to generate using conventional solid-state laser systems. Previous studies of Raman amplification concentrated on maximizing the intensity and power of femtosecond pulses [Trines et al., Nature Physics (2010)]. Here we present particle-in-cell simulations and analytic theory that confirm that Raman amplification of high-energy nanosecond pulses in plasma can generate petawatt peak power pulses of picosecond duration with high efficiency (up to 60%), even at 351 nm wavelength. This scheme provides a potential new route for the realization of fast ignition ICF in the laboratory, as well as access to wide range of other high energy density physics research applications. This work was supported by STFC's CLF and CfFP, by EPSRC through grant EP/G04239X/1 and by FCT (Portugal) through grants PTDC/FIS/66823/2006 and SFRH/BD/38952/2007.

  10. Explosive boiling of metals upon irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Mazhukin, V I; Demin, M M; Shapranov, A V; Samokhin, A A

    2014-04-28

    A repeated effect of explosive boiling has been found in metals exposed to a nanosecond laser pulse in the framework of molecular dynamic simulations combined with a continuum description of a conduction band electrons system. This effect can be used, in particular, as a marker of approaching critical parameters of the region in the irradiated matter. (letters)

  11. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  12. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  13. High on/off ratio nanosecond laser pulses for a triggered single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Gang; Liu, Bei; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    An 852 nm nanosecond laser pulse chain with a high on/off ratio is generated by chopping a continuous-wave laser beam using a Mach–Zehnder-type electro-optic intensity modulator (MZ-EOIM). The detailed dependence of the MZ-EOIM’s on/off ratio on various parameters is characterized. By optimizing the incident beam polarization and stabilizing the MZ-EOIM temperature, a static on/off ratio of 12600:1 is achieved. The dynamic on/off ratios versus the pulse repetition rate and the pulse duty cycle are measured and discussed. The high-on/off-ratio nanosecond pulsed laser system was used in a triggered single-photon source based on a trapped single cesium atom, which reveals clear antibunching.

  14. High on/off ratio nanosecond laser pulses for a triggered single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Gang; Liu, Bei; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    An 852 nm nanosecond laser pulse chain with a high on/off ratio is generated by chopping a continuous-wave laser beam using a Mach-Zehnder-type electro-optic intensity modulator (MZ-EOIM). The detailed dependence of the MZ-EOIM’s on/off ratio on various parameters is characterized. By optimizing the incident beam polarization and stabilizing the MZ-EOIM temperature, a static on/off ratio of 12600:1 is achieved. The dynamic on/off ratios versus the pulse repetition rate and the pulse duty cycle are measured and discussed. The high-on/off-ratio nanosecond pulsed laser system was used in a triggered single-photon source based on a trapped single cesium atom, which reveals clear antibunching.

  15. Spatial and Transient Effects during the Amplification of a Picosecond Pulse Beam by a Nanosecond Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, C.; Baccou, C.; Debayle, A.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Hüller, S.; Casanova, M.; Marion, D.; Loiseau, P.; Glize, K.; Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.

    2016-09-01

    Amplification of a picosecond pulse beam by a lower intensity nanosecond pulse beam was experimentally observed in a flowing plasma. Modifications of intensity distributions in beam focal spots due to nonhomogeneous energy transfer and its transient regime were investigated. The mean transferred power reached 57% of the incident power of the nanosecond pulse beam. An imaging diagnostic allowed the intensity profile of the picosecond pulse beam to be determined, bringing to evidence the spatial nonuniformity of energy transfer in the amplified beam. This diagnostic also enabled us to observe the temporal evolution of the speckle intensity distribution because of the transfer. These results are reproduced by numerical simulations of two complementary codes. The method and the observed effects are important for the understanding of experiments with multiple crossing laser beams in plasmas.

  16. Over 0.5 MW green laser from sub-nanosecond giant pulsed microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2016-03-01

    A sub-nanosecond green laser with laser head sized 35 × 35 × 35 mm3 was developed from a giant pulsed microchip laser for laser processing on organic superconducting transistor with a flexible substrate. A composite monolithic Y3Al5O12 (YAG) /Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG crystal was designed for generating giant pulsed 1064 nm laser. A fibercoupled 30 W laser diode centered at 808 nm was used with pump pulse duration of 245 μs. The 532 nm green laser was obtained from a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with output energy of 150 μJ and pulse duration of 268 ps. The sub-nanosecond green laser is interesting for 2-D ablation patterns.

  17. Controlling the stimulated Brillouin scattering of self-focusing nanosecond laser pulses in silica glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, Sarah; Berge, Luc; Skupin, Stefan

    2011-06-15

    We numerically investigate the interplay between Kerr self-focusing (SF) and transient stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) for nanosecond pulses in bulk silica. The influences of the input power, phase, or amplitude modulations in the pump pulse together with the incident beam shape on the filamentation dynamics are discussed. We show that appropriate amplitude modulations dividing nanosecond laser pumps into picosecond-long pulse trains inhibit SBS at any power. In contrast, phase-modulated pulses with comparable spectral width undergo multiple filamentation and earlier beam collapse due to modulational instabilities. We demonstrate, however, the existence of a critical pump bandwidth above which SBS can be efficiently suppressed by phase modulations even at high powers. This observation also holds for squared beam shapes with much broader spatial spectra, which decay more easily into multiple filaments over short distances. Intensity profiles of the reflected Stokes waves for such broad pumps are finally discussed.

  18. OES characterization of streamers in a nanosecond pulsed SDBD using N2 and Ar transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goekce, S.; Peschke, P.; Hollenstein, Ch; Leyland, P.; Ott, P.

    2016-08-01

    The characterization of non-thermal homogeneous plasmas is possible using optical emission spectroscopy (OES), notably by estimating the reduced electric field. This method was applied to characterize streamers generated by a nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) operated in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure and also at 0.5 atm. The average reduced electric field associated with the surface streamers was determined using four different sets of transitions occurring in air plasmas, the first negative system (FNS) of \\text{N}2+ , the first positive system (FPS) and second positive system (SPS) of {{\\text{N}}2} and argon transitions 2{{p}x}-1{{s}y} . The analysis of the results allowed to critically assess the validity of the estimated reduced electric field for the present conditions. It is shown experimentally that the inhomogeneous nature of the streamer head influences significantly the estimation of the reduced electric field. Moreover, the estimated reduced electric field is not sufficient to characterize the processes taking place in the streamer head, due to the steep variation of both the reduced electric field E/N and the electron density n e in space and time. To overcome this limitation, a new method is proposed to take into account the spatial structure of a streamer head. The applicability of the new method is demonstrated for these experimental conditions and shows a very good agreement for the transitions tested.

  19. Laser photoionization of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) by femtosecond and nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Christopher; Huestis, David; Coggiola, Michael; Oser, Harald

    2006-05-01

    Laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been applied to the study of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), an improvised explosive. Wavelength dependent mass spectra in two time regimes were acquired using nanosecond (5 ns) and femtosecond (130 fs) laser pulses. We find the major difference between the two time regimes to be the detection of the parent molecular ion when femtosecond laser pulses are employed.

  20. 188 W nanosecond pulsed fiber amplifier at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zebiao; Guo, Chao; Li, Qi; Zhao, Pengfei; Li, Chengyu; Huang, Zhihua; Tang, Xuan; Lin, Honghuan; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin; Wang, Jianjun; Jing, Feng

    2016-07-01

    We report an all-fiber high power nanosecond pulsed laser at a center wavelength of 1064 nm. Optimizing the coiling diameter of the active fiber, 188 W average power is achieved at a repetition rate of 40 kHz. The pulse width is measured as 101 ns, while the peak power can be estimated to 46.5 kW.

  1. Plasma in a Pulsed Discharge Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remy, J.; Bienier, L.; Salama, F.

    2005-01-01

    The plasma generated in a pulsed slit discharge nozzle is used to form molecular ions in an astrophysically relevant environment. The plasma has been characterized as a glow discharge in the abnormal regime. Laboratory studies help understand the formation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ions that are thought to be the source of the ubiquitous unidentified infrared bands.

  2. Mechanism initiated by nanoabsorber for UV nanosecond-pulse-driven damage of dielectric coatings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chaoyang; Shao, Jianda; He, Hongbo; Yi, Kui; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2008-03-01

    A model of plasma formation for UV nanosecond pulse-laser interaction with SiO(2) thin film based on nanoabsorber is proposed. The formalism considered the temperature dependence of band gap. The numerical results show that during the process of nanosecond pulsed-laser interaction with SiO(2) films, foreign inclusion absorbing a fraction of incident radiation heats the surrounding host material through heat conduction causing the decrease of the band gap and making the initial transparent matrix into an absorptive medium around the inclusion. During the remainder pulse, the abosorbing volume of the host material is effectively growed and lead to the formation of the damage craters. We investigated the experimental damage craters and compared with theoretical prediction. The pulselength dependence of damage threshold was also investigated. PMID:18542429

  3. Spatial and Temporal Dependence of Interspark Interactions in Femtosecond-Nanosecond Dual-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pearman, William; Lawrence, Marion; Chance Carter, J.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Angel, S. Michael

    2004-09-01

    A femtosecond air spark has recently been combined with a nanosecond ablative pulse in order to map the spatial and temporal interactions of the two plasmas in femtosecond-nanosecond orthogonal preablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Good spatial and temporal correlation was found for reduced atomic emission from atmospheric species (nitrogen and oxygen) and increased atomic emission from ablated species (copper and aluminum) in the femtosecond-nanosecond plasma, suggesting a potential role for atmospheric pressure or nitrogen/oxygen concentration reduction following air spark formation in generating atomic emission enhancements in dual-pulse LIBS.

  4. Irreversible electroporation and apoptosis in human liver cancer cells induced by nanosecond electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Deyou; Yao, Chenguo; Liu, Huan; Li, Chengxiang; Cheng, Jie; Guo, Fei; Tang, Liling

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of nanosecond electric pulses on HepG2 human liver cancer cells. Electric pulses with a high strength of 10 kV/cm, duration of 500 ns and frequency of 1 Hz were applied to the cells. After delivery of electric pulses, apoptosis, intracellular calcium ion concentrations, transmembrane mitochondrial potentials, electropermeabilization and recovery from electropermeabilization in cells were investigated. The results showed that electric pulse treatment for 20 s and more could trigger apoptosis in cells. Real-time observation indicated an immediate increase in intracellular calcium ion concentration and a dramatic decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in cells responding to electric pulses. In subsequent experiments, propidium iodide uptake in cells emerged after exposure to electric pulses, indicating electropermeabilization of the cell membrane. Furthermore, recovery from electropermeabilization was not observed even 4 h after the stimulation, demonstrating that irreversible electropermeabilization was induced by electric pulses. In conclusion, electric pulses with a high strength and nanosecond duration can damage cancer cells, accompanied by a series of intracellular changes, providing strong evidence for the application of electric pulses in cancer treatment. PMID:23740887

  5. The role of nanosecond electric pulse-induced mechanical stress in cellular nanoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.

    Background: Exposures of cells to very short (less than 1 microsecond) electric pulses in the megavolt/meter range have been shown to cause a multitude of effects, both physical and molecular in nature. Physically, nanosecond electrical pulse exposure can disrupt the plasma membrane, leading to a phenomenon known as nanoporation. Nanoporation is the production of nanometer sized holes (less than 2 nanometers in diameter) that can persist for up to fifteen minutes, allowing the flow of ions into and out of the cell. Nanoporation can lead to secondary physical effects, such as cellular swelling, shrinking and blebbing. Molecularly, nanosecond electrical pulses have been shown to activate signaling pathways, produce oxidative stress, stimulate hormone secretion and induce both apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause molecular changes is unknown; however, it is thought the flow of ions, such as calcium, into the cell via nanopores, could be a major cause. The ability of nanosecond electrical pulses to cause membranes to become permeable and to induce apoptosis makes the technology a desirable modality for cancer research; however, the lack of understanding regarding the mechanisms by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause nanoporation impedes further development of this technology. This dissertation documents the genomic and proteomic responses of cells exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses and describes in detail the biophysical effects of these electrical pulses, including the demonstration for the first time of the generation of acoustic pressure transients capable of disrupting plasma membranes and possibly contributing to nanoporation. Methods: Jurkat, clone E6-1 (human lymphocytic cell line), U937 (human lymphocytic cell line), Chinese hamster ovarian cells and adult primary human dermal fibroblasts exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses were subjected to a variety of molecular assays, including flow cytometry

  6. Ion transport into cells exposed to monopolar and bipolar nanosecond pulses

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N.; Ibey, Bennet L.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with CHO cells exposed to 60 and 300 ns pulsed electric fields with amplitudes in the range from several kV/cm to tens of kV/cm, showed a decrease of the uptake of calcium ions by more than an order of magnitude when, immediately after a first pulse, a second one of opposite polarity was applied. This effect is assumed to be due to the reversal of the electrophoretic transport of ions through the electroporated membrane during the second phase of the bipolar pulse. This assumption, however, is only valid if electrophoresis is the dominant transport mechanism, rather than diffusion. Comparison of calculated calcium ion currents with experimental results showed that for nanosecond pulses, electrophoresis is at least as important as diffusion. By delaying the second pulse with respect to the first one, the effect of reverse electrophoresis is reduced. Consequently, separating nanosecond pulses of opposite polarity by up to approximately hundred microseconds allows us to vary the uptake of ions from very small values to that obtained with two pulses of the same polarity. The measured calcium ion uptake obtained with bipolar pulses also allowed us to determine the membrane pore recovery time. The calculated recovery time constants are on the order of ten microseconds. PMID:25212701

  7. Ion transport into cells exposed to monopolar and bipolar nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Schoenbach, Karl H; Pakhomov, Andrei G; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Ibey, Bennett L

    2015-06-01

    Experiments with CHO cells exposed to 60 and 300 ns pulsed electric fields with amplitudes in the range from several kV/cm to tens of kV/cm showed a decrease of the uptake of calcium ions by more than an order of magnitude when, immediately after a first pulse, a second one of opposite polarity was applied. This effect is assumed to be due to the reversal of the electrophoretic transport of ions through the electroporated membrane during the second phase of the bipolar pulse. This assumption, however, is only valid if electrophoresis is the dominant transport mechanism, rather than diffusion. Comparison of calculated calcium ion currents with experimental results showed that for nanosecond pulses, electrophoresis is at least as important as diffusion. By delaying the second pulse with respect to the first one, the effect of reverse electrophoresis is reduced. Consequently, separating nanosecond pulses of opposite polarity by up to approximately hundred microseconds allows us to vary the uptake of ions from very small values to those obtained with two pulses of the same polarity. The measured calcium ion uptake obtained with bipolar pulses also allowed us to determine the membrane pore recovery time. The calculated recovery time constants are on the order of 10 μs.

  8. Mechanisms of deflagration-to-detonation transition under initiation by high-voltage nanosecond discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rakitin, Aleksandr E.; Starikovskii, Andrei Yu.

    2008-10-15

    An experimental study of detonation initiation in a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture by a high-voltage nanosecond gas discharge was performed in a detonation tube with a single-cell discharge chamber. The discharge study performed in this geometry showed that three modes of discharge development were realized under the experimental conditions: a spark mode with high-temperature channel formation, a streamer mode with nonuniform gas excitation, and a transient mode. Under spark and transient initiation, simultaneous ignition inside the discharge channel occurred, forming a shock wave and leading to a conventional deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) via an adiabatic explosion. The DDT length and time at 1 bar of initial pressure in the square smooth tube with a 20-mm transverse size amounted to 50 mm and 50{mu}s, respectively. The streamer mode of discharge development at an initial pressure of 1 bar resulted in nonuniform mixture excitation and a successful DDT via a gradient mechanism, which was confirmed by high-speed time resolved ICCD imaging. The gradient mechanism implied a longer DDT time of 150{mu}s, a DDT run-up distance of 50 mm, and an initiation energy of 1 J, which is two orders of magnitude less than the direct initiation energy for a planar detonation under these conditions. (author)

  9. 100  J-level nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Mason, Paul D; Ertel, Klaus; Jonathan Phillips, P; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Divoky, Martin; Pilar, Jan; Smith, Jodie; Butcher, Thomas; Lintern, Andrew; Tomlinson, Steph; Shaikh, Waseem; Hooker, Chris; Lucianetti, Antonio; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Mocek, Tomas; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John L

    2016-05-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of a 100 J-level, diode pumped solid state laser based on cryogenic gas cooled, multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. When operated at 175 K, the system delivered a pulse energy of 107 J at a 1 Hz repetition rate and 10 ns pulse duration, pumped by 506 J of diode energy at 940 nm, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 21%. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest energy obtained from a nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser. This demonstration confirms the energy scalability of the diode pumped optical laser for experiments laser architecture.

  10. Studies on laser material processing with nanosecond and sub-nanosecond and picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser ablation of widely used metal (Al, Cu. stainless-steel), semiconductor (Si), transparent material (glass, sapphire), ceramic (Al2O3, AlN) and polymer (PI, PMMA) in industry were systematically studied with pulse width from nanosecond (5-100ns), picosecond (6-10ps) to sub-picosecond (0.8-0.95ps). A critical damage zone (CDZ) of up to 100um with ns laser, <=50um with ps laser, and <=20um with sub-ps laser, respectively was observed as a criteria of selecting the laser pulse width. The effects of laser processing parameters on speed and efficiency were also investigated. This is to explore how to provide industry users the best laser solution for device micro-fabrication with best price. Our studies of cutting and drilling with ns, ps, and sub-ps lasers indicate that it is feasible to achieve user accepted quality and speed with cost-effective and reliable laser by optimizing processing conditions.

  11. A Single Pulse Sub-Nanosecond Proton RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R W; Pearce-Percy, H; Pearson, D; Rougieri, M; Weir, J; Zografos, A; Guethlein, G; Hawkins, S; Falabella, S; Poole, B; Blackfield, D

    2011-03-29

    A Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac system has been developed to provide a single pulse of 2 MeV protons with a beam pulse width of {approx}300 ps and a charge of 30 pC, either for injection into a pulsed Dielectric Wall Accelerator or for bombardment of a target to produce a fast neutron pulse. The 1.2 m long RFQ structure operates at 425 MHz and bunches and accelerates a single 2.35 ns beam pulse injected into it at 35 keV using a parallel plate deflector placed directly in front of the RFQ entrance. The input acceptance properties of the RFQ allow a simple dc bias voltage on the plates to block acceleration of the unwanted beam, with a short rf voltage pulse applied to null the deflection field for the ions within the 8 mm 'kicker' plate length. The use of the RFQ as the accelerating structure allows one to efficiently produce a large charge in a single sub-ns bunch. In addition, the kicker can also be used without the dc bias voltage to produce a 'notch' in the normal RFQ output beam for synchrotron injection.

  12. Wind tunnel experiments on flow separation control of an Unmanned Air Vehicle by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chen; Hua, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Plasma flow control (PFC) is a new kind of active flow control technology, which can improve the aerodynamic performances of aircrafts remarkably. The flow separation control of an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (NDPAA) is investigated experimentally in this paper. Experimental results show that the applied voltages for both the nanosecond discharge and the millisecond discharge are nearly the same, but the current for nanosecond discharge (30 A) is much bigger than that for millisecond discharge (0.1 A). The flow field induced by the NDPAA is similar to a shock wave upward, and has a maximal velocity of less than 0.5 m/s. Fast heating effect for nanosecond discharge induces shock waves in the quiescent air. The lasting time of the shock waves is about 80 μs and its spread velocity is nearly 380 m/s. By using the NDPAA, the flow separation on the suction side of the UAV can be totally suppressed and the critical stall angle of attack increases from 20° to 27° with a maximal lift coefficient increment of 11.24%. The flow separation can be suppressed when the discharge voltage is larger than the threshold value, and the optimum operation frequency for the NDPAA is the one which makes the Strouhal number equal one. The NDPAA is more effective than the millisecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (MDPAA) in boundary layer flow control. The main mechanism for nanosecond discharge is shock effect. Shock effect is more effective in flow control than momentum effect in high speed flow control. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61503302, 51207169, and 51276197), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M562446), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2015JM1001).

  13. Nanosecond pulse pumped, narrow linewidth all-fiber Raman amplifier with stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rongtao; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Lü, Haibin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    We report on a narrow linewidth nanosecond all-fiber Raman amplifier core pumped by a pulsed laser at approximately 1030 nm. The Raman amplifier was based on a standard single-mode fiber with a length of ∼1 km, and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) was suppressed by employing pulses with a short pulse width. 1083 nm pulses with an average power of 32.6 mW, a repetition rate of 2 MHz, and pulse widths of ∼7.2 ns were achieved. A maximum slope efficiency of 46.1% and a gain of 31 dB were obtained. The output Raman power can be scaled further by using fiber with shorter lengths and pump pulses with a higher power.

  14. Effects of high voltage nanosecond electric pulses on eukaryotic cells (in vitro): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Batista Napotnik, Tina; Reberšek, Matej; Vernier, P Thomas; Mali, Barbara; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-08-01

    For this systematic review, 203 published reports on effects of electroporation using nanosecond high-voltage electric pulses (nsEP) on eukaryotic cells (human, animal, plant) in vitro were analyzed. A field synopsis summarizes current published data in the field with respect to publication year, cell types, exposure configuration, and pulse duration. Published data were analyzed for effects observed in eight main target areas (plasma membrane, intracellular, apoptosis, calcium level and distribution, survival, nucleus, mitochondria, stress) and an additional 107 detailed outcomes. We statistically analyzed effects of nsEP with respect to three pulse duration groups: A: 1-10ns, B: 11-100ns and C: 101-999ns. The analysis confirmed that the plasma membrane is more affected with longer pulses than with short pulses, seen best in uptake of dye molecules after applying single pulses. Additionally, we have reviewed measurements of nsEP and evaluations of the electric fields to which cells were exposed in these reports, and we provide recommendations for assessing nanosecond pulsed electric field effects in electroporation studies. PMID:26946156

  15. Effects of high voltage nanosecond electric pulses on eukaryotic cells (in vitro): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Batista Napotnik, Tina; Reberšek, Matej; Vernier, P Thomas; Mali, Barbara; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-08-01

    For this systematic review, 203 published reports on effects of electroporation using nanosecond high-voltage electric pulses (nsEP) on eukaryotic cells (human, animal, plant) in vitro were analyzed. A field synopsis summarizes current published data in the field with respect to publication year, cell types, exposure configuration, and pulse duration. Published data were analyzed for effects observed in eight main target areas (plasma membrane, intracellular, apoptosis, calcium level and distribution, survival, nucleus, mitochondria, stress) and an additional 107 detailed outcomes. We statistically analyzed effects of nsEP with respect to three pulse duration groups: A: 1-10ns, B: 11-100ns and C: 101-999ns. The analysis confirmed that the plasma membrane is more affected with longer pulses than with short pulses, seen best in uptake of dye molecules after applying single pulses. Additionally, we have reviewed measurements of nsEP and evaluations of the electric fields to which cells were exposed in these reports, and we provide recommendations for assessing nanosecond pulsed electric field effects in electroporation studies.

  16. Nanosecond, high-intensity pulsed electric fields induce apoptosis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Stephen J; Fox, Paula M; Rec, Laura J; Willis, E Lauren K; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2003-08-01

    Electroporation by using pulsed electric fields with long durations compared with the charging time of the plasma membrane can induce cell fusion or introduce xenomolecules into cells. Nanosecond pulse power technology generates pulses with high-intensity electric fields, but with such short durations that the charging time of the plasma membrane is not reached, but intracellular membranes are affected. To determine more specifically their effects on cell structure and function, human cells were exposed to high intensity (up to 300 kV/cm) nanosecond (10-300 ns) pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) and were analyzed at the cellular and molecular levels. As the pulse duration decreased, plasma membrane electroporation decreased and appearances of apoptosis markers were delayed. NsPEF induced apoptosis within tens of minutes, depending on the pulse duration. Annexin-V binding, caspase activation, decreased forward light scatter, and cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm were coincident. Apoptosis was caspase- and mitochondria-dependent but independent of plasma membrane electroporation and thermal changes. The results suggest that with decreasing pulse durations, nsPEF modulate cell signaling from the plasma membrane to intracellular structures and functions. NsPEF technology provides a unique, high-power, energy-independent tool to recruit plasma membrane and/or intracellular signaling mechanisms that can delete aberrant cells by apoptosis.

  17. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  18. Spectroscopic Investigation of a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Over a Wide Range of Pulse Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Julian; Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth E.; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Most high voltage pulser used to drive dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), produce a single pulse shape (width and voltage), thus making it challenging to assess the effect of pulse shape on the production of different chemical species during a discharge. Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. has developed a nanosecond pulser that allows for independent control of the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency. Through the utilization of this technology, presented here is a precise characterization of reactive species generated by the DBD under the independent variation of voltage (0-20 kV), frequency (0-20 kHz) and pulse width (20-260 ns). A better understanding of this parameter dependency can allow for more targeted and effective application of plasma in medical, environmental, industrial, and other applications.

  19. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields cause melanomas to self-destruct

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Pliquett, Uwe; Chen, Xinhua; Ford, Wentia; Swanson, R. James; Beebe, Stephen J.; Kolb, Juergen F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2006-01-01

    We have discovered a new, drug-free therapy for treating solid skin tumors. Pulsed electric fields greater than 20 kV/cm with rise times of 30 ns and durations of 300 ns penetrate into the interior of tumor cells and cause tumor cell nuclei to rapidly shrink and tumor blood flow to stop. Melanomas shrink by 90% within two weeks following a cumulative field exposure time of 120 μs. A second treatment at this time can result in complete remission. This new technique provides a highly localized targeting of tumor cells with only minor effects on overlying skin. Each pulse deposits 0.2 J and 100 pulses increase the temperature of the treated region by only 3 °C, ten degrees lower than the minimum temperature for hyperthermia effects. PMID:16545779

  20. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields cause melanomas to self-destruct.

    PubMed

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Pliquett, Uwe; Chen, Xinhua; Ford, Wentia; James Swanson, R; Beebe, Stephen J; Kolb, Juergen F; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2006-05-01

    We have discovered a new, drug-free therapy for treating solid skin tumors. Pulsed electric fields greater than 20 kV/cm with rise times of 30 ns and durations of 300 ns penetrate into the interior of tumor cells and cause tumor cell nuclei to rapidly shrink and tumor blood flow to stop. Melanomas shrink by 90% within two weeks following a cumulative field exposure time of 120 micros. A second treatment at this time can result in complete remission. This new technique provides a highly localized targeting of tumor cells with only minor effects on overlying skin. Each pulse deposits 0.2 J and 100 pulses increase the temperature of the treated region by only 3 degrees C, ten degrees lower than the minimum temperature for hyperthermia effects.

  1. Investigation of Vacuum Insulator Surface Dielectric Strength with Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W C; Krogh, M; Williams, C; Trimble, D; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2003-06-03

    The maximum vacuum insulator surface dielectric strength determines the acceleration electric field gradient possible in a short pulse accelerator. Previous work has indicated that higher electric field strengths along the insulator-vacuum interface might be obtained as the pulse duration is decreased. In this work, a 250 kV, single ns wide impulse source was applied to small diameter, segmented insulators samples in a vacuum to evaluate the multi-layer surface dielectric strength of the sample construction. Resonances in the low inductance test geometry were used to obtain unipolar, pulsed electric fields in excess of 100 MV/m on the insulator surface. The sample construction, experimental arrangement and experimental results are presented for the initial data in this work. Modeling of the multi-layer structure is discussed and methods of improving insulator surface dielectric strength in a vacuum are proposed.

  2. Conversion of high explosive chemical energy into energy of powerful nanosecond high-current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, K. V.; Mikhaylov, V. M.; Nesterov, E. V.; Stroganov, V. A.; Chernykh, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study is a contribution into the development of physicotechnical foundations for generation of powerful nanosecond high-current pulses on the basis of explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators. This problem is solved by using inductive storage of energy for matching comparatively low-voltage explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators and high-impedance loads; short forming lines and vacuum diodes. Experimental data of charging of forming lines are given.

  3. OH Production Enhancement in Bubbling Pulsed Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lungu, Cristian P.; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Jepu, Ionut; Chiru, Petrica; Zaroschi, Valentin; Lungu, Ana M.; Saito, Nagahiro; Bratescu, Maria; Takai, Osamu; Velea, Theodor; Predica, Vasile

    2010-10-13

    The generation of active species, such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, O{sup *}, OH*, HO{sub 2}*, O{sub 3}, N{sub 2}{sup *}, etc, produced in aqueous solutions by HV pulsed discharges was studied in order to find the most efficient way in waste water treatment taking into account that these species are almost stronger oxidizers than ozone. Plasma was generated inside gas bubbles formed by the argon, air and oxygen gas flow between the special designed electrodes. The pulse width and pulse frequency influence was studied in order to increase the efficiency of the OH active species formation. The produced active species were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy and correlated with electrical parameters of the discharges (frequency, pulse width, amplitude, and rise and decay time).

  4. Tunable microwave pulse generation using discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, David R.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    The response of a microwave resonant cavity with a plasma discharge tube inside is (continuously or intermittently) filled with a plasma and studied both numerically and experimentally. The resonance frequency of the cavity-plasma system is sensitive to plasma densities from 1016 to 1020 m-3 corresponding to resonant frequencies of 12.3-18.3 GHz. The system is first characterized for its quasi-steady state response using a low frequency plasma discharge at 70 kHz and 125 V RMS. A plasma discharge is then driven with a high voltage pulse of 4 kV and a CW input microwave signal is converted to a pulsed output signal. The microwave pulse delay and pulse width are varied by selecting the input microwave frequency. The microwave input power is set to +20 dBm. The delay of the microwave pulse is also used as a diagnostic tool for measuring the variation of plasma density in time and, with numerical fitting, the discharge plasma recombination coefficient and diffusion timescales are estimated.

  5. Electric Field in a Plasma Channel in a High-Pressure Nanosecond Discharge in Hydrogen: A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatom, S.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2013-12-01

    Experimental results of a study of the electric field in a plasma channel produced during nanosecond discharge at a H2 gas pressure of (2-3)×105 Pa by the coherent anti-Stokes scattering method are reported. The discharge was ignited by applying a voltage pulse with an amplitude of ˜100 kV and a duration of ˜5 ns to a blade cathode placed at a distance of 10 and 20 mm from the anode. It was shown that this type of gas discharge is characterized by the presence of an electric field in the plasma channel with root-mean-square intensities of up to 30 kV/cm. Using polarization measurements, it was found that the direction of the electric field is along the cathode-anode axis.

  6. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  7. Characterisation of pulsed discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocik, Marek; Dors, Miroslaw; Podlinski, Janusz; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Kanazawa, Seiji; Ichiki, Ryuta; Sato, Takehiko

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, Schlieren photography technique has been applied for the visualization of the pressure field of a single-shot underwater pulsed discharge. A needle-to-plane electrode configuration submerged in distilled water was used. The detailed time- and space-resolved images of both streamers and pressure waves were captured. As a result, several phenomena, such as the phase change prior to the initiation of the discharge, primary and secondary streamers propagation, shock wave generation, and the bubble formation, were observed. From these observations, a scenario of multiple events from prebreakdown to post-discharge was proposed. The gas bubbles generated in discharge were used to visualize the electrohydrodynamic flow induced by the discharge. This work was presented on the occasion of the 13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII).

  8. Generation and dynamics of single-electrode nanosecond pulsed microplasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunqi; Lane, Jamie; Song, Shutong; Plasma; Pulsed Power Lab at ODU-CBE Team

    2015-11-01

    Several millimeter long, 160 - 260 micrometer-in-width, helium plasma jets were generated in ambient atmosphere when a needle electrode was excited with nanosecond high voltage pulses at single shot or up to 500 Hz. This single-electrode system does not require the use of ground electrode for plasma generation, and thus has advantages in simplicity and small-dimension for a variety of biomedical applications. Dynamics of the microplasma jet powered by high voltage pulses with two different nanosecond pulses - 5 ns and 164 ns, was studied with high speed imaging, and spatiotemporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Whereas the plasma jet exhibits three different modes including a positive-streamer mode, a stochastic transition, and a negative streamer-like mode when it was excited with 164 ns kilovolt pulses, such modes and transitions in the plasma development were not observed for the 5 ns pulsed excitation. Shorter pulses with shorter rise times allowed higher energy deposition into the plasma and promote rapid acceleration of the plasma wavefronts; 5 ns pulsed excitation resulted in 4 times increase in the wavefront velocity compared with the 164 ns pulsed excitation. Importantly, the production of excited atomic oxygen increased by a factor of 2 for the 5 ns pulsed plasma jet when compared with that for a 164 ns pulsed plasma jet, whereas the other excited species including He, O, H, OH, N2(C-B) and N2+(B-X) were produced at comparable rates for the two plasma jets. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR Award No. FA9550-11-1-0190).

