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Sample records for nanosphere self-assembly initiated

  1. A solution NMR investigation into the early events of amelogenin nanosphere self-assembly initiated with sodium chloride or calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Bekhazi, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L; Shaw, Wendy J

    2008-12-16

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early events governing amelogenin supramolecular self-assembly have been identified using sodium chloride and calcium chloride to trigger the association. Two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC spectra were recorded for 15N- and 13C-labeled murine amelogenin as a function of increasing NaCl and CaCl2 concentration beginning with solution conditions of 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0, where amelogenin was monomeric. Residue specific changes in molecular dynamics, manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of 1H-15N HSQC cross-peaks, were observed with the addition of either salt to the protein. With increasing NaCl concentrations, residues between T21 and R31 near the N-terminus were affected first, suggesting that these residues may initiate amelogenin dimerization, the first step in nanosphere assembly. At higher NaCl concentrations, more residues near the N-terminus (Y12-I51) were affected, and with further additions of NaCl, residues near the C-terminus (L141-T171) began to show a similar change in molecular dynamics. With increasing CaCl2 concentrations, a similar stepwise change in molecular dynamics involving essentially the same set of amelogenin residues was observed. As the concentration of either salt was increased, a concomitant increase in the estimated overall rotational correlation time (tau(c)) was observed, consistent with assembly. Self-assembly into a dimer or trimer was established with dynamic light scattering studies under similar conditions that showed an increase in diameter of the smallest species from 4.1 nm in the absence of salt to 10 nm in the presence of salt. These results suggest a possible stepwise interaction mechanism, starting with the N-terminus and followed by the C-terminus, leading to amelogenin nanosphere assembly.

  2. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin Nanosphere Self-Assembly Initiated with Sodium Chloride or Calcium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-12-08

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early intermolecular interactions stabilizing amelogenin supramolecular assembly and the potential role of calcium ions have been discovered. Two-dimensional 1H-15N spectra were recorded for 15N-labeled amelogenin as a function of increasing Ca2+ concentration starting from monomeric conditions. Evidence for protein-protein interactions were observed between residues E18 and E40 in the N-terminus. At higher Ca2+ concentrations there was concurrent involvement of residues in both the N- (Y12-Q56) and the C-terminus (Q144-T171). Neither specific residues nor their stepwise interaction have previously been identified in the initial stages of nanosphere assembly.

  3. Kinetically controlled self-assembly of redox-active ferrocene-diphenylalanine: from nanospheres to nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuefei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Wu, Zhongjie; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2013-11-22

    Putting metals into organic compounds such as peptides can lead to many new desirable properties. Here we designed a novel bioorganometallic molecule, ferrocene-diphenylalanine (Fc-FF), and investigated its self-assembly behavior. We directly observed a morphological transition from metastable nanospheres to nanofibers, which led to the formation of a self-supporting hydrogel. The strong hydrophobic interaction of the Fc moiety was suggested to have a key role in this kinetically controlled self-assembly process. Moreover, the redox center of the ferrocene group further allowed us to reversibly control the self-assembly behavior of Fc-FF by altering its redox state.

  4. Kinetically controlled self-assembly of redox-active ferrocene-diphenylalanine: from nanospheres to nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuefei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Wu, Zhongjie; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2013-11-01

    Putting metals into organic compounds such as peptides can lead to many new desirable properties. Here we designed a novel bioorganometallic molecule, ferrocene-diphenylalanine (Fc-FF), and investigated its self-assembly behavior. We directly observed a morphological transition from metastable nanospheres to nanofibers, which led to the formation of a self-supporting hydrogel. The strong hydrophobic interaction of the Fc moiety was suggested to have a key role in this kinetically controlled self-assembly process. Moreover, the redox center of the ferrocene group further allowed us to reversibly control the self-assembly behavior of Fc-FF by altering its redox state.

  5. Amphiphilic Graft Copolymer Nanospheres: From Colloidal Self-Assembly to CO2 Capture Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Harim; Kim, Dong Jun; Park, Min Su; Ryu, Du Yeol; Kim, Jong Hak

    2016-04-13

    Colloidal nanosphere self-assembly effectively generates ordered nanostructures, prompting tremendous interest in many applications such as photonic crystals and templates for inverse opal fabrication. Here we report the self-assembly of low-cost, graft copolymer nanospheres for CO2 capture membranes. Specifically, poly(dimethylsiloxane)-graft-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PDMS-g-P4VP) is synthesized via one-pot, free radical dispersion polymerization to give discrete monodisperse nanospheres. These nanospheres comprise a surface-anchored highly permeable PDMS layer and internal CO2-philic P4VP spherical core. Their diameter is controllable below the submicrometer range by varying grafting ratios. The colloidal dispersion forms a long-range, close-packed hexagonal array on a substrate by inclined deposition and convective assembly. The array shows dispersion medium-dependent packing characteristics. A thermodynamic correlation is determined using different solvents to obtain stable PDMS-g-P4VP dispersions and interpreted in terms of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter. As a proof-of-concept, the implementation of these nanospheres into membranes simultaneously enhances the CO2 permeability and CO2/N2 selectivity of PDMS-based transport matrixes. Upon physical aging of the solution, the CO2/N2 selectivity is improved up to 26, one of the highest values for highly permeable PDMS-based polymeric membranes.

  6. Initial condition of stochastic self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jason K.; Sindi, Suzanne S.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of a stable protein aggregate is regarded as the rate limiting step in the establishment of prion diseases. In these systems, once aggregates reach a critical size the growth process accelerates and thus the waiting time until the appearance of the first critically sized aggregate is a key determinant of disease onset. In addition to prion diseases, aggregation and nucleation is a central step of many physical, chemical, and biological process. Previous studies have examined the first-arrival time at a critical nucleus size during homogeneous self-assembly under the assumption that at time t =0 the system was in the all-monomer state. However, in order to compare to in vivo biological experiments where protein constituents inherited by a newly born cell likely contain intermediate aggregates, other possibilities must be considered. We consider one such possibility by conditioning the unique ergodic size distribution on subcritical aggregate sizes; this least-informed distribution is then used as an initial condition. We make the claim that this initial condition carries fewer assumptions than an all-monomer one and verify that it can yield significantly different averaged waiting times relative to the all-monomer condition under various models of assembly.

  7. Construction of mono- and multilayer colloidal crystals with self-assembled nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kang, Bo-Sun; Kim, Min-Cheol; Sohn, Youngjoo; Tae, Ki-Sik; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Do Kyung

    2013-09-01

    A new self-assembly method for the fabrication of periodic structures using monodispersed polystyrene nanoparticles matrix was developed. The self-assembly could be formed into polystyrene nanoparticles matrix constructed by the face centered cubic (FCC) structure and hexagonally close-packed (HCP) monolayer. The polystyrene nanoparticles have been prepared by emulsion polymerization. Several aspects were investigated by using different techniques: Particle sizer, TEM and DSC etc. In this study, the feasibility of synthesizing nanoparticles of 550 nm polystyrene with a perfect spherical shape and a narrow size distribution was demonstrated. Subsequently, an investigation of the self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres to built up an opal structure was performed. This arrangement was achieved by gravitational sedimentation under vacuum. The face centered cubic structure was identified by using SEM, thus that the different facet type {100}, {110} and {111} were composed. The self-assembly of monodispersed polystyrene nanoparticles in 2D structure was fabricated in the structure of hexagonally close-packed monolayer.

  8. Self-assembled multifunctional DNA nanospheres for biosensing and drug delivery into specific target cells.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Dong, Ying; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Min; Zhong, Hua; Ji, Bin

    2015-04-28

    Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (∼ 200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the proposed NSs could lead to novel routes for nucleic acid self-assembly, promising versatile applications in biosensing and biomedicine.

  9. Self-assembled multifunctional DNA nanospheres for biosensing and drug delivery into specific target cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Sai; Dong, Ying; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Min; Zhong, Hua; Ji, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (~200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the proposed NSs could lead to novel routes for nucleic acid self-assembly, promising versatile applications in biosensing and biomedicine.Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (~200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the

  10. Gold(I) catalysis at extreme concentrations inside self-assembled nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Hessels, Joeri; Leenders, Stefan H A M; Tröppner, Oliver; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-12-01

    Homogeneous transition-metal catalysis is a crucial technology for the sustainable preparation of valuable chemicals. The catalyst concentration is usually kept as low as possible, typically at mM or μM levels, and the effect of high catalyst concentration is hardly exploited because of solubility issues and the inherent unfavorable catalyst/substrate ratio. Herein, a self-assembly strategy is reported which leads to local catalyst concentrations ranging from 0.05 M to 1.1 M, inside well-defined nanospheres, whilst the overall catalyst concentration in solution remains at the conventional mM levels. We disclose that only at this high concentration, the gold(I) chloride is reactive and shows high selectivity in intramolecular CO and CC bond-forming cyclization reactions.

  11. Tuning the Chirality of Block Copolymers: From Twisted Morphologies to Nanospheres by Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Suárez, Silvia; Carriedo, Gabino A; Presa Soto, Alejandro

    2015-09-28

    New advances into the chirality effect in the self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) have been achieved by tuning the helicity of the chiral-core-forming blocks. The chiral BCPs {[N=P(R)-O2C20H12](200-x)[N=P(OC5H4N)2](x)}-b-[N=PMePh]50 ((R)-O2C20H12 = (R)-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-dioxy, OC5H4N = 4-pyridinoxy (OPy); x = 10, 30, 60, 100 for 3 a-d, respectively), in which the [N=P(OPy)2] units are randomly distributed within the chiral block, have been synthesised. The chiroptical properties of the BCPs ([α]D vs. T and CD) demonstrated that the helicity of the BCP chains may be simply controlled by the relative proportion of the chiral and achiral (i.e., [N=P(R)-O2C20H12] and [N=P(OPy)2], respectively) units. Thus, although 3 a only contained only 5% [N=P(OPy)2] units and exhibited a preferential helical sense, 3 d with 50% of this unit adopted non-preferred helical conformations. This gradual variation of the helicity allowed us to examine the chirality effect on the self-assembly of chiral and helical BCPs (i.e., 3 a-c) and chiral but non-helical BCPs (i.e., 3 d). The very significant influence of the helicity on the self-assembly of these materials resulted in a variety of morphologies that extend from helical nanostructures to pearl-necklace aggregates and nanospheres (i.e., 3 b and 3 d, respectively). We also demonstrate that the presence of pyridine moieties in BCPs 3 a-d allows specific decoration with gold nanoparticles.

  12. Controllable preparation of multishelled NiO hollow nanospheres via layer-by-layer self-assembly for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zeheng; Xu, Feifei; Zhang, Weixin; Mei, Zhousheng; Pei, Bo; Zhu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a facile layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly method for controllable preparation of single-, double-, and triple-shelled NiO hollow nanospheres by calcining Ni(OH)2/C precursors formed at different stage. It is observed that the external nanoflakes of the NiO hollow nanospheres are inherited from the Ni(OH)2 precursors organized on the surface of carbon spheres via a self-assembly growth process and the inner shells result from the formation of different Ni(OH)2 layers within the carbon spheres during different preparation cycles. Supercapacitive performance of the three types of NiO hollow nanospheres as active electrode materials has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The results indicate that double-shelled NiO hollow nanosphere sample with largest surface area (92.99 m2 g-1) exhibits the best electrochemical properties among the three NiO hollow nanosphere samples. It delivers a high capacitance of 612.5 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and demonstrates a superior long-term cyclic stability, with over 90% specific capacitance retention after 1000 charge-discharge cycles. This excellent performance is ascribed to the short diffusion path and large surface area of the unique hollow structure with nanoflake building blocks for bulk accessibility of faradaic reaction.

  13. Interplay between hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions in the self-assembly of a gemini amphiphilic pseudopeptide: from nano-spheres to hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Jenifer; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burguete, M Isabel; Luis, Santiago V

    2012-02-21

    The formation of soluble nano-spheres or stable hydrogels through the self-assembling of a simple gemini amphiphilic pseudopeptide can be controlled by the tuning of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions in aqueous medium.

  14. GREEN AND CONTROLLED SYNTHESIS OF GOLD AND PLATINUM NANOMATERIALS USING VITAMIN B2: DENSITY-ASSISTED SELF-ASSEMBLY OF NANOSPHERES, WIRES AND RODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the first time, we report density-assisted self-assembly and efficient synthesis of gold (Au) and platinum (Pt) nanospheres, nanowires and nanorods using vitamin B2 (riboflavin) without employing any special capping or dispersing agent at room temperature; this env...

  15. Porous fluorinated SnO(2) hollow nanospheres: transformative self-assembly and photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengwei; Huang, Guocheng; Yu, Jiaguo; Ng, Tsz Wai; Yip, Ho Yin; Wong, Po Keung

    2014-02-26

    Highly porous surface fluorinated SnO2 hollow nanospheres (SnO2(F) HNS) were produced in high yield by a hydrothermal treatment of stannous fluoride in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Two important processes in terms of oriented self-assembly and in situ self-transformation were highlighted for the formation of as-prepared SnO2(F) HNS, which were largely relying on the directing effects of selected specific chemical species in the present synthesis system. Significantly, these SnO2(F) HNS showed considerable activity in photocatalytic inactivation of a surface negatively charged bacterium, Escherichia coli K-12, in aqueous saline solution. The dominant reactive species involved in the inactivation process were also identified.

  16. Self-assembled Multilayers of Silica Nanospheres for Defect Reduction in Non- and Semipolar Gallium Nitride Epitaxial Layers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non- and semipolar GaN have great potential to improve the efficiency of light emitting devices due to much reduced internal electric fields. However, heteroepitaxial GaN growth in these crystal orientations suffers from very high dislocation and stacking faults densities. Here, we report a facile method to obtain low defect density non- and semipolar heteroepitaxial GaN via selective area epitaxy using self-assembled multilayers of silica nanospheres (MSN). Nonpolar (11–20) and semipolar (11–22) GaN layers with high crystal quality have been achieved by epitaxial integration of the MSN and a simple one-step overgrowth process, by which both dislocation and basal plane stacking fault densities can be significantly reduced. The underlying defect reduction mechanisms include epitaxial growth through the MSN covered template, island nucleation via nanogaps in the MSN, and lateral overgrowth and coalescence above the MSN. InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells structures grown on a nonpolar GaN/MSN template show more than 30-fold increase in the luminescence intensity compared to a control sample without the MSN. This self-assembled MSN technique provides a new platform for epitaxial growth of nitride semiconductors and offers unique opportunities for improving the material quality of GaN grown on other orientations and foreign substrates or heteroepitaxial growth of other lattice-mismatched materials. PMID:27065755

  17. Self-assembled Multilayers of Silica Nanospheres for Defect Reduction in Non- and Semipolar Gallium Nitride Epitaxial Layers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tongtong; Ding, Tao; Tang, Fengzai; Han, Yisong; Ali, Muhammad; Badcock, Tom; Kappers, Menno J; Shields, Andrew J; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Oliver, Rachel A

    2016-02-03

    Non- and semipolar GaN have great potential to improve the efficiency of light emitting devices due to much reduced internal electric fields. However, heteroepitaxial GaN growth in these crystal orientations suffers from very high dislocation and stacking faults densities. Here, we report a facile method to obtain low defect density non- and semipolar heteroepitaxial GaN via selective area epitaxy using self-assembled multilayers of silica nanospheres (MSN). Nonpolar (11-20) and semipolar (11-22) GaN layers with high crystal quality have been achieved by epitaxial integration of the MSN and a simple one-step overgrowth process, by which both dislocation and basal plane stacking fault densities can be significantly reduced. The underlying defect reduction mechanisms include epitaxial growth through the MSN covered template, island nucleation via nanogaps in the MSN, and lateral overgrowth and coalescence above the MSN. InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells structures grown on a nonpolar GaN/MSN template show more than 30-fold increase in the luminescence intensity compared to a control sample without the MSN. This self-assembled MSN technique provides a new platform for epitaxial growth of nitride semiconductors and offers unique opportunities for improving the material quality of GaN grown on other orientations and foreign substrates or heteroepitaxial growth of other lattice-mismatched materials.

  18. Linear and nonlinear optical characterization of self-assembled, large-area gold nanosphere metasurfaces with sub-nanometer gaps.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Jake; Maldonado, Melissa; Charipar, Nicholas; Trammell, Scott A; Nita, Rafaela; Naciri, Jawad; Pique, Alberto; Ratna, Banahalli; Gomes, Anderson S L

    2016-11-28

    We created centimeter-scale area metasurfaces consisting of a quasi-hexagonally close packed monolayer of gold nanospheres capped with alkanethiol ligands on glass substrates using a directed self-assembly approach. We experimentally characterized the morphology and the linear and nonlinear optical properties of metasurfaces. We show these metasurfaces, with interparticle gaps of 0.6 nm, are modeled well using a classical (without charge transfer) description. We find a large dispersion of linear refractive index, ranging from values less than vacuum, 0.87 at 600 nm, to Germanium-like values of 4.1 at 880 nm, determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Nonlinear optical characterization was carried out using femtosecond Z-scan and we observe saturation behavior of the nonlinear absorption (NLA) and nonlinear refraction (NLR). We find a negative NLR from these metasurfaces two orders of magnitude larger (n2,sat = -7.94x10-9 cm2/W at Isat,n2 = 0.43 GW/cm2) than previous reports on gold nanostructures at similar femtosecond time scales. We also find the magnitude of the NLA comparable to the largest values reported (β2,sat = -0.90x105 cm/GW at Isat,β2 = 0.34 GW/cm2). Precise knowledge of the index of refraction is of crucial importance for emerging dispersion engineering technologies. Furthermore, utilizing this directed self-assembly approach enables the nanometer scale resolution required to develop the unique optical response and simultaneously provides high-throughput for potential device realization.

  19. Magnetization reversal and microstructure in polycrystalline Fe50Pd50 dot arrays by self-assembling of polystyrene nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Tiberto, Paola; Celegato, Federica; Barrera, Gabriele; Coisson, Marco; Vinai, Franco; Rizzi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nanoscale magnetic materials are the basis of emerging technologies to develop novel magnetoelectronic devices. Self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres is here used to generate 2D hexagonal dot arrays on Fe50Pd50 thin films. This simple technique allows a wide-area patterning of a magnetic thin film. The role of disorder on functional magnetic properties with respect to conventional lithographic techniques is studied. Structural and magnetic characteristics have been investigated in arrays having different geometry (i.e. dot diameters, inter-dot distances and thickness). The interplay among microstructure and magnetization reversal is discussed. Magnetic measurements reveal a vortex domain configuration in all as-prepared films. The original domain structure changes drastically upon thermal annealing performed to promote the transformation of disordered A1 phase into the ordered, tetragonal L10 phase. First-order reversal magnetization curves have been measured to rule out the role of magnetic interaction among crystalline phases characterized by different magnetic coercivity. PMID:27877896

  20. Multiscale active layer morphologies for organic photovoltaics through self-assembly of nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Gehan, Timothy S; Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Shen, Xiaobo; Algaier, Dana D; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Venkataraman, Dhandapani

    2014-09-10

    We address here the need for a general strategy to control molecular assembly over multiple length scales. Efficient organic photovoltaics require an active layer comprised of a mesoscale interconnected networks of nanoscale aggregates of semiconductors. We demonstrate a method, using principles of molecular self-assembly and geometric packing, for controlled assembly of semiconductors at the nanoscale and mesoscale. Nanoparticles of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) or [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were fabricated with targeted sizes. Nanoparticles containing a blend of both P3HT and PCBM were also fabricated. The active layer morphology was tuned by the changing particle composition, particle radii, and the ratios of P3HT:PCBM particles. Photovoltaic devices were fabricated from these aqueous nanoparticle dispersions with comparable device performance to typical bulk-heterojunction devices. Our strategy opens a revolutionary pathway to study and tune the active layer morphology systematically while exercising control of the component assembly at multiple length scales.

  1. Rapid Synthesis of Monodisperse Au Nanospheres through a Laser Irradiation -Induced Shape Conversion, Self-Assembly and Their Electromagnetic Coupling SERS Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dilong; Li, Cuncheng; Zhou, Fei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Honghua; Li, Xinyang; Duan, Guotao; Cai, Weiping; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We develop a facile and effective strategy to prepare monodispersed Au spherical nanoparticles by two steps. Large-scale monocrystalline Au nanooctahedra with uniform size were synthesized by a polyol-route and subsequently Au nanoparticles were transformed from octahedron to spherical shape in a liquid under ambient atmosphere by non-focused laser irradiation in very short time. High monodipersed, ultra-smooth gold nanospheres can be obtained by simply optimizing the laser fluence and irradiation time. Photothermal melting-evaporation model was employed to get a better understanding of the morphology transformation for the system of nanosecond pulsed-laser excitation. These Au nanoparticles were fabricated into periodic monolayer arrays by self-assembly utilizing their high monodispersity and perfect spherical shape. Importantly, such Au nanospheres arrays demonstrated very good SERS enhancement related to their periodic structure due to existence of many SERS hot spots between neighboring Au nanospheres caused by the electromagnetic coupling in an array. These gold nanospheres and their self-assembled arrays possess distinct physical and chemical properties. It will make them as an excellent and promising candidate for applying in sensing and spectroscopic enhancement, catalysis, energy, and biology. PMID:25566872

  2. Theoretical Study of the Initial Stages of Self-Assembly of a Carboxysome’s Facet

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalik, J. P.; Brown, Kirsten A.; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2016-02-24

    Bacterial microcompartments, BMCs, are organelles that exist within wide variety of bacteria and act as nanofactories. Among the different types of known BMCs, the carboxysome has been studied the most. The carboxysome plays an important role in the light-independent part of the photosynthesis process, where its icosahedral-like proteinaceous shell acts as a membrane that controls the transport of metabolites. Although a structural model exists for the carboxysome shell, it remains largely unknown how the shell proteins self-assemble. Understanding the self-assembly process can provide insights into how the shell affects the carboxysome s function and how it can be modified to create new functionalities, such as artificial nanoreactors and artificial protein membranes. Here, we explain a theoretical framework that employs Monte Carlo simulations with a coarse-grain potential that reproduces well the atomistic potential of mean force; employing this framework, we are able to capture the initial stages of the 2D self-assembly of CcmK2 hexamers, a major protein-shell component of the carboxysome's facet. The simulations reveal that CcmK2 hexamers self-assemble into clusters that resemble what was seen experimentally in 2D layers. Further analysis of the simulation results suggests that the 2D self-assembly of carboxysome s facets is driven by a nucleation growth process, which in turn could play an important role in the hierarchical self- assembly of BMC shells in general.

  3. Theoretical Study of the Initial Stages of Self-Assembly of a Carboxysome’s Facet

    DOE PAGES

    Mahalik, J. P.; Brown, Kirsten A.; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2016-02-24

    Bacterial microcompartments, BMCs, are organelles that exist within wide variety of bacteria and act as nanofactories. Among the different types of known BMCs, the carboxysome has been studied the most. The carboxysome plays an important role in the light-independent part of the photosynthesis process, where its icosahedral-like proteinaceous shell acts as a membrane that controls the transport of metabolites. Although a structural model exists for the carboxysome shell, it remains largely unknown how the shell proteins self-assemble. Understanding the self-assembly process can provide insights into how the shell affects the carboxysome s function and how it can be modified tomore » create new functionalities, such as artificial nanoreactors and artificial protein membranes. Here, we explain a theoretical framework that employs Monte Carlo simulations with a coarse-grain potential that reproduces well the atomistic potential of mean force; employing this framework, we are able to capture the initial stages of the 2D self-assembly of CcmK2 hexamers, a major protein-shell component of the carboxysome's facet. The simulations reveal that CcmK2 hexamers self-assemble into clusters that resemble what was seen experimentally in 2D layers. Further analysis of the simulation results suggests that the 2D self-assembly of carboxysome s facets is driven by a nucleation growth process, which in turn could play an important role in the hierarchical self- assembly of BMC shells in general.« less

  4. Ordered silicon nanowire arrays prepared by an improved nanospheres self-assembly in combination with Ag-assisted wet chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guobin; Westphalen, Jasper; Drexler, Jan; Plentz, Jonathan; Dellith, Jan; Dellith, Andrea; Andrä, Gudrun; Falk, Fritz

    2016-04-01

    An improved Langmuir-Blodgett self-assembly process combined with Ag-assisted wet chemical etching for the preparation of ordered silicon nanowire arrays is presented in this paper. The new process is independent of the surface conditions (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) of the substrate, allowing for depositing a monolayer of closely packed polystyrene nanospheres onto any flat surface. A full control of the morphology of the silicon nanowire is achieved. Furthermore, it is observed that the formation of porous-Si at the tips of the nanowires is closely related to the release of Ag nanoparticles from the Ag mask during the etching, which subsequently redeposit on the surface initially free of Ag, and these Ag nanoparticles catalyze the etching of the tips and lead to the porous-Si formation. This finding will help to improve the resulting nano- and microstructures to get them free of pores, and renders it a promising technology for low-cost high throughput fabrication of specific optical devices, photonic crystals, sensors, MEMS, and NEMS by substituting the costly BOSCH process. It is shown that ordered nanowire arrays free of porous structures can be produced if all sources of Ag nanoparticles are excluded, and structures with aspect ratio more than 100 can be produced.

  5. Triphenylalanine peptides self-assemble into nanospheres and nanorods that are different from the nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cong; Luo, Yin; Zhou, Ruhong; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-03-07

    Understanding the nature of the self-assembly of peptide nanostructures at the molecular level is critical for rational design of functional bio-nanomaterials. Recent experimental studies have shown that triphenylalanine(FFF)-based peptides can self-assemble into solid plate-like nanostructures and nanospheres, which are different from the hollow nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine(FF)-based peptides. In spite of extensive studies, the assembly mechanism and the molecular basis for the structural differences between FFF and FF nanostructures remain poorly understood. In this work, we first investigate the assembly process and the structural features of FFF nanostructures using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and then compare them with FF nanostructures. We find that FFF peptides spontaneously assemble into solid nanometer-sized nanospheres and nanorods with substantial β-sheet contents, consistent with the structural properties of hundred-nanometer-sized FFF nano-plates characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. Distinct from the formation mechanism of water-filled FF nanovesicles and nanotubes reported in our previous study, intermediate bilayers are not observed during the self-assembly process of FFF nanospheres and nanorods. The peptides in FFF nanostructures are predominantly anti-parallel-aligned, which can form larger sizes of β-sheet-like structures than the FF counterparts. In contrast, FF peptides exhibit lipid-like assembly behavior and assemble into bilayered nanostructures. Furthermore, although the self-assembly of FF and FFF peptides is mostly driven by side chain-side chain (SC-SC) aromatic stacking interactions, the main chain-main chain (MC-MC) interactions also play an important role in the formation of fine structures of the assemblies. The delicate interplay between MC-MC and SC-SC interactions results in the different nanostructures formed by the two peptides. These findings provide new insights into the structure

  6. Preparation of high-quality colloidal mask for nanosphere lithography by a combination of air/water interface self-assembly and solvent vapor annealing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Geng, Chong; Zheng, Lu; Ma, Zhaohui; Tan, Tianya; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yan, Qingfeng; Shen, Dezhong

    2012-08-28

    Nanosphere lithography (NSL) has been regarded as an inexpensive, inherently parallel, high-throughput, materials-general approach to the fabrication of nanoparticle arrays. However, the order of the resulting nanoparticle array is essentially dependent on the quality of the colloidal monolayer mask. Furthermore, the lateral feature size of the nanoparticles created using NSL is coupled with the diameter of the colloidal spheres, which makes it inconvenient for studying the size-dependent properties of nanoparticles. In this work, we demonstrate a facile approach to the fabrication of a large-area, transferrable, high-quality latex colloidal mask for nanosphere lithography. The approach is based on a combination of the air/water interface self-assembly method and the solvent-vapor-annealing technique. It enables the fabrication of colloidal masks with a higher crystalline integrity compared to those produced by other strategies. By manipulating the diameter of the colloidal spheres and precisely tuning the solvent-vapor-annealing process, flexible control of the size, shape, and spacing of the interstice in a colloidal mask can be realized, which may facilitate the broad use of NSL in studying the size-, shape-, and period-dependent optical, magnetic, electronic, and catalytic properties of nanomaterials.

  7. Soft-Templated Self-Assembly of Mesoporous Anatase TiO2/Carbon Composite Nanospheres for High-Performance Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruofei; Shen, Shuiyun; Xia, Guofeng; Zhu, Fengjuan; Lastoskie, Christian; Zhang, Junliang

    2016-08-10

    Mesoporous anatase TiO2/carbon composite nanospheres (designated as meso-ATCCNs) were successfully synthesized via a facile soft-templated self-assembly followed by thermal treatment. Structural and morphological analyses reveal that the as-synthesized meso-ATCCNs are composed of primary TiO2 nanoparticles (∼5 nm), combined with in situ deposited carbon either on the surface or between the primary TiO2 nanoparticles. When cycled in an extended voltage window from 0.01 to 3.0 V, meso-ATCCNs exhibit excellent rate capabilities (413.7, 289.7, and 206.8 mAh g(-1) at 200, 1000, and 3000 mA g(-1), respectively) as well as stable cyclability (90% capacity retention over 500 cycles at 1000 mA g(-1)). Compared with both mesoporous TiO2 nanospheres and bulk TiO2, the superior electrochemical performance of the meso-ATCCNs electrode could be ascribed to a synergetic effect induced by hierarchical structure that includes uniform TiO2 nanoparticles, the presence of hydrothermal carbon derived from phenolic resols, a high surface area, and open mesoporosity.

  8. Cooperative Effects of Fibronectin Matrix Assembly and Initial Cell-Substrate Adhesion Strength in Cellular Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, James R.; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-01-01

    The cell-dependent polymerization of intercellular fibronectin fibrils can stimulate cells to self-assemble into multicellular structures. The local physical cues that support fibronectin-mediated cellular self-assembly are largely unknown. Here, fibronectin matrix analogs were used as synthetic adhesive substrates to model cell-matrix fibronectin fibrils having different integrin-binding specificity, affinity, and/or density. We utilized this model to quantitatively assess the relationship between adhesive forces derived from cell-substrate interactions and the ability of fibronectin fibril assembly to induce cellular self-assembly. Results indicate that the strength of initial, rather than mature, cell-substrate attachments correlates with the ability of substrates to support fibronectin-mediated cellular self-assembly. The cellular response to soluble fibronectin was bimodal and independent of the integrin-binding specificity of the substrate; increasing soluble fibronectin levels above a critical threshold increased aggregate cohesion on permissive substrates. Once aggregates formed, continuous fibronectin polymerization was necessary to maintain cohesion. During self-assembly, soluble fibronectin decreased cell-substrate adhesion strength and induced aggregate cohesion via a Rho-dependent mechanism, suggesting that the balance of contractile forces derived from fibronectin fibrils within cell-cell versus cell-substrate adhesions controls self-assembly and aggregate cohesion. Thus, initial cell-substrate attachment strength may provide a quantitative basis with which to build predictive models of fibronectin-mediated microtissue fabrication on a variety of substrates. PMID:26712598

  9. Fabrication of composite thin films with microstructures of honeycomb, foam, and nanosphere arrays through adsorption and self-assembly of block copolymers at the liquid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanan; Chen, Lifang; Geng, Yuanyuan; Lee, Yong-Ill; Li, Ying; Hao, Jingcheng; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2013-10-01

    The adsorption and self-organization behaviors of two kinds of block copolymers, polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) and poly(4-vinylpyridine)-block-polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP-b-PS-b-P4VP), at planar liquid/liquid interfaces were investigated. A gel film decorating with honeycomb-like microstructures forms at the liquid/liquid interface between PS-b-P4VP chloroform solution and chloroauric acid aqueous solution. However, foam films were developed when the chloroauric acid aqueous solution was replaced by a chloroplatinic acid solution or a silver nitrate solution. Furthermore, a free-standing film containing the ordered arrays of nanospheres appeared at the liquid/liquid interface between P4VP-b-PS-b-P4VP chloroform solution and chloroauric acid aqueous solution. The formation of these microstructures was attributed to the adsorption of polymer molecules, combining with inorganic ions and the self-assembly of the composite species at the interface. The doped metal ions and complex ions were transformed to metal nanoparticles after further treatment. This is a facile and convenient method to prepare polymer/inorganic nanoparticle composites. These results also indicate the great influences of the polymer structures and the inorganic species in the aqueous phases on the self-assembly behaviors of the polymers at the interfaces, the final morphology, and structure of the composites. In addition, the formed thin composite films doped with well-dispersed, homogeneous small noble metal nanoparticles exhibit great and durable catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by potassium borohydride.

  10. Self-assembly of an amphiphilic macromolecule under spherical confinement: an efficient route to generate hollow nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Glagoleva, A A; Vasilevskaya, V V; Yoshikawa, K; Khokhlov, A R

    2013-12-28

    In general, bio-macromolecules are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties and are confined within small cavities, such as cell membranes and intracellular organelles. Here, we studied the self-organization of macromolecules having groups with different affinities to solvents under spherical nano-scale confinement by means of computer modeling. It is shown that depending on the interaction parameters of monomer units composed of side- and main-chain monomer groups along a single linear macromolecule and on cavity size, such amphiphilic polymers undergo the conformational transitions between hollow nanospheres, rod-like and folded cylindrical structures, and a necklace conformation with and without a particular ordering of beads. The diagram of the conformations in the variables the incompatibility parameter of monomer units and the cavity radius is constructed.

  11. Self-assembly of an amphiphilic macromolecule under spherical confinement: An efficient route to generate hollow nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagoleva, A. A.; Vasilevskaya, V. V.; Yoshikawa, K.; Khokhlov, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In general, bio-macromolecules are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties and are confined within small cavities, such as cell membranes and intracellular organelles. Here, we studied the self-organization of macromolecules having groups with different affinities to solvents under spherical nano-scale confinement by means of computer modeling. It is shown that depending on the interaction parameters of monomer units composed of side- and main-chain monomer groups along a single linear macromolecule and on cavity size, such amphiphilic polymers undergo the conformational transitions between hollow nanospheres, rod-like and folded cylindrical structures, and a necklace conformation with and without a particular ordering of beads. The diagram of the conformations in the variables the incompatibility parameter of monomer units and the cavity radius is constructed.

  12. Initiation of Chondrocyte Self-Assembly Requires an Intact Cytoskeletal Network

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer K.; Hu, Jerry C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly and self-organization have recently emerged as robust scaffold-free tissue engineering methodologies that can be used to generate various tissues, including cartilage, vessel, and liver. Self-assembly, in particular, is a scaffold-free platform for tissue engineering that does not require the input of exogenous energy to the system. Although self-assembly can generate functional tissues, most notably neocartilage, the mechanisms of self-assembly remain unclear. To study the self-assembling process, we used articular chondrocytes as a model to identify parameters that can affect this process. Specifically, the roles of cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesion molecules, surface-bound collagen, and the actin cytoskeletal network were investigated. Using time-lapse imaging, we analyzed the early stages of chondrocyte self-assembly. Within hours, chondrocytes rapidly coalesced into cell clusters before compacting to form tight cellular structures. Chondrocyte self-assembly was found to depend primarily on integrin function and secondarily on cadherin function. In addition, actin or myosin II inhibitors prevented chondrocyte self-assembly, suggesting that cell adhesion alone is not sufficient, but rather the active contractile actin cytoskeleton is essential for proper chondrocyte self-assembly and the formation of neocartilage. Better understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms allows for the rational modulation of this process toward generating neocartilages with improved properties. These findings are germane to understanding self-assembly, an emerging platform for tissue engineering of a plethora of tissues, especially as these neotissues are poised for translation. PMID:26729374

  13. Anti-fouling surfaces by combined molecular self-assembly and surface-initiated ATRP for micropatterning active proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiu, K M; Cai, Q; Li, J S; Yang, X P; Yang, W T; Xu, F J

    2012-02-01

    A simple method by combined molecular self assembly and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) was proposed to prepare a biologically inert surface for micropatterning active proteins. The MPEG microdomains having a short terminal poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) unit were prepared by self assembly of 2-(methyoxy(polyethylenoxy) propyl)trimethoxy silane (MPEG-silane). The remaining local regions or poly(poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (P(PEGMEMA-co-GMA)) microdomains were produced via SI-ATRP of PEGMEMA and GMA comonomers. The epoxy groups of the P(PEGMEMA-co-GMA) microdomains were used directly for covalent coupling of an active protein (human immunoglobulin or IgG) via the ring-opening reaction to produce the IgG-coupled microdomains. The IgG-coupled microdomains interact only and specifically with target anti-IgG, while the other antifouling microregions from self-assembled monolayers with short terminal PEG units effectively prevent specific and non-specific protein fouling. When extended to other active biomolecules, microarrays for specific and non-specific analyte interactions with a high signal-to-noise ratio could be readily tailored.

  14. Constructing Novel Si@SnO2 Core-Shell Heterostructures by Facile Self-Assembly of SnO2 Nanowires on Silicon Hollow Nanospheres for Large, Reversible Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Wei; Liu, Yi-Tao; Xie, Xu-Ming; Ye, Xiong-Ying

    2016-03-23

    Developing an industrially viable silicon anode, featured by the highest theoretical capacity (4200 mA h g(-1)) among common electrode materials, is still a huge challenge because of its large volume expansion during repeated lithiation-delithiation as well as low intrinsic conductivity. Here, we expect to address these inherent deficiencies simultaneously with an interesting hybridization design. A facile self-assembly approach is proposed to decorate silicon hollow nanospheres with SnO2 nanowires. The two building blocks, hand in hand, play a wonderful duet by bridging their appealing functionalities in a complementary way: (1) The silicon hollow nanospheres, in addition to the major role as a superior capacity contributor, also act as a host material (core) to partially accommodate the volume expansion, thus alleviating the capacity fading by providing abundant hollow interiors, void spaces, and surface areas. (2) The SnO2 nanowires serve as a conductive coating (shell) to enable efficient electron transport due to a relatively high conductivity, thereby improving the cyclability of silicon. Compared to other conductive dopants, the SnO2 nanowires with a high theoretical capacity (790 mA h g(-1)) can contribute outstanding electrochemical reaction kinetics, further adding value to the ultimate electrochemical performances. The resulting novel Si@SnO2 core-shell heterostructures exhibit remarkable synergy in large, reversible lithium storage, delivering a reversible capacity as high as 1869 mA h g(-1)@500 mA g(-1) after 100 charging-discharging cycles.

  15. Self-assembly of lead chalcogenide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Quan, Zewei; Valentin-Bromberg, Loriana; Loc, Welley Siu; Fang, Jiye

    2011-05-02

    This review focuses on recent developments in the self-assembly of lead chalcogenide nanocrystals into two- and three-dimensional superstructures. Self-assembly is categorized by the shapes of building blocks, including nanospheres, nanocubes, nano-octahedra, and nanostars. In the section on nanospheres, rapid assemblies of lead chalcogenide-based multicomponent nanocrystals with additional components, such as semiconductors, noble metals, and magnetic nanocrystals, are further highlighted. In situ self-assembly of lead chalcogenide nanocrystals into one-dimensional nanostructures at elevated temperatures is also covered. Each section of this paper highlights examples extracted from recent publications. Finally, relatively novel properties and applications arising from lead chalcogenide superlattices as typical examples are also discussed.

  16. Selective inhibition of MG-63 osteosarcoma cell proliferation induced by curcumin-loaded self-assembled arginine-rich-RGD nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Run; Sun, Linlin; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant form of bone cancer, comprising 30% of all bone cancer cases. The objective of this in vitro study was to develop a treatment against osteosarcoma with higher selectivity toward osteosarcoma cells and lower cytotoxicity toward normal healthy osteoblast cells. Curcumin (or diferuloylmethane) has been found to have antioxidant and anticancer effects by multiple cellular pathways. However, it has lower water solubility and a higher degradation rate in alkaline conditions. In this study, the amphiphilic peptide C18GR7RGDS was used as a curcumin carrier in aqueous solution. This peptide contains a hydrophobic aliphatic tail group leading to their self-assembly by hydrophobic interactions, as well as a hydrophilic head group composed of an arginine-rich and an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid structure. Through characterization by transmission electron microscopy, self-assembled structures of spherical amphiphilic nanoparticles (APNPs) with diameters of 10–20 nm in water and phosphate-buffered saline were observed, but this structure dissociated when the pH value was reduced to 4. Using a method of codissolution with acetic acid and dialysis tubing, the solubility of curcumin was enhanced and a homogeneous solution was formed in the presence of APNPs. Successful encapsulation of curcumin in APNPs was then confirmed by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of the APNP/curcumin complexes on both osteosarcoma and normal osteoblast cell lines were also evaluated by methyl-thiazolyl-tetrazolium assays and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the curcumin-loaded APNPs had significant selective cytotoxicity against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells when compared with normal osteoblasts. We have demonstrated for the first time that APNPs can encapsulate hydrophobic curcumin in their hydrophobic cores, and curcumin-loaded APNPs could be an innovative treatment

  17. Directed immobilization of protein-coated nanospheres to nanometer-scale patterns fabricated by electron beam lithography of poly(ethylene glycol) self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Rundqvist, Jonas; Hoh, Jan H; Haviland, David B

    2006-05-23

    Controlling the spatial organization of biomolecules on solid supports with high resolution is important for a wide range of scientific and technological problems. Here we report a study of electron beam lithography (EBL) patterning of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of the amide-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) thiol CH(3)O(CH(2)CH(2)O)(17)NHCO(CH(2))(2)SH on Au and demonstrate the patterning of biomolecular features with dimensions approaching 40 nm. The electron dose dependence of feature size and pattern resolution is studied in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM), which reveals two distinct patterning mechanisms. At low doses, the pattern formation occurs by SAM ablation in a self-developing process where the feature size is directly dose-dependent. At higher doses, electron beam-induced deposition of material, so-called contamination writing, is seen in the ablated areas of the SAM. The balance between these two mechanisms is shown to depend on the geometry of the pattern. The patterned SAMs were backfilled with fluorescent 40-nm spheres coated with NeutrAvidin. These protein-coated spheres adhered to exposed areas in the SAM with high selectivity. This direct writing approach for patterning bioactive surfaces is a fast and efficient way to produce patterns with a resolution approaching that of single proteins.

  18. Modeling the self-assembly of silica-templated nanoparticles in the initial stages of zeolite formation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Szu-Chia; Auerbach, Scott M; Monson, Peter A

    2015-05-05

    The reaction ensemble Monte Carlo method was used to model the self-assembly and structure of silica nanoparticles found in the initial stages of the clear-solution synthesis of the silicalite-1 zeolite. Such nanoparticles, which comprise both silica and organic structure-directing agents (OSDAs), are believed to play a crucial role in the formation of silica nanoporous materials, yet very limited atomic-level structural information is available for these nanoparticles. We have modeled silica monomers as flexible tetrahedra with spring constants fitted in previous work to silica bulk moduli and OSDAs as spheres attracted to anionic silica monomers. We have studied one-step and two-step formation mechanisms, the latter involving the initial association of silica species and OSDAs driven by physical solution forces, followed by silica condensation/hydrolysis reactions simulated with reaction ensemble Monte Carlo. The two-step process with preassociation was found to be crucial for generating nearly spherical nanoparticles; otherwise, without preassociation they exhibited jagged, ramified structures. The two-step nanoparticles were found to exhibit a core-shell structure with mostly silica in the core surrounded by a diffuse shell of OSDAs, in agreement with SANS and SAXS data. The Qn distribution, quantifying silicon atoms bound to n bridging oxygens, found in the simulated nanoparticles is in broad agreement with (29)Si solid-state NMR data on smaller, 2 nm nanoparticle populations. Ring-size distributions from the simulated nanoparticles show that five-membered rings are prevalent when considering OSDA/silica mole fractions (∼0.2) that lead to silicalite-1, in agreement with a previous IR and modeling study. Nanoparticles simulated with higher OSDA concentrations show ring-size distributions shifted to smaller rings, with three-membered silica rings dominating at an OSDA/silica mole fraction of 0.8. Our simulations show no evidence of long-range silicalite-1

  19. Self-assembled SnO2 micro- and nanosphere-based gas sensor thick films from an alkoxide-derived high purity aqueous colloid precursor.

    PubMed

    Kelp, G; Tätte, T; Pikker, S; Mändar, H; Rozhin, A G; Rauwel, P; Vanetsev, A S; Gerst, A; Merisalu, M; Mäeorg, U; Natali, M; Persson, I; Kessler, V G

    2016-04-07

    Tin oxide is considered to be one of the most promising semiconductor oxide materials for use as a gas sensor. However, a simple route for the controllable build-up of nanostructured, sufficiently pure and hierarchical SnO2 structures for gas sensor applications is still a challenge. In the current work, an aqueous SnO2 nanoparticulate precursor sol, which is free of organic contaminants and sorbed ions and is fully stable over time, was prepared in a highly reproducible manner from an alkoxide Sn(OR)4 just by mixing it with a large excess of pure neutral water. The precursor is formed as a separate liquid phase. The structure and purity of the precursor is revealed using XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, HRTEM imaging, FTIR, and XRF analysis. An unconventional approach for the estimation of the particle size based on the quantification of the Sn-Sn contacts in the structure was developed using EXAFS spectroscopy and verified using HRTEM. To construct sensors with a hierarchical 3D structure, we employed an unusual emulsification technique not involving any additives or surfactants, using simply the extraction of the liquid phase, water, with the help of dry butanol under ambient conditions. The originally generated crystalline but yet highly reactive nanoparticles form relatively uniform spheres through self-assembly and solidify instantly. The spheres floating in butanol were left to deposit on the surface of quartz plates bearing sputtered gold electrodes, producing ready-for-use gas sensors in the form of ca. 50 μm thick sphere-based-films. The films were dried for 24 h and calcined at 300 °C in air before use. The gas sensitivity of the structures was tested in the temperature range of 150-400 °C. The materials showed a very quickly emerging and reversible (20-30 times) increase in electrical conductivity as a response to exposure to air containing 100 ppm of H2 or CO and short (10 s) recovery times when the gas flow was stopped.

  20. Self-assembled SnO2 micro- and nanosphere-based gas sensor thick films from an alkoxide-derived high purity aqueous colloid precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelp, G.; Tätte, T.; Pikker, S.; Mändar, H.; Rozhin, A. G.; Rauwel, P.; Vanetsev, A. S.; Gerst, A.; Merisalu, M.; Mäeorg, U.; Natali, M.; Persson, I.; Kessler, V. G.

    2016-03-01

    Tin oxide is considered to be one of the most promising semiconductor oxide materials for use as a gas sensor. However, a simple route for the controllable build-up of nanostructured, sufficiently pure and hierarchical SnO2 structures for gas sensor applications is still a challenge. In the current work, an aqueous SnO2 nanoparticulate precursor sol, which is free of organic contaminants and sorbed ions and is fully stable over time, was prepared in a highly reproducible manner from an alkoxide Sn(OR)4 just by mixing it with a large excess of pure neutral water. The precursor is formed as a separate liquid phase. The structure and purity of the precursor is revealed using XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, HRTEM imaging, FTIR, and XRF analysis. An unconventional approach for the estimation of the particle size based on the quantification of the Sn-Sn contacts in the structure was developed using EXAFS spectroscopy and verified using HRTEM. To construct sensors with a hierarchical 3D structure, we employed an unusual emulsification technique not involving any additives or surfactants, using simply the extraction of the liquid phase, water, with the help of dry butanol under ambient conditions. The originally generated crystalline but yet highly reactive nanoparticles form relatively uniform spheres through self-assembly and solidify instantly. The spheres floating in butanol were left to deposit on the surface of quartz plates bearing sputtered gold electrodes, producing ready-for-use gas sensors in the form of ca. 50 μm thick sphere-based-films. The films were dried for 24 h and calcined at 300 °C in air before use. The gas sensitivity of the structures was tested in the temperature range of 150-400 °C. The materials showed a very quickly emerging and reversible (20-30 times) increase in electrical conductivity as a response to exposure to air containing 100 ppm of H2 or CO and short (10 s) recovery times when the gas flow was stopped.Tin oxide is considered to be one of the

  1. Simulation of metal-ligand self-assembly into spherical complex M6L8.

    PubMed

    Yoneya, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Sato, Sota; Fujita, Makoto

    2012-09-05

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the self-assembly of a spherical complex through metal-ligand coordination interactions. M(6)L(8), a nanosphere with six palladium ions and eight pyridine-capped tridentate ligands, was selected as a target system. We successfully observed the spontaneous formation of spherical shaped M(6)L(8) cages over the course of our simulations, starting from random initial placement of the metals and ligands. To simulate spontaneous coordination bond formations and breaks, the cationic dummy atom method was employed to model nonbonded metal-ligand interactions. A coarse-grained solvent model was used to fill the gap between the time scale of the supramolecular self-assembly and that accessible by common molecular dynamics simulation. The simulated formation process occurred in the distinct three-stage (assembly, evolution, fixation) process that is well correlated with the experimental results. We found that the difference of the lifetime (or the ligand exchange rate) between the smaller-sized incomplete clusters and the completed M(6)L(8) nanospheres is crucially important in their supramolecular self-assembly.

  2. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  3. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  4. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  5. Adsorption of Amelogenin onto Self-Assembled and Fluoroapatite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Bernt, William; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2009-02-19

    Abstract. The interactions of proteins at surfaces are of great importance to biomineralizaton processes and to the development and function of biomaterials. Amelogenin is a unique biomineralization protein because it self-assembles to form supramolecular structures called “nanospheres,” spherical aggregates of monomers that are 20-60 nm in diameter. Although the nanosphere quaternary structure has been observed in solution, the quaternary structure of amelogenin adsorbed onto surfaces is also of great interest because the surface structure is critical to its function. We report studies of the adsorption of the amelogenin onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with COOH and CH3 end group functionality and single crystal fluoroapatite (FAP). Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments showed that the solutions contained nanospheres and aggregates of nanospheres. Protein adsorption onto the various substrates was evidenced by null ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and external reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ERFTIR). Although only nanospheres were observed in solution, ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the protein adsorbates were much smaller structures than the original nanospheres, from monomers to small oligomers in size. Monomer adsorption was promoted onto the CH3 surfaces and small oligomer adsorption was promoted onto the COOH and FAP substrates. In some cases, remnants of the original nanospheres adsorbed as multilayers on top of the underlying subnanosphere layers. This work suggests that amelogenin can adsorb by the “shedding” or disassembling of substructures from the nanospheres onto substrates and indicates that amelogenin may have a range of possible quaternary structures depending on whether it is in solution or interacting with surfaces.

  6. Self-assembled monolayer initiated electropolymerization: a route to thin-film materials with enhanced photovoltaic performance.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Euiyong; de Silva, K M Nalin; Seevers, Chad B; Li, Jie-Ren; Garno, Jayne C; Nesterov, Evgueni E

    2008-09-02

    Continuing progress in the field of organic polymer photovoltaic (PV) devices requires the development of new materials with better charge-transport efficiency. To improve this parameter, we have investigated surface-attached bilayer polymer PV thin films prepared starting from a covalently attached monolayer of an electroactive initiator using sequential electropolymerization of dithiophene and its derivatives. These systems were found to show significantly increased photocurrent generation quantum yields as compared to systems made through conventional approaches. In addition, the described PV thin films possess remarkable mechanical, air, and photostability. These properties likely arise from the more uniform and better ordered bulk layer morphologies as well as tighter covalently bonded contacts at the interfacial junctions, contributing to improved charge transport. While more studies on the fundamental reasons behind the discovered phenomenon are currently underway, this information can be readily applied to build more efficient organic polymer photovoltaics.

  7. Porous nano-structured Co3O4 anode materials generated from coordination-driven self-assembled aggregates for advanced lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ge, Danhua; Geng, Hongbo; Wang, Jiaqing; Zheng, Junwei; Pan, Yue; Cao, Xueqin; Gu, Hongwei

    2014-08-21

    A simple and scalable coordination-derived method for the synthesis of porous Co3O4 hollow nanospheres is described here. The initially formed coordination-driven self-assembled aggregates (CDSAAs) could act as the precursor followed by calcination treatment. Then the porous hollow Co3O4 nanospheres are obtained, in which the primary Co3O4 nanoparticles are inter-dispersed. When the nanospheres are used as anode materials for lithium storage, they show excellent coulombic efficiency, high lithium storage capacity and superior cycling performance. In view of the facile synthesis and excellent electrochemical performance obtained, this protocol to fabricate special porous hollow frameworks could be further extended to other metal oxides and is expected to improve the practicality of superior cycle life anode materials with large volume excursions for the development of the next generation of LIBs.

  8. Self-assembly of nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sellinger, Alan; Lu, Yunfeng

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a nanocomposite self-assembly is provided where at least one hydrophilic compound, at least one hydrophobic compound, and at least one amphiphilic surfactant are mixed in an aqueous solvent with the solvent subsequently evaporated to form a self-assembled liquid crystalline mesophase material. Upon polymerization of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds, a robust nanocomposite self-assembled material is formed. Importantly, in the reaction mixture, the amphiphilic surfactant has an initial concentration below the critical micelle concentration to allow formation of the liquid-phase micellar mesophase material. A variety of nanocomposite structures can be formed, depending upon the solvent evaporazation process, including layered mesophases, tubular mesophases, and a hierarchical composite coating composed of an isotropic worm-like micellar overlayer bonded to an oriented, nanolaminated underlayer.

  9. Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, David W.

    2016-09-27

    Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing is a concept that allows the strength of thick-wall rigid pipe, and the flexibility of thin-wall tubing, to be realized in a single design. The primary use is for a drillstring tubular, but it has potential for other applications requiring transmission of mechanical loads (forces and torques) through an initially coiled tubular. The concept uses a spring-loaded spherical `ball-and-socket` type joint to interconnect two or more short, rigid segments of pipe. Use of an optional snap ring allows the joint to be permanently made, in a `self-assembling` manner.

  10. Synthesis of ordered porous graphitic-C3N4 and regularly arranged Ta3N5 nanoparticles by using self-assembled silica nanospheres as a primary template.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Yuki; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Shimojima, Atsushi; Antonietti, Markus; Domen, Kazunari; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2011-01-03

    Uniform-sized silica nanospheres (SNSs) assembled into close-packed structures were used as a primary template for ordered porous graphitic carbon nitride (g-C(3)N(4)), which was subsequently used as a hard template to generate regularly arranged Ta(3)N(5) nanoparticles of well-controlled size. Inverse opal g-C(3)N(4) structures with the uniform pore size of 20-80 nm were synthesized by polymerization of cyanamide and subsequent dissolution of the SNSs with an aqueous HF solution. Back-filling of the C(3)N(4) pores with tantalum precursors, followed by nitridation in an NH(3) flow gave regularly arranged, crystalline Ta(3)N(5) nanoparticles that are connected with each other. The surface areas of the Ta(3)N(5) samples were as high as 60 m(2) g(-1), and their particle size was tunable from 20 to 80 nm, which reflects the pore size of g-C(3)N(4). Polycrystalline hollow nanoparticles of Ta(3)N(5) were also obtained by infiltration of a reduced amount of the tantalum source into the g-C(3)N(4) template. An improved photocatalytic activity for H(2) evolution on the assembly of the Ta(3)N(5) nanoparticles under visible-light irradiation was attained as compared with that on a conventional Ta(3)N(5) bulk material with low surface area.

  11. Intrinsic defect formation in peptide self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Li; Zhao, Yurong; Xu, Hai; Wang, Yanting

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to extensively studied defects in traditional materials, we report here a systematic investigation of the formation mechanism of intrinsic defects in self-assembled peptide nanostructures. The Monte Carlo simulations with our simplified dynamic hierarchical model revealed that the symmetry breaking of layer bending mode at the two ends during morphological transformation is responsible for intrinsic defect formation, whose microscopic origin is the mismatch between layer stacking along the side-chain direction and layer growth along the hydrogen bond direction. Moreover, defect formation does not affect the chirality of the self-assembled structure, which is determined by the initial steps of the peptide self-assembly process.

  12. Self-assembly via microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Sánchez, Samuel

    2015-12-07

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic building blocks has attracted extensive interest in myriad fields in recent years, due to their great potential in the nanoscale design of functional hybrid materials. Microfluidic techniques provide an intriguing method to control kinetic aspects of the self-assembly of molecular amphiphiles by the facile adjustment of the hydrodynamics of the fluids. Up to now, there have been several reports about one-step direct self-assembly of different building blocks with versatile and multi-shape products without templates, which demonstrated the advantages of microfluidics. These assemblies with different morphologies have great applications in various areas such as cancer therapy, micromotor fabrication, and controlled drug delivery.

  13. Self-assembling amphiphilic peptides†

    PubMed Central

    Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of several classes of amphiphilic peptides is reviewed, and selected applications are discussed. We discuss recent work on the self-assembly of lipopeptides, surfactant-like peptides and amyloid peptides derived from the amyloid-β peptide. The influence of environmental variables such as pH and temperature on aggregate nanostructure is discussed. Enzyme-induced remodelling due to peptide cleavage and nanostructure control through photocleavage or photo-cross-linking are also considered. Lastly, selected applications of amphiphilic peptides in biomedicine and materials science are outlined. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24729276

  14. Final Report for Grant # DE-FG02-02ER46000 Simulations of Self-Assembly of Tethered Nanoparticle Shape Amphiphiles

    SciTech Connect

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2014-08-25

    Self-assembly of nanoparticle building blocks including nanospheres, nanorods, nanocubes, nano plates, nanoprisms, etc., may provide a promising means for manipulating these building blocks into functional and useful materials. One increasingly popular method for self-assembly involves functionalizing nanoparticles and nanostructured molecules with “tethers” of organic polymers or biomolecules with specific or nonspecific interactions to facilitate their assembly. However, there is little theory and little understanding of the general principles underlying self-assembly in these complex materials. Using computer simulation to elucidate the principles of self-assembly and develop a predictive theoretical framework was the central goal of this project.

