Science.gov

Sample records for nanostructural features formed

  1. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  2. Nanostructural features of demosponge biosilica.

    PubMed

    Weaver, James C; Pietrasanta, Lía I; Hedin, Niklas; Chmelka, Bradley F; Hansma, Paul K; Morse, Daniel E

    2003-12-01

    Recent interest in the optical and mechanical properties of silica structures made by living sponges, and the possibility of harnessing these mechanisms for the synthesis of advanced materials and devices, motivate our investigation of the nanoscale structure of these remarkable biomaterials. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopic (SEM and AFM) analyses of the annular substructure of demosponge biosilica spicules reveals that the deposited material is nanoparticulate, with a mean particle diameter of 74+/-13 nm. The nanoparticles are deposited in alternating layers with characteristic etchant reactivities. Further analyses of longitudinally fractured spicules indicate that each deposited layer is approximately monoparticulate in thickness and exhibits extensive long range ordering, revealing an unanticipated level of nanoscale structural complexity. NMR data obtained from differentially heated spicule samples suggest that the etch sensitivity exhibited by these annular domains may be related to variation in the degree of silica condensation, rather than variability in the inclusion of organics. In addition, AFM phase imaging in conjunction with results obtained from HF and alkaline etching experiments suggest that at various stages in spicule biosynthesis, regions of unusually low silica condensation are deposited, indicating a possible interruption in normal spicule formation. While this discovery of nanoparticulate silica aggregation in demosponge skeletal elements is likely to reflect the intrinsic kinetic tendency of silica to form such particles during polycondensation, the heirarchical organization of these nanoparticles is biologically unique.

  3. Ordered biological nanostructures formed from chaperonin polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The following application relates to nanotemplates, nanostructures, nanoarrays and nanodevices formed from wild-type and mutated chaperonin polypeptides, methods of producing such compositions, methods of using such compositions and particular chaperonin polypeptides that can be utilized in producing such compositions.

  4. Campus Landscape: Functions, Forms, Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dober, Richard P.

    This guide provides information, instruction, and ideas on planning and designing every aspect of the campus landscape, from parking lots to playing fields. Using real-world examples of classic and contemporary campus landscapes, it features coverage of landscape restoration and regeneration; provides an assessment matrix for consistent, effective…

  5. Charge-free method of forming nanostructures on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hoffbauer; Mark , Akhadov; Elshan

    2010-07-20

    A charge-free method of forming a nanostructure at low temperatures on a substrate. A substrate that is reactive with one of atomic oxygen and nitrogen is provided. A flux of neutral atoms of least one of oxygen and nitrogen is generated within a laser-sustained-discharge plasma source and a collimated beam of energetic neutral atoms and molecules is directed from the plasma source onto a surface of the substrate to form the nanostructure. The energetic neutral atoms and molecules in the beam have an average kinetic energy in a range from about 1 eV to about 5 eV.

  6. Nanostructured thermoelectrics : big efficiency gains from small features.

    SciTech Connect

    Vineis, C. J.; Shakouri, A.; Majumdar, A.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.; Univ.of California at Santa Cruz; Univ. of California at Berkeley

    2010-01-01

    The field of thermoelectrics has progressed enormously and is now growing steadily because of recently demonstrated advances and strong global demand for cost-effective, pollution-free forms of energy conversion. Rapid growth and exciting innovative breakthroughs in the field over the last 10-15 years have occurred in large part due to a new fundamental focus on nanostructured materials. As a result of the greatly increased research activity in this field, a substantial amount of new data - especially related to materials - have been generated. Although this has led to stronger insight and understanding of thermoelectric principles, it has also resulted in misconceptions and misunderstanding about some fundamental issues. This article sets out to summarize and clarify the current understanding in this field; explain the underpinnings of breakthroughs reported in the past decade; and provide a critical review of various concepts and experimental results related to nanostructured thermoelectrics. We believe recent achievements in the field augur great possibilities for thermoelectric power generation and cooling, and discuss future paths forward that build on these exciting nanostructuring concepts.

  7. Platinum nanostructures formed by femtosecond laser irradiation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Huo Haibin; Shen Mengyan

    2012-11-15

    Platinum nanostructures with various morphologies, such as spike-like, ripple-like and array-like structures, have been fabricated by 400 nm and 800 nm femtosecond laser irradiation in water. Different structures can be formed on the surfaces as a function of the laser wavelength, the fluence and scan methods. The reflectance measurements of these structures show much larger absorption on the irradiated surfaces than untreated platinum surfaces.

  8. Waste Form Features, Events, and Processes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schreiner

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the waste form features, events and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical bases for screening decisions. This information is required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with the issues related to the degradation and potential failure of the waste form and the migration of the waste form colloids. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA, (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical bases for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This revision addresses the TSPA-LA FEP list (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analyses and resolution of the features, events, and processes (FEPs) associated with the waste form performance in the repository. Forty FEPs were identified that are associated with the waste form performance. This report has been prepared to document the screening methodology used in the process of FEP inclusion and exclusion. The analyses documented in this report are for the license application (LA) base case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). In this design, a drip shield is placed over the waste package and no backfill is placed over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). Each FEP may include one or more specific issues that are collectively described by a FEP name and a FEP description. The FEP description may encompass a single feature, process or event, or a few closely related or coupled processes if the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA-LA disposition. The FEPs are

  9. [Electromyographic features of 3 forms of myotonia].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianov, M V; Chuchin, M Iu

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of a great body of examination data the electromyographic peculiarities of three forms of myotonia are analyzed. As a result, the authors come to a conclusion that in the third form of myotonia the function of muscular fibres is grossly impaired, this impairment following the pattern of their being put out of activity. This failure appears invariably during the muscle activity and leads, in the end to the clinically observed transient, and in more advanced cases, moderately permanent weakness of the muscles and their hypotrophy. In addition, data on synaptic apparatus involvement were also obtained. The time course of the development of those disorders, as regards the neuromuscular conduction and the distal parts of the muscular fibres is followed. In atrophic myotonia, certain peculiarities of the electrophysiological characteristics of the neuromuscular periphery were noted. In particular, a marked phase of secondary refractoriness was revealed. Thomsen's myotonia was found to differ substantially in the electrophysiological characteristics from the above two forms of the myotonia. Although in a number of cases it is difficult to class a particular case with one or another form of myotonia (this can be explained by an exceedingly great diversity of the biochemical peculiarities inherited by each individual) the differentiation of the above three forms of myotonia is justified from the viewpoint of both exploring the pathogenesis of the disease forms, and choosing the treatment method the most effective in this particular case. Of importance in solving these problems may be diversified electrophysiological examinations of the motor apparatus, and comparisons of their results with those of clinical examinations. PMID:7180301

  10. Exciton dispersion in silicon nanostructures formed by intense, ultra-fast electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, A. V.; Newman, M. W.; Thielen, P. A.; Lee, H. W. H.; Schenkel, T.; McDonald, J. W.; Schneider, D. H.

    The intense, ultra-fast electronic excitation of clean silicon (100)-(2×1) surfaces leads to the formation of silicon nanostructures embedded in silicon, which photoluminesce in the yellow-green ( 2-eV band gap). The silicon surfaces were irradiated with slow, highly charged ions (e.g. Xe44+ and Au53+) to produce the ultra-fast electronic excitation. The observation of excitonic features in the luminescence from these nanostructures has recently been reported. In this paper we report the dispersion of the excitonic features with laser excitation energy. A phonon-scattering process is proposed to explain the observed dispersion.

  11. Light-emitting nanostructures formed by intense, ultrafast electronic excitation in silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Alex V.; Newman, Micheal W.; Thielen, Peter A.; Lee, Howard W. H.; Schenkel, Thomas; McDonald, Joseph W.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2001-10-01

    The intense, ultrafast electronic excitation of clean silicon (100)-(2×1) surfaces leads to the formation of silicon nanostructures embedded in silicon, which photoluminescence at ˜560 nm wavelength (˜2 eV band gap). The silicon surfaces were irradiated with slow, highly charged ions (e.g., Xe44+ and Au53+) to produce the electronic excitation. The observation of excitonic features in the luminescence is particularly unusual for silicon nanostructures. The temperature dependence and the measurement of the triplet-singlet splitting of the emission strongly support the excitonic assignment.

  12. Terahertz wave generation from spontaneously formed nanostructures in silver nanoparticle ink.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kosaku; Takano, Keisuke; Tadokoro, Yuzuru; Nakajima, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate terahertz pulse generation from silver nanoparticle ink, originally developed for printed electronics, under irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Using metal nanoparticle ink, metallic nanostructures can be easily made in a large area without lithographic techniques. Terahertz pulses were emitted from the baked ink, having spontaneously formed nanostructures of ∼100  nm. From the results of the baking temperature dependence and the polarization measurement, the terahertz generation is attributed to the nonlinear polarization induced by the enhanced local fields around these nanostructures. This study paves the way for the future development of terahertz emitters which have resonances in both the near-infrared light and the terahertz wave, by combining micrometer-scale structures drawn by an inkjet printer and nanometer-scale structures formed during the baking process. PMID:27128090

  13. Terahertz wave generation from spontaneously formed nanostructures in silver nanoparticle ink.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kosaku; Takano, Keisuke; Tadokoro, Yuzuru; Nakajima, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate terahertz pulse generation from silver nanoparticle ink, originally developed for printed electronics, under irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Using metal nanoparticle ink, metallic nanostructures can be easily made in a large area without lithographic techniques. Terahertz pulses were emitted from the baked ink, having spontaneously formed nanostructures of ∼100  nm. From the results of the baking temperature dependence and the polarization measurement, the terahertz generation is attributed to the nonlinear polarization induced by the enhanced local fields around these nanostructures. This study paves the way for the future development of terahertz emitters which have resonances in both the near-infrared light and the terahertz wave, by combining micrometer-scale structures drawn by an inkjet printer and nanometer-scale structures formed during the baking process.

  14. Eigenanalysis of morphological diversity in silicon random nanostructures formed via resist collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Makoto; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Shumpei; Tate, Naoya; Yoshida, Naoki; Matsumoto, Tsutomu

    2016-11-01

    Nano-artifact metrics is an information security principle and technology that exploits physically uncontrollable processes occurring at the nanometer-scale to protect against increasing security threats. Versatile morphological patterns formed on the surfaces of planar silicon devices originating from resist collapse are one of the most unique and useful vehicles for nano-artifact metrics. In this study, we demonstrate the eigenanalysis of experimentally fabricated silicon random nanostructures, through which the diversity and the potential capacity of identities are quantitatively characterized. Our eigenspace-based approach provides intuitive physical pictures and quantitative discussions regarding the morphological diversity of nanostructured devices while unifying measurement stability, which is one of the most important concerns regarding security applications. The analysis suggests approximately 10115 possible identities per 0.18-μm2 nanostructure area, indicating the usefulness of nanoscale versatile morphology. The presented eigenanalysis approach has the potential to be widely applicable to other materials, devices, and system architectures.

  15. Spherical plasmoids formed upon the combustion and explosion of nanostructured hydrated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarouk, S. K.; Dolbik, A. V.; Labunov, V. A.; Borisenko, V. E.

    2007-02-01

    The kinetics of the combustion and explosion of nanostructured hydrated porous silicon has been analyzed in a duration range from 100 μs to 1 s. It has been shown that the presence of hydrogen in silicon nanostructures increases the energy yield of oxidation processes leading to the formation of spherical plasmoids with a size of 0.1-0.8 m. Buoyancy in them can be compensated by the weight of the material particles formed inside and this compensation leads to a change in the velocity of plasmoids from 0.5 m/s to zero in the process of their cooling. It is hypothesized that a ball lightning appears due to the combustion and explosion of nanostructured hydrated silicon in spherical plasmoids.

  16. Method of making nanostructured glass-ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Huizhen; Wang, Yifeng; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2014-07-08

    A waste form for and a method of rendering hazardous materials less dangerous is disclosed that includes fixing the hazardous material in nanopores of a nanoporous material, reacting the trapped hazardous material to render it less volatile/soluble, and vitrifying the nanoporous material containing the less volatile/soluble hazardous material.

  17. Terra firma-forme dermatosis: Case Series and dermoscopic features.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Razek, Moheb M; Fathy, Hanan

    2015-10-16

    Terra firma-forme dermatosis (TFFD) is characterized by dirt-like skin lesions that disappear after rubbing with alcohol. We describe the dermoscopic features of TFFD before and after alcohol swabbing in six patients. All patients showed similar dermoscopic appearance with large polygonal plate-like brown scales arranged together giving a mosaic pattern. These features disappear completely after isopropyl alcohol swabbing of the lesions. In conclusion dermoscopy can assist in the evaluation of terra firma-forme dermatosis and the dermoscopic evaluation of other dirty dermatoses is recommended in the future to compare findings with TFFD.

  18. Study of the technology of the plasma nanostructuring of silicon to form highly efficient emission structures

    SciTech Connect

    Galperin, V. A.; Kitsyuk, E. P.; Pavlov, A. A.; Shamanaev, A. A.

    2015-12-15

    New methods for silicon nanostructuring and the possibility of raising the aspect ratios of the structures being formed are considered. It is shown that the technology developed relates to self-formation methods and is an efficient tool for improving the quality of field-emission cathodes based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by increasing the Si–CNT contact area and raising the efficiency of the heat sink.