  9. Energy deposition characteristics of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: Influence of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, G.; Winkel, R.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study aimed at the characterization of energy deposition of nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators was carried out. Special attention was given on the effect of the thickness and material used for dielectric barrier. The selected materials for this study were polyimide film (Kapton), polyamide based nylon (PA2200), and silicone rubber. Schlieren measurements were carried out in quiescent air conditions in order to observe density gradients induced by energy deposited. Size of heated area was used to qualify the energy deposition coupled with electrical power measurements performed using the back-current shunt technique. Additionally, light intensity measurements showed a different nature of discharge based upon the material used for barrier, for a fixed thickness and frequency of discharge. Finally, a characterisation study was performed for the three tested materials. Dielectric constant, volume resistivity, and thermal conductivity were measured. Strong trends between the control parameters and the energy deposited into the fluid during the discharge were observed. Results indicate that efficiency of energy deposition mechanism relative to the thickness of the barrier strongly depends upon the material used for the dielectric barrier itself. In general, a high dielectric strength and a low volumetric resistivity are preferred for a barrier, together with a high heat capacitance and a low thermal conductivity coefficient in order to maximize the efficiency of the thermal energy deposition induced by an ns-DBD plasma actuator.

  10. Deflagration-to-detonation transition control by high voltage nanosecond discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskii, Andrei; Rakitin, Aleksandr

    2008-10-01

    A smooth square detonation tube with a transverse size of 20 mm and a single-cell discharge chamber has been assembled to study DDT mechanisms under initiation by high-voltage nanosecond discharges. Stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture was used at initial pressures of 0.3 and 1 bar. Two general mechanisms of DDT initiation have been observed and explained under the experimental conditions. When initiated by a spark, the mixture ignites simultaneously over the volume of the discharge channel, producing a shock wave with Mach number over 2 and a flame wave. The waves then form an accelerating complex, and, after it reaches a certain velocity, an adiabatic explosion occurs resulting in DDT. At 1 bar of initial pressure, the DDT length and time do not exceed 50 mm and 50 μs, respectively. Under streamer initiation, the mixture inside the discharge channel is excited non-uniformly. The mixture is first ignited at the hottest spot with the shortest ignition delay, which is at the high voltage electrode tip. Originating at this point, the ignition wave starts propagating along the channel and accelerates up to the CJ velocity value. The initiation energy is by an order of magnitude lower for the streamer-gradient mode when compared to the spark initiation.

  11. Pulse circuit apparatus for gas discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Laird P.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method using a unique pulse circuit for a known gas discharge laser apparatus to provide an electric field for preconditioning the gas below gas breakdown and thereafter to place a maximum voltage across the gas which maximum voltage is higher than that previously available before the breakdown voltage of that gas laser medium thereby providing greatly increased pumping of the laser.

  12. A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator for solid dielectric breakdown research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Pan, Ya Feng; Su, Jian Cang; Zhang, Xi Bo; Wang, Li Min; Fang, Jin Peng; Sun, Xu; Lui, Rui

    2013-10-01

    A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator including a pair of electrode and a matched absorption resistor is established for the application of solid dielectric breakdown research. As major components, a built-in Tesla transformer and a gas-gap switch are designed to boost and shape the output pulse, respectively; the electrode is to form the anticipated electric field; the resistor is parallel to the electrode to absorb the reflected energy from the test sample. The parameters of the generator are a pulse width of 10 ns, a rise and fall time of 3 ns, and a maximum amplitude of 300 kV. By modifying the primary circuit of the Tesla transformer, the generator can produce both positive and negative pulses at a repetition rate of 1-50 Hz. In addition, a real-time measurement and control system is established based on the solid dielectric breakdown requirements for this generator. With this system, experiments on test samples made of common insulation materials in pulsed power systems are conducted. The preliminary experimental results show that the constructed generator is capable to research the solid dielectric breakdown phenomenon on a nanosecond time scale.

  13. Study on Nonlinear Absorption Effect of Nanosecond Pulse Laser Irradiation for GaAs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjun; Liu, Zhongyang; Zhou, Haijiao

    2016-04-01

    In order to research nonlinear absorption effect of pulse laser irradiation for GaAs, a physical model of Gaussian distribution pulse laser irradiation for semiconductor material was established by software COMSOL Multiphysics. The thermal effects of semiconductor material GaAs was analyzed under irradiation of nanosecond pulse laser with wavelength of 1064 nm. The radial and transverse temperature distribution of semiconductor material GaAs was calculated under irradiation of nanosecond pulse laser with different power density by solving the thermal conduction equations. The contribution of one-photon absorption, two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption to temperature of GaAs material were discussed. The results show that when the pulse laser power density rises to 10(10) W/cm2, free carrier absorption played a leading role and it was more than that of one-photon absorption of material. The temperature contribution of two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption could be ignored at laser power density lower than 10(8) W/cm2. The result is basically consistent with relevant experiments, which shows that physical model constructed is valid. PMID:27451733

  14. Study on Nonlinear Absorption Effect of Nanosecond Pulse Laser Irradiation for GaAs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjun; Liu, Zhongyang; Zhou, Haijiao

    2016-04-01

    In order to research nonlinear absorption effect of pulse laser irradiation for GaAs, a physical model of Gaussian distribution pulse laser irradiation for semiconductor material was established by software COMSOL Multiphysics. The thermal effects of semiconductor material GaAs was analyzed under irradiation of nanosecond pulse laser with wavelength of 1064 nm. The radial and transverse temperature distribution of semiconductor material GaAs was calculated under irradiation of nanosecond pulse laser with different power density by solving the thermal conduction equations. The contribution of one-photon absorption, two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption to temperature of GaAs material were discussed. The results show that when the pulse laser power density rises to 10(10) W/cm2, free carrier absorption played a leading role and it was more than that of one-photon absorption of material. The temperature contribution of two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption could be ignored at laser power density lower than 10(8) W/cm2. The result is basically consistent with relevant experiments, which shows that physical model constructed is valid.

  15. A single-shot nanosecond neutron pulsed technique for the detection of fissile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V.; Miklaszewski, R. A.; Chernyshova, M.; Scholz, M.; Prokopovicz, R.; Tomaszewski, K.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiacek, U.; Gabanska, B.; Dworak, D.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.

    2012-07-01

    A novel technique with the potential of detecting hidden fissile materials is presented utilizing the interaction of a single powerful and nanosecond wide neutron pulse with matter. The experimental system is based on a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) device as a neutron source generating pulses of almost mono-energetic 2.45 MeV and/or 14.0 MeV neutrons, a few nanoseconds in width. Fissile materials, consisting of heavy nuclei, are detected utilizing two signatures: firstly by measuring those secondary fission neutrons which are faster than the elastically scattered 2.45 MeV neutrons of the D-D reaction in the DPF; secondly by measuring the pulses of the slower secondary fission neutrons following the pulse of the fast 14 MeV neutrons from the D-T reaction. In both cases it is important to compare the measured spectrum of the fission neutrons induced by the 2.45 MeV or 14 MeV neutron pulse of the DPF with theoretical spectra obtained by mathematical simulation. Therefore, results of numerical modelling of the proposed system, using the MCNP5 and the FLUKA codes are presented and compared with experimental data.

  16. A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator for solid dielectric breakdown research.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Pan, Ya Feng; Su, Jian Cang; Zhang, Xi Bo; Wang, Li Min; Fang, Jin Peng; Sun, Xu; Lui, Rui

    2013-10-01

    A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator including a pair of electrode and a matched absorption resistor is established for the application of solid dielectric breakdown research. As major components, a built-in Tesla transformer and a gas-gap switch are designed to boost and shape the output pulse, respectively; the electrode is to form the anticipated electric field; the resistor is parallel to the electrode to absorb the reflected energy from the test sample. The parameters of the generator are a pulse width of 10 ns, a rise and fall time of 3 ns, and a maximum amplitude of 300 kV. By modifying the primary circuit of the Tesla transformer, the generator can produce both positive and negative pulses at a repetition rate of 1-50 Hz. In addition, a real-time measurement and control system is established based on the solid dielectric breakdown requirements for this generator. With this system, experiments on test samples made of common insulation materials in pulsed power systems are conducted. The preliminary experimental results show that the constructed generator is capable to research the solid dielectric breakdown phenomenon on a nanosecond time scale.

  17. Studies of nanosecond pulsed power for modifications of biomaterials and nanomaterials (SWCNT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng-Tse

    This work investigates the modification of biological materials through the applications of modern nanosecond pulsed power, along with other forms of nanotechnologies. The work was initially envisaged as a study of the effect of intense nanosecond pulsed electric fields on cancer cells. As the work progressed, the studies suggested incorporation of additional technologies, in particular, cold plasmas, and carbon nanotubes. The reasons for these are discussed below, however, they were largely suggested by the systems that we were studying, and resulted in new and potentially important medical therapies. Using nanosecond cold plasmas powered with nanosecond pulses, collaboration with endodontists and biofilm experts demonstrated a killing effect on biofilms deep within root canals, suggesting a fundamentally new approach to an ongoing problem of root canal sterilization. This work derived from the application of nanosecond pulsed power, resulting in effective biofilm disinfection, without excessive heating, and is being investigated for additional dental and other medical applications. In the second area, collaboration with medical and nanotube experts, studies of gliomamultiforme (GBM) led to the incorporation of functionalized carbon nanotubes. Single-walled carbon nanotube-fluorescein carbazide (SWCNT-FC) conjugates demonstrated that the entry mechanism of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was through an energy-dependent endocytotic pathway. Finally, a monotonic pH sensitivity of the intracellular fluorescence emission of SWCNT-FC conjugates in human ovarian cancer cells suggests these conjugates may serve as intracellular pH sensors. Light-stimulated intracellular hydrolysis of the amide linkage and localized intracellular pH changes are proposed as mechanisms. The use of SWCNTs for cancer therapy of gliomas, resulting in hyperthermia effect after 808 nm infrared radiations, absorbed specifically by SWCNTs but not by biological tissue. Heat was only

  18. The effects of gaseous bubble composition and gap distance on the characteristics of nanosecond discharges in distilled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Cha, Min Suk

    2016-06-01

    Electric discharge in liquids with bubbles can reduce the energy consumption, which increases treatment efficiency. We present an experimental study of nanosecond discharges in distilled water bubbled with the monoatomic gas argon and with the polyatomic gases methane, carbon dioxide, and propane. We monitor the time evolution of the voltage and current waveforms, and calculate the injected charges to characterize the discharge. We establish a relationship between the injected charges and the shape of the plasma by time-resolved imaging to find that increasing the size of the gap reduces the injected charges. Moreover, we determine the plasma characteristics, including electron density, excitation temperatures (for atoms and ions), and rotational temperature of the OH and C2 radicals found in the plasma. Our space- and time-averaged measurements allow us to propose a spatial distribution of the plasma that is helpful for understanding the plasma dynamics necessary to develop and optimize applications based on nanosecond discharges in bubbled liquids.

  19. Spectral broadening and shaping of nanosecond pulses: toward shaping of single photons from quantum emitters.

    PubMed

    Agha, Imad; Ates, Serkan; Sapienza, Luca; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2014-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate spectral broadening and shaping of exponentially-decaying nanosecond pulses via nonlinear mixing with a phase-modulated pump in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide. 1550 nm pump light is imprinted with a temporal phase and used to upconvert a weak 980 nm pulse to 600 nm while simultaneously broadening the spectrum to that of a Lorentzian pulse up to 10 times shorter. While the current experimental demonstration is for spectral shaping, we also provide a numerical study showing the feasibility of subsequent spectral phase correction to achieve temporal compression and reshaping of a 1 ns mono-exponentially decaying pulse to a 250 ps Lorentzian, which would constitute a complete spectrotemporal waveform shaping protocol. This method, which uses quantum frequency conversion in PPLN with >100:1 signal-to-noise ratio, is compatible with single photon states of light. PMID:25360957

  20. Frequency-modulation spectroscopy with transform-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Eyler, E E; Gangopadhyay, S; Melikechi, N; Bloch, J C; Field, R W

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate high-quality FM spectra with nanosecond laser pulses. Transform-limited pulses with FM sidebands are produced by pulsed amplification of a phase-modulated cw laser. The pulses can be shifted to the UV by nonlinear mixing. We report both initial experiments on I(2) and what is to our knowledge the first observation of a far-UV transition by FM spectroscopy, at 214.5 nm. Major advantages of this method include (1) spectral resolution of the order of 0.001 cm(-1), (2) better-defined optical phase, and (3) a much smaller and more easily detected modulation frequency, ~500 MHz. The absorption sensitivity is ~10(-4), and considerable further improvement is expected.

  1. Pulsed electrical discharge in conductive solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, V. A.; Vasilyak, L. M.; Vetchinin, S. P.; Pecherkin, V. Ya; Son, E. E.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical discharge in a conductive solution of isopropyl alcohol in tap water (330 μ S cm‑1) has been studied experimentally applying high voltage millisecond pulses (rise time  ∼0.4 μ \\text{s} , amplitude up to 15 kV, positive polarity) to a pin anode electrode. Dynamic current–voltage characteristics synchronized with high-speed images of the discharge were studied. The discharge was found to develop from high electric field region in the anode vicinity where initial conductive current with density  ∼100 A cm‑2 results in fast heating and massive nucleation of vapor bubbles. Discharges in nucleated bubbles then produce a highly conductive plasma region and facilitate overheating instability development with subsequent formation of a thermally ionized plasma channel. The measured plasma channel propagation speed was 3–15 m s‑1. A proposed thermal model of plasma channel development explains the low observed plasma channel propagation speed.

  2. Pulsed electrical discharge in conductive solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, V. A.; Vasilyak, L. M.; Vetchinin, S. P.; Pecherkin, V. Ya; Son, E. E.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical discharge in a conductive solution of isopropyl alcohol in tap water (330 μ S cm-1) has been studied experimentally applying high voltage millisecond pulses (rise time  ˜0.4 μ \\text{s} , amplitude up to 15 kV, positive polarity) to a pin anode electrode. Dynamic current-voltage characteristics synchronized with high-speed images of the discharge were studied. The discharge was found to develop from high electric field region in the anode vicinity where initial conductive current with density  ˜100 A cm-2 results in fast heating and massive nucleation of vapor bubbles. Discharges in nucleated bubbles then produce a highly conductive plasma region and facilitate overheating instability development with subsequent formation of a thermally ionized plasma channel. The measured plasma channel propagation speed was 3-15 m s-1. A proposed thermal model of plasma channel development explains the low observed plasma channel propagation speed.

  3. Plasma decay in the afterglow of a high-voltage nanosecond discharge in air

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Anokhin, E. M.; Kindysheva, S. V.; Kirpichnikov, A. A.; Kosarev, I. N.; Nudnova, M. M.; Starikovskaya, S. M.; Starikovskii, A. Yu.

    2012-02-15

    The decay of air plasma produced by a high-voltage nanosecond discharge at room temperature and gas pressures in the range of 1-10 Torr was studied experimentally and theoretically. The time dependence of the electron density was measured with a microwave interferometer. The initial electron density was about 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The discharge homogeneity was monitored using optical methods. The dynamics of the charged particle densities in the discharge afterglow was simulated by numerically solving the balance equations for electron and ions and the equation for the electron temperature. It was shown that, under these experimental conditions, plasma electrons are mainly lost due to dissociative and three-body recombination with ions. Agreement between the measured and calculated electron densities was achieved only when the rate constant of the three-body electron-ion recombination was increased by one order of magnitude and the temperature dependence of this rate constant was modified. This indicates that the mechanism for three-body recombination of molecular ions differs from that of the well-studied mechanism of atomic ion recombination.

  4. A compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, high voltage pulse generator with variable amplitude.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiubing; Wang, Xin; Tang, Dan; Lv, Huayi; Li, Chengxin; Shao, Yanhua; Qin, Lan

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, command triggered, high peak power, gas-switch pulse generator system is developed for high energy physics experiment. The main components of the system are a high voltage capacitor, the spark gap switch and R = 50 Ω load resistance built into a structure to obtain a fast high power pulse. The pulse drive unit, comprised of a vacuum planar triode and a stack of avalanche transistors, is command triggered by a single or multiple TTL (transistor-transistor logic) level pulses generated by a trigger pulse control unit implemented using the 555 timer circuit. The control unit also accepts user input TTL trigger signal. The vacuum planar triode in the pulse driving unit that close the first stage switches is applied to drive the spark gap reducing jitter. By adjusting the charge voltage of a high voltage capacitor charging power supply, the pulse amplitude varies from 5 kV to 10 kV, with a rise time of <3 ns and the maximum peak current up to 200 A (into 50 Ω). The jitter of the pulse generator system is less than 1 ns. The maximum pulse repetition rate is set at 10 Hz that limited only by the gas-switch and available capacitor recovery time.

  5. A compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, high voltage pulse generator with variable amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiubing; Wang, Xin; Tang, Dan; Lv, Huayi; Li, Chengxin; Shao, Yanhua; Qin, Lan

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, command triggered, high peak power, gas-switch pulse generator system is developed for high energy physics experiment. The main components of the system are a high voltage capacitor, the spark gap switch and R = 50 Ω load resistance built into a structure to obtain a fast high power pulse. The pulse drive unit, comprised of a vacuum planar triode and a stack of avalanche transistors, is command triggered by a single or multiple TTL (transistor-transistor logic) level pulses generated by a trigger pulse control unit implemented using the 555 timer circuit. The control unit also accepts user input TTL trigger signal. The vacuum planar triode in the pulse driving unit that close the first stage switches is applied to drive the spark gap reducing jitter. By adjusting the charge voltage of a high voltage capacitor charging power supply, the pulse amplitude varies from 5 kV to 10 kV, with a rise time of <3 ns and the maximum peak current up to 200 A (into 50 Ω). The jitter of the pulse generator system is less than 1 ns. The maximum pulse repetition rate is set at 10 Hz that limited only by the gas-switch and available capacitor recovery time.

  6. A compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, high voltage pulse generator with variable amplitude.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiubing; Wang, Xin; Tang, Dan; Lv, Huayi; Li, Chengxin; Shao, Yanhua; Qin, Lan

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, command triggered, high peak power, gas-switch pulse generator system is developed for high energy physics experiment. The main components of the system are a high voltage capacitor, the spark gap switch and R = 50 Ω load resistance built into a structure to obtain a fast high power pulse. The pulse drive unit, comprised of a vacuum planar triode and a stack of avalanche transistors, is command triggered by a single or multiple TTL (transistor-transistor logic) level pulses generated by a trigger pulse control unit implemented using the 555 timer circuit. The control unit also accepts user input TTL trigger signal. The vacuum planar triode in the pulse driving unit that close the first stage switches is applied to drive the spark gap reducing jitter. By adjusting the charge voltage of a high voltage capacitor charging power supply, the pulse amplitude varies from 5 kV to 10 kV, with a rise time of <3 ns and the maximum peak current up to 200 A (into 50 Ω). The jitter of the pulse generator system is less than 1 ns. The maximum pulse repetition rate is set at 10 Hz that limited only by the gas-switch and available capacitor recovery time. PMID:22852729

  7. Interaction between pulsed discharge and radio frequency discharge burst at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Shi, Yuncheng; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2015-08-15

    The atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) with dual excitations in terms of pulsed voltage and pulse-modulation radio frequency (rf) power are studied experimentally between two parallel plates electrodes. Pulse-modulation applied in rf APGD temporally separates the discharge into repetitive discharge bursts, between which the high voltage pulses are introduced to ignite sub-microsecond pulsed discharge. The discharge characteristics and spatio-temporal evolution are investigated by means of current voltage characteristics and time resolved imaging, which suggests that the introduced pulsed discharge assists the ignition of rf discharge burst and reduces the maintain voltage of rf discharge burst. Furtherly, the time instant of pulsed discharge between rf discharge bursts is manipulated to study the ignition dynamics of rf discharge burst.

  8. Long-lived plasma and fast quenching of N2(C3Π u ) by electrons in the afterglow of a nanosecond capillary discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Klochko, A. V.; Popov, N. A.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    Quenching of electronically excited nitrogen state, {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u},{{v}\\prime}=0\\right) , in the afterglow of nanosecond capillary discharge in pure nitrogen is studied. It is found experimentally that an additional collisional mechanism appears and dominates at high specific deposited energies leading to the anomalously fast quenching of the {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) in the afterglow. On the basis of obtained experimental data and of the analysis of possible quenching agents, it is concluded that the anomalously fast deactivation of the {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) can be explained by quenching by electrons. Long-lived plasma at time scale of hundreds nanoseconds after the end of the pulse is observed. High electron densities, about 1014 cm‑3 at 27 mbar, are sustained by reactions of associative ionization. Kinetic 1D numerical modeling and comparison of calculated results with experimentally measured electric fields in the second high-voltage pulse 250 ns after the initial pulse, and electron density measurements in the afterglow confirm the validity of the suggested mechanism.

  9. Long-lived plasma and fast quenching of N2(C3Π u ) by electrons in the afterglow of a nanosecond capillary discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Klochko, A. V.; Popov, N. A.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    Quenching of electronically excited nitrogen state, {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u},{{v}\\prime}=0\\right) , in the afterglow of nanosecond capillary discharge in pure nitrogen is studied. It is found experimentally that an additional collisional mechanism appears and dominates at high specific deposited energies leading to the anomalously fast quenching of the {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) in the afterglow. On the basis of obtained experimental data and of the analysis of possible quenching agents, it is concluded that the anomalously fast deactivation of the {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) can be explained by quenching by electrons. Long-lived plasma at time scale of hundreds nanoseconds after the end of the pulse is observed. High electron densities, about 1014 cm-3 at 27 mbar, are sustained by reactions of associative ionization. Kinetic 1D numerical modeling and comparison of calculated results with experimentally measured electric fields in the second high-voltage pulse 250 ns after the initial pulse, and electron density measurements in the afterglow confirm the validity of the suggested mechanism.

  10. Nanosecond laser pulse heating of a platinum surface studied by pump-probe X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayduk, Roman; Vonk, Vedran; Arndt, Björn; Franz, Dirk; Strempfer, Jörg; Francoual, Sonia; Keller, Thomas F.; Spitzbart, Tobias; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We report on the quantitative determination of the transient surface temperature of Pt(110) upon nanosecond laser pulse heating. We find excellent agreement between heat transport theory and the experimentally determined transient surface temperature as obtained from time-resolved X-ray diffraction on timescales from hundred nanoseconds to milliseconds. Exact knowledge of the surface temperature's temporal evolution after laser excitation is crucial for future pump-probe experiments at synchrotron storage rings and X-ray free electron lasers.

  11. Picosecond and nanosecond pulse delivery through a hollow-core Negative Curvature Fiber for micro-machining applications.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Piotr; Yu, Fei; Maier, Robert R J; Wadsworth, William J; Knight, Jonathan C; Shephard, Jonathan D; Hand, Duncan P

    2013-09-23

    We present high average power picosecond and nanosecond pulse delivery at 1030 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths respectively through a novel hollow-core Negative Curvature Fiber (NCF) for high-precision micro-machining applications. Picosecond pulses with an average power above 36 W and energies of 92 µJ, corresponding to a peak power density of 1.5 TWcm⁻² have been transmitted through the fiber without introducing any damage to the input and output fiber end-faces. High-energy nanosecond pulses (>1 mJ), which are ideal for micro-machining have been successfully delivered through the NCF with a coupling efficiency of 92%. Picosecond and nanosecond pulse delivery have been demonstrated in fiber-based laser micro-machining of fused silica, aluminum and titanium.

  12. Nanosecond pulse-width electron diode based on dielectric wall accelerator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Quantang; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, P.; Cao, S. C.; Shen, X. K.; Jing, Y.; Yu, C. S.; Li, Z. P.; Liu, M.; Xiao, R. Q.; Zong, Y.; Wang, Y. R.; Zhao, H. W.

    2013-11-01

    An electron diode using a short section of dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) has been under development at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. Tests have been carried out with spark gap switches triggered by lasers. The stack voltage efficiency of a four-layer of Blumleins reached about 60-70% with gas filled spark gap switching. The generated pulse voltage of peak amplitude of 23 kV and pulse width of 5 ns is used to extract and accelerate an electron beam of 320 mA, measured by a fast current transformer. A nanosecond pulse width electron diode was achieved successfully. Furthermore, the principle of a DWA is well proven and the development details and discussions are presented in this article.

  13. Multiple-frequency injection-seeded nanosecond pulsed laser without parasitic intensity modulation.

    PubMed

    Penninckx, D; Luce, J; Diaz, R; Bonville, O; Courchinoux, R; Lamaignère, L

    2016-07-15

    Thanks to a phase-modulated injection seeder, we report the operation of a nanosecond Nd:YAG Q-switched laser with pulses having both a large spectral bandwidth and a smooth temporal waveform. Because of the smooth temporal waveform, such pulses allow, for instance, reducing the impact of the Kerr effect and, because of the large spectral bandwidth, suppressing stimulated Brillouin scattering. We conducted a parametric study of the features of the generated pulses versus the injection conditions. We show that, as opposed to the central frequency (wavelength) of the seeder, the phase modulation frequency has to be carefully chosen, but it is not a critical parameter and does not require any particular feedback. PMID:27420504

  14. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  15. Dynamics of the microstructure of current channels and the generation of high-energy electrons in nanosecond discharges in air

    SciTech Connect

    Karelin, V. I.; Trenkin, A. A. Fedoseev, I. G.

    2015-12-15

    The results of the three-dimensional numerical simulation of the dynamics of the microstructure of high-voltage nanosecond discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are presented. It is established that the fast (at a time of ≈10 ns) broadening and significant decrease in the gas concentration in the microchannels occur as a result of the ohmic heating of microchannels with the diameter of 1–30 μm. It was shown that the broadening of microchannels in a nanosecond diffusive discharge provides an increase in the ratio of the electric field strength to the gas concentration in microchannels to values sufficient for the generation highenergy electron beams and X-ray bremsstrahlung in them. Features of the dynamics of the system of microchannels and its effect on the efficiency of the generation of high-energy electrons in discharges developing in the microstructuring regime of the current channels are considered.

  16. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  17. Pulsed discharge detector: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, D S

    2004-09-24

    The pulsed discharge detector (PDD) is a significant advancement in gas chromatography (GC) detector design which can be operated in three different modes: pulsed discharge helium ionization (He-PDPID), pulsed discharge electron capture (PDECD) and helium ionization emission (PDED). The He-PDPID can detect permanent gases, volatile inorganics and other compounds which give little or no response with the flame ionization detector (FID) and has significantly better limits of detection (minimum detectable quantities (MDQs) in low picogram range) than can be achieved with a thermal conductivity detector (typically not lower than 1 ng). The PDECD has similar or better sensitivity (MDQs of 10(-15) to 10(-12) g) than radioactive source ECD but does not require licensing, wipe tests and other administrative or safety requirements which have increased over security concerns. The PDED shows promise as an extremely selective and sensitive elemental detector but a commercial unit is not presently available. In this report, the theory of operation, applications of the PDD and the practical aspects of using this novel detector are presented. PMID:15503926

  18. Controlled oxide films formation by nanosecond laser pulses for color marking.

    PubMed

    Veiko, Vadim; Odintsova, Galina; Ageev, Eduard; Karlagina, Yulia; Loginov, Anatoliy; Skuratova, Alexandra; Gorbunova, Elena

    2014-10-01

    A technology of laser-induced coloration of metals by surface oxidation is demonstrated. Each color of the oxide film corresponds to a technologic chromacity coefficient, which takes into account the temperature of the sample after exposure by sequence of laser pulses with nanosecond duration and effective time of action. The coefficient can be used for the calculation of laser exposure regimes for the development of a specific color on the metal. A correlation between the composition of the films obtained on the surface of stainless steel AISI 304 and commercial titanium Grade 2 and its color and chromacity coordinates is shown. PMID:25322009

  19. Electrostatic diagnostics of nanosecond pulsed electron beams in a Malmberg-Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, B.; Bettega, G.; Maero, G.; Rome, M.; Norgia, M.; Pesatori, A.; Svelto, C.

    2010-06-15

    A fast electrostatic diagnostic and analysis scheme on nanosecond pulsed beams in the keV energy range has been developed in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP. Low-noise electronics has been used for the detection of small induced current signals on the trap electrodes. A discrete wavelet-based procedure has been implemented for data postprocessing. The development of an effective electrostatic diagnostics together with proper data analysis techniques is of general interest in view of deducing the beam properties through comparison of the postprocessed data with the theoretically computed signal shape, which contains beam radius, length, and average density as fit parameters.

  20. Shield gas induced cracks during nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Noguchi, Jun; Yan, Jiwang

    2016-10-01

    Laser processing techniques have been given increasing attentions in the field of metallic glasses (MGs). In this work, effects of two kinds of shield gases, nitrogen and argon, on nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based MG were comparatively investigated. Results showed that compared to argon gas, nitrogen gas remarkably promoted the formation of cracks during laser irradiation. Furthermore, crack formation in nitrogen gas was enhanced by increasing the peak laser power intensity or decreasing the laser scanning speed. X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the reason for enhanced cracks in nitrogen gas was the formation of ZrN.

  1. Development of selective laser treatment techniques using mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) laser with a specific wavelength can excite the corresponding biomolecular site to regulate chemical, thermal and mechanical interactions to biological molecules and tissues. In laser surgery and medicine, tunable MIR laser irradiation can realize the selective and less-invasive treatments and the special diagnosis by vibrational spectroscopic information. This paper showed a novel selective therapeutic technique for a laser angioplasty of atherosclerotic plaques and a laser dental surgery of a carious dentin using a MIR tunable nanosecond pulsed laser.

  2. Kinetic mechanism of plasma recombination in methane, ethane and propane after high-voltage nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, E. M.; Popov, M. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Starikovskiy, A. Yu; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2016-08-01

    The results of the experimental and numerical study of high-voltage nanosecond discharge afterglow in pure methane, ethane and propane are presented for room temperature and pressures from 2 to 20 Torr. Time-resolved electron density during the plasma decay was measured with a microwave interferometer for initial electron densities in the range between 5  ×  1010 and 3  ×  1012 cm‑3 and the effective recombination coefficients were obtained. Measured effective recombination coefficients increased with gas pressure and were much higher than the recombination coefficients for simple molecular hydrocarbon ions. The properties of plasma in the discharge afterglow were numerically simulated by solving the balance equations for charged particles and electron temperature. Calculations showed that electrons had time to thermalize prior to the recombination. The measured data were interpreted under the assumption that cluster hydrocarbon ions are formed during the plasma decay that is controlled by the dissociative electron recombination with these ions at electron room temperature. Based on the analysis of the experimental data, the rates of three-body formation of cluster ions and recombination coefficients for these ions were estimated.

  3. Plasma decay in high-voltage nanosecond discharges in oxygen-containing mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, E. M.; Popov, M. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Aleksandrov, N. L.; Starikovskii, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma decay in high-voltage nanosecond discharges in CO2: O2 and Ar: O2 mixtures at room gas temperature and a pressure of 10 Torr is studied experimentally and theoretically. The time dependence of the electron density during plasma decay is measured using microwave interferometry. The time evolution of the charged particle density, ion composition, and electron temperature is simulated numerically. It is shown that, under the given conditions, the discharge plasma is dominated for the most time by O 2 + ions and plasma decay is determined by dissociative and three-body electron-ion recombination. As in the previous studies performed for air and oxygen plasmas, agreement between measurements and calculations is achieved only under the assumption that the rate of three-body recombination of molecular ions is much greater than that for atomic ions. The values of the rate constant of three-body recombination of electrons with O2 + ions in a wide range of electron temperatures (500-5500 K), as well as for thermal (300 K) electrons, are obtained by processing the experimental results.