  15. Mussel-inspired bolaamphiphile sticky self-assemblies for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chaemyeong; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2015-03-01

    Adopting the strong metal binding moiety of a mussel protein, a novel bolaamphiphile molecule was prepared and applied to the fabrication of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles. The novel bolaamphiphile molecule with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) end groups was synthesized and its self-assembly was used as a template to adsorb metal ions and subsequently to produce magnetic nanoparticles. The DOPA bolaamphiphile molecule self-assembled in aqueous solution to produce nanospherical structures that exposed the catechol moiety of DOPA to the outer surface. The catechol groups adsorbed cobalt and iron ions to create magnetic metal oxide clusters on the self-assembly. Spectroscopic analysis showed that the cobalt and iron ions were coordinated with quinone, an oxidized form of the catechol. Exploiting the strong metal-adsorbing and binding properties of DOPA, dense cobalt oxide and iron oxide shell layers were created on the nanospherical self-assembly to produce magnetic core-shell nanoparticles. This study demonstrated a simple method for creating magnetic metal oxide nanoparticles that exploits the molecular binding forces and self-assembly property of DOPA.

  16. Self-Assembly of Plasmonic Nanoclusters for Optical Metauids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, Nicholas Benjamin

    I discuss experimental progress towards developing a material with an isotropic, negative index of refraction at optical frequencies. The simplest way to make such a material is to create a metafluid, or a disordered collection of subwavelength, isotropic electromagnetic resonators. Small clusters of metal particles, such as tetrahedra, serve as these constituents. What is needed are methods for manufacturing these structures with high precision and in sufficient yield that their resonances are identical. Jonathan Fan et al. [Science, 328 (5982), 1135-1138, 2010] demonstrated that colloidal self-assembly is a means of preparing electromagnetic resonators from metal nanoparticles. However, the resonances are sensitive to the separation gaps between particles. Standard synthesis routes for metal nanoparticles yield crystals or nanoshells that are inadequate for metafluids due to polydispersity, faceting, and thermal instabilities. To ensure that the separation gaps and resonances are uniform, more monodisperse spherical particles are needed. An additional challenge is the self-assembly of tetrahedral clusters in high yield from these particles. In self-assembly approaches that others have examined previously, the yield of any particular type of cluster is low. In this dissertation I present solutions to several of these problems, developed in collaboration with my research group and others. We demonstrate that slow chemical etching can transform octahedral gold crystals into ultrasmooth, monodisperse nanospheres. The particles can serve as seeds for the growth of larger octahedra which can in turn be etched. The size of the gold nanospheres can therefore be adjusted as desired. We further show that in colloidal mixtures of two sphere species that strongly bind to one another, the sphere size ratio determines the size distribution of self-assembled clusters. At a critical size ratio, tetrahedral clusters assemble in high yield. We explain the experimentally observed

  17. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles: Form and Function at Multiple Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Runye Helen

    Hierarchical self-assembly, the organization of molecules into supramolecular structures of increasing size and complexity, is a potent tool for materials synthesis and requires understanding the connections of structure across multiple length scales. Herein, self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) into nanoscopic and macroscopic materials is explored, and their anti-cancer applications are investigated. First, nanoscale assembly is examined in the context of an anti-angiogenic PA bearing the G-helix motif of maspin, a tumor suppressor protein. Assembly of this maspin-mimetic PA (MMPA) stabilizes the native G-helix conformation and improves binding to endothelial cells. Furthermore, PA nanostructures significantly increase cell adhesion to fibronectin as compared to G-helix peptide alone. Combined with its inhibitory effect on cell migration, MMPA nanostructures thus show anti-angiogenic activity on par with maspin protein in vitro and in vivo. Second, assembly of cationic PAs with hyaluronic acid (HA), an anionic polyelectrolyte, into macroscopic membranes is explored using PAs with identical formal charge but systematically varied self-assembly domains. Results suggest that membrane formation is dictated by the initial moments of component aggregation and is highly sensitive to PA molecular structure via nanoscale assembly. Specifically, PAs with beta-sheet forming residues are nanofibrous and have high surface charge density, leading to robust membranes with aligned-fiber microstructure. PAs without beta-sheet forming residues are nanospherical and have low surface charge density, leading to weak membranes with non-fibrous finger-like microstructure. Lastly, the principles of PA-HA membrane assembly are applied towards development of anti-cancer therapeutic biomaterials. Here, cytotoxic PAs bearing the epitope (KLAKLAKbeta)2 are co-assembled with non-bioactive cationic PA in order to achieve varying nanoscale morphology. These nanostructures are then

  18. Self-assembled magnetocapillary swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Maxime; Lumay, Geoffroy; Weyer, Floriane; Obara, Noriko; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Capillary driven self-assembly consists of suspending small objects at a water-air interface. Due to the effects of wetting, gravity and surface tension, the interface is slightly deformed, inducing a net force between the particles. In the experiments we present, we consider the presence of a vertical magnetic field acting on soft-ferromagnetic particles. Dipole-dipole repulsion competes with capillary attraction such that 2d ordered structures are self-assembling. By adding a secondary horizontal and oscillating magnetic field, periodic deformations of the assembly are induced. Pulsating particle arrangements start to swim, either translating or rotating. The physical mechanisms and geometrical ingredients behind this cooperative locomotion are identified. Furthermore, strategies to control the swimming dynamics are proposed.

  19. Anisotropic Self-Assembly of Citrate-Coated Gold Nanoparticles on Fluidic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sugikawa, Kouta; Kadota, Tatsuya; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Ikeda, Atsushi

    2016-03-14

    The behavior of self-assembly processes of nanoscale particles on plasma membranes can reveal mechanisms of important biofunctions and/or intractable diseases. Self-assembly of citrate-coated gold nanoparticles (cAuNPs) on liposomes was investigated. The adsorbed cAuNPs were initially fixed on the liposome surfaces and did not self-assemble below the phospholipid phase transition temperature (Tm ). In contrast, anisotropic cAuNP self-assembly was observed upon heating of the composite above the Tm, where the phospholipids became fluid. The number of self-assembled NPs is conveniently controlled by the initial mixing ratio of cAuNPs and liposomes. Gold nanoparticle protecting agents strongly affected the self-assembly process on the fluidic membrane.

  20. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  1. Multifunctional self-assembled monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.; Bar, G.; Rubin, S.; Uribe, F.; Ferrais, J.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of at three year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The specific goals of this research project were threefold: to develop multifunctional self-assembled monolayers, to understand the role of monolayer structure on the functioning of such systems, and to apply this knowledge to the development of electrochemical enzyme sensors. An array of molecules that can be used to attach electrochemically active biomolecules to gold surfaces has been synthesized. Several members of a class of electroactive compounds have been characterized and the factors controlling surface modification are beginning to be characterized. Enzymes have been attached to self-assembled molecules arranged on the gold surface, a critical step toward the ultimate goal of this project. Several alternative enzyme attachment strategies to achieve robust enzyme- modified surfaces have been explored. Several means of juxtaposing enzymes and mediators, electroactive compounds through which the enzyme can exchange electrons with the electrode surface, have also been investigated. Finally, the development of sensitive biosensors based on films loaded with nanoscale-supported gold particles that have surface modified with the self-assembled enzyme and mediator have been explored.

  2. Structural and optical properties of self-assembled chains of plasmonic nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Klinkova, Anna; Gang, Oleg; Therien-Aubin, Heloise; Ahmed, Aftab; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Gagnon, Brandon; Muntyanu, Anastasiya; Walker, Gilbert C.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-10-10

    Solution-based linear self-assembly of metal nanoparticles offers a powerful strategy for creating plasmonic polymers, which, so far, have been formed from spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. Here, we report linear solution-based self-assembly of metal nanocubes (NCs), examine the structural characteristics of the NC chains and demonstrate their advanced optical characteristics. Predominant face-to-face assembly of large NCs coated with short polymer ligands led to a larger volume of hot spots in the chains, a nearly uniform E-field enhancement in the gaps between co-linear NCs and a new coupling mode for NC chains, in comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, composition and surface chemistry. The NC chains exhibited a stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, in comparison with linear assemblies of nanospheres. The experimental results were in agreement with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations.

  3. Structural and optical properties of self-assembled chains of plasmonic nanocubes

    DOE PAGES

    Klinkova, Anna; Gang, Oleg; Therien-Aubin, Heloise; ...

    2014-10-10

    Solution-based linear self-assembly of metal nanoparticles offers a powerful strategy for creating plasmonic polymers, which, so far, have been formed from spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. Here, we report linear solution-based self-assembly of metal nanocubes (NCs), examine the structural characteristics of the NC chains and demonstrate their advanced optical characteristics. Predominant face-to-face assembly of large NCs coated with short polymer ligands led to a larger volume of hot spots in the chains, a nearly uniform E-field enhancement in the gaps between co-linear NCs and a new coupling mode for NC chains, in comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, compositionmore » and surface chemistry. The NC chains exhibited a stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, in comparison with linear assemblies of nanospheres. The experimental results were in agreement with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations.« less

  4. Molecular self-assembly at solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José María; de Parga, Amadeo L Vázquez; Martín, Nazario; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2011-11-23

    Self-assembly, the process by which objects initially distributed at random arrange into well-defined patterns exclusively due to their local mutual interactions without external intervention, is generally accepted to be the most promising method for large-scale fabrication of functional nanostructures. In particular, the ordering of molecular building-blocks deposited at solid surfaces is relevant for the performance of many organic electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or photovoltaic solar cells. However, the fundamental knowledge on the nature and strength of the intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions that govern the ordering of molecular adsorbates is, in many cases, rather scarce. In most cases, the structure and morphology of the organic-metal interface is not known and it is just assumed to be the same as in the bulk, thereby implicitly neglecting the role of the surface on the assembly. However, this approximation is usually not correct, and the evidence gathered over the last decades points towards an active role of the surface in the assembly, leading to self-assembled structures that only in a few occasions can be understood by considering just intermolecular interactions in solid or gas phases. In this work we review several examples from our recent research demonstrating the apparently endless variety of ways in which the surface might affect the assembly of organic adsorbates.

  5. Self-assembling magnetic "snakes"

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Nickel particles float peacefully in a liquid medium until a giant snake seems to swim by and snatch several particles up, adding to its own mass. The self-assembled "snakes" act like biological systems, but they are not alive and are driven by a magnetic field. The research may someday offer some insight into the organization of life itself. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/03/snakes/ Research and video by Alex Snezhko and Igor Aronson, Argonne National Laboratory.

  6. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  7. Self-assembling RNA square

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; McLean, Jaime; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-12-22

    The three-dimensional structures of noncoding RNA molecules reveal recurring architectural motifs that have been exploited for the design of artificial RNA nanomaterials. Programmed assembly of RNA nanoobjects from autonomously folding tetraloop-receptor complexes as well as junction motifs has been achieved previously through sequence-directed hybridization of complex sets of long oligonucleotides. Due to size and complexity, structural characterization of artificial RNA nanoobjects has been limited to low-resolution microscopy studies. Here we present the design, construction, and crystal structure determination at 2.2 {angstrom} of the smallest yet square-shaped nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The RNA square is comprised of 100 residues and self-assembles from four copies each of two oligonucleotides of 10 and 15 bases length. Despite the high symmetry on the level of secondary structure, the three-dimensional architecture of the square is asymmetric, with all four corners adopting distinct folding patterns. We demonstrate the programmed self-assembly of RNA squares from complex mixtures of corner units and establish a concept to exploit the RNA square as a combinatorial nanoscale platform.

  8. Chemical Reactions Directed Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B.; Das, Apurba K.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly. PMID:25984603

  9. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  10. Stereochemistry in subcomponent self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Ana M; Ramsay, William J; Nitschke, Jonathan R

    2014-07-15

    incorporated in self-assembly reactions to control the stereochemistry of increasingly complex architectures. This strategy has also allowed exploration of the degree to which stereochemical information is propagated through tetrahedral frameworks cooperatively, leading to the observation of stereochemical coupling across more than 2 nm between metal stereocenters and the enantioselective synthesis of a face-capped tetrahedron containing no carbon stereocenters via a stereochemical memory effect. Several studies on the communication of stereochemistry between the configurationally flexible metal centers in tetrahedral metal-organic cages have shed light on the factors governing this process, allowing the synthesis of an asymmetric cage, obtained in racemic form, in which all symmetry elements have been broken. Finally, we discuss how stereochemical diversity leads to structural complexity in the structures prepared through subcomponent self-assembly. Initial use of octahedral metal templates with facial stereochemistry in subcomponent self-assembly, which predictably gave rise to structures of tetrahedral symmetry, was extended to meridional metal centers. These lower-symmetry linkages have allowed the assembly of a series of increasingly intricate 3D architectures of varying functionality. The knowledge gained from investigating different aspects of the stereochemistry of metal-templated assemblies thus not only leads to new means of structural control but also opens pathways toward functions such as stereoselective guest binding and transformation.

  11. Evolution of Nanoflowers and Nanospheres of Zinc Bisporphyrinate Tweezers at the Air/water Interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fan; Zhuo, Congcong; Hu, Chuanjiang; Liu, Ming Hua

    2017-03-22

    While the sophisticated Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett technique facilitates the fabrication of uniform ultrathin monolayer and films, it is also revealed as a powerful tool for the bottom-up constructions of the nanostructures through the air/water interface. In this paper, unique nanoflowers or nanospheres were constructed based on the synthesized m-phthalic diamide-linked Zinc bis-porphyrinate tweezers using the Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. It was found that both the two tweezer type Zinc bisporphyrinates could form stable two-dimensional spreading films at the air/water interface, which could be subsequently transferred onto solid substrates by the vertical lifting method. The atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that at the initial spreading stage the compound formed flat disk-like domains and then hierarchically evolved into nanoflowers or nanospheres upon compressing the floating film. Such nanostructures have not been reported before and cannot be fabricated using the other self-assembly methods.

  12. Self-assembly of tetrahedral plasmonic nanoclusters for optical metafluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, Nicholas; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2015-03-01

    We direct the assembly of clusters of gold nanospheres that behave as nanoscale electromagnetic resonators. We use spherical gold nanoparticles that are exceptionally smooth, monocrystalline, and monodisperse. These particles exhibit highly reproducible scattering spectra compared with gold colloids that are available commercially. We mix these positively charged particles with negatively charged dielectric particles. The gold particles stick to the dielectric particles permanently and randomly in a process that can be modeled mathematically as ``random parking,'' a type of non-equilibrium self-assembly. By controlling the particles' sizes, stoichiometry, and interactions, we maximize the yield of tetrahedral clusters, the ideal structures for isotropic metamaterials. We measure the optical properties of these structures with dark-field spectroscopy to characterize their suitability as building blocks for a bulk, isotropic, optical metafluid.

  13. Multi-scale modeling for the self-assembly of DNA-functionalized nanoparticle into supperlattice and Wulff polydedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Auyeung, Evelyn; Mirkin, Chad; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Northwestern University Team

    2014-03-01

    Since 1996, DNA hybridization has proven robust for programmable self-assembly of nanoparticles (NPs). Recently, we showed that through a ``slow cooling'' method, DNA functionalized nanospheres or so-called ``programmable atom equivalents'' can assemble into crystals with a specific and uniform habit. Here we perform molecular dynamics simulations on multi-scale models to study and predict the corresponding shapes. Firstly, we use a scale-accurate coarse-grained model with explicit DNA chains to estimate surface energy ratios for different surface orientations, and predict the corresponding Wulff polyhedra based on these values. Secondly, we use a colloidal model in which each DNA coated nanosphere is represented by a single bead to simulate the growth dynamics of the crystals. By this method, we confirm the shape for the body-centered-cubic system to be a (110)-enclosed rhombic dodecahedron. But the face-centered-cubic system does not show any uniform shape yet except triangular features with (111) and (100) facets due to crystallographic defects including twinning and stacking faults. These simulated crystal shapes agrees very well with experiments. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) FA9550-11-1-0275.

  14. Functionalization of Recombinant Amelogenin Nanospheres Allows Their Binding to Cellulose Materials.

    PubMed

    Butler, Samuel J; Bülow, Leif; Bonde, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Protein engineering to functionalize the self-assembling enamel matrix protein amelogenin with a cellulose binding domain (CBD) is used. The purpose is to examine the binding of the engineered protein, rh174CBD, to cellulose materials, and the possibility to immobilize self-assembled amelogenin nanospheres on cellulose. rh174CBD assembled to nanospheres ≈35 nm in hydrodynamic diameter, very similar in size to wild type amelogenin (rh174). Uniform particles are formed at pH 10 for both rh174 and rh174CBD, but only rh174CBD nanospheres showes significant binding to cellulose (Avicel). Cellulose binding of rh174CBD is promoted when the protein is self-assembled to nanospheres, compared to being in a monomeric form, suggesting a synergistic effect of the multiple CBDs on the nanospheres. The amount of bound rh174CBD nanospheres reached ≈15 mg/g Avicel, which corresponds to 4.2 to 6.3 × 10(-7) mole/m(2) . By mixing rh174 and rh174CBD, and then inducing self-assembly, composite nanospheres with a high degree of cellulose binding can be formed, despite a lower proportion of rh174CBD. This demonstrates that amelogenin variants like rh174 can be incorporated into the nanospheres, and still retain most of the binding to cellulose. Engineered amelogenin nanoparticles can thus be utilized to construct a range of new cellulose based hybrid materials, e.g. for wound treatment.

  15. Self-Assembly: How Nature Builds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Falvo, Michael R.; Broadwell, Bethany; Dotger, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly or spontaneous assembly is a process in which materials build themselves without assistance. This process plays a central role in the construction of biological structures and materials such as cells, viruses, and bone, and also in abiotic processes like phase transitions and crystal formation. The principles of self-assembly help…

  16. Research on Self-Assembling Quantum Dots.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-30

    0K. in a second phase of this contract we turned our efforts to the fabrication and studies of self assembled quantum dots . We first demonstrated a...method for producing InAs-GasAs self assembled quantum dots (SAD) using MBE. (AN)

  17. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  18. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-07

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  19. Developmental self-assembly of a DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, John P; Calvert, Colby R; Zhang, David Yu; Pierce, Niles A; Yin, Peng

    2014-04-22

    Kinetically controlled isothermal growth is fundamental to biological development, yet it remains challenging to rationally design molecular systems that self-assemble isothermally into complex geometries via prescribed assembly and disassembly pathways. By exploiting the programmable chemistry of base pairing, sophisticated spatial and temporal control have been demonstrated in DNA self-assembly, but largely as separate pursuits. By integrating temporal with spatial control, here we demonstrate the "developmental" self-assembly of a DNA tetrahedron, where a prescriptive molecular program orchestrates the kinetic pathways by which DNA molecules isothermally self-assemble into a well-defined three-dimensional wireframe geometry. In this reaction, nine DNA reactants initially coexist metastably, but upon catalysis by a DNA initiator molecule, navigate 24 individually characterizable intermediate states via prescribed assembly pathways, organized both in series and in parallel, to arrive at the tetrahedral final product. In contrast to previous work on dynamic DNA nanotechnology, this developmental program coordinates growth of ringed substructures into a three-dimensional wireframe superstructure, taking a step toward the goal of kinetically controlled isothermal growth of complex three-dimensional geometries.

  20. Self assembled structures for 3D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madhav

    Three dimensional (3D) micro-scale structures attached to a silicon substrate have various applications in microelectronics. However, formation of 3D structures using conventional micro-fabrication techniques are not efficient and require precise control of processing parameters. Self assembly is a method for creating 3D structures that takes advantage of surface area minimization phenomena. Solder based self assembly (SBSA), the subject of this dissertation, uses solder as a facilitator in the formation of 3D structures from 2D patterns. Etching a sacrificial layer underneath a portion of the 2D pattern allows the solder reflow step to pull those areas out of the substrate plane resulting in a folded 3D structure. Initial studies using the SBSA method demonstrated low yields in the formation of five different polyhedra. The failures in folding were primarily attributed to nonuniform solder deposition on the underlying metal pads. The dip soldering method was analyzed and subsequently refined. A modified dip soldering process provided improved yield among the polyhedra. Solder bridging referred as joining of solder deposited on different metal patterns in an entity influenced the folding mechanism. In general, design parameters such as small gap-spacings and thick metal pads were found to favor solder bridging for all patterns studied. Two types of soldering: face and edge soldering were analyzed. Face soldering refers to the application of solder on the entire metal face. Edge soldering indicates application of solder only on the edges of the metal face. Mechanical grinding showed that face soldered SBSA structures were void free and robust in nature. In addition, the face soldered 3D structures provide a consistent heat resistant solder standoff height that serve as attachments in the integration of dissimilar electronic technologies. Face soldered 3D structures were developed on the underlying conducting channel to determine the thermo-electric reliability of

  1. Liquid Cell Electron Microscopy of Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Driven by Solvent Drying.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Chul; Kim, Byung Hyo; Choi, Sun; Takeuchi, Shoji; Park, Jungwon

    2017-02-02

    Drying a colloidal solution of nanoparticles is a versatile method to construct self-assembled structures of nanoparticles. However, mechanistic understanding has mostly relied on empirical knowledge obtained from the final structures of self-assembly as relevant processes during solvent drying are likely kinetic and far from equilibrium. Here, we present in situ TEM studies of nanoparticle self-assembly under various conditions, including the concentrations of the initial solution and the types of nanoparticles and substrates. The capability of tracking trajectories of individual nanoparticles enables us to understand the mechanisms of drying-mediated self-assembly at the single-nanoparticle level. Our results consistently show that a solvent boundary primarily affects nanoparticle motions and the resulting self-assembly processes regardless of different conditions. The solvent boundary drives nanoparticles to form two-dimensional assembly mainly through two pathways, transporting scattered nanoparticles by lateral dragging and flattening aggregated nanoparticles by vertical pressing.

  2. Self-Assembly Behavior of Pullulan Abietate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradwell, Sheila; Esker, Alan; Glasser, Wolgang; Heinze, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Wood is one of nature's most fascinating biological composites due to its toughness and resistance to fracture properties. These properties stem from the self-assembly of cellulose microfibrils in an amorphous matrix of hemicellulose and lignin. In recent years, science has looked to nature for guidance in preparing synthetic materials with desirable physical properties. In order to study the self-assembly process in wood, a model system composed of a polysaccharide, pullulan abietate, and a biomimetic cellulose substrate prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique has been developed. Interfacial tension and surface plasmon resonance measurements used to study the self-assembly process will be discussed for different pullulan derivatives.

  3. Computational design of protein self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Norn, Christoffer H; André, Ingemar

    2016-08-01

    Protein self-assembly is extensively used in nature to build functional biomolecules and provides a general approach to design molecular complexes with many intriguing applications. Although computational design of protein-protein interfaces remains difficult, much progress has recently been made in de novo design of protein assemblies with cyclic, helical, cubic, internal and lattice symmetries. Here, we discuss some of the underlying biophysical principles of self-assembly that influence the design problem and highlight methodological advances that have made self-assembly design a fruitful area of protein design.

  4. Microscale Self-Assembled Electrical Contacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    scales. 23 References 1. Morris, C. J.; Stauth, S.A.; Parviz , B.A. Self-assembly for micro and nano scale packaging: steps toward self-packaging...IEEE Trans. Adv. Packag. 2005, 28, 600–611. 2 Stauth, S.; Parviz , B.A. Self-assembled silicon networks on plastic. Proceedings of the 13th Int...Conf. on Solid State Sens. Actuators (Transducers 󈧉), Seoul, Korea, 2005, 964–967. 3. Stauth, S. A;. Parviz , B.A. Self-assembled single

  5. Self-Assembly of Biomolecular Soft Matter

    PubMed Central

    Zha, R. Helen; Palmer, Liam C.; Cui, Honggang; Bitton, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly programmed by molecular structure and guided dynamically by energy dissipation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems that build functional structures from the nanoscale to macroscopic dimensions. This paper describes examples of one-dimensional self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles and the consequent biological functions that emerge in these systems. We also discuss here hierarchical self-assembly of supramolecular peptide nanostructures and polysaccharides, and some new results are reported on supramolecular crystals formed by highly charged peptide amphiphiles. Reflecting on presentations at this Faraday Discussion, the paper ends with a discussion of some of the future opportunities and challenges of the field. PMID:24611266

  6. Defects in the Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers and Their Relevance for Directed Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihua; Müller, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Block copolymer self-assembly provides a platform for fabricating dense, ordered nanostructures by encoding information in the chemical architecture of multicomponent macromolecules. Depending on the volume fraction of the components and chain topology, these macromolecules form a variety of spatially periodic microphases in thermodynamic equilibrium. The kinetics of self-assembly, however, often results in initial morphologies with defects, and the subsequent ordering is protracted. Different strategies have been devised to direct the self-assembly of copolymer materials by external fields to align and perfect the self-assembled nanostructures. Understanding and controlling the thermodynamics of defects, their response to external fields, and their dynamics is important because applications in microelectronics either require extremely low defect densities or aim at generating specific defects at predetermined locations to fabricate irregular device-oriented structures for integrated circuits. In this review, we discuss defect morphologies of block copolymers in the bulk and thin films, highlighting (a) analogies to and differences from defects in other crystalline materials, (b) the stability of defects and their dynamics, and (c) the influence of external fields.

  7. Self-assembled Materials for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Kake; Wang, Donghai; Liu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight developments on self-assembled nanostructured materials (i.e. mesoporous and nanoparticle based materials) and their catalytic applications. Since there are some reviews available for metal-based nanoparticles as catalysts, this review will mainly focus on self-assembled oxide-based catalytic materials. The content includes: (1) Design and synthetic strategy toward self-assembled mesoporous catalysts; (2) Polyoxometalates (POMs) based nanocatalysts; (3) Dendrimers based nanocatalysts; (4) Shaped nanomaterials and catalytic applications. We show that self-assemblies of molecules, crystalline seeds, nano-building blocks into organized mesoscopic structures paved new roads for tailoring porosities of heterogeneous catalysts and catalytic active sites.

  8. Biologically-Based Self-Assembling Hydrogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014396 TITLE: Biologically-Based Self-Assembling Hydrogels DISTRIBUTION...Based Self-Assembling Hydrogels Brandon L. Seal and Alyssa Panitch Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287-9709, U.S.A...Factor Xllla substrate were synthesized and conjugated to methacroylated dextran or acrylated poly(ethylene glycol). Peptide-conjugated dextran was added

  9. Self Assembly and Pyroelectric Poling for Organics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-06

    molecular phosphonic acid (PA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been developed for applications in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and graphene...and semiconducting molecular phosphonic acid (PA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been developed for applications in organic field-effect...appeal for organic semiconductor applications due to their low-cost processing, reduced material quantity needed compared to traditional organic thin

  10. Directed Self-Assembly of Nanodispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Furst, Eric M

    2013-11-15

    Directed self-assembly promises to be the technologically and economically optimal approach to industrial-scale nanotechnology, and will enable the realization of inexpensive, reproducible and active nanostructured materials with tailored photonic, transport and mechanical properties. These new nanomaterials will play a critical role in meeting the 21st century grand challenges of the US, including energy diversity and sustainability, national security and economic competitiveness. The goal of this work was to develop and fundamentally validate methods of directed selfassembly of nanomaterials and nanodispersion processing. The specific aims were: 1. Nanocolloid self-assembly and interactions in AC electric fields. In an effort to reduce the particle sizes used in AC electric field self-assembly to lengthscales, we propose detailed characterizations of field-driven structures and studies of the fundamental underlying particle interactions. We will utilize microscopy and light scattering to assess order-disorder transitions and self-assembled structures under a variety of field and physicochemical conditions. Optical trapping will be used to measure particle interactions. These experiments will be synergetic with calculations of the particle polarizability, enabling us to both validate interactions and predict the order-disorder transition for nanocolloids. 2. Assembly of anisotropic nanocolloids. Particle shape has profound effects on structure and flow behavior of dispersions, and greatly complicates their processing and self-assembly. The methods developed to study the self-assembled structures and underlying particle interactions for dispersions of isotropic nanocolloids will be extended to systems composed of anisotropic particles. This report reviews several key advances that have been made during this project, including, (1) advances in the measurement of particle polarization mechanisms underlying field-directed self-assembly, and (2) progress in the

  11. From Solvolysis to Self-Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    My sojourn from classical physical-organic chemistry and solvolysis to self-assembly and supramolecular chemistry, over the last forty years, is described. My contributions to unsaturated reactive intermediates, namely vinyl cations and unsaturated carbenes, along with my decade long involvement with polyvalent iodine chemistry, especially alkynyliodonium salts, as well as my more recent research with metal-ligand, coordination driven and directed self-assembly of finite supramolecular ensembles are discussed. PMID:19111062

  12. Dissecting Amelogenin Protein Nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Kiss, Andrew S.; Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Fan, Daming; Ndao, Moise; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenin self-assembles to form an extracellular protein matrix, which serves as a template for the continuously growing enamel apatite crystals. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism of amelogenin nanosphere formation, we manipulated the interactions between amelogenin monomers by altering pH, temperature, and protein concentration to create isolated metastable amelogenin oligomers. Recombinant porcine amelogenins (rP172 and rP148) and three different mutants containing only a single tryptophan (Trp161, Trp45, and Trp25) were used. Dynamic light scattering and fluorescence studies demonstrated that oligomers were metastable and in constant equilibrium with monomers. Stable oligomers with an average hydrodynamic radius (RH) of 7.5 nm were observed at pH 5.5 between 4 and 10 mg·ml−1. We did not find any evidence of a significant increase in folding upon self-association of the monomers into oligomers, indicating that they are disordered. Fluorescence experiments with single tryptophan amelogenins revealed that upon oligomerization the C terminus of amelogenin (around residue Trp161) is exposed at the surface of the oligomers, whereas the N-terminal region around Trp25 and Trp45 is involved in protein-protein interaction. The truncated rP148 formed similar but smaller oligomers, suggesting that the C terminus is not critical for amelogenin oligomerization. We propose a model for nanosphere formation via oligomers, and we predict that nanospheres will break up to form oligomers in mildly acidic environments via histidine protonation. We further suggest that oligomeric structures might be functional components during maturation of enamel apatite. PMID:21840988

  13. Tetraphenylethene-based star shaped porphyrins: synthesis, self-assembly, and optical and photophysical study.

    PubMed

    Rananaware, Anushri; Bhosale, Rajesh S; Ohkubo, Kei; Patil, Hemlata; Jones, Lathe A; Jackson, Sam L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Bhosale, Sidhanath V; Bhosale, Sheshanath V

    2015-04-17

    Supramolecular self-assembly and self-organization are simple and convenient ways to design and create controlled assemblies with organic molecules, and they have provoked great interest due to their potential applications in various fields, such as electronics, photonics, and light-energy conversion. Herein, we describe the synthesis of two π-conjugated porphyrin molecules bearing tetraphenylethene moieties with high fluorescence quantum yield. Photophysical and electrochemical studies were conducted to understand the physical and redox properties of these new materials, respectively. Furthermore, these derivatives were used to investigate self-assembly via the solvophobic effect. The self-assembled aggregation was performed in nonpolar and polar organic solvents and forms nanospheres and ring-like nanostructures, respectively. The solution based aggregation was studied by means of UV-vis absorption, emission, XRD, and DLS analyses. Self-assembled ring-shape structures were visualized by SEM and TEM imaging. This ring-shape morphology of nanosized macromolecules might be a good candidate for the creation of artificial light-harvesting nanodevices.

  14. Self-assembling holographic biosensors and biocomputers.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Bachand, George David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Trent, Amanda M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-01

    We present concepts for self-assembly of diffractive optics with potential uses in biosensors and biocomputers. The simplest such optics, diffraction gratings, can potentially be made from chemically-stabilized microtubules migrating on nanopatterned tracks of the motor protein kinesin. We discuss the fabrication challenges involved in patterning sub-micron-scale structures with proteins that must be maintained in aqueous buffers to preserve their activity. A novel strategy is presented that employs dry contact printing onto glass-supported amino-silane monolayers of heterobifunctional crosslinkers, followed by solid-state reactions of these cross-linkers, to graft patterns of reactive groups onto the surface. Successive solution-phase addition of cysteine-mutant proteins and amine-reactive polyethylene glycol allows assembly of features onto the printed patterns. We present data from initial experiments showing successful micro- and nanopatterning of lines of single-cysteine mutants of kinesin interleaved with lines of polyethylene, indicating that this strategy can be employed to arrays of features with resolutions suitable for gratings.

  15. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-07-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces.

  16. Guided self-assembly of nanostructured titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoxiang; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Knudsen, Kenneth D.; Yu, Yingda

    2012-02-01

    A series of nanostructured titanium oxide particles were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and characterized by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analysis, and rheometry. Tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and ethylene glycol (EG) can be combined to form either TiOx nanowires or smooth nanorods, and the molar ratio of TBT:EG determines which of these is obtained. Therefore, TiOx nanorods with a highly rough surface can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant in an EG solution. Furthermore, TiOx nanorods with two sharp ends can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of salt (LiCl) in an EG solution. The AFM results show that the TiOx nanorods with rough surfaces are formed by the self-assembly of TiOx nanospheres. The electrorheological (ER) effect was investigated using a suspension of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods dispersed in silicone oil. Oil suspensions of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods exhibit a dramatic reorganization when submitted to a strong DC electric field and the particles aggregate to form chain-like structures along the direction of applied electric field. Two-dimensional SAXS images from chains of anisotropically shaped particles exhibit a marked asymmetry in the SAXS patterns, reflecting the preferential self-assembly of the particles in the field. The suspension of rough TiOx nanorods shows stronger ER properties than that of the other nanostructured TiOx particles. We find that the particle surface roughness plays an important role in modification of the dielectric properties and in the enhancement of the ER effect.

  17. Self-assembly concepts for multicompartment nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, André H; Müller, Axel H E

    2015-07-28

    Compartmentalization is ubiquitous to many biological and artificial systems, be it for the separate storage of incompatible matter or to isolate transport processes. Advancements in the synthesis of sequential block copolymers offer a variety of tools to replicate natural design principles with tailor-made soft matter for the precise spatial separation of functionalities on multiple length scales. Here, we review recent trends in the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers to multicompartment nanostructures (MCNs) under (semi-)dilute conditions, with special emphasis on ABC triblock terpolymers. The intrinsic immiscibility of connected blocks induces short-range repulsion into discrete nano-domains stabilized by a third, soluble block or molecular additive. Polymer blocks can be synthesized from an arsenal of functional monomers directing self-assembly through packing frustration or response to various fields. The mobility in solution further allows the manipulation of self-assembly processes into specific directions by clever choice of environmental conditions. This review focuses on practical concepts that direct self-assembly into predictable nanostructures, while narrowing particle dispersity with respect to size, shape and internal morphology. The growing understanding of underlying self-assembly mechanisms expands the number of experimental concepts providing the means to target and manipulate progressively complex superstructures.

  18. Directed self-assembly of performance materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealey, Paul

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) is a promising strategy for high-volume cost-effective manufacturing at the nanoscale. Over the past decades, manufacturing techniques have been developed with such remarkable efficiency that it is now possible to engineer complex systems of heterogeneous materials at the scale of a few tens of nanometers. Further evolution of these techniques, however, is faced with difficult challenges not only in feasibility of implementation at scales of 10 nm and below, but also in prohibitively high capital equipment costs. Materials that self-assemble, on the other hand, spontaneously form structures at the mesoscale, but the micrometer areas or volumes over which the materials self-assemble with adequate perfection in structure is incommensurate with the macroscopic dimensions of working devices and systems of devices of industrial relevance. Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) refers to the integration of self-assembling materials with traditional manufacturing processes. Here we will discuss DSA of block copolymers to revolutionize sub 10 nm lithography and the manufacture of integrated circuits and storage media, DSA of ex-situ synthesized nanoparticles for applications in nanophotonics, and DSA of liquid crystals for advanced optics.

  19. Self-assembly concepts for multicompartment nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröschel, André H.; Müller, Axel H. E.

    2015-07-01

    Compartmentalization is ubiquitous to many biological and artificial systems, be it for the separate storage of incompatible matter or to isolate transport processes. Advancements in the synthesis of sequential block copolymers offer a variety of tools to replicate natural design principles with tailor-made soft matter for the precise spatial separation of functionalities on multiple length scales. Here, we review recent trends in the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers to multicompartment nanostructures (MCNs) under (semi-)dilute conditions, with special emphasis on ABC triblock terpolymers. The intrinsic immiscibility of connected blocks induces short-range repulsion into discrete nano-domains stabilized by a third, soluble block or molecular additive. Polymer blocks can be synthesized from an arsenal of functional monomers directing self-assembly through packing frustration or response to various fields. The mobility in solution further allows the manipulation of self-assembly processes into specific directions by clever choice of environmental conditions. This review focuses on practical concepts that direct self-assembly into predictable nanostructures, while narrowing particle dispersity with respect to size, shape and internal morphology. The growing understanding of underlying self-assembly mechanisms expands the number of experimental concepts providing the means to target and manipulate progressively complex superstructures.

  20. Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly of Galactose-Functionalized Biocompatible Diblock Copolymers for Intracellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer science are enabling substantial progress in nanobiotechnology, particularly in the design of new tools for enhanced understanding of cell biology and for smart drug delivery formulations. Herein, a range of novel galactosylated diblock copolymer nano-objects is prepared directly in concentrated aqueous solution via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using polymerization-induced self-assembly. The resulting nanospheres, worm-like micelles, or vesicles interact in vitro with galectins as judged by a turbidity assay. In addition, galactosylated vesicles are highly biocompatible and allow intracellular delivery of an encapsulated molecular cargo. PMID:23941545

  1. Self-assembled gelators for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Babu, Sukumaran Santhosh; Prasanthkumar, Seelam; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2012-02-20

    Nature excels at engineering materials by using the principles of chemical synthesis and molecular self-assembly with the help of noncovalent forces. Learning from these phenomena, scientists have been able to create a variety of self-assembled artificial materials of different size, shapes, and properties for wide ranging applications. An area of great interest in this regard is solvent-assisted gel formation with functional organic molecules, thus leading to one-dimensional fibers. Such fibers have improved electronic properties and are potential soft materials for organic electronic devices, particularly in bulk heterojunction solar cells. Described herein is how molecular self-assembly, which was originally proposed as a simple laboratory curiosity, has helped the evolution of a variety of soft functional materials useful for advanced electronic devices such as organic field-effect transistors and organic solar cells. Highlights on some of the recent developments are discussed.

  2. S-Layer Protein Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pum, Dietmar; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline S(urface)-layers are the most commonly observed cell surface structures in prokaryotic organisms (bacteria and archaea). S-layers are highly porous protein meshworks with unit cell sizes in the range of 3 to 30 nm, and thicknesses of ~10 nm. One of the key features of S-layer proteins is their intrinsic capability to form self-assembled mono- or double layers in solution, and at interfaces. Basic research on S-layer proteins laid foundation to make use of the unique self-assembly properties of native and, in particular, genetically functionalized S-layer protein lattices, in a broad range of applications in the life and non-life sciences. This contribution briefly summarizes the knowledge about structure, genetics, chemistry, morphogenesis, and function of S-layer proteins and pays particular attention to the self-assembly in solution, and at differently functionalized solid supports. PMID:23354479

  3. Theory of Programmable Hierarchic Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2011-06-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the inverse problem in self-assembly. A particular scheme is proposed for building an arbitrary desired nanostructure out of self-assembled building blocks (“octopus” nanoparticles). The conditions for robust self-assembly of the target structure are identified. This includes the minimal number of “colors” needed to encode interparticle bonds, which are to be implemented as pairs of complementary DNA sequences. As a part of this analysis, it is demonstrated that a floppy network with thermal fluctuations, in a certain range of coordination numbers ⟨Z⟩, possesses entropic rigidity and can be described as a traditional elastic solid. The onset of the entropic rigidity, ⟨Z⟩=d+1, determines the minimal number of bond types per particle needed to encode the desired structure. Thermodynamic considerations give additional conditions for the implementation of this scheme.

  4. Model-driven optimization of multicomponent self-assembly processes.

    PubMed

    Korevaar, Peter A; Grenier, Christophe; Markvoort, Albert J; Schenning, Albertus P H J; de Greef, Tom F A; Meijer, E W

    2013-10-22

    Here, we report an engineering approach toward multicomponent self-assembly processes by developing a methodology to circumvent spurious, metastable assemblies. The formation of metastable aggregates often hampers self-assembly of molecular building blocks into the desired nanostructures. Strategies are explored to master the pathway complexity and avoid off-pathway aggregates by optimizing the rate of assembly along the correct pathway. We study as a model system the coassembly of two monomers, the R- and S-chiral enantiomers of a π-conjugated oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative. Coassembly kinetics are analyzed by developing a kinetic model, which reveals the initial assembly of metastable structures buffering free monomers and thereby slows the formation of thermodynamically stable assemblies. These metastable assemblies exert greater influence on the thermodynamically favored self-assembly pathway if the ratio between both monomers approaches 1:1, in agreement with experimental results. Moreover, competition by metastable assemblies is highly temperature dependent and hampers the assembly of equilibrium nanostructures most effectively at intermediate temperatures. We demonstrate that the rate of the assembly process may be optimized by tuning the cooling rate. Finally, it is shown by simulation that increasing the driving force for assembly stepwise by changing the solvent composition may circumvent metastable pathways and thereby force the assembly process directly into the correct pathway.

  5. Self-assembly of chlorophenols in water

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Ewa; Rogalski, Marek; Gulik-Krzywicki, Tadeusz; Gulik, Annette; Chipot, Christophe

    1999-01-01

    In saturated solutions of some di- and trichlorophenols, structures with complex morphologies, consisting of thin, transparent sheets often coiling into helices and ultimately twisting into filaments, were observed under the optical microscope. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, phase diagrams, and molecular modeling were performed to elucidate the observed phenomena. Here, we present evidence that the chlorophenols studied, when interacting with water, self-assemble into bilayers. The fact that some chlorophenols form the same supramolecular structures as those described previously for structurally nonrelated surfactants sheds light on the mechanisms of self-assembly. PMID:10359753

  6. Remote control of self-assembled microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosjean, G.; Lagubeau, G.; Darras, A.; Hubert, M.; Lumay, G.; Vandewalle, N.

    2015-11-01

    Physics governing the locomotion of microorganisms and other microsystems is dominated by viscous damping. An effective swimming strategy involves the non-reciprocal and periodic deformations of the considered body. Here, we show that a magnetocapillary-driven self-assembly, composed of three soft ferromagnetic beads, is able to swim along a liquid-air interface when powered by an external magnetic field. More importantly, we demonstrate that trajectories can be fully controlled, opening ways to explore low Reynolds number swimming. This magnetocapillary system spontaneously forms by self-assembly, allowing miniaturization and other possible applications such as cargo transport or solvent flows.

  7. Self-assembly of small peptidomimetic cyclophanes.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Jorge; Burguete, M Isabel; Escuder, Beatriu; Galindo, Francisco; Gavara, Raquel; Miravet, Juan F; Luis, Santiago V; Peris, Gabriel

    2004-08-20

    The self-assembly of a series of small peptidomimetic cyclophanes in organic solvents was studied. X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modelling were used to understand the structural features of these self-assembling compounds both at the molecular and supramolecular level. The factors that could influence the formation of gels rather than crystals were studied and a model for the arrangement of molecules in the gel was proposed. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy revealed that in some cases these compounds undergo a transcription of chirality when going from organogelator to helicoidal gel fibres.

  8. Remote control of self-assembled microswimmers

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, G.; Lagubeau, G.; Darras, A.; Hubert, M.; Lumay, G.; Vandewalle, N.

    2015-01-01

    Physics governing the locomotion of microorganisms and other microsystems is dominated by viscous damping. An effective swimming strategy involves the non-reciprocal and periodic deformations of the considered body. Here, we show that a magnetocapillary-driven self-assembly, composed of three soft ferromagnetic beads, is able to swim along a liquid-air interface when powered by an external magnetic field. More importantly, we demonstrate that trajectories can be fully controlled, opening ways to explore low Reynolds number swimming. This magnetocapillary system spontaneously forms by self-assembly, allowing miniaturization and other possible applications such as cargo transport or solvent flows. PMID:26538006

  9. Computing by molecular self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Jonoska, Nataša; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2012-08-06

    The paper reviews two computing models by DNA self-assembly whose proof of principal have recently been experimentally confirmed. The first model incorporates DNA nano-devices and triple crossover DNA molecules to algorithmically arrange non-DNA species. This is achieved by simulating a finite-state automaton with output where golden nanoparticles are assembled to read-out the result. In the second model, a complex DNA molecule representing a graph emerges as a solution of a computational problem. This supports the idea that in molecular self-assembly computing, it may be necessary to develop the notion of shape processing besides the classical approach through symbol processing.

  10. Nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoro, S.; Göpfrich, K.; Kartanas, T.; Keyser, U. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate general properties of nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions, using a computational model and DNA tile assembly experiments. By contrasting symmetric and asymmetric interactions we show that the latter can lead to self-limiting cluster growth. Furthermore, by adjusting the relative abundance of self-assembly particles in a two-particle mixture, we are able to tune the final sizes of these clusters. We show that this is a fundamental property of asymmetric interactions, which has potential applications in bioengineering, and provides insights into the study of diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  11. Self-assembling materials for therapeutic delivery✩

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Monica C.; Schneider, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of medications must be administered through parenteral delivery, i.e., intravenous, intramuscular, or subcutaneous injection, to ensure effectiveness of the therapeutic. For some therapeutics, the use of delivery vehicles in conjunction with this delivery mechanism can improve drug efficacy and patient compliance. Macromolecular self-assembly has been exploited recently to engineer materials for the encapsulation and controlled delivery of therapeutics. Self-assembled materials offer the advantages of conventional crosslinked materials normally used for release, but also provide the ability to tailor specific bulk material properties, such as release profiles, at the molecular level via monomer design. As a result, the design of materials from the “bottom up” approach has generated a variety of supramolecular devices for biomedical applications. This review provides an overview of self-assembling molecules, their resultant structures, and their use in therapeutic delivery. It highlights the current progress in the design of polymer- and peptide-based self-assembled materials. PMID:19010748

  12. Nanopropulsion by biocatalytic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Joy; Hope, Alexander; Hughes, Meghan; Debnath, Sisir; Fleming, Scott; Wark, Alastair W; Ulijn, Rein V; Haw, Mark D

    2014-09-23

    A number of organisms and organelles are capable of self-propulsion at the micro- and nanoscales. Production of simple man-made mimics of biological transportation systems may prove relevant to achieving movement in artificial cells and nano/micronscale robotics that may be of biological and nanotechnological importance. We demonstrate the propulsion of particles based on catalytically controlled molecular self-assembly and fiber formation at the particle surface. Specifically, phosphatase enzymes (acting as the engine) are conjugated to a quantum dot (the vehicle), and are subsequently exposed to micellar aggregates (fuel) that upon biocatalytic dephosphorylation undergo fibrillar self-assembly, which in turn causes propulsion. The motion of individual enzyme/quantum dot conjugates is followed directly using fluorescence microscopy. While overall movement remains random, the enzyme-conjugates exhibit significantly faster transport in the presence of the fiber forming system, compared to controls without fuel, a non-self-assembling substrate, or a substrate which assembles into spherical, rather than fibrous structures upon enzymatic dephosphorylation. When increasing the concentration of the fiber-forming fuel, the speed of the conjugates increases compared to non-self-assembling substrate, although directionality remains random.

  13. Self-assembly micro optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping (Cerina); Le, Kevin; Malalur-Nagaraja-Rao, Smitha; Hsu, Lun-Chen; Chiao, J.-C.

    2006-01-01

    Optical communication and sensor industry face critical challenges in manufacturing for system integration. Due to the assembly complexity and integration platform variety, micro optical components require costly alignment and assembly procedures, in which many required manual efforts. Consequently, self-assembly device architectures have become a great interest and could provide major advantages over the conventional optical devices. In this paper, we discussed a self-assembly integration platform for micro optical components. To demonstrate the adaptability and flexibility of the proposed optical device architectures, we chose a commercially available MEMS fabrication foundry service - MUMPs (Multi-User MEMS Process). In this work, polysilicon layers of MUMPS are used as the 3-D structural material for construction of micro component framework and actuators. However, because the polysilicon has high absorption in the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges, it is not suitable for optical interaction. To demonstrate the required optical performance, hybrid integration of materials was proposed and implemented. Organic compound materials were applied on the silicon-based framework to form the required optical interfaces. Organic compounds provide good optical transparency, flexibility to form filters or lens and inexpensive manufacturing procedures. In this paper, we have demonstrated a micro optical filter integrated with self-assembly structures. We will discuss the self-assembly mechanism, optical filter designs, fabrication issues and results.

  14. Inertially assisted nanoscale self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, E; Marcheselli, C; Shum, A; Parviz, B A

    2010-09-17

    We present a simple and versatile method for integrating submicron objects onto pre-determined locations on a substrate. The method relies on augmenting inertial forces using centrifugal motion and geometric constraints to guide the placement of submicron objects on a substrate with minimal requirements for surface engineering and binding chemistries. Here, we demonstrate the utility of the method for placing gold particles, metal nanorods and inorganic nanocrystals. The method has demonstrated high yield of self-assembly for submicron particles with a variety of shapes and sizes. We have been able to get a near-perfect yield for filling hundreds of traps with nanoparticles in only 20 min. Two hundred nanometer diameter nanorods were self-assembled into an array of 256 traps on the template with 92% yield. 1.4 microm and 300 nm sodium chloride crystals were self-assembled in arrays of 7000 and 576 traps, respectively, with near-perfect yield in filling each site. Due to its convenient set-up and high performance, inertially assisted self-assembly can be easily adopted and used for a variety of integration needs on the submicron scale.

  15. [INVITED] Self-assembled optical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Alexandre; Aradian, Ashod; Ponsinet, Virginie; Barois, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled metamaterials constitute a promising platform to achieving bulk and homogenous optical materials that exhibit unusual effective medium properties. For many years now, the research community has contemplated lithographically fabricated metasurfaces, with extraordinary optical features. However, achieving large volumes at low cost is still a challenge by top-down fabrication. Bottom-up fabrication, that relies both on nanochemistry and self-assembly, is capable of building such materials while greatly reducing the energy footprint in the formulation of the metamaterial. Self-assembled metamaterials have shown that they are capable of reaching unprecedented values of bulkiness and homogeneity figures of merit. This feat is achieved by synthesizing plasmonic nanoresonators (meta-atoms in the sense of artificial polarizable units) and assembling them into a fully three-dimensional matrix through a variety of methods. Furthermore it has been shown that a wide range of material parameters can be tailored by controlling the geometry and composition of the meta-atoms as well as the volume fraction of the nano-objects in the metamaterial. Here we conduct a non-comprehensive review of some of the recent trends in self-assembled optical metamaterials and illustrate these trends with our recent work.

  16. Large branched self-assembled DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosch, Paul; Wälti, Christoph; Middelberg, Anton P. J.; Davies, A. Giles

    2007-04-01

    Many biological molecules have been demonstrated to self-assemble into complex structures and networks by using their very efficient and selective molecular recognition processes. The use of biological molecules as scaffolds for the construction of functional devices by self-assembling nanoscale complexes onto the scaffolds has recently attracted significant attention and many different applications in this field have emerged. In particular DNA, owing to its inherent sophisticated self-organization and molecular recognition properties, has served widely as a scaffold for various nanotechnological self-assembly applications, with metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles, proteins, macromolecular complexes, inter alia, being assembled onto designed DNA scaffolds. Such scaffolds may typically contain multiple branch-points and comprise a number of DNA molecules selfassembled into the desired configuration. Previously, several studies have used synthetic methods to produce the constituent DNA of the scaffolds, but this typically constrains the size of the complexes. For applications that require larger self-assembling DNA complexes, several tens of nanometers or more, other techniques need to be employed. In this article, we discuss a generic technique to generate large branched DNA macromolecular complexes.

  17. Inverse Problem in Self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Alexei

    2012-02-01

    By decorating colloids and nanoparticles with DNA, one can introduce highly selective key-lock interactions between them. This leads to a new class of systems and problems in soft condensed matter physics. In particular, this opens a possibility to solve inverse problem in self-assembly: how to build an arbitrary desired structure with the bottom-up approach? I will present a theoretical and computational analysis of the hierarchical strategy in attacking this problem. It involves self-assembly of particular building blocks (``octopus particles''), that in turn would assemble into the target structure. On a conceptual level, our approach combines elements of three different brands of programmable self assembly: DNA nanotechnology, nanoparticle-DNA assemblies and patchy colloids. I will discuss the general design principles, theoretical and practical limitations of this approach, and illustrate them with our simulation results. Our crucial result is that not only it is possible to design a system that has a given nanostructure as a ground state, but one can also program and optimize the kinetic pathway for its self-assembly.

  18. Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV

  19. The Role of Secondary Structure in the Entropically Driven Amelogenin Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Fan, Daming; Du, Chang; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Amelogenin, the major extracellular enamel matrix protein, plays critical roles in controlling enamel mineralization. This generally hydrophobic protein self-assembles to form nanosphere structures under certain solution conditions. To gain clearer insight into the mechanisms of amelogenin self-assembly, we first investigated the occurrences of secondary structures within its sequence. By applying isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we determined the thermodynamic parameters associated with protein-protein interactions and with conformational changes during self-assembly. The recombinant porcine full length (rP172) and a truncated amelogenin lacking the hydrophilic C-terminal (rP148) were used. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements performed at low concentrations (<5 μM) revealed the presence of the polyproline-type II (PPII) conformation in both amelogenins in addition to α-helix and unordered conformations. Structural transition from PPII/unordered to β-sheet was observed for both proteins at higher concentrations (>62.5 μM) and upon self-assembly. ITC measurements indicated that the self-assembly of rP172 and rP148 is entropically driven (+ΔSA) and energetically favorable (−ΔGA). The magnitude of enthalpy (ΔHA) and entropy changes of assembly (ΔSA) were smaller for rP148 than rP172, whereas the Gibbs free energy change of assembly (ΔGA) was not significantly different. It was found that rP172 had higher PPII content than rP148, and the monomer-multimer equilibrium for rP172 was observed in a narrower protein concentration range when compared to rP148. The large positive enthalpy and entropy changes in both cases are attributed to the release of ordered water molecules and the associated entropy gain (due to the hydrophobic effect). These findings suggest that PPII conformation plays an important role in amelogenin self-assembly and that rP172 assembly is more favorable than rP148. The data are direct evidence for the notion that hydrophobic

  20. Structure and dynamics of optically directed self-assembly of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debjit; Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles leading to the formation of colloidal clusters often serves as the representative analogue for understanding molecular assembly. Unravelling the in situ structure and dynamics of such clusters in liquid suspensions is highly challenging. Presently colloidal clusters are first isolated from their generating environment and then their structures are probed by light scattering methods. In order to measure the in situ structure and dynamics of colloidal clusters, we have generated them using the high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulse optical tweezer. Since the constituent of our dimer, trimer or tetramer clusters are 250 nm radius two-photon resonant fluorophore coated nanospheres under the optical trap, they inherently produce Two-Photon Fluorescence, which undergo intra-nanosphere Fluorescence Energy Transfer. This unique energy transfer signature, in turn, enables us to visualize structures and orientations of these colloidal clusters during the process of their formation and subsequent dynamics in a liquid suspension. We also show that due to shape-birefringence, orientation and structural control of these colloidal clusters are possible as the polarization of the trapping laser is changed from linear to circular. We thus report important progress in sampling the smallest possible aggregates of nanoparticles, dimers, trimers or tetramers, formed early in the self-assembly process. PMID:27006305

  1. Chemical Functionalization, Self-Assembly, and Applications of Nanomaterials and Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Tifeng; Yan, Xingbin; Balan, Lavinia; Stepanov, Andrey; Chen, Xinqing; Hu, Michael Z.

    2014-01-01

    This special issue addresses the research studies on chemical functionalization, self-assembly, and applications of nanomaterials and nanocomposites. It contains twentyfour articles including two reviews and twenty-two research articles. It is used to create new functional nanomaterials and nanocomposites with a variety of sizes and morphologies such as Zn/Al layered double hydroxide, tin oxide nanowires, FeOOH-modified anion resin, Au nanoclusters silica composite nanospheres, Ti-doped ZnO sol-composite films, TiO2/ZnO composite, graphene oxide nanocomposites, LiFePO4/C nanocomposites, and chitosan nanoparticles. These nanomaterials and nanocomposites have widespread applications in tissue engineering, antitumor, sensors, photoluminescence, electrochemical, and catalytic properties. In addition, this themed issue includes some research articles about self-assembly systems covering organogels and Langmuir films. Furthermore, B. Blasiak et al. performed a literature survey on the recent advances in production, functionalization, toxicity reduction, and application of nanoparticles in cancer diagnosis, treatment, and treatment monitoring. P. Colson et al. performed a literature survey on the recent advances in nanosphere lithography due to its compatibility with wafer-scale processes as well as its potential to manufacture a wide variety of homogeneous one-, two-, or three-dimensional nanostructures.

  2. Ultrasmall peptides self-assemble into diverse nanostructures: morphological evaluation and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Anupama; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we perform a morphological evaluation of the diverse nanostructures formed by varying concentration and amino acid sequence of a unique class of ultrasmall self-assembling peptides. We modified these peptides by replacing the aliphatic amino acid at the C-aliphatic terminus with different aromatic amino acids. We tracked the effect of introducing aromatic residues on self-assembly and morphology of resulting nanostructures. Whereas aliphatic peptides formed long, helical fibers that entangle into meshes and entrap >99.9% water, the modified peptides contrastingly formed short, straight fibers with a flat morphology. No helical fibers were observed for the modified peptides. For the aliphatic peptides at low concentrations, different supramolecular assemblies such as hollow nanospheres and membrane blebs were found. Since the ultrasmall peptides are made of simple, aliphatic amino acids, considered to have existed in the primordial soup, study of these supramolecular assemblies could be relevant to understanding chemical evolution leading to the origin of life on Earth. In particular, we propose a variety of potential applications in bioengineering and nanotechnology for the diverse self-assembled nanostructures.