  19. Optofluidic Modulation of Self-Associated Nanostructural Units Forming Planar Bragg Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Ramirez, Manuel; Barranco, Angel; Löffler, Markus; Yubero, Francisco; González-Elipe, Agustin R

    2016-01-26

    Bragg microcavities (BMs) formed by the successive stacking of nanocolumnar porous SiO2 and TiO2 layers with slanted, zigzag, chiral, and vertical configurations are prepared by physical vapor deposition at oblique angles while azimuthally varying the substrate orientation during the multilayer growth. The slanted and zigzag BMs act as wavelength-selective optical retarders when they are illuminated with linearly polarized light, while no polarization dependence is observed for the chiral and vertical cavities. This distinct optical behavior is attributed to a self-nanostructuration mechanism involving a fence-bundling association of nanocolumns as observed by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy in the slanted and zigzag microcavities. The outstanding retarder response of the optically active BMs can be effectively modulated by dynamic infiltration of nano- and mesopores with liquids of different refraction indices acting as a switch of the polarization behavior. The unprecedented polarization and tunable optofluidic properties of these nanostructured photonic systems have been successfully simulated with a simple model that assumes a certain birefringence for the individual stacked layers and accounts for the light interference phenomena developed in the BMs. The possibilities of this type of self-arranged nanostructured and optically active BMs for liquid sensing and monitoring applications are discussed. PMID:26653767

  20. Spray-Formed Tooling with Micro-Scale Features

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin McHugh

    2010-06-01

    Molds, dies, and related tooling are used to shape many of the plastic and metal components we use every day at home and work. Traditional mold-making practices are labor and capital equipment intensive, involving multiple machining, benching and heat treatment operations. Spray forming is an alternative method to manufacture molds and dies. The general concept is to atomize and deposit droplets of a tooling alloy onto a pattern to form a thick deposit while imaging the pattern’s shape, surface texture and details. Unlike conventional machining, this approach can be used to fabricate tooling with micro-scale surface features. This paper describes a research effort to spray form molds and dies that are used to image micro-scale surface textures into polymers. The goal of the study is to replicate textures that give rise to superhydrophobic behavior by mimicking the surface structure of highly water repellent biological materials such as the lotus leaf. Spray conditions leading to high transfer fidelity of features into the surface of molded polymers will be described. Improvements in water repellency of these materials was quantified by measuring the static contact angle of water droplets on flat and textured surfaces.

  1. Nanostructure and Composition of Tribo-Boundary Films Formed in Ionic Liquid Lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Chi, Miaofang; Meyer III, Harry M; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    Since the idea of using ionic liquids (ILs) as lubricants was raised in 2001, many studies have been conducted in this area and results have demonstrated superior lubricating performance for a variety of ionic liquids. It is widely believed that tribochemical reactions occur between the metal surface and the IL during the wear process to form a protective tribo-boundary film on the contact area that reduces friction and wear. However, the study of this critical boundary film has been limited to top surface two-dimensional topography examination and chemical analysis in the literature. A more comprehensive characterization is needed to help understand the film formation process and the lubricating mechanism. This study demonstrated a multi-technique three-dimensional approach to characterize the IL-formed boundary films, including top surface morphology examination, cross section nanostructure characterization, and layered chemical analysis. Characterization was carried out on both ferrous and aluminum surfaces lubricated by an ammonium IL. The focused-ion-beam (FIB) technique enabled TEM/EDS examination on the cross section of the boundary film to provide direct measurement of the film thickness, visualization of the nanostructure, and analysis of composition. In addition, composition-depth profiles were generated using XPS aided by ion-sputtering to reveal the composition change at different levels of the boundary film to investigate the film formation process.

  2. One-dimensional Fe Nanostructures Formed on Vicinal Au(111) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Susumu; Fujisawa, Hideki; Nantoh, Masashi; Kawai, Maki

    2005-07-01

    In this study of fabricated one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of Fe adatoms on vicinal Au(111) surfaces, the growth mechanism and electronic structures are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). STM observations reveal that dosed Fe atoms are trapped at the lower corners of the steps. They create nucleation centers near the intersections between steps and discommensuration lines, and grow into evenly spaced Fe fragments located at face-centered-cubic (fcc) stacking regions of the substrate. The connection of these fragments aligned along the steps results in the formation of Fe monatomic rows. As the Fe coverage increases, the Fe growth proceeds predominantly at the fcc stacking regions, and forms quasi-1D nanostructures with undulating edges. At an Fe coverage of ˜0.6 ML, the fast-growing parts connect with the adjacent Fe structures and a two-dimensional network structure is built up. ARPES measurements reveal that the decoration of the step edges with Fe has a significant influence on the periodic potential of the surface state electrons confined between the regularly arranged steps. On the surface with Fe monatomic rows, photoemission spectra measured in the direction perpendicular to the steps show a parabolic dispersion of the Au(111) surface state with downward energy shift of the band bottom; the clean surface, in contrast, shows two 1D quantum-well levels. A simple analysis using a 1D Kronig-Penny model reveals that the Fe decoration reduces the potential barrier height at the steps from 20 to 4.6 eV Å, suggesting that the Fe adatoms work as attractive scatterers and increase the probability of transmission through the barriers. Furthermore, for the higher Fe coverage, the spectra reflecting the electronic nature of the 1D nanostructures show little dispersion, suggesting that the Fe 3d states are localized in the 1D structures.

  3. Study of micro/nanostructures formed by a nanosecond laser in gaseous environments for stainless steel surface coloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Fangfang; Ong, Weili; Guan, Yingchun; Li, Fengping; Sun, Shufeng; Lim, G. C.; Hong, Minghui

    2015-02-01

    Micro/nanostructures are fabricated on the stainless steel surfaces by a nanosecond laser in different gaseous environments, including air, O2, N2 and Ar. Our results indicate that the dimensional feature of the micro/nanostructures is greatly affected by laser scanning speed as well as gaseous environment. The chemical composition of the structures can be flexibly adjusted by laser processing parameters. Oxygen-rich environment is found to boost the growth of the nanostructures. The coloring by the laser processing can be achieved on the laser treated stainless steel surfaces. The multicolor effect on the surfaces is found to be attributed to both feature dimension and chemical composition of the structures. The coloring of the metal surfaces has promising applications in surface marking and code identifying.

  4. Nanostructures formed by displacement of porous silicon with copper: from nanoparticles to porous membranes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The application of porous silicon as a template for the fabrication of nanosized copper objects is reported. Three different types of nanostructures were formed by displacement deposition of copper on porous silicon from hydrofluoric acid-based solutions of copper sulphate: (1) copper nanoparticles, (2) quasi-continuous copper films, and (3) free porous copper membranes. Managing the parameters of porous silicon (pore sizes, porosity), deposition time, and wettability of the copper sulphate solution has allowed to achieve such variety of the copper structures. Elemental and structural analyses of the obtained structures are presented. Young modulus measurements of the porous copper membrane have been carried out and its modest activity in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy is declared. PMID:22916840

  5. Nanostructures formed by displacement of porous silicon with copper: from nanoparticles to porous membranes.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Hanna; Redko, Sergey; Smirnov, Aleksandr; Panarin, Andrei; Terekhov, Sergei; Nenzi, Paolo; Balucani, Marco; Bondarenko, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    The application of porous silicon as a template for the fabrication of nanosized copper objects is reported. Three different types of nanostructures were formed by displacement deposition of copper on porous silicon from hydrofluoric acid-based solutions of copper sulphate: (1) copper nanoparticles, (2) quasi-continuous copper films, and (3) free porous copper membranes. Managing the parameters of porous silicon (pore sizes, porosity), deposition time, and wettability of the copper sulphate solution has allowed to achieve such variety of the copper structures. Elemental and structural analyses of the obtained structures are presented. Young modulus measurements of the porous copper membrane have been carried out and its modest activity in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy is declared.

  6. Nanostructure characterisation of flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel using transmission Kikuchi diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Birosca, S; Ding, R; Ooi, S; Buckingham, R; Coleman, C; Dicks, K

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays flow-forming has become a desired near net shape manufacturing method as it provides excellent mechanical properties with improved surface finish and significant manufacturing cost reduction. However, the material is subjected to excessive plastic deformation during flow-forming process, generating a very fine and complex microstructure. In addition, the intense dislocation density and residual stress that is generated in the component during processing makes the microstructure characterisation using conventional micro-analytical tools challenging. Thus, the microstructure/property relationship study in such a material is rather difficult. In the present study a flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel nanostructure and crystallographic texture were characterised by means of Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Here, TKD is shown to be a powerful technique in revealing very fine martensite laths within an austenite matrix. Moreover, fine precipitates in the order of 20-70 nm on the martensite lath boundaries were clearly imaged and characterised. This greatly assisted in understanding the preferable site formation of the carbides in such a complex microstructure. The results showed that the actual TKD spatial resolution was in the range of 5-10 nm using 25 kV for flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel.

  7. Flexible a-Si:H Solar Cells with Spontaneously Formed Parabolic Nanostructures on a Hexagonal-Pyramid Reflector.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wan Jae; Yoo, Chul Jong; Cho, Hyoung Won; Kim, Kyoung-Bo; Kim, Moojin; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2015-04-24

    Flexible amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells with high photoconversion efficiency (PCE) are demonstrated by embedding hexagonal pyramid nanostructures below a Ag/indium tin oxide (ITO) reflector. The nanostructures constructed by nanoimprint lithography using soft materials allow the top ITO electrode to spontaneously form parabolic nanostructures. Nanoimprint lithography using soft materials is simple, and is conducted at low temperature. The resulting structure has excellent durability under repeated bending, and thus, flexible nanostructures are successfully constructed on flexible a-Si:H solar cells on plastic film. The nanoimprinted pyramid back reflector provides a high angular light scattering with haze reflectance >98% throughout the visible spectrum. The spontaneously formed parabolic nanostructure on the top surface of the a-Si:H solar cells both reduces reflection and scatters incident light into the absorber layer, thereby elongating the optical path length. As a result, the nanopatterned a-Si:H solar cells, fabricated on polyethersulfone (PES) film, exhibit excellent mechanical flexibility and PCE increased by 48% compared with devices on a flat substrate.

  8. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  9. Fabrication and optical characterization of nanostructures formed inside berlinite-5 zeolite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jian Ting

    Ultra small single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and molecular iodine species were fabricated inside the channels of AFI zeolite crystals in this study. These nanostructures are mono-sized and uniformly aligned showing unique physical properties. Furthermore, the thermal stability of freestanding ultra small SWNTs and the tuning of the electronic band structure by lithium doping in SWNTs formed inside AFI zeolites were also studied. (I) the study on ultra small SWNTs included: (1) DSC/TG and mass spectrum characterization of the growth process of SWNTs inside the zeolite framework and sample quality improvement by a UV-assisted pyrolysis method; (2) thermal properties of SWNTs AFI and freestanding SWNTs; (3) fabricating lithium-doped SWNTs AFI using a vapor phase adsorption method and characterizing the charge transfer between the lithium atoms and SWNTs by resonant Raman scattering. (II) The study on iodine species occluded inside the AFI zeolite frameworks included (1) fabricating uniform arrays of one-dimensional molecular iodine chains through vapor phase adsorption; (2) identifying the iodine species formed inside the AM zeolite channels by polarized Raman scattering, resonant Raman scattering, and polarized micro optical absorption; (3) characterizing and controlling the phase properties of iodine species by DSC/TG, Raman scattering, and localized heating of the focused laser beam.

  10. Feature Article: Fast scanning tunnelling microscopy as a tool to understand changes on metal surfaces: from nanostructures to single atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Karina

    2005-03-01

    The Feature Article [1] describes how structural changes in metallic nanostructures can be followed with fast scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The title page shows the same spot of a Ag(111) surface at room temperature, imaged with STM approximately one hour apart. Intrinsic changes to prepared nano-structures are marked as Brownian motion of vacancy islands (rectangle), coalescence of two vacancy islands (hexagon), and decay of an adatom island (circle).Karina Morgenstern is now professor at the University of Hannover. Her research is placed within the field of nanoscience and is in particular devoted to thermally activated processes of metallic nanostructures, electronically activated reactions of molecules on metallic surfaces, and water-metal interactions.The present issue of physica status solidi (b) also contains the article Apperance of copper d9 defect centres in wide-gap CdSe nanoparticles: A high-fequency EPR study by N. R. J. Poolton et al. as Editor's Choice [2] as well as several papers on electrical and nonlinear optical properties from the European Conference on Organised Films (ECOF 2004) chaired by José Antonio de Saja, Valladolid.

  11. Role of artesian groundwater in forming Martian permafrost features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Alan D.

    1991-01-01

    Various landforms possibly related to formation (growth), movement, or decay of ground ice have been identified on Mars, including fretted terrain (ft) and associated lobate debris aprons (lda), the chaotic terrain, concentric crater fills (ccf), polygonal ground, softened terrain, small domes that are possibly pingos, and curvilinear (fingerprint) features (cuf). Glaciers may also have been present. Some of these may involve ice derived from artesian groundwater. Topical areas of discussion are: Mars groundwater and the location of permafrost features; the ft, lda, ccf, and cuf; role of artesian groundwater in formation of fretted terrain, lobate debris blankets, and concentric crater fills; sources of glacial ice; and pingos and other pseudovolcanic structures.

  12. Femtosecond laser nanostructuring in porous glass with sub-50 nm feature sizes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yang; Shen, Yinglong; Qiao, Lingling; Chen, Danping; Cheng, Ya; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2013-01-15

    We report on controllable production of nanostructures embedded in a porous glass by femtosecond laser direct writing. We show that a hollow nanovoid with a lateral size of ~40 nm and an axial size of ~1500 nm can be achieved by manipulating the peak intensity and polarization of the writing laser beam. Our finding enables applications ranging from direct construction of 3D nanofluidics in glass to clean stealth dicing of transparent plates.