  4. Kinetic mechanism of plasma recombination in methane, ethane and propane after high-voltage nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, E. M.; Popov, M. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Starikovskiy, A. Yu; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2016-08-01

    The results of the experimental and numerical study of high-voltage nanosecond discharge afterglow in pure methane, ethane and propane are presented for room temperature and pressures from 2 to 20 Torr. Time-resolved electron density during the plasma decay was measured with a microwave interferometer for initial electron densities in the range between 5  ×  1010 and 3  ×  1012 cm-3 and the effective recombination coefficients were obtained. Measured effective recombination coefficients increased with gas pressure and were much higher than the recombination coefficients for simple molecular hydrocarbon ions. The properties of plasma in the discharge afterglow were numerically simulated by solving the balance equations for charged particles and electron temperature. Calculations showed that electrons had time to thermalize prior to the recombination. The measured data were interpreted under the assumption that cluster hydrocarbon ions are formed during the plasma decay that is controlled by the dissociative electron recombination with these ions at electron room temperature. Based on the analysis of the experimental data, the rates of three-body formation of cluster ions and recombination coefficients for these ions were estimated.

  5. Radiative Characteristics of the Pulse-Periodic Discharge Plasma Initiated by Runaway Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Sorokin, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Results of experimental investigations of amplitude-temporal and spectral characteristics of radiation of a pulse-periodic discharge plasma initiated in nitrogen by runaway electrons are presented. The discharge was initiated by high-voltage nanosecond voltage pulses with repetition frequency of 60 Hz in a sharply inhomogeneous electric field in a gap between the conic potential cathode and the planar grounded aluminum anode. It is established that intensive lines of Al I atoms and Al II atomic ions, lines of N I atoms and N II ions, bands of the first (1+) and second positive (2+) nitrogen systems, as well as bands of cyanogen CN are observed in the emission spectrum of the discharge plasma under the given excitation conditions.

  6. Nanosecond laser-induced phase transitions in pulsed laser deposition-deposited GeTe films

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xinxing Thelander, Erik; Lorenz, Pierre; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Decker, Ulrich; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-10-07

    Phase transformations between amorphous and crystalline states induced by irradiation of pulsed laser deposition grown GeTe thin films with nanosecond laser pulses at 248 nm and pulse duration of 20 ns are studied. Structural and optical properties of the Ge-Te phase-change films were studied by X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity measurements as a function of the number of laser pulses between 0 and 30 pulses and of the laser fluence up to 195 mJ/cm². A reversible phase transition by using pulse numbers ≥ 5 at a fluence above the threshold fluence between 11 and 14 mJ/cm² for crystallization and single pulses at a fluence between 162 and 182 mJ/cm² for amorphization could be proved. For laser fluences from 36 up to 130 mJ/cm², a high optical contrast of 14.7% between the amorphous and crystalline state is measured. A simple model is used that allows the discussion on the distribution of temperature in dependency on the laser fluence.

  7. Matching a (sub)nanosecond pulse source to a corona plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huiskamp, T.; Beckers, F. J. C. M.; Hoeben, W. F. L. M.; van Heesch, E. J. M.; Pemen, A. J. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the energy transfer from the pulses of a (sub)nanosecond pulse source to the plasma in a corona-plasma reactor. This energy transfer (or ‘matching’) should be as high as possible. We studied the effect of multiple parameters on matching, such as the reactor configuration, the pulse duration and amplitude and the energy density. The pulse reflection on the reactor interface has a significant influence on matching, and should be as low as possible to transfer the most energy into the reactor. We developed a multiple-wire inner conductor for the reactor which decreases the vacuum impedance of the reactor to decrease the pulse reflection on the reactor interface while maintaining a high electric field on the wire. The results were very encouraging and showed an energy transfer efficiency of over 90 percent. The matching results further show that there is only a small effect on the matching between different wire diameters. In addition, a long reactor and a long pulse result in the best matching due to the more intense plasma that is generated in these conditions. Finally, even without the multiple-wire reactor, we are able to achieve a very good matching (over 80 percent) between our pulse source and the reactor.

  8. Transient Features in Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Differentially Modulate Mitochondria and Viability

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Stephen J.; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Sain, Nova M.; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Xiao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0–80 kV/cm) and short (15 ns) or long (150 ns) rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm). Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. PMID:23284682

  9. Nanosecond pulsed electric field generators for the study of subcellular effects.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Juergen F; Kono, Susumu; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2006-04-01

    Modeling and experimental studies have shown that pulsed electric fields of nanosecond duration and megavolt per meter amplitude affect subcellular structures but do not lead to the formation of large pores in the outer membrane. This "intracellular electromanipulation" requires the use of pulse generators which provide extremely high power but low energy pulses. In this study, we describe the concept of the required pulsed power sources, their design, operation, and the necessary diagnostics. Two types of pulse generators based on the Blumlein line principle have been developed and are described here. One system is designed to treat a large number of cells in cuvettes holding volumes from 0.1 to 0.8 ml. Pulses of up to 40 kV amplitude, with a duration of 10 ns and a rise time close to 1 ns can be applied to the cuvette. For an electrode gap of 1 mm this voltage corresponds to an average electric field of 40 MV/m. The second system allows for real time observation of individual cells under a microscope. It generates pulses of 10-300 ns duration with a rise time of 3.5 ns and voltage amplitudes up to 1 kV. Connected to a microreactor with an electrode gap of 100 microm, electric fields up to 10 MV/m are applied.

  10. Transient features in nanosecond pulsed electric fields differentially modulate mitochondria and viability.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Sain, Nova M; Schoenbach, Karl H; Xiao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0-80 kV/cm) and short (15 ns) or long (150 ns) rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm). Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death.

  11. Modification of water in a nanosecond diffuse discharge with fast electron preionization at a short voltage rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlovskii, Victor M.; Panarin, Victor A.; Shulepov, Mikhail A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper studies the dynamics of a nanosecond diffuse discharge with no additional preionization at a voltage rise time of less than 1 ns and its effect on drinking and distilled water. It is shown that the diffuse discharge is formed due to avalanche charge multiplication initiated by fast electrons and is sustained by secondary breakdown waves through ionized gas channels. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that repeated exposure to the discharge changes the absorption spectra of drinking and distilled water such that the stretching vibration band of OH groups broadens and lacks clearly defined peaks. The water conductivity after irradiation increases. Probably, this is due to cluster rearrangement of water molecules.

  12. Characterization of Wet Air Plasma Jet Powered by Sinusoidal High Voltage and Nanosecond Pulses for Plasma Agricultural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Shimada, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Not only for the plasma sterilization but also for many of plasma life-science applications, atmospheric pressure plasma devices that allowed us to control its state and reactive species production are deserved to resolve the roles of the chemical species. Influence of the hydroxyl radical and ozone on germination of conidia of a strawberry pathogen is presented. Water addition to air plasma jet significantly improves germination suppression performance, while measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reduced. Although the results show a negative correlation between ROS and the germination suppression, this infers the importance of chemical composition generated by plasma. For further control of the plasma product, a plasma jet powered by sinusoidal high voltage and nanosecond pulses is developed and characterized with the voltage-charge Lissajous. Control of breakdown phase and discharge power by pulse-imposed phase is presented. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) Grant Number 15K17480 and Exploratory Research Grant Number 23644199.

  13. Effect of nanosecond pulse laser ablation on the surface morphology of Zr-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunhu; Fu, Jie; Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the ripple patterns formation on the surface of Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (vit1) bulk metallic glass using a nanosecond pulse laser ablation in air with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The strong thermal ablation phenomenon could be observed on vit1 BMG surface at laser energy of 200 mJ as a result of the adhibition of confining overlay. Many periodic ripples had formed on the edge of the ablated area at laser energy of 400 mJ because of the high intensity pulsed laser beam. The underlying mechanism of the periodic ripples formation could be explained by the K-H hydrodynamic instability theory. It had been shown that laser ablation with 600 mJ and 200 pulses results in the formation of many micro-cracks on the ablated area. Further analysis showed that the spatial occupation of the laser ablated area and the spacing between two adjacent ripples increased as the laser energy and the number of incident laser pulses increasing. The surface ripples feature on the edge of ablated area became more obvious with increasing laser pulses, but it was not correlated closely with the laser energies variation.

  14. High frequency application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields alters cellular membrane disruption and fluorescent dye uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Beier, Hope T.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-03-01

    Cells exposed to nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) exhibit a wide variety of nonspecific effects, including blebbing, swelling, intracellular calcium bursts, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, formation of nanopores, and depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) to induce activation of the inositol trisphosphate/diacylglycerol pathway. While several studies have taken place in which multiple pulses were delivered to cells, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) is not well understood. To better understand the effects of PRR, a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to observe CHO-K1 cells exposed to ten 600ns, 200V pulses at varying repetition rates (5Hz up to 500KHz) in the presence of either FM 1-43, YO-PRO-1, or Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent dyes, probes frequently used to indicate nanoporation or permeabilization of the plasma membrane. Dye uptake was monitored for 30 seconds after pulse application at a rate of 1 image/second. In addition, a single long pulse of equivalent energy (200V, 6 μs duration) was applied to test the hypothesis that very fast PRR will approximate the biological effects of a single long pulse of equal energy. Upon examination of the data, we found strong variation in the relationship between PRR and uptake in each of the three dyes. In particular, PI uptake showed little frequency dependence, FM 1-43 showed a strong inverse relationship between frequency and internal cell fluorescence, and YO-PRO-1 exhibited a "threshold" point of around 50 KHz, after which the inverse trend observed in FM 1-43 was seen to reverse itself. Further, a very high PRR of 500 KHz only approximated the biological effects of a single 6 μs pulse in cells stained with YO-PRO-1, suggesting that uptake of different dyes may proceed by different physical mechanisms.

  15. First gaseous boronization during pulsed discharge cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Weix, P. J.; Limbach, S. T.

    2013-01-01

    The first successful gaseous boronization during a pulsed discharge is reported. Sublimation of o-carborane (C2B10H12) combined with pulsed discharge plasmas with a repetition rate of 1 Hz is used to produce a hard boron-containing coating for reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Ar ion beam etching for silicon coupons installed at the plasma boundary shows about 60% boron concentration in the deposited layer. Both profilometer and scanning electron microscope analyses of the silicon coupons imply a strong toroidally non-uniform deposition depending on the location of the o-carborane injection. The layer thickness ranges from 50 to 300 nm. Ellipsometry calibrated with the profilometer results yields a refractive index of 2.2-2.3 for the films. The high refractive index implies that the coating is hard and has a well-ordered morphology. A reduction in wall recycling has consistently been observed after all boronization sessions. Comparison of the X-ray spectra in standard RFP plasmas before and after boronization indicates a slight decrease in the effective ionic charge.

  16. An atmospheric pressure self-pulsing micro thin-cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Beilei; Mohr, Sebastian; Luggenhölscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2011-03-01

    A micro thin-cathode discharge (μTCD) is a modified micro hollow-cathode discharge (MHCD) where the anode is much thicker than the one in a MHCD, which allows a stable operation at atmospheric pressure. The μTCD was operated at different pressures in argon by a dc voltage. At atmospheric pressure, the μTCD operates in a self-pulsing mode with current peaks with a duration of a few nanoseconds and a current density up to 105 A cm-2, supplied by the charge stored in the capacitance of the discharge device. The plasma emission was observed by an ICCD camera. Both, the voltage-current characteristic and the ICCD image indicate that this self-pulsing is due to a periodic ignition of a spark discharge. The electron density was measured by Stark broadening of the Hβ-line with an admixture of 1% hydrogen. In the periodic spark mode the electron density is of the order of 1016 cm-3. The direct measurement of the discharge current in these kinds of discharges is not possible, since it is driven by the inherent capacitance of the discharge device. Therefore, an electrical model including stray capacitances is set up. The modelled results agree very well with the measured currents and voltages.

  17. Non-equilibrium nanosecond-pulsed plasma generation in the liquid phase (water, PDMS) without bubbles: fast imaging, spectroscopy and leader-type model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Danil; Seepersad, Yohan; Pekker, Mikhail; Shneider, Mikhail; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we report the results on study of the non-equilibrium nanosecond discharge generation in liquid media. Here we studied the discharge in both water and silicon transformer oil, and present our findings on discharge behaviour depending on global (applied) electric, discharge emission spectrum and shadow imaging of the discharge. We also discuss possible scenarios of non-equilibrium nanosecond discharge development and suggest that the discharge operates in a leader-type regime supported by the electrostriction effect—creation of nano-sized pores in liquid due to high local electric field.

  18. Investigation of a direct effect of nanosecond pulse electric fields on mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estlack, Larry E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Cerna, Cesario Z.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-03-01

    The unique cellular response to nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) exposure, as compared to longer pulse exposure, has been theorized to be due to permeabilization of intracellular organelles including the mitochondria. In this investigation, we utilized a high-throughput oxygen and pH sensing system (Seahorse® XF24 extracellular flux analyzer) to assess the mitochondrial activity of Jurkat and U937 cells after nsPEF. The XF Analyzer uses a transient micro-chamber of only a few μL in specialized cell culture micro-plates to enable oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) to be monitored in real-time. We found that for nsPEF exposures of 10 pulses at 10-ns pulse width and at 50 kV/cm e-field, we were able to cause an increase in OCR in both U937 and Jurkat cells. We also found that high pulse numbers (>100) caused a significant decrease in OCR. Higher amplitude 150 kV/cm exposures had no effect on U937 cells and yet they had a deleterious effect on Jurkat cells, matching previously published 24 hour survival data. These results suggest that the exposures were modulating metabolic activity in cells possibly due to direct effects on the mitochondria themselves. To validate this hypothesis, we isolated mitochondria from U937 cells and exposed them similarly and found no significant change in metabolic activity for any pulse number. In a final experiment, we removed calcium from the buffer solution that the cells were exposed in and found that no significant enhancement in metabolic activity was observed. These results suggest that direct permeabilization of the mitochondria is unlikely a primary effect of nsPEF exposure and calcium-mediated intracellular pathway activation is likely responsible for observed pulse-induced mitochondrial effects.

  19. Temperature dependence of nanosecond laser pulse thresholds of melanosome and microsphere microcavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanosome microcavitation is the threshold-level retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage mechanism for nanosecond (ns) pulse exposures in the visible and near-infrared (NIR). Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes were determined as a function of temperature (20 to 85°C) using single ns laser pulses at 532 and 1064 nm. Melanosomes were irradiated using a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG (doubled for 532-nm irradiation). For comparison to melanosome data, a similar temperature (20 to 65°C) dependence study was also performed for 532 nm, ns pulse exposures of black polystyrene microbeads. Results indicated a decrease in the microcavitation average radiant exposure threshold with increasing sample temperature for both 532- and 1064-nm single pulse exposures of melanosomes and microbeads. Threshold data and extrapolated nucleation temperatures were used to estimate melanosome absorption coefficients in the visible and NIR, and microbead absorption coefficients in the visible, indicating that melanin is a better absorber of visible light than black polystyrene. The NIR melanosome absorption coefficients ranged from 3713 cm-1 at 800 nm to 222 cm-1 at 1319 nm. These data represent the first temperature-dependent melanosome microcavitation study in the NIR and provide additional information for understanding melanosome microcavitation threshold dependence on wavelength and ambient temperature.

  20. Raising the avermectins production in Streptomyces avermitilis by utilizing nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinsong; Ma, Ruonan; Su, Bo; Li, Yinglong; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Avermectins, a group of anthelmintic and insecticidal agents produced from Streptomyces avermitilis, are widely used in agricultural, veterinary, and medical fields. This study presents the first report on the potential of using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) to improve avermectin production in S. avermitilis. The results of colony forming units showed that 20 pulses of nsPEFs at 10 kV/cm and 20 kV/cm had a significant effect on proliferation, while 100 pulses of nsPEFs at 30 kV/cm exhibited an obvious effect on inhibition of agents. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry assay revealed that 20 pulses of nsPEFs at 15 kV/cm increased avermectin production by 42% and reduced the time for reaching a plateau in fermentation process from 7 days to 5 days. In addition, the decreased oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and increased temperature of nsPEFs-treated liquid were evidenced to be closely associated with the improved cell growth and fermentation efficiency of avermectins in S. avermitilis. More importantly, the real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that nsPEFs could remarkably enhance the expression of aveR and malE in S. avermitilis during fermentation, which are positive regulator for avermectin biosynthesis. Therefore, the nsPEFs technology presents an alternative strategy to be developed to increase avermectin output in fermentation industry.

  1. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE PAGES

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of amore » unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm⁻¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.« less

  2. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, David C. Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Wishart, James F.; Bernstein, Herbert J.

    2015-04-15

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm{sup −1}. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ∼40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ∼100 μOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  3. Raising the avermectins production in Streptomyces avermitilis by utilizing nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinsong; Ma, Ruonan; Su, Bo; Li, Yinglong; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Avermectins, a group of anthelmintic and insecticidal agents produced from Streptomyces avermitilis, are widely used in agricultural, veterinary, and medical fields. This study presents the first report on the potential of using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) to improve avermectin production in S. avermitilis. The results of colony forming units showed that 20 pulses of nsPEFs at 10 kV/cm and 20 kV/cm had a significant effect on proliferation, while 100 pulses of nsPEFs at 30 kV/cm exhibited an obvious effect on inhibition of agents. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry assay revealed that 20 pulses of nsPEFs at 15 kV/cm increased avermectin production by 42% and reduced the time for reaching a plateau in fermentation process from 7 days to 5 days. In addition, the decreased oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and increased temperature of nsPEFs-treated liquid were evidenced to be closely associated with the improved cell growth and fermentation efficiency of avermectins in S. avermitilis. More importantly, the real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that nsPEFs could remarkably enhance the expression of aveR and malE in S. avermitilis during fermentation, which are positive regulator for avermectin biosynthesis. Therefore, the nsPEFs technology presents an alternative strategy to be developed to increase avermectin output in fermentation industry. PMID:27181521

  4. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility.

    PubMed

    Grills, David C; Farrington, Jaime A; Layne, Bobby H; Preses, Jack M; Bernstein, Herbert J; Wishart, James F

    2015-04-01

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm(-1). The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ∼40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ∼100 μOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  5. Myocardium tissue ablation with hollow-waveguide-delivered near-infrared nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shunichi; Arai, Tsunenori; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Ashida, Hiroshi

    2001-06-01

    With 1064-nm, nanosecond laser pulses delivered from hollow waveguide, ablation characteristics of porcine myocardium tissue have been investigated in vitro. For the hollow waveguide a vacuum-cored scheme was introduced to suppress the laser-induced air breakdown that limited the available transmitted laser energy/power. The delivered laser pulse beam was focused with a collimation lens and a focusing lens, and it was shown that higher efficiency ablation was obtained when a focusing lens with a shorter focal length was used. Waveguide bending (bending angle 90 degree(s)C, bending radius approximately 50 cm) caused no deteriorating effect on the ablation characteristics for ablation energies up to approximately 60 mJ/pulse. It was demonstrated that deep and sharp ablated holes with aspect ratios > 8 was obtained with the hollow-waveguide-delivered laser pulses. It may be a realistic option to aim at using the present hollow waveguide system for trocar-based applications or replacing articulated mirror-based laser delivery systems. It is an important part of the future works to downsize the waveguide output unit for catheter-based applications.

  6. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm⁻¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  7. Rhodamine B as an optical thermometer in cells focally exposed to infrared laser light or nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Burke, Ryan; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2015-01-01

    The temperature-dependent fluorescence property of Rhodamine B was used to measure changes in temperature at the cellular level induced by either infrared laser light exposure or high intensity, ultrashort pulsed electric fields. The thermal impact of these stimuli were demonstrated at the cellular level in time and contrasted with the change in temperature observed in the extracellular bath. The method takes advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine B which has a quantum yield linearly dependent on temperature. The thermal effects of different temporal pulse applications of infrared laser light exposure and of nanosecond pulsed electric fields were investigated. The temperature increase due to the application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields was demonstrated at the cellular level. PMID:26504658

  8. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R. Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  9. Understanding the physics limitations of PFNA — the nanosecond pulsed fast neutron analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1995-05-01

    The PFNA was conceived by Sawa, Gozani and Ryge, in late 1987 as a means to achieve the highest possible sensitivity for detecting small amounts of explosives concealed in luggage. This could be attained because 1) all the elements present in explosives, i.e., O,N,C (and H, indirectly) can be measured via the (n,n'γ) process with fast neutrons, 2) using nanosecond pulses of neutrons and the time-of-flight (TOF) technique, a full direct imaging of the elements and hence all present materials can be obtained, and 3) the TOF assures the best signal to background ratio, as the signal-stimulated γ-rays are measured before the background — neutron interacting in the detector environment — arrives. The PFNA technology has made great strides since the autumn of 1987. It enables the detection of narcotics, explosives, many hazardous materials and most dutiable goods carried in trucks and containers.

  10. Explosive boiling of a metallic glass superheated by nanosecond pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, M. Q. E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn; Wei, Y. P.; Wilde, G.; Dai, L. H. E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn

    2015-01-12

    We report an explosive boiling in a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1) bulk metallic glass irradiated by a nanosecond pulse laser with a single shot. This critical phenomenon is accompanied by the ejection of high-temperature matter from the target and the formation of a liquid-gas spinodal pattern on the irradiated area. An analytical model reveals that the glassy target experiences the normal heating (melting) and significant superheating, eventually culminating in explosive boiling near the spinodal limit. Furthermore, the time lag of nucleation and the critical radius of vapor bubbles are theoretically predicted, which are in agreement with the experimental observations. This study provides the investigation on the instability of a metallic glass liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature.

  11. Nanosecond laser pulse induced stress waves enhanced magnetofection of human carcinoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdík, Š.; Babincová, M.; Bergemann, C.; Babinec, P.

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a novel platform for efficient gene delivery into cells using magnetic force for pre-concentration of gene-magnetic nanoparticle complex on the surface of cells with subsequent nanosecond laser pulse for generation of stress waves in transfection chamber which is able to permeabilize cell membrane for the facilitated delivery of gene into the cell interior. Combination of these two physical factors increased the efficiency of three different human carcinoma cells transfection with plasmid coding green fluorescence protein from 43% to 67%, from 35% to 54%, and from 23% to 39%, for HeLa (cervical carcinoma), MCF-7 (breast carcinoma), and UCI-107 (ovarian carcinoma) cells, respectively, as compared with using only magnetofection. Proposed fast, simple, and efficient method may have far reaching applications for cancer gene therapy.

  12. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  13. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C.; Dalzell, Danielle R.; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (<2 nm) are created in the plasma membrane in contrast to larger diameter pores (>2 nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  14. Surface morphological modification of crosslinked hydrophilic co-polymers by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primo, Gastón A.; Alvarez Igarzabal, Cecilia I.; Pino, Gustavo A.; Ferrero, Juan C.; Rossa, Maximiliano

    2016-04-01

    This work reports an investigation of the surface modifications induced by irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses of ultraviolet and visible wavelengths on crosslinked hydrophilic co-polymeric materials, which have been functionalized with 1-vinylimidazole as a co-monomer. A comparison is made between hydrogels differing in the base co-monomer (N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide) and in hydration state (both swollen and dried states). Formation of craters is the dominant morphological change observed by ablation in the visible at 532 nm, whereas additional, less aggressive surface modifications, chiefly microfoams and roughness, are developed in the ultraviolet at 266 nm. At both irradiation wavelengths, threshold values of the incident laser fluence for the observation of the various surface modifications are determined under single-pulse laser irradiation conditions. It is shown that multiple-pulse irradiation at 266 nm with a limited number of laser shots can be used alternatively for generating a regular microfoam layer at the surface of dried hydrogels based on N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate. The observations are rationalized on the basis of currently accepted mechanisms for laser-induced polymer surface modification, with a significant contribution of the laser foaming mechanism. Prospective applications of the laser-foamed hydrogel matrices in biomolecule immobilization are suggested.

  15. Pulsed-discharge carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willetts, David V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to attempt a general introduction to pulsed carbon dioxide lasers of the kind used or proposed for laser radar applications. Laser physics is an excellent example of a cross-disciplinary topic, and the molecular spectroscopy, energy transfer, and plasma kinetics of the devices are explored. The concept of stimulated emission and population inversions is introduced, leading on to the molecular spectroscopy of the CO2 molecule. This is followed by a consideration of electron-impact pumping, and the pertinent energy transfer and relaxation processes which go on. Since the devices are plasma pumped, it is necessary to introduce a complex subject, but this is restricted to appropriate physics of glow discharges. Examples of representative devices are shown. The implications of the foregoing to plasma chemistry and gas life are discussed.

  16. Biophysical Studies of Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field Induced Cell Membrane Permeabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Hsuan

    Nanosecond megavolts-per-meter pulsed electric field (nsPEF) offers a non-invasive manipulation of intracellular organelles and functions of biological cells. Accordingly, nsPEF is a potential technique for biophysical research and cancer therapy, and is of growing interest. Although, the application of nsPEF has shown electroperturbation on cell plasma membranes and intracellular membranes as well, the mechanisms underlying the electropermeabilization are still not clear. In this thesis, we systematically study nsPEFs (5 and 30 ns) induced membrane permeability change in biological cell in-vitro with different pulse parameters. In Chapter 3, we investigate the nsPEF-induced intracellular membrane permeabilization of mitochondria which play key roles in activating apoptosis in mammalian cells. The results show the evidences of nsPEF-induced membrane permeability increase in mitochondria, and suggest that nsPEF is a potential technology for cancer cell ablation without delivery of drug or gene into cells. In Chapter 2, 4 and 6, we study the properties of nsPEF-induced plasma membrane permeabilization. In the beginning, the change of plasma membrane permeability is studied by uptake of YO-PRO-1 and propidium iodide, fluorescent dyes specifically used as indicators of plasma membrane permeabilization. However, the detection is limited by the fluorescent emission efficiency and detector capability. To increase the detection sensitivity, we later develop a method based on cell volume change due to regulation of osmotic balance that causes water and small ions transport through plasma membrane. We find that even a single 10 MV/m pulse of 5 ns duration produces measureable cell swelling. The results demonstrate that cell swelling is susceptible to nsPEF and can detect membrane permeabilization more easily and precisely than fluorescent dyes. We compare the effects of different pulse parameters (pulse duration, pulse number, electric field amplitude and pulse repetition

  17. Long term survival of mice with hepatocellular carcinoma after pulse power ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhuang, J; Kolb, J F; Schoenbach, K H; Beebe, S J

    2012-02-01

    Novel therapies are needed for treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without recurrence in a single procedure. In this work we evaluated anti-neoplastic effects of a pulse power ablation (PPA) with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), a non-thermal, non-drug, local, regional method and investigated its molecular mechanisms for hepatocellular carcinoma tumor ablation in vivo. An ectopic tumor model was established using C57BL/6 mice with Hepa1-6 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Pulses with durations of 30 or 100 ns and fast rise times were delivered by a needle or ring electrode with different electric field strengths (33, 50 and 68 kV/cm), and 900 pulses in three treatment sessions (300 pulses each session) or a single 900 pulse treatment. Treated and control tumor volumes were monitored by ultrasound and apoptosis and angiogenesis markers were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Seventy five percent of primary hepatocellular carcinoma tumors were eradicated with 900 hundred pulses at 100 ns pulses at 68 kV/cm in a single treatment or in three treatment sessions without recurrence within 9 months. Using quantitative analysis, tumors in treated animals showed nsPEF-mediated nuclear condensation (3 h post-pulse), cell shrinkage (1 h), increases in active executioner caspases (caspase-3 > -7 > -6) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end-labeling (1 h) with decreases in vascular endothelial growth factor expression (7d) and micro-vessel density (14d). NsPEF ablation eliminated hepatocellular carcinoma tumors by targeting two therapeutic sites, apoptosis induction and inhibition of angiogenesis, both important cancer hallmarks. These data indicate that PPA with nsPEFs is not limited to treating skin cancers and provide a rationale for continuing to investigate pulse power ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma using other models in pre-clinical applications and ultimately in clinical trials. Based on present treatments for specific HCC stages, it

  18. A fast CMOS array imager for nanosecond light pulse detection in accumulation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zint, Chantal-V.; Uhring, Wilfried; Casadei, Bruno; Le Normand, Jean-P.; Morel, Frederic; Hu, Yann

    2004-09-01

    We designed a camera based on a fast CMOS APS imager for high speed optical detection which produces images simi-larly as a streak camera. This imager produces the intensity information I as function of one spatial dimension and time (I=f(x,t)) from one frame with two spatial dimensions. The time sweeping is obtained by delaying successively the integration phase for each pixel of the same row. For the first FAMOSI (Fast MOs Imager) prototype the start of in-tegration is given by the camera itself. This signal is injected to a laser trigger. This laser emits a 10 nanoseconds light pulse onto the sensor. The temporal evolution of the light pulse is then resolved by the camera with a resolution of 800 ps. In single shot, the maximum dynamic of the camera is estimated to 64 dB and is limited by the readout noise. We decide to work in accumulation mode in order to increase the signal to noise ratio of the camera. But the high laser trigger (about 20 ns rms) does not allow accumulation of several optical events without a large spreading. The camera has been modified in order to be triggered by an external signal delivered by a trigger unit. In this new configuration the laser emit pulses at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. A photodiode detect a part of the laser pulse and generate the trigger signal for FAMOSI. The laser pulse is delayed with an optical fibre before being directed to the camera. The trigger jitter obtained is then less than 100 ps and allows accumulation without significant loss of the temporal resolution. With accumulation the readout noise is attenuated by a √N factor. Then with N = 1000 accumulations, the dynamics approach 93 dB. This allows the camera to work similarly as a synchroscan streak camera and then to observe weak signal.

  19. Damage threshold and focusability of mid-infrared free-electron laser pulses gated by a plasma mirror with nanosecond switching pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaolong; Nakajima, Takashi; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-11-04

    The presence of a pulse train structure of an oscillator-type free-electron laser (FEL) results in the immediate damage of a solid target upon focusing. We demonstrate that the laser-induced damage threshold can be significantly improved by gating the mid-infrared FEL pulses with a plasma mirror. Although the switching pulses we employ have a nanosecond duration which does not guarantee the clean wavefront of the gated FEL pulses, the high focusability is experimentally confirmed through the observation of spectral broadening by a factor of 2.1 when we tightly focus the gated FEL pulses onto the Ge plate.

  20. Detectable initial breakdown pulses and the following discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Lu, W.; Zheng, D.

    2014-12-01

    The initial breakdown which was descripted by so-called BIL model is an important discharge process. Bipolar pulses as important signals of initial breakdown process, were usually used in the research. However, the detectability of the pulses is different in different researches. At the same time, the discharge process from initial breakdown to return stroke is not always the simple BIL model. In the research, using electric field waveforms of lightning discharges observed in Beijing and Guangzhou, the detectable initial breakdown (preliminary breakdown, PB) pulses and the following discharges are analyzed. The results show that, (1) Although, the percentage of detectable PB pulse trains is just as a function of latitude in large range of latitude, the values are similar in Beijing and Guangzhou, which indicate that the characteristic of storm also play a key role in detectable PB besides the latitude. (2)According to the difference in discharge process of following PB pulse, three discharge types, which exhibits PB pulses followed by inverted IC, hybrid flash, leader and RS, can be identified. And the fourth type only exhibits a RS waveform without detectable PB pulses. (3)The discharge with undetectable PB pulse is dominant in Beijing and Guangzhou. But the percentage of each discharge type is obvious different in the two regions. The occurrence of different discharge types and different percentage in Beijing and Guangzhou can be contributed to the difference in low positive charge region.

  1. Soda-lime glass microlens arrays fabricated by laser: Comparison between a nanosecond and a femtosecond IR pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Tamara; Nieto, Daniel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2016-11-01

    We present the manufacturing of microlens arrays on soda-lime glass substrates by using two different IR pulsed lasers: a nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser (1064 nm) and a femtosecond laser based on Ytterbium crystal technology (1030 nm). In both cases, the fabrication technique consists of the combination of a direct-write laser process, followed by a post-thermal treatment assisted by a CO2 laser. Through the analysis of the morphological characteristics of the generated microlenses, the different physical mechanisms involved in the glass ablation process with a nanosecond and a femtosecond laser are studied. In addition, by analyzing the optical features of the microlenses, a better result in terms of the homogeneity and quality of the spot focuses are observed for those microlenses fabricated with the Nd:YVO4 nanosecond laser. Microlens arrays with a diameter of 80 and 90 μm were fabricated.