  3. Ultrasmall Peptides Self-Assemble into Diverse Nanostructures: Morphological Evaluation and Potential Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Anupama; Hauser, Charlotte A.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we perform a morphological evaluation of the diverse nanostructures formed by varying concentration and amino acid sequence of a unique class of ultrasmall self-assembling peptides. We modified these peptides by replacing the aliphatic amino acid at the C-aliphatic terminus with different aromatic amino acids. We tracked the effect of introducing aromatic residues on self-assembly and morphology of resulting nanostructures. Whereas aliphatic peptides formed long, helical fibers that entangle into meshes and entrap >99.9% water, the modified peptides contrastingly formed short, straight fibers with a flat morphology. No helical fibers were observed for the modified peptides. For the aliphatic peptides at low concentrations, different supramolecular assemblies such as hollow nanospheres and membrane blebs were found. Since the ultrasmall peptides are made of simple, aliphatic amino acids, considered to have existed in the primordial soup, study of these supramolecular assemblies could be relevant to understanding chemical evolution leading to the origin of life on Earth. In particular, we propose a variety of potential applications in bioengineering and nanotechnology for the diverse self-assembled nanostructures. PMID:22016623

  4. Self-assembly between biomacromolecules and lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hongjun

    Anionic DNA and cationic lipsomes can self-assemble into a multi-lamellar structure where two-dimensional (2-D) lipid sheets confine a periodic one-dimensional (1-D) lattice of parallel DNA chains, between which Cd2+ ions can condense, and be subsequently reacted with H 2S to template CdS nanorods with crystallographic control analogous to biomineralization. The strong electrostatic interactions align the templated CdS (002) polar planes parallel to the negatively charged sugar-phosphate DNA backbone, which indicates that molecular details of the DNA molecule are imprinted onto the inorganic crystal structure. The resultant nanorods have (002) planes tilted by ˜60° with respect to the rod axis, in contrast to all known II-VI semiconductor nanorods. Rational design of the biopolymer-membrane templates is possible, as demonstrated by the self-assembly between anionic M13 virus and cationic membrane. The filamentous virus has diameter ˜3x larger but similar surface charge density as DNA, the self-assembled complexes maintain the multi-lamellar structure, but pore sizes are ˜10x larger in area, which can be used to package and organize large functional molecules. Not only the counter-charged objects can self-assemble, the like-charged biopolymer and membrane can also self-assemble with the help of multivalent ions. We have investigated anionic lipid-DNA complexes induced by a range of divalent ions to show how different ion-mediated interactions are expressed in the self-assembled structures, which include two distinct lamellar phases and an inverted hexagonal phase. DNA can be selectively organized into or expelled out of the lamellar phases depending on membrane charge density and counterion concentration. For a subset of ion (Zn2+ etc.) at high enough concentration, 2-D inverted hexagonal phase can be formed where DNA strands are coated with anionic lipid tubes via interaction with Zn2+ ions. We suggest that the effect of ion binding on lipid's spontaneous

  5. Self-assembling membranes and related methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Capito, Ramille M; Azevedo, Helena S; Stupp, Samuel L

    2013-08-20

    The present invention relates to self-assembling membranes. In particular, the present invention provides self-assembling membranes configured for securing and/or delivering bioactive agents. In some embodiments, the self-assembling membranes are used in the treatment of diseases, and related methods (e.g., diagnostic methods, research methods, drug screening).

  6. Self-assembled Oniontype Multiferroic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shenqiang; Briber, Robert M.; Wuttig, Manfred

    2009-03-01

    Spontaneously self-assembled oniontype multiferroic nanostructures based on block copolymers as templating materials are reported. Diblock copolymer containing two different magnetoelectric precursors separately segregated to the two microdomains have been shown to form well-ordered templated lamellar structures. Onion-type multilamellar ordered multiferroic (PZT/CoFe2O4) nanostructures have been induced by room temperature solvent annealing in a magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the plane of the film. The evolution of the onion-like microstructure has been characterized by AFM, MFM, and TEM. The structure retains lamellar periodicity observed at zero field. The onion structure is superparamagnetic above and antiferromagnetic below the blocking temperature. This templating process opens a route for nanometer-scale patterning of magnetic toroids by means of self-assembly on length scales that are difficult to obtain by standard lithography techniques.

  7. Controlling and imaging biomimetic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Aliprandi, Alessandro; Mauro, Matteo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of chemical entities represents a very attractive way to create a large variety of ordered functional structures and complex matter. Although much effort has been devoted to the preparation of supramolecular nanostructures based on different chemical building blocks, an understanding of the mechanisms at play and the ability to monitor assembly processes and, in turn, control them are often elusive, which precludes a deep and comprehensive control of the final structures. Here the complex supramolecular landscape of a platinum(II) compound is characterized fully and controlled successfully through a combination of supramolecular and photochemical approaches. The supramolecular assemblies comprise two kinetic assemblies and their thermodynamic counterpart. The monitoring of the different emission properties of the aggregates, used as a fingerprint for each species, allows the real-time visualization of the evolving self-assemblies. The control of multiple supramolecular pathways will help the design of complex systems in and out of their thermodynamic equilibrium.

  8. Controlling and imaging biomimetic self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliprandi, Alessandro; Mauro, Matteo; de Cola, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of chemical entities represents a very attractive way to create a large variety of ordered functional structures and complex matter. Although much effort has been devoted to the preparation of supramolecular nanostructures based on different chemical building blocks, an understanding of the mechanisms at play and the ability to monitor assembly processes and, in turn, control them are often elusive, which precludes a deep and comprehensive control of the final structures. Here the complex supramolecular landscape of a platinum(II) compound is characterized fully and controlled successfully through a combination of supramolecular and photochemical approaches. The supramolecular assemblies comprise two kinetic assemblies and their thermodynamic counterpart. The monitoring of the different emission properties of the aggregates, used as a fingerprint for each species, allows the real-time visualization of the evolving self-assemblies. The control of multiple supramolecular pathways will help the design of complex systems in and out of their thermodynamic equilibrium.

  9. The dynamics of nacre self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H.E; Checa, Antonio G

    2006-01-01

    We show how nacre and pearl construction in bivalve and gastropod molluscs can be understood in terms of successive processes of controlled self-assembly from the molecular- to the macro-scale. This dynamics involves the physics of the formation of both solid and liquid crystals and of membranes and fluids to produce a nanostructured hierarchically constructed biological composite of polysaccharides, proteins and mineral, whose mechanical properties far surpass those of its component parts. PMID:17251136

  10. Columnar self-assembly of colloidal nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Aaron E; Ghezelbash, Ali; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Sigman, Michael B; Korgel, Brian A

    2006-12-01

    The self-assembly of sterically stabilized colloidal copper sulfide nanodisks, 14-20 nm in diameter and 5-7 nm thick, was studied. The nanodisks were observed by electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering to form columnar arrays when evaporated as thin films from concentrated dispersions. These superstructured nanomaterials might give rise to technologically useful properties, such as anisotropic electrical transport and electrorheological and optical properties.

  11. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Zhigang

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  12. Meniscus height controlled convective self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Satyan; Crosby, Alfred

    Convective self-assembly techniques based on the 'coffee-ring effect' allow for the fabrication of materials with structural hierarchy and multi-functionality across a wide range of length scales. The coffee-ring effect describes deposition of non-volatiles at the edge of droplet due to capillary flow and pattern formations due to pinning and de-pinning of meniscus with the solvent evaporation. We demonstrate a novel convective self-assembly method which uses a piezo-actuated bending motion for driving the de-pinning step. In this method, a dilute solution of nanoparticles or polymers is trapped by capillary forces between a blade and substrate. As the blade oscillates with a fixed frequency and amplitude and the substrate translates at a fixed velocity, the height of the capillary meniscus oscillates. The meniscus height controls the contact angle of three phase contact line and at a critical angle de-pinning occurs. The combination of convective flux and continuously changing contact angle drives the assembly of the solute and subsequent de-pinning step, providing a direct means for producing linear assemblies. We demonstrate a new method for convective self-assembly at an accelerated rate when compared to other techniques, with control over deposit dimensions. Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0185).

  13. Self-Assembly of Chiral Plasmonic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiang; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic chiroptical effects have attracted significant attention for their widespread potential applications in negative-refractive-index materials, advanced light-polarization filters, and ultrasensitive sensing devices, etc. As compared to top-down fabrication methods, the bottom-up self-assembly strategy provides nanoscale resolution, parallel production, and isotropic optical response, and therefore plays an indispensable role in the fabrication of chiral plasmonic nanostructures. The optical properties of these chiral structures can be predicted based on the near-field coupling of localized surface plasmons in structural components, which offers a route to tune or enhance optical activity by selecting building blocks and designing structural configurations. To date, three main types of chiral plasmonic nanostructures, i.e., chiral "plasmonic molecules", chiral superstructures, and chiral-molecule-metal hybrid complexes, are usually assembled, in which metal nanoparticles with various sizes, shapes, and compositions, and/or chiral molecules are employed as building blocks. Here, recent achievements in the self-assembly of chiral plasmonic nanostructures are highlighted and perspectives on the future directions of chiral plasmonics integrated with bottom-up self-assembly are presented, showing three typical examples, including chiral plasmonic switches, chiral nanoparticles, and chiral metamaterials.

  14. Anisotropic Self-Assembly of Nanoparticle Amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat

    2009-03-01

    It is easy to understand the self-assembly of particles having anisotropic shapes or interactions, such as Co nanoparticles or proteins, into highly extended structures. However, there is no experimentally established strategy for creating anisotropic structures from common spherical nanoparticles. We demonstrate that spherical nanoparticles, uniformly grafted with macromolecules, robustly self-assemble into a range of anisotropic superstructures when they are dispersed in the corresponding homopolymer matrix. This phenomenon is driven by the microphase separation between the inorganic nanoparticles and the (organic) polymeric chains grafted to their surfaces in a fashion similar to block copolymers. This microphase separation driven particle self-assembly provides a unique means of controlling the global nanoparticle dispersion state in polymer nanocomposites. The relationship between the state of particle dispersion and nanocomposite properties can thus be critically examined, and in particular we focus on the mechanical reinforcement afforded when particles are added to polymers. Grafted nanoparticles are thus versatile building blocks for creating tunable and functional particle superstructures with significant practical applications. With Pinar Akcora, Hongjun Liu, Yu Li, Brian Benicewicz, Linda Schadler, Thanos Panagiotopoulos, Jack Douglas, P. Thiyagarajan and Ralph Colby.

  15. Self-assembly of Artificial Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Christopher; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Actin Filaments are long, double-helical biopolymers that make up the cytoskeleton along with microtubules and intermediate filaments. In order to further understand the self-assembly process of these biopolymers, a model to recreate actin filament geometry was developed. A monomer in the shape of a bent rod with vertical and lateral binding sites was designed to assemble into single or double helices. With Molecular Dynamics simulations, a variety of phases were observed to form by varying the strength of the binding sites. Ignoring lateral binding sites, we have found a narrow range of binding strengths that lead to long single helices via various growth pathways. When lateral binding strength is introduced, double helices begin to form. These double helices self-assemble into substantially more stable structures than their single helix counterparts. We have found double helices to form long filaments at about half the vertical binding strength of single helices. Surprisingly, we have found that triple helices occasionally form, indicating the importance of structural regulation in the self-assembly of biopolymers.

  16. Engineered Self-Assembly of Plasmonic Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    A critical need in nanotechnology is the development of new tools and methods to organize, connect, and integrate solid-state nanocomponents. Self-assembly - where components spontaneously organize themselves - can be carried out on a massively parallel scale to construct large-scale architectures using solid-state nanocrystal building blocks. I will present our recent work on the synthesis and self-assembly of nanocrystals for plasmonics, where light is propagated, manipulated, and confined by solid-state components that are smaller than the wavelength of light itself. We show the organization of polymer-grafted metal nanocrystals into hierarchical nanojunction arrays that possess intense ``hot spots'' due to electromagnetic field localization. We also show that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can serve as a new class of plasmonic building blocks, where shape and carrier density can be actively tuned to engineer plasmon resonances. These examples demonstrate that nanocrystals possess unique electromagnetic properties that rival top-down structures, and the potential of self-assembly for fabricating designer plasmonic materials.

  17. Interparticle Forces Underlying Nanoparticle Self-Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Yan, Cong; Wang, Tie

    2015-12-02

    Studies on the self-assembly of nanoparticles have been a hot topic in nanotechnology for decades and still remain relevant for the present and future due to their tunable collective properties as well as their remarkable applications to a wide range of fields. The novel properties of nanoparticle assemblies arise from their internal interactions and assemblies with the desired architecture key to constructing novel nanodevices. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the interparticle forces of nanoparticle self-assemblies is a pre-requisite to the design and control of the assembly processes, so as to fabricate the ideal nanomaterial and nanoproducts. Here, different categories of interparticle forces are classified and discussed according to their origins, behaviors and functions during the assembly processes, and the induced collective properties of the corresponding nanoparticle assemblies. Common interparticle forces, such as van der Waals forces, electrostatic interactions, electromagnetic dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, solvophonic interactions, and depletion interactions are discussed in detail. In addition, new categories of assembly principles are summarized and introduced. These are termed template-mediated interactions and shape-complementary interactions. A deep understanding of the interactions inside self-assembled nanoparticles, and a broader perspective for the future synthesis and fabrication of these promising nanomaterials is provided.

  18. Self-assembly of knots and links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, Enzo; Polles, Guido; Marenduzzo, Davide; Micheletti, Cristian

    2017-03-01

    Guiding the self-assembly of identical building blocks towards complex three-dimensional structures with a set of desired properties is a major goal in material science, chemistry and physics. A particularly challenging problem, especially explored in synthetic chemistry, is that of self-assembling closed structures with a target topology starting by simple geometrical templates. Here we overview and revisit recent advancements, based on stochastic simulations, where the geometry of rigid helical templates with functionalised sticky ends has been designed for self-assembling efficiently and reproducibly into a wide range of three-dimensional closed structures. Notably, these include non trivial topologies of links and knots, including the 819 knot that we had predicted to be highly encodable and that has only recently been obtained experimentally. By appropriately tuning the parameters that define the template shape, we show that, for fixed concentration of templates, the assembly process can be directed towards the formation of specific knotted and linked structures such as the trefoils, pentafoil knots, Hopf and Solomon links. More exotic and unexpected knots and links are also found. Our results should be relevant to the design of new protocols that can both increase and broaden the population of synthetise molecular knots and catenanes.

  19. Amphiphilic Janus gold nanoparticles prepared by interface-directed self-assembly: synthesis and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guannan; Tian, Jia; Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Hanying

    2014-09-01

    Materials with Janus structures are attractive for wide applications in materials science. Although extensive efforts in the synthesis of Janus particles have been reported, the synthesis of sub-10 nm Janus nanoparticles is still challenging. Herein, the synthesis of Janus gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based on interface-directed self-assembly is reported. Polystyrene (PS) colloidal particles with AuNPs on the surface were prepared by interface-directed self-assembly, and the colloidal particles were used as templates for the synthesis of Janus AuNPs. To prepare colloidal particles, thiol-terminated polystyrene (PS-SH) was dissolved in toluene and citrate-stabilized AuNPs were dispersed in aqueous solution. Upon mixing the two solutions, PS-SH chains were grafted to the surface of AuNPs and amphiphilic AuNPs were formed at the liquid-liquid interface. PS colloidal particles decorated with AuNPs on the surfaces were prepared by adding the emulsion to excess methanol. On the surface, AuNPs were partially embedded in the colloidal particles. The outer regions of the AuNPs were exposed to the solution and were functionalized through the grafting of atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. Poly[2-(dimethamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) on AuNPs were prepared by surface-initiated ATRP. After centrifugation and dissolving the colloidal particles in tetrahydrofuran (THF), Janus AuNPs with PS and PDMAEMA on two hemispheres were obtained. In acidic pH, Janus AuNPs are amphiphilic and are able to emulsify oil droplets in water; in basic pH, the Janus AuNPs are hydrophobic. In mixtures of THF/methanol at a volume ratio of 1:5, the Janus AuNPs self-assemble into bilayer structures with collapsed PS in the interiors and solvated PDMAEMA at the exteriors of the structures.

  20. Self-assembled biomimetic nanoreactors I: Polymeric template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile; Jugroot, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The variety of nanoarchitectures made feasible by the self-assembly of alternating copolymers opens new avenues for biomimicry. Indeed, self-assembled structures allow the development of nanoreactors which combine the efficiency of high surface area metal active centres to the effect of confinement due to the very small cavities generated by the self-assembly process. A novel self-assembly of high molecular weight alternating copolymers is characterized in the present study. The self-assembly is shown to organize into nanosheets, providing a 2 nm hydrophobic cavity with a 1D confinement.

  1. Bacterial expression of self-assembling peptide hydrogelators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, Cem

    For tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications, various architectures are explored to serve as biomaterial tools. Via de novo design, functional peptide hydrogel materials have been developed as scaffolds for biomedical applications. The objective of this study is to investigate bacterial expression as an alternative method to chemical synthesis for the recombinant production of self-assembling peptides that can form rigid hydrogels under physiological conditions. The Schneider and Pochan Labs have designed and characterized a 20 amino acid beta-hairpin forming amphiphilic peptide containing a D-residue in its turn region (MAX1). As a result, this peptide must be prepared chemically. Peptide engineering, using the sequence of MAX1 as a template, afforded a small family of peptides for expression (EX peptides) that have different turn sequences consisting of natural amino acids and amenable to bacterial expression. Each sequence was initially chemically synthesized to quickly assess the material properties of its corresponding gel. One model peptide EX1, was chosen to start the bacterial expression studies. DNA constructs facilitating the expression of EX1 were designed in such that the peptide could be expressed with different fusion partners and subsequently cleaved by enzymatic or chemical means to afford the free peptide. Optimization studies were performed to increase the yield of pure peptide that ultimately allowed 50 mg of pure peptide to be harvested from one liter of culture, providing an alternate means to produce this hydrogel-forming peptide. Recombinant production of other self-assembling hairpins with different turn sequences was also successful using this optimized protocol. The studies demonstrate that new beta-hairpin self-assembling peptides that are amenable to bacterial production and form rigid hydrogels at physiological conditions can be designed and produced by fermentation in good yield at significantly reduced cost when compared to

  2. Dynamic modeling and scaling of nanostructure formation in the lithographically induced self-assembly and self-construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Chou, Stephen Y.

    2003-05-01

    We numerically studied the dynamical formation process and the scaling of the nanostructures in the lithographically induced self-assembly and self-construction of thin polymer films. Our studies show that the period of the self-assembled pillars depends on the ratio between the surface tension force and the electrostatic force. The viscosity of the polymer has no effect on the final pillar shape. When the feature width of the mold is comparable to or smaller than the most unstable disturbance wavelength of the system, the initially self-assembled pillars will merge to form a self-constructed mesa.

  3. Self-assembly processes in the prebiotic environment.

    PubMed

    Deamer, David; Singaram, Sara; Rajamani, Sudha; Kompanichenko, Vladimir; Guggenheim, Stephen

    2006-10-29

    An important question guiding research on the origin of life concerns the environmental conditions where molecular systems with the properties of life first appeared on the early Earth. An appropriate site would require liquid water, a source of organic compounds, a source of energy to drive polymerization reactions and a process by which the compounds were sufficiently concentrated to undergo physical and chemical interactions. One such site is a geothermal setting, in which organic compounds interact with mineral surfaces to promote self-assembly and polymerization reactions. Here, we report an initial study of two geothermal sites where mixtures of representative organic solutes (amino acids, nucleobases, a fatty acid and glycerol) and phosphate were mixed with high-temperature water in clay-lined pools. Most of the added organics and phosphate were removed from solution with half-times measured in minutes to a few hours. Analysis of the clay, primarily smectite and kaolin, showed that the organics were adsorbed to the mineral surfaces at the acidic pH of the pools, but could subsequently be released in basic solutions. These results help to constrain the range of possible environments for the origin of life. A site conducive to self-assembly of organic solutes would be an aqueous environment relatively low in ionic solutes, at an intermediate temperature range and neutral pH ranges, in which cyclic concentration of the solutes can occur by transient dry intervals.

  4. Self-assembled lipid bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Waggoner, Tina A.; Last, Julie A.

    2005-11-08

    The present invention is a self-assembling material comprised of stacks of lipid bilayers formed in a columnar structure, where the assembly process is mediated and regulated by chemical recognition events. The material, through the chemical recognition interactions, has a self-regulating system that corrects the radial size of the assembly creating a uniform diameter throughout most of the structure. The materials form and are stable in aqueous solution. These materials are useful as structural elements for the architecture of materials and components in nanotechnology, efficient light harvesting systems for optical sensing, chemical processing centers, and drug delivery vehicles.

  5. Biological Nanoplatforms for Self-Assembled Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-24

    Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 NUMBER(S) AFRL -RV-PS-TR-2015-0024 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is...LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2015-0024 TR-2015-0024 BIOLOGICAL NANOPLATFORMS FOR SELF- ASSEMBLED ELECTRONICS Stephen Jett University of New Mexico 1

  6. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  7. Functional membranes via nanoparticle self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Green, Erica; Fullwood, Emily; Selden, Julieann; Zharov, Ilya

    2015-05-07

    This article summarizes a recently developed approach for the preparation of membrane materials by the self-assembly of inorganic, polymeric or hybrid nanoparticles, with the focus on functional membranes possessing permselectivity. Two types of such membranes are discussed, those possessing size and charge selectivity suitable for ultra- and nanofiltration and chemoselective separation, and those possessing proton or lithium transport properties suitable for fuel cell and lithium battery applications, respectively. This article describes the preparation methods of nanoparticle membranes, as well as their mechanical, molecular, and ionic transport properties.

  8. Self-assembly of Random Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longyu; Raghupathi, Kishore; Song, Cunfeng; Prasad, Priyaa; Thayumanavan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of random copolymers has attracted considerable attention recently. In this feature article, we highlight the use of random copolymers to prepare nanostructures with different morphologies and to prepare nanomaterials that are responsive to single or multiple stimuli. The synthesis of single-chain nanoparticles and their potential applications from random copolymers are also discussed in some detail. We aim to draw more attention to these easily accessible copolymers, which are likely to play an important role in translational polymer research. PMID:25036552

  9. Self-assembly of magnetic biofunctional nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiangcheng; Thode, C.J.; Mabry, J.K.; Harrell, J.W.; Nikles, D.E.; Sun, K.; Wang, L.M.

    2005-05-15

    Spherical, ferromagnetic FePt nanoparticles with a particle size of 3 nm were prepared by the simultaneous polyol reduction of Fe(acac){sub 3} and Pt(acac){sub 2} in phenyl ether in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. The oleic acid ligands can be replaced with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid, giving particles that can be dispersed in water. Both x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy indicated that FePt particles were not affected by ligands replacement. Dispersions of the FePt particles with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid ligands and ammonium counter ions gave self-assembled films consisting of highly ordered hexagonal arrays of particles.

  10. Mineral Surface Chemistry and Nanoparticle-aggregation Control Membrane Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, Nita; Kaddour, Hussein; Dalai, Punam; Wang, Ziqiu; Bass, Garrett; Gao, Min

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes to enclose functional biomolecules, thus defining a “protocell,” was a seminal moment in the emergence of life on Earth and likely occurred at the micro-environment of the mineral-water interface. Mineral-lipid interactions are also relevant in biomedical, industrial and technological processes. Yet, no structure-activity relationships (SARs) have been identified to predict lipid self-assembly at mineral surfaces. Here we examined the influence of minerals on the self-assembly and survival of vesicles composed of single chain amphiphiles as model protocell membranes. The apparent critical vesicle concentration (CVC) increased in the presence of positively-charged nanoparticulate minerals at high loadings (mg/mL) suggesting unfavorable membrane self-assembly in such situations. Above the CVC, initial vesicle formation rates were faster in the presence of minerals. Rates were correlated with the mineral’s isoelectric point (IEP) and reactive surface area. The IEP depends on the crystal structure, chemical composition and surface hydration. Thus, membrane self-assembly showed rational dependence on fundamental mineral properties. Once formed, membrane permeability (integrity) was unaffected by minerals. Suggesting that, protocells could have survived on rock surfaces. These SARs may help predict the formation and survival of protocell membranes on early Earth and other rocky planets, and amphiphile-mineral interactions in diverse other phenomena. PMID:28266537

  11. Mineral Surface Chemistry and Nanoparticle-aggregation Control Membrane Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Nita; Kaddour, Hussein; Dalai, Punam; Wang, Ziqiu; Bass, Garrett; Gao, Min

    2017-03-07

    The self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes to enclose functional biomolecules, thus defining a "protocell," was a seminal moment in the emergence of life on Earth and likely occurred at the micro-environment of the mineral-water interface. Mineral-lipid interactions are also relevant in biomedical, industrial and technological processes. Yet, no structure-activity relationships (SARs) have been identified to predict lipid self-assembly at mineral surfaces. Here we examined the influence of minerals on the self-assembly and survival of vesicles composed of single chain amphiphiles as model protocell membranes. The apparent critical vesicle concentration (CVC) increased in the presence of positively-charged nanoparticulate minerals at high loadings (mg/mL) suggesting unfavorable membrane self-assembly in such situations. Above the CVC, initial vesicle formation rates were faster in the presence of minerals. Rates were correlated with the mineral's isoelectric point (IEP) and reactive surface area. The IEP depends on the crystal structure, chemical composition and surface hydration. Thus, membrane self-assembly showed rational dependence on fundamental mineral properties. Once formed, membrane permeability (integrity) was unaffected by minerals. Suggesting that, protocells could have survived on rock surfaces. These SARs may help predict the formation and survival of protocell membranes on early Earth and other rocky planets, and amphiphile-mineral interactions in diverse other phenomena.

  12. Mineral Surface Chemistry and Nanoparticle-aggregation Control Membrane Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Nita; Kaddour, Hussein; Dalai, Punam; Wang, Ziqiu; Bass, Garrett; Gao, Min

    2017-03-01

    The self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes to enclose functional biomolecules, thus defining a “protocell,” was a seminal moment in the emergence of life on Earth and likely occurred at the micro-environment of the mineral-water interface. Mineral-lipid interactions are also relevant in biomedical, industrial and technological processes. Yet, no structure-activity relationships (SARs) have been identified to predict lipid self-assembly at mineral surfaces. Here we examined the influence of minerals on the self-assembly and survival of vesicles composed of single chain amphiphiles as model protocell membranes. The apparent critical vesicle concentration (CVC) increased in the presence of positively-charged nanoparticulate minerals at high loadings (mg/mL) suggesting unfavorable membrane self-assembly in such situations. Above the CVC, initial vesicle formation rates were faster in the presence of minerals. Rates were correlated with the mineral’s isoelectric point (IEP) and reactive surface area. The IEP depends on the crystal structure, chemical composition and surface hydration. Thus, membrane self-assembly showed rational dependence on fundamental mineral properties. Once formed, membrane permeability (integrity) was unaffected by minerals. Suggesting that, protocells could have survived on rock surfaces. These SARs may help predict the formation and survival of protocell membranes on early Earth and other rocky planets, and amphiphile-mineral interactions in diverse other phenomena.

  13. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Grime, John M. A.; Dama, James F.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Woodward, Cora L.; Jensen, Grant J.; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies. PMID:27174390

  14. Designed post-self-assembly structural and functional modifications of a truncated tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yao-Rong; Lan, Wen-Jie; Wang, Ming; Cook, Timothy R; Stang, Peter J

    2011-10-26

    Post-self-assembly modifications of a discrete metal-organic supramolecular structure have been developed. Such modifications allow the properties of the self-assembled supramolecular species to be changed in a simple and efficient manner (>90% yield). Initiated by the application of chemical stimuli, the post-self-assembly modifications described herein result in three distinct changes to the supramolecular system: an individual building-block component change, an overall structural modification, and a functional evolution of a [6+4] metal-organic supramolecular structure. The three modifications have been carefully examined by a range of characterization methods, including NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, pulsed field gradient spin echo NMR measurements, electrochemical analysis, and computational simulations.

  15. Entropic Phase Transitions with Stable Twisted Intermediates of Bio-Inspired Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Tao, Kai; Levin, Aviad; Jacoby, Guy; Beck, Roy; Gazit, Ehud

    2016-10-17

    Controlling the hierarchical process and capturing the intermediate stage underlying bio-inspired self-assembly are pivotal for understanding their aggregation mechanism and exploring possible applications. Here, the self-assembly of a designed minimal lipopeptide was characterized, showing it to initially self-assemble to narrow nanotwists, which then ripen to wide nanotwists, and finally transit to hollow nanotubes. The supramolecular phase transitions were revealed to be driven by entropic hydrophobic interactions, rather than by the common mechanism of enthalpy-related contributions. The transformation dynamics were sufficiently slow to enable detection and characterization of each stage, thus inducing the stable and extensive distributions of twisted intermediates. The findings allow an in-depth understanding of the hierarchical self-association of bio-inspired building blocks and provide a new approach for the preparation of superstructures of unique morphologies.

  16. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, John M. A.; Dama, James F.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Woodward, Cora L.; Jensen, Grant J.; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-05-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies.

  17. Self-assembled Nanofibrils for Immunomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan

    This thesis has been mainly focused on applying self-assembled nanofibrils as unique depots for controlled release to modulate immune system, with two major chapters on modulation of innate immunity in chapter 2 and adaptive immunity in chapter 3, respectively. There are 5 chapters in the thesis. Chapter 1 gives a detailed review on the discovery, synthesis and application of self-assembled nanofibrils of therapeutic agents (termed as "self-delivery drugs"), including bioactive molecules; Chapter 2 demonstrates the supramolecular hydrogel of chemotactic peptides as a prolonged inflammation model through proper molecular engineering; Chapter 3 reports a suppressive antibody response achieved by encapsulation of antigens by supramolecular hydrogel of glycopeptide; Chapter 4 illustrates an example of supramolecular hydrogel formation of molecules with extremely low solubility, based on the fact that many small organic drugs have poor solubility. Chapter 5 used beta-galatosidase as a model to study glycosidase-instructed supramolecular hydrogel formation, with potential to target cancer cells due to their distinct metabolic profile.

  18. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles.

  19. Directed Self-Assembly: Expectations and Achievements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been a revolutionary thrust in recent years of development of science and technology for its broad appeal for employing a novel idea for relevant technological applications in particular and for mass-scale production and marketing as common man commodity in general. An interesting aspect of this emergent technology is that it involves scientific research community and relevant industries alike. Top–down and bottom–up approaches are two broad division of production of nanoscale materials in general. However, both the approaches have their own limits as far as large-scale production and cost involved are concerned. Therefore, novel new techniques are desired to be developed to optimize production and cost. Directed self-assembly seems to be a promising technique in this regard; which can work as a bridge between the top–down and bottom–up approaches. This article reviews how directed self-assembly as a technique has grown up and outlines its future prospects. PMID:20730077

  20. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles. PMID:26975332

  1. Quantifying quality in DNA self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Wachauf, Christian H.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with DNA is an attractive route for building nanoscale devices. The development of sophisticated and precise objects with this technique requires detailed experimental feedback on the structure and composition of assembled objects. Here we report a sensitive assay for the quality of assembly. The method relies on measuring the content of unpaired DNA bases in self-assembled DNA objects using a fluorescent de-Bruijn probe for three-base ‘codons’, which enables a comparison with the designed content of unpaired DNA. We use the assay to measure the quality of assembly of several multilayer DNA origami objects and illustrate the use of the assay for the rational refinement of assembly protocols. Our data suggests that large and complex objects like multilayer DNA origami can be made with high strand integration quality up to 99%. Beyond DNA nanotechnology, we speculate that the ability to discriminate unpaired from paired nucleic acids in the same macromolecule may also be useful for analysing cellular nucleic acids. PMID:24751596

  2. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ye, L; Pearson, T; Cordeau, Y; Mefford, O T; Crawford, T M

    2016-03-15

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufacturing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles.

  3. Comparison of directed self-assembly integrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somervell, Mark; Gronheid, Roel; Hooge, Joshua; Nafus, Kathleen; Rincon Delgadillo, Paulina; Thode, Chris; Younkin, Todd; Matsunaga, Koichi; Rathsack, Ben; Scheer, Steven; Nealey, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) is gaining momentum as a means for extending optical lithography past its current limits. There are many forms of the technology, and it can be used for creating both line/space and hole patterns.1-3 As with any new technology, adoption of DSA faces several key challenges. These include creation of a new materials infrastructure, fabrication of new processing hardware, and the development of implementable integrations. Above all else, determining the lowest possible defect density remains the industry's most critical concern. Over the past year, our team, working at IMEC, has explored various integrations for making 12-14nm half-pitch line/space arrays. Both grapho- and chemo-epitaxy implementations have been investigated in order to discern which offers the best path to high volume manufacturing. This paper will discuss the manufacturing readiness of the various implementations by comparing the process margin for different DSA processing steps and defect density for the entirety of the flow. As part of this work, we will describe our method for using programmed defectivity on reticle to elucidate the mechanisms that drive self-assembly defectivity on wafer.

  4. Peptide self-assembly: thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Liu, Kai; Xing, Ruirui; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-10-21

    Self-assembling systems play a significant role in physiological functions and have therefore attracted tremendous attention due to their great potential for applications in energy, biomedicine and nanotechnology. Peptides, consisting of amino acids, are among the most popular building blocks and programmable molecular motifs. Nanostructures and materials assembled using peptides exhibit important potential for green-life new technology and biomedical applications mostly because of their bio-friendliness and reversibility. The formation of these ordered nanostructures pertains to the synergistic effect of various intermolecular non-covalent interactions, including hydrogen-bonding, π-π stacking, electrostatic, hydrophobic, and van der Waals interactions. Therefore, the self-assembly process is mainly driven by thermodynamics; however, kinetics is also a critical factor in structural modulation and function integration. In this review, we focus on the influence of thermodynamic and kinetic factors on structural assembly and regulation based on different types of peptide building blocks, including aromatic dipeptides, amphiphilic peptides, polypeptides, and amyloid-relevant peptides.

  5. Terminal groups control self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzelakowski, M.; Kita-Tokarczyk, K.

    2016-03-01

    The terminal groups of amphiphilic block copolymers are shown to control macromolecular self-assembly in aqueous solutions, in the micellar/lamellar region of the phase diagram. At the same concentration and using the same self-assembly conditions, dramatic differences are observed in polymer hydration and the resulting nano-/microstructure for two series of polymers with identical block chemistry and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). This suggests a strong contribution from end groups to the hydration as the initial step of the self-assembly process, and could be conveniently used to guide the particle morphology and size. Additionally, for polymers with those head groups which drive vesicular structures, differences in membrane organization affect their physical properties, such as permeability.The terminal groups of amphiphilic block copolymers are shown to control macromolecular self-assembly in aqueous solutions, in the micellar/lamellar region of the phase diagram. At the same concentration and using the same self-assembly conditions, dramatic differences are observed in polymer hydration and the resulting nano-/microstructure for two series of polymers with identical block chemistry and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). This suggests a strong contribution from end groups to the hydration as the initial step of the self-assembly process, and could be conveniently used to guide the particle morphology and size. Additionally, for polymers with those head groups which drive vesicular structures, differences in membrane organization affect their physical properties, such as permeability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1: Particle diameters for hydrated NH2-ABA-NH2 polymers with different degrees of functionalization; Fig. S2: TEM characterization of compound micelles from BA-OH polymer after extrusion; Fig. S3: Cryo-TEM and stopped flow characterization of lipid vesicles; Fig. S4 and S5: NMR spectra for ABA and BA polymers

  6. Self-assembled Tunable Photonic Hyper-crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-16

    1ITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a CONTRACTNUMBER Self - assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals W911NF-09-l-0539 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...ABSTRACT Self - assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals Report Title We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the “photonic hyper-crystal...photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self - assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to

  7. Ionic self-assembly for functional hierarchical nanostructured materials.

    PubMed

    Faul, Charl F J

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: The challenge of constructing soft functional materials over multiple length scales can be addressed by a number of different routes based on the principles of self-assembly, with the judicious use of various noncovalent interactions providing the tools to control such self-assembly processes. It is within the context of this challenge that we have extensively explored the use of an important approach for materials construction over the past decade: exploiting electrostatic interactions in our ionic self-assembly (ISA) method. In this approach, cooperative assembly of carefully chosen charged surfactants and oppositely charged building blocks (or tectons) provides a facile noncovalent route for the rational design and production of functional nanostructured materials. Generally, our research efforts have developed with an initial focus on establishing rules for the construction of novel noncovalent liquid-crystalline (LC) materials. We found that the use of double-tailed surfactant species (especially branched double-tailed surfactants) led to the facile formation of thermotropic (and, in certain cases, lyotropic) phases, as demonstrated by extensive temperature-dependent X-ray and light microscopy investigations. From this core area of activity, research expanded to cover issues beyond simple construction of anisotropic materials, turning to the challenge of inclusion and exploitation of switchable functionality. The use of photoactive azobenzene-containing ISA materials afforded opportunities to exploit both photo-orientation and surface relief grating formation. The preparation of these anisotropic LC materials was of interest, as the aim was the facile production of disposable and low-cost optical components for display applications and data storage. However, the prohibitive cost of the photo-orientation processes hampered further exploitation of these materials. We also expanded our activities to explore ISA of biologically relevant tectons

  8. Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2013-01-08

    A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

  9. DNA tile based self-assembly: building complex nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chenxiang; Liu, Yan; Rinker, Sherri; Yan, Hao

    2006-08-11

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides an attractive route to create nanoarchitectures of programmable patterns. It also offers excellent scaffolds for directed self-assembly of nanometer-scale materials, ranging from nanoparticles to proteins, with potential applications in constructing nanoelectronic/nanophotonic devices and protein/ligand nanoarrays. This Review first summarizes the currently available DNA tile toolboxes and further emphasizes recent developments toward self-assembling DNA nanostructures with increasing complexity. Exciting progress using DNA tiles for directed self-assembly of other nanometer scale components is also discussed.

  10. Hollow Nanospheres Array Fabrication via Nano-Conglutination Technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Deng, Qiling; Xia, Liangping; Shi, Lifang; Cao, Axiu; Pang, Hui; Hu, Song

    2015-09-01

    Hollow nanospheres array is a special nanostructure with great applications in photonics, electronics and biochemistry. The nanofabrication technique with high resolution is crucial to nanosciences and nano-technology. This paper presents a novel nonconventional nano-conglutination technology combining polystyrenes spheres (PSs) self-assembly, conglutination and a lift-off process to fabricate the hollow nanospheres array with nanoholes. A self-assembly monolayer of PSs was stuck off from the quartz wafer by the thiol-ene adhesive material, and then the PSs was removed via a lift-off process and the hollow nanospheres embedded into the thiol-ene substrate was obtained. Thiolene polymer is a UV-curable material via "click chemistry" reaction at ambient conditions without the oxygen inhibition, which has excellent chemical and physical properties to be attractive as the adhesive material in nano-conglutination technology. Using the technique, a hollow nanospheres array with the nanoholes at the diameter of 200 nm embedded into the rigid thiol-ene substrate was fabricated, which has great potential to serve as a reaction container, catalyst and surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate.

  11. Electrodynamic tailoring of self-assembled three-dimensional electrospun constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Tiago C.; Correia, Ilídio J.; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana

    2013-07-01

    The rational design of three-dimensional electrospun constructs (3DECs) can lead to striking topographies and tailored shapes of electrospun materials. This new generation of materials is suppressing some of the current limitations of the usual 2D non-woven electrospun fiber mats, such as small pore sizes or only flat shaped constructs. Herein, we pursued an explanation for the self-assembly of 3DECs based on electrodynamic simulations and experimental validation. We concluded that the self-assembly process is driven by the establishment of attractive electrostatic forces between the positively charged aerial fibers and the already collected ones, which tend to acquire a negatively charged network oriented towards the nozzle. The in situ polarization degree is strengthened by higher amounts of clustered fibers, and therefore the initial high density fibrous regions are the preliminary motifs for the self-assembly mechanism. As such regions increase their in situ polarization electrostatic repulsive forces will appear, favoring a competitive growth of these self-assembled fibrous clusters. Highly polarized regions will evidence higher distances between consecutive micro-assembled fibers (MAFs). Different processing parameters - deposition time, electric field intensity, concentration of polymer solution, environmental temperature and relative humidity - were evaluated in an attempt to control material's design.The rational design of three-dimensional electrospun constructs (3DECs) can lead to striking topographies and tailored shapes of electrospun materials. This new generation of materials is suppressing some of the current limitations of the usual 2D non-woven electrospun fiber mats, such as small pore sizes or only flat shaped constructs. Herein, we pursued an explanation for the self-assembly of 3DECs based on electrodynamic simulations and experimental validation. We concluded that the self-assembly process is driven by the establishment of attractive

  12. Extracellular self-assembly of virus-like particles from secreted recombinant polyoma virus major coat protein.

    PubMed

    Ng, J; Koechlin, O; Ramalho, M; Raman, D; Krauzewicz, N

    2007-12-01

    Mouse polyoma virus major coat protein (VP1) expressed from a recombinant baculovirus is efficiently transported to infected cell nuclei and assembles into protein nanospheres morphologically similar to natural capsids. The nanospheres readily combine with plasmid DNA to form a hybrid gene therapy agent known as virus-like particles (VLPs). To facilitate large-scale production of VLPs free from cellular contaminants, the use of stable Drosophila cell lines expressing either wild-type protein, or VP1 tagged with a secretion signal for targeting to the extracellular medium, was investigated. Both wild-type and tagged VP1 expressed at 2-4 mg VP1/litre of culture. As expected, the wild-type protein self-assembled into VLPs. The tagged VP1 was efficiently secreted to the extracellular medium but was also glycosylated, unlike wild-type VP1. Despite this fact, a small fraction of the recombinant secreted protein assembled into VLP-like structures that had altered disulphide bonding, but were still biologically active. These results demonstrate the considerable tolerance in the nanosphere assembly to structural (i.e. aberrant glycosylation) and environmental (i.e. extracellular medium vs. nuclear milieu) changes. Thus, with modifications to improve nanosphere assembly, the secretion method could be adapted to large-scale preparation of VLPs, providing significant advantages over current methods of production of the vector.

  13. Pseudotannins Self-assembled into Antioxidant Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H. A.; Drinnan, C. T.; Pleshko, N.; Fisher, O. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Natural tannins are attractive as building blocks for biomaterials due to their antioxidant properties and ability to form interpolymer complexes (IPCs) with other macromolecules. One of the major challenges to tannin usage in biomedical applications is their instability at physiological conditions and a lack of control over the purity and reactivity. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of tannin-like polymers with controlled architecture, reactivity, and size. These pseudotannins were synthesized by substituting linear dextran chains with gallic, resorcylic, and protocatechuic pendant groups to mimic the structure of natural hydrolysable tannins. We demonstrate that these novel materials can self-assemble to form reductive and colloidally stable nanoscale and microscale particles. Specifically, the synthesis, turbidity, particle size, antioxidant power, and cell uptake of IPCs derived from pseudotannins and poly(ethylene glycol) was evaluated. PMID:26313262

  14. Controlling water evaporation through self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Kevin; Liebi, Marianne; Heimdal, Jimmy; Pham, Quoc Dat; Sparr, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Water evaporation concerns all land-living organisms, as ambient air is dryer than their corresponding equilibrium humidity. Contrarily to plants, mammals are covered with a skin that not only hinders evaporation but also maintains its rate at a nearly constant value, independently of air humidity. Here, we show that simple amphiphiles/water systems reproduce this behavior, which suggests a common underlying mechanism originating from responding self-assembly structures. The composition and structure gradients arising from the evaporation process were characterized using optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We observed a thin and dry outer phase that responds to changes in air humidity by increasing its thickness as the air becomes dryer, which decreases its permeability to water, thus counterbalancing the increase in the evaporation driving force. This thin and dry outer phase therefore shields the systems from humidity variations. Such a feedback loop achieves a homeostatic regulation of water evaporation. PMID:27573848

  15. Controlling water evaporation through self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Roger, Kevin; Liebi, Marianne; Heimdal, Jimmy; Pham, Quoc Dat; Sparr, Emma

    2016-09-13

    Water evaporation concerns all land-living organisms, as ambient air is dryer than their corresponding equilibrium humidity. Contrarily to plants, mammals are covered with a skin that not only hinders evaporation but also maintains its rate at a nearly constant value, independently of air humidity. Here, we show that simple amphiphiles/water systems reproduce this behavior, which suggests a common underlying mechanism originating from responding self-assembly structures. The composition and structure gradients arising from the evaporation process were characterized using optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We observed a thin and dry outer phase that responds to changes in air humidity by increasing its thickness as the air becomes dryer, which decreases its permeability to water, thus counterbalancing the increase in the evaporation driving force. This thin and dry outer phase therefore shields the systems from humidity variations. Such a feedback loop achieves a homeostatic regulation of water evaporation.

  16. Self-Assembled Magnetic Surface Swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, A.; Belkin, M.; Aranson, I. S.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2009-03-01

    We report studies of novel self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers (magnetic snakes) formed from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles at a liquid-air interface and energized by an alternating magnetic field. We show that under certain conditions the snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of surface flows and turn into self-propelled objects. Parameters of the driving magnetic field tune the propulsion velocity of these snakelike swimmers. We find that the symmetry of the surface flows can also be broken in a controlled fashion by attaching a large bead to a magnetic snake (bead-snake hybrid), transforming it into a self-locomoting entity. The observed phenomena have been successfully described by a phenomenological model based on the amplitude equation for surface waves coupled to a large-scale hydrodynamic mean flow equation.

  17. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  18. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    1999-10-12

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  19. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

    1996-10-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

  20. Self Assembly and Elasticity of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, Matthew; Horowitz, Chuck; Berry, Don; da Silva Schneider, Andre

    2015-10-01

    While the outer crust of a neutron star is likely a solid ion lattice, the core consists of uniform nuclear matter at or above saturation density. In between, nuclei adopt exotic non-spherical geometries called ``nuclear pasta'' in order to minimize the nuclear attraction and Coulomb repulsion between protons. These structures have been well studied with both classical and quantum molecular dynamics, and their geometry can be predicted from the density, temperature, and proton fraction. Recent classical molecular dynamics simulations find evidence for a phase transition at T ~ 0 . 5 MeV, where simulations with low proton fractions undergo a solid-liquid phase transition, while simulations with high proton fractions under a glass-rubber phase transition. This is expected to have nontrivial consequences for the elastic properties of the pasta. Additionally, recent observations indicate that the structure of nuclear pasta may be related to structures observed in biophysics, specifically self assembling lipid membranes.

  1. Supramolecular self-assemblies as functional nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busseron, Eric; Ruff, Yves; Moulin, Emilie; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we survey the diversity of structures and functions which are encountered in advanced self-assembled nanomaterials. We highlight their flourishing implementations in three active domains of applications: biomedical sciences, information technologies, and environmental sciences. Our main objective is to provide the reader with a concise and straightforward entry to this broad field by selecting the most recent and important research articles, supported by some more comprehensive reviews to introduce each topic. Overall, this compilation illustrates how, based on the rules of supramolecular chemistry, the bottom-up approach to design functional objects at the nanoscale is currently producing highly sophisticated materials oriented towards a growing number of applications with high societal impact.

  2. Self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Belkin, M.; Aranson, I. S.; Kwok, W.-K.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-03-20

    We report studies of novel self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers (magnetic snakes) formed from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles at a liquid-air interface and energized by an alternating magnetic field. We show that under certain conditions the snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of surface flows and turn into self-propelled objects. Parameters of the driving magnetic field tune the propulsion velocity of these snakelike swimmers. We find that the symmetry of the surface flows can also be broken in a controlled fashion by attaching a large bead to a magnetic snake (bead-snake hybrid), transforming it into a self-locomoting entity. The observed phenomena have been successfully described by a phenomenological model based on the amplitude equation for surface waves coupled to a large-scale hydrodynamic mean flow equation.

  3. Self assembly properties of primitive organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    A central event in the origin of life was the self-assembly of amphiphilic, lipid-like compounds into closed microenvironments. If a primitive macromolecular replicating system could be encapsulated within a vesicular membrane, the components of the system would share the same microenvironment, and the result would be a step toward true cellular function. The goal of our research has been to determine what amphiphilic molecules might plausibly have been available on the early Earth to participate in the formation of such boundary structures. To this end, we have investigated primitive organic mixtures present in carbonaceous meteorites such as the Murchison meteorite, which contains 1-2 percent of its mass in the form of organic carbon compounds. It is likely that such compounds contributed to the inventory of organic carbon on the prebiotic earth, and were available to participate in chemical evolution leading to the emergence of the first cellular life forms. We found that Murchison components extracted into non-polar solvent systems are surface active, a clear indication of amphiphilic character. One acidic fraction self-assembles into vesicular membranes that provide permeability barriers to polar solutes. Other evidence indicates that the membranes are bimolecular layers similar to those formed by contemporary membrane lipids. We conclude that bilayer membrane formation by primitive amphiphiles on the early Earth is feasible. However, only a minor fraction of acidic amphiphiles assembles into bilayers, and the resulting membranes require narrowly defined conditions of pH and ionic composition to be stable. It seems unlikely, therefore, that meteoritic infall was a direct source of membrane amphiphiles. Instead, the hydrocarbon components and their derivatives more probably would provide an organic stock available for chemical evolution. Our current research is directed at possible reactions which would generate substantial quantities of membranogenic

  4. Controlled self-assembly in homopolymer and diblock copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Lei

    This thesis work studies the process, mechanism and control of self-assembly in homopolymers and diblock copolymers. These studies are aimed at finding novel patterning methods that can lead to low cost lithography technologies capable of creating micrometer to nanometer patterns over a large area. We first present a new phenomenon called Lithographically-Induced Self-Assembly (LISA) that can create ordered arrays of pillars in a homopolymer film with a mask placed close to its surface. We demonstrate that the shape, size and morphology of the ordered pillar arrays can be controlled with a patterned mask. A model is developed based on the instability in a fluidic film induced by the Coulomb force from charge accumulation in the polymer film and the mask. Experimental results are shown to support the model. We also investigate the behavior of defects that destroy the ordering of the LISA array and propose ways to prevent them. This self-assembly phenomenon is used as a patterning technique to define the active area of an organic light emitting diode (OLED). The device shows significantly improved lifetime due to the restriction of defect growth. Another patterning technology that is closely related to LISA, Lithographically-Induced Self-Construction (LISC), is also introduced. LISC can form mesas of polymer from the initial thin film and they inherit the shape and size of the mask patterns. A model based on the dynamics of LISA pillar formation and mass conservation is presented and provides a guideline for choosing LISC process parameters. In the final part of the thesis, we study a technique to control the orientation of diblock copolymer phase separation in a thin film by applying a pressure on the film through a flat mask. The result is a well-ordered grating pattern of the phase separation with a period of tens of nanometers. The effect of pressure and film thickness on the final pattern is investigated by experiments. We suggest that the increased ordering is

  5. Spatiotemporal Control of Supramolecular Self-Assembly and Function.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jie; Cai, Yanbin; Ji, Shenglu; He, Shuangshuang; Cao, Yi; Ding, Dan; Wang, Ling; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-03-09

    The enzyme-triggered self-assembly of peptides has flourished in controlling the self-assembly kinetics and producing nanostructures that are typically inaccessible by conventional self-assembly pathways. However, the diffusion and nanoscale chemical gradient of self-assembling peptides generated by the enzyme also significantly affect the outcome of self-assembly, which has not been reported yet. In this work, we demonstrated for the first time a spatiotemporal control of enzyme-triggered peptide self-assembly. By simply adjusting the temperature, we could change both the catalytic activity of the enzyme of phosphatase and their aggregation states. The strategy kinetically controls the production rate of self-assembling peptides and spatially controls their distribution in the system, leading to the formation of nanoparticles at 37 °C and nanofibers at 4 °C. The nanofibers showed ∼10 times higher cellular uptake by 3T3 cells than the nanoparticles, thanks to their higher stability and more ordered structures. Using such spatiotemporal control, we could prepare optimized nanoprobes with low background fluorescence, rapid and high cellular uptake, and high sensitivity. We postulate that this strategy would be very useful in general for preparing self-assembled nanomaterials with controllable morphology and function.

  6. Supramolecular chemistry: Unexplored territory for self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuerle, Florian

    2016-12-01

    Cage-like structures can self-assemble from suitable metal ions and organic linkers, but the size of the assemblies was limited. The surprise discovery of a new series of cages opens up fresh horizons for self-assembly. See Letter p.563

  7. Self-Assembly of Optical Molecules with Supramolecular Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Chithra, Parayalil; Richards, Gary J.; Hill, Jonathan P.; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of nano-sized objects is one of the most important issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Soft nanomaterials with flexible properties have been given much attention and can be obtained through bottom-up processing from functional molecules, where self-assembly based on supramolecular chemistry and designed assembly have become crucial processes and techniques. Among the various functional molecules, dyes have become important materials in certain areas of nanotechnology and their self-assembling behaviors have been actively researched. In this short review, we briefly introduce recent progress in self-assembly of optical molecules and dyes, based mainly on supramolecular concepts. The introduced examples are classified into four categories: self-assembly of (i) low-molecular-weight dyes and (ii) polymeric dyes and dye self-assembly (iii) in nanoscale architectures and (iv) at surfaces. PMID:19564931

  8. Challenges and breakthroughs in recent research on self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P; Lee, Michael V; Vinu, Ajayan; Charvet, Richard; Acharya, Somobrata

    2008-01-01

    The controlled fabrication of nanometer-scale objects is without doubt one of the central issues in current science and technology. However, existing fabrication techniques suffer from several disadvantages including size-restrictions and a general paucity of applicable materials. Because of this, the development of alternative approaches based on supramolecular self-assembly processes is anticipated as a breakthrough methodology. This review article aims to comprehensively summarize the salient aspects of self-assembly through the introduction of the recent challenges and breakthroughs in three categories: (i) types of self-assembly in bulk media; (ii) types of components for self-assembly in bulk media; and (iii) self-assembly at interfaces. PMID:27877935

  9. Solvent mediated self-assembly of solids

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J.; Wilson, W.D.; Palmore, T.

    1997-12-12

    Solvent-mediated crystallization represents a robust approach to self-assembly of nanostructures and microstructures. In organic systems, the relative ease with which the structure of hydrogen- bonded molecules can be manipulated allows for generation of a wide variety of nanoscale crystal structures. In living organisms, control over the micron-to-millimeter form of inorganic crystals is achieved through introduction of bio-organic molecules. The purpose of this proposal is to understand the interplay between solution chemistry, molecular structure, surface chemistry, and the processes of nucleation and crystal growth in solvent-mediated systems, with the goal of developing the atomic and molecular basis of a solvent-mediated self-assembly technology. We will achieve this purpose by: (1) utilizing an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach that provides in situ, real time imaging during growth from solutions, (2) by modifying kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models to include solution-surface kinetics, (3) by introducing quantum chemistry (QC) calculations of the potentials of the relevant chemical species and the near-surface structure of the solution, and (4) by utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify the minimum energy pathways to the solid state. Our work will focus on two systems chosen to address both the manometer and micron-to-millimeter length scales of assembly, the family of 2,5- diketopiperazines (X-DKPs) and the system of CaCO{sub 3} with amino acids. Using AFM, we will record the evolution of surface morphology, critical lengths, step speeds, and step-step interactions as a function of supersaturation and temperature. In the case of the X-DKPs, these measurements will be repeated as the molecular structure of the growth unit is varied. In the case of CaCO{sub 3}, they will be performed as a function of solution chemistry including pH, ionic strength, and amino acid content. In addition, we will measure nucleation rates and orientations of

  10. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-01

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of ‘pressure control’ to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  11. Analysis of Secondary Structure and Self-Assembly of Amelogenin by Variable Temperature Circular Dichroism and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Yoon, Il; Hegde, Balachandra G.; Daming, Fan; Du, Chang; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenin is a proline-rich enamel matrix protein known to play an important role in the oriented growth of enamel crystals. Amelogenin self-assembles to form nanospheres and higher order structures mediated by hydrophobic interactions. This study aims to obtain a better insight into the relationship between primary-secondary structure and self-assembly of amelogenin by applying computational and biophysical methods. Variable temperature circular dichroism studies indicated that under physiological pH recombinant full-length porcine amelogenin contains unordered structures in equilibrium with polyproline type II (PPII) structure, the latter being more populated at lower temperatures. Increasing the concentration of rP172 resulted in the promotion of folding to an ordered β-structured assembly. Isothermal titration calorimetry dilution studies revealed that, at all temperatures, self-assembly is entropically driven due to the hydrophobic effect and the molar heat of assembly (ΔHA) decreases with temperature. Using a computational approach, a profile of domains in the amino acid sequence that have a high propensity to assemble and to have PPII structures has been identified. We conclude that the assembly properties of amelogenin are due to complementarity between the hydrophobic and PPII helix prone regions. PMID:19274734

  12. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control.

    PubMed

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-10

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of 'pressure control' to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres  with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  13. Facile preparation of luminescent and intelligent gold nanodots based on supramolecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunfeng; Li, Sujuan; Zhou, Yahui; Zhai, Qingpan; Hu, Mengyue; Cai, Fensha; Du, Jimin; Liang, Jiamiao; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2012-12-01

    A new strategy for preparing luminescent and intelligent gold nanodots based on supramolecular self-assembly is described in this paper. The supramolecular self-assembly was initiated through electrostatic interactions and ion pairing between palmitic acid and hyperbranched poly(ethylenimine). The resulting structures not only have the dynamic reversible properties of supramolecules but also possess torispherical and highly branched architectures. Thus they can be regarded as a new kind of ideal nanoreactor for preparing intelligent Au nanodots. By preparing Au nanodots within this kind of supramolecular self-assembly, the environmental sensitivity of intelligent polymers and the optical, electrical properties of Au nanodots can be combined, endowing the Au nanodots with intelligence. In this paper, a supramolecular self-assembly process based on dendritic poly(ethylenimine) and palmitic acid was designed and then applied to prepare fluorescent and size-controlled Au nanodots. The pH response of Au nanodots embodied by phase transfer from oil phase to water phase was also investigated.