  13. Nanostructured BN-Mg composites: features of interface bonding and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Shtansky, Dmitry; Sorokin, Pavel B; Golberg, Dmitri

    2016-01-14

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the lightest industrially used metals. However, wide applications of Mg-based components require a substantial enhancement of their mechanical characteristics. This can be achieved by introducing small particles or fibers into the metal matrix. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the stability and mechanical properties of a nanocomposite made of magnesium reinforced with boron nitride (BN) nanostructures (BN nanotubes and BN monolayers). We show that boron vacancies at the BN/Mg interface lead to a substantial increase in BN/Mg bonding establishing an efficient route towards the development of BN/Mg composite materials with enhanced mechanical properties. PMID:26662205

  14. Morphological and biochemical features of Borrelia burgdorferi pleomorphic forms

    PubMed Central

    Herranen, Anni; Schwarzbach, Armin; Gilbert, Leona

    2015-01-01

    The spirochaete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in the northern hemisphere. There is a long-standing debate regarding the role of pleomorphic forms in Lyme disease pathogenesis, while very little is known about the characteristics of these morphological variants. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of B. burgdorferi pleomorphic formation in different culturing conditions at physiological temperature. Interestingly, human serum induced the bacterium to change its morphology to round bodies (RBs). In addition, biofilm-like colonies in suspension were found to be part of B. burgdorferi’s normal in vitro growth. Further studies provided evidence that spherical RBs had an intact and flexible cell envelope, demonstrating that they are not cell wall deficient, or degenerative as previously implied. However, the RBs displayed lower metabolic activity compared with spirochaetes. Furthermore, our results indicated that the different pleomorphic variants were distinguishable by having unique biochemical signatures. Consequently, pleomorphic B. burgdorferi should be taken into consideration as being clinically relevant and influence the development of novel diagnostics and treatment protocols. PMID:25564498

  15. [Featuring pathogenicity factors in biofilm-forming and no-biofilm forming strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis].

    PubMed

    Sidashenko, O I; Voronkova, O S; Sirokvasha, O A; Vinnikov, A I

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the manifestation of pathogenicity factors: hemolytic, lipase, letsytinase activity and ability to adhere in 20 film-forming and 17 non-film-forming strains of S. epidermidis. Studying pathogenicity factors of the film-forming strains it was found that complete hemolysis and lipase activity shown was by all the film-forming strains of S. epidermidis, letsytinase activity was observed in 80%. Among the non-film-forming strains complete hemolysis and lipase activity were observed in 89% and letsytinase - 71%. Researched non-film-forming and film-forming strains of S. epidermidis showed the ability to adhere to buccal epithelial cells of humans. Found that all the film-forming strains of S. epidermidis were hight level adgesion, the highest IAM was equal to 11,84. It was found that among non-film-forming strains of S. epidermidis were low-, medium- and hight level adgesion. IAM of non-film-forming strains of S. epidermidis is 3 times lower compared to the IAM of the film-forming strains of human epithelial cells and was 3.2.

  16. Effect of the particle size on the micro and nanostructural features of a calcium phosphate cement: a kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ginebra, M P; Driessens, F C M; Planell, J A

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of controlling the final micro and nanostructural features of a calcium phosphate cement by modifying the particle size of the starting powder, and to study the effect of this parameter on the kinetics of the setting reaction. The development of calcium phosphate materials with tailored structures at the micro and nanoscale levels could allow the modulation of some specific responses in biologic phenomena such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion, which strongly depend on the nano-sized roughness of the interface. It is shown that the higher specific surface, produced by the reduction of the particle size of the powder, strongly accelerates the hydrolysis of the alpha-TCP into calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite. The higher degree of supersaturation attained in the solution favours the nucleation of smaller crystals. Thus, by increasing the specific surface of the starting powder in a factor of 5, the size of the precipitated crystals is strongly reduced, and the specific surface of the set cement increases by a factor of 2. The reduction of the particle size produces a substantial decrease of the setting time and accelerates the hardening of the cement without significantly affecting the final strength attained. The mechanical strength achieved by the cement cannot be univocally related to the degree of reaction, without considering the microstructural features.

  17. Effects of geometric form features on three-dimensional object categorization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang H; Chang, Wuefay; Chuang, Ming-Chuen

    2005-06-01

    The purpose was to investigate the effects of 3-D form features on the object-categorization process. 30 subjects [17 male and 13 female undergraduate industrial design students whose mean age was 20.7 yr. (SD= 1.5)] were asked to classify 32 3-D prismatic images according to their similarity. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analyses indicated that the classification process was strongly related to the prisms' compounded features. The attention-weighting of each individual form feature was calculated by regression analysis which further indicated that each feature had a different effect on the categorizing process.

  18. Spin-transfer torque and specific features of magnetic-state switching in vacuum tunnel nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, G. D. Popkov, A. F.; Dyuzhev, N. A.

    2015-12-15

    The specific features of spin-transfer torque in vacuum tunnel structures with magnetic electrodes are investigated using the quasi-classical Sommerfeld model of electron conductivity, which takes into account the exchange splitting of the spin energy subbands of free electrons. Using the calculated voltage dependences of the transferred torques for a tunnel structure with cobalt electrodes and noncollinear magnetic moments in the electrodes, diagrams of stable spin states on the current–field parameter plane in the in-plane geometry of the initial magnetization are obtained.

  19. Nanostructured ZnO films in forms of rod, plate and flower: Electrodeposition mechanisms and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kıcır, Nur; Tüken, Tunç; Erken, Ozge; Gumus, Cebrail; Ufuktepe, Yuksel

    2016-07-01

    Uniformity and reproducibility of well-defined ZnO nanostructures are particularly important issues for fabrication and applications of these nanomaterials. In present study, we report selective morphology control during electrodeposition, by adjusting the hydroxyl generation rate and Zn(OH)2 deposition. In presence of remarkably high chloride concentration (0.3 M) and -1.0 V deposition potential, slow precipitation conditions were provided in 5 mM Zn(NO3)2 solution. By doing so, we have obtained highly ordered, vertically aligned and uniformly spaced hexagon shaped nanoplates, on ITO surface. We have also investigated the mechanism for shifting the morphology from rod/plate to flower like structure of ZnO, for better understanding the reproducibility. For this reason, the influence of various supporting electrolytes (sodium/ammonium salts of acetate) has been investigated for interpretation of the influence of OH- concentration nearby the surface. From rod to plate and flower nanostructures, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were realized for characterization, also the optical properties were studied.

  20. Nanostructural features in silica-polyvinyl acetate nanocomposites characterized by small-angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, R. A.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Zhu, A. J.; Ash, J.; Shofner, M. L.; Schadler, L. S.; Kumar, S. K.; Sternstein, S. S.; ORNL; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

    2007-09-10

    Small-angle scattering (SAS) experiments were carried out on nanocomposites of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) and fumed silica nanoparticles with different surface areas and chemical treatment, in the wave-vector (Q) range: 0.0002-1 Angstrom{sup -1}. SAS data on composites with matrices of two different molecular weights indicate that the particle aggregation is independent of the molecular weight of the matrix for a fixed filler concentration and surface treatment. Particle size distributions derived from the SAS data suggest that particle aggregation is reduced when the native surface hydroxyl groups are blocked by various surface treatments, which also reduce the bonding strength to the polymer matrix. The unified exponential/power-law analysis of the SAS data shows three levels of hierarchy in the organization of silica particles. The first level consists of small aggregates of silica particles. At the second level we observe polydispersed aggregates resembling mass-fractal objects that is corroborated by TEM. The polydispersed aggregates further associate to form agglomerates at the third level. The relevance of these findings to the mechanism of nanofiller reinforcement of linear amorphous polymers above T{sub g} is discussed.

  1. Nanostructural Features in Silica-polyvinyl Acetate Nanocomposites Characterized by Small-Angle Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, Aravinda N; Thiyagarajan, P.; Zhu, Dr. Ai-Jun; Ash, Dr. Benjamin J.; Shofner, M. L.; Schadler, Linda; Kumar, Sanat K; Sternstein, S. S.

    2007-01-01

    Small-angle scattering (SAS) experiments were carried out on nanocomposites of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) and fumed silica nanoparticles with different surface areas and chemical treatment, in the wave-vector (Q) range: 0.0002-1 A-1 . SAS data on composites with matrices of two different molecular weights indicate that the particle aggregation is independent of the molecular weight of the matrix for a fixed filler concentration and surface treatment. Particle size distributions derived from the SAS data suggest that particle aggregation is reduced when the native surface hydroxyl groups are blocked by various surface treatments, which also reduce the bonding strength to the polymer matrix. The unified exponential/power-law analysis of the SAS data shows three levels of hierarchy in the organization of silica particles. The first level consists of small aggregates of silica particles. At the second level we observe polydispersed aggregates resembling mass-fractal objects that is corroborated by TEM. The polydispersed aggregates further associate to form agglomerates at the third level. The relevance of these findings to the mechanism of nanofiller reinforcement of linear amorphous polymers above Tg is discussed.

  2. Growth of Hydrothermally Derived CdS-Based Nanostructures with Various Crystal Features and Photoactivated Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Lung, Tsai-Wen

    2016-05-01

    CdS crystallites with rod- and flower-like architectures were synthesized using a facile hydrothermal growth method. The hexagonal crystal structure of CdS dominated the growth mechanisms of the rod- and flower-like crystallites under specific growth conditions, as indicated by structural analyses. The flower-like CdS crystallites had a higher crystal defect density and lower optical band gap value compared with the rod-like CdS crystallites. The substantial differences in microstructures and optical properties between the rod- and flower-like CdS crystallites revealed that the flower-like CdS crystallites exhibited superior photoactivity, and this performance could be further enhanced through appropriate thermal annealing in ambient air. A postannealing procedure conducted in ambient air oxidized the surfaces of the flower-like CdS crystallites and formed a CdO phase. The formation of heterointerfaces between the CdS and CdO phases mainly contributed to the improved photoactivity of the synthesized flower-like CdS crystallites.

  3. Particulates vs. fibers: dimension featured magnetic and visible light driven photocatalytic properties of Sc modified multiferroic bismuth ferrite nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sakar, M; Balakumar, S; Saravanan, P; Bharathkumar, S

    2016-01-14

    We report the magnetic and visible light driven photocatalytic properties of scandium (Sc) substituted bismuth ferrite (BSFO) particulate and fiber nanostructures. An increasing concentration of Sc was found to reduce the crystallite size, particle size and band gap energy of the BSFO nanostructures, which was evident from X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analysis respectively. The temperature dependent magnetic studies carried out using a SQUID magnetometer suggested that the origin of the magnetic properties in the pure BFO system could be the emergence of an antiferromagnetic-core/ferromagnetic-shell like structure, in contrast to the modified spin canted structures in the case of the BSFO nanostructures. The observed photocatalytic efficiency was attributed to the enhanced band bending process and recombination resistance in the BSFO nanostructures. For a comparative study, the photocatalytic activities of some selected compositions were also investigated under simulated solar light along with natural solar light. PMID:26667276

  4. Particulates vs. fibers: dimension featured magnetic and visible light driven photocatalytic properties of Sc modified multiferroic bismuth ferrite nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S.; Saravanan, P.; Bharathkumar, S.

    2015-12-01

    We report the magnetic and visible light driven photocatalytic properties of scandium (Sc) substituted bismuth ferrite (BSFO) particulate and fiber nanostructures. An increasing concentration of Sc was found to reduce the crystallite size, particle size and band gap energy of the BSFO nanostructures, which was evident from X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analysis respectively. The temperature dependent magnetic studies carried out using a SQUID magnetometer suggested that the origin of the magnetic properties in the pure BFO system could be the emergence of an antiferromagnetic-core/ferromagnetic-shell like structure, in contrast to the modified spin canted structures in the case of the BSFO nanostructures. The observed photocatalytic efficiency was attributed to the enhanced band bending process and recombination resistance in the BSFO nanostructures. For a comparative study, the photocatalytic activities of some selected compositions were also investigated under simulated solar light along with natural solar light.We report the magnetic and visible light driven photocatalytic properties of scandium (Sc) substituted bismuth ferrite (BSFO) particulate and fiber nanostructures. An increasing concentration of Sc was found to reduce the crystallite size, particle size and band gap energy of the BSFO nanostructures, which was evident from X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analysis respectively. The temperature dependent magnetic studies carried out using a SQUID magnetometer suggested that the origin of the magnetic properties in the pure BFO system could be the emergence of an antiferromagnetic-core/ferromagnetic-shell like structure, in contrast to the modified spin canted structures in the case of the BSFO nanostructures. The observed photocatalytic efficiency was attributed to the enhanced band bending process

  5. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 1. Regular sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, J.W.; Smith, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    Small-scale topographic features are commonly found on the boundaries of natural rivers, streams, and floodplains. A simple method for determining the form drag on these features is presented, and the results of this model are compared to laboratory measurements. The roughness elements are modeled as Gaussian-shaped features defined in terms of three parameters: a protrusion height, H; a streamwise length scale, ??; and a spacing between crests, ??. This shape is shown to be a good approximation to a wide variety of natural topographic bank features. The form drag on an individual roughness element embedded in a series of identical elements is determined using the drag coefficient of the individual element and a reference velocity that includes the effects of roughness elements further upstream. In addition to calculating the drag on each element, the model determines the spatially averaged total stress, skin friction stress, and roughness height of the boundary. The effects of bank roughness on patterns of velocity and boundary shear stress are determined by combining the form drag model with a channel flow model. The combined model shows that drag on small-scale topographic features substantially alters the near-bank flow field. These methods can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers and to form the basis for fully predictive (no empirically adjusted parameters) channel flow models. They also provide a foundation for calculating the near-bank boundary shear stress fields necessary for determining rates of sediment transport and lateral erosion.