  2. Self-consistent evolution of plasma discharge and electromagnetic fields in a microwave pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Beilin, L.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Hadas, Y.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2015-07-15

    Nanosecond-scale evolution of plasma and RF electromagnetic fields during the release of energy from a microwave pulse compressor with a plasma interference switch was investigated numerically using the code MAGIC. The plasma was simulated in the scope of the gas conductivity model in MAGIC. The compressor embodied an S-band cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm filled with pressurized gas. In a simplified approach, the gas discharge was initiated by setting an external ionization rate in a layer crossing the side arm waveguide in the location of the electric field antinode. It was found that with increasing ionization rate, the microwave energy absorbed by the plasma in the first few nanoseconds increases, but the absorption for the whole duration of energy release, on the contrary, decreases. In a hybrid approach modeling laser ignition of the discharge, seed electrons were set around the electric field antinode. In this case, the plasma extends along the field forming a filament and the plasma density increases up to the level at which the electric field within the plasma decreases due to the skin effect. Then, the avalanche rate decreases but the density still rises until the microwave energy release begins and the electric field becomes insufficient to support the avalanche process. The extraction of the microwave pulse limits its own power by terminating the rise of the plasma density and filament length. For efficient extraction, a sufficiently long filament of dense plasma must have sufficient time to be formed.

  3. Self-consistent evolution of plasma discharge and electromagnetic fields in a microwave pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Beilin, L.; Hadas, Y.; Schamiloglu, E.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-07-01

    Nanosecond-scale evolution of plasma and RF electromagnetic fields during the release of energy from a microwave pulse compressor with a plasma interference switch was investigated numerically using the code MAGIC. The plasma was simulated in the scope of the gas conductivity model in MAGIC. The compressor embodied an S-band cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm filled with pressurized gas. In a simplified approach, the gas discharge was initiated by setting an external ionization rate in a layer crossing the side arm waveguide in the location of the electric field antinode. It was found that with increasing ionization rate, the microwave energy absorbed by the plasma in the first few nanoseconds increases, but the absorption for the whole duration of energy release, on the contrary, decreases. In a hybrid approach modeling laser ignition of the discharge, seed electrons were set around the electric field antinode. In this case, the plasma extends along the field forming a filament and the plasma density increases up to the level at which the electric field within the plasma decreases due to the skin effect. Then, the avalanche rate decreases but the density still rises until the microwave energy release begins and the electric field becomes insufficient to support the avalanche process. The extraction of the microwave pulse limits its own power by terminating the rise of the plasma density and filament length. For efficient extraction, a sufficiently long filament of dense plasma must have sufficient time to be formed.

  4. Signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fast square-pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, H.; Robledo-Martinez, A.

    2016-10-01

    A fast, high voltage square-shaped electrical pulse initiated by laser ablation was investigated as a means to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser Induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The electrical pulse is generated by the discharge of a charged coaxial cable into a matching impedance. The pulse duration and the stored charge are determined by the length of the cable. The ablation plasma was produced by hitting an aluminum target with a nanosecond 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam under variable fluence 1.8-900 J cm- 2. An enhancement of up to one order of magnitude on the emission signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the spark discharge assisted laser ablation. Besides, this increment is larger for ionized species than for neutrals. LIBS signal is also increased with the discharge voltage with a tendency to saturate for high laser fluences. Electron density and temperature evolutions were determined from time delays of 100 ns after laser ablation plasma onset. Results suggest that the spark discharge mainly re-excites the laser produced plume.

  5. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, N.; Strader, J.; Kumar, Amit; Vincent, A.; Zhang, P.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Cho, H-J.; Seal, Sudipta; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2011-01-23

    Fast, sensitive and discriminating detection of hydrogen at room temperature is crucial for storage, transportation, and distribution of hydrogen as an energy source. One dimensional nanowires of SnO2 are potential candidates for improved H2 sensor performance. The single directional conducting continuous nanowires can decrease electrical noise, and their large active surface area could improve the response and recovery time of the sensor. In this work we discuss synthesis and characterization of nanowire arrays made using nanosecond ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm) laser interference processing of ultrathin SnO2 films on SiO2 substrates. The laser energy was chosen to be above the melting point of the films. The results show that the final nanowire formation is dominated by preferential evaporation as compared to thermocapillary flow. The nanowire height (and hence wire aspect ratio) increased with increasing initial film thickness ho and with increasing laser energy density Eo. Furthermore, a self-limiting effect was observed where-in the wire formation ceased at a specific final remaining thickness of SnO2 that was almost independent of ho for a given Eo. To understand these effects, finite element modeling of the nanoscale laser heating was performed. This showed that the temperature rise under laser heating was a strong non-monotonic function of film thickness. As a result, the preferential evaporation rate varies as wire formation occurs, eventually leading to a shut-off of evaporation at a characteristic thickness. This results in the stoppage of wire formation. This combination of nanosecond pulsed laser experiments and thermal modeling shows that several unique synthesis approaches can be utilized to control the nanowire characteristics.

  6. Plasma membrane charging of Jurkat cells by nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    White, Jody A; Pliquett, Uwe; Blackmore, Peter F; Joshi, Ravindra P; Schoenbach, Karl H; Kolb, Juergen F

    2011-08-01

    The initial effect of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) on cells is a change of charge distributions along membranes. This first response is observed as a sudden shift in the plasma transmembrane potential that is faster than can be attributed to any physiological event. These immediate, yet transient, effects are only measurable if the diagnostic is faster than the exposure, i.e., on a nanosecond time scale. In this study, we monitored changes in the plasma transmembrane potential of Jurkat cells exposed to nsPEFs of 60 ns and amplitudes from 5 to 90 kV/cm with a temporal resolution of 5 ns by means of the fast voltage-sensitive dye Annine-6. The measurements suggest the contribution of both dipole effects and asymmetric conduction currents across opposite sides of the cell to the charging. With the application of higher field strengths the membrane charges until a threshold voltage value of 1.4-1.6 V is attained at the anodic pole. This indicates when the ion exchange rates exceed charging currents, thus providing strong evidence for pore formation. Prior to reaching this threshold, the time for the charging of the membrane by conductive currents is qualitatively in agreement with accepted models of membrane charging, which predict longer charging times for lower field strengths. The comparison of the data with previous studies suggests that the sub-physiological induced ionic imbalances may trigger other intracellular signaling events leading to dramatic outcomes, such as apoptosis.

  7. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: Micro iron-oxide zones generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, M.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Acosta-Ortiz, S. E.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  8. Transient suppression of gap junctional intercellular communication after exposure to 100-nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Anna; Schmidt, Anke; Labohá, Petra; Babica, Pavel; Kolb, Juergen F

    2016-12-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is an important mechanism that is involved and affected in many diseases and injuries. So far, the effect of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) on the communication between cells was not investigated. An in vitro approach is presented with rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells grown and exposed in a monolayer. In order to observe sub-lethal effects, cells were exposed to pulsed electric fields with a duration of 100ns and amplitudes between 10 and 20kV/cm. GJIC strongly decreased within 15min after treatment but recovered within 24h. Gene expression of Cx43 was significantly decreased and associated with a reduced total amount of Cx43 protein. In addition, MAP kinases p38 and Erk1/2, involved in Cx43 phosphorylation, were activated and Cx43 became hyperphosphorylated. Immunofluorescent staining of Cx43 displayed the disassembly of gap junctions. Further, a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton was observed whereas tight junction protein ZO-1 was not significantly affected. All effects were field- and time-dependent and most pronounced within 30 to 60min after treatment. A better understanding of a possible manipulation of GJIC by nsPEFs might eventually offer a possibility to develop and improve treatments. PMID:27439151

  9. Thermal and microstructural effects of nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation on tooth root surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Grill, G.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Berns, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    Plaque, calculus and altered cementum removal by scaling and root planing is a fundamental procedure in periodontal treatment. However, the residual smear layer contains cytotoxic and inflammatory mediators which adversely affect healing. Chemical smear layer removal is also problematic. In previous investigations effective smear layer removal was achieved using long pulsed irradiation at 1.06 (mu) . However, laser irradiation was not adequate as an alternative to scaling and root planing procedures and concurrent temperature rises exceeded thermal thresholds for pulpal and periodontal safety. It was the aim of this study to determine whether nanosecond pulsed irradiation at 1.06 (mu) could be used as an alternative or an adjunct to scaling and root planing. Sixty freshly extracted teeth were divided as follows: 5 control, 5 root planed only, 25 irradiated only, 25 root planed and irradiated. Irradiation was performed at fluences of 0.5 - 2.7 J/cm2, total energy densities of 12 - 300 J/cm2, frequencies of 2 - 10 Hz using the Medlite (Continuum) laser. Irradiation-induced thermal events were recorded using a thermocouple within the root canal and a thermal camera to monitor surface temperatures. SEM demonstrated effective smear layer removal with minimal microstructural effects. Surface temperatures increased minimally (< 3 C) at all parameters, intrapulpal temperature rises remained below 4 C at 2 and 5 Hz, F < 0.5 J/cm2. Without prior scaling and root planing, laser effects did not provide an adequately clean root surface.

  10. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-05

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  11. Nanosecond pulsed laser induced generation of open macro porosity on sintered ZnO pellet surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Samanta, Soumen; Sinha, Sucharita

    2015-01-01

    Surface porosity and pore size distribution of sensing material greatly influence performance parameters such as sensitivity, reproducibility and response time of sensors. Various approaches have been employed to generate surface porosity having varying pore size distribution. This paper presents our results on pulsed laser irradiation based surface microstructuring of sintered zinc oxide (ZnO) pellets leading to generation of enhanced surface porosity. ZnO targets have been surface treated using a frequency doubled nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at laser fluence levels ranging between 2 and 9 J/cm2. Our observations establish that laser irradiation provides an effective technique for generation of surface macro porosity in case of ZnO pellets. Also, extent of surface porosity and the mean pore size could be controlled by appropriately varying the incident laser fluence. Such laser treated ZnO surfaces with enhanced surface porosity and large size pores can serve as potential candidate for humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response time, particularly in high humidity range.

  12. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  13. Disassembly of actin structures by nanosecond pulsed electric field is a downstream effect of cell swelling.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Semenov, Iurii; Kuipers, Marjorie A; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-12-01

    Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton structures was reported as one of the characteristic effects of nanosecond-duration pulsed electric field (nsPEF) in both mammalian and plant cells. We utilized CHO cells that expressed the monomeric fluorescent protein (mApple) tagged to actin to test if nsPEF modifies the cell actin directly or as a consequence of cell membrane permeabilization. A train of four 600-ns pulses at 19.2 kV/cm (2 Hz) caused immediate cell membrane poration manifested by YO-PRO-1 dye uptake, gradual cell rounding and swelling. Concurrently, bright actin features were replaced by dimmer and uniform fluorescence of diffuse actin. To block the nsPEF-induced swelling, the bath buffer was isoosmotically supplemented with an electropore-impermeable solute (sucrose). A similar addition of a smaller, electropore-permeable solute (adonitol) served as a control. We demonstrated that sucrose efficiently blocked disassembly of actin features by nsPEF, whereas adonitol did not. Sucrose also attenuated bleaching of mApple-tagged actin in nsPEF-treated cells (as integrated over the cell volume), although did not fully prevent it. We conclude that disintegration of the actin cytoskeleton was a result of cell swelling, which, in turn, was caused by cell permeabilization by nsPEF and transmembrane diffusion of solutes which led to the osmotic imbalance. PMID:24507565

  14. Transient suppression of gap junctional intercellular communication after exposure to 100-nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Anna; Schmidt, Anke; Labohá, Petra; Babica, Pavel; Kolb, Juergen F

    2016-12-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is an important mechanism that is involved and affected in many diseases and injuries. So far, the effect of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) on the communication between cells was not investigated. An in vitro approach is presented with rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells grown and exposed in a monolayer. In order to observe sub-lethal effects, cells were exposed to pulsed electric fields with a duration of 100ns and amplitudes between 10 and 20kV/cm. GJIC strongly decreased within 15min after treatment but recovered within 24h. Gene expression of Cx43 was significantly decreased and associated with a reduced total amount of Cx43 protein. In addition, MAP kinases p38 and Erk1/2, involved in Cx43 phosphorylation, were activated and Cx43 became hyperphosphorylated. Immunofluorescent staining of Cx43 displayed the disassembly of gap junctions. Further, a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton was observed whereas tight junction protein ZO-1 was not significantly affected. All effects were field- and time-dependent and most pronounced within 30 to 60min after treatment. A better understanding of a possible manipulation of GJIC by nsPEFs might eventually offer a possibility to develop and improve treatments.

  15. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment. PMID:26728251

  16. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protectivemore » thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.« less

  17. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  18. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas. PMID:24699286

  19. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment. PMID:26728251

  20. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields modulate cell function through intracellular signal transduction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Stephen J; Blackmore, Peter F; White, Jody; Joshi, Ravindra P; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2004-08-01

    These studies describe the effects of nanosecond (10-300 ns) pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) on mammalian cell structure and function. As the pulse durations decrease, effects on the plasma membrane (PM) decrease and effects on intracellular signal transduction mechanisms increase. When nsPEF-induced PM electroporation effects occur, they are distinct from classical PM electroporation effects, suggesting unique, nsPEF-induced PM modulations. In HL-60 cells, nsPEF that are well below the threshold for PM electroporation and apoptosis induction induce effects that are similar to purinergic agonistmediated calcium release from intracellular stores, which secondarily initiate capacitive calcium influx through store-operated calcium channels in the PM. NsPEF with durations and electric field intensities that do or do not cause PM electroporation, induce apoptosis in mammalian cells with a well-characterized phenotype typified by externalization of phosphatidylserine on the outer PM and activation of caspase proteases. Treatment of mouse fibrosarcoma tumors with nsPEF also results in apoptosis induction. When Jurkat cells were transfected by electroporation and then treated with nsPEF, green fluorescent protein expression was enhanced compared to electroporation alone. The results indicate that nsPEF activate intracellular mechanisms that can determine cell function and fate, providing an important new tool for probing signal transduction mechanisms that modulate cell structure and function and for potential therapeutic applications for cancer and gene therapy.

  1. Apoptosis initiation and angiogenesis inhibition: melanoma targets for nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhua; Kolb, Juergen F; Swanson, R James; Schoenbach, Karl H; Beebe, Stephen J

    2010-08-01

    Many effective anti-cancer strategies target apoptosis and angiogenesis mechanisms. Applications of non-ionizing, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) induce apoptosis in vitro and eliminate cancer in vivo; however in vivo mechanisms require closer analysis. These studies investigate nsPEF-induced apoptosis and anti-angiogenesis examined by fluorescent microscopy, immunoblots, and morphology. Six hours after treatment with one hundred 300 ns pulses at 40 kV/cm, cells transiently expressed active caspases indicating that caspase-mediated mechanisms. Three hours after treatment transient peaks in Histone 2AX phosphorylation coincided with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive cells and pyknotic nuclei, suggesting caspase-independent mechanisms on nuclei/DNA. Large DNA fragments, but not 180 bp fragmentation ladders, were observed, suggesting incomplete apoptosis. Nevertheless, tumor weight and volume decreased and tumors disappeared. One week after treatment, vessel numbers, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF), CD31, CD35 and CD105 were decreased, indicating anti-angiogenesis. The nsPEFs activate multiple melanoma therapeutic targets, which is consistent with successes of nsPEF applications for tumor treatment in vivo as a new cancer therapeutic modality.

  2. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-01

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm3, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  3. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-15

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm{sup 3}, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  4. The Nonlinear Behaviors in Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Multi Pulse Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dingzong; Wang, Yanhui; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-08-01

    An in-depth and comprehensive understanding of the complex nonlinear behaviors in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge is significant for the stable operation and effective control of the plasma. In this paper, we study the nonlinear behaviors in argon atmospheric dielectric barrier multi pulse discharges by a one-dimensional fluid model. Under certain conditions, the multi pulse discharge becomes very sensitive with the increase of frequency, and the multi pulse period-doubling bifurcation, inverse period-doubling bifurcation and chaos appear frequently. The discharge can reach a relatively steady state only when the discharges are symmetrical between positive and negative half cycle. In addition, the effects of the voltage on these nonlinear discharges are also studied. It is found that the amplitude of voltage has no effects on the number of discharge pulses in multi-pulse period-doubling bifurcation sequences; however, to a relatively stable periodic discharge, the discharge pulses are proportional to the amplitude of the applied voltage within a certain range. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11447244), the Science Foundation of Hengyang Normal University of China (No. 14B41), the Construct Program of the Key Discipline in Hunan Province, and the Hunan Provincial Applied Basic Research Base of Optoelectronic Information Technology of China (No. GDXX010)

  5. A method for the formation of Pt metal nanoparticle arrays using nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting

    SciTech Connect

    Owusu-Ansah, Ebenezer; Horwood, Corie A.; Birss, Viola I.; Shi, Yujun J.; El-Sayed, Hany A.

    2015-05-18

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films, deposited on a dimpled Ta (DT) surface, has been studied here in order to form ordered Pt nanoparticle (NP) arrays. The DT substrate was fabricated via a simple electrochemical anodization process in a highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HF solution. Pt thin films (3–5 nm) were sputter coated on DT and then dewetted under vacuum to generate NPs using a 355 nm laser radiation (6–9 ns, 10 Hz). The threshold laser fluence to fully dewet a 3.5 nm thick Pt film was determined to be 300 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our experiments have shown that shorter irradiation times (≤60 s) produce smaller nanoparticles with more uniform sizes, while longer times (>60 s) give large nanoparticles with wider size distributions. The optimum laser irradiation time of 1 s (10 pulses) has led to the formation of highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays with an average nanoparticle size of 26 ± 3 nm with no substrate deformation. At the optimum condition of 1 s and 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}, as many as 85% of the dewetted NPs were found neatly in the well-defined dimples. This work has demonstrated that pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films on a pre-patterned dimpled substrate is an efficient and powerful technique to produce highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays. This method can thus be used to produce arrays of other high-melting-point metal nanoparticles for a range of applications, including electrocatalysis, functionalized nanomaterials, and analytical purposes.

  6. Induction of Cell Death Mechanisms and Apoptosis by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields (nsPEFs)

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Stephen J.; Sain, Nova M.; Ren, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Pulse power technology using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) offers a new stimulus to modulate cell functions or induce cell death for cancer cell ablation. New data and a literature review demonstrate fundamental and basic cellular mechanisms when nsPEFs interact with cellular targets. NsPEFs supra-electroporate cells creating large numbers of nanopores in all cell membranes. While nsPEFs have multiple cellular targets, these studies show that nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm closely parallels deterioration in cell viability. Increases in intracellular Ca2+ alone were not sufficient for cell death; however, cell death depended of the presence of Ca2+. When both events occur, cell death ensues. Further, direct evidence supports the hypothesis that pulse rise-fall times or high frequency components of nsPEFs are important for decreasing ΔΨm and cell viability. Evidence indicates in Jurkat cells that cytochrome c release from mitochondria is caspase-independent indicating an absence of extrinsic apoptosis and that cell death can be caspase-dependent and –independent. The Ca2+ dependence of nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm suggests that nanoporation of inner mitochondria membranes is less likely and effects on a Ca2+-dependent protein(s) or the membrane in which it is embedded are more likely a target for nsPEF-induced cell death. The mitochondria permeability transition pore (mPTP) complex is a likely candidate. Data demonstrate that nsPEFs can bypass cancer mutations that evade apoptosis through mechanisms at either the DISC or the apoptosome. PMID:24709649

  7. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  8. Nonlinear optical absorption of ZnO doped with copper nanoparticles in the picosecond and nanosecond pulse laser field.

    PubMed

    Ryasnyansky, Aleksandr; Palpant, Bruno; Debrus, Solange; Ganeev, Rashid; Stepanov, Andrey; Can, Nurdogan; Buchal, Christoph; Uysal, Sibel

    2005-05-10

    The nonlinear absorption of nanocomposite layers based on ZnO implanted with Cu+ ions with an energy of 160 keV in implantation doses of 10(16) and 10(17) ions/cm2 was investigated. The values of the nonlinear absorption coefficient were measured by the Z-scan method at a wavelength of 532 nm by use of nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses. Possible optical applications of these materials are discussed.

  9. Absolute calibration of OH density in a nanosecond pulsed plasma filament in atmospheric pressure He-H2O: comparison of independent calibration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreycken, T.; van der Horst, R. M.; Sadeghi, N.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2013-11-01

    The absolute density of OH radicals generated in a nanosecond pulsed filamentary discharge in atmospheric pressure He +0.84% H2O is measured independently by UV absorption and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) calibrated with Rayleigh scattering. For the calibration of LIF with Rayleigh scattering, two LIF models, with six levels and four levels, are studied to investigate the influence of the rotational and vibrational energy transfers. In addition, a chemical model is used to deduce the OH density in the afterglow from the relative LIF intensity as function of time. The different models show good correspondence and by comparing these different methods, the accuracy and the effect of assumptions on the obtained OH density are discussed in detail. This analysis includes an analysis of the sensitivity to parameters used in the LIF models.

  10. Transistorized Marx bank pulse circuit provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, E. A.; Lewis, R. N.

    1968-01-01

    Base-triggered avalanche transistor circuit used in a Marx bank pulser configuration provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time. The avalanche-mode transistors replace conventional spark gaps in the Marx bank. The delay time from an input signal to the output signal to the output is typically 6 nanoseconds.

  11. Continuum emission-based electron diagnostics for atmospheric pressure plasmas and characteristics of nanosecond-pulsed argon plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Holak; Park, Joo Young

    2015-06-01

    Electron diagnostics based on electron-neutral atom (e-a) bremsstrahlung in the UV and visible range emitted from atmospheric pressure plasmas is presented. Since the spectral emissivity of the e-a bremsstrahlung is determined by electron density (ne) and mean electron temperature (Te) representing the Maxwellian electron energy distribution, their diagnostics is possible. As an example, emission spectra measured from capacitive discharges are presented, which show good agreement with the theoretically calculated emissivity of the e-a bremsstrahlung. For a single pin electrode nanosecond-pulsed plasma jet (n-PPJ) in argon, we investigate the electron properties and the temporal behavior of the positive streamers. Streamers with many branches are clearly observed inside the dielectric tube, while a few main streamers propagate outside the tube along the jet axis. A two-dimensional (2D) measurement of the time-averaged Te distribution was developed using a commercial digital camera and optical band pass filters based on the emissivity ratio of two wavelengths of the e-a bremsstrahlung. The viable measurement range of Te is 0.5-7 eV for the choice of two wavelengths of 300s and 900s nm and 0.5-4 eV for two wavelengths of 400s and 900s nm, which are uncontaminated by the atomic and/or molecular spectra. The 2D Te distribution obtained using 514.5 and 632.8 nm emissions helps to reveal the role of electrons in streamer characteristics in the argon n-PPJ. Time-averaged Te of 2.0 eV and 1.0 eV inside and outside the tube, respectively, were measured. The streamer dynamics of the n-PPJ is shown to be dependent on Te.

  12. Discharge processes of UV pre-ionized electric-discharge pulsed DF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qikun; Xie, Jijiang; Shao, Chunlei; Wang, Chunrui; Shao, Mingzhen; Guo, Jin

    2016-03-01

    The discharge processes of ultraviolet (UV) pre-ionized electric-discharge pulsed DF laser operating with a SF6-D2 gas mixture are studied. A mathematical model based on continuity equation of electrons and Kirchhoff equations for discharge circuit is established to describe the discharge processes. Voltage and current waveforms of main discharge and voltage waveforms of pre-ionization are solved numerically utilizing the model. The calculations correctly display some physical processes, such as the delay time between pre-ionization and main discharge, breakdown of the main electrode and self-sustained volume discharge (SSVD). The results of theory are consistent with the experiments, which are performed in our non-chain pulsed DF laser. Then the delay inductance and peak capacitance are researched to analyze their influences on discharge processes, and the circuit parameters of DF laser are given which is useful to improve the discharge stability.

  13. Observation of repetitively nanosecond pulse-width transverse patterns in microchip self-Q-switched laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jun; Ueda, Ken-ichi

    2006-05-15

    Repetitively nanosecond pulse-width transverse pattern formation in a plane-parallel microchip Cr,Nd: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) self-Q-switched laser was investigated. The complex point-symmetric transverse patterns were observed by varying the pump beam diameter incident on the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal. The gain guiding effect and the thermal effect induced by the pump power in microchip Cr,Nd:YAG laser control the oscillating transverse modes. These transverse pattern formations were due to the variation of the saturated inversion population and the thermal induced index profile along radial and longitudinal direction in the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal induced by the pump power incident on the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal. These were intrinsic properties of such a microchip self-Q-switched laser. The longitudinal distribution of the saturated inversion population inside the gain medium plays an important role on the transverse pattern formation. Different sets of the transverse patterns corresponds to the different saturated inversion population distribution inside microchip Cr,Nd:YAG crystal.

  14. Activation of autophagy in response to nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Jody C; Tarango, Melissa; Roth, Caleb C; Ibey, Bennett L

    2015-03-01

    Previous work demonstrated significant changes in cellular membranes following exposure of cells to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), including nanoporation and increases in intracellular calcium concentration. While it is known that nsPEF exposure can cause cell death, how cells repair and survive nsPEF-induced cellular damage is not well understood. In this paper, we investigated whether autophagy is stimulated following nsPEF exposure to repair damaged membranes, proteins, and/or organelles in a pro-survival response. We hypothesized that autophagy is activated to repair nsPEF-induced plasma membrane damage and overwhelming this compensatory mechanism results in cell death. Activation of autophagy and subsequent cell death pathways were assessed measuring toxicity, gene and protein expression of autophagy markers, and by monitoring autophagosome formation and maturation using fluorescent microscopy. Results show that autophagy is activated at subtoxic nsPEF doses, as a compensatory mechanism to repair membrane damage. However, prolonged exposure results in increased cell death and a concomitant decrease in autophagic markers. These results suggest that cells take an active role in membrane repair, through autophagy, following exposure to nsPEF. PMID:25660455

  15. Breakdown in a bulk of transparent solids under irradiation of a nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Z. U.; Grigorov, Y. V.; Tran, K. A.; Janulewicz, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    A single pulse of a nanosecond laser was tightly focused in the bulk of transparent materials (soda lime glass, borosilicate glass, fused silica , sapphire and Gorilla Glass) to a beam spot diameter of ~ 2.1μm. A value of the total energy absorbed in the materials was measured with corrections for the transmitted, scattered and reflected components of the incident energy. It was found that 3-11% of the incident radiation was scattered but the total absorption still achieved a very high level of up to 88%. Absorptance dependence on the incident fluence was reasonably approximated by the sigmoidal Hill function. Here we suggest using this analytical description to identify empirical intrinsic laser-induced breakdown threshold (LIBT). Optical damage threshold (ODT) was identified by optical inspection. The results for some materials suggest significantly lower breakdown threshold than that reported earlier for more loosely focused beams. A study of the damage area morphology with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission microscope (HRTEM) revealed existence of the shock waves-affected area with a localized nano-crystallization. Spectroscopic study of the light emission accompanying breakdown showed typical quasi-continuum emission with temperature as high as 8917K (0.8 eV).

  16. Nanosecond multi-pulse laser milling for certain area removal of metal coating on plastics surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Jia, Zhenyuan; Ma, Jianwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Metal coating with functional pattern on engineering plastics surface plays an important role in industry applications; it can be obtained by adding or removing certain area of metal coating on engineering plastics surface. However, the manufacturing requirements are improved continuously and the plastic substrate presents three-dimensional (3D) structure-many of these parts cannot be fabricated by conventional processing methods, and a new manufacturing method is urgently needed. As the laser-processing technology has many advantages like high machining accuracy and constraints free substrate structure, the machining of the parts is studied through removing certain area of metal coating based on the nanosecond multi-pulse laser milling. To improve the edge quality of the functional pattern, generation mechanism and corresponding avoidance strategy of the processing defects are studied. Additionally, a prediction model for the laser ablation depth is proposed, which can effectively avoid the existence of residual metal coating and reduces the damage of substrate. With the optimal machining parameters, an equiangular spiral pattern on copper-clad polyimide (CCPI) is machined based on the laser milling at last. The experimental results indicate that the edge of the pattern is smooth and consistent, the substrate is flat and without damage. The achievements in this study could be applied in industrial production.

  17. Hybrid-modality ocular imaging using a clinical ultrasound system and nanosecond pulsed laser

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Matham, Murukeshan Vadakke

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Hybrid optical modality imaging is a special type of multimodality imaging significantly used in the recent past in order to harness the strengths of different imaging methods as well as to furnish complementary information beyond that provided by any individual method. We present a hybrid-modality imaging system based on a commercial clinical ultrasound imaging (USI) system using a linear array ultrasound transducer (UST) and a tunable nanosecond pulsed laser as the source. The integrated system uses photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and USI for ocular imaging to provide the complementary absorption and structural information of the eye. In this system, B-mode images from PAI and USI are acquired at 10 Hz and about 40 Hz, respectively. A linear array UST makes the system much faster compared to other ocular imaging systems using a single-element UST to form B-mode images. The results show that the proposed instrumentation is able to incorporate PAI and USI in a single setup. The feasibility and efficiency of this developed probe system was illustrated by using enucleated pig eyes as test samples. It was demonstrated that PAI could successfully capture photoacoustic signals from the iris, anterior lens surface, and posterior pole, while USI could accomplish the mapping of the eye to reveal the structures like the cornea, anterior chamber, lens, iris, and posterior pole. This system and the proposed methodology are expected to enable ocular disease diagnostic applications and can be used as a preclinical imaging system. PMID:26835487

  18. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes Jr., Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Christopher Mimun, L.; Maswadi, Saher M.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane. PMID:26450165

  19. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure.

    PubMed

    Roth, Caleb C; Barnes, Ronald A; Ibey, Bennett L; Beier, Hope T; Christopher Mimun, L; Maswadi, Saher M; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D

    2015-10-09

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane.

  20. Evidence of water reorientation on model electrocatalytic surfaces from nanosecond-laser-pulsed experiments.

    PubMed

    García-Aráez, Nuria; Climent, Víctor; Feliu, Juan M

    2008-03-26

    The behavior of water at the interface formed between a quasi-perfect Pt(111) single-crystal electrode and an aqueous electrolyte solution is studied by means of the laser-induced temperature jump method. This method is based on the use of nanosecond laser pulses to suddenly increase the temperature at the interface. The measurement of the response of the interface toward the laser heating under coulostatic conditions provides evidence on the net orientation of water at the interface. Especially interesting is the study of the effect on the interfacial water caused by the selective deposition of foreign metal adatoms, because these bimetallic systems usually exhibit appealing electrocatalytic properties. The T-jump methodology shows that the surface composition strongly affects the interaction of water with the surface. The most representative parameter to characterize this interaction is the potential where water reorientation occurs; this potential shifts in different directions, depending on the relative values of the electronegativity of the adatom and the substrate. These results are discussed in the light of available information about the effect of adatom deposition on the work function and the surface potential of the modified surface. Finally, some implications on the enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity are briefly discussed. PMID:18321095

  1. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A., Jr.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Christopher Mimun, L.; Maswadi, Saher M.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane.

  2. Decolorization of methylene blue in aqueous suspensions of gold nanoparticles using parallel nanosecond pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yan P; Liu, Xian H; Du, Xi W; Lu, Yi R; Wang, Mei Y; Wang, Guang Y

    2013-01-01

    Using 532 nm parallel nanosecond pulsed laser, the decolorization of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous suspensions of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) was studied. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as irradiation time, laser energy, and initial MB concentration on the decolorization rate were investigated. Experiments using real samples of textile dyeing wastewater were also carried out to examine the effectiveness of the method in more complex samples. From the results, the following conclusions may be drawn: (i) Under the optimum conditions (pH 7.19, 135 mJ laser energy, 4 mg/L MB concentration, and 11.6 mg/L GNP concentration), the rate of MB decolorization could reach 94% in 15 min. The decolorization follows pseudo-first-order kinetics; (ii) The amount of MB decreased rapidly during the decolorization. No intermediates of the decolorization could be detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. These observations indicate that MB was decolorized through a very rapid degradation mechanism; (iii) The rate of MB decolorization increased with the increase in laser energy (at laser energies of 0 to 135 mJ); and, (iv) The efficient decolorization of MB in real samples of textile dyeing wastewater was achieved at a decolorization rate of about 85% in 15 min.