  14. Aqueous Self-Assembly of Y-Shaped Amphiphilic Block Copolymers into Giant Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanping; Jin, Yong; Fan, Baozhu; Lai, Shuangquan; Sun, Xiaopeng; Qi, Rui

    2017-02-06

    The preparation and aqueous self-assembly of newly Y-shaped amphiphilic block polyurethane (PUG) copolymers are reported here. These amphiphilic copolymers, designed to have two hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) tails and one hydrophobic alkyl tail via a two-step coupling reaction, can self-assemble into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) (diameter ≥ 1000 nm) with a direct dissolution method in aqueous solution, depending on their Y-shaped structures and initial concentrations. More interesting, the copolymers can self-assemble into various distinct nano-/microstructures, such as spherical micelles, small vesicles, and GUVs, with the increase of their concentrations. The traditional preparation methods of GUVs generally need conventional amphiphilic molecules and additional complicated conditions, such as alternating electrical field, buffer solution, or organic solvent. Therefore, the self-assembly of Y-shaped PUGs with a direct dissolution method in aqueous solution demonstrated in this study supplies a new clue to fabricate GUVs based on the geometric design of amphiphilic polymers.

  15. Dissipative adaptation in driven self-assembly.

    PubMed

    England, Jeremy L

    2015-11-01

    In a collection of assembling particles that is allowed to reach thermal equilibrium, the energy of a given microscopic arrangement and the probability of observing the system in that arrangement obey a simple exponential relationship known as the Boltzmann distribution. Once the same thermally fluctuating particles are driven away from equilibrium by forces that do work on the system over time, however, it becomes significantly more challenging to relate the likelihood of a given outcome to familiar thermodynamic quantities. Nonetheless, it has long been appreciated that developing a sound and general understanding of the thermodynamics of such non-equilibrium scenarios could ultimately enable us to control and imitate the marvellous successes that living things achieve in driven self-assembly. Here, I suggest that such a theoretical understanding may at last be emerging, and trace its development from historic first steps to more recent discoveries. Focusing on these newer results, I propose that they imply a general thermodynamic mechanism for self-organization via dissipation of absorbed work that may be applicable in a broad class of driven many-body systems.

  16. Electronically Guided Self Assembly within Quantum Corrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Rongxing; Miao, Bingfeng; Zhong, Zhangfeng; Sun, Liang; You, Biao; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Di; Hu, An; Bader, Samuel; Ding, Haifeng; Center Collaboration; Low Dimensional Magnetism Team

    2013-03-01

    A grand challenge of nanoscience is to master the control of structure and properties in order to go beyond present day functionality. The creation of nanostructures via atom manipulation by means of a scanning probe represents one of the great achievements of the nano era. Here we build on this achievement to self-assemble nanostructures within quantum corrals. We constructed circular and triangular Fe quantum corrals on Ag(111) substrate via STM manipulation and studied the quantum confinement of electronic states and the diffusion of Gd atoms inside the corrals. Statistical results reveal the motion of the Gd atoms forming several individual orbits that are closely related to the local density of states. We experimentally demonstrate that different self-organized Gd atomic structures are formed within 30-nm circular and triangular Fe quantum corrals with a step-by-step guiding process. The findings demonstrate that quantum confinement can be used to engineer atomic structures and atom diffusion. And 30-nm resolution can be reached by means of advanced lithography. Adding quantum engineering to augment it opens new possibilities for local functionality design down to the atomic scale. Work at Nanjing is supported by the State Key Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2010CB923401), NSFC (Grants Nos. 10974087, 10834001, and 11023002) and PAPD.

  17. Self-assembled nanostructures via electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, S. N.

    2006-07-01

    A concentrated nanoparticulate-based ethylene glycol suspension was prepared and electrosprayed at optimum and stable cone-jet mode conditions. Using laser spectroscopy, the droplets were measured and found to range within ∼0.23-3.8 μm. In parallel to spectroscopy-assisted sizing, a volume equivalence route for estimating droplet sizes was carried out by measuring contact angles and diameters of the deposits. The electrosprayed nanosuspension relics were examined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These deposits were further characterized using energy-dispersive X-rays and selected area electron diffraction. Simultaneously deposits were formed by a controlled route through needle deposition without the presence of an electric field. The structures formed in this non-electric field driven route are compared with those formed with electric fields. Thus, elucidating electrosprays as a competing nanofabrication route for forming self-assemblies with a wide range of nanomaterials in the nanoscale for top-down based bottom-up assembly of structures.

  18. Electrostatic self-assembly of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Charged filaments and membranes are natural structures abundant in cell media. In this talk we discuss the assembly of amphiphiles into biocompatible fibers, ribbons and membranes. We describe one- and two-dimensional assemblies that undergo re-entrant transitions in crystalline packing in response to changes in the solution pH and/or salt concentration resulting in different mesoscale morphologies and properties. In the case of one-dimensional structures, we discuss self-assembled amphiphiles into highly charged nanofibers in water that order into two-dimensional crystals. These fibers of about 6 nm cross-sectional diameter form crystalline arrays with inter-fiber spacings of up to 130 nm. Solution concentration and temperature can be adjusted to control the inter-fiber spacings. The addition of salt destroys crystal packing, indicating that electrostatic repulsions are necessary for the observed ordering. We describe the crystallization of bundles of filament networks interacting via long-range repulsions in confinement by a phenomenological model. Two distinct crystallization mechanisms in the short and large screening length regimes are discussed and the phase diagram is obtained. Simulation of large bundles predicts the existence of topological defects among bundled filaments. Crystallization processes driven by electrostatic attractions are also discussed. Funded by Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science (CBES), which is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0000989.

  19. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; ...

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain andmore » surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.« less

  20. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain and surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.

  1. Stochastic self-assembly of incommensurate clusters.

    PubMed

    D'Orsogna, M R; Lakatos, G; Chou, T

    2012-02-28

    Nucleation and molecular aggregation are important processes in numerous physical and biological systems. In many applications, these processes often take place in confined spaces, involving a finite number of particles. Analogous to treatments of stochastic chemical reactions, we examine the classic problem of homogeneous nucleation and self-assembly by deriving and analyzing a fully discrete stochastic master equation. We enumerate the highest probability steady states, and derive exact analytical formulae for quenched and equilibrium mean cluster size distributions. Upon comparison with results obtained from the associated mass-action Becker-Döring equations, we find striking differences between the two corresponding equilibrium mean cluster concentrations. These differences depend primarily on the divisibility of the total available mass by the maximum allowed cluster size, and the remainder. When such mass "incommensurability" arises, a single remainder particle can "emulsify" the system by significantly broadening the equilibrium mean cluster size distribution. This discreteness-induced broadening effect is periodic in the total mass of the system but arises even when the system size is asymptotically large, provided the ratio of the total mass to the maximum cluster size is finite. Ironically, classic mass-action equations are fairly accurate in the coarsening regime, before equilibrium is reached, despite the presence of large stochastic fluctuations found via kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations. Our findings define a new scaling regime in which results from classic mass-action theories are qualitatively inaccurate, even in the limit of large total system size.

  2. Stochastic self-assembly of incommensurate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, M. R.; Lakatos, G.; Chou, T.

    2012-02-01

    Nucleation and molecular aggregation are important processes in numerous physical and biological systems. In many applications, these processes often take place in confined spaces, involving a finite number of particles. Analogous to treatments of stochastic chemical reactions, we examine the classic problem of homogeneous nucleation and self-assembly by deriving and analyzing a fully discrete stochastic master equation. We enumerate the highest probability steady states, and derive exact analytical formulae for quenched and equilibrium mean cluster size distributions. Upon comparison with results obtained from the associated mass-action Becker-Döring equations, we find striking differences between the two corresponding equilibrium mean cluster concentrations. These differences depend primarily on the divisibility of the total available mass by the maximum allowed cluster size, and the remainder. When such mass "incommensurability" arises, a single remainder particle can "emulsify" the system by significantly broadening the equilibrium mean cluster size distribution. This discreteness-induced broadening effect is periodic in the total mass of the system but arises even when the system size is asymptotically large, provided the ratio of the total mass to the maximum cluster size is finite. Ironically, classic mass-action equations are fairly accurate in the coarsening regime, before equilibrium is reached, despite the presence of large stochastic fluctuations found via kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations. Our findings define a new scaling regime in which results from classic mass-action theories are qualitatively inaccurate, even in the limit of large total system size.

  3. Stochastic self-assembly of incommensurate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DÓ Rsogna, Maria; Lakatos, Greg; Chou, Tom

    2013-03-01

    We examine the classic problem of homogeneous nucleation and self-assembly by deriving and analyzing a fully discrete stochastic master equation. We enumerate the highest probability steady-states, and derive exact analytical formulae for quenched and equilibrium mean cluster size distributions. Upon comparison with results obtained from the associated the mass-action Becker-Döring (BD) equations, we find striking differences between the two corresponding equilibrium mean cluster concentrations. These differences depend primarily on the divisibility of the total available mass by the maximum allowed cluster size, and the remainder. When such mass ``incommensurability'' arises, a single remainder particle can ``emulsify'' the system by significantly broadening the equilibrium mean cluster size distribution. This discreteness-induced broadening effect is periodic in the total mass of the system but arises even when the system size is asymptotically large, provided the ratio of the total mass to the maximum cluster size is finite. Our findings define a new scaling regime in which results from classic mass-action theories are qualitatively inaccurate, even in the limit of large total system size. This work supported by NSF DMS-1021818 and DMS-1021850

  4. What promotes derected self assembly (DSA)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S. T.

    2016-09-01

    A low-energy electron beam (EB) can create self-interstitial atoms (SIA) in a solid and can cause directed self-assembly (DSA), e.g. {3 1 1}SIA platelets in c-Si. The crystalline structure of this planar defect is known from experiment to be made up of SIAs that form well aligned <1 1 0> atomic rows on each (3 1 1) plane. To simulate the experiment we distributed Frenkel pairs (FP) randomly in bulk c-Si. Then making use of a molecular dynamic (MD) simulation, we have reproduced the experimental result, where SIAs are trapped at metastable sites in bulk. With increasing pre-doped FP concentration, the number of SIAs that participate in DSA tends to be increased but soon slightly supressed. On the other hand, when the FP concentration is less than 3%, a cooperative motion of target atoms was characterized from the long-range-order (LRO) parameter. Here we investigated the correlation between DSA and that cooperative motion, by adding a case of intrinsic c-Si. We confirmed that the cooperative motion slightly promote DSA by assisting migration of SIAs toward metastable sites as long as the FP concentration is less than 3%, however, it is essentially independent of DSA.

  5. Self-assembly programming of DNA polyominoes.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui San; Syafiq-Rahim, Mohd; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2016-10-20

    Fabrication of functional DNA nanostructures operating at a cellular level has been accomplished through molecular programming techniques such as DNA origami and single-stranded tiles (SST). During implementation, restrictive and constraint dependent designs are enforced to ensure conformity is attainable. We propose a concept of DNA polyominoes that promotes flexibility in molecular programming. The fabrication of complex structures is achieved through self-assembly of distinct heterogeneous shapes (i.e., self-organised optimisation among competing DNA basic shapes) with total flexibility during the design and assembly phases. In this study, the plausibility of the approach is validated using the formation of multiple 3×4 DNA network fabricated from five basic DNA shapes with distinct configurations (monomino, tromino and tetrominoes). Computational tools to aid the design of compatible DNA shapes and the structure assembly assessment are presented. The formations of the desired structures were validated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imagery. Five 3×4 DNA networks were successfully constructed using combinatorics of these five distinct DNA heterogeneous shapes. Our findings revealed that the construction of DNA supra-structures could be achieved using a more natural-like orchestration as compared to the rigid and restrictive conventional approaches adopted previously.

  6. Self-assembly of smallest magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh Taheri, Sara; Michaelis, Maria; Friedrich, Thomas; Förster, Beate; Drechsler, Markus; Römer, Florian M.; Bösecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Weber, Birgit; Rehberg, Ingo; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Förster, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of tiny magnetic particles in external magnetic fields is important for many applications ranging from data storage to medical technologies. The development of ever smaller magnetic structures is restricted by a size limit, where the particles are just barely magnetic. For such particles we report the discovery of a kind of solution assembly hitherto unobserved, to our knowledge. The fact that the assembly occurs in solution is very relevant for applications, where magnetic nanoparticles are either solution-processed or are used in liquid biological environments. Induced by an external magnetic field, nanocubes spontaneously assemble into 1D chains, 2D monolayer sheets, and large 3D cuboids with almost perfect internal ordering. The self-assembly of the nanocubes can be elucidated considering the dipole–dipole interaction of small superparamagnetic particles. Complex 3D geometrical arrangements of the nanodipoles are obtained under the assumption that the orientation of magnetization is freely adjustable within the superlattice and tends to minimize the binding energy. On that basis the magnetic moment of the cuboids can be explained. PMID:26554000

  7. Functional Self-Assembled Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, A.; Wendorff, J. H.

    Electrospinning constitutes a unique technique for the production of nanofibers with diameters down to the range of a few nanometers. In strong contrast to conventional fiber producing techniques, it relies on self-assembly processes driven by the Coulomb interactions between charged elements of the fluids to be spun to nanofibers. The transition from a macroscopic fluid object such as a droplet emerging from a die to solid nanofibers is controlled by a set of complex physical instability processes. They give rise to extremely high extensional deformations and strain rates during fiber formation causing among others a high orientational order in the nanofibers as well as enhanced mechanical properties. Electrospinning is predominantly applied to polymer based materials including natural and synthetic polymers, but, more recently, its use has been extended towards the production of metal, ceramic and glass nanofibers exploiting precursor routes. The nanofibers can be functionalized during electrospinning by introducing pores, fractal surfaces, by incorporating functional elements such as catalysts, quantum dots, drugs, enzymes or even bacteria. The production of individual fibers, random nonwovens, or orientationally highly ordered nonwovens is achieved by an appropriate selection of electrode configurations. Broad areas of application exist in Material and Life Sciences for such nanofibers, including not only optoelectronics, sensorics, catalysis, textiles, high efficiency filters, fiber reinforcement but also tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing. The basic electrospinning process has more recently been extended towards compound co-electrospinning and precision deposition electrospinning to further broaden accessible fiber architectures and potential areas of application.

  8. Self-assembled single-crystal silicon circuits on plastic.

    PubMed

    Stauth, Sean A; Parviz, Babak A

    2006-09-19

    We demonstrate the use of self-assembly for the integration of freestanding micrometer-scale components, including single-crystal, silicon field-effect transistors (FETs) and diffusion resistors, onto flexible plastic substrates. Preferential self-assembly of multiple microcomponent types onto a common platform is achieved through complementary shape recognition and aided by capillary, fluidic, and gravitational forces. We outline a microfabrication process that yields single-crystal, silicon FETs in a freestanding, powder-like collection for use with self-assembly. Demonstrations of self-assembled FETs on plastic include logic inverters and measured electron mobility of 592 cm2/V-s. Finally, we extend the self-assembly process to substrates each containing 10,000 binding sites and realize 97% self-assembly yield within 25 min for 100-microm-sized elements. High-yield self-assembly of micrometer-scale functional devices as outlined here provides a powerful approach for production of macroelectronic systems.

  9. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots

  10. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots.

  11. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters.

    PubMed

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2011-08-07

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots.

  12. Functional self-assembled lipidic systems derived from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Julian R; Samateh, Malick; John, George

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled lipidic amphiphile systems can create a variety of multi-functional soft materials with value-added properties. When employing natural reagents and following biocatalytic syntheses, self-assembling monomers may be inherently designed for degradation, making them potential alternatives to conventional and persistent polymers. By using non-covalent forces, self-assembled amphiphiles can form nanotubes, fibers, and other stimuli responsive architectures prime for further applied research and incorporation into commercial products. By viewing these lipid derivatives under a lens of green principles, there is the hope that in developing a structure-function relationship and functional smart materials that research may remain safe, economic, and efficient.

  13. Dynamic self-assembly of 'living' polymeric chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Binghui; Shi, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    We report a dynamic self-assembly system of 'living' polymeric chains sustained by chemistry using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The linear polymeric chains consist of self-assembled nanoparticles connected by metastable linker molecules. As such, the polymeric chains, once assembled, undergo spontaneous dissociation driven by thermodynamics. However, with a continuous supply of linker molecules and the stored chemical energy therein, the polymeric chains can survive and maintain a steady state averaged chain length. These dynamically self-assembled polymeric chains are analogous to biological systems that both are thermodynamically metastable, yet dynamically stable upon continuous influx of matter and energy.

  14. Colloidosome like structures: self-assembly of silica microrods

    DOE PAGES

    Datskos, P.; Polizos, G.; Bhandari, M.; ...

    2016-03-07

    Self-assembly of one-dimensional structures is attracting a great deal of interest because assembled structures can provide better properties compared to individual building blocks. We demonstrate silica microrod self-assembly by exploiting Pickering emulsion based strategy. Micron-sized silica rods were synthesized employing previously reported methods based on polyvinylpyrrolidone/ pentanol emulsion droplets. Moreover, rods self-assembled to make structures in the range of z10 40 mm. Smooth rods assembled better than segmented rods. Finally, the assembled structures were bonded by weak van der Waals forces.

  15. Lutetium(III)-dependent self-assembly study of ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus centrin.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Zhao, Ya-Qin; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Li, Guo-Ting; Liang, Ai-Hua; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2008-02-01

    Ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (EoCen) is a member of the EF-hand superfamily of calcium-binding proteins, which often associated with the centrosomes and basal bodies. To explore the possible structural role of EoCen, we initiated a physicochemical study of the self-assembly properties of the purified protein in vitro. The native PAGE results indicate that only the integral protein shows multimers in the presence of Lu(3+). The dependence of Lu(3+) induced self-assembly of EoCen on various chemical and physical factors, including temperature, protein concentration, ionic strength and pH, was characterized using resonance light scattering (RLS). Control experiments with different metal ions suggest that Ca(2+) and Lu(3+) bindings to the N-terminal domain of EoCen are all positive to the self-assembly of the protein, and Lu(3+) exhibits the stronger effect, however, Mg(2+) alone cannot take the same effect. The experiments of 2-ptoluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) binding and ionic strength demonstrate that the lutetium(III)-dependent self-assembly is closely related to the exposure of hydrophobic cavity. Control experiment on pH value with EoCen and the fragments of it, N-terminal domain of EoCen (N-EoCen), indicates that the electrostatic effect is of small tendency to be served as the main driving force in the self-assembly of EoCen. The specific oligomerization form of the protein was exhibited by cross-linking experiment.

  16. Self-assembly in block polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2011-02-01

    The self-consistent field theory (SCFT) complemented with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation is employed to explore self-assembly of polyelectrolyte copolymers composed of charged blocks A and neutral blocks B. We have extended SCFT to dissociating triblock copolymers and demonstrated our approach on three characteristic examples: (1) diblock copolymer (AB) melt, (2) symmetric triblock copolymer (ABA) melt, (3) triblock copolymer (ABA) solution with added electrolyte. For copolymer melts, we varied the composition (that is, the total fraction of A-segments in the system) and the charge density on A blocks and calculated the phase diagram that contains ordered mesophases of lamellar, gyroid, hexagonal, and bcc symmetries, as well as the uniform disordered phase. The phase diagram of charged block copolymer melts in the charge density - system composition coordinates is similar to the classical phase diagram of neutral block copolymer melts, where the composition and the Flory mismatch interaction parameter χ _{AB} are used as variables. We found that the transitions between the polyelectrolyte mesophases with the increase of charge density occur in the same sequence, from lamellar to gyroid to hexagonal to bcc to disordered morphologies, as the mesophase transitions for neutral diblocks with the decrease of χ _{AB}. In a certain range of compositions, the phase diagram for charged triblock copolymers exhibits unexpected features, allowing for transitions from hexagonal to gyroid to lamellar mesophases as the charge density increases. Triblock polyelectrolyte solutions were studied by varying the charge density and solvent concentration at a fixed copolymer composition. Transitions from lamellar to gyroid and gyroid to hexagonal morphologies were observed at lower polymer concentrations than the respective transitions in the similar neutral copolymer, indicating a substantial influence of the charge density on phase behavior.

  17. Self assembly: An approach to terascale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.

    1993-09-01

    Surely one of the most remarkable accomplishments of modern times has been the miniaturization of electronic components, starting with discrete transistors and leading to Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) Circuits which will soon contain almost 100 million components in a few square centimeters. It led to an information processing industry that fuels almost every aspect of industrial societies and that has brought manifold benefits to their citizens. Although continuation of the miniaturization process is likely to produce even greater benefits, many experts are concerned that extrapolation of traditional silicon VLSI techniques will meet with increasingly severe difficulties. Some of these are fundamental in nature, e. g., granularity and fluctuations in semiconductors and interconnects and proximity effects such as tunneling. The first major difficulty to be encountered will be a rising cost of products due to increased complexity and difficulty of manufacturing and assembly. Such difficulties are likely to be seen in about 10 years when minimum component sizes are expected to decrease below 0.15--0.2 {mu}m. If alternatives to present VLSI techniques are to be available when needed, work on them must start now. At Los Alamos, we are exploring the feasibility of ultrasmall wires and switches that self-assemble themselves into computing elements and circuits. Their operation is based on the quantum properties of nanometer scale molecular clusters. This paper will describe our efforts in the development of these components and will summarize our work in four areas: (1) the development of conducting molecular wires, (2) conducting nanoparticle wires and switches based on the Coulomb Blockade principle, (3) the development of advanced architectures that benefit from the use of such components and that significantly advance the art of high performance computing, and (4) the development of novel methods for attaining sub-Angstrom 3-D non-destructive imaging.

  18. One-step synthesis of monodisperse AuNPs@PANI composite nanospheres as recyclable catalysts for 4-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Runming; Li, Zhiyuan; Wu, Qiang; Li, Dongfeng; Shi, Jiahua; Chen, Yuewen; Yu, Shuling; Ding, Tao; Qiao, Congzhen

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative polymerization of aniline was carried out in ethanol using chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) as the oxidant. Simultaneous reduction of HAuCl4 and formation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and polyaniline (PANI) composite nanospheres (AuNPs@PANI nanospheres) were achieved without using any templates or structure-directing agents. The composite nanospheres are uniformly distributed with an average diameter of about 400 nm, in which the ultrafine AuNPs with size of about 2-4 nm were evenly embedded in the PANI matrix which acted as the dispersing agent and stabilizer of AuNPs. In addition, the catalytic performance of these composite nanospheres towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol in the presence of NaBH4 was studied. Furthermore, the possible formation mechanism and catalytic mechanism of the self-assembled AuNPs@PANI nanospheres were also discussed.

  19. Converting molecular information of redox coenzymes via self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Masa-aki; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2012-11-21

    β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its reduced form NADH specifically interact with a cyanine dye in aqueous media, giving distinct spectral and nanostructural characteristics to which molecular information of constituent coenzymes are converted via self-assembly.

  20. Differentially photo-crosslinked polymers enable self-assembling microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Mustapha; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh M.; Gracias, David H.

    2012-01-01

    An important feature of naturally self-assembled systems such as leaves and tissues is that they are curved and have embedded fluidic channels that enable the transport of nutrients to, or removal of waste from, specific three-dimensional (3D) regions. Here, we report the self-assembly of photopatterned polymers, and consequently microfluidic devices, into curved geometries. We discovered that differentially photo-crosslinked SU-8 films spontaneously and reversibly curved upon film de-solvation and re-solvation. Photolithographic patterning of the SU-8 films enabled the self-assembly of cylinders, cubes, and bidirectionally folded sheets. We integrated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels with these SU-8 films to self-assemble curved microfluidic networks. PMID:22068594

  1. Directed flexibility: self-assembly of a supramolecular tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, James M; Xie, Tingzheng; Guo, Zaihong; Guo, Kai; Saunders, Mary Jane; Moorefield, Charles N; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Newkome, George R

    2015-03-04

    Self-assembly of a tribenzo-27-crown-9 ether functionalized with six terpyridines generated (85%) an expanded tetrahedral structure comprised of four independent triangular surfaces interlinked by crown ether vertices.

  2. Self-Assembly of Structures with Addressable Complexity.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-03-02

    The self-assembly of structures with "addressable complexity", where every component is distinct and is programmed to occupy a specific location within a target structure, is a promising route to engineering materials with precisely defined morphologies. Because systems with many components are inherently complicated, one might assume that the chances of successful self-assembly are extraordinarily small. Yet recent advances suggest otherwise: addressable structures with hundreds of distinct building blocks have been designed and assembled with nanometer precision. Despite this remarkable success, it is often challenging to optimize a self-assembly reaction to ensure that the intended structure is kinetically accessible. In this Perspective, we focus on the prediction of kinetic pathways for self-assembly and implications for the design of robust experimental protocols. The development of general principles to predict these pathways will enable the engineering of complex materials using a much wider range of building blocks than is currently possible.

  3. Directed self-assembly of proteins into discrete radial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Garima; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Unlike physical patterning of materials at nanometer scale, manipulating soft matter such as biomolecules into patterns is still in its infancy. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with surface density gradient has the capability to drive biomolecules in specific directions to create hierarchical and discrete structures. Here, we report on a two-step process of self-assembly of the human serum albumin (HSA) protein into discrete ring structures based on density gradient of SAM. The methodology involves first creating a 2-dimensional (2D) polyethylene glycol (PEG) islands with responsive carboxyl functionalities. Incubation of proteins on such pre-patterned surfaces results in direct self-assembly of protein molecules around PEG islands. Immobilization and adsorption of protein on such structures over time evolve into the self-assembled patterns. PMID:23719678

  4. Ionic liquids as amphiphile self-assembly media.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Tamar L; Drummond, Calum J

    2008-08-01

    In recent years, the number of non-aqueous solvents which mediate hydrocarbon-solvent interactions and promote the self-assembly of amphiphiles has been markedly increased by the reporting of over 30 ionic liquids which possess this previously unusual solvent characteristic. This new situation allows a different exploration of the molecular "solvophobic effect" and tests the current understanding of amphiphile self-assembly. Interestingly, both protic and aprotic ionic liquids support amphiphile self-assembly, indicating that it is not required for the solvents to be able to form a hydrogen bonded network. Here, the use of ionic liquids as amphiphile self-assembly media is reviewed, including micelle and liquid crystalline mesophase formation, their use as a solvent phase in microemulsions and emulsions, and the emerging field of nanostructured inorganic materials synthesis. Surfactants, lipids and block co-polymers are the focus amphiphile classes in this critical review (174 references).

  5. Understanding emergent functions in self-assembled fibrous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinko, Robert; Keten, Sinan

    2015-09-01

    Understanding self-assembly processes of nanoscale building blocks and characterizing their properties are both imperative for designing new hierarchical, network materials for a wide range of structural, optoelectrical, and transport applications. Although the characterization and choices of these material building blocks have been well studied, our understanding of how to precisely program a specific morphology through self-assembly still must be significantly advanced. In the recent study by Xie et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 205602), the self-assembly of end-functionalized nanofibres is investigated using a coarse-grained molecular model and offers fundamental insight into how to control the structural morphology of nanofibrous networks. Varying nanoscale networks are observed when the molecular interaction strength is changed and the findings suggest that self-assembly through the tuning of molecular interactions is a key strategy for designing nanostructured networks with specific topologies.

  6. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardan Ekiz, Melis; Cinar, Goksu; Aref Khalily, Mohammad; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2016-10-01

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies.

  7. Activity-assisted self-assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, S. A.; Cacciuto, A.

    2016-08-01

    We outline a basic strategy of how self-propulsion can be used to improve the yield of a typical colloidal self-assembly process. The success of this approach is predicated on the thoughtful design of the colloidal building block as well as how self-propulsion is endowed to the particle. As long as a set of criteria are satisfied, it is possible to significantly increase the rate of self-assembly, and greatly expand the window in parameter space where self-assembly can occur. In addition, we show that by tuning the relative on-off time of the self-propelling force it is possible to modulate the effective speed of the colloids allowing for further optimization of the self-assembly process.

  8. Self-assembly drugs: from micelles to nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Messina, Paula V; Besada-Porto, Jose Miguel; Ruso, Juan M

    2014-03-01

    Self-assembly has fascinated many scientists over the past few decades. Rapid advances and widespread interest in the study of this subject has led to the synthesis of an ever-increasing number of elegant and intricate functional structures with sizes that approach nano- and mesoscopic dimensions. Today, it has grown into a mature field of modern science whose interfaces with many disciplines have provided invaluable opportunities for crossing boundaries for scientists seeking to design novel molecular materials exhibiting unusual properties, and for researchers investigating the structure and function of biomolecules. Consequently, self-assembly transcends the traditional divisional boundaries of science and represents a highly interdisciplinary field including nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Basically, self-assembly focuses on a wide range of discrete molecules or molecular assemblies and uses physical transformations to achieve its goals. In this Review, we present a comprehensive overview of the advances in the field of drug self-assembly and discuss in detail the synthesis, self-assembly behavior, and physical properties as well as applications. We refer the reader to past reviews dealing with colloidal molecules and colloidal self-assembly. In the first part, we will discuss, compare, and link the various bioinformatic procedures: Molecular Dynamics and Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship. The second section deals with the self-assembly behavior in more detail, in which we focus on several experimental techniques, selected according to the depth of knowledge obtained. The last part will review the advances in drug-protein assembly. Nature provides many examples of proteins that form their substrate binding sites by bringing together the component pieces in a process of self-assembly. We will focus in the understanding of physical properties and applications developing thereof.

  9. Self-assembled nanotubes from single fluorescent amino acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babar, Dipak Gorakh; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2017-03-01

    Self-assembly of biomolecules has gained increasing attention as it generates various supramolecular structural assemblies having potential applications principally in biomedical sciences. Here, we show that amino acid like tryptophan or tyrosine readily aggregates as nanotubes via a simple self-assembly process. These were characterized by FTIR, scanning electron microscopy, and by fluorescence microscopy. Nanotubes prepared from tryptophan are having 200 nm inner diameter and those from tyrosine are having the same around 50 nm diameter.

  10. Self Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro/Nano-Textured Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Self Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces by Adam M. Rawlett, Joshua A. Orlicki, Nicole Zander, Afia Karikari, and...5069 ARL-TN-275 April 2007 Self Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces Adam M. Rawlett, Joshua A. Orlicki, and...NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITL Self A bled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER E ssem AND SUBTITLE 5d

  11. Self-assembled Nanomaterials for Hybrid Electronic and Photonic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-15

    Self-assembled Nanomaterials for Hybrid Electronic and Photonic Systems This grant studied DNA nanostructures and their applications in a variety of...MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 DNA , nanoscience, self-assembly...Title This grant studied DNA nanostructures and their applications in a variety of ways, including: (1) the development of thermo-mechanical models, (2

  12. Electronic polymers and DNA self-assembled in nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, Mahiar; Elfwing, Anders; Gabrielsson, Roger; Inganäs, Olle

    2013-02-11

    Aqueous self-assembly of DNA and molecular electronic materials can lead to the creation of innumerable copies of identical devices, and inherently programmed complex nanocircuits. Here self-assembly of a water soluble and highly conducting polymer PEDOT-S with DNA in aqueous conditions is shown. Orientation and assembly of the conducting DNA/PEDOT-S complex into electrochemical DNA nanowire transistors is demonstrated.

  13. DYNAMIC SHEAR-INFLUENCED COLLAGEN SELF-ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9 s-1). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (~2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 microns/sec) occurring at a shear rate of 9 s-1. The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s-1. However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term “hooks” which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or “mat” and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  14. Clamped Hybridization Chain Reactions for the Self-Assembly of Patterned DNA Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbang; Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Su, Shao; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Willner, Itamar; Fan, Chunhai

    2017-02-13

    DNA hydrogels hold great potential for biological and biomedical applications owing to their programmable nature and macroscopic sizes. However, most previous studies involve spontaneous and homogenous gelation procedures in solution, which often lack precise control. A clamped hybridization chain reaction (C-HCR)-based strategy has been developed to guide DNA self-assembly to form macroscopic hydrogels. Analogous to catalysts in chemical synthesis or seeds in crystal growth, we introduced DNA initiators to induce the gelation process, including crosslinked self-assembly and clamped hybridization in three dimensions with spatial and temporal control. The formed hydrogels show superior mechanical properties. The use of printed, surface-confined DNA initiators was also demonstrated for fabricating 2D hydrogel patterns without relying on external confinements. This simple method can be used to construct DNA hydrogels with defined geometry, composition, and order for various bioapplications.

  15. Born-Haber cycle for monolayer self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface: assessing the enthalpic driving force.

    PubMed

    Song, Wentao; Martsinovich, Natalia; Heckl, Wolfgang M; Lackinger, Markus

    2013-10-02

    The driving force for self-assembly is the associated gain in free energy with decisive contributions from both enthalpy and entropy differences between final and initial state. For monolayer self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface, solute molecules are initially dissolved in the liquid phase and then become incorporated into an adsorbed monolayer. In this work, we present an adapted Born-Haber cycle for obtaining precise enthalpy values for self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface, a key ingredient for a profound thermodynamic understanding of this process. By choosing terephthalic acid as a model system, it is demonstrated that all required enthalpy differences between well-defined reference states can be independently and consistently assessed by both experimental and theoretical methods, giving in the end a reliable value of the overall enthalpy gain for self-assembly of interfacial monolayers. A quantitative comparison of enthalpy gain and entropy cost reveals essential contributions from solvation and dewetting, which lower the entropic cost and render monolayer self-assembly a thermodynamically favored process.

  16. Design strategies for self-assembly of discrete targets

    SciTech Connect

    Madge, Jim; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-07-28

    Both biological and artificial self-assembly processes can take place by a range of different schemes, from the successive addition of identical building blocks to hierarchical sequences of intermediates, all the way to the fully addressable limit in which each component is unique. In this paper, we introduce an idealized model of cubic particles with patterned faces that allows self-assembly strategies to be compared and tested. We consider a simple octameric target, starting with the minimal requirements for successful self-assembly and comparing the benefits and limitations of more sophisticated hierarchical and addressable schemes. Simulations are performed using a hybrid dynamical Monte Carlo protocol that allows self-assembling clusters to rearrange internally while still providing Stokes-Einstein-like diffusion of aggregates of different sizes. Our simulations explicitly capture the thermodynamic, dynamic, and steric challenges typically faced by self-assembly processes, including competition between multiple partially completed structures. Self-assembly pathways are extracted from the simulation trajectories by a fully extendable scheme for identifying structural fragments, which are then assembled into history diagrams for successfully completed target structures. For the simple target, a one-component assembly scheme is most efficient and robust overall, but hierarchical and addressable strategies can have an advantage under some conditions if high yield is a priority.

  17. Impregnation of tubular self-assemblies into dextran hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoming; Chu, Chih-Chang

    2010-02-16

    Amine groups are the building units of proteins. The incorporation of amine groups into polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel through dextran-allyl isocyanate-ethylamine (Dex-AE) enhances sustained protein release by introducing effective interactions. To investigate such an interaction effect and to improve protein release, we impregnated self-assembled tubular structures from dextran-bromoethylamine (Dex-BH) and dextran-chloroacetic acid (Dex-CA) into Dex-AE/PEGDA hydrogel. The morphology data obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal that pure PEGDA hydrogel had no effect on the distribution of the self-assembled tubules; the introduction of Dex-AE brought about the dispersion of these tubules, and an increase in Dex-AE content led to more evenly distributed structures. Moreover, the implantation of the self-assembled tubules had no distinct effect on the swelling capacity of the hybrid self-assembly embedded hydrogels. The in vitro albumin release study was carried out in a pH 7.4 buffer solution; the results show that the implantation of the self-assembly into the hydrogels reduced the burst release and prolonged the protein release time. These findings demonstrate that the impregnation of tubular self-assembly into hydrogel makes the hybrid hydrogel an excellent protein delivery system.

  18. Effect of polymerization on hierarchical self-assembly into nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Taichi

    2015-01-20

    The oligomers consisting of phenyl-capped bithiophene and tetra(ethylene glycol)s linked by azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition were synthesized. The relationship between the degree of polymerization and self-assembling ability was investigated in o-dichlorobenzene and dimethyl sulfoxide. From the absorption spectrum, it was confirmed that the critical degree of polymerization (CDP) for thiophene unit aggregation was 4. The morphology of the aggregated product was observed by atomic force microscopy. The oligomers 4mer and 5mer could not self-assemble into well-defined structures due to the weak driving force for the self-assembly. In the cases of 6mer and 7mer, aggregates with nonwell-defined and nanosheet structures coexisted. In the cases of 8mer and 9mer, the nanosheet was the main product. The critical point between 7mer and 8mer could be confirmed by different aggregation behaviors in the cooling process of the solution (nonsigmoidal and sigmoidal). In the cases of 8mer and 9mer, polymer folding prior to intermolecular self-assembly, which was supported by sigmoidal aggregation behavior, leads to the nanosheet formation. On the contrary, shorter oligomers than 8mer experience intermolecular aggregation prior to intramolecular polymer folding, which was supported by the nonsigmoidal aggregation behavior. This is the first report to prove the existence of CDP for folded polymer nanosheet formation which requires hierarchical self-assembly, i.e., polymer folding followed by intermolecular self-assembly.

  19. DNA-based self-assembly for functional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan

    2013-07-26

    The unprecedented development of DNA nanotechnology has caused DNA self-assembly to attract close attention in many disciplines. In this research news article, the employment of DNA self-assembly in the fields of materials science and nanotechnology is described. DNA self-assembly can be used to prepare bulk-scale hydrogels and 3D macroscopic crystals with nanoscale internal structures, to induce the crystallization of nanoparticles, to template the fabrication of organic conductive nanomaterials, and to act as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents. The properties and functions are fully tunable because of the designability and specificity of DNA assembly. Moreover, because of the intrinsic dynamics, DNA self-assembly can act as a program switch and can efficiently control stimuli responsiveness. We highlight the power of DNA self-assembly in the preparation and function regulation of materials, aiming to motivate future multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research. Finally, we describe some of the challenges currently faced by DNA assembly that may affect the functional evolution of such materials, and we provide our insights into the future directions of several DNA self-assembly-based nanomaterials.

  20. Albumin binds self-assembling dyes as specific polymolecular ligands.

    PubMed

    Stopa, Barbara; Rybarska, Janina; Drozd, Anna; Konieczny, Leszek; Król, Marcin; Lisowski, Marek; Piekarska, Barbara; Roterman, Irena; Spólnik, Paweł; Zemanek, Grzegorz

    2006-12-15

    Self-assembling dyes with a structure related to Congo red (e.g. Evans blue) form polymolecular complexes with albumin. The dyes, which are lacking a self-assembling property (Trypan blue, ANS) bind as single molecules. The supramolecular character of dye ligands bound to albumin was demonstrated by indicating the complexation of dye molecules outnumbering the binding sites in albumin and by measuring the hydrodynamic radius of albumin which is growing upon complexation of self-assembling dye in contrast to dyes lacking this property. The self-assembled character of Congo red was also proved using it as a carrier introducing to albumin the intercalated nonbonding foreign compounds. Supramolecular, ordered character of the dye in the complex with albumin was also revealed by finding that self-assembling dyes become chiral upon complexation. Congo red complexation makes albumin less resistant to low pH as concluded from the facilitated N-F transition, observed in studies based on the measurement of hydrodynamic radius. This particular interference with protein stability and the specific changes in digestion resulted from binding of Congo red suggest that the self-assembled dye penetrates the central crevice of albumin.

  1. Electric Field Controlled Self-Assembly of Hierarchically Ordered Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Velichko, Yuri S.; Mantei, Jason R.; Bitton, Ronit; Carvajal, Daniel; Shull, Kenneth R.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly in the presence of external forces is an adaptive, directed organization of molecular components under nonequilibrium conditions. While forces may be generated as a result of spontaneous interactions among components of a system, intervention with external forces can significantly alter the final outcome of self-assembly. Superimposing these intrinsic and extrinsic forces provides greater degrees of freedom to control the structure and function of self-assembling materials. In this work we investigate the role of electric fields during the dynamic self-assembly of a negatively charged polyelectrolyte and a positively charged peptide amphiphile in water leading to the formation of an ordered membrane. In the absence of electric fields, contact between the two solutions of oppositely charged molecules triggers the growth of closed membranes with vertically oriented fibrils that encapsulate the polyelectrolyte solution. This process of self-assembly is intrinsically driven by excess osmotic pressure of counterions, and the electric field is found to modify the kinetics of membrane formation, and also its morphology and properties. Depending on the strength and orientation of the field we observe a significant increase or decrease of up to nearly 100% in membrane thickness, as well as the controlled rotation of nanofiber growth direction by 90 degrees, resulting in a significant increase in mechanical stiffness. These results suggest the possibility of using electric fields to control structure in self-assembly processes involving diffusion of oppositely charged molecules. PMID:23166533

  2. Kinetics of Surface-Driven Self-Assembly and Fatigue-Induced Disassembly of a Virus-Based Nanocoating.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Alejandro; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2017-02-28

    Self-assembling protein layers provide a "bottom-up" approach for precisely organizing functional elements at the nanoscale over a large solid surface area. The design of protein sheets with architecture and physical properties suitable for nanotechnological applications may be greatly facilitated by a thorough understanding of the principles that underlie their self-assembly and disassembly. In a previous study, the hexagonal lattice formed by the capsid protein (CA) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was self-assembled as a monomolecular layer directly onto a solid substrate, and its mechanical properties and dynamics at equilibrium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Here, we use atomic force microscopy to analyze the kinetics of self-assembly of the planar CA lattice on a substrate and of its disassembly, either spontaneous or induced by materials fatigue. Both self-assembly and disassembly of the CA layer are cooperative reactions that proceed until a phase equilibrium is reached. Self-assembly requires a critical protein concentration and is initiated by formation of nucleation points on the substrate, followed by lattice growth and eventual merging of CA patches into a continuous monolayer. Disassembly of the CA layer showed hysteresis and appears to proceed only after large enough defects (nucleation points) are formed in the lattice, whose number is largely increased by inducing materials fatigue that depends on mechanical load and its frequency. Implications of the kinetic results obtained for a better understanding of self-assembly and disassembly of the HIV capsid and protein-based two-dimensional nanomaterials and the design of anti-HIV drugs targeting (dis)assembly and biocompatible nanocoatings are discussed.

  3. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    dry plasma etch. The wet chemical etches the silicon away, exposing the TiSi2 rods, whereas plasma etching preferentially etches the Si-TiSi2 interface to form a crater. The porous architectures are applicable to fabricating microdevices or creating templates for part fabrication. The porous rod structure can serve as a platform for fabricating microplasma devices for propulsion or microheat exchangers and for fabricating microfilters for miniatured chemical reactors. Although more work is required, self-assembly from DSE can have a role in microdevice fabrication.

  4. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (<20 nm in diameter) in diameter. Essential to our approach is an understanding of the nanoparticle as a building block, combined with an ability to integrate them into thin films that have uniform and characteristic electrical properties. We observe the BaTiO3 nanocrystals crystallize with evidence of tetragonality. Electric field dependent polarization measurements show spontaneous polarization and hysteresis, indicating ferroelectric behavior for the BaTiO 3 nanocrystalline films with grain sizes in the range of 10--30 nm. Dielectric measurements of the films show dielectic constants in the range of 85--90 over the 1 kHz--100 kHz, with low loss. We present nanocrystals as initial building blocks for the preparation of thin films which exhibit uniform nanostructured morphologies and grain sizes. In the second part of this chapter, a nonhydrolytic alcoholysis route to study the preparation of well-crystallized size-tunable BaTiO3

  5. AFM characterization of spin coated carboxylated polystyrene nanospheres/xyloglucan layers on mica and silicon.

    PubMed

    Lubambo, Adriana F; Lucyszyn, Neoli; Petzhold, Cesar L; Sierakowski, Maria-R; Schreiner, Wido H; Saul, Cyro K

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembled nano-arrays have a potential application as solid-phase diagnostics in many biomedical devices. The easiness of its production is directly connected to manufacture cost reduction. In this work, we present self-assembled structures starting from spin coated thin films of carboxylated polystyrene (PSC) and xyloglucan (XG) mixtures on both mica and silicon substrates. AFM images showed PSC nanospheres on top of a homogeneous layer of XG, for both substrates. The average nanosphere diameter fluctuated for a constant speed and it was likely to be independent of the component proportions on the mixture within a range of 30-50% (v/v) PSC. It was also observed that the largest diameters were found at the center of the sample and the smallest at the border. The detected nanospheres were also more numerous at the border. This behavior presents a similarity to spin coated colloidal dispersions. We observed that the average nanosphere diameter on mica substrates was bigger than the nanosphere diameters obtained on top of silicon substrates, under the same conditions. This result seems to be possibly connected to different mixture-surface interactions.

  6. Tunable two dimensional protein patterns through self-assembly nanosphere template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhishi; Ruan, Weidong; Shen, Shanshan; Wang, Haiyang; Guo, Zhinan; Xue, Xiangxin; Mao, Zhu; Ji, Wei; Wang, Xu; Song, Wei; Zhao, Bing

    2012-10-01

    By the aim of constructing surfaces for multi-component and multifunctional bioassay, a microsphere lithography technique was employed to control the surface morphology. Two kinds of protein molecules (antibodies) were used as building blocks. As a result, dual-component biocompatible surfaces with alternate immunoglobulin micropatterns were fabricated. The employed antibodies included human Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and rabbit IgG, which composed nanometer scale surface arrays on the surfaces. The antibodies were identified specially by immunoreactions with labeled antigens of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-antihuman IgG and tetramethylrhodamine-5-(and 6)-isothiocyanate (TRITC)-antirabbit IgG. The immune responses were confirmed by confocal fluorescence (FL) microscopy. A study on the sensitivity and quantification was done by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectroscopy. The obtained SERRS spectra showed satisfactory resolution in the multi-component detection objects. No interference was observed from inner- or interactions of detecting molecules. The detection limits for both of the antigens reached to as low as 1 ng/mL, which was comparable to FL method. Meanwhile, a good linear relationship between SERRS peak intensity and the logarithm of antigens' concentrations (from 1 ng/mL to 1 mg/mL) were observed. The results demonstrated that SERRS is a very promising detection technique for multi-component immunoassay, and has great potential applications in biotechnology and biochemistry.

  7. Self-assembled magnetic nanospheres with three-dimensional magnetic vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Kwan; Dhak, Prasanta; Lee, Ha-Youn; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Nam, Ki Tae; Kim, Miyoung; Park, Hyun Soon; Aizawa, Shinji; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Shindo, Daisuke

    2014-12-08

    We report the electron holography images of spin configurations in peculiar assemblies of soft magnetic nanoparticles in single-, double-, triple-, or quadruple-sphere geometrical arrangements, in which each particle has a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic-vortex structure. Micromagnetic numerical calculations reveal that the uniqueness of the nanoparticles' 3D vortex structure plays a crucial role in their assembly, especially in terms of the contrasting contributions of the exchange and dipolar interactions to their binding energies. The results represent physical insights into the assembly of 3D-vortex-structure magnetic nanoparticles in different geometrical configurations and offer a practical means of controlling those assemblies.

  8. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  9. Cationic polymers and their self-assembly for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Deka, Smriti Rekha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pradee

    2015-01-01

    The present article focuses on the amphiphilic cationic polymers as antibacterial agents. These polymers undergo self-assembly in aqueous conditions and impart biological activity by efficiently interacting with the bacterial cell wall, hence, used in preparing chemical disinfectants and biocides. Both cationic charge as well as hydrophobic segments facilitate interactions with the bacterial cell surface and initiate its disruption. The perturbation in transmembrane potential causes leakage of cytosolic contents followed by cell death. Out of two categories of macromolecules, peptide oligomers and cationic polymers, which have extensively been used as antibacterials, we have elaborated on the current advances made in the area of cationic polymer-based (naturally occurring and commonly employed synthetic polymers and their modified analogs) antibacterial agents. The development of polymer-based antibacterials has helped in addressing challenges posed by the drug-resistant bacterial infections. These polymers provide a new platform to combat such infections in the most efficient manner. This review presents concise discussion on the amphiphilic cationic polymers and their modified analogs having low hemolytic activity and excellent antibacterial activity against array of fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms.

  10. Directed self-assembly cut mask assignment for unidirectional design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jiaojiao; Yu, Bei; Gao, Jhih-Rong; Pan, David Z.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, directed self-assembly (DSA) has emerged as a promising lithography solution for cut manufacturing. We perform a comprehensive study on the DSA aware mask optimization problem to provide a DSA friendly design on cut layers. We first formulate the problem as an integer linear programming (ILP) to assign cuts to different guiding templates, targeting both conflict minimization and line-end extension minimization. As ILP may not be scalable for very large size problems, we then propose two speed-up strategies. The first one is to decompose the initial problem into smaller ones and solve them separately, followed by solution merging without much loss of quality. The second one is using the set cover algorithm to decide the DSA guiding pattern assignment, and then legalize the template placement. Our approaches can be naturally extended to handle arbitrary DSA guiding template patterns with complicated shapes. Experimental results show that our methodologies can significantly improve the DSA friendly, i.e., both the unresolved pattern number and the line-end extensions can be reduced.

  11. Label-free optical characterization methods for detecting amine silanization-driven gold nanoparticle self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shibsekhar; Dixit, Chandra K; Woolley, Robert; O'Kennedy, Richard; McDonagh, Colette

    2011-09-06

    Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) is presented as a single-step label-free detection method for probing the amine silanization-driven spontaneous 3D self-assembly of freestanding gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in solution. Unlike the conventional methods of studying self-assembly, for example, UV-vis spectroscopy and electron microscopy, FLCS utilizes the intrinsic gold fluorescence. The significance of this approach is to amalgamate the measurement of optical and hydrodynamic size properties simultaneously to achieve a more coherent description of the self-assembly pathway. GNP self-assembly has two-stage kinetics. Electrostatic interaction drives the initial amine silanization, and this is followed by siloxane bond formation between hydrolyzed ethoxy groups of GNP-attached APTES, resulting in the formation of micrometer-sized superstructures. The self-assembly has resulted in a 5-fold increase in the fluorescence lifetime (FL), and the FLCS study has shown an 8- to 10-fold increase in the diffusion coefficient using the pure diffusion model. This result is consistent with the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation, which shows a few hundred fold increase in the diameter due to assembly formation by the GNPs.

  12. Investigate the Effect of Thawing Process on the Self-Assembly of Silk Protein for Tissue Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hien Anh; Huynh, Khon Chan; Vo, Toi Van

    2017-01-01

    Biological self-assembly is a process in which building blocks autonomously organize to form stable supermolecules of higher order and complexity through domination of weak, noncovalent interactions. For silk protein, the effect of high incubating temperature on the induction of secondary structure and self-assembly was well investigated. However, the effect of freezing and thawing on silk solution has not been studied. The present work aimed to investigate a new all-aqueous process to form 3D porous silk fibroin matrices using a freezing-assisted self-assembly method. This study proposes an experimental investigation and optimization of environmental parameters for the self-assembly process such as freezing temperature, thawing process, and concentration of silk solution. The optical images demonstrated the possibility and potential of −80ST48 treatment to initialize the self-assembly of silk fibroin as well as controllably fabricate a porous scaffold. Moreover, the micrograph images illustrate the assembly of silk protein chain in 7 days under the treatment of −80ST48 process. The surface morphology characterization proved that this method could control the pore size of porous scaffolds by control of the concentration of silk solution. The animal test showed the support of silk scaffold for cell adhesion and proliferation, as well as the cell migration process in the 3D implantable scaffold. PMID:28367442

  13. Self-assemblies of 5'-cholesteryl-ethyl-phosphoryl zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Du, Lina; Jia, Junwei; Ge, Pingju; Jin, Yiguang

    2016-12-01

    Anti-HIV prodrugs are recently focused on due to their ability of self-assembly, macrophage targeting, and enhanced antiviral effects. Here, an amphiphilic prodrug of zidovudine, an anti-HIV nucleoside analogue, 5'-cholesteryl-ethyl-phosphoryl zidovudine (CEPZ) was synthesized. CEPZ showed some unique physicochemical properties. The solubility of CEPZ in the noncompetitive solvents chloroform and tetrahydrofuran (THF) was very high based on the hydrogen bonds between zidovudine groups, though CEPZ was sparing soluble in alcohols and almost insoluble in water. The typical amphiphilic property of CEPZ was demonstrated according to the Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface. The LogP of CEPZ was high to 13.78, indicating the high hydrophobicity of amphiphilic CEPZ similar to phospholipids. Homogenous and stable self-assemblies were formed with the mean size of 128.7nm and the zeta potential of -35.4mV after injecting the CEPZ-in-THF solution into water. Hydrophobic interaction between the cholesteryl moieties of CEPZ could drive molecular self-assembly and lead to the formation of spherical vesicles. CEPZ self-assemblies showed strong stability even under high temperature and gravity probably due to the high surface charge. CEPZ was very slowly degraded in neutral solutions (e.g., pH 7.4), but fast in acid solutions (e.g., pH 5.0) and some tissue homogenates. CEPZ was quickly eliminated from the circulation and distributed into the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) including the liver, spleen and lung after bolus intravenous administration of CEPZ self-assemblies to mice. The MPS targeting effect of CEPZ self-assemblies makes them become a promising self-assembled drug delivery system to eradicate the HIV hidden in the macrophages.

  14. DC electric field induced phase array self-assembly of Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavali, S.; Sachan, R.; Dyck, O.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we report the discovery of phase array self-assembly, a new way to spontaneously make periodic arrangements of metal nanoparticles. An initially random arrangement of gold (Au) or silver (Ag) nanoparticles on SiO2/Si substrates was irradiated with linearly polarized (P) laser light in the presence of a dc electric (E) field applied to the insulating substrate. For E fields parallel to the laser polarization (E \\parallel P), the resulting periodic ordering was single-crystal like with extremely low defect density and covered large macroscopic areas. The E field appears to be modifying the phase between radiation scattered by the individual nanoparticles thus leading to enhanced interference effects. While phase array behavior is widely known in antenna technology, this is the first evidence that it can also aid in nanoscale self-assembly. These results provide a simple way to produce periodic metal nanoparticles over large areas.

  15. Self-assembly enhances the strength of fibers made from vimentin intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Nicole; Yang, Fei-Chi; Negishi, Atsuko; Rheinstädter, Maikel C; Gillis, Todd E; Fudge, Douglas S

    2014-02-10

    Hagfish slime threads were recently established as a promising biomimetic model for efforts to produce ecofriendly alternatives to petroleum polymers. Initial attempts to make fibers from solubilized slime thread proteins fell short of achieving the outstanding mechanics of native slime threads. Here we tested the hypothesis that the high strength and toughness of slime threads arise from the ability of constituent intermediate filaments to undergo a stress-induced α-to-β transition. To do this, we made fibers from human vimentin proteins that were first allowed to self-assemble into 10 nm intermediate filaments. Fibers made from assembled vimentin hydrogels underwent an α-to-β transition when strained and exhibited improved mechanical performance. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to make materials from intermediate filament hydrogels and that mimicking the secondary structure of native hagfish slime threads using intermediate filament self-assembly is a promising strategy for improving the mechanical performance of biomimetic protein materials.

  16. Flexible minerals: self-assembled calcite spicules with extreme bending strength.

    PubMed

    Natalio, Filipe; Corrales, Tomas P; Panthöfer, Martin; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Müller, Werner E G; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2013-03-15

    Silicatein-α is responsible for the biomineralization of silicates in sponges. We used silicatein-α to guide the self-assembly of calcite "spicules" similar to the spicules of the calcareous sponge Sycon sp. The self-assembled spicules, 10 to 300 micrometers (μm) in length and 5 to 10 μm in diameter, are composed of aligned calcite nanocrystals. The spicules are initially amorphous but transform into calcite within months, exhibiting unusual growth along [100]. They scatter x-rays like twinned calcite crystals. Whereas natural spicules evidence brittle failure, the synthetic spicules show an elastic response, which greatly enhances bending strength. This remarkable feature is linked to a high protein content. With nano-thermogravimetric analysis, we measured the organic content of a single spicule to be 10 to 16%. In addition, the spicules exhibit waveguiding properties even when they are bent.

  17. Supramolecular star polymers. Increased molecular weight with decreased polydispersity through self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Todd, Eric M; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2007-11-28

    A ditopic structure containing two heterocyclic DeAP units and programmed to self-assemble is used as an initiation unit for the synthesis of polylactide and polystyrene. The resultant polymers self-assemble into higher molecular weight structures with a lower molecular weight distribution. The largest discrete nanoscale polymeric assembly is proposed to be a hexameric star with a molecular weight of ca. 92.7 kDa. All polymeric assemblies generally exhibit PDI values of 1.3 to 1.5, which are lower than the PDI value of the corresponding polymeric arms. A hexameric assembly is stabilized by 30 hydrogen bonds, including six AADD.DDAA contacts. The hexameric star is formed under conditions that are at least partially controlled by kinetics.