  6. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 1. Regular sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, Jason W.; Smith, J. Dungan

    2006-12-01

    Small-scale topographic features are commonly found on the boundaries of natural rivers, streams, and floodplains. A simple method for determining the form drag on these features is presented, and the results of this model are compared to laboratory measurements. The roughness elements are modeled as Gaussian-shaped features defined in terms of three parameters: a protrusion height, H; a streamwise length scale, σ; and a spacing between crests, λ. This shape is shown to be a good approximation to a wide variety of natural topographic bank features. The form drag on an individual roughness element embedded in a series of identical elements is determined using the drag coefficient of the individual element and a reference velocity that includes the effects of roughness elements further upstream. In addition to calculating the drag on each element, the model determines the spatially averaged total stress, skin friction stress, and roughness height of the boundary. The effects of bank roughness on patterns of velocity and boundary shear stress are determined by combining the form drag model with a channel flow model. The combined model shows that drag on small-scale topographic features substantially alters the near-bank flow field. These methods can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers and to form the basis for fully predictive (no empirically adjusted parameters) channel flow models. They also provide a foundation for calculating the near-bank boundary shear stress fields necessary for determining rates of sediment transport and lateral erosion.

  7. Static and Dynamical Properties of Ferroelectrics and Related Materials in Bulk and Nanostructure Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Zhigang

    Ferroelectrics (FE) and multiferroics (MFE) have attracted a lot of attentions due to their rich and novel properties. Studies towards FE and MFE are of both fundamental and technological importance. We use a first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian method, conventional ab-initio packages and linear-scale three-dimension fragment method to investigate several important issues about FE and MFE. Tuning the properties of FE and MFE films are essential for miniaturized device applications, which can be realized through epitaxial strain and growth direction. In this dissertation, we use the effective Hamiltonian method to study (i) BaTiO3 films grown along the (110) pseudocubic direction on various substrates, (ii) BaTiO3 films grown on a single substrate along directions varying from [001] to [110] via [111] pseudocubic direction. Optimized physical responses or curie temperatures are found along some special directions or under epitaxial strain of certain range. FE and MFE nanostructures are shown to possess electrical vortices (known as one type topological defect), which have the potential to be used in new memory devices. However, the dynamic mechanism behind them is barely known. We use the effective Hamiltonian method to reveal that there exists a distinct mode which is shown to be responsible for the formation of the electrical vortices and in the THz region. Spin-canted magnetic structures are commonly seen in MFE, which results in the coexistence of two or more magnetic order parameters in the same structure. Understanding the physics behind such coupled magnetic order parameters is of obvious benefit for the sake of control of the magnetic properties of such systems. We employ both the effective Hamiltonian and ab-initio methods to derive and prove there is a universal law that explicitly correlates various magnetic order parameters with the different types of oxygen octahedra rotations. FE or MFE possessing electrical vortices are experimentally shown to

  8. Incorporation of DOPE into Lipoplexes formed from a Ferrocenyl Lipid leads to Inverse Hexagonal Nanostructures that allow Redox-Based Control of Transfection in High Serum

    PubMed Central

    Muller, John P. E.; Aytar, Burcu S.; Kondo, Yukishige; Lynn, David M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    We report small angle X-ray and neutron scattering measurements that reveal that mixtures of the redox-active lipid bis(11-ferrocenylundecyl)dimethylammonium bromide (BFDMA) and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) spontaneously form lipoplexes with DNA that exhibit inverse hexagonal nanostructure (HIIc). In contrast to lipoplexes of DNA and BFDMA only, which exhibit a multilamellar nanostructure (Lαc) and limited ability to transfect cells in the presence of serum proteins, we measured lipoplexes of BFDMA and DOPE with the HIIc nanostructure to survive incubation in serum and to expand significantly the range of media compositions (e.g., up to 80% serum) over which BFDMA can be used to transfect cells with high efficiency. Importantly, we also measured the oxidation state of the ferrocene within the BFDMA/DNA lipoplexes to have a substantial influence on the transfection efficiency of the lipoplexes in media containing serum. Specifically, whereas lipoplexes of reduced BFDMA and DOPE transfect cells with high efficiency, lipoplexes of oxidized BFDMA and DNA lead to low levels of transfection. Complementary measurements using SAXS reveal that the low transfection efficiency of the lipoplexes of oxidized BFDMA and DOPE correlates with the presence of weak Bragg peaks and thus low levels of HIIc nanostructure in solution. Overall, these results provide support for our hypothesis that DOPE-induced formation of the HIIc nanostructure of the BFDMA-containing lipoplexes underlies the high cell transfection efficiency measured in the presence of serum, and that the oxidation state of BFDMA within lipoplexes with DOPE substantially regulates the formation of the HIIc nanostructure and thus the ability of the lipoplexes to transfect cells with DNA. More generally, the results presented in this paper suggest that lipoplexes formed from BFDMA and DOPE may offer the basis of approaches that permit active and external control of transfection of cells in the presence of high

  9. Feature-oriented regional modeling and simulations (FORMS) for the western South Atlantic: Southeastern Brazil region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calado, L.; Gangopadhyay, A.; da Silveira, I. C. A.

    The multi-scale synoptic circulation system in the southeastern Brazil (SEBRA) region is presented using a feature-oriented approach. Prevalent synoptic circulation structures, or "features," are identified from previous observational studies. These features include the southward-flowing Brazil Current (BC), the eddies off Cabo São Tomé (CST - 22°S) and off Cabo Frio (CF - 23°S), and the upwelling region off CF and CST. Their synoptic water-mass ( T- S) structures are characterized and parameterized to develop temperature-salinity ( T- S) feature models. Following [Gangopadhyay, A., Robinson, A.R., Haley, P.J., Leslie, W.J., Lozano, C.J., Bisagni, J., Yu, Z., 2003. Feature-oriented regional modeling and simulation (forms) in the gulf of maine and georges bank. Cont. Shelf Res. 23 (3-4), 317-353] methodology, a synoptic initialization scheme for feature-oriented regional modeling and simulation (FORMS) of the circulation in this region is then developed. First, the temperature and salinity feature-model profiles are placed on a regional circulation template and objectively analyzed with available background climatology in the deep region. These initialization fields are then used for dynamical simulations via the Princeton Ocean Model (POM). A few first applications of this methodology are presented in this paper. These include the BC meandering, the BC-eddy interaction and the meander-eddy-upwelling system (MEUS) simulations. Preliminary validation results include realistic wave-growth and eddy formation and sustained upwelling. Our future plan includes the application of these feature models with satellite, in-situ data and advanced data-assimilation schemes for nowcasting and forecasting the SEBRA region.

  10. Nanostructures formed by cyclodextrin covered procainamide through supramolecular self assembly - Spectral and molecular modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Mohandoss, T.; Sankaranarayanan, R. K.

    2015-02-01

    Inclusion complexation behavior of procainamide (PCA) with two cyclodextrins (α-CD and β-CD) were analyzed by absorption, fluorescence, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Raman image, FT-IR, differential scanning colorimeter (DSC), Powder X ray diffraction (XRD) and 1H NMR. Blue shift was observed in β-CD whereas no significant spectral shift observed in α-CD. The inclusion complex formation results suggest that water molecules also present in the inside of the CD cavity. The present study revealed that the phenyl ring of the PCA drug is entrapped in the CD cavity. Cyclodextrin studies show that PCA forms 1:2 inclusion complex with α-CD and β-CD. PCA:α-CD complex form nano-sized particles (46 nm) and PCA:β-CD complex form self-assembled to micro-sized tubular structures. The shape-shifting of 2D nanosheets into 1D microtubes by simple rolling mechanism were analysed by micro-Raman and TEM images. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG and ΔS) of inclusion process were determined from semiempirical PM3 calculations.

  11. Influence of fourfold anisotropy form on hysteresis loop shape in ferromagnetic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrmann, Andrea; Blachowicz, Tomasz

    2014-08-15

    The dependence of the form of different mathematical depictions of fourfold magnetic anisotropies has been examined, using a simple macro-spin model. Strong differences in longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops occur due to deviations from the usual phenomenological model, such as using absolute value functions. The proposed possible models can help understanding measurements on sophisticated magnetic nanosystems, like exchange bias layered structures employed in magnetic hard disk heads or magnetic nano-particles, and support the development of solutions with specific magnetization reversal behavior needed in novel magneto-electronic devices.

  12. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 2. Irregular sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, J.W.; Smith, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The size, shape, and spacing of small-scale topographic features found on the boundaries of natural streams, rivers, and floodplains can be quite variable. Consequently, a procedure for determining the form drag on irregular sequences of different-sized topographic features is essential for calculating near-boundary flows and sediment transport. A method for carrying out such calculations is developed in this paper. This method builds on the work of Kean and Smith (2006), which describes the flow field for the simpler case of a regular sequence of identical topographic features. Both approaches model topographic features as two-dimensional elements with Gaussian-shaped cross sections defined in terms of three parameters. Field measurements of bank topography are used to show that (1) the magnitude of these shape parameters can vary greatly between adjacent topographic features and (2) the variability of these shape parameters follows a lognormal distribution. Simulations using an irregular set of topographic roughness elements show that the drag on an individual element is primarily controlled by the size and shape of the feature immediately upstream and that the spatial average of the boundary shear stress over a large set of randomly ordered elements is relatively insensitive to the sequence of the elements. In addition, a method to transform the topography of irregular surfaces into an equivalently rough surface of regularly spaced, identical topographic elements also is given. The methods described in this paper can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers as well as quantify bank roughness.

  13. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 2. Irregular sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, Jason W.; Smith, J. Dungan

    2006-12-01

    The size, shape, and spacing of small-scale topographic features found on the boundaries of natural streams, rivers, and floodplains can be quite variable. Consequently, a procedure for determining the form drag on irregular sequences of different-sized topographic features is essential for calculating near-boundary flows and sediment transport. A method for carrying out such calculations is developed in this paper. This method builds on the work of Kean and Smith (2006), which describes the flow field for the simpler case of a regular sequence of identical topographic features. Both approaches model topographic features as two-dimensional elements with Gaussian-shaped cross sections defined in terms of three parameters. Field measurements of bank topography are used to show that (1) the magnitude of these shape parameters can vary greatly between adjacent topographic features and (2) the variability of these shape parameters follows a lognormal distribution. Simulations using an irregular set of topographic roughness elements show that the drag on an individual element is primarily controlled by the size and shape of the feature immediately upstream and that the spatial average of the boundary shear stress over a large set of randomly ordered elements is relatively insensitive to the sequence of the elements. In addition, a method to transform the topography of irregular surfaces into an equivalently rough surface of regularly spaced, identical topographic elements also is given. The methods described in this paper can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers as well as quantify bank roughness.

  14. Genetically improved monolayer-forming tobacco mosaic viruses to generate nanostructured semiconducting bio/inorganic hybrids.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Petia; Stitz, Nina; Sanctis, Shawn; Maurer, Johannes H M; Hoffmann, Rudolf C; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Schneider, Jörg J; Bill, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    The genetically determined design of structured functional bio/inorganic materials was investigated by applying a convective assembly approach. Wildtype tobacco mosaic virus (wt TMV) as well as several TMV mutants were organized on substrates over macroscopic-length scales. Depending on the virus type, the self-organization behavior showed pronounced differences in the surface arrangement under the same convective assembly conditions. Additionally, under varying assembly parameters, the virus particles generated structures encompassing morphologies emerging from single micrometer long fibers aligned parallel to the triple-contact line through disordered but dense films to smooth and uniform monolayers. Monolayers with diverse packing densities were used as templates to form TMV/ZnO hybrid materials. The semiconducting properties can be directly designed and tuned by the variation of the template architecture which are reflected in the transistor performance. PMID:25768914

  15. Nanostructures of colloidal complexes formed in oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant dilute aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, S.; Guillot, S.; Ritacco, H.; Boué, F.; Langevin, D.

    2007-07-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering measurements were performed on dilute solutions of carboxymethylcellulose/DTAB complexes in water in order to determine their size, shape and internal structures. At low polymer content, the complexes are spherical, rather monodisperse and probably made of polymer chains intercalated between surfactant micelles. Moreover, we show that these micelles have a similar cubic arrangement than found in polymer/surfactant precipitates formed at higher surfactant concentrations. At larger polymer content, in the semi-dilute polyelectrolyte regime, the complexes are larger, softer and polydisperse. However, they possess a similar internal structure in both regimes. Carboxymethylcellulose/CTAB complexes are also large, soft and polydisperse but do not seem to exhibit well-defined internal structures.

  16. Organo-montmorillonite Barrier Layers Formed by Combustion: Nanostructure and Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, James B; Ambuken, Preejith V.; Stretz, Holly A; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Payzant, E Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles into barrier layers has been the most cited theoretical explanation for the significant reduction in flammability often noted for nanocomposites formed from polymers and montmorillonite organoclays. Both mass and heat transport reductions have been credited for such improvements, and in most cases a coupled mechanism is expected. To provide validation for early models, new model barrier layers were produced from organoclays, and these barrier layers subjected to novel permeability analysis to obtain a flux. The effects of surfactant, temperature and pressure on barrier layer structure were examined. XRD versus TGA results suggest that chemical degradation of four different organoclays and physical collapse on heating are not correlated. Addition of pressure as low as 7kPa also altered the structure produced. Permeability of Ar through the ash was found to be sensitive to structural change/self assembly of high aspect ratio MMT nanoparticles. Actual fluxes ranged from 0.139 to 0.151 mol(m2.sec)-1, values which will provide useful limits in verifying models for the coupled contribution of mass and heat transfer to flammability parameters such as peak heat release rate.

  17. Intermolecular interactions and solvent diffusion in ordered nanostructures formed by self-assembly of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiyong

    Hydrogels formed by Poloxamer poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) (PEO-PPO) block copolymers find various pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. A variety of ordered structures can be exhibited by Poloxamer block copolymers in selective solvents such as water, for example, micellar cubic phase, hexagonal phase, lamellar phase, etc. We are interested in the thermodynamic and transport properties of water in such hydrogels that have an ordered (lyotropic liquid crystalline) structure. We have investigated the time evolution of water loss from Poloxamer gel films under a driving force of known water vapor pressure in the air in contact with the film. The experimental data on the drying process have been fitted to the diffusion equation for water in the film, under a boundary condition that includes the water concentration in the gel at infinite time; the water diffusion coefficient and other parameters have thus been obtained. The water chemical potential and osmotic pressure in the gel have been obtained from osmotic stress measurements. The osmotic pressure (force), together with data on the corresponding lyotropic liquid crystal spacing (distance) that we obtained from Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) measurements, have been analyzed to provide information on the prevailing intermolecular (inter-assembly) forces in the gel. The forces in the gel reveal interactions that occur at two levels, that of the PEO coil and that of the PEO segment.