  3. Fast switching thyristor applied in nanosecond-pulse high-voltage generator with closed transformer core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Bao, Chaobing; Feng, Xibo; Liu, Yunlong; Fochan, Lin

    2013-02-01

    For a compact and reliable nanosecond-pulse high-voltage generator (NPHVG), the specification parameter selection and potential usage of fast controllable state-solid switches have an important bearing on the optimal design. The NPHVG with closed transformer core and fast switching thyristor (FST) was studied in this paper. According to the analysis of T-type circuit, the expressions for the voltages and currents of the primary and secondary windings on the transformer core of NPHVG were deduced, and the theoretical maximum analysis was performed. For NPHVG, the rise-rate of turn-on current (di/dt) across a FST may exceed its transient rating. Both mean and maximum values of di/dt were determined by the leakage inductances of the transformer, and the difference is 1.57 times. The optimum winding ratio is helpful to getting higher voltage output with lower specification FST, especially when the primary and secondary capacitances have been established. The oscillation period analysis can be effectively used to estimate the equivalent leakage inductance. When the core saturation effect was considered, the maximum di/dt estimated from the oscillating period of the primary current is more accurate than one from the oscillating period of the secondary voltage. Although increasing the leakage inductance of NPHVG can decrease di/dt across FST, it may reduce the output peak voltage of the NPHVG.

  4. [Temporal Pattern of DNA Breaks in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells after Exposure to Nanosecond Electric Pulses].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoli; Fu, Xiao; Ren, Xueyi; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lima

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to explore the temporal pattern of DNA breaks induced by nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) in cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells. Human ovarian cancer cells A2780 (cisplatin-sensitive subline) and C30 (cisplatin-resistant subline) were exposed to nsEP. Sham exposed groups were shame exposed to nsEP. Cell viability was determined using CCK-8 assay after 0 h, 4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h, respectively, and the percentage of dead cells was calculated. The DNA break was detected with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay), and the 75th percentiles of TL (tail length), TM (tail moment) and OTM (Olive tail moment) were measured. Cell viability displayed an early decrease and late increase, with the valley value seen at 8 h. Percentages of cell death and comet-formed in A2780 cells were higher than those in C30 cells (P < 0.05) at 8 h, respectively. TL, TM and OTM in C30 cells were less than those in A2780 cells (P < 0.05). The percentage of comet-formed correlated with that of cell death in either A2780 (r = 0.997, P < 0.05) or C30 (r = 0.998, P < 0.05) cells. DNA breaks induced by nsEP in cisplatin-sensitive cells differred from that in resistant cells, and DNA break resulted in fraction of cell death.

  5. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields have differential effects on cells in the S-phase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily H; Schoenbach, Karl H; Beebe, Stephen J

    2007-03-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are a type of nonthermal, nonionizing radiation that exhibit intense electric fields with high power, but low energy. NsPEFs extend conventional electroporation (EP) to affect intracellular structures and functions and depending on the intensity, can induce lethal and nonlethal cell signaling. In this study, HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells were synchronized to the S-phase or remained unsynchronized, exposed to electric fields of 60 kV/cm with either 60-ns or 300-ns durations, and analyzed for apoptosis and proliferative markers. Several nsPEF structural and functional targets were identified. Unlike unsynchronized cells, S-phase cells under limiting conditions exhibited greater membrane integrity and caspase activation and maintained cytoskeletal structure. Regardless of synchronization, cells exposed to nsPEFs under these conditions primarily survived, but exhibited some turnover and delayed proliferation in cell populations, as well as reversible increases in phosphatidylserine externalization, membrane integrity, and nuclei size. These results show that nsPEFs can act as a nonligand agonist to modulate plasma membrane (PM) and intracellular structures and functions, as well as differentially affect cells in the S-phase, but without effect on cell survival. Furthermore, nsPEF effects on the nucleus and cytoskeleton may provide synergistic therapeutic actions with other agents, such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutics that affect these same structures.

  6. The dynamics of thermal expansion in single crystal beryllium from nanosecond x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric N; Greenfield, Scott; Luo, Shengnian; Johnson, Randall; Shimada, Tom; Cobble, Jim; Seifter, Achim; Montgomery, David

    2008-01-01

    Single crystals of beryllium were exposed to nanosecond x-ray pulses generated from laser irradiated (1.5 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) gold targets. The characteristic gold M-band centered at 2.5 keV was measured by time integrated transmission grating spectroscopy and time resolved (spectrally integrated) x-ray photodiodes through beryllium targets of various thickness. Approximately decaying exponential temperature profiles were immediately induced in 100 {mu}m thick single crystal targets producing nearly instand surface motion as measured by free surface velocity interferometry. This temperature profile gave rise to a similar velocity history between a c-axis single crystal and a (10{bar 1}0) single crystal where a large initial acceleration gave way to a profile due to the internal temperature gradient. A smooth rise to the peak velocity was then followed by a sharp release originating from the opposite free surface. Differences between the velocities in each of these regions were found between the two single crystals investigated, which were due to the thermal expansion properties as a function of direction (including plasticity). These results can be used to predict behavior of polycrystalline targets relevant to instability seeding in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ablators.

  7. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Rezac, K.; Sila, O.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Velyhan, A.

    2015-09-01

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 108 at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 1016 W/cm2. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the 2H(d,n)3He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 109 with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 108 n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 1014 deuterons in the 0.5-2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 109 at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 106 n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 1016 W/cm2. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  8. Plasma Membrane Integrity and Survival of Melanoma Cells After Nanosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Evans, Rodger; Guillén, Gabriel; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) photoacoustic detection systems can aid clinical decision-making in the treatment of cancer. Interaction of melanin within melanoma cells with nanosecond laser pulses generates photoacoustic waves that make its detection possible. This study aims at: (1) determining melanoma cell survival after laser pulses of 6 ns at λ = 355 and 532 nm; (2) comparing the potential enhancement in the photoacoustic signal using λ = 355 nm in contrast with λ = 532 nm; (3) determining the critical laser fluence at which melanin begins to leak out from melanoma cells; and (4) developing a time-resolved imaging (TRI) system to study the intracellular interactions and their effect on the plasma membrane integrity. Monolayers of melanoma cells were grown on tissue culture-treated clusters and irradiated with up to 1.0 J/cm2. Surviving cells were stained with trypan blue and counted using a hemacytometer. The phosphate buffered saline absorbance was measured with a nanodrop spectrophotometer to detect melanin leakage from the melanoma cells post-laser irradiation. Photoacoustic signal magnitude was studied at both wavelengths using piezoelectric sensors. TRI with 6 ns resolution was used to image plasma membrane damage. Cell survival decreased proportionally with increasing laser fluence for both wavelengths, although the decrease is more pronounced for 355 nm radiation than for 532 nm. It was found that melanin leaks from cells equally for both wavelengths. No significant difference in photoacoustic signal was found between wavelengths. TRI showed clear damage to plasma membrane due to laser-induced bubble formation. PMID:20589533

  9. Dynamic effects and applications for nanosecond pulsed electric fields in cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, Stephen J.; Blackmore, Peter F.; Hall, Emily; White, Jody A.; Willis, Lauren K.; Fauntleroy, Laura; Kolb, Juergen F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2005-04-01

    Nanosecond, high intensity pulsed electric fields [nsPEFs] that are below the plasma membrane [PM] charging time constant have decreasing effects on the PM and increasing effects on intracellular structures and functions as the pulse duration decreases. When human cell suspensions were exposed to nsPEFs where the electric fields were sufficiently intense [10-300ns, <=300 kV/cm.], apoptosis signaling pathways could be activated in several cell models. Multiple apoptosis markers were observed in Jurkat, HL-60, 3T3L1-preadipocytes, and isolated rat adipocytes including decreased cell size and number, caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and/or cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm. Phosphatidylserine externalization was observed as a biological response to nsPEFs in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and p53-wildtype and -null human colon carcinoma cells. B10.2 mouse fibrosarcoma tumors that were exposed to nsPEFs ex vivo and in vivo exhibited DNA fragmentation, elevated caspase activity, and reduced size and weight compared to contralateral sham-treated control tumors. When nsPEF conditions were below thresholds for apoptosis and classical PM electroporation, non-apoptotic responses were observed similar to those initiated through PM purinergic receptors in HL-60 cells and thrombin in human platelets. These included Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores [endoplasmic reticulum] and subsequently through store-operated Ca2+ channels in the PM. In addition, platelet activation measured as aggregation responses were observed in human platelets. Finally, when nsPEF conditions followed classical electroporation-mediated transfection, the expression intensity and number of GFP-expressing cells were enhanced above cells exposed to electroporation conditions alone. These studies demonstrate that application of nsPEFs to cells or tissues can modulate cell-signaling mechanisms with possible applications as a new basic science tool, cancer treatment, wound healing, and gene therapy.

  10. Nanosecond electric pulses induce DNA breaks in cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Linghu, Lingjuan; Tan, Yafang; Lou, Yi; Hu, Lina; Yang, Hongchun; Yu, Tinghe

    2013-01-11

    Human ovarian cancer cells COC1 and COC1/DDP (cisplatin-resistant subline) were exposed to 6 kV/cm nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) with a pulse length of 8, 16 or 24 ns. The potential in a subcellular unit was calculated using a multilayer dielectric spherical model, and area under the voltage-time curves (AUC) integrated with a lower limit of 0.2V. Cell viability was determined, and double-stand and total DNA breaks detected with the neutral and alkaline comet assays. nsEP evoked a higher voltage and AUC in nucleoplasm, and the levels in COC1 cells was just above those in COC1/DDP cells. Comets only appeared in the alkaline assay demonstrating single-stand DNA break. Fewer DNA break (16.51% vs. 35.13% at 24 ns, p=0.0150) and more survival (22.42% vs. 13.19% at 24 ns, p=0.0015) occurred in COC1/DDP cells despite an equal electric energy and almost equal cell sizes. 24-ns EP led to higher rates of cell-death and comet. The comet rate correlated with cell-death fraction in either cell line (r=0.5701, p=0.0135; r=0.5110, p=0.0302). There was no a correlation between the tail length, tail moment or Olive tail moment and cell-death rate. The data showed that response of chemosensitive cells differed from that of chemoresistant cells and DNA damage contributed to percent of cell death. PMID:23211598

  11. Histopathology of normal skin and melanomas after nanosecond pulsed electric field treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinhua; Swanson, R. James; Kolb, Juergen F.; Nuccitelli, Richard; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2011-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) can affect the intracellular structures of cells in vitro. This study shows the direct effects of nsPEFs on tumor growth, tumor volume, and histological characteristics of normal skin and B16-F10 melanoma in SKH-1 mice. A melanoma model was set up by injecting B16-F10 into female SKH-1 mice. After a 100-pulse treatment with an nsPEF (40-kV/cm field strength; 300-ns duration; 30-ns rise time; 2-Hz repetition rate), tumor growth and histology were studied using transillumination, light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin stain and transmission electron microscopy. Melanin and iron within the melanoma tumor were also detected with specific stains. After nsPEF treatment, tumor development was inhibited with decreased volumes post-nsPEF treatment compared with control tumors (P< 0.05). The nsPEF-treated tumor volume was reduced significantly compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Hematoxylin and eosin stain and transmission electron microscopy showed morphological changes and nuclear shrinkage in the tumor. Fontana–Masson stain indicates that nsPEF can externalize the melanin. Iron stain suggested nsPEF caused slight hemorrhage in the treated tissue. Histology confirmed that repeated applications of nsPEF disrupted the vascular network. nsPEF treatment can significantly disrupt the vasculature, reduce subcutaneous murine melanoma development, and produce tumor cell contraction and nuclear shrinkage while concurrently, but not permanently, damaging peripheral healthy skin tissue in the treated area, which we attribute to the highly localized electric fields surrounding the needle electrodes. PMID:19730404

  12. Changes in protein expression of U937 and Jurkat cells exposed to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, Erick K.; Roth, Caleb C.; Cerna, Caesar; Estalck, Larry; Wilmink, Gerald; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2013-02-01

    Application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) to various biological cell lines has been to shown to cause many diverse effects, including poration of the plasma membrane, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, blebbing, apoptosis, and intracellular calcium bursts. The underlying mechanism(s) responsible for these diverse responses are poorly understood. Of specific interest in this paper are the long-term effects of nsPEF on cellular processes, including the regulation of genes and production of proteins. Previous studies have reported transient activation of select signaling pathways involving mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), protein phosphorylation and downstream gene expression following nsPEF application. We hypothesize that nsPEF represents a unique stimulus that could be used to externally modulate cellular processes. To validate our hypothesis, we performed a series of cuvette-based exposures at 10 and 600ns pulse widths using a custom Blumlien line pulser system. We measured acute changes in the plasma membrane structure using flow cytometry by tracking phosphatidylserine externalization via FITC-Annexin V labeling and poration via propidium iodide uptake. We then compared these results to viability of the cells at 24 hours post exposure using MTT assay and changes in the MAPK family of proteins at 8 hours post-exposure using Luminex assay. By comparing exposures at 10 and 600ns duration, we found that most MAPK family-protein expression increased in Jurkat and U937 cell lines following exposure and compared well with drops in viability and changes in plasma membrane asymmetry. What proved interesting is that some MAPK family proteins (e.g. p53, STAT1), were expressed in one cell line, but not the other. This difference may point to an underlying mechanism for observed difference in cellular sensitivity to nsPEFinduced stresses.

  13. A protective effect after clearance of orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma by nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Sain, Nova M; Harlow, K Tyler; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Shires, Peter K; Heller, Richard; Beebe, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Strategies for treating liver cancer using radiation, chemotherapy combinations and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting specific mutations have provided longer survival times, yet multiple treatments are often needed and recurrences with new malignant phenotypes are not uncommon. New and innovative treatments are undoubtedly needed to successfully treat liver cancer. Over the last decade, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have shown promise in pre-clinical studies; however, these have been limited to treatment of skin cancers or xenographs in mice. In the present report, an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model is established in rats using N1-S1 HCC cells. Data demonstrate a response rate of 80-90% when 1000 pulses are delivered with 100ns durations, electric field strengths of 50kV/cm and repetition rates of 1Hz. N1-S1 tumours treated with nsPEFs expressed significant number of cells with active caspase-3 and caspase-9, but not caspase-8, indicating an intrinsic apoptosis mechanism(s) as well as caspase-independent mechanisms. Most remarkably, rats with successfully ablated tumours failed to re-grow tumours when challenged with a second injection of N1-S1 cells when implanted in the same or different liver lobe that harboured the original tumour. Given this protective effect, infiltration of immune cells and the presence of granzyme B expressing cells within days of treatment suggest the possibility of an anti-tumour adaptive immune response. In conclusion, NsPEFs not only eliminate N1-S1 HCC tumours, but also may induce an immuno-protective effect that defends animals against recurrences of the same cancer.

  14. Histopathology of normal skin and melanomas after nanosecond pulsed electric field treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhua; James Swanson, R; Kolb, Juergen F; Nuccitelli, Richard; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2009-12-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) can affect the intracellular structures of cells in vitro. This study shows the direct effects of nsPEFs on tumor growth, tumor volume, and histological characteristics of normal skin and B16-F10 melanoma in SKH-1 mice. A melanoma model was set up by injecting B16-F10 into female SKH-1 mice. After a 100-pulse treatment with an nsPEF (40-kV/cm field strength; 300-ns duration; 30-ns rise time; 2-Hz repetition rate), tumor growth and histology were studied using transillumination, light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin stain and transmission electron microscopy. Melanin and iron within the melanoma tumor were also detected with specific stains. After nsPEF treatment, tumor development was inhibited with decreased volumes post-nsPEF treatment compared with control tumors (P<0.05). The nsPEF-treated tumor volume was reduced significantly compared with the control group (P<0.01). Hematoxylin and eosin stain and transmission electron microscopy showed morphological changes and nuclear shrinkage in the tumor. Fontana-Masson stain indicates that nsPEF can externalize the melanin. Iron stain suggested nsPEF caused slight hemorrhage in the treated tissue. Histology confirmed that repeated applications of nsPEF disrupted the vascular network. nsPEF treatment can significantly disrupt the vasculature, reduce subcutaneous murine melanoma development, and produce tumor cell contraction and nuclear shrinkage while concurrently, but not permanently, damaging peripheral healthy skin tissue in the treated area, which we attribute to the highly localized electric fields surrounding the needle electrodes.

  15. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1-10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He-Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm-2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  16. Pulsed positive streamer discharges in air at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo; Kamakura, Taku

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air pulsed positive streamer discharges are generated in a 13 mm point-plane gap in the temperature range of 293 K–1136 K, and the effect of temperature on the streamer discharges is studied. When the temperature is increased, the product of applied voltage and temperature VT proportional to the reduced electric field can be used as a primary parameter that determines some discharge parameters regardless of temperature. For a given VT, the transferred charge per pulse, streamer diameter, product of discharge energy and temperature, and length of secondary streamer are almost constant regardless of T, whereas the streamer velocity decreases with increasing T and the decay rate of the discharge current is proportional to 1/T. The N2(C) emission intensity is approximately determined by the discharge energy independent of T. These results are useful to predict the streamer discharge and its reactive species production when the ambient temperature is increased.

  17. Pulsed positive streamer discharges in air at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo; Kamakura, Taku

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air pulsed positive streamer discharges are generated in a 13 mm point-plane gap in the temperature range of 293 K-1136 K, and the effect of temperature on the streamer discharges is studied. When the temperature is increased, the product of applied voltage and temperature VT proportional to the reduced electric field can be used as a primary parameter that determines some discharge parameters regardless of temperature. For a given VT, the transferred charge per pulse, streamer diameter, product of discharge energy and temperature, and length of secondary streamer are almost constant regardless of T, whereas the streamer velocity decreases with increasing T and the decay rate of the discharge current is proportional to 1/T. The N2(C) emission intensity is approximately determined by the discharge energy independent of T. These results are useful to predict the streamer discharge and its reactive species production when the ambient temperature is increased.

  18. Dynamical studies of model membrane and cellular response to nanosecond, high-intensity pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qin

    The dynamics of electroporation of biological cells subjected to nanosecond, high intensity pulses are studied based on a coupled scheme involving the current continuity and Smoluchowski equations. The improved pore formation energy model includes a dependence on pore population and density. It also allows for variable surface tension and incorporates the effects of finite conductivity on the electrostatic correction term, which was not considered by the simple energy models in the literature. It is shown that E(r) becomes self-adjusting with variations in its magnitude and profile. The whole scheme is self-consistent and dynamic. An electromechanical analysis based on thin-shell theory is presented to analyze cell shape changes in response to external electric fields. The calculations demonstrate that at large fields, the spherical cell geometry can be modified, and even ellipsoidal forms may not be appropriate to account for the resulting shape. It is shown that, in keeping with reports in the literature, the final shape depends on membrane thickness. This has direct implications for tissues in which significant molecular restructuring can occur. This study is also focused on obtaining qualitative predictions of pulse width dependence to apoptotic cell irreversibility that has been observed experimentally. The analysis couples a distributed electrical model for current flow with the Smoluchowski equation to provide self-consistent, time-dependent transmembrane voltages. The model captures the essence of the experimentally observed pulse-width dependence, and provides a possible physical picture that depends only on the electrical trigger. Different cell responses of normal and malignant (Farage) tonsillar B-cell are also compared and discussed. It is shown that subjecting a cell to an ultrashort, high-intensity electric pulse is the optimum way for reversible intracellular manipulation. Finally, a simple but physical atomistic model is presented for molecular

  19. Dynamics of the spatial structure of pulsed discharges in dense gases in point cathode-plane anode gaps and their erosion effect on the plane electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Blinova, O. M.; Erofeev, M. V.; Karelin, V. I.; Ripenko, V. S.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Trenkin, A. A.; Shibitov, Yu. M.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of the spatial structure of the plasma of pulsed discharges in air and nitrogen in a nonuniform electric field and their erosion effect on the plane anode surface were studied experimentally. It is established that, at a nanosecond front of the voltage pulse, a diffuse discharge forms in the point cathode-plane anode gap due to the ionization wave propagating from the cathode. As the gap length decreases, the diffuse discharge transforms into a spark. A bright spot on the anode appears during the diffuse discharge, while the spark channel forms in the later discharge stage. The microstructure of autographs of anode spots and spark channels in discharges with durations of several nanoseconds is revealed. The autographs consist of up to 100 and more microcraters 5-100 μm in diameter. It is shown that, due to the short duration of the voltage pulse, a diffuse discharge can be implemented, several pulses of which do not produce appreciable erosion on the plane anode or the soot coating deposited on it.

  20. Fiber grating compression of giant-chirped nanosecond pulses from an ultra-long nanotube mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Woodward, R I; Kelleher, E J R; Runcorn, T H; Loranger, S; Popa, D; Wittwer, V J; Ferrari, A C; Popov, S V; Kashyap, R; Taylor, J R

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that the giant chirp of coherent, nanosecond pulses generated in an 846 m long, all-normal dispersion, nanotube mode-locked fiber laser can be compensated using a chirped fiber Bragg grating compressor. Linear compression to 11 ps is reported, corresponding to an extreme compression factor of ∼100. Experimental results are supported by numerical modeling, which is also used to probe the limits of this technique. Our results unequivocally conclude that ultra-long cavity fiber lasers can support stable dissipative soliton attractors and highlight the design simplicity for pulse-energy scaling through cavity elongation.

  1. Self-pulsing of hollow cathode discharge in various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Y.; He, F. Jiang, X. X.; Ouyang, J. T.; Xie, K.

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, we investigate the self-pulsing phenomenon of cavity discharge in a cylindrical hollow cathode in various gases including argon, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and air. The current-voltage characteristics of the cavity discharge, the waveforms of the self-pulsing current and voltage as well as the repetition frequency were measured. The results show that the pulsing frequency ranges from a few to tens kilohertz and depends on the averaged current and the pressure in all gases. The pulsing frequency will increase with the averaged current and decrease with the pressure. The rising time of the current pulse is nearly constant in a given gas or mixture. The self-pulsing does not depend on the external ballast but is affected significantly by the external capacitor in parallel with the discharge cell. The low-current self-pulsing in hollow cathode discharge is the mode transition between Townsend and glow discharges. It can be described by the charging-discharging process of an equivalent circuit consisting of capacitors and resistors.

  2. On the applicability of arbitrarily shaped nanosecond laser pulses for high-quality, high-efficiency micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselen, Sasia; Riedel, Sebastian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Progressive developments in temporal shaping of short laser pulses offer entirely new approaches at influence and investigate laser-matter-interactions. Commonly used parameters for describing the behavior of short or ultrashort pulses or pulse trains are fluence and intensity. However, fluence does not imply any information about the temporal behavior of energy input during specific pulse duration τ while using the pulse intensity as describing parameter is more meaningful. Nevertheless it still is an averaging over pulse duration and no change in intensity can be determined if the temporal pulse shape changes within a certain combination of pulse duration and pulse energy. Using a flexible programmable MOPA fiber laser experimental studies on the impact of temporal energy distribution within one single laser pulse in micro machining applications were therefore carried out. With this laser source a direct modulation of the temporal pulse shape in the nanosecond regime can easily be controlled. Experiments were carried out with moved as well as with un-moved beam resulting in areas and dimples respectively drilling holes. The presented results clearly show that any averaging over pulse duration results in missing information about time-dependent interactions but can at the same time lead to significant differences in ablation results. Thus, resulting surface roughness Sa can be decreased up to 25 % when changing the pulse shape at constant parameters of fluence and pulse peak power at a pulse duration of 30 ns. It can be observed that the combination of an intensity peak and a lower edge within one pulse can lead to increasing ablation efficiency as well as higher ablation quality compared to the commonly used Gaussian-like temporal pulse shape.

  3. Nanosecond pulse shaping at 780 nm with fiber-based electro-optical modulators and a double-pass tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. E.; Gould, P. L.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a system for generating frequency-chirped and amplitude-shaped pulses on time scales from sub-nanosecond to ten nanoseconds. The system starts with cw diode-laser light at 780 nm and utilizes fiber-based electro-optical phase and intensity modulators, driven by an arbitrary waveform generator, to generate the shaped pulses. These pulses are subsequently amplified to several hundred mW with a tapered amplifier in a delayed double-pass configuration. Frequency chirps up to 5 GHz in 2 ns and pulse widths as short as 0.15 ns have been realized.

  4. Nanosecond pulse shaping at 780 nm with fiber-based electro-optical modulators and a double-pass tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Rogers, C E; Gould, P L

    2016-02-01

    We describe a system for generating frequency-chirped and amplitude-shaped pulses on time scales from sub-nanosecond to ten nanoseconds. The system starts with cw diode-laser light at 780 nm and utilizes fiber-based electro-optical phase and intensity modulators, driven by an arbitrary waveform generator, to generate the shaped pulses. These pulses are subsequently amplified to several hundred mW with a tapered amplifier in a delayed double-pass configuration. Frequency chirps up to 5 GHz in 2 ns and pulse widths as short as 0.15 ns have been realized. PMID:26906832

  5. Development of a stereo-symmetrical nanosecond pulsed power generator composed of modularized avalanche transistor Marx circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Zhong, Xu; Cao, Hui; Zhao, Zheng; Xue, Jing; Li, Tao; Li, Zheng; Wang, Ya-Nan

    2015-09-01

    Avalanche transistors have been widely studied and used in nanosecond high voltage pulse generations. However, output power improvement is always limited by the low thermal capacities of avalanche transistors, especially under high repetitive working frequency. Parallel stacked transistors can effectively improve the output current but the controlling of trigger and output synchronism has always been a hard and complex work. In this paper, a novel stereo-symmetrical nanosecond pulsed power generator with high reliability was developed. By analyzing and testing the special performances of the combined Marx circuits, numbers of meaningful conclusions on the pulse amplitude, pulse back edge, and output impedance were drawn. The combining synchronism of the generator was confirmed excellent and lower conducting current through the transistors was realized. Experimental results showed that, on a 50 Ω resistive load, pulses with 1.5-5.2 kV amplitude and 5.3-14.0 ns width could be flexibly generated by adjusting the number of combined modules, the supply voltage, and the module type.

  6. Xenon excimer emission from pulsed microhollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, M.; Shi, W.; Stark, R. H.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2001-08-01

    By applying electrical pulses of 20 ns duration to xenon microplasmas, generated by direct current microhollow cathode discharges, we were able to increase the xenon excimer emission by more than an order of magnitude over direct current discharge excimer emission. For pulsed voltages in excess of 500 V, the optical power at 172 nm was found to increase exponentially with voltage. Largest values obtained were 2.75 W of vacuum-ultraviolet optical power emitted from a single microhollow cathode discharge in 400 Torr xenon with a 750 V pulse applied to a discharge. Highest radiative emittance was 15.2 W/cm2. The efficiency for excimer emission was found to increase linearly with pulsed voltages above 500 V reaching values of 20% at 750 V.

  7. Two-stage optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier using sub-nanosecond pump pulse generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Jumpei; Miyamoto, Sho; Matsuyama, Takahiro; Sueda, Keiichi; Yoshida, Hidetsugu; Tsubakimoto, Koji; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) based on two-beam pumping, using sub-nanosecond pulses generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering compression. Seed pulse energy, duration, and center wavelength were 5 nJ, 220 ps, and ˜1065 nm, respectively. The 532 nm pulse from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was compressed to ˜400 ps in heavy fluorocarbon FC-40 liquid. Stacking of two time-delayed pump pulses reduced the amplifier gain fluctuation. Using a walk-off-compensated two-stage OPCPA at a pump energy of 34 mJ, a total gain of 1.6 × 105 was obtained, yielding an output energy of 0.8 mJ. The amplified chirped pulse was compressed to 97 fs.

  8. Comparative Study of the Dissociative Ionization of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane Using Nanosecond and Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Anton; Strydom, Christien; Botha, Lourens

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the laser induced molecular dissociation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE) were studied using a range of intensities and standard laser wavelengths with nanosecond and femtosecond pulse durations. TCE contains C-H, C-C and C-Cl bonds and selective bond breakage of one or more of these bonds is of scientific interest. Using laser ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, it was found that considerable variation of fragment ion peak heights as well as changes in relative peak ratios is possible by varying the laser intensity (by attenuation), wavelength and pulse duration using standard laser sources. The nanosecond laser dissociation seems to occur via C-Cl bond breakage, with significant fragmentation and only a few large mass ion peaks observed. In contrast, femtosecond laser dissociative ionization results in many large mass ion peaks. Evidence is found for various competing dissociation and ionization pathways. Variation of the nanosecond laser intensity does not change the fragmentation pattern, while at high femtosecond intensities large changes are observed in relative ion peak sizes. The total ionization yield and fragmentation ratios are presented for a range of wavelengths and intensities, and compared to the changes observed due to a linear chirp variation. PMID:20480004

  9. Nanosecond electric pulses affect a plant-specific kinesin at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Sebastian; Liu, Qiong; Eing, Christian; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Electric pulses with high field strength and durations in the nanosecond range (nsPEFs) are of considerable interest for biotechnological and medical applications. However, their actual cellular site of action is still under debate--due to their extremely short rise times, nsPEFs are thought to act mainly in the cell interior rather than at the plasma membrane. On the other hand, nsPEFs can induce membrane permeability. We have revisited this issue using plant cells as a model. By mapping the cellular responses to nsPEFs of different field strength and duration in the tobacco BY-2 cell line, we could define a treatment that does not impinge on short-term viability, such that the physiological responses to the treatment can be followed. We observe, for these conditions, a mild disintegration of the cytoskeleton, impaired membrane localization of the PIN1 auxin-efflux transporter and a delayed premitotic nuclear positioning followed by a transient mitotic arrest. To address the target site of nsPEFs, we made use of the plant-specific KCH kinesin, which can assume two different states with different localization (either near the nucleus or at the cell membrane) driving different cellular functions. We show that nsPEFs reduce cell expansion in nontransformed cells but promote expansion in a line overexpressing KCH. Since cell elongation and cell widening are linked to the KCH localized at the cell membrane, the inverted response in the KCH overexpressor provides evidence for a direct action of nsPEFs, also at the cell membrane. PMID:24062185

  10. Novel X-ray imaging diagnostics of high energy nanosecond pulse accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Graham W.; Gallegos, Roque Rosauro; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Beutler, David Eric; Dudley, John; Seymour, Calvin L. G.; Bell, John D.

    2004-08-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE's and Sandia National Laboratories radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  11. Lead extraction by selective operation of a nanosecond-pulsed 355nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Amir; Bogdan, Stefan; Glikson, Michael; Ishaaya, Amiel A.; Love, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Lead extraction (LE) is necessary for patients who are suffering from a related infection, or in opening venous occlusions that prevent the insertion of additional lead. In severe cases of fibrous encapsulation of the lead within a vein, laser-based cardiac LE has become one of the foremost methods of removal. In cases where the laser radiation (typically at 308 nm wavelength) interacts with the vein wall rather than with the fibrotic lesion, severe injury and subsequent bleeding may occur. Selective tissue ablation was previously demonstrated by a laser operating in the UV regime; however, it requires the use of sensitizers (e.g.: tetracycline). In this study, we present a preliminary examination of efficacy and safety aspects in the use of a nanosecond-pulsed solid-state laser radiation, at 355 nm wavelength, guided in a catheter consisting of optical fibers, in LE. Specifically, we demonstrate a correlation between the tissue elasticity and the catheter advancement rate, in ex-vivo experiments. Our results indicate a selectivity property for specific parameters of the laser radiation and catheter design. The selectivity is attributed to differences in the mechanical properties of the fibrotic tissue and a normal vein wall, leading to a different photomechanical response of the tissue's extracellular matrix. Furthermore, we performed successful in-vivo animal trials, providing a basic proof of concept for using the suggested scheme in LE. Selective operation using a 355 nm laser may reduce the risk of blood vessel perforation as well as the incidence of major adverse events.

  12. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  13. Inductively stabilized, long pulse duration transverse discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively stabilized, long pulse duration transverse discharge apparatus. The use of a segmented electrode where each segment is attached to an inductive element permits high energy, high efficiency, long-pulsed laser outputs to be obtained. The present apparatus has been demonstrated with rare-gas halide lasing media. Orders of magnitude increase in pulse repetition frequency are obtained in lasing devices that do not utilize gas flow.

  14. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Cikhardt, J.; Rezac, K.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Sila, O.