  18. Self-assembled tethered bimolecular lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Ritz, Sandra; Naumann, Renate; Schiller, Stefan; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the strategies developed in our group for designing, constructing and structurally and functionally characterizing tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLM). We introduce this platform as a novel model membrane system that complements the existing ones, for example, Langmuir monolayers, vesicular liposomal dispersions and bimolecular ("black") lipid membranes. Moreover, it offers the additional advantage of allowing for studies of the influence of membrane structure and order on the function of integral proteins, for example, on how the composition and organization of lipids in a mixed membrane influence the ion translocation activity of integral channel proteins. The first strategy that we introduce concerns the preparation of tethered monolayers by the self-assembly of telechelics. Their molecular architecture with a headgroup, a spacer unit (the "tether") and the amphiphile that mimics the lipid molecule allows them to bind specifically to the solid support thus forming the proximal layer of the final architecture. After fusion of vesicles that could contain reconstituted proteins from a liposomal dispersion in contact to this monolayer the tethered bimolecular lipid membrane is obtained. This can then be characterized by a broad range of surface analytical techniques, including surface plasmon spectroscopies, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques, to mention a few. It is shown that this concept allows for the construction of tethered lipid bilayers with outstanding electrical properties including resistivities in excess of 10 MOmega cm2. A modified strategy uses the assembly of peptides as spacers that couple covalently via their engineered sulfhydryl or lipoic acid groups at the N-terminus to the employed gold substrate, while their C-terminus is being activated afterward for the coupling of, for example, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanol amine (DMPE) lipid molecules

  19. Interface-induced disassembly of a self-assembled two-component nanoparticle system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Duc, Le T; Ali, Affira; Liang, Beverly; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2013-03-19

    We present a study of static and dynamic interfacial properties of self-assembled polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (size 110-120 nm) containing entrapped surfactant molecules at a fluid/fluid interface. Surface tension vs time measurements of an aqueous solution of these polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (PCNs) show a concentration-dependent biphasic adsorption to the air/water interface while interfacial microrheology data show a concentration-dependent initial increase in the surface viscosity (up to 10(-7) N·m/s), followed by a sharp decrease (10(-9) N·m/s). Direct visualization of the air/water interface shows disappearance of particles from the interface over time. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the PCNs at fluid/fluid interfaces exist in two states: initial accumulation of PCNs at the air/water interface as nanoparticles, followed by interface induced disassembly of the accumulated PCNs into their components. The lack of change in particle size, charge, and viscosity of the bulk aqueous solution of PCNs with time indicates that this disintegration of the self-assembled PCNs is an interfacial phenomenon. Changes in energy encountered by the PCNs at the interface lead to instability of the self-assembled system and dissociation into its components. Such systems can be used for applications requiring directed delivery and triggered release of entrapped surfactants or macromolecules at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  20. Well-Defined Protein/Peptide-Polymer Conjugates by Aqueous Cu-LRP: Synthesis and Controlled Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Muxiu; Zhu, Chongyu; Nurumbetov, Gabit; Li, Zaidong; Wilson, Paul; Kempe, Kristian; Haddleton, David M

    2015-07-29

    The synthesis of well-defined protein/peptide-polymer conjugates with interesting self-assembly behavior via single electron transfer living radical polymerization in water is described. A range of protein/peptides with different physical and chemical properties have been modified to macroinitiators and optimized polymerization conditions ensure successful polymerization from soluble, insoluble, and dispersed protein/peptide molecules or protein aggregates. This powerful strategy tolerates a range of functional monomers and mediates efficient homo or block copolymerization to generate hydrophilic polymers with controlled molecular weight (MW) and narrow MW distribution. The polymerizations from bovine insulin macroinitiators follow surface-initiated "grafting from" polymerization mechanism and may involve a series of self-assembly and disassembly processes. Synthesized insulin-polymer conjugates form spheres in water, and the self-assembly behavior could be controlled via thermal control, carbohydrate-protein interaction, and protein denaturation.

  1. Self-Assembly of Nanoclusters into Mono-, Few-, and Multilayered Sheets via Dipole-Induced Asymmetric van der Waals Attraction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhennan; Liu, Jiale; Li, Yanchun; Cheng, Ziyi; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Hao; Lu, Zhongyuan; Yang, Bai

    2015-06-23

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials possessing regular layered structures and versatile chemical composition are highly expected in many applications. Despite the importance of van der Waals (vdW) attraction in constructing and maintaining layered structures, the origin of 2D anisotropy is not fully understood, yet. Here, we report the 2D self-assembly of ligand-capped Au15 nanoclusters into mono-, few-, and multilayered sheets in colloidal solution. Both the experimental results and computer simulation reveal that the 2D self-assembly is initiated by 1D dipolar attraction common in nanometer-sized objects. The dense 1D attachment of Au15 leads to a redistribution of the surface ligands, thus generating asymmetric vdW attraction. The deliberate control of the coordination of dipolar and vdW attraction further allows to manipulate the thickness and morphologies of 2D self-assembly architectures.

  2. Cooperative thermodynamic control of selectivity in the self-assembly of rare earth metal-ligand helices.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amber M; Young, Michael C; Zhang, Xing; Julian, Ryan R; Hooley, Richard J

    2013-11-27

    Metal-selective self-assembly with rare-earth cations is possible with suitable rigid, symmetrical bis-tridentate ligands. Kinetically controlled formation is initially observed, with smaller cations preferentially incorporated. Over time, the more thermodynamically favorable complexes with larger metals are formed. This thermodynamic control is a cooperative supramolecular phenomenon and only occurs upon multiple-metal-based self-assembly: single-metal ML3 analogues do not show reversible selectivity. The selectivity is dependent on small variations in lanthanide ionic radius and occurs despite identical coordination-ligand coordination geometries and minor size differences in the rare-earth metals.

  3. Orientation dynamics of azobenzene-based self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Guanjiu

    2007-12-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) synthesized on glass and incorporating azobenzene are illuminated with actinic light to study the effect of photo-isomerization on in-plane molecular orientation. Measurements of the monolayer birefringence show that the SAM orientation dynamics are non-first-order kinetics, characterized by an exponential relaxation with a distribution of relaxation times. The orientational birefringence decays as a power law with an exponent that decreases with increasing initial writing intensity, indicative of orientational trapping wells with a distribution of depths. The distribution of trapping well depths, resulting from the distribution of free volumes among the SAM molecules, is modified by exposure to light. This depth modification indicates that photoisomerization is a collective process depending on neighboring molecules. Increasing the light intensity enhances the collective effect so that the orientation dynamics are changed from fractal to normal diffusion. With a further increase in light intensity, the collective effect does not change any more so that the mean width of the trapping well depth distribution, characterized by the power law exponent, becomes constant. The liquid crystal alignment in a photo-buffed SAM/rubbed nylon twisted nematic cell is very stable at room temperature, but it is lost upon cooling if the liquid crystal is heated into the isotropic phase, which is attributed to the thermal orientational relaxation of the SAM molecules. The liquid crystal response to reorienting the SAM with polarized light depends on the initial SAM writing time: the harder the initial writing, the slower subsequent reorientation, which is similar to the behavior of bare SAMs. The reorientation of the liquid crystals shows hysteresis compared with that of bare SAMs, with a larger dose required at higher intensity.

  4. Acylpyrazolones: Synthesis, self-assembly and lanthanide metal ion separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    The central hypothesis that nanoscale self-assemblies can provide excellent metal ion recognition has been substantiated by employing acylpyrazolones and trivalent lanthanide metal ions as model systems. Several novel acylpyrazolones and their amphiphilic analogs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Their lanthanide metal ion recognition efficacies have been demonstrated through baseline separations of a mixture of light, middle, and heavy lanthanide metal ions by employing them in the aqueous mobile phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with octadecylsilanized silica (ODS) as the stationary phase. The complex separation mechanism is influenced by the structures of acylpyrazolone and amphiphilic moieties, and spontaneous self-assembly of the ligand in the aqueous and on the stationary phases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the ligand self-assemblies in the aqueous phase in the absence and presence of lanthanide metal ions reveal spherical, dendritic, and linear (nanofibers, nanorods, and nanotubes) nanoscale structures. Such structures have also been observed when chloromethylated acylpyrazolones are stimulated to self-assemble by a base in nonaqueous solvents and when silica nanoparticles derivatized with them spontaneously self-assemble in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents.

  5. Self-Assembly for the Synthesis of Functional Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Ortony, Julia H.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    The use of self-assembly for the construction of functional biomaterials is a highly promising and exciting area of research, with great potential for the treatment of injury or disease. By using multiple noncovalent interactions, coded into the molecular design of the constituent components, self-assembly allows for the construction of complex, adaptable, and highly tunable materials with potent biological effects. This review describes some of the seminal advances in the use of self-assembly to make novel systems for regenerative medicine and biology. Materials based on peptides, proteins, DNA, or hybrids thereof have found application in the treatment of a wide range of injuries and diseases, and this review outlines the design principles and practical applications of these systems. Most of the examples covered focus on the synthesis of hydrogels for the scaffolding or transplantation of cells, with an emphasis on the biological, mechanical, and structural properties of the resulting materials. In addition, we will discuss the distinct advantages conferred by self-assembly (compared with traditional covalent materials), and present some of the challenges and opportunities for the next generation of self-assembled biomaterials. PMID:23457423

  6. Sequential programmable self-assembly: Role of cooperative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Jonathan D.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a general strategy of "sequential programmable self-assembly" that enables a bottom-up design of arbitrary multi-particle architectures on nano- and microscales. We show that a naive realization of this scheme, based on the pairwise additive interactions between particles, has fundamental limitations that lead to a relatively high error rate. This can be overcome by using cooperative interparticle binding. The cooperativity is a well known feature of many biochemical processes, responsible, e.g., for signaling and regulations in living systems. Here we propose to utilize a similar strategy for high precision self-assembly, and show that DNA-mediated interactions provide a convenient platform for its implementation. In particular, we outline a specific design of a DNA-based complex which we call "DNA spider," that acts as a smart interparticle linker and provides a built-in cooperativity of binding. We demonstrate versatility of the sequential self-assembly based on spider-functionalized particles by designing several mesostructures of increasing complexity and simulating their assembly process. This includes a number of finite and repeating structures, in particular, the so-called tetrahelix and its several derivatives. Due to its generality, this approach allows one to design and successfully self-assemble virtually any structure made of a "GEOMAG" magnetic construction toy, out of nanoparticles. According to our results, once the binding cooperativity is strong enough, the sequential self-assembly becomes essentially error-free.

  7. Harnessing Surface Dislocation Networks for Molecular Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Karsten

    2009-03-01

    The controlled fabrication of functional wafer-based nano-arrays is one of the ultimate quests in current nanotechnologies. Well-ordered misfit dislocation networks of ultrathin metal films are viable candidates for the growth of two- dimensional ordered cluster arrays in the nanometer regime. Such bottom-up processes can be very complex, involving collective effects from a large number of atoms. Unraveling the fundamental forces that drive these self-assembly processes requires detailed experimental information at the atomic level of large ensembles of hundreds to thousands of atoms. The combination of variable temperature measurements from our home-built STM correlated with 2D Frenkel-Kontorova models based on first-principle interaction parameters is used to explain how uniform arrays can form with the strain in the thin film as the driving force responsible for the surface self-assembly process. This process is generally applicable to assemble many molecular species thus opening avenues towards complex self-assembled structures based on a lock-and-key type approach. Moreover, when increasing the molecular coverage and/or decreasing the strain in the thin film the intermolecular interactions will eventually dominate the elastic effects and dictate the self-assembly process via molecular structure and functionality. We will show that controlling this delicate balance leads to a richness of structures, ranging from disperse ordered arrays of molecular clusters to patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of functionalized fullerenes and methanethiol.

  8. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  9. Controlled evaporative self-assembly of poly(acrylic acid) in a confined geometry for fabricating patterned polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Men, Yonghong; Xiao, Peng; Chen, Jing; Fu, Jun; Huang, Youju; Zhang, Jiawei; Xie, Zhengchao; Wang, Wenqin; Chen, Tao

    2014-04-29

    A simple yet robust approach was exploited to fabricate large-scaled patterned polymer brushes by combining controlled evaporative self-assembly (CESA) in a confined geometry and self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SIPGP). Our method was carried out without any sophisticated instruments, free of lithography, overcoming current difficulties in fabricating polymer patterns by using complex instruments.

  10. Nano-scale characterization of binary self-assembled monolayers under an ambient condition with STM and TERS.

    PubMed

    Horimoto, Noriko N; Tomizawa, Shigeru; Fujita, Yasuhiko; Kajimoto, Shinji; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2014-09-07

    Gold surfaces were modified by benzyl-mercaptan (BM) and then partly replaced with benzenethiol (BT), which formed binary self-assembled monolayers (SAM). Initially BT randomly replaced BM in the monolayer, but at long exchange times >15 nm radius domains were observed with specific relative composition of BT and BM.

  11. Actinide Sequestration Using Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Wu, Hong; Kemner, K. M.; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-03-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents, whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometallate anions and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental clean-up necessary after 40 years of weapons grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented.

  12. Self-assembly of polymeric microspheres of complex internal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkowski, Marcin; Bitner, Agnieszka; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2005-01-01

    Self-assembly can easily produce intricate structures that would be difficult to make by conventional fabrication means. Here, self-assembly is used to prepare multicomponent polymeric microspheres of arbitrary internal symmetries. Droplets of liquid prepolymers are printed onto a water-soluble hydrogel, and are allowed to spread and coalesce into composite patches. These patches are then immersed in an isodense liquid, which both compensates the force of gravity and dissolves the gel beneath the polymers. Subsequently, the patches fold into spheres whose internal structures are dictated by the arrangement of the droplets printed onto the surface. The spheres can be solidified either thermally or by ultraviolet radiation. We present a theoretical analysis of droplet spreading, coalescence and folding. Conditions for the stability of the folded microspheres are derived from linear stability analysis. The composite microbeads that we describe are likely to find uses in optics, colloidal self-assembly and controlled-delivery applications.

  13. Functional self-assembled lipidic systems derived from renewable resources

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Julian R.; Samateh, Malick; John, George

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled lipidic amphiphile systems can create a variety of multi-functional soft materials with value-added properties. When employing natural reagents and following biocatalytic syntheses, self-assembling monomers may be inherently designed for degradation, making them potential alternatives to conventional and persistent polymers. By using non-covalent forces, self-assembled amphiphiles can form nanotubes, fibers, and other stimuli responsive architectures prime for further applied research and incorporation into commercial products. By viewing these lipid derivatives under a lens of green principles, there is the hope that in developing a structure–function relationship and functional smart materials that research may remain safe, economic, and efficient. PMID:26766923

  14. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C.H.; Gungordu, H.I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents. PMID:25175148

  15. Equation of State for Phospholipid Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid self-assembly is the basis of biomembrane stability. The entropy of transfer from water to self-assembled micelles of lysophosphatidylcholines and diacyl phosphatidylcholines with different chain lengths converges to a common value at a temperature of 44°C. The corresponding enthalpies of transfer converge at ∼−18°C. An equation of state for the free energy of self-assembly formulated from this thermodynamic data depends on the heat capacity of transfer as the sole parameter needed to specify a particular lipid. For lipids lacking calorimetric data, measurement of the critical micelle concentration at a single temperature suffices to define an effective heat capacity according to the model. Agreement with the experimental temperature dependence of the critical micelle concentration is then good. The predictive powers should extend also to amphiphile partitioning and the kinetics of lipid-monomer transfer. PMID:26745421

  16. Self-Assemblies of Acicular Hollow Fe/C Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangchang; Qiao, Xiaojing; Li, Mingyu; Zheng, Qiuyu; Ren, Qingguo; Zhu, Y Q; Peng, H X

    2015-08-01

    Self-assemblies of acicular hollow Fe/C structures were synthesized using D-glucose monohydrate and ferric chloride as precursors by a simple hydrothermal process followed by carbonization at 800 °C. The self-assembled structures with an overall diameter of 15~20 µm composed of radially formed hollow needles from a central core with an average diameter of ca. 1 µm and a length up to 10 µm. The end of the needles was revealed to be a awl shape with a hollow structure formed during the self-assembly process and the subsequent heat treatment. The hollow structure was probably caused by the Kirkendall effect at 800 °C. The materials exhibit ferromagnetic characteristic with saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (Mr), and coercivity (Hc) of 22.2 emu/g, 3 emu/g, and 151.22 Oe, respectively, with Ms much lower than that of Fe3O4.

  17. Dynamic self-assembly of coordination polymers in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Kim, Yongju; Li, Jingfang; Lee, Myongsoo

    2014-08-07

    The construction of supramolecular polymers has been intensively pursued because the nanostructures formed through weak non-covalent interactions can be triggered by external stimuli leading to smart materials and sensors. Self-assemblies of coordination polymers consisting of metal ions and organic ligands in aqueous solution also provide particular contributions in this area. The main motivation for developing those coordination polymers originates from the value-added combination between metal ions and ligands. This review highlights the recent progress of the dynamic self-assembly of coordination polymers that result from the sophisticated molecular design, towards fabricating stimuli-responsive systems and bio-related materials. Dynamic structural changes and switchable physical properties triggered by various stimuli are summarized. Finally, the outlook for aqueous nanostructures originated from the dynamic self-assembly of coordination polymers is also presented.

  18. Equation of State for Phospholipid Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-05

    Phospholipid self-assembly is the basis of biomembrane stability. The entropy of transfer from water to self-assembled micelles of lysophosphatidylcholines and diacyl phosphatidylcholines with different chain lengths converges to a common value at a temperature of 44°C. The corresponding enthalpies of transfer converge at ∼-18°C. An equation of state for the free energy of self-assembly formulated from this thermodynamic data depends on the heat capacity of transfer as the sole parameter needed to specify a particular lipid. For lipids lacking calorimetric data, measurement of the critical micelle concentration at a single temperature suffices to define an effective heat capacity according to the model. Agreement with the experimental temperature dependence of the critical micelle concentration is then good. The predictive powers should extend also to amphiphile partitioning and the kinetics of lipid-monomer transfer.

  19. Self-Assembly in Biosilicification and Biotemplated Silica Materials

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Francisco M.; Coradin, Thibaud; Aimé, Carole

    2014-01-01

    During evolution, living organisms have learned to design biomolecules exhibiting self-assembly properties to build-up materials with complex organizations. This is particularly evidenced by the delicate siliceous structures of diatoms and sponges. These structures have been considered as inspiration sources for the preparation of nanoscale and nanostructured silica-based materials templated by the self-assembled natural or biomimetic molecules. These templates range from short peptides to large viruses, leading to biohybrid objects with a wide variety of dimensions, shapes and organization. A more recent strategy based on the integration of biological self-assembly as the driving force of silica nanoparticles organization offers new perspectives to elaborate highly-tunable, biofunctional nanocomposites. PMID:28344249

  20. Hydrodynamic Self-Assembly of Topographical Patterns on Soft Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Satish

    2016-01-06

    The objective of this project is to use theoretical tools to explore fundamentally new ways of creating and controlling surface topography on soft materials (e.g., polymeric liquids, gels, colloidal suspensions) that make use of principles from hydrodynamics and self-assembly. Surface topography is known to have a significant impact on the optical, adhesive, and wetting properties of materials, so improved fundamental understanding of how to create and control it will help enable the tailoring of these properties to desired specifications. Self-assembly is the spontaneous organization of an ordered structure, and hydrodynamics often plays an important role in the self-assembly of soft materials. This research supported through this project has led to the discovery of a number of novel phenomena that are described in published journal articles. In this way, the research significantly adds to the fundamental understanding of the topics investigated.

  1. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  2. Actinide sequestration using self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, Glen E; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandy; Birnbaum, Jerome C; Wu, Hong; Kemner, Ken; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-03-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometalate anions, and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis, and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental cleanup necessary after 40 years of weapons-grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented.

  3. Reactivity within a confined self-assembled nanospace.

    PubMed

    Koblenz, Tehila S; Wassenaar, Jeroen; Reek, Joost N H

    2008-02-01

    Confined nanospaces in which reactions can take place, have been created by various approaches such as molecular capsules, zeolites and micelles. In this tutorial review we focus on the application of self-assembled nanocapsules with well-defined cavities as nanoreactors for organic and metal catalysed transformations. The self-assembly of nanocapsules based on noncovalent bonds such as hydrogen bonds and metal-ligand interactions is discussed to introduce the properties of the building blocks and capsules thereof. We will elaborate on the encapsulation effects that can be expected when reactions are carried out in a capsule-protected environment. Subsequently, literature examples will be described in which self-assembled nanocapsules are applied as nanoreactors, for various types of organic and metal catalysed reactions.

  4. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C. H.; Gungordu, H. I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents.

  5. Self-Assembly of DNA-coated colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pine, David

    DNA-coated particles have emerged as a powerful tool for programming the self-assembly of colloids and nanoparticles. The power of this approach lies in the highly specific molecular recognition properties of DNA and in the thermal reversibility of the interactions between DNA strands attached to different particles. These two properties taken together can, in principle, direct the bottom-up self-assembly of different materials into almost any desired structure. Here we discuss the self-assembly of single and multi-component crystals of DNA-coated colloids. This work is supported by the Army Research Office under MURI Grant Award Number W911NF-10-1-0518 and the MRSEC Program of the NSF under Award Number DMR-1420073.

  6. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, S; Yu, C H; Gungordu, H I; Guven, S; Vural, T; Demirci, U

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call 'magnetoceptive' materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents.

  7. Self-assembled liposomal nanoparticles in photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivam, Magesh; Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Lakshmanan, Shanmugamurthy; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Huang, Ying-Ying; Kumar, Raj; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers (PS) together with harmless visible light of the appropriate wavelength to produce reactive oxygen species that kill unwanted cells. Because many PS are hydrophobic molecules prone to aggregation, numerous drug delivery vehicles have been tested to solubilize these molecules, render them biocompatible and enhance the ease of administration after intravenous injection. The recent rise in nanotechnology has markedly expanded the range of these nanoparticulate delivery vehicles beyond the well-established liposomes and micelles. Self-assembled nanoparticles are formed by judicious choice of monomer building blocks that spontaneously form a well-oriented 3-dimensional structure that incorporates the PS when subjected to the appropriate conditions. This self-assembly process is governed by a subtle interplay of forces on the molecular level. This review will cover the state of the art in the preparation and use of self-assembled liposomal nanoparticles within the context of PDT. PMID:24348377

  8. Self-assembly of tunable protein suprastructures from recombinant oleosin

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, Kevin B.; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Using recombinant amphiphilic proteins to self-assemble suprastructures would allow precise control over surfactant chemistry and the facile incorporation of biological functionality. We used cryo-TEM to confirm self-assembled structures from recombinantly produced mutants of the naturally occurring sunflower protein, oleosin. We studied the phase behavior of protein self-assembly as a function of solution ionic strength and protein hydrophilic fraction, observing nanometric fibers, sheets, and vesicles. Vesicle membrane thickness correlated with increasing hydrophilic fraction for a fixed hydrophobic domain length. The existence of a bilayer membrane was corroborated in giant vesicles through the localized encapsulation of hydrophobic Nile red and hydrophilic calcein. Circular dichroism revealed that changes in nanostructural morphology in this family of mutants was unrelated to changes in secondary structure. Ultimately, we envision the use of recombinant techniques to introduce novel functionality into these materials for biological applications. PMID:22753512

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of mixed self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raigoza, Annette Fernandez

    This thesis examines the formation of multicomponent self-assembled mono-layers (SAMs) on the Au(111) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. Two methods, sequential adsorption and coadsorption, are used to create these mixed SAMs. In the sequential adsorption experiments, a clean Au(111)-on-mica sub-strate is exposed to the first molecular species and then this adsorbate-covered sample is exposed to the second molecular species. Alternately, in the coadsorption experiments, a gold surface is exposed to both adsorbates simultaneously. Exposing a coronene- or dithiocarbamate-covered surface to excess thiol in the vapor phase results in a drastic restructuring of the initial surface. This is primarily driven by the kinetics of the octanethiol monolayer formation process, but the extent to which this happens is dependent on the molecule-molecule and molecule-surface interactions of the adsorbate due to the initial coverage and order of the monolayer. An octanethiolate monolayer is also substantially modified when immersed in a solution containing dithiocarbamate (DTC). Defects in the octanethiol monolayer are prime sites for molecular exchange. A surplus of DTC in the solution drives substitution that can lead to the complete removal of thiol from the surface. When a Au(111) surface is exposed to solutions containing both octanethiol and dithiocarbamate (DTC), both molecular species compete for available ad- sorption sites. At equal octanethiol-to-DTC ratios, molecular exchange hinders octanethiol monolayer formation. Higher octanethiol concentration in solution results in the incorporation of thiol into the resulting monolayer, with a strong dependence on the chain length of the DTC molecules.

  10. Self-Assembled DNA Templated Nano-wires and Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erez

    2000-03-01

    The realization that conventional microelectronics is approaching its miniaturization limits has motivated the search for an alternative route based on self-assembled nanometer-scale electronics. We have recently proposed a new approach based on the hybridization of biological and electronic materials (Braun E., Eichen Y., Sivan U. and Ben-Yoseph G., Nature 391, 775 (1998)). The concept relies on a two-step self-assembly process. The inherent molecular recognition capabilities of DNA molecules are first utilized to construct a network that serves as a template for the subsequent assembly of electronic materials into a circuit. The utilization of DNA and its associated enzymatic machinery enables: (a) self-assembly of complex substrates, (b) specific molecular addresses for the localization of electronic materials (e.g., gold colloids) by standard molecular biology techniques, (c) interdevice wiring and (d) bridging the microscopic structures to the macroscopic world. The self-assembly of nanometer scale electronics relies on two complementary developments. First, the ability to convert DNA molecules into thin conductive wires and second, the self-assembly of complex extended DNA templates. Our progress in these two directions will be presented. Regarding the first issue, a physical process resulting in condensation of gold colloids onto DNA molecules enables the assembly of thin gold wires (around 100-200 A wide) having, in principle, unlimited extensions. The second issue is developed in the context of recombinant DNA which allows the self-assembly of precise molecular junctions and networks. Specifically, we use RecA protein, which is the main protein responsible for genetic recombination in E. Coli bacteria, to construct DNA junctions at pre-designed addresses (sequences) on the molecules. The integration of these processes allows advancing nanometer-scale electronics. A realistic fabrication scheme for a room-temperature single-electron transistor

  11. Interfacial and mechanical properties of self-assembling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Daniel

    Self-assembly is a fascinating phenomena where interactions between small subunits allow them to aggregate and form complex structures that can span many length scales. These self-assembled structures are especially important in biology where they are necessary for life as we know it. This dissertation is a study of three very different self-assembling systems, all of which have important connections to biology and biological systems. Drop shape analysis was used to study the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers at the oil/water interface. When biologically functionalyzed copolymers are used, this system can serve as a model for receptor-ligand interactions that are used by cells to perform many activities, such as interact with their surroundings. The physical properties of a self-assembling membrane system were quantified using membrane inflation and swelling experiments. These types of membranes may have important applications in medicine such as drug eluting (growth factor eluting) scaffolds to aid in wound healing. The factors affecting the properties of bis(leucine) oxalamide gels were also explored. We believe that this particular system will serve as an appropriate model for biological gels that are made up of fiber-like and/or rod-like structures. During the course of the research presented in this dissertation, many new techniques were developed specifically to allow/aid the study of these distinct self-assembling systems. For example, numerical methods were used to predict drop stability for drop shape analysis experiments and the methods used to create reproducibly create self-assembling membranes were developed specifically for this purpose. The development of these new techniques is an integral part of the thesis and should aid future students who work on these projects. A number ongoing projects and interesting research directions for each one of the projects is also presented.

  12. Probing peptide amphiphile self-assembly in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arijit; Buettner, Christian J; Manos, Aaron A; Wallace, Ashley J; Tweedle, Michael F; Goldberger, Joshua E

    2014-12-08

    There has been recent interest in designing smart diagnostic or therapeutic self-assembling peptide or polymeric materials that can selectively undergo morphological transitions to accumulate at a disease site in response to specific stimuli. Developing approaches to probe these self-assembly transitions in environments that accurately amalgamate the diverse plethora of proteins, biomolecules, and salts of blood is essential for creating systems that function in vivo. Here, we have developed a fluorescence anisotropy approach to probe the pH-dependent self-assembly transition of peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules that transform from spherical micelles at pH 7.4 to nanofibers under more acidic pH's in blood serum. By mixing small concentrations of a Ru(bipy)3(2+)-tagged PA with a Gd(DO3A)-tagged PA having the same lipid-peptide sequence, we showed that the pH dependence of self-assembly is minimally affected and can be monitored in mouse blood serum. These PA vehicles can be designed to transition from spherical micelles to nanofibers in the pH range 7.0-7.4 in pure serum. In contrast to the typical notion of serum albumin absorbing isolated surfactant molecules and disrupting self-assembly, our experiments showed that albumin does not bind these anionic PAs and instead promotes nanofibers due to a molecular crowding effect. Finally, we created a medium that replicates the transition pH in serum to within 0.08 pH units and allows probing self-assembly behavior using conventional spectroscopic techniques without conflicting protein signals, thus simplifying the development pathway from test tube to in vivo experimentation for stimuli-responsive materials.

  13. Composition and method for self-assembly and mineralization of peptide amphiphiles

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Beniash, Elia; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2009-06-30

    The present invention is directed to a composition useful for making homogeneously mineralized self assembled peptide-amphiphile nanofibers and nanofiber gels. The composition is generally a solution comprised of a positively or negatively charged peptide-amphiphile and a like signed ion from the mineral. Mixing this solution with a second solution containing a dissolved counter-ion of the mineral and/or a second oppositely charged peptide amphiphile, results in the rapid self assembly of the peptide-amphiphiles into a nanofiber gel and templated mineralization of the ions. Templated mineralization of the initially dissolved mineral cations and anions in the mixture occurs with preferential orientation of the mineral crystals along the fiber surfaces within the nanofiber gel. One advantage of the present invention is that it results in homogenous growth of the mineral throughout the nanofiber gel. Another advantage of the present invention is that the nanofiber gel formation and mineralization reactions occur in a single mixing step and under substantially neutral or physiological pH conditions. These homogeneous nanostructured composite materials are useful for medical applications especially the regeneration of damaged bone in mammals. This invention is directed to the synthesis of peptide-amphiphiles with more than one amphiphilic moment and to supramolecular compositions comprised of such multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles. Supramolecular compositions can be formed by self assembly of multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles by mixing them with a solution comprising a monovalent cation.

  14. Composition and method for self-assembly and mineralization of peptide-amphiphiles

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I [Chicago, IL; Beniash, Elia [Newton, MA; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D [Pearland, TX

    2012-02-28

    The present invention is directed to a composition useful for making homogeneously mineralized self assembled peptide-amphiphile nanofibers and nanofiber gels. The composition is generally a solution comprised of a positively or negatively charged peptide-amphiphile and a like signed ion from the mineral. Mixing this solution with a second solution containing a dissolved counter-ion of the mineral and/or a second oppositely charged peptide amphiphile, results in the rapid self assembly of the peptide-amphiphiles into a nanofiber gel and templated mineralization of the ions. Templated mineralization of the initially dissolved mineral cations and anions in the mixture occurs with preferential orientation of the mineral crystals along the fiber surfaces within the nanofiber gel. One advantage of the present invention is that it results in homogenous growth of the mineral throughout the nanofiber gel. Another advantage of the present invention is that the nanofiber gel formation and mineralization reactions occur in a single mixing step and under substantially neutral or physiological pH conditions. These homogeneous nanostructured composite materials are useful for medical applications especially the regeneration of damaged bone in mammals. This invention is directed to the synthesis of peptide-amphiphiles with more than one amphiphilic moment and to supramolecular compositions comprised of such multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles. Supramolecular compositions can be formed by self assembly of multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles by mixing them with a solution comprising a monovalent cation.

  15. Self-Assembly of Octopus Nanoparticles into Pre-Programmed Finite Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Jonathan; Tkachenko, Alexei

    2012-02-01

    The precise control of the spatial arrangement of nanoparticles (NP) is often required to take full advantage of their novel optical and electronic properties. NPs have been shown to self-assemble into crystalline structures using either patchy surface regions or complementary DNA strands to direct the assembly. Due to a lack of specificity of the interactions these methods lead to only a limited number of structures. An emerging approach is to bind ssDNA at specific sites on the particle surface making so-called octopus NPs. Using octopus NPs we investigate the inverse problem of the self-assembly of finite clusters. That is, for a given target cluster (e.g., arranging the NPs on the vertices of a dodecahedron) what are the minimum number of complementary DNA strands needed for the robust self-assembly of the cluster from an initially homogeneous NP solution? Based on the results of Brownian dynamics simulations we have compiled a set of design rules for various target clusters including cubes, pyramids, dodecahedrons and truncated icosahedrons. Our approach leads to control over the kinetic pathway and has demonstrated nearly perfect yield of the target.

  16. Covalently Connected Polymer-Protein Nanostructures Fabricated by a Reactive Self-Assembly Approach.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Xing, Cheng; Wu, Dongxia; Wu, Yunfang; Wang, Lianyong; Zhao, Hanying

    2017-03-08

    The synthesis of polymer-protein nanostructures opens up a new avenue for the development of new biomaterials. In this research, covalently connected polymer-protein nanostructures were fabricated through a reactive self-assembly approach. Poly(tert-butyl methacrylate-co-pyridyl disulfide methacrylamide) (PtBMA-co-PPDSMA) was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Covalently connected nanostructures (CCNs) with hydrophobic polymer cores and hydrophilic protein coronae were prepared by adding solutions of PtBMA-co-PPDSMA/DMF to aqueous solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The thiol-disulfide exchange reaction between pyridyl disulfide groups on the polymer chains and thiol groups on the protein molecules plays a key role in the fabrication of CCNs. The self-assembly process was investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and stopped-flow techniques. DLS results indicated that the sizes of the CCNs were determined by the initial polymer concentration, the BSA concentration, and the average number of thiol groups on BSA molecules. TEM and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to analyze the nanostructures. Far-UV circular dichroism results demonstrated that the original folded conformations of BSA molecules were basically maintained in the reactive self-assembly process. Compared with native BSA, the secondary structure and conformation change of coronal BSA induced by urea or thermal treatment were remarkably suppressed. The cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that the CCNs were essentially nontoxic to Hela and COS-7 cells.

  17. Integrating DNA-strand-displacement circuitry with self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongbao; Song, Tingjie; Sun, Xianbao; Xiao, Shiyan; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun

    2015-11-11

    Programmable and algorithmic behaviors of DNA molecules allow one to control the structures of DNA-assembled materials with nanometer precision and to construct complex networks with digital and analog behaviors. Here we developed a way of integrating a DNA-strand-displacement circuit with self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids, wherein a single DNA strand was used to initiate and catalyze the operation of upstream circuits to release a single strand that subsequently triggers self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids in downstream circuits, realizing a programmable kinetic control of self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids. Through utilizing this method, single-nucleotide polymorphisms or indels occurring at different positions of a sequence of oligonucleotide were unambiguously discriminated. We provide here a sophisticated way of combining the DNA-strand-displacement-based characteristic of DNA with the distinct assembly properties of inorganic nanoparticles, which may find broad potential applications in the fabrication of a wide range of complex multicomponent devices and architectures.

  18. DNA biosensors based on self-assembled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, S G; Wang, Ruili; Sellin, P J; Zhang, Qing

    2004-12-24

    DNA biosensors based on self-assembled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were described in this paper, in which the probe DNA oligonucleotides were immobilized by forming covalent amide bonds between carboxyl groups at the nanotubes and amino groups at the ends of the DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridization between the probe and target DNA oligonucleotides was confirmed by the changes in the voltammetric peak of the indicator of methylene blue. Our results demonstrate that the DNA biosensors based on self-assembled MWNTs had a higher hybridization efficiency compared to those based on random MWNTs. In addition, the developed DNA biosensors also had a high selectivity of hybridization detection.

  19. Backfilled, self-assembled monolayers and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Addleman, R. Shane; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Zheng, Feng; Busche, Brad; Egorov, Oleg B.

    2009-06-30

    Backfilled, self-assembled monolayers and methods of making the same are disclosed. The self-assembled monolayer comprises at least one functional organosilane species and a substantially random dispersion of at least one backfilling organosilane species among the functional organosilane species, wherein the functional and backfilling organosilane species have been sequentially deposited on a substrate. The method comprises depositing sequentially a first organosilane species followed by a backfilling organosilane species, and employing a relaxation agent before or during deposition of the backfilling organosilane species, wherein the first and backfilling organosilane species are substantially randomly dispersed on a substrate.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy of self-assembled viral nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, Benjamin; Steinsultz, Nat; Sharma, Prashant

    2010-03-01

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy to investigate self-assembled monolayers of M13 bacteriophages on graphite surface. The bacteriophages we use have gold binding peptide motifs on their outer protein coat (˜1μm long, ˜10 nm diameter) allowing us to self-assemble gold nanoparticles on graphite. Using scanning tunneling microscopy we are able to resolve sub-molecular structure of the protein coat of M13 bacteriophage. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy allows us to study the binding of gold nanoparticles to the peptide motif on the bacteriophage.

  1. Nano-engineering by optically directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Furst, Eric; Dunn, Elissa; Park, Jin-Gyu; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sainis, Sunil; Merrill, Jason; Dufresne, Eric; Reichert, Matthew D.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Molecke, Ryan A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Grillet, Anne Mary; Gorby, Allen D.; Singh, John; Lele, Pushkar; Mittal, Manish

    2009-09-01

    Lack of robust manufacturing capabilities have limited our ability to make tailored materials with useful optical and thermal properties. For example, traditional methods such as spontaneous self-assembly of spheres cannot generate the complex structures required to produce a full bandgap photonic crystals. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate novel methods of directed self-assembly of nanomaterials using optical and electric fields. To achieve this aim, our work employed laser tweezers, a technology that enables non-invasive optical manipulation of particles, from glass microspheres to gold nanoparticles. Laser tweezers were used to create ordered materials with either complex crystal structures or using aspherical building blocks.

  2. Self-assembly of colloidal pyramids in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Helseth, L E

    2005-08-02

    We study routes toward the construction of 2D colloidal pyramids. We find that magnetic beads may self-assemble into pyramids near a nonmagnetic 1D boundary as long as the number of beads in the pyramid does not exceed 10. We have also found that a strong magnetic field gradient could act as a boundary, thus assisting the self-assembly of magnetic colloids in water, and have observed the formation of stable microscopic pyramids within a certain magnetic field range. Our results indicate that colloidal pyramids can be formed in a number of ways by utilizing external fields.

  3. Morphological Control of Anisotropic Self-Assemblies from Alternating Poly(p-dioxanone)-poly(ethylene glycol) Multiblock Copolymer Depending on the Combination Effect of Crystallization and Micellization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Jia; Wang, Hao; Chen, Si-Chong; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Ya

    2015-06-30

    A novel and facile method was developed for morphological controlling of self-assemblies prepared by crystallization induced self-assembly of crystalline-coil copolymer depending on the combination effect of crystallization and micellization. The morphological evolution of the self-assemblies of alternating poly(p-dioxanone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PPDO-PEG) multiblock copolymer prepared by different solvent mixing methods in aqueous solution were investigated. "Chrysanthemum"-like and "star anise"-like self-assemblies were obtained at different rates of solvent mixing. The results suggested gradually change in solvent quality (slowly dropping water into DMF solution) leaded to a hierarchical micellization-crystallization process of core-forming PPDO blocks, and flake-like particles were formed at the initial stage of crystallization. Meanwhile, crystallization induced micellization process occurred when solvent quality changed drastically. Shuttle-like particles, which have much smaller size than those of flake-like particles, were formed at the initial stage of crystallization when quickly injecting water into DMF solution of the copolymer. Therefore, owing to the different changing rate of solvent quality, which may result in different combination effect of crystallization and micellization during self-assembly of the copolymer, PPDO-PEG self-assemblies with different hierarchical morphology in nano scale could be obtained.

  4. A switchable self-assembling and disassembling chiral system based on a porphyrin-substituted phenylalanine-phenylalanine motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambidis, Georgios; Georgilis, Evangelos; Panda, Manas K.; Anson, Christopher E.; Powell, Annie K.; Doyle, Stephen; Moss, David; Jochum, Tobias; Horton, Peter N.; Coles, Simon J.; Linares, Mathieu; Beljonne, David; Naubron, Jean-Valère; Conradt, Jonas; Kalt, Heinz; Mitraki, Anna; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G.; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2016-09-01

    Artificial light-harvesting systems have until now not been able to self-assemble into structures with a large photon capture cross-section that upon a stimulus reversibly can switch into an inactive state. Here we describe a simple and robust FLFL-dipeptide construct to which a meso-tetraphenylporphyrin has been appended and which self-assembles to fibrils, platelets or nanospheres depending on the solvent composition. The fibrils, functioning as quenched antennas, give intense excitonic couplets in the electronic circular dichroism spectra which are mirror imaged if the unnatural FDFD-analogue is used. By slightly increasing the solvent polarity, these light-harvesting fibres disassemble to spherical structures with silent electronic circular dichroism spectra but which fluoresce. Upon further dilution with the nonpolar solvent, the intense Cotton effects are recovered, thus proving a reversible switching. A single crystal X-ray structure shows a head-to-head arrangement of porphyrins that explains both their excitonic coupling and quenched fluorescence.

  5. A switchable self-assembling and disassembling chiral system based on a porphyrin-substituted phenylalanine–phenylalanine motif

    PubMed Central

    Charalambidis, Georgios; Georgilis, Evangelos; Panda, Manas K.; Anson, Christopher E.; Powell, Annie K.; Doyle, Stephen; Moss, David; Jochum, Tobias; Horton, Peter N.; Coles, Simon J.; Linares, Mathieu; Beljonne, David; Naubron, Jean-Valère; Conradt, Jonas; Kalt, Heinz; Mitraki, Anna; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G.; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2016-01-01

    Artificial light-harvesting systems have until now not been able to self-assemble into structures with a large photon capture cross-section that upon a stimulus reversibly can switch into an inactive state. Here we describe a simple and robust FLFL-dipeptide construct to which a meso-tetraphenylporphyrin has been appended and which self-assembles to fibrils, platelets or nanospheres depending on the solvent composition. The fibrils, functioning as quenched antennas, give intense excitonic couplets in the electronic circular dichroism spectra which are mirror imaged if the unnatural FDFD-analogue is used. By slightly increasing the solvent polarity, these light-harvesting fibres disassemble to spherical structures with silent electronic circular dichroism spectra but which fluoresce. Upon further dilution with the nonpolar solvent, the intense Cotton effects are recovered, thus proving a reversible switching. A single crystal X-ray structure shows a head-to-head arrangement of porphyrins that explains both their excitonic coupling and quenched fluorescence. PMID:27582363

  6. Solvatochromism, Reversible Chromism and Self-Assembly Effects of Heteroatom-Assisted Aggregation-Induced Enhanced Emission (AIEE) Compounds.

    PubMed

    Niu, Caixia; You, Ying; Zhao, Liu; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-09-28

    Two compounds, 9,10-bis[2-(quinolyl)vinyl]anthracene (BQVA) and 9,10-bis[2-(naphthalen-2-yl)vinyl]anthracene (BNVA), have been synthesised and investigated. Both of them have aggregation-induced enhanced emission (AIEE) properties. Heteroatom-assisted BQVA shows solvatochromism, reversible chromism properties and self-assembly effects. When increasing the solvent polarities, the green solution of BQVA turns to orange with a redshift of the fluorescence emission wavelengths from λ=527 to 565 nm. Notably, BQVA exhibits reversible chromism properties, including mechano- and thermochromism. The as-prepared BQVA powders show green fluorescence (λem=525 nm) and the colour can turn into orange (λem=573 nm) after grinding. Interestingly, the orange colour can return at high temperature. Based on these reversible chromism properties, a simple and convenient erasable board has been designed. Different from BQVA, non-heteroatom-assisted BNVA has no clear chromic processes. The results obtained from XRD, differential scanning calorimetry, single-crystal analysis and theoretical calculations indicate that the chromic processes depend on the heteroatoms in BQVA. Additionally, BQVA also exhibits excellent self-assembly effects in different solvents. Homogeneous nanospheres are formed in mixtures of tetrahydrofuran and water, which are then doped into silica nanoparticles and treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to give amino-functionalised nanoparticles (BQVA-AFNPs). The BQVAAFNPs could be used to stain protein markers in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  7. Fluorescent polystyrene photonic crystals self-assembled with water-soluble conjugated polyrotaxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stasio, Francesco; Berti, Luca; McDonnell, Shane O.; Robbiano, Valentina; Anderson, Harry L.; Comoretto, Davide; Cacialli, Franco

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate control of the photoluminescence spectra and decay rates of water-soluble green-emitting conjugated polyrotaxanes by incorporating them in polystyrene opals with a stop-band spectrally tuned on the rotaxane emission (405-650 nm). We observe a suppression of the luminescence within the photonic stop-band and a corresponding enhancement of the high-energy edge (405-447 nm). Time-resolved measurements reveal a wavelength-dependent modification of the emission lifetime, which is shortened at the high-energy edge (by ˜11%, in the range 405-447 nm), but elongated within the stop-band (by ˜13%, in the range 448-482 nm). We assign both effects to the modification of the density of photonic states induced by the photonic crystal band structure. We propose the growth of fluorescent composite photonic crystals from blends of "solvent-compatible" non-covalently bonded nanosphere-polymer systems as a general method for achieving a uniform distribution of polymeric dopants in three-dimensional self-assembling photonic structures.

  8. Redox control of GPx catalytic activity through mediating self-assembly of Fmoc-phenylalanine selenide into switchable supramolecular architectures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zupeng; Luo, Quan; Guan, Shuwen; Gao, Jianxiong; Wang, Yongguo; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Liang; Xu, Jiayun; Dong, Zeyuan; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-12-28

    Artificial enzymes capable of achieving tunable catalytic activity through stimuli control of enzymatic structure transition are of significance in biosensor and biomedicine research. Herein we report a novel smart glutathione peroxidise (GPx) mimic with modulatory catalytic activity based on redox-induced supramolecular self-assembly. First, an amphiphilic Fmoc-phenylalanine-based selenide was designed and synthesized, which can self-assemble into nanospheres (NSs) in aqueous solution. The NSs demonstrate extremely low GPx activity. Upon the oxidation of hydroperoxides (ROOH), the selenide can be quickly transformed into the selenoxide form. The change of the molecular structure induces complete morphology transition of the self-assemblies from NSs to nanotubes (NTs), resulting in great enhancement in the GPx catalytic activity. Under the reduction of GSH, the selenoxide can be further reversibly reduced back into the selenide; therefore the reversible switch between the NSs and NTs can be successfully accomplished. The relationship between the catalytic activity and enzymatic structure was also investigated. The dual response nature makes this mimic play roles of both a sensor and a GPx enzyme at the same time, which can auto-detect the signal of ROOH and then auto-change its activity to achieve quick or slow/no scavenging of ROOH. The dynamic balance of ROOH is vital in organisms, in which an appropriate amount of ROOH does benefit to the metabolism, whereas surplus ROOH can cause oxidative damage of the cell instead and this smart mimic is of remarkable significance. We expect that such a mimic can be developed into an effective antioxidant drug and provide a new platform for the construction of intelligent artificial enzymes with multiple desirable properties.

  9. Strain mediated self-assembly of ceramic nano islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Michael

    This dissertation presents the first observations of self-assembled arrays of epitaxial nano islands in ceramic systems, based on RF sputtering and thermal processing of Gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) thin films on an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal substrate. In contrast to the conventional semiconductor nano island self-assembly systems, the island arrays in the GDC-YSZ system provide materials with categorically different physical properties and functionalities, and they exhibit a stronger ordering at a larger characteristic length scale. The initial focus of this study was on the processing and characterization of thin GDC layers on YSZ, which are used in SOFCs as barriers to prevent the reaction of some cathode materials with the YSZ electrolyte. Chapter 3 of this document describes studies on relatively thin (<200 nm) GDC deposits which remained adherent to their substrates during post-deposition processing. The GDC films were amorphous or ultra-fine grained as deposited, with a mixed GDC-YSZ layer at the interface. After annealing at 1150°C, the GDC films were epitaxially oriented on the YSZ substrates, with isolated porosity in their interior. Some of the thick RF-sputtered GDC layers (>300 nm) were found to fail by spalling from the YSZ substrate, leaving behind patches of unspalled film and exposing a sputter-mixed GDC-YSZ surface. Upon annealing, the modified surface spontaneously broke up into two-dimensional arrays of epitaxial islands with sub-micron dimensions, exhibiting order in spacing and alignment. In addition to the classical local effects that drive dewetting processes, the self-assembly of the epitaxial GDC-bearing islands is driven by elastic interactions between them, and these interactions are mediated by the elastically anisotropic underlying YSZ substrate. The stresses in the initial mixed surface layers are modified by two factors: The thermal-expansion mismatch leads to stresses, depending on temperature and heating rates

  10. Controlled self-assembly of hydrophobic quantum dots through silanization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Ando, Masanori; Murase, Norio

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the formation of one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanocomposites through the self-assembly of silanized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) by using a controlled sol-gel process. The self-assembly behavior of the QDs was created when partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxide monomers replaced hydrophobic ligands on the QDs. We examined systematically self-assembly conditions such as solvent components and QD sizes in order to elucidate the formation mechanism of various QD nanocomposites. The QD nanocomposites were assembled in water phase or on the interface of water and oil phase in emulsions. The partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxides act as intermolecules to assemble the QDs. The QD nanocomposites with well-defined solid or hollow spherical, fiber-like, sheet-like, and pearl-like morphologies were prepared by adjusting the experimental conditions. The high photoluminescence efficiency of the prepared QD nanocomposites suggests partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxides reduced the surface deterioration of QDs during self-assembly. These techniques are applicable to other hydrophobic QDs for fabricating complex QD nanocomposites.

  11. pH-directed self-assembling helical peptide conformation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beta-sheet and alpha-helix peptide conformation are two of the most fundamentally ordered secondary structures found in proteins and peptides. They also give rise to self-assembling motifs that form macromolecular channels and nanostructures. Through design these conformations can yield enhance...

  12. Photocontrol over cooperative porphyrin self-assembly with phenylazopyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Takashi; Helmich, Floris; Meijer, E W

    2013-01-02

    The cooperative self-assembly of chiral zinc porphyrins is regulated by a photoresponsive phenylazopyridine ligand. Porphyrin stacks depolymerize into dimers upon axial ligation and the strength of the coordination is regulated by its photoinduced isomerization, which shows more than 95 % conversion ratio for both photostationary states.

  13. New Metal-organic Polymers Through Subcomponent Self-Assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-27

    material using subcomponent self-assembly. We developed the synthesis of double helical polymeric species according to the general procedure...to use - diketones as subcomponents for polymers. She then shifted her efforts to other projects, funded by the European Research Council. Because

  14. Nano-imaging enabled via self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Imaging object details with length scales below approximately 200 nm has been historically difficult for conventional microscope objective lenses because of their inability to resolve features smaller than one-half the optical wavelength. Here we review some of the recent approaches to surpass this limit by harnessing self-assembly as a fabrication mechanism. Self-assembly can be used to form individual nano- and micro-lenses, as well as to form extended arrays of such lenses. These lenses have been shown to enable imaging with resolutions as small as 50 nm half-pitch using visible light, which is well below the Abbe diffraction limit. Furthermore, self-assembled nano-lenses can be used to boost contrast and signal levels from small nano-particles, enabling them to be detected relative to background noise. Finally, alternative nano-imaging applications of self-assembly are discussed, including three-dimensional imaging, enhanced coupling from light-emitting diodes, and the fabrication of contrast agents such as quantum dots and nanoparticles. PMID:25506387

  15. Self-assembling biomolecular catalysts for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Paul C.; Patterson, Dustin P.; Saboda, Kendall N.; Edwards, Ethan J.; Miettinen, Heini M.; Basu, Gautam; Thielges, Megan C.; Douglas, Trevor

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of highly evolved protein-based compartments has inspired the design of new catalytically active materials that self-assemble from biological components. A frontier of this biodesign is the potential to contribute new catalytic systems for the production of sustainable fuels, such as hydrogen. Here, we show the encapsulation and protection of an active hydrogen-producing and oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase, sequestered within the capsid of the bacteriophage P22 through directed self-assembly. We co-opted Escherichia coli for biomolecular synthesis and assembly of this nanomaterial by expressing and maturing the EcHyd-1 hydrogenase prior to expression of the P22 coat protein, which subsequently self assembles. By probing the infrared spectroscopic signatures and catalytic activity of the engineered material, we demonstrate that the capsid provides stability and protection to the hydrogenase cargo. These results illustrate how combining biological function with directed supramolecular self-assembly can be used to create new materials for sustainable catalysis.

  16. Molecular Recognition Directed Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    chemistry. The ability of these supramolecular architectures to form liquid crystalline phases is determined by the shape of the self-assembled...be discussed. In the case of TMV-like supramolecular architectures a comparison between various supramolecdr (generated via H-bonding, ionic and...molecular, macromolecular and supramolecular chemistry. The ability of these supramolecular architectures to form liquid crystalline phases is determined

  17. Self-assembly from milli- to nanoscales: methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangeli, M; Abbasi, S; Varel, C; Van Hoof, C; Celis, J-P; Böhringer, K F

    2009-01-01

    The design and fabrication techniques for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanodevices are progressing rapidly. However, due to material and process flow incompatibilities in the fabrication of sensors, actuators and electronic circuitry, a final packaging step is often necessary to integrate all components of a heterogeneous microsystem on a common substrate. Robotic pick-and-place, although accurate and reliable at larger scales, is a serial process that downscales unfavorably due to stiction problems, fragility and sheer number of components. Self-assembly, on the other hand, is parallel and can be used for device sizes ranging from millimeters to nanometers. In this review, the state-of-the-art in methods and applications for self-assembly is reviewed. Methods for assembling three-dimensional (3D) MEMS structures out of two-dimensional (2D) ones are described. The use of capillary forces for folding 2D plates into 3D structures, as well as assembling parts onto a common substrate or aggregating parts to each other into 2D or 3D structures, is discussed. Shape matching and guided assembly by magnetic forces and electric fields are also reviewed. Finally, colloidal self-assembly and DNA-based self-assembly, mainly used at the nanoscale, are surveyed, and aspects of theoretical modeling of stochastic assembly processes are discussed. PMID:20209016

  18. Soft self-assembled nanoparticles with temperature-dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Capone, Barbara; Likos, Christos N.

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of versatile building blocks that reliably self-assemble into desired ordered and disordered phases is amongst the hottest topics in contemporary materials science. To this end, microscopic units of varying complexity, aimed at assembling the target phases, have been thought, designed, investigated and built. Such a path usually requires laborious fabrication techniques, especially when specific functionalisation of the building blocks is required. Telechelic star polymers, i.e., star polymers made of a number of f di-block copolymers consisting of solvophobic and solvophilic monomers grafted on a central anchoring point, spontaneously self-assemble into soft patchy particles featuring attractive spots (patches) on the surface. Here we show that the tunability of such a system can be widely extended by controlling the physical and chemical parameters of the solution. Indeed, under fixed external conditions the self-assembly behaviour depends only on the number of arms and on the ratio of solvophobic to solvophilic monomers. However, changes in temperature and/or solvent quality make it possible to reliably change the number and size of the attractive patches. This allows the steering of the mesoscopic self-assembly behaviour without modifying the microscopic constituents. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that diverse combinations of the parameters can generate stars with the same number of patches but different radial and angular stiffness. This mechanism could provide a neat way of further fine-tuning the elastic properties of the supramolecular network without changing its topology.

  19. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Melis Sardan; Cinar, Goksu; Khalily, Mohammad Aref; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-10-07

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies.

  20. Sequential programmable self-assembly: Role of cooperative interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan D. Halverson; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2016-03-04

    Here, we propose a general strategy of “sequential programmable self-assembly” that enables a bottom-up design of arbitrary multi-particle architectures on nano- and microscales. We show that a naive realization of this scheme, based on the pairwise additive interactions between particles, has fundamental limitations that lead to a relatively high error rate. This can be overcome by using cooperative interparticle binding. The cooperativity is a well known feature of many biochemical processes, responsible, e.g., for signaling and regulations in living systems. Here we propose to utilize a similar strategy for high precision self-assembly, and show that DNA-mediated interactions provide a convenient platform for its implementation. In particular, we outline a specific design of a DNA-based complex which we call “DNA spider,” that acts as a smart interparticle linker and provides a built-in cooperativity of binding. We demonstrate versatility of the sequential self-assembly based on spider-functionalized particles by designing several mesostructures of increasing complexity and simulating their assembly process. This includes a number of finite and repeating structures, in particular, the so-called tetrahelix and its several derivatives. Due to its generality, this approach allows one to design and successfully self-assemble virtually any structure made of a “GEOMAG” magnetic construction toy, out of nanoparticles. According to our results, once the binding cooperativity is strong enough, the sequential self-assembly becomes essentially error-free.

  1. Theoretical Modelling of Self-Assembly of Molecular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Manuela; Martsinovich, Natalia; Kantorovich, Lev

    2008-03-01

    The phenomenon of self-assembly of atomic and molecular superstructures on crystal surfaces has attracted an increasing interest in nanotechnology. Self-organised nano-templates where the self-assembled monolayer traps other molecules with selected functional properties, can be used as building blocks for larger nanoscale structures. These superstructures can form chiral domains ranging from 1D chains to 2D monolayers. In particular, there have been many scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)studies of self-assembly of melamine, perylene tetra-carboxylic di-imide(PTCDI) or perylene tetra-carboxylic di-anhydride (PTCDA) molecules on the Au(111). STM images of these networks do not reveal the exact details of the intermolecular bonding and process of network growth. It is therefore the task of theory to determine the exact atomic structure of these networks. We present a theoretical study of self-assembly of molecular networks based on different molecules by using a systematic approach to build molecular superstructures. The energies of these structures are calculated using the density-functional theory SIESTA code. The theoretically predicted monolayer structures are in very good agreement with the results of STM measurements.

  2. Self-assembling multidomain peptide fibers with aromatic cores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Self-assembling multidomain peptides have been shown to have desirable properties, such as the ability to form hydrogels that rapidly recover following shear-thinning and the potential to be tailored by amino acid selection to vary their elasticity and encapsulate and deliver proteins and cells. Her...