  18. FUNCTION FOLLOWS FORM: ACTIVATION OF SHAPE & FUNCTION FEATURES DURING OBJECT IDENTIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Eiling; Huffstetler, Stacy; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Most theories of semantic memory characterize knowledge of a given object as comprising a set of semantic features. But how does conceptual activation of these features proceed during object identification? We present the results of a pair of experiments that demonstrate that object recognition is a dynamically unfolding process in which function follows form. We used eye movements to explore whether activating one object’s concept leads to the activation of others that share perceptual (shape) or abstract (function) features. Participants viewed four-picture displays and clicked on the picture corresponding to a heard word. In critical trials, the conceptual representation of one of the objects in the display was similar in shape or function (i.e., its purpose) to the heard word. Importantly, this similarity was not apparent in the visual depictions (e.g., for the target “frisbee,” the shape-related object was a triangular slice of pizza – a shape that a frisbee cannot take); preferential fixations on the related object were therefore attributable to overlap of the conceptual representations on the relevant features. We observed relatedness effects for both shape and function, but shape effects occurred earlier than function effects. We discuss the implications of these findings for current accounts of the representation of semantic memory. PMID:21417543

  19. One-step growth of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} stem-branch featured nanostructures: Morphology control by VS and VLS mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiushi; Gao Wei; Shan Lianchen; Zhang Jian; Jin Yunxia; Cong Ridong; Cui Qiliang

    2011-09-15

    We report here one-step synthesis of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanodendrites by selectively applying a vapor-solid (VS) and vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) strategy via direct current arc discharge method. The resultant nanodendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The spine-shaped nanodendrites were generated by a noncatalytic growth following a VS mode. The uniform secondary nanowire branches were epitaxial grown from two side surfaces of the nanowire stems. The pine-shaped nanodendrites were obtained through a catalytic growth in a VLS process. These branch nanowires were unsystematically grown from the nanocone-like stems. The photoluminescence spectra of the nanodendrites show a strong white light emission around 400-750 nm, suggesting their potential applications in light and electron emission devices. - Graphical abstract: Spine-shaped and pine-shaped Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures were synthesized by VS and VLS mode with plasma-assisted dc arc discharge method. Highlights: > Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} stem-branch featured nanostructures have been prepared. > Spine-shaped nanodendrites were generated by a noncatalytic growth following a VS mode. > Pine-shaped nanodendrites were obtained through a catalytic growth in a VLS process.

  20. Fractal features of soil particle size distribution in newly formed wetlands in the Yellow River Delta

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junbao; Lv, Xiaofei; Bin, Ma; Wu, Huifeng; Du, Siyao; Zhou, Mo; Yang, Yanming; Han, Guangxuan

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic of particle size distribution (PSD) in the newly formed wetlands in coast has seldom been studied. We applied fractal-scaling theory in assessing soil particle size distribution (PSD) features of newly formed wetlands in the Yellow River Delta (YRD), China. The singular fractal dimensions (D) values ranged from 1.82 to 1.90, the capacity dimension (D0) values ranged from 0.84 to 0.93, and the entropy dimension (D1) values ranged from 0.66 to 0.84. Constrained corresponding analysis revealed that 43.5% of the variance in soil PSD can be explained by environmental factors, including 14.7% by seasonal variation, 8.6% by soil depth, and 8.0% by vegetation type. The fractal dimensions D and D1 were sensitive with fine particles with size ranging less than 126 μm, and D0 was sensitive with coarse particles with size ranging between 126 μm to 2000 μm. Fractal analysis makes full use of soil PSD information, and offers a useful approach to quantify and assess the soil physical attributes in the newly formed wetland. PMID:26014107

  1. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  2. Channels and valleys on Mars: Cold climate features formed as a result of a thickening cryosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Large flood channels, valley networks, and a variety of features attributed to the action of ground ice indicate that Mars emerged from heavy bombardment around 3.8Gyr ago, with an inventory of water at the surface equivalent to at least a few hundred meters spread over the whole planet, as compared with 3 km for the Earth. The surface water resided primarily in a porous, kilometers thick, megaregolith created by the high impact rates. At the end of heavy bombardment a rapid decline in erosion rates by a factor of 1000 suggests a major change in the global climate. It is proposed that at this time the climate became similar to today's and that this climate has been maintained throughout the rest of Mars' history. The various drainage features represent an adjustment of the distribution of water to the surface relief inherited from the period of heavy bombardment and to a thickening of the cryosphere as the heat flow declined. The valley networks formed mostly at the end of heavy bombardment when erosion rates were high and climatic conditions permitted an active water cycle. They continued to form after heavy bombardment when the cryosphere started to form by a combination of episodic flooding and mass-wasting aided by the presence of liquid water at shallow depths. As the cryosphere thickened with declining heat flow, water could no longer easily access the surface and the rate of valley formation declined. Hydrostatic pressures built below the cryosphere. Eruptions of groundwater became more catastrophic and massive floods resulted, mainly in upper Hesperian time. Flood sources were preferentially located in low-lying, low-latitude areas where the cryosphere was thin, or near volcanoes where a thinner than typical cryosphere is also expected. Floods caused a drawdown in the global water table so that few formed in the second half of Mars' history. The floodwaters pooled in low-lying areas, mostly in the northern plains. Some of the water may still be present as

  3. Characterization and optimization of illumination vector for contouring surface form and feature using DSPI.

    PubMed

    Song, Chaolong; Prasad A S, Guru; Chan, Kelvin H K; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-06-01

    Surface defect or damage is one of the critical factors leading to the failure of engineering materials and structures. The methodologies for the measurement of surface shape and feature or defect have been extensively explored and developed over the past few decades, including both contact and non-contact methods. Speckle pattern interferometry, as a non-contact optical method, has been demonstrated to effectively contour the surface shape through adjusting the illumination vector. However, few studies have been made to investigate the effect of the initial position of the illumination source as well as the source translation direction. In this paper, we report to carry out a study of measuring the surface form and feature using digital speckle pattern interferometry system via a slight translation of illumination source. Through theoretically analyzing the sensitivity factor along with the experimental validation, it is shown that the contouring fringe is more sensitive to the surface height with an off-axis illumination than the paraxial illumination. It is also found that translating the source along axial and lateral direction can be both used for the surface shape re-construction. PMID:27370435

  4. Characterization and optimization of illumination vector for contouring surface form and feature using DSPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chaolong; Prasad A. S., Guru; Chan, Kelvin H. K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-06-01

    Surface defect or damage is one of the critical factors leading to the failure of engineering materials and structures. The methodologies for the measurement of surface shape and feature or defect have been extensively explored and developed over the past few decades, including both contact and non-contact methods. Speckle pattern interferometry, as a non-contact optical method, has been demonstrated to effectively contour the surface shape through adjusting the illumination vector. However, few studies have been made to investigate the effect of the initial position of the illumination source as well as the source translation direction. In this paper, we report to carry out a study of measuring the surface form and feature using digital speckle pattern interferometry system via a slight translation of illumination source. Through theoretically analyzing the sensitivity factor along with the experimental validation, it is shown that the contouring fringe is more sensitive to the surface height with an off-axis illumination than the paraxial illumination. It is also found that translating the source along axial and lateral direction can be both used for the surface shape re-construction.

  5. Photocurrent detection of chemically tuned hierarchical ZnO nanostructures grown on seed layers formed by atomic layer deposition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the morphological control method of ZnO nanostructures by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on an Al2O3/ZnO seed layer surface and the application of a hierarchical ZnO nanostructure for a photodetector. Two layers of ZnO and Al2O3 prepared using ALD with different pH values in solution coexisted on the alloy film surface, leading to deactivation of the surface hydroxyl groups. This surface complex decreased the ZnO nucleation on the seed layer surface, and thereby effectively screened the inherent surface polarity of ZnO. As a result, a 2-D zinc hydroxyl compound nanosheet was produced. With increasing ALD cycles of ZnO in the seed layer, the nanostructure morphology changes from 2-D nanosheet to 1-D nanorod due to the recovery of the natural crystallinity and polarity of ZnO. The thin ALD ZnO seed layer conformally covers the complex nanosheet structure to produce a nanorod, then a 3-D, hierarchical ZnO nanostructure was synthesized using a combined hydrothermal and ALD method. During the deposition of the ALD ZnO seed layer, the zinc hydroxyl compound nanosheets underwent a self-annealing process at 150 °C, resulting in structural transformation to pure ZnO 3-D nanosheets without collapse of the intrinsic morphology. The investigation on band electronic properties of ZnO 2-D nanosheet and 3-D hierarchical structure revealed noticeable variations depending on the richness of Zn-OH in each morphology. The improved visible and ultraviolet photocurrent characteristics of a photodetector with the active region using 3-D hierarchical structure against those of 2-D nanosheet structure were achieved. PMID:22672780

  6. Enhanced apatite-forming ability and cytocompatibility of porous and nanostructured TiO2/CaSiO3 coating on titanium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongjie; Qiao, Yuqin; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong; Ding, Chuanxian

    2013-01-01

    To improve the bioactivity and cytocompatibility of biomedical titanium dioxide coating, many efforts have been made to modify its surface composition and topography. Meanwhile, CaSiO(3) was commonly investigated as coating material on titanium implants for fast fixation and firm implant-bone attachment due to its demonstrated bioactivity and osteointegration. In this work, gradient TiO(2)/CaSiO(3) coating on titanium was prepared by a two-step procedure, in which porous and nanostructured TiO(2) coating on titanium was prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation in advance, and then needle and flake-like CaSiO(3) nanocrystals were deposited on the TiO(2) coating surface by electron beam evaporation. In view of the potential clinical applications, apatite-forming ability of the TiO(2)/CaSiO(3) coating was evaluated by simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion tests, and MG63 cells were cultured on the surface of the coating to investigate its cytocompatibility. The results show that deposition of CaSiO(3) significantly enhanced the apatite-forming ability of nanostructured TiO(2) coating in SBF. Meanwhile, the MG63 cells on TiO(2)/CaSiO(3) coating show higher proliferation rate and vitality than that on TiO(2) coating. In conclusion, the porous and nanostructured TiO(2)/CaSiO(3) coating on titanium substrate with good apatite-forming ability and cytocompatibility is a potential candidate for bone tissue engineering and implant coating.

  7. Fresh shallow valleys in the Martian midlatitudes as features formed by meltwater flow beneath ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, Daniel E. J.; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant numbers of valleys have been identified in the Martian midlatitudes (30-60°N/S), spatially associated with extant or recent ice accumulations. Many of these valleys date to the Amazonian, but their formation during these cold, dry epochs is problematic. In this study, we look in detail at the form, distribution, and quantitative geomorphology of two suites of these valleys and their associated landforms in order to better constrain the processes of their formation. Since the valleys themselves are so young and thus well preserved, uniquely, we can constrain valley widths and courses and link these to the topography from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter and High-Resolution Stereo Camera data. We show that the valleys are both qualitatively and quantitatively very similar, despite their being >5000 km apart in different hemispheres and around 7 km apart in elevation. Buffered crater counting indicates that the ages of these networks are statistically identical, probably forming during the Late Amazonian, ~100 Ma. In both localities, at least tens of valleys cross local drainage divides, apparently flowing uphill. We interpret these uphill reaches to be characteristic of flow occurring beneath a now absent, relatively thin (order 101-102 m), regionally extensive ice cover. Ridges and mounds occasionally found at the foot of these valley systems are analogous to eskers and aufeis-like refreezing features. On the basis of their interaction with these aufeis-like mounds, we suggest that this suite of landforms may have formed in a single, short episode (perhaps order of days), probably forced by global climate change.