    2015-09-15

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 8} at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9} with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 8 }n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 10{sup 14} deuterons in the 0.5–2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 10{sup 9} at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 10{sup 6 }n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  15. Spatio-temporal characterization of pulses obtained from a high-energy sub-nanosecond laser system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chengyong; Xu, Xiaozhen; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-01

    Spatio-temporal profiles of laser pulses, obtained from each stage of a high-energy sub-nanosecond laser system, are investigated. The laser system is composed of a Q-switched Nd:YAG unstable oscillator, a chain of Nd:YAG amplifiers, a second-harmonic generator, and a high-energy pulse compressor based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). A curved energy front, i.e., the pulses emerging away from the beam center being gradually delayed from the center pulse, is shown to originate from the unstable oscillator. Our comparative study shows that injection seeding will enlarge the energy front curvature, via reduction of the effective gain. After the laser amplifiers, the energy front curvature is more than doubled due to the gain saturation effect. The latter also modifies the spatial pulse width distribution. While there is a negligible pulse duration spread across the oscillator beam, the amplified pulses are found to have gradually reduced pulse duration away from the beam center. More interestingly, after the SBS pulse compression, not only the pulse width but also the delay is compressed down. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study of the spatio-temporal profile of the SBS compressed pulse. To compare with the experiments, two numerical models are developed to simulate the evolution of spatio-temporal profiles within the Nd:YAG laser system and during the SBS pulse compression, respectively. The first model is demonstrated to reproduce the experimental results very well, while the second model predicts part of the features of the SBS compressed pulse. The limitation on the latter is discussed. PMID:26974618

  16. Optimized Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field Therapy Can Cause Murine Malignant Melanomas to Self-Destruct with a Single Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Sheikh, Saleh; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    We have identified a new, nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) therapy capable of eliminating murine melanomas located in the skin with a single treatment. When these optimized parameters are used, nsPEFs initiate apoptosis without hyperthermia. We have developed new suction electrodes that are compatible with human skin and have applied them to a xenograft nude mouse melanoma model system to identify the optimal field strength, pulse frequency and pulse number for the treatment of murine melanomas. A single treatment using the optimal pulse parameters (2000 pulses, 100 ns in duration, 30 kV/cm in amplitude at a pulse frequency of 5–7 pulses/s) eliminated all 17 melanomas treated with those parameters in 4 mice. This was the highest pulse frequency that we could use without raising the treated skin tumor temperature above 40 °C. We also demonstrate that the effects of nsPEF therapy are highly localized to only cells located between electrodes and results in very little scarring of the nsPEF-treated skin. PMID:20473857

  17. EUV Emission of a Pulsed Capillary Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, L. S.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    An argon-filled capillary discharge system with an inner diameter of 1 mm and a length of 10 mm is investigated as potential Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light source. The working pressure is maintained in the range of 10-4 mbar and the discharge voltage is varied in order to obtain the maximum emission of the EUV energy. The current that flows through the capillary plasma is measured by a magnetic probe while EUV radiation from the capillary discharge is detected by two sets of EUV detector, D1 and D2. Total EUV energy of the order of milli joules is obtained in the wavelength range of 11 to 18 nm from measurement using D1. However, the total energy of the 13.5 nm radiation, as deduced from the signal of D2 is only of the order of micro joules. It is also found that the total EUV energy in the wavelength of 11 to 18 nm increases with the discharge voltage, while the total energy of the EUV radiation at 13.5 nm decreases with the discharge voltage for the current setup.

  18. High energy green nanosecond and picosecond pulse delivery through a negative curvature fiber for precision micro-machining.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Piotr; Yu, Fei; Carter, Richard M; Knight, Jonathan C; Shephard, Jonathan D; Hand, Duncan P

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present an anti-resonant guiding, low-loss Negative Curvature Fiber (NCF) for the efficient delivery of high energy short (ns) and ultrashort (ps) pulsed laser light in the green spectral region. The fabricated NCF has an attenuation of 0.15 dB/m and 0.18 dB/m at 532 nm and 515 nm respectively, and provided robust transmission of nanosecond and picosecond pulses with energies of 0.57 mJ (10.4 kW peak power) and 30 µJ (5 MW peak power) respectively. It provides single-mode, stable (low bend-sensitivity) output and maintains spectral and temporal properties of the source laser beam. The practical application of fiber-delivered pulses has been demonstrated in precision micro-machining and marking of metals and glass.

  19. Feedback-free single-beam pattern formation by nanosecond pulses in dye-doped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepeshkin, Nick N.; Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Boyd, Robert W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.

    2006-08-01

    Generally, optical feedback and/or two counter-propagating beams are necessary to form high-definition patterns in the cross section of a laser beam after passing through a nonlinear medium. In this paper we present an observation of pattern formation in liquid crystal media in a single laser beam without any external feedback. We found that after irradiation of a dye-doped liquid crystal cell with repetitive nanosecond pulses, the beam coming out of the liquid crystal cell exhibits a spectacular kaleidoscopic change of beam patterns in the far field. The patterns vary from pulse to pulse in an ordered manner cycling through a variety of complicated forms. We speculate that localized phase separation of the dye from the liquid crystal host occurs in the focal region of the beam in our experiments, and that the observed far-field patterns result from the laser-beam diffraction on these absorptive and refractive inhomogeneities.

  20. White-light emission from solid carbon in aqueous solution during hydrogen generation induced by nanosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Shota; Maeda, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    We previously discovered a novel method of hydrogen generation from high-grade charcoal in an aqueous solution using nanosecond laser pulse irradiation. In this paper, white-light emission during this reaction is reported: A broad spectrum over the visible range is observed above a threshold excitation energy density. The white-light emission is a simultaneous product of the hydrogen generation reaction and is attributed to blackbody radiation in accordance with Planck's Law at a temperature above 3800 K. Consequently, we propose that hydrogen generation induced by laser irradiation proceeds similarly to classical coal gasification, which features reactions at high pressure and high temperature.

  1. Gene transfer of human hepatocyte growth factor by the use of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Hasegawa, Makoto; Ashida, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Obara, Minoru

    2006-05-01

    We successfully delivered a therapeutic vector construct, which carries hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene, to rat skin in vivo. After HGF expression vector had been intradermally injected to rat skin, LISWs were generated by irradiating the laser target put on the rat skin with nanosecond pulses from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Concentration of HGF protein increased by a factor of four by the application of LISWs when compared with that of control samples without LISW application. We also investigated the effects of LISWs on the integrity of plasmid DNA.

  2. Through nanohole formation in thin metallic film by single nanosecond laser pulses using optical dielectric apertureless probe.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Y N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Nepomnyashchii, A V; Savchuk, A G; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2013-05-01

    Separate nanoholes with the minimum size down to 35 nm (~λ/15) and nanohole arrays with the hole size about 100 nm (~λ/5) were fabricated in a 50 nm optically "thick" Au/Pd film, using single 532 nm pump nanosecond laser pulses focused to diffraction-limited spots by a specially designed apertureless dielectric fiber probe. Nanohole fabrication in the metallic film was found to result from lateral heat diffusion and center-symmetrical lateral expulsion of the melt by its vapor recoil pressure. The optimized apertureless dielectric microprobe was demonstrated to enable laser fabrication of deep through nanoholes.

  3. Sub-ten nanosecond laser pulse shaping using lithium niobate modulators and a double-passed tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. E., III; Gould, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    We present progress on developing a laser pulse shaping system capable of generating pulses shorter than ten nanoseconds and frequency chirps of up to about 5 GHz in 2.5 ns. Shaped control of phase and amplitude on this timescale may prove useful for producing ultracold molecules and controlling atomic hyperfine state populations. The pulses are generated by passing 780 nm light from an external cavity diode laser through a fiber-coupled lithium niobate (LN) phase modulator (PM) in series with an LN intensity modulator (IM). The modulators are driven with a single-channel 8 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator configured with an RF delay line for quasi-two channel pulsed operation. The optical pulses are then amplified in a double-pass tapered amplifier (TA). The TA's intrinsic mode structure leads to an etalon effect that modulates the pulse amplitude during a frequency chirp. To reduce this unwanted effect, a compensating intensity modulation can be programmed onto the seed pulse. This work is supported by DOE.

  4. Electron Heating in Pulsed Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Robert H.; Leipold, Frank; Jiang, Chunqi; Merhi, Hisham; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2000-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges in air and noble gases have been operated by using microhollow cathode discharges as plasma cathodes [1]. In these discharges the electron energy distribution is determined by the value of the reduced electric field (E/N). Pulsing the discharges causes the electron energy distribution to shift into an energy range where the ionization rate increases strongly. In order to study this effect, a 10 ns high voltage pulse was applied to a dc glow discharge in atmospheric air. Electrical measurements of the temporal development of current and voltage and optical measurements of the integral emission intensity during the pulse and in the afterglow of the discharge have shown an increase in electron life time from 200 ns at 10 kV/cm to approximately 1.6 μ at 30 kV/cm. The measured effect can be used to reduce the power consumption of glow discharges and to induce and enhance certain plasma processes. [1] Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett., 74, 3770 (1999) This work was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  5. Partial discharge pulse shape recognition using an inductive loop sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Tarifa, J. M.; Robles, G.; Rojas-Moreno, M. V.; Sanz-Feito, J.

    2010-10-01

    Partial discharges (PD) are a clear ageing agent on insulating materials used in high-voltage electrical machines and cables. For this reason, there is increasing interest in measuring this phenomenon in an effort to forecast unexpected failures in electrical equipment. In order to focus on harmful discharges, PD pulse shape analysis is being used as an insulation defect identification technique. In this paper, a simple, inexpensive and high-frequency inductive loop sensor will be used to detect and acquire PD pulses. Several measurements will be made on some controlled test cell geometries in order to characterize PD pulse shapes for different discharge sources. The sensor identification capability has been checked in an insulation system where two simultaneous PD sources were active.

  6. Long-pulse plasma discharge on the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ohkubo, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Ogawa, H.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Watari, T.; Watanabe, T.; Sakamoto, M.; Ichimura, M.; Takase, Y.; Notake, T.; Takeuchi, N.; Torii, Y.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Yoon, J. S.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD experiment Group

    2006-03-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge of more than 30 min duration was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8 × 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. The total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by sweeping the magnetic axis inward and outward. Causes limiting the long pulse plasma discharge are discussed. An ion impurity penetration limited further long-pulse discharge in the 8th experimental campaign (2004).

  7. Selective removal of cholesterol ester in atherosclerotic plaque using nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.75 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, K.; Tsukimoto, H.; Hazama, H.; Awazu, K.

    2008-02-01

    Laser angioplasty, for example XeCl excimer laser angioplasty, has gained more attention in addition to conventional methods of surgical and interventional treatment of atherosclerotic diseases such as bypass operation and balloon dilatation. Low degrees of thermal damage after ablation of atherosclerotic lesions have been achieved by XeCl excimer laser at 308 nm. However, in most cases, laser ablation is not selective and normal arterial wall is also damaged. To avoid complications such as severe dissections or perforation of the arterial wall in an angioplasty, a laser light source with high ablation efficiency but low arterial wall injury is desirable. At atherosclerotic lesions, cholesterol accumulates on the tunica intima by establishing an ester bond with fatty acids such as oleic acid, and thus cholesterol ester is the main component of atherosclerotic plaques. Mid-infrared pulsed laser at 5.75 μm is selectively well absorbed in C=O stretching vibration mode of ester bonds. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.75 μm irradiation of cholesterol ester in atherosclerotic plaques. In this study, we used a mid-infrared tunable solid-state laser which is operated by difference frequency generation method, with a wavelength of 5.75 μm, a pulse width of 5 nsec and a pulse duration of 10 Hz. It was confirmed that non-invasive interaction to normal thoracic aortas could be induce by the parameters, the wavelength of 5.75 μm, the average power densities of 35 W/cm2 and the irradiation time under 10 sec. This study shows that nanosecond pulsed laser irradiations at 5.75 μm provide an alternative laser light source as an effectively cutting, less traumatic tool for removal of atherosclerotic plaque.

  8. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia

    A phenomenological picture of pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water is produced by combining electrical, spectroscopic, and imaging methods. The discharge is generated by applying one microsecond long 5 to 20 kilovolt pulses between the needle and disk electrodes submerged in water. A gas bubble is generated at the tip of the needle electrode. The study includes detailed experimental investigation of the discharge in argon bubbles and a brief look at the discharge in oxygen bubbles. Imaging, electrical characteristics, and time-resolved optical emission data point to a fast streamer propagation mechanism and formation of a plasma channel in the bubble. Spectroscopic methods based on line intensity ratios and Boltzmann plots of line intensities of argon, atomic hydrogen, and argon ions and the examination of molecular emission bands from molecular nitrogen and hydroxyl radicals provide evidence of both fast beam-like electrons and slow thermalized ones with temperatures of 0.6 -- 0.8 electron-volts. The collisional nature of plasma at atmospheric pressure affects the decay rates of optical emission. Spectroscopic study of rotational-vibrational bands of hydroxyl radical and molecular nitrogen gives vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures of the discharge of about 0.9 and 0.1 electron-volt, respectively. Imaging and electrical evidence show that discharge charge is deposited on the bubble wall and water serves as a dielectric barrier for the field strength and time scales of this experiment. Comparing the electrical and imaging information for consecutive pulses applied at a frequency of 1 Hz indicates that each discharge proceeds as an entirely new process with no memory of the previous discharge aside from long-lived chemical species, such as ozone and oxygen. Intermediate values for the discharge gap and pulse duration, low repetition rate, and unidirectional character of the applied voltage pulses make the discharge process here unique

  9. Evaluating the generation efficiency of hydrogen peroxide in water by pulsed discharge over water surface and underwater bubbling pulsed discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiaojing; Yao, Dan; Lu, Na; Jiang, Nan; Wu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed electric discharge over water surface/in water has been used to generate reactive species for decomposing the organic compounds in water, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the strong reactive species which can be decomposed into another stronger oxidative species, hydroxyl radical. The production efficacy of H2O2 by a gas phase pulsed discharge over water surface and an underwater bubbling pulsed discharge was evaluated through diagnosis of H2O2 by a chemical probe method. The experimental results show that the yield and the production rate of H2O2 increased with the input energy regardless of the electric discharge patterns, and the underwater bubbling pulsed discharge was more advantageous for H2O2 production considering both the yield and the production rate of H2O2. Results also indicate that the electric discharge patterns also influenced the water solution properties including the conductivity, the pH value and the water temperature.

  10. Simulating the inception of pulsed discharges near positive electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2013-09-01

    With 3D particle simulations we study the inception of pulsed discharges near positive electrodes. In different geometries, we first determine the breakdown voltage. Then we study the probability of inception for a fast voltage pulse. This probability mostly depends on the availability of seed electrons to generate the initial electron avalanches. These results are compared with experimental observations. Then we investigate how the shape of a starting discharge affects its further development. In particular, we discuss the formation of so-called ``inception clouds.'' JT was supported by STW-project 10755.

  11. Microsecond-scale electric field pulses in cloud lightning discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villanueva, Y.; Rakov, V. A.; Uman, M. A.; Brook, M.

    1994-01-01

    From wideband electric field records acquired using a 12-bit digitizing system with a 500-ns sampling interval, microsecond-scale pulses in different stages of cloud flashes in Florida and New Mexico are analyzed. Pulse occurrence statistics and waveshape characteristics are presented. The larger pulses tend to occur early in the flash, confirming the results of Bils et al. (1988) and in contrast with the three-stage representation of cloud-discharge electric fields suggested by Kitagawa and Brook (1960). Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed. The tendency for the larger pulses to occur early in the cloud flash suggests that they are related to the initial in-cloud channel formation processes and contradicts the common view found in the atmospheric radio-noise literature that the main sources of VLF/LF electromagnetic radiation in cloud flashes are the K processes which occur in the final, or J type, part of the cloud discharge.

  12. Few-nanosecond pulse switching with low write error for in-plane nanomagnets using the spin-Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha; Rowlands, Graham; Shi, Shengjie; Oh, Junseok; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, Robert

    Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) using spin transfer torques (STT) holds great promise for replacing existing best-in-class memory technologies in several application domains. Research on conventional two-terminal STT-MRAM thus far has revealed the existence of limitations that constrain switching reliability and speed for both in-plane and perpendicularly magnetized devices. Recently, spin torque arising from the giant spin-Hall effect in Ta, W and Pt has been shown to be an efficient mechanism to switch magnetic bits in a three-terminal geometry. Here we report highly reliable, nanosecond timescale pulse switching of three-terminal devices with in-plane magnetized magnetic tunnel junctions. We obtain write error rates (WER) down to ~10-5 using pulses as short as 2 ns, in contrast to conventional in-plane STT-MRAM devices where write speeds were limited to a few tens of nanoseconds for comparable WER. Utilizing micro-magnetic simulations, we discuss the differences from conventional MRAM that allow for this unanticipated and significant performance improvement. Finally, we highlight the path towards practical application enabled by the ability to separately optimize the read and write pathways in three-terminal devices.

  13. Electron beam-switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, L.D.; Murray, J.R.; Goldhar, J.; Bradley, L.P.

    1979-12-11

    A method and apparatus are designed for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  14. Solving the speckle decorrelation challenge in acousto-optic sensing using tandem nanosecond pulses within the ultrasound period.

    PubMed

    Resink, Steffen; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2014-11-15

    We present a novel acousto-optic (AO) method, based on a nanosecond laser system, which will enable us to obtain AO signals in liquid turbid media. By diverting part of the light in a delay line, we inject tandem pulses with 27 ns separation. The change of the speckle pattern, caused by the ultrasound phase shift, reduces the speckle contrast of the integrated speckle pattern captured in a single camera frame. With these tandem pulses, we were able to perform AO on a 2 cm liquid turbid medium in transmission mode. We show the raw signal and a spatial AO scan of a homogenous water-intralipid sample. This approach is potentially capable of AO probing in vivo, since the acquisition time (of approximately 40 ns) is four orders of magnitude less than the typical time scales of speckle decorrelation found in vivo. The method may eventually enable us to obtain fluence compensated photoacoustic signals generated by the same laser. PMID:25490500

  15. Multiphoton imaging reveals that nanosecond pulsed electric fields collapse tumor and normal vascular perfusion in human glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Sylvia M.; Carr, Lynn; Soueid, Malak; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the biomedical advances of the last century, many cancers including glioblastoma are still resistant to existing therapies leaving patients with poor prognoses. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) are a promising technology for the treatment of cancer that have thus far been evaluated in vitro and in superficial malignancies. In this paper, we develop a tumor organoid model of glioblastoma and apply intravital multiphoton microscopy to assess their response to nsPEFs. We demonstrate for the first time that a single 10 ns, high voltage electric pulse (35–45 kV/cm), collapses the perfusion of neovasculature, and also alters the diameter of capillaries and larger vessels in normal tissue. These results contribute to the fundamental understanding of nsPEF effects in complex tissue environments, and confirm the potential of nsPEFs to disrupt the microenvironment of solid tumors such as glioblastoma. PMID:27698479

  16. Time domain dielectric spectroscopy of nanosecond pulsed electric field induced changes in dielectric properties of pig whole blood.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jie; Kolb, Juergen F

    2015-06-01

    The dielectric spectra of fresh pig whole blood in the β-dispersion range after exposure to 300-nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) with amplitude higher than the supra-electroporation threshold for erythrocytes were recorded by time domain reflectometry dielectric spectroscopy. The implications of the dielectric parameters on the dynamics of post-pulse pore development were discussed in light of the Cole-Cole relaxation model. The temporal development of the Cole-Cole parameters indicates that nsPEFs induced significant poration and swelling of erythrocytes within the first 5 min. The results also show that the majority of erythrocytes could not fully recover from supra-electroporation up to 30 min. The findings of this study suggest that time domain dielectric spectroscopy is a promising label-free and real-time physiological measuring technique for nsPEF-blood related biomedical applications, capable of following the conformational and morphological changes of cells.

  17. Excimer Emission from Pulsed Tandem Microhollow Cathode Discharges in Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Rahaman, Hasibur; Nam, Sang Hoon; Iberler, Marcus; Teske, Christian; Jacoby, Joachim; Frank, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes an extension of a basic single microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) to a tandem MHCD, i.e., two discharges in series from an anode-cathode-anode configuration. When a high-voltage pulse is superimposed with a direct current (DC) tandem MHCD, an intense excimer emission along the discharge axis in a high pressure xenon gas is generated which is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the DC tandem MHCD. In addition, the emission intensity increases to almost twice by increasing cathode thickness from 250 to 1000 µm. The emission is further enhanced by increasing the gas pressure from 400 to 800 mbar.

  18. Efficient intracellular delivery of molecules with high cell viability using nanosecond-pulsed laser-activated carbon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Aritra; Kelly, Sean C; Dwivedi, Nishant; Thadhani, Naresh; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2014-03-25

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5-9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability.

  19. Efficient Intracellular Delivery of Molecules with High Cell Viability Using Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser-Activated Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5–9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:24547946

  20. Probing with randomly interleaved pulse train bridges the gap between ultrafast pump-probe and nanosecond flash photolysis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tatsuo; Okamoto, Kido; Hanada, Hiroaki; Katoh, Ryuzi

    2016-04-01

    Despite the long-standing importance of transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy, many researchers remain frustrated by the difficulty of measuring the nanosecond range in a wide spectral range. To address this shortcoming, we propose a TA spectrophotometer in which there is no synchronization between a pump pulse and a train of multiple probe pulses from a picosecond supercontinuum light source, termed the randomly-interleaved-pulse-train (RIPT) method. For each pump pulse, many monochromatized probe pulses impinge upon the sample, and the associated pump-probe time delays are determined passively shot by shot with subnanosecond accuracy. By repeatedly pumping with automatically varying time delays, a TA temporal profile that covers a wide dynamic range from subnanosecond to milliseconds is simultaneously obtained. By scanning wavelength, this single, simple apparatus acquires not only wide time range TA profiles, but also broadband TA spectra from the visible through the near-infrared regions. Furthermore, we present a typical result to demonstrate how the RIPT method may be used to correct for fluorescence, which often pollutes TA curves. PMID:27192271

  1. Identification of the formation phases of filamentary damage induced by nanosecond laser pulses in bulk fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Zhongjie; Chambonneau, Maxime E-mail: jiangtian198611@163.com; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian E-mail: jiangtian198611@163.com

    2015-09-14

    Employing a pump-probe polarization-based two-frame shadowgraphy setup, the formation of filamentary damage induced in bulk fused silica by a nanosecond pulse at 1064 nm is investigated with a picosecond probe. Three different phases are exhibited in the damage experiments. The first phase is the formation of a micrometric plasma channel along the laser direction during the beginning of the pulse likely caused by multi-photon ionization. This channel exhibits growth during ∼400 ps, and the newly grown plasma is discrete. Then, during the end of the pulse, this channel evolves into a tadpole-like morphology showing an elliptical head upstream the laser flux followed by a thin tail. This observed asymmetry is attributed to shielding effects caused by both the plasma and hot modified silica. Once the damage shows its almost final morphology, a last phase consists in the launch of a pressure wave enlarging it after the laser pulse. The physical mechanisms that might be involved in the formation of plasma channels are discussed. The experimental data are first confronted to the moving breakdown model which overestimates the filamentary damage length. Finally, taking into account the temporal shape of the laser pulses, the coupling between Kerr-induced self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin scattering is discussed to interpret the observations.

  2. Radiation-induced insulator discharge pulses in the CRRES internal discharge monitor satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Mullen, E. G.; Brautigam, D. H.; Kerns, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Internal Discharge Monitor (IDM) was designed to observe electrical pulses from common electrical insulators in space service. The sixteen insulator samples included twelve planar printed circuit boards and four cables. The samples were fully enclosed, mutually isolated, and space radiation penetrated 0.02 cm of aluminum before striking the samples. Pulsing began on the seventh orbit, the maximum pulse rate occurred on the seventeenth orbit when 13 pulses occurred, and the pulses slowly diminished to about one per 3 orbits six months later. After 8 months, the radiation belts abruptly increased and the pulse rates attained a new high. These pulse rates were in agreement with laboratory experience on shorter time scales. Several of the samples never pulsed. If the pulses were not confined within IDM, the physical processes could spread to become a full spacecraft anomaly. The IDM results indicate the rate at which small insulator pulses occur. Small pulses are the seeds of larger satellite electrical anomalies. The pulse rates are compared with space radiation intensities, L shell location, and spectral distributions from the radiation spectrometers on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite.

  3. Laser Thomson scattering in a pulsed atmospheric arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, Bradley; Adams, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Laser scattering measurements, including Rayleigh, Raman, and Thomson scattering have been performed on an atmospheric pulsed arc discharge. Such laser scattering techniques offer a non-invasive diagnostic to measure gas temperature, electron temperature, and electron density in atmospheric plasma sources, particularly those with feature sizes approaching 1 mm. The pulsed discharge is ignited in a pin to pin electrode geometry using a 6 kV pulse with 10 ns duration. The electrodes are housed in a glass vacuum chamber filled with argon gas. The laser signal is produced by a Nd:Yag laser supply, repetitively pulsed at 10 Hz and frequency quadrupled to operate at 266 nm. The scattered laser signal is imaged onto a triple grating spectrometer, which is used to suppress the Rayleigh scatter signal in order to measure the low amplitude Thomson and Raman signals. Preliminary results include measurements of electron temperature and electron density in the plasma column taken during the evolution of the discharge. The laser system is also used to measure the Rayleigh scattering signal, which provides space and time resolved measurements of gas temperature in the arc discharge.

  4. Accumulated destructive effect of nanosecond repetitive voltage pulses on the insulated coatings of Fe-based nanocrystalline ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Jinliang

    2013-03-11

    Fe-based nanocrystalline ribbon is widely employed in pulsed power devices and accelerators. A temperature accumulation model is put forward to explain the accumulated destructive effect of discharge plasma bombardment on the TiO{sub 2} coatings of nanocrystalline ribbon under 50 Hz/100 ns voltage pulses. Experimental results revealed that the plasma channel expansion caused by air breakdown in the coating crack heated the coating repetitively, and the coating temperature was increased and accumulated around the crack. The fact that repetitive voltage pulses were more destructive than a single pulse with the same amplitude was caused by the intensified coating ablation under the temperature accumulation effect.

  5. Influence of pulse duration on the plasma characteristics in high-power pulsed magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, S.; Dauchot, J.P.; Ganciu, M.; Ricard, A.; Hecq, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-power pulsed magnetron discharges have drawn an increasing interest as an approach to produce highly ionized metallic vapor. In this paper we propose to study how the plasma composition and the deposition rate are influenced by the pulse duration. The plasma is studied by time-resolved optical emission and absorption spectroscopies and the deposition rate is controlled thanks to a quartz microbalance. The pulse length is varied between 2.5 and 20 {mu}s at 2 and 10 mTorr in pure argon. The sputtered material is titanium. For a constant discharge power, the deposition rate increases as the pulse length decreases. With 5 {mu}s pulse, for an average power of 300 W, the deposition rate is {approx}70% of the deposition rate obtained in direct current magnetron sputtering at the same power. The increase of deposition rate can be related to the sputtering regime. For long pulses, self-sputtering seems to occur as demonstrated by time-resolved optical emission diagnostic of the discharge. In contrary, the metallic vapor ionization rate, as determined by absorption measurements, diminishes as the pulses are shortened. Nevertheless, the ionization rate is in the range of 50% for 5 {mu}s pulses while it lies below 10% in the case of a classical continuous magnetron discharge.

  6. Pulsed discharge ionization source for miniature ion mobility spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Ramsey, J. Michael; Whitten, William B.

    2004-11-23

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for flowing a sample gas and a reactant gas (38, 43) past a corona discharge electrode (26) situated at a first location in an ion drift chamber (24), applying a pulsed voltage waveform comprising a varying pulse component and a dc bias component to the corona discharge electrode (26) to cause a corona which in turn produces ions from the sample gas and the reactant gas, applying a dc bias to the ion drift chamber (24) to cause the ions to drift to a second location (25) in the ion drift chamber (24), detecting the ions at the second location (25) in the drift chamber (24), and timing the period for the ions to drift from the corona discharge electrode to the selected location in the drift chamber.

  7. Plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Yang, Yong

    2014-07-22

    The present invention is directed to a novel method for cleaning a filter surface using a plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system. The method involves utilizing plasma discharges to induce short electric pulses of nanoseconds duration at high voltages. These electrical pulses generate strong Shockwaves that disintegrate and dislodge particulate matter located on the surface of the filter.

  8. Generation of pulsed discharge plasma in water with fine bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yui; Takada, Noriharu; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu; Goto laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    Recently, some researchers have proposed electric discharge methods with bubbles in water because the discharge plasma inside bubble was easy to be generated compared to that in water. Almost all of these methods introduced bubbles in the order of millimeter size from a nozzle placed in water. In these methods, bubbles rose one after another owing to high rising speed of millibubble, leading to inefficient gas consumption. We proposed fine bubbles introduction at the discharge area in water. A fine bubble is determined a bubble with less than 100 μm in a diameter. Fine bubbles exhibit extremely slow rising speed. Fine bubbles decrease in size during bubble rising and subsequently collapse in water with OH radical generation. Therefore, combining the discharge plasma with fine bubbles is expected to generate more active species with small amount of gas consumption. In this work, fine bubbles were introduced in water and pulsed discharge plasma was generated between two cylindrical electrodes which placed in water. We examined effects of fine bubbles on electric discharge in water when argon or oxygen gas was utilized as feed gas. Fine bubbles enhanced optical emission of hydrogen and oxygen atoms from H2O molecules, but that of feed gas was not observed. The formation mechanism of H2O2 by electric discharge was supposed to be different from that with no bubbling. Dissolved oxygen in water played a role in H2O2 formation by the discharge with fine bubbles.

  9. Generation of high-power nanosecond pulses from laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kinpui

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results are used to compare the pulse energy levels and pulse energy widths that can be achieved with LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers for both the pulse-transmission mode (PTM) and pulse-reflection mode (PRM) Q-switching methods for pulse energy levels up to hundreds of microjoules and pulse widths as short as 1 ns. It is shown that high-power pulses with pulse widths as short as 1 ns can be generated with PTM Q-switched in LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers. With the PRM Q-switching method, pulse widths as short as 2 ns and pulse energy at the level of a few hundred microjoules can also be achieved but require pumping with 8-10-mJ AlGaAs laser diode arrays.

  10. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) induce direct electric field effects and biological effects on human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily H; Schoenbach, Karl H; Beebe, Stephen J

    2005-05-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are ultrashort pulses with high electric field intensity (kV/cm) and high power (megawatts), but low energy density (mJ/cc). To determine roles for p53 in response to nsPEFs, HCT116 cells (p53+/+ and p53-/-) were exposed to nsPEF and analyzed for membrane integrity, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase activation, and cell survival. Decreasing plasma membrane effects were observed in both HCT116p53+/+ and p53-/- cells with decreasing pulse durations and/or decreasing electric fields. However, addition of ethidium homodimer-1 and Annexin-V-FITC post-pulse demonstrated greater fluorescence in p53-/- versus p53+/+ cells, suggesting a postpulse p53-dependent biological effect at the plasma membrane. Caspase activity was significantly higher than nonpulsed cells only in the p53-/- cells. HCT116 cells exhibited greater survival in response to nsPEFs than HL-60 and Jurkat cells, but survival was more evident for HCT116p53+/+ cells than for HCT116p53-/- cells. These results indicate that nsPEF effects on HCT116 cells include (1) apparent direct electric field effects, (2) biological effects that are p53-dependent and p53-independent, (3) actions on mechanisms that originate at the plasma membranes and at intracellular structures, and (4) an apparent p53 protective effect. NsPEF applications provide a means to explore intracellular structures and functions that can reveal mechanisms in health and disease.

  11. Optical diagnostics for high power pulsed underwater electrical discharge characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroy, J.; Claverie, A.; Avrillaud, G.; Boustie, M.; Mazanchenko, E.; Assous, D.; Chuvatin, A.

    2014-05-01

    In order to evaluate the behavior of a high power pulsed underwater electrical discharge, and especially characterize the pressure generated by such a discharge, we implemented several optical diagnostics. We first observed directly the expansion of the plasma produced by the dielectric breakdown of the water between the electrodes and the resulting gaseous pulsating bubble. This observation led to an estimate of the pressure inside the bubble with respect to time. We then visualized the propagation of the pressure wave generated by the discharge with shadowgraph and Schlieren setup. The obtained velocity was then used to evaluate the theoretical maximum pressure at the pressure front. Finally, we measured the velocity induced by the pressure wave on a thin aluminum disk with a heterodyne velocimeter and used numerical simulation to obtain a temporal form of pressure. These methods and results can be used to develop and assess performances of processes using underwater electrical discharges to generate pressure waves such as electrohydraulic forming.