  3. Lag periods during the self-assembly of {Mo(72)Fe(30)} macroions: connection to the virus capsid formation process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Dong; Liu, Guang; Glover, Kerney Jebrell; Liu, Tianbo

    2009-10-28

    The kinetic properties of the self-assembly of hydrophilic Keplerate-type polyoxometalate (POM) {Mo(72)Fe(30)} macroanions into single-layer, vesicle-like blackberry structures in solutions were monitored by the static and dynamic laser light scattering techniques. In the presence of additional electrolytes, an obvious lag period at the initial stage of self-assembly was observed, followed by a fast increase of the scattered intensity. The whole kinetic curve is sigmoidal with a lag phase. A two-step nucleation-growth mechanism is proposed to explain this lag phase: the {Mo(72)Fe(30)} macroanions slowly associate into oligomers (mostly dimers), which are the thermodynamically unfavorable intermediates, at the initial stage; once the oligomers reach a critical concentration, the blackberry formation process is accelerated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) was used to confirm the oligomeric state in {Mo(72)Fe(30)} solution during the lag period. The length of the lag period is dependent on temperature, ionic strength, and the valent states of the additional salts, as well as the solvent content. The kinetics (including the lag period) of the blackberry formation of the {Mo(72)Fe(30)} macroanions show similarities to the self-assembly of virus capsid proteins (which are also soluble macroions) into spherical capsid shells, suggesting possible connections between the self-assembly behaviors of inorganic species and biological macromolecules.

  4. Structural diversity in the self-assembly of pseudopeptidic macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Ignacio; Bru, Miriam; Burguete, M Isabel; García-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2010-01-25

    The self-assembling abilities of several pseudopeptidic macrocycles have been thoroughly studied both in the solid (SEM, TEM, FTIR) and in solution (NMR, UV, CD, FTIR) states. Detailed microscopy revealed large differences in the morphology of the self-assembling micro/nanostructures depending on the macrocyclic chemical structures. Self-assembly was triggered by the presence of additional methylene groups or by changing from para to meta geometry of the aromatic phenylene backbone moiety. More interestingly, the nature of the side chain also plays a fundamental role in some of the obtained nanostructures, thus producing structures from long fibers to hollow spheres. These nanostructures were obtained in different solvents and on different surfaces, thus implying that the chemical information for the self-assembly is contained in the molecular structure. Dilution NMR studies (chemical shift and self-diffusion rates) suggest the formation of incipient aggregates in solution by a combination of hydrogen-bonding and pi-pi interactions, thus implicating amide and aryl groups, respectively. Electronic spectroscopy further supports the pi-pi interactions because the compounds that lead to fibers show large hypochromic shifts in the UV spectra. Moreover, the fiber-forming macrocycles also showed a more intense CD signature. The hydrogen-bonding interactions within the nanostructures were also characterized by attenuated total-reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, which allowed us to monitor the complete transition from the solution to the dried nanostructure. Overall, we concluded that the self-assembly of this family of pseudopeptidic macrocycles is dictated by a synergic action of hydrogen-bonding and pi-pi interactions. The feasibility and geometrical disposition of these interactions finally render a hierarchical organization, which has been rationalized with a proposal of a model. The understanding of the process at the molecular level has allowed us to prepare hybrid soft

  5. Building polyhedra by self-assembly: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ryan; Klobušický, Joseph; Pandey, Shivendra; Gracias, David H; Menon, Govind

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the utility of a mathematical framework based on discrete geometry to model biological and synthetic self-assembly. Our primary biological example is the self-assembly of icosahedral viruses; our synthetic example is surface-tension-driven self-folding polyhedra. In both instances, the process of self-assembly is modeled by decomposing the polyhedron into a set of partially formed intermediate states. The set of all intermediates is called the configuration space, pathways of assembly are modeled as paths in the configuration space, and the kinetics and yield of assembly are modeled by rate equations, Markov chains, or cost functions on the configuration space. We review an interesting interplay between biological function and mathematical structure in viruses in light of this framework. We discuss in particular: (i) tiling theory as a coarse-grained description of all-atom models; (ii) the building game-a growth model for the formation of polyhedra; and (iii) the application of these models to the self-assembly of the bacteriophage MS2. We then use a similar framework to model self-folding polyhedra. We use a discrete folding algorithm to compute a configuration space that idealizes surface-tension-driven self-folding and analyze pathways of assembly and dominant intermediates. These computations are then compared with experimental observations of a self-folding dodecahedron with side 300 μm. In both models, despite a combinatorial explosion in the size of the configuration space, a few pathways and intermediates dominate self-assembly. For self-folding polyhedra, the dominant intermediates have fewer degrees of freedom than comparable intermediates, and are thus more rigid. The concentration of assembly pathways on a few intermediates with distinguished geometric properties is biologically and physically important, and suggests deeper mathematical structure.

  6. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler G.; Garzon, Max H.; Deaton, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are “strong” assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly

  7. The impact of substrate interaction in directed self-assembly of symmetric diblock copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Robert

    ) and size of process window. It also introduces an analysis technique for evaluating assembly kinetics with an emphasis on defect annihilation. The fifth chapter seeks to identify more thoroughly the root causes of LER in BCP line/space DSA by investigating a number of factors. The sixth and final full chapter describes initial success in the effort to extend the concepts of BCP DSA on patterned planar substrates to flexible or three-dimensional substrates (for roll-to-roll applications) by using functional layer-by-layer deposited films. Our final conclusion touches on the ideas of nucleation of self-assembled BCP structures and how they relate to kinetic pathways and timescales of assembly.

  8. Hierarchical self-assembly: Self-organized nanostructures in a nematically ordered matrix of self-assembled polymeric chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubeena, Shaikh; Chatterji, Apratim

    2015-03-01

    We report many different nanostructures which are formed when model nanoparticles of different sizes (diameter σn) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semiflexible self-assembled polymeric wormlike micellar chains. The different nanostructures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nanoparticles. The different morphologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, and, of course, the ratio of the size of self-assembling nanoparticles and self-avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (nonequilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nanostructures. We observe rodlike structures of nanoparticles which get self-assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains, as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nanoparticles and monomers, in which each crystal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the condition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nanostructures in the laboratory.

  9. Hierarchical self-assembly: Self-organized nanostructures in a nematically ordered matrix of self-assembled polymeric chains.

    PubMed

    Mubeena, Shaikh; Chatterji, Apratim

    2015-03-01

    We report many different nanostructures which are formed when model nanoparticles of different sizes (diameter σn) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semiflexible self-assembled polymeric wormlike micellar chains. The different nanostructures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nanoparticles. The different morphologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, and, of course, the ratio of the size of self-assembling nanoparticles and self-avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (nonequilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nanostructures. We observe rodlike structures of nanoparticles which get self-assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains, as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nanoparticles and monomers, in which each crystal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the condition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nanostructures in the laboratory.

  10. Polyelectrolyte - mediated adsorption of amelogenin monomers and nanospheres forming mono- or multi-layers

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Csilla; Szalontai, Balázs; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Cuisinier, Frédéric J.G.

    2008-01-01

    We have applied optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy combined with streaming potential measurements and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy to investigate adsorption of amelogenin nanospheres onto polyelectrolytes. The long term objective was to better understand the chemical nature of these assemblies and to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms involved during self-assembly. It was found that monolayers of monomers and negatively charged nanospheres of a recombinant amelogenin (rM179) irreversibly adsorbed onto a positively charged polyelectrolyte multilayer films. Based on measurements performed at different temperatures it was demonstrated that intermolecular interactions for the formation of nanospheres were not affected by their adsorption onto polyelectrolytes. Consecutive adsorption of nanospheres resulting in the formation of multilayer structures was possible by using cationic poly(L-lysine) as mediators. N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine (GlcNac) did not disturb the nanosphere-assembled protein’s structure and it only affected the adsorption of monomeric amelogenin. Infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed amelogenin revealed conformational differences between the monomeric and assembled forms of rM179. While there was a considerable amount of α-helices in the monomers, β-turn and β-sheet structures dominated the assembled proteins. Our work constitutes the first report on a structurally controlled in-vitro buildup of an rM179 nanosphere monolayer-based matrix. Our data support the notion that amelogenin self-assembly is mostly driven by hydrophobic interactions and that amelogenin/PEM interactions are dominated by electrostatic forces. We suggest that similar forces can govern amelogenin interactions with non-amelogenins or the mineral phase during enamel biomineralization. PMID:17579474

  11. Mapping magnetic fields of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosphere assemblies by electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    He Kai; Cumings, John; Ma Feixiang; Xu Chengyan

    2013-05-07

    Crystalline Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanospheres with averaged diameters of 150 nm have been synthesized by a facile solvothermal method and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and electron holography. The nanospheres can self-assemble into either chain-like or ring-like shapes with sizes of a few micrometers, where large magnetic moments are found for individual particles at the remanent state and lead to strong fringing field in vicinity of the assemblies. Magnetic dipolar moments can be aligned both within and out of the sample plane, with a typical length scale on the order of 500 nm.

  12. Orthogonal self-assembly in folding block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Nobuhiko; Gillissen, Martijn A J; Li, Yuanchao; Sheiko, Sergei S; Palmans, Anja R A; Meijer, E W

    2013-01-09

    We herein report the synthesis and characterization of ABA triblock copolymers that contain two complementary association motifs and fold into single-chain polymeric nanoparticles (SCPNs) via orthogonal self-assembly. The copolymers were prepared using atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and possess different pendant functional groups in the A and B blocks (alcohols in the A block and acetylenes in the B block). After postfunctionalization, the A block contains o-nitrobenzyl-protected 2-ureidopyrimidinone (UPy) moieties and the B block benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) moieties. While the protected UPy groups dimerize after photoinduced deprotection of the o-nitrobenzyl group, the BTA moieties self-assemble into helical aggregates when temperature is reduced. In a two-step thermal/photoirradiation treatment under dilute conditions, the ABA block copolymer forms both BTA-based helical aggregates and UPy dimers intramolecularly. The sequential association of the two self-assembling motifs results in single-chain folding of the polymer, affording nanometer-sized particles with a compartmentalized interior. Variable-temperature NMR studies showed that the BTA and UPy self-assembly steps take place orthogonally (i.e., without mutual interference) in dilute solution. In addition, monitoring of the intramolecular self-assembly of BTA moieties into helical aggregates by circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the stability of the aggregates is almost independent of UPy dimerization. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis provided evidence of significant reductions in the hydrodynamic volume and radius of gyration, respectively, after photoinduced deprotection of the UPy groups; a 30-60% reduction in the size of the polymer chains was observed using SEC in CHCl(3). Molecular imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) corroborated significant contraction of individual polymer chains due to intramolecular association of the

  13. An information-bearing seed for nucleating algorithmic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Barish, Robert D; Schulman, Rebecca; Rothemund, Paul W K; Winfree, Erik

    2009-04-14

    Self-assembly creates natural mineral, chemical, and biological structures of great complexity. Often, the same starting materials have the potential to form an infinite variety of distinct structures; information in a seed molecule can determine which form is grown as well as where and when. These phenomena can be exploited to program the growth of complex supramolecular structures, as demonstrated by the algorithmic self-assembly of DNA tiles. However, the lack of effective seeds has limited the reliability and yield of algorithmic crystals. Here, we present a programmable DNA origami seed that can display up to 32 distinct binding sites and demonstrate the use of seeds to nucleate three types of algorithmic crystals. In the simplest case, the starting materials are a set of tiles that can form crystalline ribbons of any width; the seed directs assembly of a chosen width with >90% yield. Increased structural diversity is obtained by using tiles that copy a binary string from layer to layer; the seed specifies the initial string and triggers growth under near-optimal conditions where the bit copying error rate is <0.2%. Increased structural complexity is achieved by using tiles that generate a binary counting pattern; the seed specifies the initial value for the counter. Self-assembly proceeds in a one-pot annealing reaction involving up to 300 DNA strands containing >17 kb of sequence information. In sum, this work demonstrates how DNA origami seeds enable the easy, high-yield, low-error-rate growth of algorithmic crystals as a route toward programmable bottom-up fabrication.

  14. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V.; Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A.

    2014-10-14

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (~100 cm²V⁻¹s⁻¹). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ~1.8 ×10¹⁴cm⁻². We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  15. Self-reproduction of nanoparticles through synergistic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Keisuke; Nakano, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    We describe a self-reproduction mechanism of nanometer-sized particles (i.e., nanodiscs) through chemical ligation of the precursors and self-assembly of the building blocks. The ligation reaction was accelerated on lipid bilayer surfaces, and the products spontaneously assembled into nanodiscs with lipid molecules. With the increase in the number of nanodiscs, a rapid proliferation of the nanodiscs occurred through the spatial rearrangements of the molecules between the pre-existing nanodiscs and the unreacted materials, rather than template- or complex-enhanced ligation of the precursors. The subsequent process of surface-enhanced ligation of integrated precursors matured the nanoparticles into identical copies of the pre-existing assembly. Our study showed that the synergistic self-assembly mechanism probably underlie the self-replication principles for heterogeneous multimolecular systems.

  16. Self-assembled photonic crystals for a chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdillon, C.; Gam Derouich, S.; Daney de Marcillac, W.; Coolen, L.; Maître, A.; Mangeney, C.; Schwob, C.

    2016-03-01

    As they allow the control of light propagation, photonic crystals find many fields of application. Among them, self-assembled 3D-photonic crystals are ordered at the nanometric scale over centrimetric areas. Furthermore, self-assembly allows the design of complexes structures leading, for example, to the controlled disruption of the crystal periodicity (called defect) and the appearance of permitted optical frequency bands within the photonic bandgap. Light frequencies included in the corresponding passband are then localized in the defect allowing manipulation of nano-emitters fluorescence. We present the fabrication and the optical characterization of a heterostructure composed of a sputtered silica layer sandwiched between two silica opals. We show by photoluminescence measurements than this structure strongly modifies the transmitted fluorescence of nanocrystals.

  17. Self-assembly of double helical nanostructures inside carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cheng; Xue, Qingzhong; Shan, Meixia; Jing, Nuannuan; Ling, Cuicui; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Jiao, Zhiyong; Xing, Wei; Yan, Zifeng

    2013-05-21

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that a DNA-like double helix of two poly(acetylene) (PA) chains can form inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The computational results indicate that SWNTs can activate and guide the self-assembly of polymer chains, allowing them to adopt a helical configuration in a SWNT through the combined action of the van der Waals potential well and the π-π stacking interaction between the polymer and the inner surface of SWNTs. Meanwhile both the SWNT size and polymer chain stiffness determine the outcome of the nanostructure. Furthermore, we also found that water clusters encourage the self-assembly of PA helical structures in the tube. This molecular model may lead to a better understanding of the formation of a double helix biological molecule inside SWNTs. Alternatively, it could form the basis of a novel nanoscale material by utilizing the 'empty' spaces of SWNTs.

  18. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B.; Acharya, Rudresh; Degrado, William F.; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-04-01

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design.

  19. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B; Acharya, Rudresh; DeGrado, William F; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-04-26

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design.

  20. Biomolecular decision-making process for self assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2005-01-01

    The brain is often identified with decision-making processes in the biological world. In fact, single cells, single macromolecules (proteins) and populations of molecules also make simple decisions. These decision processes are essential to survival and to the biological self-assembly and self-repair processes that we seek to emulate. How do these tiny systems make effective decisions? How do they make decisions in concert with a cooperative network of other molecules or cells? How can we emulate the decision-making behaviors of small-scale biological systems to program and self-assemble microsystems? This LDRD supported research to answer these questions. Our work included modeling and simulation of protein populations to help us understand, mimic, and categorize molecular decision-making mechanisms that nonequilibrium systems can exhibit. This work is an early step towards mimicking such nanoscale and microscale biomolecular decision-making processes in inorganic systems.

  1. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  2. Self-assembly of hyperbranched polymers and its biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongfeng; Huang, Wei; Liu, Jinyao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2010-11-02

    Hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) are highly branched macromolecules with a three-dimensional dendritic architecture. Due to their unique topological structure and interesting physical/chemical properties, HBPs have attracted wide attention from both academia and industry. In this paper, the recent developments in HBP self-assembly and their biomedical applications have been comprehensively reviewed. Many delicate supramolecular structures from zero-dimension (0D) to three-dimension (3D), such as micelles, fibers, tubes, vesicles, membranes, large compound vesicles and physical gels, have been prepared through the solution or interfacial self-assembly of amphiphilic HBPs. In addition, these supramolecular structures have shown promising applications in the biomedical areas including drug delivery, protein purification/detection/delivery, gene transfection, antibacterial/antifouling materials and cytomimetic chemistry. Such developments promote the interdiscipline researches among surpramolecular chemistry, biomedical chemistry, nano-technology and functional materials.

  3. Self-assembled Chiral Nanostructure as Scaffold for Asymmetric Reaction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Ouyang, Guanghui; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2017-03-25

    Asymmetric reaction is one of the most important reactions in organic synthesis. While large amount of efficient molecular catalysts have been developed and applied, supramolecular and nanostructured catalysts have been attracting recent interest. In this mini review, we focused on the self-assembled chiral nanostructures and reviewed their possibility and feasibility as the enantioselective catalyst. The design concept and the requirement of the chiral scaffold as the catalysts are discussed. Based on the chirality and catalytic performance of the building molecules and the supramolecular nanostructures, the nanocatalyst is divided into chiral nanostructure driven (CND) and chiral nanostructure enhanced (CNE) enantioselective catalysts. Then, several typical self-assembled chiral nanostructures such as nanocage, nanotube, nanorod, micelles and vesicles are selected as the chiral scaffold and their catalytic behaviors for the asymmetric reactions were demonstrated. Finally, the future development of the field is also outlooked.

  4. Self-assembling enzymes and the origins of the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Rachael; Gitai, Zemer

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial cytoskeleton is composed of a complex and diverse group of proteins that self-assemble into linear filaments. These filaments support and organize cellular architecture and provide a dynamic network controlling transport and localization within the cell. Here, we review recent discoveries related to a newly appreciated class of self-assembling proteins that expand our view of the bacterial cytoskeleton and provide potential explanations for its evolutionary origins. Specifically, several types of metabolic enzymes can form structures similar to established cytoskeletal filaments and, in some cases, these structures have been repurposed for structural uses independent of their normal role. The behaviors of these enzymes suggest that some modern cytoskeletal proteins may have evolved from dual-role proteins with catalytic and structural functions. PMID:22014508

  5. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  6. Self-assembly of nanomaterials at fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Toor, Anju; Feng, Tao; Russell, Thomas P

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in the field of the self-assembly of nanoscale materials such as nanoparticles, nanorods and nanosheets at liquid/liquid interfaces are reviewed. Self-assembly behavior of both biological and synthetic particles is discussed. For biological nanoparticles, the nanoparticle assembly at fluid interfaces provides a simple route for directing nanoparticles into 2D or 3D constructs with hierarchical ordering. The interfacial assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at liquid interfaces would play a key role in applications such as nanotube fractionation, flexible electronic thin-film fabrication and synthesis of porous SWCNT/polymer composites foams. Liquids can be structured by the jamming of nanoparticle surfactants at fluid interfaces. By controlling the interfacial packing of nanoparticle surfactants using external triggers, a new class of materials can be generated that combines the desirable characteristics of fluids such as rapid transport of energy carriers with the structural stability of a solid.

  7. DNA Self-assembly and Computer System Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The migration of circuit fabrication technology from the microscale to the nanoscale has generated a great deal of interest in how the fundamental physical limitations of materials will change the way computer systems are engineered. The changing relationships between performance, defects, and cost have motivated research into so-called disruptive or exotic technologies and draws inspiration from systems found in biology. Advances in DNA self-assembly have demonstrated versatile and programmable methods for the synthesis of complex nanostructures suitable for logic circuitry. Several recent advances in programmable DNA self-assembly and the theory and design of DNA nanostructures for computing will be presented. The advantages of this technology go beyond the simple scaling of device feature sizes (sub-20nm) to enable new modes of computation that are otherwise impractical with conventional technologies. A brief survey of several computer architectures that take advantage of this new technology will also be presented.

  8. Chemical optimization of self-assembled carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Auvray, Stéphane; Derycke, Vincent; Goffman, Marcelo; Filoramo, Arianna; Jost, Oliver; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We present the improvement of carbon nanotube field effects transistors (CNTFETs) performances by chemical tuning of the nanotube/substrate and nanotube/electrode interfaces. Our work is based on a method of selective placement of individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by patterned aminosilane monolayer and its use for the fabrication of self-assembled nanotube transistors. This method brings a relevant solution to the problem of systematic connection of self-organized nanotubes. The aminosilane monolayer reactivity can be used to improve carrier injection and doping level of the SWNT. We show that the Schottky barrier height at the nanotube/metal interface can be diminished in a continuous fashion down to an almost ohmic contact through these chemical treatments. Moreover, sensitivity to 20 ppb of triethylamine is demonstrated for self-assembled CNTFETs, thus opening new prospects for gas sensors taking advantages of the chemical functionality of the aminosilane used for assembling the CNTFETs.

  9. Electrostatically Directed Self-Assembly of Ultrathin Supramolecular Polymer Microcapsules

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Richard M; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yu; Coulston, Roger J; Smith, Clive A; Salmon, Andrew R; Yu, Ziyi; Scherman, Oren A; Abell, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly offers routes to challenging architectures on the molecular and macroscopic scale. Coupled with microfluidics it has been used to make microcapsules—where a 2D sheet is shaped in 3D, encapsulating the volume within. In this paper, a versatile methodology to direct the accumulation of capsule-forming components to the droplet interface using electrostatic interactions is described. In this approach, charged copolymers are selectively partitioned to the microdroplet interface by a complementary charged surfactant for subsequent supramolecular cross-linking via cucurbit[8]uril. This dynamic assembly process is employed to selectively form both hollow, ultrathin microcapsules and solid microparticles from a single solution. The ability to dictate the distribution of a mixture of charged copolymers within the microdroplet, as demonstrated by the single-step fabrication of distinct core–shell microcapsules, gives access to a new generation of innovative self-assembled constructs. PMID:26213532

  10. Self-assembled containers based on extended tetrathiafulvalene.

    PubMed

    Bivaud, Sébastien; Goeb, Sébastien; Croué, Vincent; Dron, Paul I; Allain, Magali; Sallé, Marc

    2013-07-10

    Two original self-assembled containers constituted each by six electroactive subunits are described. They are synthesized from a concave tetratopic π-extended tetrathiafulvalene ligand bearing four pyridyl units and cis-M(dppf)(OTf)2 (M = Pd or Pt; dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene; OTf = trifluoromethane-sulfonate) complexes. Both fully characterized assemblies present an oblate spheroidal cavity that can incorporate one perylene molecule.

  11. Propagating waves of self-assembly in organosilane monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Jack F.; Efimenko, Kirill; Fischer, Daniel A.; Phelan, Fredrick R.; Genzer, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Wavefronts associated with reaction–diffusion and self-assembly processes are ubiquitous in the natural world. For example, propagating fronts arise in crystallization and diverse other thermodynamic ordering processes, in polymerization fronts involved in cell movement and division, as well as in the competitive social interactions and population dynamics of animals at much larger scales. Although it is often claimed that self-sustaining or autocatalytic front propagation is well described by mean-field “reaction–diffusion” or “phase field” ordering models, it has recently become appreciated from simulations and theoretical arguments that fluctuation effects in lower spatial dimensions can lead to appreciable deviations from the classical mean-field theory (MFT) of this type of front propagation. The present work explores these fluctuation effects in a real physical system. In particular, we consider a high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) study of the spontaneous frontal self-assembly of organosilane (OS) molecules into self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface-energy gradients on oxidized silicon wafers. We find that these layers organize from the wafer edge as propagating wavefronts having well defined velocities. In accordance with two-dimensional simulations of this type of front propagation that take fluctuation effects into account, we find that the interfacial widths w(t) of these SAM self-assembly fronts exhibit a power-law broadening in time, w(t) ≈ tβ, rather than the constant width predicted by MFT. Moreover, the observed exponent values accord rather well with previous simulation and theoretical estimates. These observations have significant implications for diverse types of ordering fronts that occur under confinement conditions in biological or materials-processing contexts. PMID:17566108

  12. Molecular Recognition Directed Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    SUPRAMOLECULAR POLYMERS by V. Percec, J. Heck, G. Johansson, D. Tomazos, M. Kawasumi and G. Ungar Published in the J. Macromol. SOi: Part A: Pure...W.asetaqIom OC JOS0l 4 TITE AN SUBITLES. FUNDING NUMBERS Molecular Recognition Directed Self-Assembly of Suprainolecular Polymers N00014-89--J-1828 6. AUTHOR(S...comparison between various supramolecular (generated via H-bonding, iions) and molecular " polymer backbones" will be made. The present limitations

  13. Lighting up cells with lanthanide self-assembled helicates

    PubMed Central

    Bünzli, Jean-Claude G.

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide bioprobes and bioconjugates are ideal luminescent stains in view of their low propensity to photobleaching, sharp emission lines and long excited state lifetimes permitting time-resolved detection for enhanced sensitivity. We show here how the interplay between physical, chemical and biochemical properties allied to microfluidics engineering leads to self-assembled dinuclear lanthanide luminescent probes illuminating live cells and selectively detecting biomarkers expressed by cancerous human breast cells. PMID:24511387

  14. A self-assembled cyclodextrin nanocarrier for photoreactive squaraine

    PubMed Central

    Kauscher, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Photoreactive squaraines produce cytotoxic oxygen species under irradiation and have significant potential for photodynamic therapy. Herein we report that squaraines can be immobilized on a self-assembled nanocarrier composed of amphiphilic cyclodextrins to enhance their photochemical activity. To this end, a squaraine was equipped with two adamantane moieties that act as anchors for the cyclodextrin vesicle surface. The supramolecular immobilization was monitored by using fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy and the photochemistry of the squaraine was investigated by using absorption spectroscopy. PMID:28144322

  15. Hyperthermal Carbon Dioxide Interactions with Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-08

    time as well as density measurements of the thermosphere. The sensor under current development is based on the charge conversion of hyperthermal...oxygen atoms (O) to their anionic form (O−) upon collision with an organosilane/silicon self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The measured current of O− can...efficiency at charge conversion. The original goals of this project were to (1) measure the lifetimes of AFRL-provided SAMs under hyperthermal O

  16. Colloids with magnetic patches: synthesis and self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacanna, Stefano; Rossi, Laura; Irvine, William; Pine, David

    2011-03-01

    We developed a new class of colloidal particles that programmably and reversibly self-assemble into well-defined clusters by virtue of ``magnetic patches'' carrying a permanent magnetic dipole moment. The resulting clusters form spontaneously in a zero external field, and their geometry is entirely determined by the interplay between magnetic, steric, and electrostatic interactions. Imposing an external magnetic field enables the clusters to unbind or change their geometry allowing, in principle, to create materials with tunable structural arrangements.

  17. Sequential programmable self-assembly: Role of cooperative interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Jonathan D. Halverson; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2016-03-04

    Here, we propose a general strategy of “sequential programmable self-assembly” that enables a bottom-up design of arbitrary multi-particle architectures on nano- and microscales. We show that a naive realization of this scheme, based on the pairwise additive interactions between particles, has fundamental limitations that lead to a relatively high error rate. This can be overcome by using cooperative interparticle binding. The cooperativity is a well known feature of many biochemical processes, responsible, e.g., for signaling and regulations in living systems. Here we propose to utilize a similar strategy for high precision self-assembly, and show that DNA-mediated interactions provide a convenientmore » platform for its implementation. In particular, we outline a specific design of a DNA-based complex which we call “DNA spider,” that acts as a smart interparticle linker and provides a built-in cooperativity of binding. We demonstrate versatility of the sequential self-assembly based on spider-functionalized particles by designing several mesostructures of increasing complexity and simulating their assembly process. This includes a number of finite and repeating structures, in particular, the so-called tetrahelix and its several derivatives. Due to its generality, this approach allows one to design and successfully self-assemble virtually any structure made of a “GEOMAG” magnetic construction toy, out of nanoparticles. According to our results, once the binding cooperativity is strong enough, the sequential self-assembly becomes essentially error-free.« less

  18. Equilibrium self-assembly of small RNA viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, R. F.; Comas-Garcia, M.; Garmann, R. F.; Grosberg, A. Y.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a description for the quasiequilibrium self-assembly of small, single-stranded (ss) RNA viruses whose capsid proteins (CPs) have flexible, positively charged, disordered tails that associate with the negatively charged RNA genome molecules. We describe the assembly of such viruses as the interplay between two coupled phase-transition-like events: the formation of the protein shell (the capsid) by CPs and the condensation of a large ss viral RNA molecule. Electrostatic repulsion between the CPs competes with attractive hydrophobic interactions and attractive interaction between neutralized RNA segments mediated by the tail groups. An assembly diagram is derived in terms of the strength of attractive interactions between CPs and between CPs and the RNA molecules. It is compared with the results of recent studies of viral assembly. We demonstrate that the conventional theory of self-assembly, which does describe the assembly of empty capsids, is in general not applicable to the self-assembly of RNA-encapsidating virions.

  19. Evolutionary dynamics in a simple model of self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Iain G.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the evolutionary dynamics of an idealized model for the robust self-assembly of two-dimensional structures called polyominoes. The model includes rules that encode interactions between sets of square tiles that drive the self-assembly process. The relationship between the model’s rule set and its resulting self-assembled structure can be viewed as a genotype-phenotype map and incorporated into a genetic algorithm. The rule sets evolve under selection for specified target structures. The corresponding complex fitness landscape generates rich evolutionary dynamics as a function of parameters such as the population size, search space size, mutation rate, and method of recombination. Furthermore, these systems are simple enough that in some cases the associated model genome space can be completely characterized, shedding light on how the evolutionary dynamics depends on the detailed structure of the fitness landscape. Finally, we apply the model to study the emergence of the preference for dihedral over cyclic symmetry observed for homomeric protein tetramers.

  20. Epitaxial photostriction-magnetostriction coupled self-assembled nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng-Jui; Chen, Long-Yi; He, Qing; Liang, Chen-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ze; Chien, Yung-Shun; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Lin, Su-Jien; Arenholz, Elke; Luo, Chih-Wei; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2012-08-28

    Self-assembled vertical nanostructures take advantage of high interface-to-volume ratio and can be used to design new functionalities by the choice of a proper combination of constituents. However, most of the studies to date have emphasized the functional controllability of the nanostructures using external electric or magnetic fields. In this study, to introduce light (or photons) as an external control parameter in a self-assembled nanostructure system, we have successfully synthesized oxide nanostructures with CoFe(2)O(4) nanopillars embedded in a SrRuO(3) matrix. The combination of photostrictive SrRuO(3) and magnetostrictive CoFe(2)O(4) in the intimately assembled nanostructures leads to a light-induced, ultrafast change in magnetization of the CoFe(2)O(4) nanopillars. Our work demonstrates a novel concept on oxide nanostructure design and opens an alternative pathway for the explorations of diverse functionalities in heteroepitaxial self-assembled oxide nanostructures.

  1. Self-assembly in sugar-oil complex glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Hiteshkumar; Gao, Feng; Lee, Jing-Huei; Liberatore, Matthew; Ho, Chia-Chi; Co, Carlos C.

    2007-04-01

    In aqueous systems, the hydrophobic effect drives the self-assembly of amphiphiles into a broad range of micellar, rod-like, bicontinuous and liquid-crystalline complex fluids. Many of these are relevant to biological matter or technological applications. However, amphiphilic self-assembly is not limited to aqueous systems. Replacement of water with supercritical carbon dioxide, for example, results in complex fluids that combine the properties of gases and liquids. Along this vein, we explore the self-assembly of surfactants in anhydrous sugars. Our study reveals that anhydrous powders of sugars and surfactants suspended in oil spontaneously form molten glasses with nanometre-size domains of sugar and liquid oil without mixing. The low cost, water solubility, low toxicity and stabilizing properties of glassy sugars make them ideal water replacements for many pharmaceutical, food and materials synthesis applications. The optical clarity and solid appearance of these glasses at room temperature belie their inclusion of more than 50% (vol.) oil, which confers liquid-like diffusivity. The unique combination of solid- and liquid-like properties may lead to applications in sensors and optical devices.

  2. Self-assembly in sugar-oil complex glasses.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hiteshkumar; Gao, Feng; Lee, Jing-Huei; Liberatore, Matthew; Ho, Chia-Chi; Co, Carlos C

    2007-04-01

    In aqueous systems, the hydrophobic effect drives the self-assembly of amphiphiles into a broad range of micellar, rod-like, bicontinuous and liquid-crystalline complex fluids. Many of these are relevant to biological matter or technological applications. However, amphiphilic self-assembly is not limited to aqueous systems. Replacement of water with supercritical carbon dioxide, for example, results in complex fluids that combine the properties of gases and liquids. Along this vein, we explore the self-assembly of surfactants in anhydrous sugars. Our study reveals that anhydrous powders of sugars and surfactants suspended in oil spontaneously form molten glasses with nanometre-size domains of sugar and liquid oil without mixing. The low cost, water solubility, low toxicity and stabilizing properties of glassy sugars make them ideal water replacements for many pharmaceutical, food and materials synthesis applications. The optical clarity and solid appearance of these glasses at room temperature belie their inclusion of more than 50% (vol.) oil, which confers liquid-like diffusivity. The unique combination of solid- and liquid-like properties may lead to applications in sensors and optical devices.

  3. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    DOE PAGES

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; ...

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free-energymore » barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers, how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to over-come them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially-relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales - a handful of nanometers -, and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.« less

  4. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman S.; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Muller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free-energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers, how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to over-come them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially-relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales - a handful of nanometers -, and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.

  5. Capillary-based static self-assembly in higher organisms

    PubMed Central

    Voise, Jonathan; Schindler, Michael; Casas, Jérôme; Raphaël, Elie

    2011-01-01

    Organized structures produced by dynamic self-assembly are often observed in animal groups. Static self-assembly, however, has to date only been observed at the cellular and sub-cellular levels. The aim of this study was to analyse organized structures in immobile whirligig beetle groups on the water surface. We used theoretical and computational approaches to model the meniscus around whirligig beetles and to calculate the surface energy for configurations involving two beetles. Theoretical predictions were then tested using live insects and resin casts. Observations were also made for three and more casts. The meniscus of whirligig beetles had a bipolar shape with two concave parts. For two beetles, predicted configurations based on energy minima corresponded to beetles in contact by their extremities, forming lines and arrows, and agreed well with observations. Experimental results for three and more beetle casts revealed new geometrical arrangements similar to those obtained with colloids at interfaces. This study provides the first example of static self-assembly at the inter-organism level and shows the importance of capillary interactions in such formations. We identify the ecological context in which our findings are of relevance. PMID:21367777

  6. Simulation Methods for Self-Assembled Polymers and Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, James T.

    2003-11-01

    New off-lattice grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation methods have been developed and used to model the equilibrium structure and phase diagrams of equilibrium polymers and rings. A scheme called Polydisperse Insertion, Removal, and Resizing (PDIRR) is used to accelerate the equilibration of the size distribution of self-assembled aggregates. This method allows the insertion or removal of aggregates (e.g., chains) containing an arbitrary number of monomers in a single Monte Carlo move, or the re-sizing of an existing aggregate. For the equilibrium polymer model under semi-dilute conditions, a several-fold increase in equilibration rate compared with single-monomer moves is observed, facilitating the study of the isotropic-nematic transition of semiflexible, self-assembled chains. Combined with the pivot-coupled GCMC method for ring simulation, the PDIRR approach also allows the phenomenological simulation of a polydisperse equilibrium phase of rings, 2-dimensional fluid domains, or flat self-assembled disks in three dimensions.

  7. Molecular Motions in Functional Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Dhotel, Alexandre; Chen, Ziguang; Delbreilh, Laurent; Youssef, Boulos; Saiter, Jean-Marc; Tan, Li

    2013-01-01

    The construction of “smart” materials able to perform specific functions at the molecular scale through the application of various stimuli is highly attractive but still challenging. The most recent applications indicate that the outstanding flexibility of self-assembled architectures can be employed as a powerful tool for the development of innovative molecular devices, functional surfaces and smart nanomaterials. Structural flexibility of these materials is known to be conferred by weak intermolecular forces involved in self-assembly strategies. However, some fundamental mechanisms responsible for conformational lability remain unexplored. Furthermore, the role played by stronger bonds, such as coordination, ionic and covalent bonding, is sometimes neglected while they can be employed readily to produce mechanically robust but also chemically reversible structures. In this review, recent applications of structural flexibility and molecular motions in self-assembled nanostructures are discussed. Special focus is given to advanced materials exhibiting significant performance changes after an external stimulus is applied, such as light exposure, pH variation, heat treatment or electromagnetic field. The crucial role played by strong intra- and weak intermolecular interactions on structural lability and responsiveness is highlighted. PMID:23348927

  8. Three dimensional self-assembly at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracias, D. H.

    2013-05-01

    At the nanoscale, three dimensional manipulation and assembly becomes extremely challenging and also cost prohibitive. Self-assembly provides an attractive and possibly the only highly parallel methodology to structure truly three dimensional patterned materials and devices at this size scale for applications in electronics, optics, robotics and medicine. This is a concise review along with a perspective of an important and exciting field in nanotechnology and is related to a Nanoengineering Pioneer Award that I received at this SPIE symposium for my contributions to the 3D selfassembly of nanostructures. I detail a historical account of 3D self-assembly and outline important developments in this area which is put into context with the larger research areas of 3D nanofabrication, assembly and nanomanufacturing. A focus in this review is on our work as it relates to the self-assembly with lithographically patterned units; this approach provides a means for heterogeneous integration of periodic, curved and angled nanostructures with precisely defined three dimensional patterns.

  9. Multilayer block copolymer meshes by orthogonal self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli K. G., Amir; Nicaise, Samuel M.; Gadelrab, Karim R.; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline A.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-01-01

    Continued scaling-down of lithographic-pattern feature sizes has brought templated self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) into the forefront of nanofabrication research. Technologies now exist that facilitate significant control over otherwise unorganized assembly of BCP microdomains to form both long-range and locally complex monolayer patterns. In contrast, the extension of this control into multilayers or 3D structures of BCP microdomains remains limited, despite the possible technological applications in next-generation devices. Here, we develop and analyse an orthogonal self-assembly method in which multiple layers of distinct-molecular-weight BCPs naturally produce nanomesh structures of cylindrical microdomains without requiring layer-by-layer alignment or high-resolution lithographic templating. The mechanisms for orthogonal self-assembly are investigated with both experiment and simulation, and we determine that the control over height and chemical preference of templates are critical process parameters. The method is employed to produce nanomeshes with the shapes of circles and Y-intersections, and is extended to produce three layers of orthogonally oriented cylinders. PMID:26796218

  10. Algorithmic Self-Assembly of DNA Sierpinski Triangles

    PubMed Central

    Rothemund, Paul W. K; Papadakis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Algorithms and information, fundamental to technological and biological organization, are also an essential aspect of many elementary physical phenomena, such as molecular self-assembly. Here we report the molecular realization, using two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA tiles, of a cellular automaton whose update rule computes the binary function XOR and thus fabricates a fractal pattern—a Sierpinski triangle—as it grows. To achieve this, abstract tiles were translated into DNA tiles based on double-crossover motifs. Serving as input for the computation, long single-stranded DNA molecules were used to nucleate growth of tiles into algorithmic crystals. For both of two independent molecular realizations, atomic force microscopy revealed recognizable Sierpinski triangles containing 100–200 correct tiles. Error rates during assembly appear to range from 1% to 10%. Although imperfect, the growth of Sierpinski triangles demonstrates all the necessary mechanisms for the molecular implementation of arbitrary cellular automata. This shows that engineered DNA self-assembly can be treated as a Turing-universal biomolecular system, capable of implementing any desired algorithm for computation or construction tasks. PMID:15583715

  11. Spectroscopic critical dimension technology (SCD) for directed self assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibe, Senichi; Dziura, Thaddeus; Nagaswami, Venkat; Gronheid, Roel

    2014-04-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) is being actively investigated as a potential patterning solution for future generation devices. While SEM based CD measurement is currently used in research and development, scatterometry-based techniques like spectroscopic CD (SCD) are preferred for high volume manufacturing. SCD can offer information about sub-surface features that are not available from CD-SEM measurement. Besides, SCD is a non-destructive, high throughput technique already adopted in HVM in several advanced nodes. The directed self assembly CD measurement can be challenging because of small dimensions and extremely thin layers in the DSA stack. In this study, the SCD technology was investigated for a 14 nm resolution PS-b-PMMA chemical epitaxy UW process optimized by imec. The DSA stack involves new materials such as cross-linkable polysterene (XPS) of thickness approximately 5 nm, ArF immersion resist (subsequently removed), -OH terminated neutral brush layer, and BCP material (Polystyrene-blockmethyl methacrylate of thickness roughly 20 to 30 nm). The mask contains a large CD and pitch matrix, for studying the quality of self-assembly as a function of the guide pattern dimensions. We report on the ability of SCD to characterize the dimensional variation in these targets and hence provide a viable process control solution.

  12. Nanostructures formed by cyclodextrin covered aminobenzophenones through supramolecular self assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Sankaranarayanan, R. K.; Saravanan, J.

    2014-06-01

    Cyclodextrin (α and β) based nanostructures formed with 2-aminobenzophenone, 3-aminobenzophenone through the supramolecular self assembly are studied by absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, DSC, PXRD and 1H NMR. The unequal layer by layer nanosheets and nanoribbons are formed through self assembly of 3ABP/CD inclusion complexes. 2ABP/α-CD complex nanostructures show the self assembly hierarchical thread structure and β-CD complexes displays a nanobrick structure. The formation of nanostructures are prearranged to Hsbnd O⋯H, NH2⋯O and H2N⋯H intermolecular hydrogen bond between individual complexes. The absorption and fluorescence spectral changes explicit formation of 1:1 inclusion complexes and solvent study demonstrate the ESIPT and TICT present in both molecules. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG and ΔS) of 2ABP and 3ABP molecule and the inclusion complexes were determined from semiempirical PM3 calculations.

  13. Controlling RNA self-assembly to form filaments.

    PubMed

    Nasalean, Lorena; Baudrey, Stéphanie; Leontis, Neocles B; Jaeger, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Fundamental control over supra-molecular self-assembly for organization of matter on the nano-scale is a major objective of nanoscience and nanotechnology. 'RNA tectonics' is the design of modular RNA units, called tectoRNAs, that can be programmed to self-assemble into novel nano- and meso-scopic architectures of desired size and shape. We report the three-dimensional design of tectoRNAs incorporating modular 4-way junction (4WJ) motifs, hairpin loops and their cognate loop-receptors to create extended, programmable interaction interfaces. Specific and directional RNA-RNA interactions at these interfaces enable conformational, topological and orientational control of tectoRNA self-assembly. The interacting motifs are precisely positioned within the helical arms of the 4WJ to program assembly from only one helical stacking conformation of the 4WJ. TectoRNAs programmed to assemble with orientational compensation produce micrometer-scale RNA filaments through supra-molecular equilibrium polymerization. As visualized by transmission electron microscopy, these RNA filaments resemble actin filaments from the protein world. This work emphasizes the potential of RNA as a scaffold for designing and engineering new controllable biomaterials mimicking modern cytoskeletal proteins.

  14. Highly conductive self-assembled nanoribbons of coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Welte, Lorena; Calzolari, Arrigo; Di Felice, Rosa; Zamora, Felix; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2010-02-01

    Organic molecules can self-assemble into well-ordered structures, but the conductance of these structures is limited, which is a disadvantage for applications in molecular electronics. Conductivity can be improved by using coordination polymers-in which metal centres are incorporated into a molecular backbone-and such structures have been used as molecular wires by self-assembling them into ordered films on metal surfaces. Here, we report electrically conductive nanoribbons of the coordination polymer [Pt(2)I(S(2)CCH(3))(4)](n) self-assembled on an insulating substrate by direct sublimation of polymer crystals. Conductance atomic force microscopy is used to probe the electrical characteristics of a few polymer chains ( approximately 10) within the nanoribbons. The observed currents exceed those previously sustained in organic and metal-organic molecules assembled on surfaces by several orders of magnitude and over much longer distances. These results, and the results of theoretical calculations based on density functional theory, confirm coordination polymers as candidate materials for applications in molecular electronics.

  15. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A; Li, Weihua; Müller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm(2). In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers and how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to overcome them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities, and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales-a handful of nanometers-and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.

  16. Foams stabilized by multilamellar polyglycerol ester self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Curschellas, Corina; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Geue, Thomas; Fischer, Peter; Schmitt, Bertrand; Rouvet, Martine; Windhab, Erich J; Limbach, Hans Jörg

    2013-01-08

    The importance of surfactant self-assemblies in foam stabilization is well-known. The aim of the current study was to investigate the self-assemblies of the nonionic surfactant polyglycerol ester (PGE) in bulk solutions, at the interface and within foams, using a combined approach of small-angle neutron scattering, neutron reflectivity, and electron microscopy. PGE bulk solutions contain vesicles as well as open lamellar structures. Upon heating of the solutions the lamellar spacing increases, with significant differences in the presence of NaCl or CaCl(2) as compared to the standard solution. The adsorption of the multilamellar structures present in the bulk solutions lead to a multilayered film at the air-water interface. The ordering within this film was increased as a result of a 20% area compression mimicking a coalescence event. Finally, PGE foams were shown to be stabilized not only by strong interfacial films but also by agglomerated self-assemblies within the interstitial areas of the foams.

  17. Engineering hierarchical nanostructures by elastocapillary self-assembly.

    PubMed

    De Volder, Michaël; Hart, A John

    2013-02-25

    Surfaces coated with nanoscale filaments such as silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes are potentially compelling for high-performance battery and capacitor electrodes, photovoltaics, electrical interconnects, substrates for engineered cell growth, dry adhesives, and other smart materials. However, many of these applications require a wet environment or involve wet processing during their synthesis. The capillary forces introduced by these wet environments can lead to undesirable aggregation of nanoscale filaments, but control of capillary forces can enable manipulation of the filaments into discrete aggregates and novel hierarchical structures. Recent studies suggest that the elastocapillary self-assembly of nanofilaments can be a versatile and scalable means to build complex and robust surface architectures. To enable a wider understanding and use of elastocapillary self-assembly as a fabrication technology, we give an overview of the underlying fundamentals and classify typical implementations and surface designs for nanowires, nanotubes, and nanopillars made from a wide variety of materials. Finally, we discuss exemplary applications and future opportunities to realize new engineered surfaces by the elastocapillary self-assembly of nanofilaments.

  18. Polymer adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A K; Golumbfskie, A J

    2001-01-01

    Driven by prospective applications, there is much interest in developing materials that can perform specific functions in response to external conditions. One way to design such materials is to create systems which, in response to external inputs, can self-assemble to form structures that are functionally useful. This review focuses on the principles that can be employed to design macromolecules that when presented with an appropriate two-dimensional surface, will self-assemble to form nanostructures that may be functionally useful. We discuss three specific examples: (a) biomimetic recognition between polymers and patterned surfaces. (b) control and manipulation of nanomechanical motion generated by biopolymer adsorption and binding, and (c) creation of patterned nanostructuctures by exposing molten diblock copolymers to patterned surfaces. The discussion serves to illustrate how polymer sequence can be manipulated to affect self-assembly characteristics near adsorbing surfaces. The focus of this review is on theoretical and computational work aimed toward elucidating the principles underlying the phenomena pertinent to the three topics noted above. However, synergistic experiments are also described in the appropriate context.

  19. Towards biologically active self-assemblies: model nucleotide chimeras.

    PubMed

    Vebert-Nardin, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    With this article, we wish to give an overview of our main research activities assessing the potential of a suitable polymer modification of DNA fragments to self-assemble biologically active nanostructures. Specifically, the grafting of a hydrophobic polymer segment on DNA fragments results in amphiphilic nucleotide-based macromolecules, which, owing to both chemical and physical incompatibility, organize in self-assembled structures either on surfaces or in aqueous solution. Through the combination of the existing know-how in polymer chemistry with modern analytical techniques, we are currently focusing on establishing the mechanism of self-assembly of the polymer-modified nucleotide sequences in solution and on surfaces prior to the assessment of their hybridization capacity once involved in the ensemble. With the evaluation of the potential of the functional nanostructures to undergo biological-like adhesion through hybridization one can eventually foresee that the optimal functionality of these bio-inspired systems could be fine-tuned for biological applications such as drug delivery, gene therapy, tissue engineering and the design of either biomedical devices or biosensors.

  20. Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed; Stone, Howard A.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-01-01

    Engineered two-phase microfluidic systems have recently shown promise for computation, encryption, and biological processing. For many of these systems, complex control of dispersed-phase frequency and switching is enabled by nonlinearities associated with interfacial stresses. Introducing nonlinearity associated with fluid inertia has recently been identified as an easy to implement strategy to control two-phase (solid-liquid) microscale flows. By taking advantage of inertial effects we demonstrate controllable self-assembling particle systems, uncover dynamics suggesting a unique mechanism of dynamic self-assembly, and establish a framework for engineering microfluidic structures with the possibility of spatial frequency filtering. Focusing on the dynamics of the particle–particle interactions reveals a mechanism for the dynamic self-assembly process; inertial lift forces and a parabolic flow field act together to stabilize interparticle spacings that otherwise would diverge to infinity due to viscous disturbance flows. The interplay of the repulsive viscous interaction and inertial lift also allow us to design and implement microfluidic structures that irreversibly change interparticle spacing, similar to a low-pass filter. Although often not considered at the microscale, nonlinearity due to inertia can provide a platform for high-throughput passive control of particle positions in all directions, which will be useful for applications in flow cytometry, tissue engineering, and metamaterial synthesis. PMID:21149674

  1. Nanoparticle-directed self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Kamps, Amanda C; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Hickey, Robert J; Clarke, Nigel; Fryd, Michael; Park, So-Jung

    2010-09-07

    Nanoparticles can form unique cavity-like structures in core-shell type assemblies of block copolymers through the cooperative self-assembly of nanoparticles and block copolymers. We show that the self-assembly behavior is general for common as-synthesized alkyl-terminated nanoparticles for a range of nanoparticle sizes. We examined various self-assembly conditions such as solvent compositions, nanoparticle coordinating ligands, volume fraction of nanoparticles, and nanoparticle sizes in order to elucidate the mechanism of the radial assembly formation. These experiments along with strong segregation theory calculations indicated that both the enthalpic interaction and the polymer stretching energy are important factors in the coassembly formation. The slightly unfavorable interaction between the hydrophobic segment of polymers and alkyl-terminated nanoparticles causes the accumulation of nanoparticles at the interface between the polymer core and the shell, forming the unique cavity-like structure. The coassemblies were stabilized for a limited range of nanoparticle volume fractions within which the inclusion of nanoparticle layers reduces the polymer stretching. The volume fraction range yielding the well-defined radial coassembly structure was mapped out with varying nanoparticle sizes. The experimental and theoretical phase map provides the guideline for the coassembly formation of as-synthesized alkyl-terminated nanoparticles and amphiphilic block copolymers.

  2. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled.

  3. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible tomore » precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.« less

  4. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible to precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.

  5. Anion-exchange nanospheres as titration reagents for anionic analytes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-08-18

    We present here anion-exchange nanospheres as novel titration reagents for anions. The nanospheres contain a lipophilic cation for which the counterion is initially Cl(-). Ion exchange takes place between Cl(-) in the nanospheres and a more lipophilic anion in the sample, such as ClO4(-) and NO3(-). Consecutive titration in the same sample solution for ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were demonstrated. As an application, the concentration of NO3(-) in spinach was successfully determined using this method.

  6. Aerosolized droplet mediated self-assembly of photosynthetic pigment analogues and deposition onto substrates.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vivek B; Biswas, Pratim

    2014-02-25

    Self-assembled photosynthetic molecules have a high extinction coefficient and a broad absorption in the infrared region, and these properties can be used to improve the efficiency of solar cells. We have developed a single-step method for the self-assembly of synthetic chlorin molecules (analogues of native bacteriochlorophylls) in aerosolized droplets, containing a single solvent and two solvents, to synthesize biomimetic light-harvesting structures. In the single-solvent approach, assembly is promoted by a concentration-driven process due to evaporation of the solvent. The peak absorbance of Zn(II) 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-phenyl-13(1)-oxophorbine (1) in methanol shifted from 646 nm to 725 nm (∼ 80 nm shift) after assembly, which is comparable to the shift observed in the naturally occurring assembly of bacteriochlorophyll c. Although assembly is thermodynamically favorable, the kinetics of self-assembly play an important role, and this was demonstrated by varying the initial concentration of the pigment monomer. To overcome kinetic limitations, a two-solvent approach using a volatile solvent (tetrahydrofuran) in which the dye is soluble and a less volatile solvent (ethanol) in which the dye is sparingly soluble was demonstrated to be effective. The effect of molecular structure is demonstrated by spraying the sterically hindered Zn(II) 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-mesityl-13(1)-oxophorbine (2), which is an analogue of 1, under similar conditions. The results illustrate a valuable and facile aerosol-based method for the formation of films of supramolecular assemblies.

  7. From Cooperative Self-Assembly to Water-Soluble Supramolecular Polymers Using Coarse-Grained Simulations.

    PubMed

    Bochicchio, Davide; Pavan, Giovanni M

    2017-01-24

    Supramolecular polymers, formed via noncovalent self-assembly of elementary monomers, are extremely interesting for their dynamic bioinspired properties. In order to understand their behavior, it is necessary to access their dynamics while maintaining high resolution in the treatment of the monomer structure and monomer-monomer interactions, which is typically a difficult task, especially in aqueous solution. Focusing on 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamide (BTA) water-soluble supramolecular polymers, we have developed a transferable coarse-grained model that allows studying BTA supramolecular polymerization in water, while preserving remarkable consistency with the atomistic models in the description of the key interactions between the monomers (hydrophobic, H-bonding, etc.), self-assembly cooperativity, and amplification of order into the growing fibers. This permitted us to monitor the amplification of the key interactions between the monomers (including H-bonding) in the BTA fibers during the dynamic polymerization process. Our molecular dynamics simulations provide a picture of a stepwise cooperative polymerization mechanism, where initial fast hydrophobic aggregation of the BTA monomers in water is followed by the slower reorganization of these disordered aggregates into ordered directional oligomers. Supramolecular polymer growth then proceeds on a slower time scale. We challenged our models via comparison with the experimental evidence, capturing the effect of temperature variations and subtle changes in the monomer structure on the polymerization and on the properties of the fibers seen in the real systems. This work provides a multiscale spatiotemporal characterization of BTA self-assembly in water and a useful platform to study a variety of BTA-based supramolecular polymers toward structure-property relationships.

  8. Simulation of macromolecule self-assembly in solution: A multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavino, Alessio D.; di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Carbone, Paola; Barresi, Antonello A.; Marchisio, Daniele L.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most common processes to produce polymer nanoparticles is to induce self-assembly by using the solvent-displacement method, in which the polymer is dissolved in a "good" solvent and the solution is then mixed with an "anti-solvent". The polymer ability to self-assemble in solution is therefore determined by its structural and transport properties in solutions of the pure solvents and at the intermediate compositions. In this work, we focus on poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) which is a biocompatible polymer that finds widespread application in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields, performing simulation at three different scales using three different computational tools: full atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), population balance modeling (PBM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Simulations consider PCL chains of different molecular weight in solution of pure acetone (good solvent), of pure water (anti-solvent) and their mixtures, and mixing at different rates and initial concentrations in a confined impinging jets mixer (CIJM). Our MD simulations reveal that the nano-structuring of one of the solvents in the mixture leads to an unexpected identical polymer structure irrespectively of the concentration of the two solvents. In particular, although in pure solvents the behavior of the polymer is, as expected, very different, at intermediate compositions, the PCL chain shows properties very similar to those found in pure acetone as a result of the clustering of the acetone molecules in the vicinity of the polymer chain. We derive an analytical expression to predict the polymer structural properties in solution at different solvent compositions and use it to formulate an aggregation kernel to describe the self-assembly in the CIJM via PBM and CFD. Simulations are eventually validated against experiments.

  9. Simulation of macromolecule self-assembly in solution: A multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lavino, Alessio D. Barresi, Antonello A. Marchisio, Daniele L.; Pasquale, Nicodemo di; Carbone, Paola

    2015-12-17

    One of the most common processes to produce polymer nanoparticles is to induce self-assembly by using the solvent-displacement method, in which the polymer is dissolved in a “good” solvent and the solution is then mixed with an “anti-solvent”. The polymer ability to self-assemble in solution is therefore determined by its structural and transport properties in solutions of the pure solvents and at the intermediate compositions. In this work, we focus on poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) which is a biocompatible polymer that finds widespread application in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields, performing simulation at three different scales using three different computational tools: full atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), population balance modeling (PBM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Simulations consider PCL chains of different molecular weight in solution of pure acetone (good solvent), of pure water (anti-solvent) and their mixtures, and mixing at different rates and initial concentrations in a confined impinging jets mixer (CIJM). Our MD simulations reveal that the nano-structuring of one of the solvents in the mixture leads to an unexpected identical polymer structure irrespectively of the concentration of the two solvents. In particular, although in pure solvents the behavior of the polymer is, as expected, very different, at intermediate compositions, the PCL chain shows properties very similar to those found in pure acetone as a result of the clustering of the acetone molecules in the vicinity of the polymer chain. We derive an analytical expression to predict the polymer structural properties in solution at different solvent compositions and use it to formulate an aggregation kernel to describe the self-assembly in the CIJM via PBM and CFD. Simulations are eventually validated against experiments.