  8. A Novel Form of Human Mendelian Hypertension Featuring Nonglucocorticoid-Remediable Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Geller, David S.; Zhang, Junhui; Wisgerhof, Max V.; Shackleton, Cedric; Kashgarian, Michael; Lifton, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Primary aldosteronism is a leading cause of secondary hypertension (HTN), but the mechanisms underlying the characteristic renin-independent secretion of aldosterone remain unknown in most patients. Objectives: We report a new familial form of aldosteronism in a father and two daughters. All were diagnosed with severe HTN refractory to medical treatment by age 7 yr. We performed a variety of clinical, biochemical, and genetic studies to attempt to clarify the underlying molecular defect. Results: Biochemical studies revealed hyporeninemia, hyperaldosteronism, and very high levels of 18-oxocortisol and 18-hydroxycortisol, steroids that reflect oxidation by both steroid 17-α hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase. These enzymes are normally compartmentalized in the adrenal fasciculata and glomerulosa, respectively. Administration of dexamethasone failed to suppress either aldosterone or cortisol secretion; these findings distinguish this clinical syndrome from glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism, another autosomal dominant form of HTN, and suggest a global defect in the regulation of adrenal steroid production. Genetic studies excluded mutation at the aldosterone synthase locus, further distinguishing this disorder from glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism. Because of unrelenting HTN, all three subjects underwent bilateral adrenalectomy, which in each case corrected the HTN. Adrenal glands showed dramatic enlargement, with paired adrenal weights as high as 82 g. Histology revealed massive hyperplasia and cellular hypertrophy of a single cortical compartment that had features of adrenal fasciculata or a transitional zone, with an atrophic glomerulosa. Conclusion: These findings define a new inherited form of aldosteronism and suggest that identification of the underlying defect will provide insight into normal mechanisms regulating adrenal steroid biosynthesis. PMID:18505761

  9. Nanostructured protic ionic liquids retain nanoscale features in aqueous solution while precursor Brønsted acids and bases exhibit different behavior.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Tamar L; Kennedy, Danielle F; Weerawardena, Asoka; Tse, Nicholas M K; Kirby, Nigel; Drummond, Calum J

    2011-03-10

    Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS) has been used to investigate the effect that water has on the nanoscale structure of protic ionic liquids (PILs) along with their precursor Brønsted acids and bases. The series of PILs consisted of primary, secondary, and tertiary alkylammonium cations in conjunction with formate, nitrate, or glycolate anions. Significant differences were observed for these systems. The nanoscale aggregates present in neat protic ionic liquids were shown to be stable in size on dilution to high concentrations of water, indicating that the water is localized in the ionic region and has little effect on the nonpolar domains. The Brønsted acid-water solutions did not display nanostructure at any water concentration. Primary amine Brønsted bases formed aggregates in water, which generally displayed characteristics of poorly structured microemulsions or a form of bicontinuous phase. Exceptions were butyl- and pentylamine with high water concentrations, for which the SWAXS patterns fitted well to the Teubner-Strey model for microemulsions. Brønsted base amines containing multiple alkyl chains or hydroxyl groups did not display nanostructure at any water concentration. IR spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of water in the various solutions. For low PIL concentrations, the water was predominately present as bulk water for PIL molar fractions less than 0.4-0.5. At high PIL concentrations, in addition to the bulk water, there was a significant proportion of perturbed water, which is water influenced in some way by the cations and anions. The molecular state of the water in the studied amines was predominately present as bulk water, with smaller contributions from perturbed water than was seen in the PILs. PMID:21319828

  10. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  11. Corrosion resistance and durability of superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Masuda, Yoshitake; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-04-19

    The corrosion resistant performance and durability of the superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution were investigated using electrochemical and contact angle measurements. The durability of the superhydrophobic surface in corrosive 5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution was elucidated. The corrosion resistant performance of the superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The EIS measurements and appropriate equivalent circuit models revealed that the superhydrophobic surface considerably improved the corrosion resistant performance of magnesium alloy AZ31. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test was performed to investigate the adhesion of the superhydrophobic film to the magnesium alloy surface. The corrosion formation mechanism of the superhydrophobic surface formed on the magnesium alloy was also proposed.

  12. Function Follows Form: Activation of Shape and Function Features during Object Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Eiling; Huffstetler, Stacy; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Most theories of semantic memory characterize knowledge of a given object as comprising a set of semantic features. But how does conceptual activation of these features proceed during object identification? We present the results of a pair of experiments that demonstrate that object recognition is a dynamically unfolding process in which function…

  13. Building a Relationship between Elements of Product Form Features and Vocabulary Assessment Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Chi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Based on the characteristic feature parameterization and the superiority evaluation method (SEM) in extension engineering, a product-shape design method was proposed in this study. The first step of this method is to decompose the basic feature components of a product. After that, the morphological chart method is used to segregate the ideas so as…

  14. Methods for the Precise Locating and Forming of Arrays of Curved Features into a Workpiece

    DOEpatents

    Gill, David Dennis; Keeler, Gordon A.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Mukherjee, Sayan D.

    2008-10-14

    Methods for manufacturing high precision arrays of curved features (e.g. lenses) in the surface of a workpiece are described utilizing orthogonal sets of inter-fitting locating grooves to mate a workpiece to a workpiece holder mounted to the spindle face of a rotating machine tool. The matching inter-fitting groove sets in the workpiece and the chuck allow precisely and non-kinematically indexing the workpiece to locations defined in two orthogonal directions perpendicular to the turning axis of the machine tool. At each location on the workpiece a curved feature can then be on-center machined to create arrays of curved features on the workpiece. The averaging effect of the corresponding sets of inter-fitting grooves provide for precise repeatability in determining, the relative locations of the centers of each of the curved features in an array of curved features.

  15. Self-seeding in one dimension: a route to uniform fiber-like nanostructures from block copolymers with a crystallizable core-forming block.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jieshu; Lu, Yijie; Chia, Anselina; Zhang, Meng; Rupar, Paul A; Gunari, Nikhil; Walker, Gilbert C; Cambridge, Graeme; He, Feng; Guerin, Gerald; Manners, Ian; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2013-05-28

    One-dimensional micelles formed by the self-assembly of crystalline-coil poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (PFS) block copolymers exhibit self-seeding behavior when solutions of short micelle fragments are heated above a certain temperature and then cooled back to room temperature. In this process, a fraction of the fragments (the least crystalline fragments) dissolves at elevated temperature, but the dissolved polymer crystallizes onto the ends of the remaining seed fragments upon cooling. This process yields longer nanostructures (up to 1 μm) with uniform width (ca. 15 nm) and a narrow length distribution. In this paper, we describe a systematic investigation of factors that affect the self-seeding behavior of PFS block copolymer micelle fragments. For PI(1000)-PFS(50) (the subscripts refer to the number average degree of polymerization) in decane, these factors include the presence of a good solvent (THF) for PFS and the effect of annealing the fragments prior to the self-seeding experiments. THF promoted the dissolution of the micelle fragments, while preannealing improved their stability. We also extended our experiments to other PFS block copolymers with different corona-forming blocks. These included PI(637)-PFS(53) in decane, PFS(60)-PDMS(660) in decane (PDMS = polydimethylsiloxane), and PFS(30)-P2VP(300) in 2-propanol (P2VP = poly(2-vinylpyridine)). The most remarkable result of these experiments is our finding that the corona-forming chain plays an important role in affecting how the PFS chains crystallize in the core of the micelles and, subsequently, the range of temperatures over which the micelle fragments dissolve. Our results also show that self-seeding is a versatile approach to generate uniform PFS fiber-like nanostructures, and in principle, the method should be extendable to a wide variety of crystalline-coil block copolymers.

  16. Can two dots form a Gestalt? Measuring emergent features with the capacity coefficient.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert X D; Houpt, Joseph W; Eidels, Ami; Townsend, James T

    2016-09-01

    While there is widespread agreement among vision researchers on the importance of some local aspects of visual stimuli, such as hue and intensity, there is no general consensus on a full set of basic sources of information used in perceptual tasks or how they are processed. Gestalt theories place particular value on emergent features, which are based on the higher-order relationships among elements of a stimulus rather than local properties. Thus, arbitrating between different accounts of features is an important step in arbitrating between local and Gestalt theories of perception in general. In this paper, we present the capacity coefficient from Systems Factorial Technology (SFT) as a quantitative approach for formalizing and rigorously testing predictions made by local and Gestalt theories of features. As a simple, easily controlled domain for testing this approach, we focus on the local feature of location and the emergent features of Orientation and Proximity in a pair of dots. We introduce a redundant-target change detection task to compare our capacity measure on (1) trials where the configuration of the dots changed along with their location against (2) trials where the amount of local location change was exactly the same, but there was no change in the configuration. Our results, in conjunction with our modeling tools, favor the Gestalt account of emergent features. We conclude by suggesting several candidate information-processing models that incorporate emergent features, which follow from our approach. PMID:25986994

  17. Can two dots form a Gestalt? Measuring emergent features with the capacity coefficient.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert X D; Houpt, Joseph W; Eidels, Ami; Townsend, James T

    2016-09-01

    While there is widespread agreement among vision researchers on the importance of some local aspects of visual stimuli, such as hue and intensity, there is no general consensus on a full set of basic sources of information used in perceptual tasks or how they are processed. Gestalt theories place particular value on emergent features, which are based on the higher-order relationships among elements of a stimulus rather than local properties. Thus, arbitrating between different accounts of features is an important step in arbitrating between local and Gestalt theories of perception in general. In this paper, we present the capacity coefficient from Systems Factorial Technology (SFT) as a quantitative approach for formalizing and rigorously testing predictions made by local and Gestalt theories of features. As a simple, easily controlled domain for testing this approach, we focus on the local feature of location and the emergent features of Orientation and Proximity in a pair of dots. We introduce a redundant-target change detection task to compare our capacity measure on (1) trials where the configuration of the dots changed along with their location against (2) trials where the amount of local location change was exactly the same, but there was no change in the configuration. Our results, in conjunction with our modeling tools, favor the Gestalt account of emergent features. We conclude by suggesting several candidate information-processing models that incorporate emergent features, which follow from our approach.

  18. The influence of nanostructured features on bacterial adhesion and bone cell functions on severely shot peened 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Bagherifard, Sara; Hickey, Daniel J; de Luca, Alba C; Malheiro, Vera N; Markaki, Athina E; Guagliano, Mario; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Substrate grain structure and topography play major roles in mediating cell and bacteria activities. Severe plastic deformation techniques, known as efficient metal-forming and grain refining processes, provide the treated material with novel mechanical properties and can be adopted to modify nanoscale surface characteristics, possibly affecting interactions with the biological environment. This in vitro study evaluates the capability of severe shot peening, based on severe plastic deformation, to modulate the interactions of nanocrystallized metallic biomaterials with cells and bacteria. The treated 316L stainless steel surfaces were first investigated in terms of surface topography, grain size, hardness, wettability and residual stresses. The effects of the induced surface modifications were then separately studied in terms of cell morphology, adhesion and proliferation of primary human osteoblasts (bone forming cells) as well as the adhesion of multiple bacteria strains, specifically Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli. The results indicated a significant enhancement in surface work hardening and compressive residual stresses, maintenance of osteoblast adhesion and proliferation as well as a remarkable decrease in the adhesion and growth of gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) compared to non-treated and conventionally shot peened samples. Impressively, the decrease in bacteria adhesion and growth was achieved without the use of antibiotics, for which bacteria can develop a resistance towards anyway. By slightly grinding the surface of severe shot peened samples to remove differences in nanoscale surface roughness, the effects of varying substrate grain size were separated from those of varying surface roughness. The expression of vinculin focal adhesions from osteoblasts was found to be singularly and inversely related to grain size, whereas the attachment of gram

  19. The influence of nanostructured features on bacterial adhesion and bone cell functions on severely shot peened 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Bagherifard, Sara; Hickey, Daniel J; de Luca, Alba C; Malheiro, Vera N; Markaki, Athina E; Guagliano, Mario; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Substrate grain structure and topography play major roles in mediating cell and bacteria activities. Severe plastic deformation techniques, known as efficient metal-forming and grain refining processes, provide the treated material with novel mechanical properties and can be adopted to modify nanoscale surface characteristics, possibly affecting interactions with the biological environment. This in vitro study evaluates the capability of severe shot peening, based on severe plastic deformation, to modulate the interactions of nanocrystallized metallic biomaterials with cells and bacteria. The treated 316L stainless steel surfaces were first investigated in terms of surface topography, grain size, hardness, wettability and residual stresses. The effects of the induced surface modifications were then separately studied in terms of cell morphology, adhesion and proliferation of primary human osteoblasts (bone forming cells) as well as the adhesion of multiple bacteria strains, specifically Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli. The results indicated a significant enhancement in surface work hardening and compressive residual stresses, maintenance of osteoblast adhesion and proliferation as well as a remarkable decrease in the adhesion and growth of gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) compared to non-treated and conventionally shot peened samples. Impressively, the decrease in bacteria adhesion and growth was achieved without the use of antibiotics, for which bacteria can develop a resistance towards anyway. By slightly grinding the surface of severe shot peened samples to remove differences in nanoscale surface roughness, the effects of varying substrate grain size were separated from those of varying surface roughness. The expression of vinculin focal adhesions from osteoblasts was found to be singularly and inversely related to grain size, whereas the attachment of gram

  20. News Stories May Form Your Publication's Character; Well-Written Features Help To Create Its Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Outlines what feature writers for their school's media can learn from the winning entries in last year's Quill & Scroll International Writing and Photography contest. Discusses seven ingredients of winning stories, and outlines seven general weaknesses found among the 503 stories evaluated for the competition. (SR)

  1. Properties of a photonic crystal formed in a solution featuring the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Rytik, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that a solution featuring the Briggs-Rauscher (BR) oscillating chemical reaction can exhibit the properties of a photonic crystal with alternating bandgap width. Thicknesses and dielectric permittivities of structural elements in the BR reaction solution have been determined by measuring the reflection and transmission spectra of microwave radiation in the range of 5-8 GHz.

  2. Effect of features on the functional form of the scalar power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooker, D. J.; Tsamis, N. C.; Woodard, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    We study how the scalar power spectrum of single-scalar inflation depends functionally on models with features which have been proposed to explain anomalies in the data. We exploit a new formalism based on evolving the norm-squared of the scalar mode functions, rather than the mode functions themselves.

  3. Cell-wall deficient L. monocytogenes L-forms feature abrogated pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Barbara; Staubli, Titu; Harris, Nicola L.; Rogler, Gerhard; Kopf, Manfred; Loessner, Martin J.; Schuppler, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Stable L-forms are cell wall-deficient bacteria which are able to multiply and propagate indefinitely, despite the absence of a rigid peptidoglycan cell wall. We investigated whether L-forms of the intracellular pathogen L. monocytogenes possibly retain pathogenicity, and if they could trigger an innate immune response. While phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes L-forms by non-activated macrophages sometimes resulted in an unexpected persistence of the bacteria in the phagocytes, they were effectively eliminated by IFN-γ preactivated or bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM). These findings were in line with the observed down-regulation of virulence factors in the cell-wall deficient L. monocytogenes. Absence of Interferon-β (IFN-β) triggering indicated inability of L-forms to escape from the phagosome into the cytosol. Moreover, abrogated cytokine response in MyD88-deficient dendritic cells (DC) challenged with L. monocytogenes L-forms suggested an exclusive TLR-dependent host response. Taken together, our data demonstrate a strong attenuation of Listeria monocytogenes L-form pathogenicity, due to diminished expression of virulence factors and innate immunity recognition, eventually resulting in elimination of L-form bacteria from phagocytes. PMID:24904838

  4. Detection of spinel ZnI n2O4 formed as nanostructures in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Komatsuda, S.; Yamada, Y.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A local structure formed by dilute In ions doped in ZnO was investigated by means of a nuclear spectroscopic technique and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Comparative studies on a presumably isomorphous CdI n2O4 unveiled the local structure: the impurity In ions form in ZnO a spinel ZnI n2O4 , which has been only a hypothetical binary oxide so far. The most stable structure of the spinel was determined by DFT calculations, and the hyperfine interaction parameters obtained for the structure show excellent agreement with the experimental values. The experimental synthesis and detection of the normal spinel ZnI n2O4 are presented.