  12. Optical Diagnostics For High Power Pulsed Underwater Electrical Discharge Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroy, Julien; Avrillaud, Gilles; Boustie, Michel; Claverie, Alain; Mazanchenko, Ekaterina; Assous, David; Chuvatin, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    In order to evaluate the behavior of a high power pulsed underwater electrical discharge, and especially characterize the pressure generated by such a discharge, we implemented several optical diagnostics. We first observed directly the expansion of the plasma produced by the dielectric breakdown of the water between the electrodes and the resulting gaseous pulsating bubble. This observation led to an estimate of the pressure inside the bubble with respect to time. We then visualized the propagation of the pressure wave generated by the discharge with shadowgraphy and Schlieren set-up. The obtained velocity was then used to evaluate the theoretical maximum pressure at the pressure front. Finally, we measured the velocity induced by the pressure wave on a thin aluminum disk with a heterodyne velocimeter and used numerical simulation to obtain a temporal form of pressure. These methods and results can be used to develop and assess performances of processes using underwater electrical discharges to generate pressure waves such as electrohydraulic forming.

  13. Experimental observation of the luminescence flash at the collapse phase of a bubble produced by pulsed discharge in water

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yifan; Zhang, Liancheng; Zhu, Xinlei; Liu, Zhen Yan, Keping; Chen, Jim

    2015-11-02

    This letter presents an experimental observation of luminescence flash at the collapse phase of an oscillating bubble produced by a pulsed discharge in water. According to the high speed records, the flash lasts around tens of microseconds, which is much longer than the lifetime of laser and ultrasound induced luminescence flashes in nanoseconds and picoseconds, respectively. The pulse width of temperature waveform and minimum radius calculated at the collapse phase also show that the thermodynamic and dynamic signatures of the bubbles in this work are much larger than those of ultrasound and laser induced bubbles both in time and space scales. However, the peak temperature at the point of collapse is close to the results of ultrasound and laser induced bubbles. This result provides another possibility for accurate emission spectrum measurement other than amplification of the emitted light, such as increasing laser energy or sound energy or substituting water with sulphuric acid.

  14. Experimental observation of the luminescence flash at the collapse phase of a bubble produced by pulsed discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yifan; Zhang, Liancheng; Chen, Jim; Zhu, Xinlei; Liu, Zhen; Yan, Keping

    2015-11-01

    This letter presents an experimental observation of luminescence flash at the collapse phase of an oscillating bubble produced by a pulsed discharge in water. According to the high speed records, the flash lasts around tens of microseconds, which is much longer than the lifetime of laser and ultrasound induced luminescence flashes in nanoseconds and picoseconds, respectively. The pulse width of temperature waveform and minimum radius calculated at the collapse phase also show that the thermodynamic and dynamic signatures of the bubbles in this work are much larger than those of ultrasound and laser induced bubbles both in time and space scales. However, the peak temperature at the point of collapse is close to the results of ultrasound and laser induced bubbles. This result provides another possibility for accurate emission spectrum measurement other than amplification of the emitted light, such as increasing laser energy or sound energy or substituting water with sulphuric acid.

  15. Discharge Characteristics of Series Surface/Packed-Bed Discharge Reactor Diven by Bipolar Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian; Jiang, Nan; Li, Jie; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Wu, Yan; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-03-01

    The discharge characteristics of the series surface/packed-bed discharge (SSPBD) reactor driven by bipolar pulse power were systemically investigated in this study. In order to evaluate the advantages of the SSPBD reactor, it was compared with traditional surface discharge (SD) reactor and packed-bed discharge (PBD) reactor in terms of the discharge voltage, discharge current, and ozone formation. The SSPBD reactor exhibited a faster rising time and lower tail voltage than the SD and PBD reactors. The distribution of the active species generated in different discharge regions of the SSPBD reactor was analyzed by optical emission spectra and ozone analysis. It was found that the packed-bed discharge region (3.5 mg/L), rather than the surface discharge region (1.3 mg/L) in the SSPBD reactor played a more important role in ozone generation. The optical emission spectroscopy analysis indicated that more intense peaks of the active species (e.g. N2 and OI) in the optical emission spectra were observed in the packed-bed region. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51177007), the Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. U1462105), and Dalian University of Technology Fundamental Research Fund of China (No. DUT15RC(3)030)

  16. Time-domain calculation of sub-nanosecond pulse launched by a proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic; Cooper, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Using the finite-difference time-domain code TBCI, we have numerically calculated the radiation from a sub-nanosecond 800-MeV proton bunch as it is launched into space. The calculation is compared to measurements of the time history of the radiated fields and good agreement is found. A movie showing the development of the radiation pattern will be shown during the presentation at this conference, namely, the First Los Alamos Symposium on Ultra-Wideband Radar. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Formation of crownlike and related nanostructures on thin supported gold films irradiated by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Yu N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Emel'yanov, V I; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2014-08-01

    A type of laser-induced surface relief nanostructure-the nanocrown-on thin metallic films was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The nanocrowns, representing a thin corrugated rim of resolidified melt and resembling well-known impact-induced water-crown splashes, were produced by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses on thin gold films of variable thickness on low-melting copper and high-melting tungsten substrates, providing different transient melting and adhesion conditions for these films. The proposed model of the nanocrown formation, based on a hydrodynamical (thermocapillary Marangoni) surface instability and described by a Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, envisions key steps of the nanocrown appearance and gives qualitative predictions of the acquired nanocrown parameters. PMID:25215830

  18. Off-axis quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy using a pulsed nanosecond mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Mikael; Lamard, Laurent; Feng, Yuyang; Peremans, Andre; Petersen, Jan C

    2016-09-01

    A trace-gas sensor, based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), consisting of two acoustically coupled micro-resonators (mR) with an off-axis 20 kHz quartz tuning fork (QTF) is demonstrated. The complete acoustically coupled mR system is optimized based on finite-element simulations and is experimentally verified. The QEPAS sensor is pumped resonantly by a nanosecond pulsed single-mode mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator. The sensor is used for spectroscopic measurements on methane in the 3.1-3.5 μm wavelength region with a resolution bandwidth of 1  cm-1 and a detection limit of 0.8 ppm. An Allan deviation analysis shows that the detection limit at the optimum integration time for the QEPAS sensor is 32 ppbv at 190 s, and that the background noise is due solely to the thermal noise of the QTF.

  19. Formation of crownlike and related nanostructures on thin supported gold films irradiated by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Yu N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Emel'yanov, V I; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2014-08-01

    A type of laser-induced surface relief nanostructure-the nanocrown-on thin metallic films was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The nanocrowns, representing a thin corrugated rim of resolidified melt and resembling well-known impact-induced water-crown splashes, were produced by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses on thin gold films of variable thickness on low-melting copper and high-melting tungsten substrates, providing different transient melting and adhesion conditions for these films. The proposed model of the nanocrown formation, based on a hydrodynamical (thermocapillary Marangoni) surface instability and described by a Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, envisions key steps of the nanocrown appearance and gives qualitative predictions of the acquired nanocrown parameters.

  20. Possibility of applying a hydrodynamic model to describe the laser erosion of metals irradiated by high-intensity nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kozadaev, K V

    2014-04-28

    We report the results of experimental investigations of the production and development of plasma-vapour plumes upon irradiation of metal targets by nanosecond (10–100 ns) pulses with a high (10{sup 8}–10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) power density under atmospheric conditions. The transition from a quasi-stationary thermal mechanism of metal erosion to an explosion hydrodynamic one takes place when the radiation power density increases from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. The resultant experimental information is extremely important for the laser deposition of metal nanostructures under atmospheric conditions, which is possible only for power densities of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  1. Off-axis quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy using a pulsed nanosecond mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, Mikael; Lamard, Laurent; Feng, Yuyang; Peremans, Andre; Petersen, Jan C.

    2016-09-01

    A trace gas sensor, based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), consisting of two acoustically coupled micro-resonators (mR) with an off-axis 20 kHz quartz tuning fork (QTF) is demonstrated. The complete acoustically coupled mR system is optimized based on finite element simulations and experimentally verified. The QEPAS sensor is pumped resonantly by a nanosecond pulsed single-mode mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (MIR OPO). The sensor is used for spectroscopic measurements on methane in the 3.1 um to 3.5 um wavelength region with a resolution bandwidth of 1 cm^-1 and a detection limit of 0.8 ppm. An Allan deviation analysis shows that the detection limit at optimum integration time for the QEPAS sensor is 32 ppbv@190s and that the background noise is solely due to the thermal noise of the QTF.

  2. Single all-fiber-based nanosecond-pulsed supercontinuum source for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiao; Bondu, Magalie; Dong, Biqin; Podoleanu, Adrian; Leick, Lasse; Zhang, Hao F

    2016-06-15

    We report the usefulness of a single all-fiber-based supercontinuum (SC) source for combined photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The SC light is generated by a tapered photonic crystal fiber pumped by a nanosecond pulsed master oscillator power amplifier at 1064 nm. The spectrum is split into a shorter wavelength band (500-800 nm) for single/multi-spectral PAM and a longer wavelength band (800-900 nm) band for OCT. In vivo mouse ear imaging was achieved with an integrated dual-modality system. We further demonstrated its potential for spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging by doing multispectral measurements on retinal pigment epithelium and blood samples with 15-nm linewidth. PMID:27304278

  3. Communication: influence of nanosecond-pulsed electric fields on water and its subsequent relaxation: dipolar effects and debunking memory.

    PubMed

    Avena, Massimiliano; Marracino, Paolo; Liberti, Micaela; Apollonio, Francesca; English, Niall J

    2015-04-14

    Water has many intriguing and anomalous physical properties that have puzzled and titillated the scientific community for centuries, perhaps none more so than the proposition that water may retain some (permanent) "memory" of conditions (e.g., dilution) or electric fields to which it has been subject. Here, we have performed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water in external electric-field nanosecond pulses, at 260-310 K, and gauged significant non-thermal field effects in terms of dipolar response. Response of both system- and individual-dipoles has been investigated, and autocorrelation functions of both show more significant effects in stronger fields, with more sluggish relaxation. Crucially, we show that once the field is removed, the dipoles relax, exhibiting no memory or permanent dipolar alignment. We also quantify the time scales for system dynamical-dipolar properties to revert to zero-field equilibrium behaviour.

  4. Off-axis quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy using a pulsed nanosecond mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Mikael; Lamard, Laurent; Feng, Yuyang; Peremans, Andre; Petersen, Jan C

    2016-09-01

    A trace-gas sensor, based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), consisting of two acoustically coupled micro-resonators (mR) with an off-axis 20 kHz quartz tuning fork (QTF) is demonstrated. The complete acoustically coupled mR system is optimized based on finite-element simulations and is experimentally verified. The QEPAS sensor is pumped resonantly by a nanosecond pulsed single-mode mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator. The sensor is used for spectroscopic measurements on methane in the 3.1-3.5 μm wavelength region with a resolution bandwidth of 1  cm-1 and a detection limit of 0.8 ppm. An Allan deviation analysis shows that the detection limit at the optimum integration time for the QEPAS sensor is 32 ppbv at 190 s, and that the background noise is due solely to the thermal noise of the QTF. PMID:27607987

  5. Shock waves in water at low energy pulsed electric discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, M. E.; Kolikov, V. A.; Rutberg, Ph G.; Leks, A. G.; Dolinovskaya, R. V.; Snetov, V. N.; Stogov, A. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Experimental results of shock wave formation and propagation in water at low energy pulsed electric discharges are presented. To study the hydrodynamic structure of the shock waves, the direct shadow optical diagnostic device with time resolution of 5 ns and spatial resolution of 0.1 mm was designed and developed. Synchronization of the diagnostic and electrodischarge units by the fast optocouplers was carried out. The dependences of shock wave velocities after breakdown of interelectrode gap for various energy inputs (at range of <=1 J) into discharge were obtained. Based on the experimental results the recommendations for the adjustment parameters of the power supply and load were suggested.

  6. Numerical simulation of compact intracloud discharge and generated electromagnetic pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2015-06-01

    Using the concept of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche, numerical simulation of compact intracloud discharge as a generator of powerful natural electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) in the HF-UHF range was conducted. We evaluated the numbers of electrons initiating the avalanche, with which the calculated EMP characteristics are consistent with measured ones. The discharge capable of generating EMPs produces runaway electrons in numbers close to those in the source of terrestrial γ-flashes (TGF) registered in the nearest space, which may be an argument for a joint EMP and TGF source.

  7. Energy efficiency in nanoscale synthesis using nanosecond plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Pai, David Z.; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya; Kumar, Shailesh; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Levchenko, Igor; Laux, Christophe O.

    2013-01-01

    We report a nanoscale synthesis technique using nanosecond-duration plasma discharges. Voltage pulses 12.5 kV in amplitude and 40 ns in duration were applied repetitively at 30 kHz across molybdenum electrodes in open ambient air, generating a nanosecond spark discharge that synthesized well-defined MoO3 nanoscale architectures (i.e. flakes, dots, walls, porous networks) upon polyamide and copper substrates. No nitrides were formed. The energy cost was as low as 75 eV per atom incorporated into a nanostructure, suggesting a dramatic reduction compared to other techniques using atmospheric pressure plasmas. These findings show that highly efficient synthesis at atmospheric pressure without catalysts or external substrate heating can be achieved in a simple fashion using nanosecond discharges. PMID:23386976

  8. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) enhance cytotoxicity of cisplatin to hepatocellular cells by microdomain disruption on plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Xinhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Danjing; Xu, Yuning; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies showed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) can ablate solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its effect on cell membrane is not fully understood. We hypothesized nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on outer-cellular membrane with direct mechanical force and as a result the plasma membrane permeability increases to facilitate the small molecule intake. Three HCC cells were pulsed one pulse per minute, an interval longer than nanopore resealing time. The cationized ferritin was used to mark up the electronegative microdomains, propidium iodide (PI) for membrane permeabilization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the negative cell surface charge and cisplatin for inner-cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that the ferritin marked-microdomain and negative cell surface charge were disrupted by nsPEF caused-mechanical force. The cell uptake of propidium and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted cisplatin increased with a dose effect. Cisplatin gains its maximum inner-cellular cytotoxicity when combining with nsPEF stimulation. We conclude that nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on the outer cellular membrane directly and increase the membrane permeabilization for PI and cisplatin. The microdomain disruption and membrane infiltration changes are caused by the mechanical force from the changes of negative cell surface charge. PMID:27375200

  9. Effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on the surface nanostructure of Au thin films on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ruixuan; Meng, Xuan; Takayanagi, Shinya; Shibayama, Tamaki Yatsu, Shigeo; Ishioka, Junya; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-04-14

    Ion irradiation and short-pulsed laser irradiation can be used to form nanostructures on the surfaces of substrates. This work investigates the synergistic effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on surface nanostructuring of Au thin films deposited under vacuum on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates. Gold nanoparticles are randomly formed on the surface of the substrate after nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation under vacuum at a wavelength of 532 nm with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and laser energy density of 0.124 kJ/m{sup 2}. Gold nanoparticles are also randomly formed on the substrate after 100-keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at doses of up to 3.8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and nearly all of these nanoparticles are fully embedded in the substrate. With increasing ion irradiation dose (number of incident laser pulses), the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles decreases (increases). However, Au nanoparticles are only formed in a periodic surface arrangement after co-irradiation with 6000 laser pulses and 3.8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The periodic distance is ∼540 nm, which is close to the wavelength of the nanosecond-pulsed laser, and the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles remains at ∼20 nm with a relatively narrow distribution. The photoabsorption peaks of the ion- or nanosecond-pulsed laser-irradiated samples clearly correspond to the mean diameter of Au nanoparticles. Conversely, the photoabsorption peaks for the co-irradiated samples do not depend on the mean nanoparticle diameter. This lack of dependence is likely caused by the periodic nanostructure formed on the surface by the synergistic effects of co-irradiation.

  10. Pulsed Operation of Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, M.; El-Habachi, A.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    1999-10-01

    Spatially resolved measurements on DC microhollow cathode discharges showed that the average radiant emittance of the xenon excimer source increases superlinearly with pressure [1]. At a current of 3 mA and a pressure of 750 Torr, the radiant emittance is approximately 20 W/cm2. For DC operation the current was limited to 8 mA to avoid thermal damage. Pulsed operation at 700 microseconds pulse width allowed us to extend the current range to 80 mA before the discharge became unstable. Pulsing the discharge allowed us also to explore its temporal development and the current dependence of the radiative power at high currents. The results showed that the time to reach a steady-state is about 200 microseconds, independent of pressure and current, in the parameter range of up to 1 atm and 80 mA, respectively. For operation at 80 mA, and 200 V, at 250 Torr the electrical power is 16 W; the optical power, assuming the same efficiency as for DC operation (8linear dependence of the intensity on current allows to generate excimer point sources which can easily be controlled electrically over a wide optical power range. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE), Advanced Energy Division, and the National Science Foundation (NSF). [1] A. El-Habachi, M. Moselhy and K. H. Schoenbach, this conference.

  11. Kinetic study on non-thermal volumetric plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by a short pulse microwave or laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a kinetic study on non-thermal plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by short pulse microwave or laser. A global self-consistent model is based on the particle balance of complex plasma chemistry, electron energy equation, and gas thermal balance equation. Electron-ion Coulomb collision is included in the steady state Boltzmann equation solver to accurately describe the electron mobility and other transport coefficients. The model is used to simulate the afterglow of microsecond to nanosecond pulse microwave discharge in N2, O2, and air, as well as femtosecond laser filament discharge in dry and humid air. The simulated results for electron density decay are in quantitative agreement with the available measured ones. The evolution of plasma decay under an external electric field is also investigated, and the effect of gas heating is considered. The underlying mechanism of plasma density decay is unveiled through the above kinetic modeling.

  12. Excimer emission from pulsed microhollow cathode discharges in xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.-J.; Nam, S. H.; Rahaman, H.; Iberler, M.; Jacoby, J.; Frank, K.

    2013-12-15

    Direct current (dc) microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) is an intense source for excimer radiation in vacuum ultraviolet at a wavelength of 172 nm in a high pressure xenon (Xe) gas. The concentration of precursors for the excimer formation, i.e., excited and ionized gas atoms, increases significantly by applying high voltage pulse onto the dc MHCD over the pulse duration range from 20 to 100 ns. The intensity of the excimer emission for the voltage pulse of 20 ns duration exceeds that of the emission intensity obtained from the same MHCD operated only in the dc mode, by one order of magnitude. In addition, the emission intensity increases by one order of magnitude over the pulse duration range from 20 to 100 ns. It can be assumed that the emission intensity of the MHCD source increases as long as the duration of the high voltage pulse is shorter than the electron relaxation time. For the high voltage pulse of 100 ns duration, the emission intensity has been found to be further enhanced by a factor of three when the gas pressure is increased from 200 to 800 mbar.

  13. Excimer emission from pulsed microhollow cathode discharges in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.-J.; Rahaman, H.; Nam, S. H.; Iberler, M.; Jacoby, J.; Frank, K.

    2013-12-01

    Direct current (dc) microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) is an intense source for excimer radiation in vacuum ultraviolet at a wavelength of 172 nm in a high pressure xenon (Xe) gas. The concentration of precursors for the excimer formation, i.e., excited and ionized gas atoms, increases significantly by applying high voltage pulse onto the dc MHCD over the pulse duration range from 20 to 100 ns. The intensity of the excimer emission for the voltage pulse of 20 ns duration exceeds that of the emission intensity obtained from the same MHCD operated only in the dc mode, by one order of magnitude. In addition, the emission intensity increases by one order of magnitude over the pulse duration range from 20 to 100 ns. It can be assumed that the emission intensity of the MHCD source increases as long as the duration of the high voltage pulse is shorter than the electron relaxation time. For the high voltage pulse of 100 ns duration, the emission intensity has been found to be further enhanced by a factor of three when the gas pressure is increased from 200 to 800 mbar.

  14. Selective removal of carious human dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at a wavelength of 5.85 μ m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-05-01

    Less invasive methods for treating dental caries are strongly desired. However, conventional dental lasers do not always selectively remove caries or ensure good bonding to the composite resin. According to our previous study, demineralized dentin might be removed by a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at wavelengths of around 5.8 μm. The present study investigated the irradiation effect of the light on carious human dentin classified into "remove," "not remove," and "unclear" categories. Under 5.85-μm laser pulses, at average power densities of 30 W/cm2 and irradiation time of 2 s, the ablation depth of "remove" and "not remove," and also the ablation depth of "unclear" and "not remove," were significantly different (p<0.01). The ablation depth was correlated with both Vickers hardness and Ca content. Thus, a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at 5.85 μm proved an effective less-invasive caries treatment.

  15. Selective removal of carious human dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at a wavelength of 5.85 μm.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-05-01

    Less invasive methods for treating dental caries are strongly desired. However, conventional dental lasers do not always selectively remove caries or ensure good bonding to the composite resin. According to our previous study, demineralized dentin might be removed by a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at wavelengths of around 5.8 μm . The present study investigated the irradiation effect of the light on carious human dentin classified into "remove," "not remove," and "unclear" categories. Under 5.85-μm laser pulses, at average power densities of 30 W/cm² and irradiation time of 2 s, the ablation depth of "remove" and "not remove," and also the ablation depth of "unclear" and "not remove," were significantly different (p<0.01 ). The ablation depth was correlated with both Vickers hardness and Ca content. Thus, a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at 5.85  μm proved an effective less-invasive caries treatment.

  16. [The epididymal adipose tissue of mice after nanosecond pulse-periodic microwave irradiation].

    PubMed

    Kereya, A V; Bolshakov, M A; Zharkova, L P; Ivanov, V V; Knyazeva, I R; Kutenkov, O P; Rostov, V V; Semjonova, Yu N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of pulse-periodic microwave radiation (PPMR) of the pulse repetition frequency of 8-25 pulseper second, the peak power density of 1500 W/cm2 on the epididymal adipose tissue of micewas investigated. The effect was assessed by the changes in the fat mass and size of the irradiated adipocytes. It was found that the fat mass and size distribution of adipocytes are affected by irradiation. The effects depend on the pulse repetition frequency and intensity of exposure.

  17. Generation of 7W nanosecond pulses with 670nm ridge-waveguide lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klehr, A.; Prziwarka, T.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Pohl, J.; Fricke, J.; Wünsche, H.-J.; Wenzel, H.; Heinrich, W.; Erbert, G.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present detailed experimental and theoretical investigations of the behavior of ridge-waveguide (RW) lasers emitting at 670 nm under injection of sub-ns current pulses with high amplitudes. The RW lasers are based on strained GaInP double quantum wells embedded in an asymmetric AlGaInP/AlInP waveguide structure. The width of the ridge is 15 μm and the cavity length 3 mm. The laser diode is mounted on an in-house developed laser driver with a final stage based on GaN transistors, which generates nearly rectangular shaped current pulses with amplitudes up to 30 A and widths down to 300 ps. The pulse width can be varied electronically between 300 ps and 1.2 ns with a repetition frequency up to 1 MHz, which results in a variation of the pulse width of the emitted optical pulses between 200 ps and 1.2 ns. The maximum pulse power depends on the electrical pulse width and reaches 7.2 W for a ridge width of 15 μm. At high pulse current amplitudes the pulse power saturates. Time-dependent simulations with the drift-diffusion simulator WIAS-TeSCA reveal that accumulation of excess electrons under the ridge is the root cause for the power saturation, limiting the maximum achievable output power.

  18. Sub-nanosecond ranging possibilities of optical radar at various signal levels and transmitted pulse widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poultney, S. K.

    1971-01-01

    The behavior of the photomultiplier is considered, as well as the method of derivation of the photomultiplier output pulse and its relation to the reflected light pulse width and amplitude, and the calibration of range precision and accuracy. Pulsed laser radars with light pulse widths of 30, 3, and 0.1 nanosec a considered, with the 0.1 nanosec system capable of highest precision in several modes of operation, including a high repetition rate, single photoelectron reception mode. An alternate calibration scheme using a fast, triggerable light pulser is described in detail.

  19. Averaging of Replicated Pulses for Enhanced-Dynamic-Range Single-Shot Measurement of Nanosecond Optical Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marciante, J.R.; Donaldson, W.R.; Roides, R.G.

    2007-10-04

    Measuring optical pulse shapes beyond the dynamic range of oscilloscopes is achieved by temporal pulse stacking in a low-loss, passive, fiber-optic network. Optical pulses are averaged with their time-delayed replicas without introducing additional noise or jitter, allowing for high-contrast pulse-shape measurements of single-shot events. A dynamic-range enhancement of three bits is experimentally demonstrated and compared with conventional multi-shot averaging. This technique can be extended to yield an increase of up to seven bits of additional dynamic range over nominal oscilloscope performance.

  20. The CRRES IDM spacecraft experiment for insulator discharge pulses. [Internal Discharge Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Mullen, E. G.; Kerns, K. J.; Robinson, P. A.; Holeman, E. G.

    1993-01-01

    The Internal Discharge Monitor (IDM) is designed to observe electrical pulses from common electrical insulators in space service. The characteristics of the instrument are described. The IDM was flown on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). The sixteen insulator samples included G10 circuit boards, FR4 and PTFE fiberglass circuit boards, FEP Teflon, alumina, and wires with common insulations. The samples are fully enclosed, mutually isolated, and space radiation penetrates 0.02 cm of aluminum before striking the samples. Published data in the literature provides a simple method for determining the flux of penetrating electrons. The pulse rate is compared to the penetrating flux of electrons.

  1. Numerical investigation of heating of a gold nanoparticle and the surrounding microenvironment by nanosecond laser pulses for nanomedicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassaroli, E.; Li, K. C. P.; O'Neill, B. E.

    2009-09-01

    We have modeled, by finite element analysis, the process of heating of a spherical gold nanoparticle by nanosecond laser pulses and of heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding medium, with no mass transfer. In our analysis, we have included thermal conductivity changes, vapor formation, and changes of the dielectric properties as a function of temperature. We have shown that such changes significantly affect the temperature reached by the particle and surrounding microenvironment and therefore the thermal and dielectric properties of the medium need to be known for a correct determination of the temperature elevation. We have shown that for sufficiently low intensity and long pulses, it is possible to establish a quasi-steady temperature profile in the medium with no vapor formation. As the intensity is increased, a phase-change with vapor formation takes place around the gold nanoparticle. As phase-transition starts, an additional increase in the intensity does not significantly increase the temperature of the gold nanoparticle and surrounding environment. The temperature starts to rise again above a given intensity threshold which is particle and environment dependent. The aim of this study is to provide useful insights for the development of molecular targeting of gold nanoparticles for applications such as remote drug release of therapeutics and photothermal cancer therapy.

  2. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protective thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.

  3. Non-contact acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation: Generation of a pulse sound source with a small amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Inoue, Tatsuo; Umenai, Koh

    2014-09-01

    A method to generate a pulse sound source for acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation with a plasma plume is discussed. Irradiating a solid surface with a laser beam expands a high-temperature plasma plume composed of free electrons, ionized atoms, etc. at a high velocity throughout ambient air. The shockwave generated by the plasma plume becomes the pulse sound source. A laser ablation sound source has two features. Because laser ablation is induced when the laser fluence reaches 1012-1014 W/m2, which is less than that for laser-induced breakdown (1015 W/m2), laser ablation can generate a lower sound pressure, and the sound source has a hemispherical radiation pattern on the surface where laser ablation is generated. Additionally, another feature is that laser-induced breakdown sound sources can fluctuate, whereas laser ablation sound sources do not because laser ablation is produced at a laser beam-irradiation point. We validate this laser ablation method for acoustic tests by comparing the measured and theoretical resonant frequencies of an impedance tube.

  4. Treatment of Wastewater with High Conductivity by Pulsed Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Jiang, Song; Liu, Kefu

    2014-07-01

    A wastewater treatment system was established by means of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The main advantage of this system is that the wastewater is employed as one of the electrodes for the degradation of rhodamine B, which makes use of the high conductivity and lessenes its negative influence on the discharge process. At the same time, the reactive species like ozone and ultraviolet (UV) light generated by the DBD can be utilized for the treatment of wastewater. The effects of some factors like conductivity, peak pulse voltage, discharge frequency and pH values were investigated. The results show that the combination of these reactive species could enhance the degradation of the dye while the ozone played the most important role in the process. The degradation efficiency was enhanced with the increase of energy supplied. The reduction in the concentration of rhodamine B was much more effective with high solution conductivity; under the highest conductivity condition, the degradation rate could rise to 99%.

  5. Application of a nanosecond laser pulse to evaluate dynamic hardness under ultra-high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziejewska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents results of experimental tests of plastic metals deformation generated by a shock wave induced by laser pulse. Tests were carried out on the Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and the laser pulse of 10 ns duration. The shock wave generate by the laser pulse was used to induced local plastic deformation of the material surface. The study examined the possibility of application the process to develop a new method of measuring the dynamic hardness of materials under ultra-high strain rate. It has been shown that the shock wave induced by the laser pulse with an energy of 0.35-1.22 J causes a repeatable plastic deformation of surface of commercially available metals and alloys without thermal effects on the surfaces. Based on the knowledge of an imprint geometry, it is possible to evaluate the dynamic hardness of materials at strain rate in the range of 107 s-1.

  6. A high-impedance attenuator for measurement of high-voltage nanosecond-range pulses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binxiong; Liu, Jinliang; Zhang, Tianyang; Hong, Zhiqiang

    2013-05-01

    A novel kind of high-impedance cable attenuator for measurement of high-voltage ns-range pulses is investigated in this paper. The input and output ports of the proposed attenuator were both high-impedance ports, and good pulse response characteristics of the proposed attenuator were obtained with pulse response time less than 1 ns. According to the requirement of measurement, two attenuators with lengths at 14 m and 0.7 m were developed with response time of 1 ns and 20 ns, and the attenuation coefficient of 96 and 33.5, respectively. The attenuator with the length of 14 m was used as a secondary-stage attenuator of a capacitive divider to measure the high-voltage pulses at several hundred ns range. The waveform was improved by the proposed attenuator in contrast to the result only measured by the same capacitive divider and a long cable line directly. The 0.7 m attenuator was also used as a secondary-stage attenuator of a standard resistant divider for an accurate measurement of high-voltage pulses at 100 ns range. The proposed cable attenuator can be used to substitute the traditional secondary-stage attenuators for the measurement of high-voltage pulses.

  7. Characteristics of a nanosecond-barrier-discharge-pumped multiwave UV - VUV lamp on a mixture of argon, krypton and vapours of freon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Minya, A. I.; Hrytsak, R. V.; Gomoki, Z. T.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of investigation of the characteristics of a nanosecond-barrier-discharge-pumped multiwave lamp based on a gas mixture of Ar - Kr - CCl4, which emits in the spectral range of 170 - 260 nm. The main emission bands in the lamp spectrum are ArCl (B → X) near 175 nm, KrCl (B → X) near 222 nm and Cl2 (D' → A') near 258 nm. The lamp intensity with respect to pressure, working mixture composition and pump regime is optimised.

  8. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%.

  9. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Sergey V.; Dubinov, Alexander E.; L'vov, Igor L.; Popolev, Vyacheslav L.; Sadovoy, Sergey A.; Sadchikov, Eugeny A.; Selemir, Victor D.; Valiulina, Valeria K.; Vyalykh, Dmitry V.; Zhdanov, Victor S.

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ˜90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ˜25%.