  10. Cellular membrane enrichment of self-assembling D-peptides for cell surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Wang, Youzhi; Han, Aitian; Cai, Yanbin; Xiao, Nannan; Wang, Ling; Ding, Dan; Yang, Zhimou

    2014-06-25

    We occasionally found that several self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids would be preferentially enriched in cellular membranes at self-assembled stages while distributed evenly in the cytoplasma of cells at unassembled stages. Self-assembling peptides containing only Lamino acids distributed evenly in cytoplasma of cells at both self-assembled and unassembled stages. The self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids could therefore be applied for engineering cell surface with peptides. More importantly, by integrating a protein binding peptide (a PDZ domain binding hexapeptide of WRESAI) with the self-assembling peptide containing D-amino acids, protein could also be introduced to the cell surface. This study not only provided a novel approach to engineer cell surface, but also highlighted the unusual properties and potential applications of self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids in regenerative medicine, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  11. Critical seeding density improves the properties and translatability of self-assembling anatomically shaped knee menisci.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Pasha; Yeh, Timothy C; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-01-01

    A recent development in the field of tissue engineering is the rise of all-biologic, scaffold-free engineered tissues. Since these biomaterials rely primarily upon cells, investigation of initial seeding densities constitutes a particularly relevant aim for tissue engineers. In this study, a scaffold-free method was used to create fibrocartilage in the shape of the rabbit knee meniscus. The objectives of this study were to: (i) determine the minimum seeding density, normalized by an area of 44 mm(2), necessary for the self-assembling process of fibrocartilage to occur; (ii) examine relevant biomechanical properties of engineered fibrocartilage, such as tensile and compressive stiffness and strength, and their relationship to seeding density; and (iii) identify a reduced, or optimal, number of cells needed to produce this biomaterial. It was found that a decreased initial seeding density, normalized by the area of the construct, produced superior mechanical and biochemical properties. Collagen per wet weight, glycosaminoglycans per wet weight, tensile properties and compressive properties were all significantly greater in the 5 million cells per construct group as compared to the historical 20 million cells per construct group. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that a lower seeding density results in a denser tissue. Additionally, the translational potential of the self-assembling process for tissue engineering was improved though this investigation, as fewer cells may be used in the future. The results of this study underscore the potential for critical seeding densities to be investigated when researching scaffold-free engineered tissues.

  12. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  13. Combustion and self-assembly of nanoenergetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malchi, Jonathan Yaniv

    The recent worldwide interest in nanotechnology spans a wide variety of scientific fields such as electronics, biology, materials science and medicine. Because of their extremely small dimensions, nanoparticles demonstrate properties different from matter at larger scales. Understanding these unusual properties and utilizing them for macroscale devices is an overall goal for nanotechnology. Moreover, manipulating these small particles into organized structures is crucial for taking full advantage of what nanotechnology has to offer, however it has proven to be a difficult task. Recent work utilizing electrostatic forces shows great potential for the self-assembly of nanoparticles into organized two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. Overall, this work examines how nanotechnology and self-assembly can benefit the field of energetic materials. Because of aluminum's high energy density and low cost, it has been used in the field of energetic materials for several decades. In order to achieve sufficient energy release rates, aluminum is typically manufactured as a powder having spherical particles with diameters on the micron scale. It is well-known that decreasing the original particle diameter of a fuel particle will increase the burning time and, thus, energy release rate. Therefore, aluminum particles have recently been made to have diameters on the nanoscale, and shown to be advantageous for several applications. The combustion of nanoaluminum (nAl) in various systems is the primary focus of this study. A progression of experiments is used to analyze the combustion of nAl: (1) a fully heterogeneous flame spread system, (2) a semi-homogeneous sonicated thermite system and (3) a quasi-homogeneous self-assembled thermite system. The flame spread experiment physically separates the nAl from the gaseous oxidizer allowing for a well-understood convective, diffusive, reactive system to be analyzed. Because of the simplicity of the experimental setup, variables

  14. Self-assembly based nanometer-scale patterning for nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramohan, Abhishek; Sibirev, Nikolai; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Mendis, Budhika; Petty, Mike C.; Gallant, Andrew J.; Zeze, Dagou A.

    2015-08-01

    Periodic nanostructure arrays have been ubiquitously exploited lately due to their properties and prospective applications in production of templates for self-induced and gold (Au)-catalysed nanowires (NWs), because this approach is relatively cheap, time-efficient and do not require electron beam lithography. The technique consists creating nanoholes in SiO2 to expose the silicon Si (111) beneath where self-induced NWs can nucleate, while nanodots deposited onto the Si (111) surface serve as catalyst seeds. For Au-catalysed NWs, a monolayer of self-assembled polystyrene nanospheres (PNS 300nm) was created on a 2 inch Si wafer by spin coating and later etched for a short time before a very thin Au-catalyst layer was deposited. In turn, for self-induced, PNS monolayer was created onto a SiO2-Si substrate. A longer etch was required to reduce PNS diameter significantly to leave relatively larger spacing where chromium is blanket deposited. PNS were lifted off by sonicating the samples in toluene produce the periodic arrays of nanodots and nanoholes, respectively. The underlying SiO2 was etched further through the nanoholes to uncover the Si below. 200 nm holes and 30-70 nm dots were demonstrated through the bespoke methods. The patterned substrates served as master templates, subsequently copied using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to produce a flexible stamp for nanoimprint lithography. A bilayer resist lift off process was developed to print the replicated nanodots or nanoholes on large-area substrates onto which III-V NWs can be grown.

  15. Self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in organic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shih-Huang

    2007-12-01

    Amphiphilic molecules are well-known for their ability to self-assemble in water to form structures such as micelles and vesicles. In comparison, much less is known about amphiphilic self-assembly in nonpolar organic liquids. Such "reverse" self assembly can produce many of the counterparts to structures found in water. In this dissertation, we focus on the formation and dynamics of such reverse structures. We seek to obtain fundamental insight into the driving forces for reverse self-assembly processes. Three specific types of reverse structures are studied: (a) reverse wormlike micelles, i.e., long, flexible micellar chains; (b) reverse vesicles, i.e., hollow containers enclosed by reverse bilayers; and (c) organogel networks. While our focus is on the fundamentals, we note that reverse structures can be useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery, controlled release, hosts for enzymatic reactions, and templates for nanomaterials synthesis. In the first part of this study, we describe a new route for forming reverse wormlike micelles in nonpolar organic liquids. This route involves the addition of trace amounts of a bile salt to solutions of the phospholipid, lecithin. We show that bile salts, due to their unique "facially amphiphilic" structure, can promote the aggregation of lecithin molecules into these reverse micellar chains. The resulting samples are viscoelastic and show interesting rheological properties. Unusual trends are seen in the temperature dependence of their rheology, which indicates the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the formation of these micelles. Another remarkable feature of their rheology is the presence of strain-stiffening, where the material becomes stiffer at high deformations. Strain-stiffening has been seen before for elastic gels of biopolymers; here, we demonstrate the same properties for viscoelastic micellar solutions. The second reverse aggregate we deal with is the reverse vesicle. We present a

  16. Anisotropic Self-Assembly of Hairy Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chenglin; Zhang, Shaoyi; Webb, Kyle Thomas; Nie, Zhihong

    2017-01-17

    Current interest in functional assemblies of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) stems from their collective properties and diverse applications ranging from nanomedicines to optically active metamaterials. Coating the surface of NPs with polymers allows for tailoring of the interactions between NPs to assemble them into hybrid nanocomposites with targeted architectures. This class of building blocks is termed "hairy" inorganic NPs (HINPs). Regiospecific attachment of polymers has been used to achieve directional interactions for HINP assembly. However, to date anisotropic surface functionalization of NPs still remains a challenge. This Account provides a review of the recent progress in the self-assembly of isotropically functionalized HINPs in both the condensed state and aqueous solution as well as the applications of assembled structures in such areas as biomedical imaging and therapy. It aims to provide fundamental mechanistic insights into the correlation between structural characteristics and self-assembly behaviors of HINPs, with an emphasis on HINPs made from NPs grafted with linear block copolymer (BCP) brushes. The key to the anisotropic self-assembly of these HINPs is the generation of directional interactions between HINPs by designing the surrounding medium (e.g., polymer matrix) or engineering the surface chemistry of the HINPs. First, HINPs can self-assemble into a variety of 1D, 2D, or 3D nanostructures with a nonisotropic local arrangement of NPs in films. Although a template is not always required, a polymer matrix (BCPs or supramolecules) can be used to assist the assembly of HINPs to form hybrid architectures. The interactions between brushes of neighboring HINPs or between HINPs and the polymer matrix can be modulated by varying the grafting density and length of one or multiple types of polymers on the surface of the NPs. Second, the rational design of deformable brushes of BCP or mixed homopolymer tethers on HINPs enables the anisotropic assembly

  17. Self-Assembled Materials Made from Functional Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yeongseon; Champion, Julie A

    2016-10-18

    Proteins are potent molecules that can be used as therapeutics, sensors, and biocatalysts with many advantages over small-molecule counterparts due to the specificity of their activity based on their amino acid sequence and folded three-dimensional structure. However, they also have significant limitations in their stability, localization, and recovery when used in soluble form. These opportunities and challenges have motivated the creation of materials from such functional proteins in order to protect and present them in a way that enhances their function. We have designed functional recombinant fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into materials with unique structures that maintain or improve the functionality of the protein. Fusion of either a functional protein or an assembly domain to a leucine zipper domain makes the materials design strategy modular, based on the high affinity between leucine zippers. The self-assembly domains, including elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) and defined-sequence random coil polypeptides, can be fused with a leucine zipper motif in order to promote assembly of the fusion proteins into larger structures upon specific stimuli such as temperature and ionic strength. Fusion of other functional domains with the counterpart leucine zipper motif endows the self-assembled materials with protein-specific functions such as fluorescence or catalytic activity. In this Account, we describe several examples of materials assembled from functional fusion proteins as well as the structural characterization, functionality, and understanding of the assembly mechanism. The first example is zipper fusion proteins containing ELPs that assemble into particles when introduced to a model extracellular matrix and subsequently disassemble over time to release the functional protein for drug delivery applications. Under different conditions, the same fusion proteins can self-assemble into hollow vesicles. The vesicles display a functional protein on

  18. Platelets self-assemble into porous nacre during freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-03-01

    Nacre possesses a remarkable combination of mechanical properties. Its high stiffness, strength and toughness are attributed to a highly aligned structure of aragonite platelets "glued" together by a small fraction (∼5vol%) of polymer; theoretically it can be described by a shear-lag model of staggered tensile elements between which loads are transferred via shear. Despite extensive research, it has not been possible yet to manufacture this aligned structure as a bulk material of considerable volume with a fast and easy production process. Particularly porous materials would benefit from enhanced wall material properties to compensate for performance loss due to their high porosity. An important application for such porous materials are tissue scaffolds for bone substitution. Bone, like nacre, exhibits excellent mechanical properties, particularly an exceptionally high toughness, because of its composite structure of hydroxyapatite platelets aligned in a ∼35vol% polymer matrix. Through the freeze casting process, which results in a fast and straightforward self-assembly of platelet-shaped particles during directional solidification, highly porous bulk materials with nacre-like cell walls can now be created. This porous nacre outperforms by a factor of 1.5-4 in terms of stiffness, strength and toughness materials that have the same amount of porosity but do not exhibit the nacre-like microarchitecture. The self-assembly process presented in this study thus has tremendous potential for the creation of highly porous, yet mechanically strong tissue scaffolds for low or medium load bearing bone substitute materials. Due to the versatility of the freeze casting process, materials with a self-assembled cell wall structure can be created from high-aspect ratio particles of all material classes. This enables material optimization for a great variety of applications such as impact protection, filtration, catalysis, energy generation and storage, in addition to those with

  19. Biomimetic synthetic self-assembled hydrogels for cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barros, Daniela; Amaral, Isabel Freitas; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    The development of three-dimensional matrices capable of recapitulating the main features of native extracellular matrix and contribute for the establishment of a favorable microenvironment for cell behavior and fate is expected to circumvent some of the main limitations of cell-based therapies. In this context, self-assembly has emerged as a promising strategy to engineer cell-compatible hydrogels. A wide number of synthetically-derived biopolymers, such as proteins, peptides and DNA/RNA, with intrinsic ability to self-assemble into well-defined nanofibrous structures, are being explored. The resulting hydrogels, in addition to closely resembling the architecture of native cellular microenvironments, present a versatile and dynamic behavior that allows them to be designed to undergo sol-to-gel transition in response to exogenous stimulus. This review presents an overview on the state-of-the-art of the different strategies being explored for the development of injectable synthetic self-assembled hydrogels for cell transplantation and/or recruitment of endogenous cells, with an emphasis on their biological performance, both in vitro and in vivo. Systems based on peptides are the most widely explored and have already generated promising results in pre-clinical in vivo studies involving different repair/regenerative scenarios, including cartilage, bone, nerve and heart. On the other hand, systems based on DNA and hybrid hydrogels are now emerging for application in the biomedical field with high potential. Finally, the main challenges hampering the translation of these systems to the clinic and the issues that need to be addressed for these to progress from bench-to-bedside are discussed.

  20. Self-assembling behavior of glycerol monoundecenoate in water.

    PubMed

    Nyame Mendendy Boussambe, Gildas; Valentin, Romain; Fabre, Jean-François; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric; Gaillard, Cedric; Mouloungui, Zephirin

    2017-03-14

    Self-assembling properties of glycerol esters in water are well known. Still, few data on glyc-erol monoesters of undecylenic acid are available. The aim of this study was to highlight the behavior of the glycerol monoundecenoate (GM-C11:1) in different, diluted and concentrated states. Self-assembling properties in water and upon solid inorganic surfaces were investigated in diluted state with surface tension experiments, AFM and Cryo-TEM studies. In concen-trated state, the gelling properties in presence of water were investigated by polarized light microscopy, DSC and SAXS experiments. GM-C11:1 at 100 mg/L self-assembles at the liq-uid/air interfaces as aggregates of about 20 nm in diameter, organized into concentric forms. These aggregates were spherical globules composed of several molecules of GM-C11:1. At higher concentrations (1000 mg/L and 104 mg/L), GM-C11:1 was able to coat uniformly liq-uid/air and liquid/solid interfaces. In bulk GM-C11:1 form spontaneously aggregates and ves-icles. In more concentrated state, GM-C11:1 assembles into lamellar Lβ and Lα form in water. By cross-referencing SAXS and DSC findings, we were able to distinguish between interla-mellar water molecules strongly bound to GM-C11:1 and other molecules remaining unbound and considered as "mobile" water. The percentage of water strongly bound was proportional to the percentage of GM-C11:1 in the system. In this case, GM-C11:1 appears to be an effec-tive molecule for surface treatments for which water retention is important.

  1. Particle self-assembly at ionic liquid-based interfaces.

    PubMed

    Frost, Denzil S; Nofen, Elizabeth M; Dai, Lenore L

    2014-04-01

    This review presents an overview of the nature of ionic liquid (IL)-based interfaces and self-assembled particle morphologies of IL-in-water, oil- and water-in-IL, and novel IL-in-IL Pickering emulsions with emphasis on their unique phenomena, by means of experimental and computational studies. In IL-in-water Pickering emulsions, particles formed monolayers at ionic liquid-water interfaces and were close-packed on fully covered emulsion droplets or aggregated on partially covered droplets. Interestingly, other than equilibrating at the ionic liquid-water interfaces, microparticles with certain surface chemistries were extracted into the ionic liquid phase with a high efficiency. These experimental findings were supported by potential of mean force calculations, which showed large energy drops as hydrophobic particles crossed the interface into the IL phase. In the oil- and water-in-IL Pickering emulsions, microparticles with acidic surface chemistries formed monolayer bridges between the internal phase droplets rather than residing at the oil/water-ionic liquid interfaces, a significant deviation from traditional Pickering emulsion morphology. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed aspects of the mechanism behind this bridging phenomenon, including the role of the droplet phase, surface chemistry, and inter-particle film. Novel IL-in-IL Pickering emulsions exhibited an array of self-assembled morphologies including the previously observed particle absorption and bridging phenomena. The appearance of these morphologies depended on the particle surface chemistry as well as the ILs used. The incorporation of particle self-assembly with ionic liquid science allows for new applications at the intersection of these two fields, and have the potential to be numerous due to the tunability of the ionic liquids and particles incorporated, as well as the particle morphology by combining certain groups of particle surface chemistry, IL type (protic or aprotic), and whether oil

  2. Self-assembly of amorphous biophotonic nanostructures by phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric R.; Noh, Heeso; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Cao, Hui; Prum, Richard O.

    2009-04-23

    Some of the most vivid colors in the animal kingdom are created not by pigments, but by wavelength-selective scattering of light from nanostructures. Here we investigate quasi-ordered nanostructures of avian feather barbs which produce vivid non-iridescent colors. These {beta}-keratin and air nanostructures are found in two basic morphologies: tortuous channels and amorphous packings of spheres. Each class of nanostructure is isotropic and has a pronounced characteristic length scale of variation in composition. These local structural correlations lead to strong backscattering over a narrow range of optical frequencies and little variation with angle of incidence. Such optical properties play important roles in social and sexual communication. To be effective, birds need to precisely control the development of these nanoscale structures, yet little is known about how they grow. We hypothesize that multiple lineages of birds have convergently evolved to exploit phase separation and kinetic arrest to self-assemble spongy color-producing nanostructures in feather barbs. Observed avian nanostructures are strikingly similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of fluid mixtures; the channel and sphere morphologies are characteristic of phase separation by spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth, respectively. These unstable structures are locked-in by the kinetic arrest of the {beta}-keratin matrix, likely through the entanglement or cross-linking of supermolecular {beta}-keratin fibers. Using the power of self-assembly, birds can robustly realize a diverse range of nanoscopic morphologies with relatively small physical and chemical changes during feather development.

  3. Electrochemically controlled self-assembly of block copolymer nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitouni, Hany Basam

    Organometallic block copolymers, wherein one block is composed of alternating ferrocene and dialkylsilane units in the main chain, undergo self-assembly to form microphase-separated ordered structures similarly to typical organic block copolymers. The 1,1'-dimethylsilylferrocenophane monomer was synthesized and polymerized anionically with other monomers to make a variety of different organometallic block copolymers. The phase behavior and thermodynamic interactions of anionically synthesized poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (SF) and poly(isoprene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (IF) copolymers were examined using depolarized light scattering, small angle x-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS), and transmission electron microscopy. The temperature-dependence of the Flory-Huggins parameter, chi, and the statistical segment lengths of SF and IF copolymers were determined by SAXS and SANS using the random phase approximation. The thermodynamic interactions in poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) diblock copolymers were systematically adjusted by oxidizing the ferrocene moieties with silver salts and examined using SAXS and depolarized light scattering. The polymers retained microphase separated ordered structures upon oxidation and showed systematic changes in the location of the order-disorder transition as a function of extent of oxidation. By controlling the redox properties of the ferrocene moiety in the backbone of the polymer, we present a method for controlling the self-assembled microstructure and hence bulk material properties. Using electrochemical techniques, a novel means of controlling the order-disorder transition of block copolymers was discovered. By applying very small electrical potentials to disordered solutions of organometallic block copolymers, oriented ordered grains were formed near one electrode, the result of electrochemical reactions. After reversing the electrical bias on the system, the ordered grains disappeared and new

  4. Bottlebrush Polymers: Synthesis, Rheology, and Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalsin, Samuel J.

    Bottlebrush polymers are comb-like molecules with a high density of side chains grafted along a central backbone. Due to their unique conformational properties, bottlebrush polymers have become attractive candidates for developing new photonic bandgap materials, nanotubes and nanowires, or drug delivery vehicles, to name a few. This dissertation primarily investigates the rheological properties and self-assembly behavior of bottlebrush polymer molecules made using a variety of different polymerization routes. A considerable portion of the work is directed towards the linear rheology of model, polyolefin-based bottlebrush polymers with independently varied branch and backbone lengths. These studies demonstrate how the tight spacing between branch points effectively precludes backbone entanglement in the polymer melts, but it does not inhibit the formation of entanglements among the branched side chains. Furthermore, the relaxation profiles reveal transient scaling behavior in which the dynamics transition from Zimm-like to Rouse-like at increasing relaxation times. These results highlight the distinct conformational character of bottlebrushes at different length scales. The latter parts of this work report on the self-assembly behavior of bottlebrush diblock polymers composed of atactic polypropylene and polystyrene side chains. The diblock samples are analyzed using small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy. Nearly all of the samples display strong segregation between the two blocks, owing to the large molar mass of typical bottlebrush polymers. Consequently, only one experimental sample displays an accessible order-disorder transition temperature. The strong segregation is also shown to affect the ability of large bottlebrush diblocks to readily achieve well-ordered nanostructures by self-assembly. Finally, results of the most symmetric (by volume fraction) diblock samples are compared with predictions of a newly developed self-consistent field

  5. Molecular Design of Bioinspired Nanostructures for Biomedical Applications: Synthesis, Self-Assembly and Functional Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hesheng Victor; Zheng, Xin Ting; Mok, Beverly Yin Leng; Ibrahim, Salwa Ali; Yu, Yong; Tan, Yen Nee

    2016-08-01

    Biomolecules are the nanoscale building blocks of cells, which play multifaceted roles in the critical biological processes such as biomineralization in a living organism. In these processes, the biological molecules such as protein and nucleic acids use their exclusive biorecognition properties enabled from their unique chemical composition, shape and function to initiate a cascade of cellular events. The exceptional features of these biomolecules, coupled with the recent advancement in nanotechnology, have led to the emergence of a new research field that focuses on the molecular design of bioinspired nanostructures that inherit the extraordinary function of natural biomaterials. These “bioinspired” nanostructures could be formulated by biomimetic approaches through either self-assembling of biomolecules or acting as a biomolecular template/precursor to direct the synthesis of nanocomposite. In either situation, the resulting nanomaterials exhibit phenomenal biocompatibility, superb aqueous solubility and excellent colloidal stability, branding them exceptionally desirable for both in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications. In this review, we will present the recent developments in the preparation of “bioinspired” nanostructures through biomimetic self-assembly and biotemplating synthesis, as well as highlight their functional properties and potential applications in biomedical diagnostics and therapeutic delivery. Lastly, we will conclude this topic with some personal perspective on the challenges and future outlooks of the “bioinspired” nanostructures for nanomedicine.

  6. Evolving self-assembly in autonomous homogeneous robots: experiments with two physical robots.

    PubMed

    Ampatzis, Christos; Tuci, Elio; Trianni, Vito; Christensen, Anders Lyhne; Dorigo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    This research work illustrates an approach to the design of controllers for self-assembling robots in which the self-assembly is initiated and regulated by perceptual cues that are brought forth by the physical robots through their dynamical interactions. More specifically, we present a homogeneous control system that can achieve assembly between two modules (two fully autonomous robots) of a mobile self-reconfigurable system without a priori introduced behavioral or morphological heterogeneities. The controllers are dynamic neural networks evolved in simulation that directly control all the actuators of the two robots. The neurocontrollers cause the dynamic specialization of the robots by allocating roles between them based solely on their interaction. We show that the best evolved controller proves to be successful when tested on a real hardware platform, the swarm-bot. The performance achieved is similar to the one achieved by existing modular or behavior-based approaches, also due to the effect of an emergent recovery mechanism that was neither explicitly rewarded by the fitness function, nor observed during the evolutionary simulation. Our results suggest that direct access to the orientations or intentions of the other agents is not a necessary condition for robot coordination: Our robots coordinate without direct or explicit communication, contrary to what is assumed by most research works in collective robotics. This work also contributes to strengthening the evidence that evolutionary robotics is a design methodology that can tackle real-world tasks demanding fine sensory-motor coordination.

  7. Self-assembling SAS-6 multimer is a core centriole building block.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Jayachandran; Guichard, Paul; Smith, Andrew H; Schwarz, Heinz; Agard, David A; Marco, Sergio; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2010-03-19

    Centrioles are conserved microtubule-based organelles with 9-fold symmetry that are essential for cilia and mitotic spindle formation. A conserved structure at the onset of centriole assembly is a "cartwheel" with 9-fold radial symmetry and a central tubule in its core. It remains unclear how the cartwheel is formed. The conserved centriole protein, SAS-6, is a cartwheel component that functions early in centriole formation. Here, combining biochemistry and electron microscopy, we characterize SAS-6 and show that it self-assembles into stable tetramers, which serve as building blocks for the central tubule. These results suggest that SAS-6 self-assembly may be an initial step in the formation of the cartwheel that provides the 9-fold symmetry. Electron microscopy of centrosomes identified 25-nm central tubules with repeating subunits and show that SAS-6 concentrates at the core of the cartwheel. Recombinant and native SAS-6 self-oligomerizes into tetramers with approximately 6-nm subunits, and these tetramers are components of the centrosome, suggesting that tetramers are the building blocks of the central tubule. This is further supported by the observation that elevated levels of SAS-6 in Drosophila cells resulted in higher order structures resembling central tubule morphology. Finally, in the presence of embryonic extract, SAS-6 tetramers assembled into high density complexes, providing a starting point for the eventual in vitro reconstruction of centrioles.

  8. Two-dimensional self-assembly of amphiphilic porphyrins on a dynamically shrinking droplet surface.

    PubMed

    Numata, Munenori; Takigami, Yusuke; Hirose, Naoya; Sakai, Ryoichiro

    2014-03-14

    Developing a new field of molecular self-assembly in the sub-micrometer regime-with precision as high as that used to make discrete nano-sized molecular architectures through molecular design-is a major challenge for supramolecular chemistry. At present, however, there is no effective strategy for controlling the assembling molecules when their quantity is greater than one thousand. Herein, we propose a potential solution by exploiting a novel supramolecular system in conjunction with dynamically shrinking oil droplets, enabling more than a thousand component molecules to organize simultaneously into the form of sub-micrometer-scale ring structures. In our developed system, amphiphilic porphyrins, having potential two-dimensional assembling ability, were compartmentalized into droplets with narrow distributions and molecular numbers. These droplets were subsequently transformed into discrete ring-like structures during the process of solvent removal from the inner organic layer, i.e., shrinking the droplets. Unique self-assembled structures, which are not accessible through conventional supramolecular strategies, can be selectively created depending on the initial stage of the droplet.

  9. Localized dealloying corrosion mediated by self-assembled monolayers used as an inhibitor system.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B R; Bashir, A; Ankah, G N; Valtiner, M; Renner, F U

    2015-01-01

    The structure and chemistry of thiol or selenol self-assembled organic monolayers have been frequently addressed due to the unique opportunities in functionalization of materials. Such organic films can also act as effective inhibition layers to mitigate oxidation or corrosion. Cu-Au alloy substrates covered by self-assembled monolayers show a different dealloying mechanism compared to bare surfaces. The organic surface layer inhibits dealloying of noble metal alloys by a suppression of surface diffusion at lower potentials but at higher applied potentials dealloying proceeds in localized regions due to passivity breakdown. We present an in situ atomic force microscopy study of a patterned thiol layer applied on Cu-Au alloy surfaces and further explore approaches to change the local composition of the surface layers by exchange of molecules. The pattern for the in situ experiment has been applied by micro-contact printing. This allows the study of corrosion protection with its dependence on different molecule densities at different sites. Low-density thiol areas surrounding the high-density patterns are completely protected and initiation of dealloying proceeds only along the areas with the lowest inhibitor concentration. Dealloying patterns are highly influenced and controlled by molecular thiol to selenol exchange and are also affected by introducing structural defects such as scratches or polishing defects.

  10. Cell Surface Self-Assembly of Hybrid Nanoconjugates via Oligonucleotide Hybridization Induces Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Te-Wei; Yang, Jiyuan; Zhang, Rui; Sima, Monika; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials composed of synthetic and biological building blocks possess high potential for the design of nanomedicines. The use of self-assembling nanomaterials as “bio-mimics” may trigger cellular events and result in new therapeutic effects. Motivated by this rationale, we designed a therapeutic platform that mimics the mechanism of immune effector cells to crosslink surface receptors of target cells and induce apoptosis. This platform was tested against B-cell lymphomas that highly express the surface antigen CD20. Here, two nanoconjugates were synthesized: (1) an anti-CD20 Fab’ fragment covalently linked to a single-stranded morpholino oligonucleotide (MORF1), and (2) a linear polymer of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) grafted with multiple copies of the complementary oligonucleotide MORF2. We show that the two conjugates self-assemble via MORF1-MORF2 hybridization at the surface of CD20+ malignant B-cells, which crosslinks CD20 antigens and initiates apoptosis. When tested in a murine model of human non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the two conjugates, either administered consecutively or as a premixture, eradicated cancer cells and produced long-term survivors. The designed therapeutics contains no small-molecule cytotoxic compounds and is immune-independent, aiming to improve over chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immunotherapy. This therapeutic platform can be applied to crosslink any non-internalizing receptor and potentially treat other diseases. PMID:24308267

  11. Two-Dimensional Layered Oxide Structures Tailored by Self-Assembled Layer Stacking via Interfacial Strain

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Mingtao; Chen, Aiping; ...

    2016-06-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures emerge as one of leading topics in fundamental materials science and could enable next generation nanoelectronic devices. Beyond graphene and molybdenum disulphide, layered complex oxides are another large group of promising 2D candidates because of their strong interplay of intrinsic charge, spin, orbital and lattice. As a fundamental basis of heteroepitaxial thin film growth, interfacial strain can be used to design materials exhibiting new phenomena beyond their conventional form. Here we report the strain-driven self-assembly of Bismuth-based supercells (SC) with a 2D layered structure, and elucidate the fundamental growth mechanism with combined experimental tools and first-principles calculations.more » The study revealed that the new layered structures were formed by the strain-enabled self-assembled atomic layer stacking, i.e., alternative growth of Bi2O2 layer and [Fe0.5Mn0.5]O6 layer. The strain-driven approach is further demonstrated in other SC candidate systems with promising room-temperature multiferroic properties. This well-integrated theoretical and experimental study inspired by the Materials Genome Initiatives opens up a new avenue in searching and designing novel 2D layered complex oxides with enormous promises.« less

  12. Two-Dimensional Layered Oxide Structures Tailored by Self-Assembled Layer Stacking via Interfacial Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Mingtao; Chen, Aiping; Li, Leigang; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Xia, Zhenhai; Lu, Ping; Boullay, Philippe; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi; Zhou, Honghui; Narayan, Jagdish; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-06-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures emerge as one of leading topics in fundamental materials science and could enable next generation nanoelectronic devices. Beyond graphene and molybdenum disulphide, layered complex oxides are another large group of promising 2D candidates because of their strong interplay of intrinsic charge, spin, orbital and lattice. As a fundamental basis of heteroepitaxial thin film growth, interfacial strain can be used to design materials exhibiting new phenomena beyond their conventional form. Here we report the strain-driven self-assembly of Bismuth-based supercells (SC) with a 2D layered structure, and elucidate the fundamental growth mechanism with combined experimental tools and first-principles calculations. The study revealed that the new layered structures were formed by the strain-enabled self-assembled atomic layer stacking, i.e., alternative growth of Bi2O2 layer and [Fe0.5Mn0.5]O6 layer. The strain-driven approach is further demonstrated in other SC candidate systems with promising room-temperature multiferroic properties. This well-integrated theoretical and experimental study inspired by the Materials Genome Initiatives opens up a new avenue in searching and designing novel 2D layered complex oxides with enormous promises.

  13. All track directed self-assembly of block copolymers: process flow and origin of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Gronheid, Roel; Thode, Christopher J.; Wu, Hengpeng; Cao, Yi; Somervell, Mark; Nafus, Kathleen; Nealey, Paul F.

    2012-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) of block copolymers is considered to be a potential lithographic solution to achieve higher feature densities than can be obtained by current lithographic techniques. However, it is still not well-established how amenable DSA of block copolymers is to an industrial fabrication environment in terms of defectivity and processing conditions. Beyond production-related challenges, precise manipulation of the geometrical and chemical properties over the substrate is essential to achieve high pattern fidelity upon the self-assembly process. Using our chemo-epitaxy DSA approach offers control over the surface properties of the slightly preferential brush material as well as those of the guiding structures. This allows for a detailed assessment of the critical material parameters for defect reduction. The precise control of environment afforded by industrial equipment allows for the selective analysis of material and process related boundary conditions and assessment of their effect on defect generation. In this study, the previously reported implementation of our feature multiplication process was used to investigate the origin of defects in terms of the geometry of the initial pre-patterns. Additionally, programmed defects were used to investigate the ability of the BCP to heal defects in the resist patterns and will aid to assess the capture capability of the inspection tool. Finally, the set-up of the infrastructure that will allow the study the generation of defects due to the interaction of the BCP with the boundary conditions has been accomplished at imec.

  14. Directed Self-Assembly of Diblock Copolymer Thin Films on Prepatterned Metal Nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tongxin; Huang, Haiying; He, Tianbai

    2016-01-01

    The sequential layer by layer self-assembly of block copolymer (BCP) nanopatterns is an effective approach to construct 3D nanostructures. Here large-scale highly ordered metal nano-arrays prepared from solvent annealed thin films of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) diblock copolymer are used to direct the assembly of the same BCP. The influence of initial loading concentration of metal precursor, the type of metal nanoparticle (gold, platinum, and silver), and the nanoparticle-substrate interaction on the directed assembly behavior of the upper BCP layer have been focused. It is found that the upper BCP film can be completely directed by the gold nanoarray with P2VP domain exclusively located between two adjacent gold nanowires or nanodots, which behaves the same way as on the platinum nanoarray. While the silver nanoarray can be destroyed during the upper BCP self-assembly with the silver nanoparticles assembled into the P2VP domain. Based on the discussions of the surface energy of nanoparticles and the interplay between nanoparticle-substrate interaction and nanoparticle-polymer interaction, it is concluded that the effect of immobilization of nanoparticles on the substrate, together with entropy effect to minimize the energetically unfavorable chain stretching contributes to the most effective alignment between each layer.

  15. Understanding recognition and self-assembly in biology using the chemist's toolbox. Insight into medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Quirolo, Z B; Benedini, L A; Sequeira, M A; Herrera, M G; Veuthey, T V; Dodero, V I

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal chemistry is intimately connected with basic science such as organic synthesis, chemical biology and biophysical chemistry among other disciplines. The reason of such connections is due to the power of organic synthesis to provide designed molecules; chemical biology to give tools to discover biological and/or pathological pathways and biophysical chemistry which provides the techniques to characterize and the theoretical background to understand molecular behaviour. The present review provides some selective examples of these research areas. Initially, template dsDNA organic synthesis and the spatio-temporal control of transcription are presenting following by the supramolecular entities used in drug delivery, such as liposomes and liquid crystal among others. Finally, peptides and protein self-assembly is connected with biomaterials and as an important event in the balance between health and disease. The final aim of the present review is to show the power of chemical tools not only for the synthesis of new molecules but also to improve our understanding of recognition and self-assembly in the biological context.

  16. Rapid Self-Assembly of Uranyl Polyhedra into Crown Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-22

    Clusters built from 32 uranyl peroxide polyhedra self-assemble and crystallize within 15 min after combining uranyl nitrate, ammonium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. These novel crown-shaped clusters are remarkable in that they form so quickly, have extraordinarily low aqueous solubility, form with at least two distinct peroxide to hydroxyl ratios, and form in very high yield. The clusters, which have outer diameters of 23 Å, topologically consist of eight pentagons and four hexagons. Their rapid formation and low solubility in aqueous systems may be useful properties at various stages in an advanced nuclear energy system.

  17. Out of the cleanroom, self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Gao, Yang; Wyss, Hans; Anderson, Patrick; den Toonder, Jaap

    2013-09-07

    Micro-sized hair-like structures, such as cilia, are abundant in nature and have various functionalities. Many efforts have been made to mimic the fluid pumping function of cilia, but most of the fabrication processes for these "artificial cilia" are tedious and expensive, hindering their practical application. In this paper a cost-effective in situ fabrication technique for artificial cilia is demonstrated. The cilia are constructed by self-assembly of micron sized magnetic beads and encapsulated with soft polymer coatings. Actuation of the cilia induces an effective fluid flow, and the cilia lengths and distribution can be adjusted by varying the magnetic bead concentration and fabrication parameters.

  18. Rapid self-assembly of block copolymers to photonic crystals

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Yan; Sveinbjornsson, Benjamin R; Grubbs, Robert H; Weitekamp, Raymond; Miyake, Garret M; Atwater, Harry A; Piunova, Victoria; Daeffler, Christopher Scot; Hong, Sung Woo; Gu, Weiyin; Russell, Thomas P.

    2016-07-05

    The invention provides a class of copolymers having useful properties, including brush block copolymers, wedge-type block copolymers and hybrid wedge and polymer block copolymers. In an embodiment, for example, block copolymers of the invention incorporate chemically different blocks comprising polymer size chain groups and/or wedge groups that significantly inhibit chain entanglement, thereby enhancing molecular self-assembly processes for generating a range of supramolecular structures, such as periodic nanostructures and microstructures. The present invention also provides useful methods of making and using copolymers, including block copolymers.

  19. Electronic instabilities in self-assembled atom wires

    SciTech Connect

    Snijders, Paul C; Weitering, Harm H

    2010-01-01

    Low dimensional systems have fascinated physicists for a long time due to their unusual properties such as charge fractionalization, semionic statistics, and Luttinger liquid behavior among others. In nature, however, low dimensional systems often suffer from thermal fluctuations that can make these systems structurally unstable. Human beings, however, can trick nature by producing artificial structures which are not naturally produced. This Colloquium reviews the problem of self-assembled atomic wires on solid surfaces from an experimental and theoretical point of view. These materials represent a class of one-dimensional systems with very unusual properties that can open doors to the study of exotic physics that cannot be studied otherwise.

  20. Passivation effects in B doped self-assembled Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Puthen Veettil, B. Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Lin, Ziyun; Zhang, Tian; Yang, Terry; Johnson, Craig; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Würfl, Ivan; McCamey, Dane

    2014-12-01

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals has enabled their widespread technological application in optoelectronics and micro/nano-electronics. In this work, boron-doped self-assembled silicon nanocrystal samples have been grown and characterised using Electron Spin Resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The passivation effects of boron on the interface dangling bonds have been investigated. Addition of boron dopants is found to compensate the active dangling bonds at the interface, and this is confirmed by an increase in photoluminescence intensity. Further addition of dopants is found to reduce the photoluminescence intensity by decreasing the minority carrier lifetime as a result of the increased number of non-radiative processes.

  1. Energy levels in self-assembled quantum arbitrarily shaped dots.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2005-02-08

    A model to determine the electronic structure of self-assembled quantum arbitrarily shaped dots is applied. This model is based principally on constant effective mass and constant potentials of the barrier and quantum dot material. An analysis of the different parameters of this model is done and compared with those which take into account the variation of confining potentials, bands, and effective masses due to strain. The results are compared with several spectra reported in literature. By considering the symmetry, the computational cost is reduced with respect to other methods in literature. In addition, this model is not limited by the geometry of the quantum dot.

  2. Buckling Instability of Self-Assembled Colloidal Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James W.; Vasquez, Paula A.; Furst, Eric M.

    2014-09-01

    Suspended, slender self-assembled domains of magnetically responsive colloids are observed to buckle in microgravity. Upon cessation of the magnetic field that drives their assembly, these columns expand axially and buckle laterally. This phenomenon resembles the buckling of long beams due to thermal expansion; however, linear stability analysis predicts that the colloidal columns are inherently susceptible to buckling because they are freely suspended in a Newtonian fluid. The dominant buckling wavelength increases linearly with column thickness and is quantitatively described using an elastohydrodynamic model and the suspension thermodynamic equation of state.

  3. Self-assembling peptide amphiphile nanostructures for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukasene, Stephen

    The application of nanotechnology to cancer therapy shows great promise for reducing the burden of the disease. By virtue of their size, nanoscale objects preferentially accumulate in tumor tissue through an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, to fully overcome the issues that limit current cancer treatments, viable nanostructures must also impart multifunctionality and be fully compatible with their biological surrounds. The self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) materials studied extensively in the Stupp Research Group form very biocompatible high aspect ratio nanostructures that meet these criteria. This thesis investigates the development of PA nanostructures designed to treat cancer. We first look to use the PA as a drug delivery vehicle by entrapping a small hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, camptothecin, in the core of the nanostructures. Using a solvent evaporation technique to load the drug into the PA nanofibers, we are able to improve the aqueous solubility of the molecule by nearly 30-fold. TEM and AFM studies show that entrapment of drug molecules does not disrupt the self-assembled morphology of the nanofiber. In vitro and in vivo studies are also conducted to demonstrate the bioactivity of the drug after its entrapment. As a potential platform for novel therapeutics, we next develop techniques for using light irradiation to trigger self-assembly inside the confined space of liposomes. We encapsulate PA monomers that assemble under acidic conditions along with a photoacid generator inside liposomes. Upon exposure to 254 nm light, the PA monomers self assemble inside the liposome to form nanostructures, which we observe through a quick freeze/deep etch technique that allows us to look inside the liposomes by SEM and TEM. Last of all, the development and discovery of epitopes for targeting PA nanostructures to tumors are explored. Using phage display technology we generate two groups of peptide sequences, one of which can potentially

  4. Nitrogen Substituted Phenothiazine Derivatives: Modelling of Molecular Self-Assembling

    PubMed Central

    Bende, Attila; Turcu, Ioan

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to present a detailed theoretical investigation of noncovalent intermolecular interactions between different π–π stacking nitrogen substituted phenothiazine derivatives by applying second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2), density functional (DFT) and semiempirical theories. The conformational stability of these molecular systems is mainly given by the dispersion-type electron correlation effects. The density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method applied for dimer structures are compared with the results obtained by the higher level theoretical methods. Additionally, the optimal configuration of the investigated supramolecular systems and their self-assembling properties are discussed. PMID:21686172

  5. Purification of ethanol for highly sensitive self-assembly experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Kathrin; Kind, Martin; Pfeiffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ethanol is the preferred solvent for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolates on gold. By applying a thin film sensor system, we could demonstrate that even the best commercial qualities of ethanol contain surface-active contaminants, which can compete with the desired thiolates for surface sites. Here we present that gold nanoparticles deposited onto zeolite X can be used to remove these contaminants by chemisorption. This nanoparticle-impregnated zeolite does not only show high capacities for surface-active contaminants, such as thiols, but can be fully regenerated via a simple pyrolysis protocol. PMID:25161861

  6. Preface: Special Topic on Supramolecular Self-Assembly at Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Ludwig; Ernst, Karl-Heinz; Gao, Hong-Jun; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2015-03-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces is one of the most exciting and active fields in Surface Science today. Applications can take advantage of two key properties: (i) versatile pattern formation over a broad length scale and (ii) tunability of electronic structure and transport properties, as well as frontier orbital alignment. It provides a new frontier for Chemical Physics as it uniquely combines the versatility of Organic Synthesis and the Physics of Interfaces. The Journal of Chemical Physics is pleased to publish this Special Topic Issue, showcasing recent advances and new directions.

  7. Model for dynamic self-assembled magnetic surface structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Belkin, M.; Glatz, A.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-07

    We propose a first-principles model for the dynamic self-assembly of magnetic structures at a water-air interface reported in earlier experiments. The model is based on the Navier-Stokes equation for liquids in shallow water approximation coupled to Newton equations for interacting magnetic particles suspended at a water-air interface. The model reproduces most of the observed phenomenology, including spontaneous formation of magnetic snakelike structures, generation of large-scale vortex flows, complex ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic ordering of the snake, and self-propulsion of bead-snake hybrids.

  8. Guided Self-Assembly of Nano-Precipitates into Mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, Z.; Zhu, Y.M.; Wang, Y.; Nie, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    We show by a combination of computer simulation and experimental characterization guided self-assembly of coherent nano-precipitates into a mesocrystal having a honeycomb structure in bulk materials. The structure consists of different orientation variants of a product phase precipitated out of the parent phase by heterogeneous nucleation on a hexagonal dislocation network. The predicted honeycomb mesocrystal has been confirmed by experimental observations in an Mg-Y-Nd alloy. The structure and lattice parameters of the mesocrystal and the size of the nano-precipitates are readily tuneable, offering ample opportunities to tailor its properties for a wide range of technological applications. PMID:26559002

  9. Color and chirality: carotenoid self-assemblies in flower petals.

    PubMed

    Zsila, F; Deli, J; Simonyi, M

    2001-10-01

    As a novel phenomenon, optical activity--often very strong--has been detected by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in carotenoid-containing living flowers of several species belonging to different families. Using natural pure xanthophyll esters, very similar CD spectra were obtained in vitro, proving the ability of these molecules to form chiral self-assemblies. The relationship between the ultrastructure of the chromoplast, its chemical composition and the optical activity is discussed. The applicability of CD spectroscopy for studying intact plant tissue is emphasized.

  10. The art and science of self-assembling molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-López, Marcos; Preece, Jon A.; Fraser Stoddart, J.

    1996-09-01

    In this review, we show how noncovalent bonding interactions between 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich aromatic ring systems (e.g. hydroquinone) and the 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient tetracationic cyclophane, cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) can be used to self-assemble novel molecular architectures which are not only interesting to us, because of their fascinating topologies, but also because they have the potential to be developed into molecular structures with switchable properties on the nanometre scale. The high efficiency observed in the self-assembly of a [2]catenane, and its dynamic properties in solution, represent the first step in the design and self-assembly of other molecular assemblies better suited for the study of molecular switching processes. Therefore, a series of [2]rotaxanes, mechanically-interlocked molecular compounds, consisting of a linear 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich dumbbell-shaped component and the 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient tetracationic cyclophane as the cyclic component, have been self-assembled and evaluated. All of the so-called molecular shuttles show translational isomerism and one of them, comprising benzidine and biphenol recognition sites as the non-degenerate 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich sites, shows molecular switching properties when it is perturbed by external stimuli, such as electrons and protons. The versatility of our approach to nanoscale molecular switches is proven by the description of a series of molecular assemblies and supramolecular arrays, consisting of 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich and 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient components, which display molecular switching properties when they are influenced by external stimuli that are photochemical, electrochemical and/or chemical in nature. However, the molecular switching phenomena take place in the solution state. Therefore, finally we describe how simple molecular structures can be ordered on to a solid

  11. Self-assembled GaN hexagonal micropyramid and microdisk

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Ikai; Hsieh, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-C.; Pang, W.-Y.; Chou, M.-C.

    2009-02-09

    The self-assembled GaN hexagonal micropyramid and microdisk were grown on LiAlO{sub 2} by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. It was found that the (0001) disk was established with the capture of N atoms by most-outside Ga atoms as the (1x1) surface was constructing, while the pyramid was obtained due to the missing of most-outside N atoms. The intensity of cathode luminescence excited from the microdisk was one order of amplitude greater than that from M-plane GaN.

  12. Guided Self-Assembly of Nano-Precipitates into Mesocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, Z.; Zhu, Y. M.; Wang, Y.; Nie, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    We show by a combination of computer simulation and experimental characterization guided self-assembly of coherent nano-precipitates into a mesocrystal having a honeycomb structure in bulk materials. The structure consists of different orientation variants of a product phase precipitated out of the parent phase by heterogeneous nucleation on a hexagonal dislocation network. The predicted honeycomb mesocrystal has been confirmed by experimental observations in an Mg-Y-Nd alloy. The structure and lattice parameters of the mesocrystal and the size of the nano-precipitates are readily tuneable, offering ample opportunities to tailor its properties for a wide range of technological applications.

  13. Early-time, beta-hairpin peptide self-assembly and hydrogelation: Structure, kinetics, and shear-recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Tuna

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the supramolecular self-assembly and hydrogelation of peptides for potential biomaterials applications. However, there has been limited work on the physicochemical characterization of these systems that will be crucial for the development of these materials for future applications. The main objective of this dissertation was to provide a solid understanding of the self-assembly kinetics, hydrogelation pathways and the physical origins of the shear-recovery behavior of a self-assembled, peptidic hydrogel system. The MAX1 peptide, (VK)4-VDPPT-(KV)4-NH 2 is unfolded, and completely soluble in acidic to neutral aqueous solution. Increasing the pH or ionic strength of the solution triggers intramolecular peptide folding into beta-hairpins and concomitant intermolecular self-assembly into bilayered nanofibrils. Combined static and dynamic light scattering experiments revealed a direct transition from the initial, monomeric state to self-assembled nanofibrils, without an intermediate self-assembly step. The energy barrier associated with MAX1 self-assembly suggested that the self-assembly process involved intramolecular peptide folding events and cluster reorganization to facilitate intermolecular self-assembly. The assembly kinetics could be modeled using Smoluchowski's equation which indicated an essentially diffusion-limited assembly process. The analysis of early-stage dependence of apparent mass on size and the concentration dependence of assembly kinetics gave different fractal dimension values: The former indicated that the nanofibrils behaved locally as rigid rods, while the latter analysis suggested an increase in the apparent fractal dimension at larger length scales. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy indicated that the increase in the apparent fractal dimension could be attributed to the formation of branched clusters of well-defined (uniform, 3 nm cross section), semi-flexible, beta-sheet-rich nanofibrils

  14. Corrosion-Mediated Self-Assembly (CMSA): Direct Writing Towards Sculpturing of 3D Tunable Functional Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2015-12-21

    Inexpensive and readily available metal foils have been extracted and sculptured into nanocomposites without the expense of applied energy. The unwanted corrosion phenomenon has been contrarily utilized to realize desirable 3D nanostructures through a corrosion-mediated self-assembly (CMSA) method, which is unattainable by conventional 2D patterning routes. By virtue of electrochemical dissolution/re-deposition initiated by brass corrosion, ionic derivatives (Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) ) are continuously supplied and seized by etchant ions (PO4 (3-) ) to self-assemble into well-defined nanocomposites. Beyond 3D geometry patterning, CMSA enables arbitrarily tailoring of structures and chemical compositions with in situ multiphase amalgamation of hybrid materials, which improves homogeneity and thus mitigates phase separation issues. Importantly, the CMSA technique is demonstrated on transition metals for functional photocatalytic applications.

  15. Silver nanoprisms self-assembly on differently functionalized silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipavicius, J.; Chodosovskaja, A.; Beganskiene, A.; Kareiva, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this work colloidal silica/silver nanoprisms (NPRs) composite coatings were made. Firstly colloidal silica sols were synthesized by sol-gel method and produced coatings on glass by dip-coating technique. Next coatings were silanized by (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (AEAPTMS), (3- Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). Silver NPRs where synthesized via seed-mediated method and high yield of 94±15 nm average edge length silver NPRs were obtained with surface plasmon resonance peak at 921 nm. Silica-Silver NPRs composite coatings obtained by selfassembly on silica coated-functionalized surface. In order to find the most appropriate silanization way for Silver NPRs self-assembly, the composite coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), water contact angle (CA) and surface free energy (SFE) methods. Results have showed that surface functionalization is necessary to achieve self-assembled Ag NPRs layer. MPTMS silanized coatings resulted sparse distribution of Ag NPRs. Most homogeneous, even distribution composite coatings obtained on APTES functionalized silica coatings, while AEAPTMS induced strong aggregation of Silver NPRs.

  16. Functional self-assembled DNA nanostructures for molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Yadavalli, Vamsi K.

    2012-03-01

    Nucleic acids present a wonderful toolkit of structural motifs for nanoconstruction. Functional DNA nanostructures can enable protein recognition by the use of aptamers attached to a basic core shape formed by DNA self-assembly. Here, we present a facile, programmable strategy for the assembly of discrete aptamer-tagged DNA shapes and nanostructures that can function for molecular recognition and binding in an aqueous environment. These nanostructures, presented here to bind two different protein targets, are easily synthesized in large numbers, and are portable and stable over long periods of time. This construction modality can facilitate on-demand production of libraries of diverse shapes to recognize and bind proteins or catalyze reactions via functional nucleic acid tags.Nucleic acids present a wonderful toolkit of structural motifs for nanoconstruction. Functional DNA nanostructures can enable protein recognition by the use of aptamers attached to a basic core shape formed by DNA self-assembly. Here, we present a facile, programmable strategy for the assembly of discrete aptamer-tagged DNA shapes and nanostructures that can function for molecular recognition and binding in an aqueous environment. These nanostructures, presented here to bind two different protein targets, are easily synthesized in large numbers, and are portable and stable over long periods of time. This construction modality can facilitate on-demand production of libraries of diverse shapes to recognize and bind proteins or catalyze reactions via functional nucleic acid tags. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11711h

  17. Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, J. P.; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-08-01

    Using the Langevin dynamics method and a coarse-grained model, we have studied the formation of vesicles by hydrophobic polymers consisting of periodically placed zwitterion side groups in dilute salt-free aqueous solutions. The zwitterions, being permanent charge dipoles, provide long-range electrostatic correlations which are interfered by the conformational entropy of the polymer. Our simulations are geared towards gaining conceptual understanding in these correlated dipolar systems, where theoretical calculations are at present formidable. A competition between hydrophobic interactions and dipole-dipole interactions leads to a series of self-assembled structures. As the spacing d between the successive zwitterion side groups decreases, single chains undergo globule → disk → worm-like structures. We have calculated the Flory-Huggins χ parameter for these systems in terms of d and monitored the radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius, spatial correlations among hydrophobic and dipole monomers, and dipole-dipole orientational correlation functions. During the subsequent stages of self-assembly, these structures lead to larger globules and vesicles as d is decreased up to a threshold value, below which no large scale morphology forms. The vesicles form via a polynucleation mechanism whereby disk-like structures form first, followed by their subsequent merger.

  18. Synthesis and simultaneous self-assembly of novel antibacterial polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J. H.; Yin, F.; Jiang, G. C.

    2016-07-01

    Novel physically crosslinked polyurethane (PUII) based on isophorone diisocyanates (IPDI) was prepared by a conventional two step method. The chemical structures of the PUII were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The PUII hydrogels were subjected to solvent-induced self-assembly in THF + water to construct a variety of morphologies. The self-assembly morphology of the PUII was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Different amounts (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%, 1.0%) of 1,3,5-Tris(2-hydroxyethyl)hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (TNO) was added as antibacterial agent to the polyurethane prepolymers. The inhibiting capacity of the antibacterial films to the Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Gray mold has been studied. The inhibiting capacity of films for each strain effect became obvious with the increase of content of antibacterial agent and the sensitive degree to all kind of bacterial species was different.

  19. Free surface BCP self-assembly process characterization with CDSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Shimon; Weinberg, Yakov; Adan, Ofer; Klinov, Michael; Argoud, Maxime; Claveau, Guillaume; Tiron, Raluca

    2016-03-01

    A simple and common practice to evaluate Block copolymers (BCP) self-assembly performances, is on a free surface wafer. With no guiding pattern the BCP designed to form line space pattern for example, spontaneously rearranges to form a random fingerprint type of a pattern. The nature of the rearrangement is dictated by the physical properties of the BCP moieties, wafer surface treatment and the self-assembly process parameters. Traditional CDSEM metrology algorithms are designed to measure pattern with predefined structure, like linespace or oval via holes. Measurement of pattern with expected geometry can reduce measurement uncertainty. Fingerprint type of structure explored in this dissertation, poses a challenge for CD-SEM measurement uncertainty and offers an opportunity to explore 2D metrology capabilities. To measure this fingerprints we developed a new metrology approach that combines image segmentation and edge detection to measure 2D pattern with arbitrary rearrangement. The segmentation approach enabled to quantify the quality of the BCP material and process, detecting 2D attributes such as: CD and CDU at one axis, and number of intersections, length and number of PS fragments, etched PMMA spaces and donut shapes numbers on the second axis. In this paper we propose a 2D metrology to measure arbitrary BCP pattern on a free surface wafer. We demonstrate experimental results demonstrating precision data, and characterization of PS-b-PMMA BCP, intrinsic period L0 = 38nm (Arkema), processed at different bake time and temperatures.

  20. Self assembled monolayers on silicon for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Aswal, D K; Lenfant, S; Guerin, D; Yakhmi, J V; Vuillaume, D

    2006-05-24

    We present an overview of various aspects of the self-assembly of organic monolayers on silicon substrates for molecular electronics applications. Different chemical strategies employed for grafting the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanes having different chain lengths on native oxide of Si or on bare Si have been reviewed. The utility of different characterization techniques in determination of the thickness, molecular ordering and orientation, surface coverage, growth kinetics and chemical composition of the SAMs has been discussed by choosing appropriate examples. The metal counterelectrodes are an integral part of SAMs for measuring their electrical properties as well as using them for molecular electronic devices. A brief discussion on the variety of options available for the deposition of metal counterelectrodes, that is, soft metal contacts, vapor deposition and soft lithography, has been presented. Various theoretical models, namely, tunneling (direct and Fowler-Nordheim), thermionic emission, Poole-Frenkel emission and hopping conduction, used for explaining the electronic transport in dielectric SAMs have been outlined and, some experimental data on alkane SAMs have been analyzed using these models. It has been found that short alkyl chains show excellent agreement with tunneling models; while more experimental data on long alkyl chains are required to understand their transport mechanism(s). Finally, the concepts and realization of various molecular electronic components, that is, diodes, resonant tunnel diodes, memories and transistors, based on appropriate architecture of SAMs comprising of alkyl chains (sigma- molecule) and conjugated molecules (pi-molecule) have been presented.

  1. Conformational flexibility facilitates self-assembly of complex DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Su, Min; He, Yu; Zhao, Xin; Fang, Ping-an; Ribbe, Alexander E; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

    2008-08-05

    Molecular self-assembly is a promising approach to the preparation of nanostructures. DNA, in particular, shows great potential to be a superb molecular system. Synthetic DNA molecules have been programmed to assemble into a wide range of nanostructures. It is generally believed that rigidities of DNA nanomotifs (tiles) are essential for programmable self-assembly of well defined nanostructures. Recently, we have shown that adequate conformational flexibility could be exploited for assembling 3D objects, including tetrahedra, dodecahedra, and buckyballs, out of DNA three-point star motifs. In the current study, we have integrated tensegrity principle into this concept to assemble well defined, complex nanostructures in both 2D and 3D. A symmetric five-point-star motif (tile) has been designed to assemble into icosahedra or large nanocages depending on the concentration and flexibility of the DNA tiles. In both cases, the DNA tiles exhibit significant flexibilities and undergo substantial conformational changes, either symmetrically bending out of the plane or asymmetrically bending in the plane. In contrast to the complicated natures of the assembled structures, the approach presented here is simple and only requires three different component DNA strands. These results demonstrate that conformational flexibility could be explored to generate complex DNA nanostructures. The basic concept might be further extended to other biomacromolecular systems, such as RNA and proteins.