  5. Form features provide a cue to the angular velocity of rotating objects

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Christopher David; Goold, Jessica; Killebrew, Kyle; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2013-01-01

    As an object rotates, each location on the object moves with an instantaneous linear velocity dependent upon its distance from the center of rotation, while the object as a whole rotates with a fixed angular velocity. Does the perceived rotational speed of an object correspond to its angular velocity, linear velocities, or some combination of the two? We had observers perform relative speed judgments of different sized objects, as changing the size of an object changes the linear velocity of each location on the object’s surface, while maintaining the object’s angular velocity. We found that the larger a given object is, the faster it is perceived to rotate. However, the observed relationships between size and perceived speed cannot be accounted for simply by size-related changes in linear velocity. Further, the degree to which size influences perceived rotational speed depends on the shape of the object. Specifically, perceived rotational speeds of objects with corners or regions of high contour curvature were less affected by size. The results suggest distinct contour features, such as corners or regions of high or discontinuous contour curvature, provide cues to the angular velocity of a rotating object. PMID:23750970

  6. Thermodynamic Features of Structural Motifs Formed by β-L-RNA.

    PubMed

    Szabat, Marta; Gudanis, Dorota; Kotkowiak, Weronika; Gdaniec, Zofia; Kierzek, Ryszard; Pasternak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This is the first report to provide comprehensive thermodynamic and structural data concerning duplex, hairpin, quadruplex and i-motif structures in β-L-RNA series. Herein we confirm that, within the limits of experimental error, the thermodynamic stability of enantiomeric structural motifs is the same as that of naturally occurring D-RNA counterparts. In addition, formation of D-RNA/L-RNA heterochiral duplexes is also observed; however, their thermodynamic stability is significantly reduced in reference to homochiral D-RNA duplexes. The presence of three locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues within the D-RNA strand diminishes the negative effect of the enantiomeric, complementary L-RNA strand in the formation of heterochiral RNA duplexes. Similar behavior is also observed for heterochiral LNA-2'-O-methyl-D-RNA/L-RNA duplexes. The formation of heterochiral duplexes was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The CD curves of homochiral L-RNA structural motifs are always reversed, whereas CD curves of heterochiral duplexes present individual features dependent on the composition of chiral strands.

  7. Pathological Features and Pathogenesis of the Endomyocardial Form of Restrictive Cardiomyopathy in Cats.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Karakama, S; Hirakawa, A; Tsuchiaka, S; Kobayashi, M; Machida, N

    2016-01-01

    This study reports pathological and molecular features in 41 cases of feline restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Grossly, there were patchy or diffuse areas of endocardial thickening affecting the left ventricle. The more common patchy endocardial lesions occurred as large trabecular or irregular broad bands of fibrous tissue bridging the left ventricular free wall and ventricular septum. Microscopically, regardless of the gross pattern, the thickened endocardium contained various numbers of stellate, spindle-shaped or elongated mesenchymal cells surrounded by fibrous connective tissue. Immunohistochemical findings were indicative of smooth muscle differentiation in mesenchymal cells. These cells proliferated vigorously and produced alcian blue-positive ground substance and collagen fibres; it was considered that the mesenchymal cells contributed to the formation of the endocardial lesions. In addition, multiple left ventricular 'false tendons' were invariably included within the trabecular or broad fibrous bands, providing a framework for formation of those bands. Evidence of endocarditis or endomyocarditis was lacking in all 41 cases, and no viral genomes were detected in any of the DNA or RNA samples obtained from 14 of the hearts. These observations suggest that any relationship between feline RCM and a virus-induced inflammatory response seems unlikely. PMID:27392420

  8. Artificial feature-based multiview registration method for three-dimensional free-form object modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tongqun; Zhu, Jigui; Guo, Yinbiao; Luo, Wei

    2010-05-01

    Two integral registration methods based on artificial features are described. In method one, independent global control points are designed to build a global coordinate system. Registration target and camera are also introduced to create intermediary coordinate systems. For each local scanning, one image of the whole measuring scene is shot by registration camera. Then local data can be unified to the global coordinate system by solving transition chains of various coordinate systems from this single image based on the projective geometry principle. In the other method, control points are placed on the object surface evenly and shot by registration camera from different positions and orientations. We solve their coordinates by employing the bundle adjustment method to build a global control network. The range sensor shoots at least three control points during each local scan. Then registration can be completed by mapping these control points into the global control network. In this work, the range sensor is untracked. Error accumulation and propagation are also effectively conquered, since overlapping of neighboring subregions is unessential. Experimental results are presented to show the feasibility of the proposed methods.

  9. Extrastriate Visual Areas Integrate Form Features over Space and Time to Construct Representations of Stationary and Rigidly Rotating Objects.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J Daniel; Kohler, Peter J; Tse, Peter U; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2015-11-01

    When an object moves behind a bush, for example, its visible fragments are revealed at different times and locations across the visual field. Nonetheless, a whole moving object is perceived. Unlike traditional modal and amodal completion mechanisms known to support spatial form integration when all parts of a stimulus are simultaneously visible, relatively little is known about the neural substrates of the spatiotemporal form integration (STFI) processes involved in generating coherent object representations from a succession visible fragments. We used fMRI to identify brain regions involved in two mechanisms supporting the representation of stationary and rigidly rotating objects whose form features are shown in succession: STFI and position updating. STFI allows past and present form cues to be integrated over space and time into a coherent object even when the object is not visible in any given frame. STFI can occur whether or not the object is moving. Position updating allows us to perceive a moving object, whether rigidly rotating or translating, even when its form features are revealed at different times and locations in space. Our results suggest that STFI is mediated by visual regions beyond V1 and V2. Moreover, although widespread cortical activation has been observed for other motion percepts derived solely from form-based analyses [Tse, P. U. Neural correlates of transformational apparent motion. Neuroimage, 31, 766-773, 2006; Krekelberg, B., Vatakis, A., & Kourtzi, Z. Implied motion from form in the human visual cortex. Journal of Neurophysiology, 94, 4373-4386, 2005], increased responses for the position updating that lead to rigidly rotating object representations were only observed in visual areas KO and possibly hMT+, indicating that this is a distinct and highly specialized type of processing.

  10. Luminescence and structural properties of germanium nanocrystals formed by annealing multilayer GeOx/Al2O3 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, D. A.; Garakhin, S. A.; Belolipetsky, A. V.; Nezhdanov, A. V.; Ershov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    By Raman scattering, luminescence, and IR-absorption spectroscopy multilayer nanoperiodic structures Ge/Al2O3 & GeOx/Al2O3 have been investigated. The samples have been obtained by the physical evaporation; their properties have been varied by changing the layer thicknesses (2-20 nm) and annealing temperature (500-1000 °C). It is found that germanium nanocrystals are formed in the temperature range of 500-800 °C and exhibit intense size-depend photoluminescence at 1.2 eV and 1.8-2.0 eV.

  11. Self-organized lipid-porphyrin bilayer membranes in vesicular form: nanostructure, photophysical properties, and dioxygen coordination.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Teruyuki; Moritake, Miho; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2002-12-01

    An amphiphilic tetraphenylporphyrin and its iron complex bearing four phospholipid substituents, in which a trimethylolethane residue connects the two acyl chains (lipid-porphyrins), have been synthesized. The free-base lipid-porphyrin 6a self-organizes in aqueous media to form spherical unilamellar vesicles with a diameter of 100 nm and a uniform thickness of 10 nm, which corresponds to twice the length of the molecule. In the visible absorption spectrum, the porphyrin Soret band was significantly red-shifted (12 nm) relative to that of the monomer in benzene/MeOH solution due to the excitonic interaction of the porphyrin chromophores. The [symbol: see text]-A isotherm of 6a gave an area per molecule of 2.2 nm2, which allowed the estimation of the number of molecules in a single vesicle (2.3 x 10(4)). Double-layered Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of 6a on a glass surface exhibited an absorption spectrum identical to that of the 6a vesicles in bulk aqueous solution, and this suggests that they contain similar geometric arrangements of the porphyrin moieties. Exciton calculations on the basis of our structural model reproduced the bathochromic shift of the Soret band well. In the photophysical properties of the 6a vesicles, the characteristics of J-aggregated porphyrins substantially predominate: strong fluorescence and extremely short triplet lifetime. The iron complex 6b with a small molar excess of 1-dodecylimidazole (DIm) also formed spherical unilamellar vesicles (100 nm phi). Scanning force microscopy after evaporation on a graphite surface revealed 6b/DIm vesicles with a vertical height of 19.8 nm, which coincided with the thickness of the double bilayer membranes. The ferrous 6c formed a bis(DIm)-coordinated low-spin FeII complex under an N2 atmosphere. Upon addition of O2 to this solution, a kinetically stable O2 adduct was formed at 37 degrees C with a half-life of 17 h. Distinct gel-phase (liquid-crystal) transitions of the lipid-porphyrin membranes were

  12. [Ecophysiological features of mat-forming bacteria Thioploca in bottom sediments of Frolikha Bay, northern Baikal].

    PubMed

    Zemsiakaia, T I; Namsaraev, B B; Dul'tseva, N M; Khanaeva, T A; Golobokova, L P; Dubinina, G A; Wada, E

    2001-01-01

    A colorless sulfur bacterium of the genus Thioploca, which forms bacterial mats, was studied in the region of underwater thermal vents (Frolikha Bay, northern Baikal). The organism occurs under microaerobic conditions in top sediment layers, and its biomass can amount to 65 mg of wet weight per 1 kg of silt. Individual filaments of the bacterium penetrate the anaerobic zone to the depth of 19 cm. Thioploca is distributed in a mosaic pattern over the bottom of the bay. Thioploca mats are typically found near vents that discharge low-temperature underground water. In the form of separate filaments, this bacterium is more widely distributed in the top sediment layer, particularly in sediments with a more active sulfate reduction. The bacteria from the deep-water and coastal areas of the bay have different morphology. Cells of Thioploca are able to accumulate nitrate, and the coefficient of nitrate accumulation in wet bacterial mass in relation to the near-bottom water is 1.3 x 10(4), suggesting a similarity of metabolism with seawater species. A more lightweight isotopic composition of nitrogen in cell mass as compared to that of representatives of zoobenthos also indicates an active metabolism of nitrogen, apparently, in the process of nitrogen respiration. Comparison of the composition of stable isotopes of carbon in the biomass of representatives of different trophic levels, including Thioploca, found at a depth of 105 m indicates its planktonic origin, whereas, in the deeper bay region, the biomass of Thioploca incorporates more of the light carbon originating from biogenic methane. PMID:11450463

  13. Solidification of Mg-Zn-Y Alloys at 6 GPa Pressure: Nanostructure, Phases Formed, and Their Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haitao; Liu, Keming; Zhang, Li; Atrens, Andrej; Yu, Jiuming; Li, Xiaolong

    2016-09-01

    Mg-Zn-Y alloys solidified under high pressure were characterized using XRD, DTA, SEM, and TEM. After solidification at atmospheric pressure, Mg-6Zn-1Y consisted of α-Mg, Mg7Zn3, and Mg3YZn6, while Mg-6Zn-3Y consisted of α-Mg, Mg3Y2Zn3, and Mg3YZn6. After solidification at 6 GPa pressure, both alloys consisted of α-Mg, MgZn, and Mg12YZn. The size and the shape of the second-phase particles formed for atmospheric solidification were significantly different to those formed for solidification at 6 GPa pressure. In Mg-6Zn-1Y, the second-phase size decreased from 300 to 50 nm, and the shape changed from needle like to blocky. In Mg-6Zn-3Y, the size decreased from 100 to 50 nm and the shape changed from short rod like to small and round. After aging at 200 °C for 12 h, the new MgZn phase transformed into the intermediate MgZn2 phase. Increasing the aging time to 24 h caused the intermediate MgZn2 phase to transform into Mg7Zn3 with a size of 50 nm, while the Mg12YZn phase remained unchanged.

  14. Proposal for precision wavelength measurement of the Ni-like gadolinium x-ray laser formed during the interaction of a nanostructured target with an ultrashort laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2015-10-01

    The wavelengths of the 3d 94d [J = 0]-3d 94p [J = 1] transitions of x-ray lasers in Ni-like sequence ions with nucleus charges Z  ⩽  79 are refined. The results of calculations are within the experimental error. It was found that the wavelengths of 3d3/294d3/2{} [J = 0]-3d3/29 4p 1/2 [J = 1] and 3d3/29 4d 3/2[J = 0]-3d5/29 4p 3/2[J = 1] transitions in Sm34+ and Gd36+, respectively, are in the range of 6.70-6.75 nm. Exactly for this narrow range, multilayer mirrors with high reflectance are developed. The gain of the x-ray laser with λ = 6.748 nm in Gd36+ is calculated under the assumption that plasma is formed during the interaction of a nanostructured (cluster-like) gadolinium target with high-intensity pump laser radiation. The optimum plasma density, temperature, length, and pump parameters are determined to achieve the highest Gd36+ ion fraction and emission quantum yield of ~1013 photons.