  10. Measurement and simulation of Joule heating during treatment of B-16 melanoma tumors in mice with nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Pliquett, Uwe; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Experimental evidence shows that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) trigger apoptosis in skin tumors. We have postulated that the energy delivered by nsPEF is insufficient to impart significant heating to the treated tissue. Here we use both direct measurements and theoretical modeling of the Joule heating in order to validate this assumption. For the temperature measurement, thermo-sensitive liquid crystals (TLC) were used to determine the surface temperature while a micro-thermocouple (made from 30 μm wires) was used for measuring the temperature inside the tissue. The calculation of the temperature distribution used an asymptotic approach with the repeated calculation of the electric field, Joule heating and heat transfer, and the subsequent readjustment of the electrical tissue conductivity. This yields a temperature distribution both in space and time. It can be shown that for the measured increase in temperature an unexpectedly high electrical conductivity of the tissue would be required, which was indeed found by using voltage and current monitoring during the experiment. Using impedance measurements within t(after)=50 μs after the pulse revealed a fast decline of the high conductivity state when the electric field ceases. The experimentally measured high conductance of a skin fold (mouse) between plate electrodes was about 5 times higher than those of the maximally expected conductance due to fully electroporated membrane structures (G(max)/G(electroporated))≈5. Fully electroporated membrane structure assumes that 100% of the membranes are conductive which is estimated from an impedance measurement at 10 MHz where membranes are capacitively shorted. Since the temperature rise in B-16 mouse melanoma tumors due to equally spaced (Δt=2 s) 300 ns-pulses with E=40 kV/cm usually does not exceed ΔΤ=3 K at all parts of the skin fold between the electrodes, a hyperthermic effect on the tissue can be excluded. PMID:24680133

  11. Measurement and simulation of Joule heating during treatment of B-16 melanoma tumors in mice with nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Pliquett, Uwe; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Experimental evidence shows that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) trigger apoptosis in skin tumors. We have postulated that the energy delivered by nsPEF is insufficient to impart significant heating to the treated tissue. Here we use both direct measurements and theoretical modeling of the Joule heating in order to validate this assumption. For the temperature measurement, thermo-sensitive liquid crystals (TLC) were used to determine the surface temperature while a micro-thermocouple (made from 30 μm wires) was used for measuring the temperature inside the tissue. The calculation of the temperature distribution used an asymptotic approach with the repeated calculation of the electric field, Joule heating and heat transfer, and the subsequent readjustment of the electrical tissue conductivity. This yields a temperature distribution both in space and time. It can be shown that for the measured increase in temperature an unexpectedly high electrical conductivity of the tissue would be required, which was indeed found by using voltage and current monitoring during the experiment. Using impedance measurements within t(after)=50 μs after the pulse revealed a fast decline of the high conductivity state when the electric field ceases. The experimentally measured high conductance of a skin fold (mouse) between plate electrodes was about 5 times higher than those of the maximally expected conductance due to fully electroporated membrane structures (G(max)/G(electroporated))≈5. Fully electroporated membrane structure assumes that 100% of the membranes are conductive which is estimated from an impedance measurement at 10 MHz where membranes are capacitively shorted. Since the temperature rise in B-16 mouse melanoma tumors due to equally spaced (Δt=2 s) 300 ns-pulses with E=40 kV/cm usually does not exceed ΔΤ=3 K at all parts of the skin fold between the electrodes, a hyperthermic effect on the tissue can be excluded.

  12. Delivery of nanosecond pulses through hollow core photonic crystal fibres and the associated damage limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, J. D.; Jones, J. D. C.; Hand, D. P.; Knight, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fibres (HC-PCFs) show significant improvement over standard solid-core single-mode fibres and although short pulses (around 60 ns pulse width) and energies greater than 0.5 mJ were delivered in a single spatial mode through the hollow-core fibre, providing the pulse energy and high beam quality required for micro-machining of metals, the predicted performance (10's of mJ's) has not yet been achieved. The damage threshold limitations of the HC-PCF were investigated, both by coupling the laser into the fibre core, and by focusing the laser spot directly onto the photonic cladding structure surrounding the hollow core to elucidate the fundamental damage mechanism of this 'web-like' structure. For 1064nm delivery damage occurs exclusively at the launch end face with either partial or complete ablation of the photonic crystal cladding around the core. The pulse energies at which this occurs have been identified using Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers either pulsed from 10 Hz to 100 kHz (10 ns and 60 ns pulse width) or in single-shot mode to isolate the initial damage event. It is proposed that a contributing factor to the damage is the mode-mismatch between the gaussian profile of the incident laser beam and the fundamental mode of the HC-PCF (which is unlike that of conventional fibre). Pulse delivery and damage thresholds for HC-PCF designed for 532 nm operation are also reported. These fibres have noticeably lower damage thresholds compared with the 1064 nm fibre and in this instance damage occurs exclusively along the length of the fibre, yet appears to be independent of bend radius. It is proposed that these fibres may be failing at imperfections within the fibre introduced during the fabrication process.

  13. Time evolution of domain-wall motion induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Logunov, M. V.; Spirin, A. V.; Nozdrin, Yu. N.; Tokman, I. D.

    2016-07-01

    The time evolution of the magnetization normal component change in a garnet film with a labyrinthine domain structure under the action of circularly and linearly polarized laser pump pulses (the pulse duration is 5 ns; the wavelength is 527 nm) has been studied. The dynamic state of the magnetic film was registered using an induction method with a time resolution of 1 ns. It was found that for the initial state of the magnetic film with an equilibrium domain structure, the form of the photomagnetization pulse reflects the time evolution of a domain-wall motion. The domain-wall motion initiated by the circularly polarized laser pump pulse continues in the same direction for a time more than an order of magnitude exceeding the laser pulse duration. In general, the time evolution of the domain-wall movement occurs in three stages. The separation of the contributions to the photomagnetization from the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects was carried out. The photomagnetization pulses that reflect the contributions by the aforementioned effects differ by form, and more than two orders of magnitude by duration. Their form doesn't change under a magnetic bias field change, only the photomagnetization pulse amplitude does: for the polarization-dependent contribution, it's an even function of the field, and for the polarization-independent contribution, it's an odd function. The interconnection between the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects, on the one hand, and the domain-wall displacement and the change of the film's saturation magnetization, on the other hand, was identified and described.

  14. Progress of long pulse discharges by ECH in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Tokitani, M.; Sakamoto, R.; Ueda, Y.; Ito, S.; Okada, K.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Makino, R.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Akiyama, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Masuzaki, S.; Motojima, G.; Shoji, M.; Suzuki, C.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yamada, I.; Goto, Y.; Yamada, H.; Mutoh, T.; Komori, A.; Takeiri, Y.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2016-04-01

    Using ion cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH), or solo ECH, trials of steady state plasma sustainment have been conducted in the superconducting helical/stellarator, large helical device (LHD) (Ida K et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 104018). In recent years, the ECH system has been upgraded by applying newly developed 77 and 154 GHz gyrotrons. A new gas fueling system applied to the steady state operations in the LHD realized precise feedback control of the line average electron density even when the wall condition varied during long pulse discharges. Owing to these improvements in the ECH and the gas fueling systems, a stable 39 min discharge with a line average electron density n e_ave of 1.1  ×  1019 m-3, a central electron temperature T e0 of over 2.5 keV, and a central ion temperature T i0 of 1.0 keV was successfully performed with ~350 kW EC-waves. The parameters are much improved from the previous 65 min discharge with n e_ave of 0.15  ×  1019 m-3 and T e0 of 1.7 keV, and the 30 min discharge with n e_ave of 0.7  ×  1019 m-3 and T e0 of 1.7 keV.

  15. Pulse-discharge plasmas for plasma-accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lopes, N. C.

    2012-12-21

    For particle-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, a long and fully-ionized plasma is desirable. We describe an experiment at UCLA to develop a prototype of such plasma using a pulsed-current discharge. Scaling of the plasma density with glass-tube diameter and with discharge-circuit parameters is currently underway. We have found that 4 Torr of Argon can be fully ionized to a density of about 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} when the current density in the 1 inch diameter, 1.2 meter-long tube is around 2 kA/cm{sup 2}, at least at one point along the discharge. The homogeneity of the plasma density in the longitudinal direction is crucial to prevent slippage of the driven plasma structures with the particles. Equally important are the transverse gradients since any dipole asymmetry in the transverse direction can lead to 'steering' of the particle beam. The longitudinal and transverse gradients may be a function of time into the discharge, the shape of the electrodes, the tube size, and the fractional ionization for a given fill pressure. These issues are currently under investigation.

  16. Convoluted effect of laser fluence and pulse duration on the property of a nanosecond laser-induced plasma into an argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xueshi; Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Yu Jin; Sabourdy, David; Nguyen, Luc; Jalocha, Alain

    2013-01-07

    We studied the behavior of the plasma induced by a nanosecond infrared (1064 nm) laser pulse on a metallic target (Al) during its propagation into argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure and especially over the delay interval ranging from several hundred nanoseconds to several microseconds. In such interval, the plasma is particularly interesting as a spectroscopic emission source for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIBS). We show a convoluted effect between laser fluence and pulse duration on the structure and the emission property of the plasma. With a relatively high fluence of about 160 J/cm{sup 2} where a strong plasma shielding effect is observed, a short pulse of about 4 ns duration is shown to be significantly more efficient to excite the optical emission from the ablation vapor than a long pulse of about 25 ns duration. While with a lower fluence of about 65 J/cm{sup 2}, a significantly more efficient excitation is observed with the long pulse. We interpret our observations by considering the post-ablation interaction between the generated plume and the tailing part of the laser pulse. We demonstrate that the ionization of the layer of ambient gas surrounding the ablation vapor plays an important role in plasma shielding. Such ionization is the consequence of laser-supported absorption wave and directly dependent on the laser fluence and the pulse duration. Further observations of the structure of the generated plume in its early stage of expansion support our explanations.

  17. An experimental investigation of pulsed multichannel discharge across solid insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakdawala, V. K.; Ko, S. T.; Lee, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study of pulsed surface flashover across a solid insulator in a vacuum is reported, with application of fast impulse voltages of a few tens of ns rise time and a few microsec tail time. Following the flashover voltage experiments, no visible degradation of the surface was found for the BaTiO3 sample, whereas for the TiO2 sample a distinct track mark could be seen where the flashover occurred. Three schemes for obtaining multichannel discharges were studied for plexiglass specimens, and results showed the number of shots to decrease as the number of channels increased.

  18. ICRF Heated Long-Pulse Plasma Discharges in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Notake, T.; Torii, Y.; Okada, H.; Ichimura, M.; Higaki, H.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Yanping; Yoon, J. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD Experimental Group

    2006-01-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge for more than 30 min. was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8× 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. Total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ, which was a quarter of the prepared RF heating energy. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by shifting the magnetic axis inward and outward.

  19. Propagation of the pulsed electron beam of nanosecond duration in gas composition of high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation of the propagation of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions (50, 300, and 760 Torr): sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and nitrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and argon. The experiments have been performed using the TEA-500 laboratory accelerator. The main parameters of the accelerator are as follows: an accelerating voltage of 500 kV; an electron beam current of 10 kA; a pulse width at half maximum of 60 ns; a pulse energy of 200 J; a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pulses per second, a beam diameter of 5 cm. The pulsed electron beam was injected into a 55 cm metal drift tube. The drift tube is equipped with three reverse-current shunts with simultaneous detecting of signals. The obtained results of the investigation make it possible to conclude that the picture of the processes occurring in the interaction of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions is different from that observed in the propagation of the electron beam in the low-pressure gas compositions (1 Torr).

  20. Laser Patterning of CIGS thin Films with 1550 nm Nanosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Bayer, Lukas; Zagoranskiy, Igor; Zimmer, Klaus

    The results of laser scribing experiments of CIGS thin films deposited on Mo-coated stainless steel sheets, using laser pulses with a wavelength of 1550 nm and a pulse duration of 6 ns, are presented in this study. It is shown that a removal of the CIGS from the Mo film is possible without edge melting of the CIGS or damaging of the Mo. The critical parameter for inducing the delamination lift-off process of the CIGS from the Mo was identified to be the scribing speed of the laser. In dependence on the laser parameters two different material removal processes were found. For a low pulse overlap the laser pulse penetrates the CIGS film and is absorbed in the interface between the CIGS and the Mo causing a lift-off process of the CIGS from the Mo back contact. For a high pulse overlap an ablation process starting from the top side of the CIGS film was found. The composition and morphology of the sample material after the laser patterning were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Heating and ablation of tokamak graphite by pulsed nanosecond Nd-YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S. V.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Brygo, F.; Thro, P.-Y.; Grisolia, C.

    2007-04-15

    The results on laser heating and ablation of graphite tiles of thermonuclear tokamaks are presented. Two pulsed Nd-YAG lasers (20 Hz repetition rate, 5 ns pulse duration and 10 kHz repetition rate, 100 ns pulse duration) were applied for ablation measurements. The ablation thresholds (1.0{+-}0.5 J/cm{sup 2} for 5 ns and 2.5{+-}0.5 J/cm{sup 2} for 100 ns laser pulses) were determined for the Tore Supra tokamak graphite tiles (backside) nonexposed to plasma. The high repetition rate Nd-YAG laser (10 kHz, 100 ns pulse duration) and the developed pyrometer system were applied for graphite heating measurements. Some unexpected features of laser heating of the graphite surface were observed. They were explained by the presence of a thin surface layer with the properties different from those of the bulk graphite. The theoretical models of laser heating and near-threshold ablation of graphite with imperfectly adhered layer were developed to interpret the experimental results.

  2. Development of a compact generator for gigawatt, nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Jiang, Zhanxing; Liang, Chuan; Li, Mingjia; Wang, Wenchuan; Li, Zhenghong

    2016-03-01

    A compact generator producing 2.2-ns 1.5 GW high-voltage pulses was developed. The generator employed a 27.6 Ω, 0.9 ns pulse-forming-line (PFL), which was charged by an iron core transformer with a turn ratio of 2:33.5 and a coefficient of 0.94. A 1.2 μF, 20 kV capacitor and a hydrogen thyratron were used in the primary circuit. When the thyratron closed at 14.5 kV, 3.4% of the energy stored in the capacitor was delivered to the PFL in 850 ns, producing a peak voltage of up to ˜500 kV. In addition, the principle of triple resonance transformation was employed by adding a 50 pF tuning capacitor and a 1.15 mH inductor between the transformer and the PFL, which led to a significant reduction of the duration and peak value of the transformer voltage without reducing that in the PFL. Meanwhile, an adjustable self-break oil switch was applied. By using transmission lines with impedance overmatched to that of the PFL, the generator delivered a 512 kV pulse across an electron beam diode, generating radiation with a dose of 20 mR/pulse at 20 cm ahead of the diode. The generator provides an excellent ultra-short radiation pulse source for the studies on radiation physics.

  3. Real-time imaging of membrane potentials during exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen F.; Frey, Wolfgang; White, Jody A.; Price, R. O.; Blackmore, Peter F.; Beebe, Stephen J.; Joshi, Ravindra P.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2005-04-01

    The charging of mammalian cell plasma membranes in response to ultrashort pulsed electric fields of 60 ns and field strengths up to 100 kV/cm was investigated. Membranes of Jurkat cells were stained with a potential-sensitive dye, Annine-6 and placed in a microreactor mounted on an inverted fluorescence microscope. Images of changes in the fluorescence intensity during the exposure were recorded with a high-sensitivity CCD-camera. A temporal resolution of 5 ns was achieved by illuminating the cells with a 5 ns laser pulse from a dye-laser. The laser pulse was synchronized with the high voltage pulse to record images at specific times before, during and after exposure to the electric field. When exposing Jurkat cells to a 60 ns, 100 kV/cm pulse, each hemisphere of the plasma membrane (as oriented with respect to the electrodes) responded uniquely to the applied field. From these observations it is possible to draw conclusions on the charging time of the membrane, maximum transmembrane voltages and the onset of poration.

  4. Development of a compact generator for gigawatt, nanosecond high-voltage pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Jiang, Zhanxing; Liang, Chuan; Li, Mingjia; Wang, Wenchuan; Li, Zhenghong

    2016-03-01

    A compact generator producing 2.2-ns 1.5 GW high-voltage pulses was developed. The generator employed a 27.6 Ω, 0.9 ns pulse-forming-line (PFL), which was charged by an iron core transformer with a turn ratio of 2:33.5 and a coefficient of 0.94. A 1.2 μF, 20 kV capacitor and a hydrogen thyratron were used in the primary circuit. When the thyratron closed at 14.5 kV, 3.4% of the energy stored in the capacitor was delivered to the PFL in 850 ns, producing a peak voltage of up to ∼500 kV. In addition, the principle of triple resonance transformation was employed by adding a 50 pF tuning capacitor and a 1.15 mH inductor between the transformer and the PFL, which led to a significant reduction of the duration and peak value of the transformer voltage without reducing that in the PFL. Meanwhile, an adjustable self-break oil switch was applied. By using transmission lines with impedance overmatched to that of the PFL, the generator delivered a 512 kV pulse across an electron beam diode, generating radiation with a dose of 20 mR/pulse at 20 cm ahead of the diode. The generator provides an excellent ultra-short radiation pulse source for the studies on radiation physics.

  5. Beta limits in long-pulse tokamak discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, O.; La Haye, R. J.; Chang, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Kamada, Y.; Zohm, H.; Bondeson, A.; Boucher, D.; Callen, J. D.; Chu, M. S.; Gianakon, T. A.; Gruber, O.; Harvey, R. W.; Hegna, C. C.; Lao, L. L.; Monticello, D. A.; Perkins, F.; Pletzer, A.; Reiman, A. H.; Rosenbluth, M.; Strait, E. J.; Taylor, T. S.; Turnbull, A. D.; Waelbroeck, F.; Wesley, J. C.; Wilson, H. R.; Yoshino, R.

    1997-05-01

    The maximum normalized beta achieved in long-pulse tokamak discharges at low collisionality falls significantly below both that observed in short pulse discharges and that predicted by the ideal MHD theory. Recent long-pulse experiments, in particular those simulating the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [M. Rosenbluth et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995), Vol. 2, p. 517] scenarios with low collisionality νe*, are often limited by low-m/n nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. The effect of saturated MHD modes is a reduction of the confinement time by 10%-20%, depending on the island size and location, and can lead to a disruption. Recent theories on neoclassical destabilization of tearing modes, including the effects of a perturbed helical bootstrap current, are successful in explaining the qualitative behavior of the resistive modes and recent results are consistent with the size of the saturated islands. Also, a strong correlation is observed between the onset of these low-m/n modes with sawteeth, edge localized modes (ELM), or fishbone events, consistent with the seed island required by the theory. We will focus on a quantitative comparison between both the conventional resistive and neoclassical theories, and the experimental results of several machines, which have all observed these low-m/n nonideal modes. This enables us to single out the key issues in projecting the long-pulse beta limits of ITER-size tokamaks and also to discuss possible plasma control methods that can increase the soft β limit, decrease the seed perturbations, and/or diminish the effects on confinement.

  6. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  7. Pulsed microwave discharges in powder mixtures: Status, problems, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batanov, G. M.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-10-01

    Results of experiments on the excitation of pulsed microwave discharges by gyrotron radiation (λ = 4 mm, P 0 = 100-500 kW, τ = 1-10 ms) in the volumes and on the surfaces of metal-dielectric powder mixtures are presented. It is shown that there are two phases of discharge development: the spark phase, accompanied by a partial evaporation of the powder material, and the phase of a developed discharge, characterized by a plasma density of ˜1017 cm-3, high absorption, and high temperatures (˜5-10 kK) in a thin layer (˜0.1-0.2 mm) of plasma and vapor. It is demonstrated that the conductivity induced in the targets by UV radiation play an important role in the microwave absorption by powder grains. It is found that, in the course of the discharge, a conductive metal mesh forms in the powder volume as a result of metal evaporation. Reactions of high-temperature synthesis were initiated in various powder mixtures (Ti + B, Al + Fe2O3, Mo + B, etc.). It is shown that the reactions of high-temperature synthesis last for up to 0.1 s and are accompanied by the evaporation of powder grains and the formation of an aerosol cloud due to free expansion of reactants from the sample surface. The possibility of experimentally studying the kinetics of reactions of high-temperature synthesis is demonstrated. It is noticed that microwave discharges can be used to initiate plasmachemical reactions on the surfaces of radioparent materials in active gaseous media.

  8. Pulsed microwave discharges in powder mixtures: Status, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M. Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-10-15

    Results of experiments on the excitation of pulsed microwave discharges by gyrotron radiation (λ = 4 mm, P{sub 0} = 100–500 kW, τ = 1–10 ms) in the volumes and on the surfaces of metal-dielectric powder mixtures are presented. It is shown that there are two phases of discharge development: the spark phase, accompanied by a partial evaporation of the powder material, and the phase of a developed discharge, characterized by a plasma density of ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup –3}, high absorption, and high temperatures (∼5–10 kK) in a thin layer (∼0.1–0.2 mm) of plasma and vapor. It is demonstrated that the conductivity induced in the targets by UV radiation play an important role in the microwave absorption by powder grains. It is found that, in the course of the discharge, a conductive metal mesh forms in the powder volume as a result of metal evaporation. Reactions of high-temperature synthesis were initiated in various powder mixtures (Ti + B, Al + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mo + B, etc.). It is shown that the reactions of high-temperature synthesis last for up to 0.1 s and are accompanied by the evaporation of powder grains and the formation of an aerosol cloud due to free expansion of reactants from the sample surface. The possibility of experimentally studying the kinetics of reactions of high-temperature synthesis is demonstrated. It is noticed that microwave discharges can be used to initiate plasmachemical reactions on the surfaces of radioparent materials in active gaseous media.

  9. Nanosecond pulsed platelet-rich plasma (nsPRP) improves mechanical and electrical cardiac function following myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Barbara; Varghese, Frency; Barabutis, Nektarios; Catravas, John; Zemlin, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) of the heart is associated with biochemical and ionic changes that result in cardiac contractile and electrical dysfunction. In rabbits, platelet-rich plasma activated using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPRP) has been shown to improve left ventricular pumping. Here, we demonstrate that nsPRP causes a similar improvement in mouse left ventricular function. We also show that nsPRP injection recovers electrical activity even before reperfusion begins. To uncover the mechanism of nsPRP action, we studied whether the enhanced left ventricular function in nsPRP rabbit and mouse hearts was associated with increased expression of heat-shock proteins and altered mitochondrial function under conditions of oxidative stress. Mouse hearts underwent 30 min of global ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion in situ. Rabbit hearts underwent 30 min of ischemia in vivo and were reperfused for 14 days. Hearts treated with nsPRP expressed significantly higher levels of Hsp27 and Hsp70 compared to hearts treated with vehicle. Also, pretreatment of cultured H9c2 cells with nsPRP significantly enhanced the "spare respiratory capacity (SRC)" also referred to as "respiratory reserve capacity" and ATP production in response to the uncoupler FCCP. These results suggest a cardioprotective effect of nsPRP on the ischemic heart during reperfusion. PMID:26908713

  10. Evaluation of the Genetic Response of U937 and Jurkat Cells to 10-Nanosecond Electrical Pulses (nsEP)

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Estlack, Larry E.; Moen, Erick K.; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Beier, Hope T.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond electrical pulse (nsEP) exposure activates signaling pathways, produces oxidative stress, stimulates hormone secretion, causes cell swelling and induces apoptotic and necrotic death. The underlying biophysical connection(s) between these diverse cellular reactions and nsEP has yet to be elucidated. Using global genetic analysis, we evaluated how two commonly studied cell types, U937 and Jurkat, respond to nsEP exposure. We hypothesized that by studying the genetic response of the cells following exposure, we would gain direct insight into the stresses experienced by the cell and in turn better understand the biophysical interaction taking place during the exposure. Using Ingenuity Systems software, we found genes associated with cell growth, movement and development to be significantly up-regulated in both cell types 4 h post exposure to nsEP. In agreement with our hypothesis, we also found that both cell lines exhibit significant biological changes consistent with mechanical stress induction. These results advance nsEP research by providing strong evidence that the interaction of nsEPs with cells involves mechanical stress. PMID:27135944

  11. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using the nanosecond pulsed laser in 5.8-μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of human carious dentin.

  12. Darkening effect on AZ31B magnesium alloy surface induced by nanosecond pulse Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Y. C.; Zhou, W.; Zheng, H. Y.; Li, Z. L.

    2013-09-01

    Permanent darkening effect was achieved on surface of AZ31B Mg alloy irradiated with nanosecond pulse Nd:YAG laser, and special attention was made to examine how surface structure as well as oxidation affect the darkening effect. Experiments were carried out to characterize morphological evolution and chemical composition of the irradiated areas by optical reflection spectrometer, Talysurf surface profiler, SEM, EDS, and XPS. The darkening effect was found to be occurred at the surface under high laser energy. Optical spectra showed that the induced darkening surface was uniform over the spectral range from 200 nm to 1100 nm. SEM and surface profiler showed that surface morphology of darkening areas consisted of large number of micron scale cauliflower-like clusters and protruding particles. EDS and XPS showed that compared to non-irradiated area, oxygen content at the darkening areas increased significantly. It was proposed a mechanism that involved trapping of light in the surface morphology and chemistry variation of irradiated areas to explain the laser-induced darkening effect on AZ31B Mg alloy.

  13. Dose dependent translocations of fluorescent probes of PIP2 hydrolysis in cells exposed to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Tarango, Melissa; Roth, Caleb C.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-03-01

    Previously, it was demonstrated that small nanometer-sized pores (nanopores) are preferentially formed after exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We have reported that nanoporation of the plasma membrane directly affects the phospholipids of the cell membrane, ultimately culminating in phosphatidylinositol4,5- bisphosphate (PIP2) intracellular signaling. PIP2, located within the internal layer of the plasma membrane, plays a critical role as a regulator of ion transport proteins, a source of second messenger compounds, and an anchor for cytoskeletal elements. In this proceeding, we present data that demonstrates that nsPEFs initiate electric field dose-dependent PIP2 hydrolysis and/or depletion from the plasma membrane through the observation of the accumulation of inositol1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in the cytoplasm and the increase of diacylglycerol (DAG) on the inner surface of the plasma membrane. The phosphoinositide signaling cascade presented here involves activation of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC), which are responsible for a multitude of biological effects after nsPEF exposure. These results expand our current knowledge of nsPEF induced physiological effects, and serve as a basis for development of novel tools for drug independent stimulation or modulation of different cellular functions.

  14. Excimer radiation from pulsed micro hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzenhauser, Isfried; Ernst, Uwe; Frank, Klaus

    2001-10-01

    Since several years d.c. microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are under investigation as efficient sources of VUV excimer radiation [1]. Up to now overall efficiency and the radiation power of the MHCDs are too low to compete e.g. with silent discharges. Substantial improvement in these parameters would make by its simple geometry MCHDs attractive for a wide range of applications. Experiments and simulations show that the efficiency of MCHDs is substantially reduced by high gas temperatures beyond 1500 K. Measurements in pure nitrogen showed that the gas temperature can be reduced about 40The actual experiments are with Xe and Ar bands in the VUV and the results of radiation output under d.c. and pulsed operation for different pulse duration and repetition rates are presented. [1] A. El-Habachi, K.H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 73(7), pp. 885-887 (1998) [2] U. Ernst, "Emissionsspektroskopische Charakterisierung von Hochdruck-Mikrohohlkathodenentladungen", Ph. D thesis, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 2001 This work was supported by DFG under the contact FR 1273-1

  15. Selective removal of carious dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Awazu, Kunio

    2010-04-01

    Conventional laser light sources for the treatment of a hard tissue in dental (Er:YAG laser, Er,Cr:YSGG laser and CO2 laser etc.) are good for removal of caries. However these lasers cannot achieve to give a selective treatment effect for caries without a side effect for normal tissue. The objective of this study is to develop the less-invasive treatment technique of carious dentin by selective absorption effect using the laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm which corresponds to an absorption peak of organic matters called amide 1 band. Mid-infrared nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for the experiment of selective treatment. A tunable wavelength range, pulse width and repetition rate is from 5.5 to 10 μm, 5 ns and Hz, respectively. The laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm and predetermined energy parameters was irradiated to the plate of carious dentin model which is made by soaking in lactic acid solution. After laser irradiation, the surface and cross-sectional surface of samples were observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Average power density about 15 W/cm2 realized to excavate a demineralized region (carious dentin model) selectively in a SEM observation. In the same energy condition, serious side effect was not observed on the surface of normal dentin. A wavelength of 6.02 μm realizes a selective excavation of carious dentin. Using 6.02 μm is a novel and promising technique toward to next-generation dental treatment procedure for realizing MI.

  16. Nanosecond pulse generation in a passively Q-switched Nd:GGG laser at 1331 nm by CVD graphene saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yongjie; Yang, Han; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-10-01

    We report on a nanosecond pulse generation in a diode end-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:GGG laser at the low-gain transition line of 1331 nm. A three-layer CVD graphene thin film was transferred from Cu foil to a BK7 glass substrate for the use of saturable absorber. A stable Q-switching laser operation was obtained with maximum average output power of 0.69 W and slope efficiency of about 11.0% with respect to the absorbed pump power. The shortest pulse duration and the maximum repetition rate of the pulse trains were registered to be 556 ns and 166.7 kHz with corresponding maximum pulse energy 4.14 μJ and pulse peak power 7.45 W. This is the first demonstration of CVD-graphene-based Q-switched laser operation at 1.3 μm, to the best of our knowledge.

  17. Pulsed hologram recording by nanosecond and subnanosecond small-dimensioned laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, Victor G.; Dikasov, A. B.

    1991-02-01

    The results of the investigation of small-sized laser system on crystals KGd(W04)2 coherence are presented. This laser system generates pulses with durat i on of 3 ns or 0 . 2 ns . The i nvest i gat ion of the rec i pros i ty 1 aw and hologram diffraction efficiency of silver halide holographic materials on these durations are reported. With the help of this hololaser hologram recordings of diffuse objects are produced. 1 .

  18. Laser Thomson Scattering Diagnostics of Pulsed Filamentary Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolouki, Nima

    2012-10-01

    Laser Thomson scattering (LTS) has been applied to measure spatiotemporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in a pulsed filamentary discharge. The light source of LTS is the second harmonics Nd:YAG laser with a energy of 8 mJ. Also a triple grating spectrometer (TGS) having high rejection rate for stray light is used to measure LTS spectra. In our experimental conditions, non-thermal and non-equilibrium micro-plasmas are generated at round atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the electrode set in this experiment is consisted of a needle electrode and a hemispherical electrode with an inter-electrode gap of 0.5 mm. The total electric charge that flows through the discharge channel vary from 20 nC to 850 nC by changing capacitance in electrical circuit. We could show that the total charge variation leads to increase in electron density from 10^22 m-3 to 10^23 m-3. However, the electron temperature remains almost constant at the main discharge. In order to investigate the streamer phase, we changed the gap up to 16mm, and then performed the LTS method to measure the electron density and electron temperature.

  19. Selective Field Effects on Intracellular Vacuoles and Vesicle Membranes with Nanosecond Electric Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tekle, Ephrem; Oubrahim, Hammou; Dzekunov, Sergey M.; Kolb, Juergen F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Chock, P. B.

    2005-01-01

    Electric pulses across intact vesicles and cells can lead to transient increase in permeability of their membranes. We studied the integrity of these membranes in response to external electric pulses of high amplitude and submicrosecond duration with a primary aim of achieving selective permeabilization. These effects were examined in two separate model systems comprising of 1), a mixed population of 1,2-di-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine phospholipid vesicles and in 2), single COS-7 cells, in which large endosomal membrane vacuoles were induced by stimulated endocytosis. It has been shown that large and rapidly varying external electric fields, with pulses shorter than the charging time of the outer-cell membrane, could substantially increase intracellular fields to achieve selective manipulations of intracellular organelles. The underlying principle of this earlier work is further developed and applied to the systems studied here. Under appropriate conditions, we show preferential permeabilization of one vesicle population in a mixed preparation of vesicles of similar size distribution. It is further shown that large endocytosed vacuoles in COS-7 cells can be selectively permeabilized with little effect on the integrity of outer cell membrane. PMID:15821165

  20. Electrosensitization assists cell ablation by nanosecond pulsed electric field in 3D cultures

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Claudia; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported a delayed increase of sensitivity to electroporation (termed “electrosensitization”) in mammalian cells that had been subjected to electroporation. Electrosensitization facilitated membrane permeabilization and reduced survival in cell suspensions when the electric pulse treatments were split in fractions. The present study was aimed to visualize the effect of sensitization and establish its utility for cell ablation. We used KLN 205 squamous carcinoma cells embedded in an agarose gel and cell spheroids in Matrigel. A local ablation was created by a train of 200 to 600 of 300-ns pulses (50 Hz, 300–600 V) delivered by a two-needle probe with 1-mm inter-electrode distance. In order to facilitate ablation by engaging electrosensitization, the train was split in two identical fractions applied with a 2- to 480-s interval. At 400–600 V (2.9–4.3 kV/cm), the split-dose treatments increased the ablation volume and cell death up to 2–3-fold compared to single-train treatments. Under the conditions tested, the maximum enhancement of ablation was achieved when two fractions were separated by 100 s. The results suggest that engaging electrosensitization may assist in vivo cancer ablation by reducing the voltage or number of pulses required, or by enabling larger inter-electrode distances without losing the ablation efficiency. PMID:26987779