  2. Interplay of directional and isotropic interactions in self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra; Starr, Francis; Douglas, Jack

    Patchy particle models, composed of hard spheres with decorated with attractive patches, have been introduced as models of micron-sized particles with anisotropic interactions, as well as solutions of globular proteins. Here, we extend the canonical model of the patchy particles to include a short-ranged isotropic interaction in order to probe of the coupling of the directional and isotropic interactions on the self-assembly process. In particular, we evaluate basic properties characterizing self-assembly including average cluster mass and the fraction of particles in the clustered state using both Monte Carlo simulation and analytic Wertheim theory. This combination allows for validation of the theory and for insight into analyzing experimental data. We also find that Flory-Stockmayer theory describes the cluster size distribution data found in our simulations remarkably well, despite its erroneous mass-scaling exponent. This result, coupled with Wertheim theory, predicts both a master curve for the average cluster mass and a method to parameterize patchy particle models using experimental data.

  3. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Liu, Lucie X.; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  4. Using lateral capillary forces to compute by self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Rothemund, P W

    2000-02-01

    Investigations of DNA computing have highlighted a fundamental connection between self-assembly (SA) and computation: in principle, any computation can be performed by a suitable self-assembling system. In practice, exploration of this connection is limited by our ability to control the geometry and specificity of binding interactions. Recently, a system has been developed that uses surface tension to assemble plastic tiles according to shape complementarity and likeness of wetting [Bowden, N., Terfort, A., Carbeck, J. & Whitesides, G. M. (1997) Science 276, 233-235]. Here the capacity of this system to compute by SA is explored. Tiles were prepared to test the system's ability to generate three structures of increasing complexity: a periodic checkerboard tiling, an aperiodic Penrose tiling, and a computational tiling that simulates a one-dimensional cellular automaton. Matching rules for these tilings were enforced by coating tiles with patterns of hydrophobic and hydrophilic patches or wetting codes. Energetic, kinetic, and mechanistic details of SA explain differences between experimental structures and mathematically ideal ones. In particular, the growth mechanism observed appears incompatible with computations that make use of a chosen input.

  5. Self-assembled Nano-layering at the Adhesive interface.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Yoshihara, K; Nagaoka, N; Hayakawa, S; Torii, Y; Ogawa, T; Osaka, A; Meerbeek, B Van

    2012-04-01

    According to the 'Adhesion-Decalcification' concept, specific functional monomers within dental adhesives can ionically interact with hydroxyapatite (HAp). Such ionic bonding has been demonstrated for 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) to manifest in the form of self-assembled 'nano-layering'. However, it remained to be explored if such nano-layering also occurs on tooth tissue when commercial MDP-containing adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray; Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE) were applied following common clinical application protocols. We therefore characterized adhesive-dentin interfaces chemically, using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and ultrastructurally, using (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM). Both adhesives revealed nano-layering at the adhesive interface, not only within the hybrid layer but also, particularly for Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), extending into the adhesive layer. Since such self-assembled nano-layering of two 10-MDP molecules, joined by stable MDP-Ca salt formation, must make the adhesive interface more resistant to biodegradation, it may well explain the documented favorable clinical longevity of bonds produced by 10-MDP-based adhesives.

  6. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B.; Acharya, Rudresh; DeGrado, William F.; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-01-01

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design. PMID:27113637

  7. Patterning of conducting polymers using charged self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi-Hee; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2008-09-02

    We introduce a new approach to pattern conducting polymers by combining oppositely charged conducting polymers on charged self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The polymer resist pattern behaves as a physical barrier, preventing the formation of SAMs. The patterning processes were carried out using commercially available conducting polymers: a negatively charged PEDOT/PSS (poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene)/poly(4-stylenesulphonic acid)) and a positively charged polypyrrole (PPy). A bifunctional NH 2 (positively charged) or COOH (negatively charged) terminated alkane thiol or silane was directly self-assembled on a substrate (Au or SiO 2). A suspension of the conducting polymers (PEDOT/PSS and PPy) was then spin-coated on the top surface of the SAMs and allowed to adsorb on the oppositely charged SAMs via an electrostatic driving force. After lift-off of the polymer resist, i.e., poly(methyl methacrylate, PMMA), using acetone, the conducting polymers remained on the charged SAMs surface. Optical microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy reveal that the prepared nanolines have low line edge roughness and high line width resolution. Thus, conducting polymer patterns with high resolution could be produced by simply employing charged bifunctional SAMs. It is anticipated that this versatile new method can be applied to device fabrication processes of various nano- and microelectronics.

  8. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Mesostructured Spherical Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C.J.; Fan,; H.; Lu, Y.; Rieker, T.; Stump, A.; Ward, T.L.

    1999-03-23

    Nanostructured particles exhibiting well-defined pore sizes and pore connectivities (1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional) are of interest for catalysis, chromatography, controlled release, low dielectric constant fillers, and custom-designed pigments and optical hosts. During the last several years considerable progress has been made on controlling the macroscopic forms of mesoporous silicas prepared by surfactant and block copolymer liquid crystalline templating procedures. Typically interfacial phenomena are used to control the macroscopic form (particles, fibers, or films), while self-assembly of amphiphilic surfactants or polymers is used to control the mesostructure. To date, although a variety of spherical or nearly-spherical particles have been prepared, their extent of order is limited as is the range of attainable mesostructures. They report a rapid, aerosol process that results in solid, completely ordered spherical particles with stable hexagonal, cubic, or vesicular mesostructures. The process relies on evaporation-induced interfacial self-assembly (EISA) confined to a spherical aerosol droplet. The process is simple and generalizable to a variety of materials combinations. Additionally, it can be modified to provide the first aerosol route to the formation of ordered mesostructured films.

  9. The multiple faces of self-assembled lipidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Tresset, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Lipids, the building blocks of cells, common to every living organisms, have the propensity to self-assemble into well-defined structures over short and long-range spatial scales. The driving forces have their roots mainly in the hydrophobic effect and electrostatic interactions. Membranes in lamellar phase are ubiquitous in cellular compartments and can phase-separate upon mixing lipids in different liquid-crystalline states. Hexagonal phases and especially cubic phases can be synthesized and observed in vivo as well. Membrane often closes up into a vesicle whose shape is determined by the interplay of curvature, area difference elasticity and line tension energies, and can adopt the form of a sphere, a tube, a prolate, a starfish and many more. Complexes made of lipids and polyelectrolytes or inorganic materials exhibit a rich diversity of structural morphologies due to additional interactions which become increasingly hard to track without the aid of suitable computer models. From the plasma membrane of archaebacteria to gene delivery, self-assembled lipidic systems have left their mark in cell biology and nanobiotechnology; however, the underlying physics is yet to be fully unraveled. PACS Codes: 87.14.Cc, 82.70.Uv PMID:19374753

  10. A coarse-grained model of microtubule self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Chola; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Microtubules play critical roles in cell structures and functions. They also serve as a model system to stimulate the next-generation smart, dynamic materials. A deep understanding of their self-assembly process and biomechanical properties will not only help elucidate how microtubules perform biological functions, but also lead to exciting insight on how microtubule dynamics can be altered or even controlled for specific purposes such as suppressing the division of cancer cells. Combining all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the essential dynamics coarse-graining method, we construct a coarse-grained (CG) model of the tubulin protein, which is the building block of microtubules. In the CG model a tubulin dimer is represented as an elastic network of CG sites, the locations of which are determined by examining the protein dynamics of the tubulin and identifying the essential dynamic domains. Atomistic MD modeling is employed to directly compute the tubulin bond energies in the surface lattice of a microtubule, which are used to parameterize the interactions between CG building blocks. The CG model is then used to study the self-assembly pathways, kinetics, dynamics, and nanomechanics of microtubules.

  11. Effect of Self-Assembled Monolayer Film Order on Nanofriction

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivan,S.; Shieh, S.; Fischer, D.; Hsu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers have increasingly been explored as potential protective films in devices against friction and adhesion. However, detailed characterization of the monolayer film structure is difficult. This article utilizes a combination of near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to determine the film structure in order to explain the observed nanofriction measurement results. A series of n-alkyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer films with various chain lengths (C5-C30) was prepared on silicon (100) surfaces. Nanofriction measurements were conducted using an atomic force microscope. Results showed that the lowest friction was obtained with a C12 film with higher friction values observed for C5 and C30 films. To explain these observations, the x-ray absorption technique NEXAFS was used to quantitatively measure the surface molecular orientation (order) of these films. It was observed that C12, C16, and C18 films were highly ordered with a molecular orientation of the carbon backbone nearly perpendicular to the surface. C5 and C30 films were less oriented and C10 film showed partial orientation. FTIR spectra suggested that these films possessed different degrees of order. This combination of molecular orientation and order supports and confirms that nanofriction results were heavily influenced by the order and structure of these films.

  12. Molecular Self-Assembly at Metal-Electrolyte Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Thanh Hai; Wandelt, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The self-assembly of molecular layers has become an important strategy in modern design of functional materials. However, in particular, large organic molecules may no longer be sufficiently volatile to be deposited by vapor deposition. In this case, deposition from solution may be a promising route; in ionic form, these molecules may even be soluble in water. In this contribution, we present and discuss results on the electrochemical deposition of viologen- and porphyrin molecules as well as their co-adsorption on chloride modified Cu(100) and Cu(111) single crystal electrode surfaces from aqueous acidic solutions. Using in situ techniques like cyclic voltametry and high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, as well as ex-situ photoelectron spectroscopy data the highly ordered self-assembled organic layers are characterized with respect to their electrochemical behavior, lateral order and inner conformation as well as phase transitions thereof as a function of their redox-state and the symmetry of the substrate. As a result, detailed structure models are derived and are discussed in terms of the prevailing interactions. PMID:23439555

  13. Stochastic lag time in nucleated linear self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Nitin S.; van der Schoot, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Protein aggregation is of great importance in biology, e.g., in amyloid fibrillation. The aggregation processes that occur at the cellular scale must be highly stochastic in nature because of the statistical number fluctuations that arise on account of the small system size at the cellular scale. We study the nucleated reversible self-assembly of monomeric building blocks into polymer-like aggregates using the method of kinetic Monte Carlo. Kinetic Monte Carlo, being inherently stochastic, allows us to study the impact of fluctuations on the polymerization reactions. One of the most important characteristic features in this kind of problem is the existence of a lag phase before self-assembly takes off, which is what we focus attention on. We study the associated lag time as a function of system size and kinetic pathway. We find that the leading order stochastic contribution to the lag time before polymerization commences is inversely proportional to the system volume for large-enough system size for all nine reaction pathways tested. Finite-size corrections to this do depend on the kinetic pathway.

  14. Aqueous Two Phase System Assisted Self-Assembled PLGA Microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeredla, Nitish; Kojima, Taisuke; Yang, Yi; Takayama, Shuichi; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai

    2016-06-01

    Here, we produce poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based microparticles with varying morphologies, and temperature responsive properties utilizing a Pluronic F127/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) assisted self-assembly. The PLGA polymer, when emulsified in Pluronic F127/dextran ATPS, forms unique microparticle structures due to ATPS guided-self assembly. Depending on the PLGA concentration, the particles either formed a core-shell or a composite microparticle structure. The microparticles facilitate the simultaneous incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules, due to their amphiphilic macromolecule composition. Further, due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) properties of Pluronic F127, the particles exhibit temperature responsiveness. The ATPS based microparticle formation demonstrated in this study, serves as a novel platform for PLGA/polymer based tunable micro/nano particle and polymersome development. The unique properties may be useful in applications such as theranostics, synthesis of complex structure particles, bioreaction/mineralization at the two-phase interface, and bioseparations.

  15. Precise hierarchical self-assembly of multicompartment micelles.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, André H; Schacher, Felix H; Schmalz, Holger; Borisov, Oleg V; Zhulina, Ekaterina B; Walther, Andreas; Müller, Axel H E

    2012-02-28

    Hierarchical self-assembly offers elegant and energy-efficient bottom-up strategies for the structuring of complex materials. For block copolymers, the last decade witnessed great progress in diversifying the structural complexity of solution-based assemblies into multicompartment micelles. However, a general understanding of what governs multicompartment micelle morphologies and polydispersity, and how to manipulate their hierarchical superstructures using straightforward concepts and readily accessible polymers remains unreached. Here we demonstrate how to create homogeneous multicompartment micelles with unprecedented structural control via the intermediate pre-assembly of subunits. This directed self-assembly leads to a step-wise reduction of the degree of conformational freedom and dynamics and avoids undesirable kinetic obstacles during the structure build-up. It yields a general concept for homogeneous populations of well-defined multicompartment micelles with precisely tunable patchiness, while using simple linear ABC triblock terpolymers. We further demonstrate control over the hierarchical step-growth polymerization of multicompartment micelles into micron-scale segmented supracolloidal polymers as an example of programmable mesoscale colloidal hierarchies via well-defined patchy nanoobjects.

  16. Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles

    DOE PAGES

    Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-08-19

    Using the Langevin dynamics method and a coarse-grained model, we have researched the formation of vesicles by hydrophobic polymers consisting of periodically placed zwitterion side groups in dilute salt-free aqueous solutions. The zwitterions, being permanent charge dipoles, provide long-range electrostatic correlations which are interfered by the conformational entropy of the polymer. Our simulations are geared towards gaining conceptual understanding in these correlated dipolar systems, where theoretical calculations are at present formidable. A competition between hydrophobic interactions and dipole-dipole interactions leads to a series of self-assembled structures. As the spacing d between the successive zwitterion side groups decreases, single chains undergomore » globule → disk → worm-like structures. We have calculated the Flory-Huggins χ parameter for these systems in terms of d and monitored the radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius, spatial correlations among hydrophobic and dipole monomers, and dipole-dipole orientational correlation functions. During the subsequent stages of self-assembly, these structures lead to larger globules and vesicles as d is decreased up to a threshold value, below which no large scale morphology forms. Finally the vesicles form via a polynucleation mechanism whereby disk-like structures form first, followed by their subsequent merger.« less

  17. Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-08-19

    Using the Langevin dynamics method and a coarse-grained model, we have researched the formation of vesicles by hydrophobic polymers consisting of periodically placed zwitterion side groups in dilute salt-free aqueous solutions. The zwitterions, being permanent charge dipoles, provide long-range electrostatic correlations which are interfered by the conformational entropy of the polymer. Our simulations are geared towards gaining conceptual understanding in these correlated dipolar systems, where theoretical calculations are at present formidable. A competition between hydrophobic interactions and dipole-dipole interactions leads to a series of self-assembled structures. As the spacing d between the successive zwitterion side groups decreases, single chains undergo globule → disk → worm-like structures. We have calculated the Flory-Huggins χ parameter for these systems in terms of d and monitored the radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius, spatial correlations among hydrophobic and dipole monomers, and dipole-dipole orientational correlation functions. During the subsequent stages of self-assembly, these structures lead to larger globules and vesicles as d is decreased up to a threshold value, below which no large scale morphology forms. Finally the vesicles form via a polynucleation mechanism whereby disk-like structures form first, followed by their subsequent merger.

  18. Self-assembled dummy patterns for lithography process margin enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, James; Nam, Byoung-Sub; Jeong, Joo-Hong; Nam, Byung-Ho; Yim, Dong Gyu

    2007-03-01

    Over the last couple of years, Design For Manufacturability (DFM) has progressed from concept to practice. What we thought then is actually applied to the design step to meet the high demand placed upon very high tech devices we make today. One of the DFM procedures that benefit the lithography process margin is generation of dummy patterns. Dummy pattern generated at design step enables stable yet high lithography process margin for many of the high technology device. But actual generation of the dummy pattern is very complex and risky for many of the layer used for memory devices. Dummy generation for simple pattern layers such as Poly or Isolation layer is not so difficult since pattern composed for these layers are usually 1 dimensional or very simple 2 dimensional patterns. But for interconnection layers that compose of complex 2 dimensional patterns, dummy pattern generation is very risky and requires lots of time and effort to safely place the dummy patterns. In this study, we propose simple self assembled dummy (SAD) generation algorithm to place dummy pattern for the complex 2 dimensional interconnection layers. This algorithm automatically self assembles dummy pattern based on the original design layout, therefore insuring the safety and simplicity of the generated dummy to the original design. Also we will evaluate SAD on interconnection layer using commercial Model Based Verification (MBV) tool to verify its applicability for both litho process margin and DFM perspective.

  19. Glycosylated Self-Assembled Monolayers for Arrays and Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, carbohydrates (glycans) have received growing attention for their many roles in biological systems, including pathogenesis, receptor-ligand interactions, and cell signaling. To unravel the biology of this important category of biomolecules, a host of new tools have been developed for glycomics investigation. At the forefront is the carbohydrate microarray, developed to immobilize functional glycans on a solid substrate to rapidly screen a variety of potential binding partners (carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids, cells, and viruses). The essential role played by surface modification on glycan microarray performance requires new methods to rigorously characterize glycan surface chemistries. Due to their highly reproducible nature and well-studied properties, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold are powerful models for presenting glycans on a solid substrate, engineering biomimetic microenvironments and exploring the bioactivity of immobilized carbohydrates via surface plasmon resonance (SPR). However, it can be challenging to prepare high quality glycosylated SAMs (glyco-SAMs) that retain their biological function following surface immobilization. Herein, a selection of versatile methods for the preparation of glyco-SAMs using natural and chemically modified glycans is described. This chapter will highlight the following three immobilization techniques: (1) direct self assembly using thiolated glycosides onto gold, (2) tethering aminated glycosides onto amine-reactive SAMs, and (3) conjugating natural glycan onto divinyl sulfone-activated SAMs. PMID:22057519

  20. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    Catalytically active colloids maintain non-equilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals at their surface. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1/r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a non-equilibrium analogue of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. In dilute conditions these active colloids join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds. Colloids are found to join up to form self-assembled molecules that could be inert or have spontaneous activity in the form of net translational velocity and spin depending on their symmetry properties and their constituents. As the interactions do not satisfy detailed-balance, it is possible to achieve structures with time dependent functionality. We study a molecule that adopts spontaneous oscillations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that posses dynamical functionalities.

  1. Compositional Inheritance: Comparison of Self-assembly and Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng; Higgs, Paul G.

    2008-10-01

    Genetic inheritance in modern cells is due to template-directed replication of nucleic acids. However, the difficulty of prebiotic synthesis of long information-carrying polymers like RNA raises the question of whether some other form of heredity is possible without polymers. As an alternative, the lipid world theory has been proposed, which considers non-covalent assemblies of lipids, such as micelles and vesicles. Assemblies store information in the form of a non-random molecular composition, and this information is passed on when the assemblies divide, i.e . the assemblies show compositional inheritance. Here, we vary several important assumptions of previous lipid world models and show that compositional inheritance is relevant more generally than the context in which it was originally proposed. Our models assume that interaction occurs between nearest neighbour molecules only, and account for spatial segregation of molecules of different types within the assembly. We also draw a distinction between a self-assembly model, in which the composition is determined by mutually favourable interaction energies between the molecules, and a catalytic model, in which the composition is determined by mutually favourable catalysis. We show that compositional inheritance occurs in both models, although the self-assembly case seems more relevant if the molecules are simple lipids. In the case where the assemblies are composed of just two types of molecules, there is a strong analogy with the classic two-allele Moran model from population genetics. This highlights the parallel between compositional inheritance and genetic inheritance.

  2. Structural Diversity of Self-Assembled Iridescent Arthropod Biophotonic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranathan, Vinod Kumar; Prum, Richard O.

    2015-03-01

    Many organisms, especially arthropods, produce vivid interference colors using diverse mesoscopic (100-350 nm) integumentary biophotonic nanostructures that are increasingly being investigated for technological applications. Despite a century of interest, we lack precise structural knowledge of many biophotonic nanostructures and mechanisms controlling their development, when such knowledge can open novel biomimetic routes to facilely self-assemble tunable, multi-functional materials. Here, we use synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to characterize the photonic nanostructure of 140 iridescent integumentary scales and setae from 127 species of terrestrial arthropods in 85 genera from 5 orders. We report a rich nanostructural diversity, including triply-periodic bicontinuous networks, close-packed spheres, inverse columnar, perforated lamellar, and disordered sponge-like morphologies, commonly observed as stable phases of amphiphilic surfactants, block copolymer, and lyotropic lipid-water systems. Diverse arthropod lineages appear to have independently evolved to utilize the self-assembly of infolding bilayer membranes to develop biophotonic nanostructures that span the phase-space of amphiphilic morphologies, but at optical length scales.

  3. Delivery of therapeutics and molecules using self-assembled peptides.

    PubMed

    Sundar, S; Chen, Y; Tong, Y W

    2014-01-01

    The use of nanobiotechnology in the formulation of drug carriers has been gaining popularity in recent years. Peptide self-assembly technology is a particularly attractive option due to its simplicity and programmability. Selfassembling peptide amphiphiles are surfactant-like molecules that are capable of spontaneous organization into a variety of nanostructures. The structural and functional features of these nanostructures can be designed through alterations to the peptide sequence. With a keen understanding of the supramolecular principles governing the non-covalent interactions involved, drug loading strategies can be customised. Hydrophobic drugs can be hidden within the core via aromatic interactions while gene-based therapeutics can be complexed with a cationic region of lysine residues. This review article focuses on the application of self-assembling peptide amphiphiles to drug delivery in the area of anti-cancer therapeutics, protein- and peptide-based therapeutics and nucleic acid-based therapeutics. Specific examples are used to discuss the various systems available and emphasis is given to the encapsulation and release mechanism.

  4. Sequence dependent proton conduction in self-assembled peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lerner Yardeni, Jenny; Amit, Moran; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2016-01-28

    The advancement of diverse electrochemistry technologies depends on the development of novel proton conducting polymers. Inspired by the efficacy of proton transport through proteins, we show in this work that self-assembling peptide nanostructures may be a promising alternative for such organic proton conducting materials. We demonstrate that aromatic amino acids, which participate in charge transport in nature, unprecedentedly promote proton conduction under both high and low relative humidity conditions for d,l α-cyclic peptide nanotubes. For dehydrated networks long-range order of the assemblies, induced by the aromatic side chains, is shown to be a dominating factor for promoting conductivity. However, for hydrated networks this order of effect is less significant and conductivity can be improved by the introduction of proton donating carboxylic acid peptide side chains in addition to the aromatic side chains despite the lower order of the assemblies. Based on these observations, a novel cyclic peptide that incorporates non-natural naphthyl side chains was designed. Self-assembled nanotubes of this peptide show greatly improved dehydrated conductivity, while maintaining high conductivity under hydrated conditions. We envision that the demonstrated modularity and versatility of these bio inspired nanostructures will make them extremely attractive building blocks for the fabrication of devices for energy conversion and storage applications, as well as other applications that involve proton transport, whether dry or wet conductivity is desired.

  5. Amination of surfaces via self-assembly of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Yu, Bo; Hao, Jingcheng; Zhou, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Catechols can strongly bind to a variety of substrates so as to functionalize the target surfaces by forming self-assembled monolayer. However, catecholic amine might self-oxidize and polymerize at high pH since the amine is susceptible to nucleophilic addition reaction that results in polymerized oligomers on surfaces. Therefore, the availability of amines for further derivation reaction would be restricted to a large extent. Herein, by controlling pH values to avoid self-oxidative polymerization, dopamine (DA) forms thin and surface-adherent monolayers onto a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, including mica, silica, and Au surface, allowing amination of the surfaces that resemble commercially used aminosilanization. The self-assembly process was traced by surface topography and elemental composition analysis using atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical characterization (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry measurements). Then, the aminated surfaces were used for secondary derivation reactions to create a variety of ad-layers, including patterned streptavidin through specific binding interaction with biotin and ferrocene surface via amidation reaction. The surface and interface properties of the obtained surfaces were tested by electrochemical measurements.

  6. Molecular and electronic structure of electroactive self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; de la Llave, Ezequiel; Scherlis, Damián; Williams, Federico J.

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing electroactive functional groups are excellent model systems for the formation of electronic devices by self-assembly. In particular ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol SAMs have been extensively studied in the past. However, there are still open questions related with their electronic structure including the influence of the ferrocene group in the SAM-induced work function changes of the underlying metal. We have thus carried out a thorough experimental and theoretical investigation in order to determine the molecular and electronic structure of ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol SAMs on Au surfaces. In agreement with previous studies we found that the Fc-containing alkanethiol molecules adsorb forming a thiolate bond with the Au surface with a molecular geometry 30° tilted with respect to the surface normal. Measured surface coverages indicate the formation of a compact monolayer. We found for the first time that the ferrocene group has little influence on the observed work function decrease which is largely determined by the alkanethiol. Furthermore, the ferrocene moiety lies 14 Å above the metal surface covalently bonded to the alkanethiol SAM and its HOMO is located at -1.6 eV below the Fermi level. Our results provide new valuable insight into the molecular and electronic structure of electroactive SAMs which are of fundamental importance in the field of molecular electronics.

  7. Molecular and electronic structure of electroactive self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Méndez De Leo, Lucila P; de la Llave, Ezequiel; Scherlis, Damián; Williams, Federico J

    2013-03-21

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing electroactive functional groups are excellent model systems for the formation of electronic devices by self-assembly. In particular ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol SAMs have been extensively studied in the past. However, there are still open questions related with their electronic structure including the influence of the ferrocene group in the SAM-induced work function changes of the underlying metal. We have thus carried out a thorough experimental and theoretical investigation in order to determine the molecular and electronic structure of ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol SAMs on Au surfaces. In agreement with previous studies we found that the Fc-containing alkanethiol molecules adsorb forming a thiolate bond with the Au surface with a molecular geometry 30° tilted with respect to the surface normal. Measured surface coverages indicate the formation of a compact monolayer. We found for the first time that the ferrocene group has little influence on the observed work function decrease which is largely determined by the alkanethiol. Furthermore, the ferrocene moiety lies 14 Å above the metal surface covalently bonded to the alkanethiol SAM and its HOMO is located at -1.6 eV below the Fermi level. Our results provide new valuable insight into the molecular and electronic structure of electroactive SAMs which are of fundamental importance in the field of molecular electronics.

  8. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Thomas; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-02-07

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  9. Performance Enhancement of Electronic and Energy Devices via Block Copolymer Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyeon Gyun; Byun, Myunghwan; Jeong, Chang Kyu; Lee, Keon Jae

    2015-07-15

    The use of self-assembled block copolymers (BCPs) for the fabrication of electronic and energy devices has received a tremendous amount of attention as a non-traditional approach to patterning integrated circuit elements at nanometer dimensions and densities inaccessible to traditional lithography techniques. The exquisite control over the dimensional features of the self-assembled nanostructures (i.e., shape, size, and periodicity) is one of the most attractive properties of BCP self-assembly. Harmonic spatial arrangement of the self-assembled nanoelements at desired positions on the chip may offer a new strategy for the fabrication of electronic and energy devices. Several recent reports show the great promise in using BCP self-assembly for practical applications of electronic and energy devices, leading to substantial enhancements of the device performance. Recent progress is summarized here, with regard to the performance enhancements of non-volatile memory, electrical sensor, and energy devices enabled by directed BCP self-assembly.

  10. Formation of mixed and patterned self-assembled films of alkylphosphonates on commercially pure titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzka, Katarzyna; Sanchez Treviño, Alda Y.; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A.

    2016-12-01

    Titanium is extensively employed in biomedical devices, in particular as implant. The self-assembly of alkylphosphonates on titanium surfaces enable the specific adsorption of biomolecules to adapt the implant response against external stimuli. In this work, chemically-tailored cpTi surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonate molecules. By bringing together attributes of two grafting molecules, aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates were used to obtain mixed self-assembled films. Single self-assembled films were also altered by laser abrasion to produce chemically patterned cpTi surfaces. Both mixed and patterned self-assembled films were confirmed by AFM, ESEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Water contact angle measurements also revealed the composition of the self-assembly films. Chemical functionalization with two grafting phosphonate molecules and laser surface engineering may be combined to guide the bone-like formation on cpTi, and the future biological response in the host.

  11. Biocompatible or biodegradable hyperbranched polymers: from self-assembly to cytomimetic applications.

    PubMed

    Jin, Haibao; Huang, Wei; Zhu, Xinyuan; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2012-09-21

    Self-assembly of amphiphilic hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) is a newly emerging research area and has attracted increasing attention due to the great advantages in biomedical applications. This tutorial review focuses on the self-assembly of biocompatible or biodegradable amphiphilic HBPs and their cytomimetic applications, and specialities or advantages therein owing to the hyperbranched structure have also been summarized. As shown here, various supramolecular structures including micelles, vesicles, tubes, fibers and films have been prepared through the primary self-assembly processes. The primary self-assemblies can be further assembled into more complex structures through hierachical self-assembly processes. Besides, the hyperbranched polymer vesicles have demonstrated great potential to be used as model membranes to mimic cellular behaviors, such as fusion, fission and cell aggregation. Other biomedical applications of HBPs as well as their self-assemblies are also briefly summarized.

  12. Self-Assembled Peptide- and Protein-Based Nanomaterials for Antitumor Photodynamic and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Manzar; Zou, Qianli; Li, Shukun; Yan, Xuehai

    2017-03-01

    Tremendous interest in self-assembly of peptides and proteins towards functional nanomaterials has been inspired by naturally evolving self-assembly in biological construction of multiple and sophisticated protein architectures in organisms. Self-assembled peptide and protein nanoarchitectures are excellent promising candidates for facilitating biomedical applications due to their advantages of structural, mechanical, and functional diversity and high biocompability and biodegradability. Here, this review focuses on the self-assembly of peptides and proteins for fabrication of phototherapeutic nanomaterials for antitumor photodynamic and photothermal therapy, with emphasis on building blocks, non-covalent interactions, strategies, and the nanoarchitectures of self-assembly. The exciting antitumor activities achieved by these phototherapeutic nanomaterials are also discussed in-depth, along with the relationships between their specific nanoarchitectures and their unique properties, providing an increased understanding of the role of peptide and protein self-assembly in improving the efficiency of photodynamic and photothermal therapy.

  13. Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using Nanosphere Photolithography

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Large area periodic nanostructures exhibit unique optical and electronic properties and have found many applications, such as photonic band-gap materials, high dense data storage, and photonic devices. We have developed a maskless photolithography method—Nanosphere Photolithography (NSP)—to produce a large area of uniform nanopatterns in the photoresist utilizing the silica micro-spheres to focus UV light. Here, we will extend the idea to fabricate metallic nanostructures using the NSP method. We produced large areas of periodic uniform nanohole array perforated in different metallic films, such as gold and aluminum. The diameters of these nanoholes are much smaller than the wavelength of UV light used and they are very uniformly distributed. The method introduced here inherently has both the advantages of photolithography and self-assembled methods. Besides, it also generates very uniform repetitive nanopatterns because the focused beam waist is almost unchanged with different sphere sizes.

  14. Molecular Self-Assembly and Nanochemistry: A Chemical Strategy for the Synthesis of Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    AD-A243 530iV1111I I II 11111 I I(/• MOLECULAR SELF-ASSEMBLY AND NANOCHEMISTRY : A CHEMICAL STRATEGY FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF NANOSTRUCTURES George M...Classfication) "Molecular Self-Assembly and Nanochemistry : A Chemistry Strategy for the Synthesis of Nanostructures." 12, PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) G.M...8217. .. .... ......... Molecular Self-Assembly and Nanochemistry : A Chemical Strategy for the Synthesis of Nanostructures George M. Whitesides, John P. Mathias

  15. Self-Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro/Nano-Textured Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Self-Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces by Adam M. Rawlett, Joshua A. Orlicki, Afia Karikari, and Tim Long ARL-TR...3547 August 2005 Self-Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces Adam M. Rawlett and Joshua A. Orlicki, Weapons and...AND SUBTITLE Self-Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER AH84 5e. TASK NUMBER

  16. Self-assembly of patterned nanoparticles on cellular membranes: effect of charge distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2013-06-06

    Nanoparticle-assisted drug delivery has been emerging as an active research area. Achieving high drug loading is only one facet of drug delivery issues; it is also important to investigate the effect of surface charge distribution on self-assembly of nanoparticles on cellular membranes. By considering the electrostatic distribution of patterned nanoparticles, we used dissipative particle dynamics simulations to investigate the self-assembly of pattern charged nanoparticles with five different surface charged patterns. It is found that both surface charged pattern and nanoparticle size significantly affect the self-assembly of nanoparticles on cellular membranes. Results indicate that 1/2 pattern charged small nanoparticles can self-assemble into dendritic structures, while those with a 1/4 pattern self-assemble into clusters. As the nanoparticle size increases, 1/2 pattern charged medium nanoparticles can self-assemble into linear structures, while those with a 1/4 pattern self-assemble into clusters. For very large nanoparticles, both 1/2 pattern and 1/4 pattern charged nanoparticles self-assemble into flaky structures with different connections. By considering the effects of surface charged pattern and nanoparticle size on self-assembly, we found that nanoparticle self-assembly requires a minimum effective charged area. When the local charged area of nanoparticles is less than the threshold, surface charge cannot induce nanoparticle self-assembly; that is, the surface charged pattern of a nanoparticle would determine effectively the self-assembly structure. It is expected that this work will provide guidance for nanoparticle-assisted drug delivery.

  17. Real time monitoring of superparamagnetic nanoparticle self-assembly on surfaces of magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Crawford, T. M.; Qi, B.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.

    2014-05-07

    Nanoparticle self-assembly dynamics are monitored in real-time by detecting optical diffraction from an all-nanoparticle grating as it self-assembles on a grating pattern recorded on a magnetic medium. The diffraction efficiency strongly depends on concentration, pH, and colloidal stability of nanoparticle suspensions, demonstrating the nanoparticle self-assembly process is highly tunable. This metrology could provide an alternative for detecting nanoparticle properties such as colloidal stability.

  18. Folding and self-assembly of aromatic and aliphatic urea oligomers: towards connecting structure and function.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lucile; Guichard, Gilles

    2010-07-21

    Folding and self-assembly of biomacromolecules has inspired the development of discrete, non-natural oligomers that fold and/or self-assemble in a controlled manner. Though aromatic and aliphatic oligoamides remain unmatched for structural diversity and synthetic versatility, oligomers based on amide bond surrogates, such as urea backbones, also demonstrated a propensity for folding and self-assembly. In this Perspective, we review the advances in the design of oligomeric aromatic and aliphatic urea sequences (essentially N,N'-linked) that fold and/or self-assemble. Whenever applicable, the relationship between structure and function will be highlighted.

  19. Surface Induced nanofiber growth by self-assembly of a silk-elastin-like protein polymer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wonseok; Kim, Bo-Hyun; Dandu, Ramesh; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Seog, Joonil

    2009-11-03

    Many synthetic and natural peptides are known to self-assemble to form various nanostructures. During the self-assembling process, environmental conditions such as salt concentration, pH, temperature, and surface characteristics play a critical role by influencing intermolecular interactions, and hence the process of self-assembly. Here we studied the self-assembly of a genetically engineered protein polymer composed of silk-like and elastin-like repeats on a mica surface. Silk-elastin-like protein polymers (SELPs) consist of tandem repeats of Gly-Ala-Gly-Ala-Gly-Ser from Bombyx mori (silkworm) and Gly-Val-Gly-Val-Pro from mammalian elastin. At a very low polymer concentration of 1 mug/mL, SELPs self-assembled into nanofibrous structures on a mica surface. Examination using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering techniques showed that SELPs self-assembled into nanofibers in the presence of the mica surface but not in the bulk state. Ionic strength had a significant influence on nanofiber growth, indicating the importance of electrostatic interactions between the polymer and the mica surface. At low ionic strength, the kinetics of nanofiber growth showed that the mica surface effectively removed a lag phase by providing nucleating sites, facilitating nanofiber self-assembly of SELPs. Furthermore, self-assembly on additional substrates such as silicon and a hydrophobic pyrolytic carbon surface revealed that the charged hydrophilic surface provides the optimal surface to facilitate self-assembly of SELPs.

  20. Multichannel biosensing platform of surface-immobilized gold nanospheres for linear and nonlinear optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Kazuma; Fukuba, Shinya; Naraoka, Ryo; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Kajikawa, Kotaro

    2007-07-10

    What we believe to be a new label-free multichannel biosensing platform is proposed. It is composed of surface-immobilized gold nanospheres (SIGNs) above a gold surface with a nanogap supported by a merocyanine self-assembled monolayer. The circular SIGN spots with a diameter of 120 microm were arrayed for multichannel biosensing on a glass slide. Two kinds of sensing methods were examined: One is a reflectivity measurement of a blue ray and the other is a second-harmonic generation measurement. It was found that the SIGN system can be used as a promising platform for multichannel biosensing in both sensing methods.

  1. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-05-18

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process.

  2. Antitumor therapeutic application of self-assembled RNAi-AuNP nanoconstructs: Combination of VEGF-RNAi and photothermal ablation

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sejin; Kim, Namho; You, Dong Gil; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Yhee, Ji Young; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Sun Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acid-directed self-assembly provides an attractive method to fabricate prerequisite nanoscale structures for a wide range of technological applications due to the remarkable programmability of DNA/RNA molecules. In this study, exquisite RNAi-AuNP nanoconstructs with various geometries were developed by utilizing anti-VEGF siRNA molecules as RNAi-based therapeutics in addition to their role as building blocks for programmed self-assembly. In particular, the anti-VEGF siRNA-functionalized AuNP nanoconstructs can take additional advantage of gold-nanoclusters for photothermal cancer therapeutic agent. A noticeable technical aspect of self-assembled RNAi-AuNP nanoconstructs in this study is the precise conjugation and separation of designated numbers of therapeutic siRNA onto AuNP to develop highly sophisticated RNA-based building blocks capable of creating various geometries of RNAi-AuNP nano-assemblies. The therapeutic potential of RNAi-AuNP nanoconstructs was validated in vivo as well as in vitro by combining heat generation capability of AuNP and anti-angiogenesis mechanism of siRNA. This strategy of combining anti-VEGF mechanism for depleting angiogenesis process at initial tumor progression and complete ablation of residual tumors with photothermal activity of AuNP at later tumor stage showed effective tumor growth inhibition and tumor ablation with PC-3 tumor bearing mice. PMID:28042312

  3. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-05-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process.

  4. Application of capillary forces and stiction for lateral displacement, alignment, suspension and locking of self-assembled microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, F.; Hattori, M.; Kobayashi, D.; Toshiyoshi, H.; Fujita, H.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2006-10-01

    We report the surface-tension-powered self-assembly (displacement, alignment, pulling down and locking) of microcantilevers. Capillary forces-assisted displacement is realized by compression of four arrays of springs linked to the opposite lateral sides of the cantilevers. After in-plane translation along the initial cantilever orientation, the microstructure is pulled down and locked on the substrate by stiction. Spring and capillary forces are described with a simple analytical model. Complete self-assembly occurs when the layout of the whole system (the cantilever with its traveling spring structure, the surrounding area and the local distribution of the liquid) is well designed. We show that the presence of a water meniscus trapped at a step edge in the vicinity of the tip end of a microcantilever could lead to stiction failure before traveling of the structure. Small beams (6 µm long) protruding over step edges were fabricated by adding a mechanically assisted displacement step (with a microneedle) to the self-assembly experiment.

  5. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process. PMID:27188258

  6. Creating Sub-50 Nm Nanofluidic Junctions in PDMS Microfluidic Chip via Self-Assembly Process of Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xi; Syed, Abeer; Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon; Song, Yong-Ak

    2016-03-13

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the prevailing building material to make microfluidic devices due to its ease of molding and bonding as well as its transparency. Due to the softness of the PDMS material, however, it is challenging to use PDMS for building nanochannels. The channels tend to collapse easily during plasma bonding. In this paper, we present an evaporation-driven self-assembly method of silica colloidal nanoparticles to create nanofluidic junctions with sub-50 nm pores between two microchannels. The pore size as well as the surface charge of the nanofluidic junction is tunable simply by changing the colloidal silica bead size and surface functionalization outside of the assembled microfluidic device in a vial before the self-assembly process. Using the self-assembly of nanoparticles with a bead size of 300 nm, 500 nm, and 900 nm, it was possible to fabricate a porous membrane with a pore size of ~45 nm, ~75 nm and ~135 nm, respectively. Under electrical potential, this nanoporous membrane initiated ion concentration polarization (ICP) acting as a cation-selective membrane to concentrate DNA by ~1,700 times within 15 min. This non-lithographic nanofabrication process opens up a new opportunity to build a tunable nanofluidic junction for the study of nanoscale transport processes of ions and molecules inside a PDMS microfluidic chip.

  7. Studies on multivalent interactions of quantum dots-protein self-assemble using fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Teng, Yiwan; Hu, Wei; Chai, Hong; Li, Jinchen; Wang, Cheli; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2014-07-01

    Nanoparticle-biomolecules self-assembly is the key to the understanding of biomolecular coating of nanoparticle. However, the self-assembly of biomolecules with nanoparticles is still under-exploited because of the lack of an efficient method to detect the subtle changes in the surface of nanoparticles. In this study, we utilized fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL) to probe the binding interaction between a multivalent ligand (dBSA, denatured bovine serum albumin which contains multiple thiol groups) and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs, 5 nm in diameter). The yield of QDs-dBSA complex increased with increasing molar ratio of dBSA to QDs, which plateaued at a ratio of 8:1. Besides, QDs-dBSA complex showed good stability due to the multivalent interaction, revealing that dBSA is a superior ligand for QDs. The self-assembly kinetics of QDs with dBSA manifested a bi-phasic kinetics with a linear initial stage followed by a saturating stage. This work revealed for the first time that there exist two types of binding sites on the surface of QDs for dBSA: one type termed "high priority" binding sites, which preferentially bind to the protein, whereas the "low priority" sites are occupied only after the first-type binding sites are fully bound. Our work thereby represents the first example of systematic investigation on the details of the metal-affinity driven self-assembly between QDs and dBSA utilizing the high-resolution CE-FL. It also expanded the application of CE-FL in the study of nanoparticle-biomolecule interaction and kinetics analysis.

  8. Applications of molecular self-assembly in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Daniel Anton

    This thesis studied the application of three self-assembling molecular systems, as potential biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Cholesteryl-(L-lactic acid)n molecules form thermotropic liquid crystals, which could be coated onto the inner and outer pores of biodegradable PLLA scaffolds, while retaining the lamellar order of the neat material. Primary bovine chondrocytes were cultured on these structures, demonstrating improved attachment and extended retention of phenotype on the C-LA-coated scaffolds. No difference in fibronectin adsorption to C-LA and PLLA surfaces was observed, suggesting a strong role for cholesterol in influencing cell phenotype. A family of peptide-amphiphiles, bearing the "RGD" adhesion sequence from fibronectin, was also assessed in the contexts of cartilage and bladder repair. These molecules self-assemble into one-dimensional fibers, with diameters of 6--8 nm, and lengths of 500 nm or greater. Chondrocytes were seeded and cultured on covalently-crosslinked PA gels and embedded within calcium-triggered PA gels. Cells became dormant over time, but remained viable, suggesting an inappropriate display of the adhesion sequence to cells. A family of "branched" PA molecules with lysine dendron headgroups was designed, in an effort to increase the spatial separation between molecules in the assembled state, and to theoretically improve epitope accessibility. These molecules coated reliably onto PGA fiber scaffolds, and dramatically increased the attachment of human bladder smooth muscle cells, possibly through better epitope display or electrostatic attraction. They also formed strong gels with several negatively-charged biologically-relevant macromolecules. In a third system, amphiphilic segmented dendrimers based on phenylene vinylene and L-lysine entered cells through an endocytic pathway with no discernible toxic effect on cell proliferation or morphology. These amphiphiles formed complex aggregates in aqueous solution, likely

  9. Molecular engineering and characterization of self-assembled biorecognition surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Sheng

    The development of molecular engineering techniques for the fabrication of biomaterial surfaces is of importance in the field of biomaterials. It offers opportunities for better understanding of biological processes on material surfaces and rational design of contemporary biomaterials. Our work in this area aims to develop novel engineering strategies to design biorecognition surfaces via self-assembly and surface derivatization. Fundamental issues regarding self-assembled monolayer (SAM) structure, formation kinetics, and chemical derivatization were investigated systematically using electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle measurements. Novel engineering concepts based on multifunctionality and statistical pattern matching were introduced and applied to develop biomimetic surfaces. Our study illustrated that molecules underwent structural transition and orientation development during self-assembly formation, from a disordered, low-density, more liquid-like structure to a highly ordered, closed-packed crystalline-like structure. Surface properties, such as wettability and the reactivity of outermost functional groups can be related to film structure, packing density, as well as molecular orientation. Given the order and organization of SAMs, the accessibility and reactivity of the outermost functional groups, reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and SAMs stability were studied systematically by surface derivatization of trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA). The TFAA derivatization reactions exhibited rapid kinetics on the hydroxyl-terminated SAMs. The data from complementary surface analytical techniques consistently indicated a nearly complete surface reaction. Biomimetic surfaces were made by random immobilization of amino acid of arginine (R), glycine (G), and aspartic acid (D) on well-defined SAMs

  10. Crops: a green approach toward self-assembled soft materials.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; John, George

    2008-06-01

    To date, a wide range of industrial materials such as solvents, fuels, synthetic fibers, and chemical products are being manufactured from petroleum resources. However, rapid depletion of fossil and petroleum resources is encouraging current and future chemists to orient their research toward designing safer chemicals, products, and processes from renewable feedstock with an increased awareness of environmental and industrial impact. Advances in genetics, biotechnology, process chemistry, and engineering are leading to a new manufacturing concept for converting renewable biomass to valuable fuels and products, generally known as the biorefinery concept. The swift integration of crop-based materials synthesis and biorefinery manufacturing technologies offers the potential for new advances in sustainable energy alternatives and biomaterials that will lead to a new manufacturing paradigm. This Account presents a novel and emerging concept of generating various forms of soft materials from crops (an alternate feedstock). In future research, developing biobased soft materials will be a fascinating yet demanding practice, which will have direct impact on industrial applications as an economically viable alternative. Here we discuss some remarkable examples of glycolipids generated from industrial byproducts such as cashew nut shell liquid, which upon self-assembly produced soft nanoarchitectures including lipid nanotubes, twisted/helical nanofibers, low-molecular-weight gels, and liquid crystals. Synthetic methods applied to a "chiral pool" of carbohydrates using the selectivity of enzyme catalysis yield amphiphilic products derived from biobased feedstock including amygdalin, trehalose, and vitamin C. This has been achieved with a lipase-mediated regioselective synthetic procedure to obtain such amphiphiles in quantitative yields. Amygdalin amphiphiles showed unique gelation behavior in a broad range of solvents such as nonpolar hexanes to polar aqueous solutions

  11. Electrochemical Properties of Organosilane Self Assembled Monolayers on Aluminum 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2004-01-01

    Self assembled monolayers are commonly used to modify surfaces. Within the last 15 years, self assembled monolayers have been investigated as a way to protect from corrosion[1,2] or biofouling.[3] In this study, self assembled monolayers of decitriethoxysilane (C10H21Si(OC2H5)3) and octadecyltriethoxysilane (C18H37Si(OC2H5)3) were formed on aluminum 2024-T3. The modified surfaces and bare Al 2024 were characterized by dynamic water contact angle measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XIPS) and infrared spectroscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.5 M NaCl was used to characterize the monolayers and evaluate their corrosion protection properties. The advancing water contact angle and infrared measurements show that the mono layers form a surface where the hydrocarbon chains are packed and oriented away from the surface, consistent with what is found in similar systems. The contact angle hysteresis measured in these systems is relatively large, perhaps indicating that the hydrocarbon chains are not as well packed as monolayers formed on other substrates. The results of the EIS measurements were modeled using a Randle's circuit modified by changing the capacitor to a constant phase element. The constant phase element values were found to characterize the monolayer. The capacitance of the monolayer modified surface starts lower than the bare Al 2024, but approaches values similar to the bare Al 2024 within 24 hours as the monolayer is degraded. The n values found for bare Al 2024 quickly approach the value of a true capacitor and are greater than 0.9 within hours after the start of exposure. For the monolayer modified structure, n can stay lower than 0.9 for a longer period of time. In fact, n for the monolayer modified surfaces is different from the bare surface even after the capacitance values have converged. This indicates that the deviation from ideal capacitance is the most sensitive indicator of the presence of the monolayer.

  12. From self-assembly fundamental knowledge to nanomedicine developments.

    PubMed

    Monduzzi, Maura; Lampis, Sandrina; Murgia, Sergio; Salis, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    This review highlights the key role of NMR techniques in demonstrating the molecular aspects of the self-assembly of surfactant molecules that nowadays constitute the basic knowledge which modern nanoscience relies on. The aim is to provide a tutorial overview. The story of a rigorous scientific approach to understand self-assembly in surfactant systems and biological membranes starts in the early seventies when the progresses of SAXRD and NMR technological facilities allowed to demonstrate the existence of ordered soft matter, and the validity of Tanford approach concerning self-assembly at a molecular level. Particularly, NMR quadrupolar splittings, NMR chemical shift anisotropy, and NMR relaxation of dipolar and quadrupolar nuclei in micellar solutions, microemulsions, and liquid crystals proved the existence of an ordered polar-apolar interface, on the NMR time scale. NMR data, rationalized in terms of the two-step model of relaxation, allowed to quantify the dynamic aspects of the supramolecular aggregates in different soft matter systems. In addition, NMR techniques allowed to obtain important information on counterion binding as well as on size of the aggregate through molecular self-diffusion. Indeed NMR self-diffusion proved without any doubt the existence of bicontinuous microemulsions and bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals, suggested by pioneering and brilliant interpretation of SAXRD investigations. Moreover, NMR self-diffusion played a fundamental role in the understanding of microemulsion and emulsion nanostructures, phase transitions in phase diagrams, and particularly percolation phenomena in microemulsions. Since the nineties, globalization of the knowledge along with many other technical facilities such as electron microscopy, particularly cryo-EM, produced huge progresses in surfactant and colloid science. Actually we refer to nanoscience: bottom up/top down strategies allow to build nanodevices with applications spanning from ICT to food

  13. Preparation of quantum dot-coated magnetic polystyrene nanospheres for cancer cell labelling and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Maoquan; Song, Xin; Cheng, Duo; Liu, Shupeng; Zhu, Jian

    2006-07-01

    CdTe-coated magnetic polystyrene nanospheres (MPN) were prepared via a stepwise electrostatic self-assembly approach, and the conjugation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to the MPN/CdTe core-shell nanocomposites was prepared by using 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylamino propyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) as a cross-linking reagent. The MPN/CdTe and their bioconjugates yielded not only emitted bright fluorescence, but also exhibited superparamagnetism. The human breast cancer MDA-MB-435S cells could be labelled and rapidly separated by the MPN/CdTe-EGF bioconjugates. These magnetofluorescent nanospheres, consisting of magnetic spheres and quantum dots (QDs), may be of special interest for many biomedical applications.

  14. Positronium emission spectra from self-assembled metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Barbiellini, B.; Brown, B. L.; Feldblyum, J. I.; Guo, P.; Gidley, D. W.; Gerchow, L.; Matzger, A. J.

    2014-06-01

    Results of positronium (Ps) emission into vacuum from self-assembled metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are presented and discussed in detail. Four different MOF crystals are considered, namely, MOF-5, IRMOF-8, ZnO4(FMA)3, and IRMOF-20. The measurements reveal that a fraction of the Ps is emitted into vacuum with a distinctly smaller energy than what one would expect for Ps localized in the MOFs' cells. Only calculations considering the Ps delocalized in a Bloch state can reproduce the measured Ps emission energy providing a robust demonstration of wave function delocalization in quantum mechanics. We show how the Bloch state population can be controlled by tuning the initial positron beam energy. Therefore, Ps in MOFs can be used both to simulate the dynamics of delocalized excitations in materials and to probe the MOFs for their advanced characterization.

  15. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by self assembled chemical field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Hang; Kang, Yuhong; Gladwin, Elizabeth; Claus, Richard O.

    2015-04-01

    Multiple layer-by-layer sensor material modifications were designed and implemented to achieve selectivity of semiconductor based chemical field effect transistors (ChemFETs) to particular heavy metal ions. The ChemFET sensors were fabricated and modified in three ways, with the intent to initially target first mercury and lead ions and then chromium ions, respectively. Sensor characterization was performed with the gate regions of the sensor elements exposed to different concentrations of target heavy metal ion solutions. A minimum detection level in the range of 0.1 ppm and a 10%-90% response time of less than 10 s were demonstrated. By combining layer-by-layer gold nanoparticles and lead ionophores, a sensor is produced that is sensitive and selective not only to chromium but also to Cr3+ and Cr6+. This result supports the claim that high selectivity can be achieved by designing self-assembled bonding for lead, arsenic, chromium, cesium, mercury, and cadmium.

  16. Shaping polymersomes into predictable morphologies via out-of-equilibrium self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rikken, R. S. M.; Engelkamp, H.; Nolte, R. J. M.; Maan, J. C.; van Hest, J. C. M.; Wilson, D. A.; Christianen, P. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Polymersomes are bilayer vesicles, self-assembled from amphiphilic block copolymers. They are versatile nanocapsules with adjustable properties, such as flexibility, permeability, size and functionality. However, so far no methodological approach to control their shape exists. Here we demonstrate a mechanistically fully understood procedure to precisely control polymersome shape via an out-of-equilibrium process. Carefully selecting osmotic pressure and permeability initiates controlled deflation, resulting in transient capsule shapes, followed by reinflation of the polymersomes. The shape transformation towards stomatocytes, bowl-shaped vesicles, was probed with magnetic birefringence, permitting us to stop the process at any intermediate shape in the phase diagram. Quantitative electron microscopy analysis of the different morphologies reveals that this shape transformation proceeds via a long-predicted hysteretic deflation–inflation trajectory, which can be understood in terms of bending energy. Because of the high degree of controllability and predictability, this study provides the design rules for accessing polymersomes with all possible different shapes. PMID:27558520

  17. Shaping polymersomes into predictable morphologies via out-of-equilibrium self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikken, R. S. M.; Engelkamp, H.; Nolte, R. J. M.; Maan, J. C.; van Hest, J. C. M.; Wilson, D. A.; Christianen, P. C. M.

    2016-08-01

    Polymersomes are bilayer vesicles, self-assembled from amphiphilic block copolymers. They are versatile nanocapsules with adjustable properties, such as flexibility, permeability, size and functionality. However, so far no methodological approach to control their shape exists. Here we demonstrate a mechanistically fully understood procedure to precisely control polymersome shape via an out-of-equilibrium process. Carefully selecting osmotic pressure and permeability initiates controlled deflation, resulting in transient capsule shapes, followed by reinflation of the polymersomes. The shape transformation towards stomatocytes, bowl-shaped vesicles, was probed with magnetic birefringence, permitting us to stop the process at any intermediate shape in the phase diagram. Quantitative electron microscopy analysis of the different morphologies reveals that this shape transformation proceeds via a long-predicted hysteretic deflation-inflation trajectory, which can be understood in terms of bending energy. Because of the high degree of controllability and predictability, this study provides the design rules for accessing polymersomes with all possible different shapes.

  18. Hierarchical volume gratings by combining holographic-patterning and block copolymer self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnkrant, Michael; Marron, Russell; Li, Christopher; Natarajan, Lalgudi; Tondiglia, Vincent; Bunning, Timothy

    2009-03-01

    A novel hierarchical photonic crystal (HPC) was fabricated by combining top-down and bottom-up nanomanufacturing techniques. The hierarchical structure was fabricated from a volume of material by combining holographic patterning (HP) and block copolymer (BCP) self assembly. The structure of the HPC was investigated as a function of the BCP architecture, BCP concentration and crystallization temperature. Upon heating the photonic crystal a red shift in the reflected wavelength occurs; but, an initial decrease in diffraction efficiency (DE) followed by an increase in DE indicates a non-monotonic change in the structure of the HPC. Upon cooling the reverse occurs reflecting the dynamic change in the hierarchical structure. Transmission electron microscopy, in-situ FTIR and optical spectroscopy were used to correlate the optical property change with BCP/HPC morphology. This approach could open a gateway to fabricating multifunctional hierarchical nanostructures.

  19. The magneto-elastica: from self-buckling to self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Dominic; du Pontavice, Emmanuel; Hall, Cameron L.; Goriely, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Spherical neodymium–iron–boron magnets are permanent magnets that can be assembled into a variety of structures owing to their high magnetic strength. A one-dimensional chain of these magnets responds to mechanical loadings in a manner reminiscent of an elastic rod. We investigate the macroscopic mechanical properties of assemblies of ferromagnetic spheres by considering chains, rings and chiral cylinders of magnets. Based on energy estimates and simple experiments, we introduce an effective magnetic bending stiffness for a chain of magnets and show that, used in conjunction with classic results for elastic rods, it provides excellent estimates for the buckling and vibration dynamics of magnetic chains. We then use this estimate to understand the dynamic self-assembly of a cylinder from an initially straight chain of magnets. PMID:24511257

  20. Supramolecular amplification of amyloid self-assembly by iodination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolani, Arianna; Pirrie, Lisa; Stefan, Loic; Houbenov, Nikolay; Haataja, Johannes S.; Catalano, Luca; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Giancane, Gabriele; Valli, Ludovico; Milani, Roberto; Ikkala, Olli; Resnati, Giuseppe; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2015-06-01

    Amyloid supramolecular assemblies have found widespread exploitation as ordered nanomaterials in a range of applications from materials science to biotechnology. New strategies are, however, required for understanding and promoting mature fibril formation from simple monomer motifs through easy and scalable processes. Noncovalent interactions are key to forming and holding the amyloid structure together. On the other hand, the halogen bond has never been used purposefully to achieve control over amyloid self-assembly. Here we show that single atom replacement of hydrogen with iodine, a halogen-bond donor, in the human calcitonin-derived amyloidogenic fragment DFNKF results in a super-gelator peptide, which forms a strong and shape-persistent hydrogel at 30-fold lower concentration than the wild-type pentapeptide. This is remarkable for such a modest perturbation in structure. Iodination of aromatic amino acids may thus develop as a general strategy for the design of new hydrogels from unprotected peptides and without using organic solvents.