  15. Nanostructured materials in electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rahi, A; Karimian, K; Heli, H

    2016-03-15

    Basic strategies and recent developments for the enhancement of the sensory performance of nanostructures in the electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals are reviewed. A discussion of the properties of nanostructures and their application as modified electrodes for drug assays is presented. The electrocatalytic effect of nanostructured materials and their application in determining low levels of drugs in pharmaceutical forms and biofluids are discussed.

  16. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  17. Structure and spectral features of H+(H2O)7: Eigen versus Zundel forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Ilgyou; Park, Mina; Min, Seung Kyu; Lee, Eun Cheol; Suh, Seung Bum; Kim, Kwang S.

    2006-12-01

    The two dimensional (2D) to three dimensional (3D) transition for the protonated water cluster has been controversial, in particular, for H+(H2O)7. For H+(H2O)7 the 3D structure is predicted to be lower in energy than the 2D structure at most levels of theory without zero-point energy (ZPE) correction. On the other hand, with ZPE correction it is predicted to be either 2D or 3D depending on the calculational levels. Although the ZPE correction favors the 3D structure at the level of coupled cluster theory with singles, doubles, and perturbative triples excitations [CCSD(T)] using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set, the result based on the anharmonic zero-point vibrational energy correction favors the 2D structure. Therefore, the authors investigated the energies based on the complete basis set limit scheme (which we devised in an unbiased way) at the resolution of the identity approximation Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory and CCSD(T) levels, and found that the 2D structure has the lowest energy for H+(H2O)7 [though nearly isoenergetic to the 3D structure for D+(D2O)7]. This structure has the Zundel-type configuration, but it shows the quantum probabilistic distribution including some of the Eigen-type configuration. The vibrational spectra of MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations, taking into account the thermal and dynamic effects, show that the 2D Zundel-type form is in good agreement with experiments.

  18. Computational modelling and optimisation of the fabrication of nano-structures using focused ion beam and imprint forming technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, S.; Bailey, C.; Tang, Y. K.; Marson, S.; Dyer, A.; Allen, D.; Desmulliez, M.

    2010-11-01

    Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and Nano-Imprint Forming (NIF) have gained recently major interest because of their potential to enable the fabrication of precision engineering parts and to deliver high resolution, low-cost and high-throughput production of fine sub-micrometre structures respectively. Using computational modelling and simulation becomes increasingly important in assessing capabilities and risks of defects with respect to product manufacturability, quality, reliability and performance, as well as controlling and optimising the process parameters. A computational model that predicts the milling depth as function of the ion beam dwell times and a number of process parameters in the case of FIB milling is investigated and experimentally validated. The focus in the NIF study is on modelling the material deformation and the filling of the pattern grooves during the mould pressing using non-linear large deformation finite element analysis with hyperelastic non-compressive material behaviour. Simulation results are used to understand the risk of imperfections in the pattern replication and to identify the optimal process parameters and their interaction.

  19. Efficient CH3 NH3 PbI3 Perovskite Solar Cells Employing Nanostructured p-Type NiO Electrode Formed by a Pulsed Laser Deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hoon; Seo, Jangwon; Park, Sangman; Shin, Seong Sik; Kim, Young Chan; Jeon, Nam Joong; Shin, Hee-Won; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Noh, Jun Hong; Yoon, Sung Cheol; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Seok, Sang Il

    2015-07-15

    Highly transparent and nanostructured nickel oxide (NiO) films through pulsed laser deposition are introduced for efficient CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite solar cells. The (111)-oriented nanostructured NiO film plays a key role in extracting holes and preventing electron leakage as hole transporting material. The champion device exhibits a power conversion efficiency of 17.3% with a very high fill factor of 0.813. PMID:26038099

  20. Acyclic forms of aldohexoses and ketohexoses in aqueous and DMSO solutions: conformational features studied using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Plazinski, Wojciech; Plazinska, Anita; Drach, Mateusz

    2016-04-14

    The molecular properties of aldohexoses and ketohexoses are usually studied in the context of their cyclic, furanose or pyranose structures which is due to the abundance of related tautomeric forms in aqueous solution. We studied the conformational features of a complete series of D-aldohexoses (D-allose, D-altrose, D-glucose, D-mannose, D-gulose, d-idose, D-galactose and D-talose) and D-ketohexoses (D-psicose, D-fructose, D-sorbose and D-tagatose) as well as of L-psicose by using microsecond-timescale molecular dynamics in explicit water and DMSO with the use of enhanced sampling methods. In each of the studied cases the preferred conformation corresponded to an extended chain structure; the less populated conformers included the quasi-cyclic structures, close to furanose rings and common for both aldo- and ketohexoses. The orientational preferences of the aldehyde or ketone groups are correlated with the relative populations of anomers characteristic of cyclic aldo- and ketohexoses, respectively, thus indicating that basic features of anomeric equilibria are preserved even if hexose molecules are not in their cyclic forms. No analogous relationship is observed in the case of other structural characteristics, such as the preferences of acyclic molecules to form either the furanose-or pyranose-like structures or maintaining the chair-like geometry of pseudo-pyranose rings.

  1. Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, Erik P; Tappan, Bryce; Mueller, Alex; Mihaila, Bogdan; Volz, Heather; Cardenas, Andreas; Papin, Pallas; Veauthier, Jackie; Stan, Marius

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

  2. Controlled placement and orientation of nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D; Fennimore, Adam M

    2014-04-08

    A method for controlled deposition and orientation of molecular sized nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) on substrates is disclosed. The method comprised: forming a thin layer of polymer coating on a substrate; exposing a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer to alter a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer; forming a suspension of nanostructures in a solvent, wherein the solvent suspends the nanostructures and activates the nanostructures in the solvent for deposition; and flowing a suspension of nanostructures across the layer of polymer in a flow direction; thereby: depositing a nanostructure in the suspension of nanostructures only to the selected portion of the thin layer of polymer coating on the substrate to form a deposited nanostructure oriented in the flow direction. By selectively employing portions of the method above, complex NEMS may be built of simpler NEMSs components.

  3. Dynamics of glass-forming liquids. XV. Dynamical features of molecular liquids that form ultra-stable glasses by vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Richert, Ranko

    2011-09-01

    The dielectric relaxation behavior of ethylbenzene (EBZ) in its viscous regime is measured, and the glass transition temperature (Tg = 116 K) as well as fragility (m = 98) are determined. While the Tg of EBZ from this work is consistent with earlier results, the fragility is found much higher than what has been assumed previously. Literature data is supplemented by the present results on EBZ to compile the dynamic behavior of those glass formers that are known to form ultra-stable glasses by vapor deposition. These dynamics are contrasted with those of ethylcyclohexane, a glass former for which a comparable vapor deposition failed to produce an equally stable glassy state. In a graph that linearizes Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behavior, i.e., the derivative of -logτ with respect to T/Tg raised to the power of -1/2 versus T/Tg, all ultra-stable glass formers fall onto one master curve in a wide temperature range, while ethylcyclohexane deviates for T ≫ Tg. This result suggests that ultra-stable glass formers share common behavior regarding the dynamics of their supercooled liquid state if scaled to their respective Tg values, and that fragility and related features are linked to the ability to form ultra-stable materials.

  4. Spontaneous aggregation of the insulin-derived steric zipper peptide VEALYL results in different aggregation forms with common features.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Dirk; Daebel, Venita; Meyenberg, Karsten; Riedel, Dietmar; Heim, Gudrun; Diederichsen, Ulf; Lange, Adam; de Groot, Bert L

    2014-01-23

    Recently, several short peptides have been shown to self-assemble into amyloid fibrils with generic cross-β spines, so-called steric zippers, suggesting common underlying structural features and aggregation mechanisms. Understanding these mechanisms is a prerequisite for designing fibril-binding compounds and inhibitors of fibril formation. The hexapeptide VEALYL, corresponding to the residues B12-17 of full-length insulin, has been identified as one of these short segments. Here, we analyzed the structures of multiple, morphologically different (fibrillar, microcrystal-like, oligomeric) [(13)C,(15)N]VEALYL samples by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance complemented with results from molecular dynamics simulations. By performing NHHC/CHHC experiments, we could determine that the β-strands within a given sheet of the amyloid-like fibrils formed by the insulin hexapeptide VEALYL are stacked in an antiparallel manner, whereas the sheet-to-sheet packing arrangement was found to be parallel. Experimentally observed secondary chemical shifts for all aggregate forms, as well as Ø and ψ backbone torsion angles calculated with TALOS, are indicative of β-strand conformation, consistent with the published crystal structure (PDB ID: 2OMQ). Thus, we could demonstrate that the structural features of all the observed VEALYL aggregates are in agreement with the previously observed homosteric zipper spine packing in the crystalline state, suggesting that several distinct aggregate morphologies share the same molecular architecture.

  5. Nanostructures created by interfered femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chang, Yun-Ching; Yao, Jimmy; Luo, Claire; Yin, Shizhuo; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The method by applying the interfered femtosecond laser to create nanostructured copper (Cu) surface has been studied. The nanostructure created by direct laser irradiation is also realized for comparison. Results show that more uniform and finer nanostructures with sphere shape and feature size around 100 nm can be induced by the interfered laser illumination comparing with the direct laser illumination. This offers an alternative fabrication approach that the feature size and the shape of the laser induced metallic nanostructures can be highly controlled, which can extremely improve its performance in related application such as the colorized metal, catalyst, SERS substrate, and etc.

  6. Integration of inorganic nanostructures with polydopamine-derived carbon: tunable morphologies and versatile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Junhua; Seyed Shahabadi, Seyed Ismail; Lu, Xuehong

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA), a mussel adhesive-inspired biomimetic polymer, has attracted tremendous attention owing to its extremely versatile adhesion properties, facile aqueous coating process, capability of self-assembly to form nanostructures, and abundant surface functional groups for secondary modification. PDA is also a fantastic carbon source because it gives nitrogen (N)-doped graphite-like carbon in high yield, and the carbonized PDA (C-PDA) thin coatings have similar properties to those of N-doped multilayered graphene, i.e., they exhibit high electrical conductivity, and good electrochemical and mechanical properties. In comparison with other carbon sources, an outstanding feature of PDA lies in its ease of integration with inorganic nanostructures and capability for easy tailoring the structure and morphology of the resultant composite nanostructures. In this article, different routes for the preparation of C-PDA-based composite nanostructures, such as carbon/metal oxide and carbon/Si hollow, mesoporous, core-shell, yolk-shell nanostructures, are introduced with typical examples. The structures, morphologies and properties of the C-PDA-based composite nanostructures are also reviewed, and their potential applications in various engineering fields, such as energy storage, solar water splitting, flexible electronics, catalysis, sensing and environmental engineering, are highlighted. Finally a future outlook for this fascinating composite-nanostructure enabler is also presented.

  7. Reclamation system design of nanostructured coatings of touch-panel.

    PubMed

    Pa, P S

    2010-02-01

    A newly design reclamation system using an ultrasonic micro electroetching (UMECE) as a machining process for Indium-tin-oxide(ITO) nanostructured coatings dissolved from a surface of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) of touch-panel is presented. The design features of the reclamation mechanism and a designed wedge-form tool are of major interest. The low yield of ITO nanostructured coatings is an important factor in optoelectronic semiconductor production. In the current experiment, a small diameter of the anode accompanying with a small distance between the two anodes, reduced the amount of time for effective ultrasonic micro electroetching of ITO since the effect of removal is facilitated by supplying sufficient electrochemical power. The performance of ultrasonics was found to be more effective than pulsed current, requiring no increase in electric power. Additionally, electric power, when combined with a fast feed rate, provides highly effective dissolution. Higher frequency or the greater power of ultrasonics corresponds to a higher dissolution rate for ITO nanostructured coatings. A small anode of the wedge-form tool or a small size of the cathode takes less time for the same amount of ITO removal. Importantly, ultrasonic micro electroetching with the designed wedge-form tool requires only a short period of time to dissolve the ITO's nanostructured coatings easily and cleanly. PMID:20352803

  8. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  9. Epidemiological and clinical features of the endomyocardial form of restrictive cardiomyopathy in cats: a review of 41 cases

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Yusuke; FUKUSHIMA, Ryuji; HIRAKAWA, Atsushi; KOBAYASHI, Masayuki; MACHIDA, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Examination of our necropsy records for the period 2005 to 2014 yielded 41 cases of the endomyocardial form of restrictive cardiomyopathy among 327 cats with evidence of heart disease, and here, we reviewed their epidemiological and clinical features. The medical data obtained retrospectively included signalment, presenting complaints, findings of physical examination, results of various diagnostic tests, methods of treatment and survival times. Except for one Chinchilla Persian cat, all were domestic short-haired cats. The mean age at death was 7.3 ± 4.5 years (median, 6 years; range, 4 months to 19 years), and males accounted for 61% (25/41) of the total. Dyspnea was the most common clinical sign, being evident in 83% (35/41) of the cats. Hind limb paresis or paralysis due to aortic thromboembolism was evident in 41% (17/41). Arrhythmias of atrial origin were common. Echocardiography commonly revealed left atrial or biatrial enlargement with severe endocardial thickening of the left ventricle. Most of the affected cats had a poor outcome; the disease duration ranged from 1 to 977 days, and the median survival period was 30 days. PMID:26822001

  10. Epidemiological and clinical features of the endomyocardial form of restrictive cardiomyopathy in cats: a review of 41 cases.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yusuke; Fukushima, Ryuji; Hirakawa, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Machida, Noboru

    2016-06-01

    Examination of our necropsy records for the period 2005 to 2014 yielded 41 cases of the endomyocardial form of restrictive cardiomyopathy among 327 cats with evidence of heart disease, and here, we reviewed their epidemiological and clinical features. The medical data obtained retrospectively included signalment, presenting complaints, findings of physical examination, results of various diagnostic tests, methods of treatment and survival times. Except for one Chinchilla Persian cat, all were domestic short-haired cats. The mean age at death was 7.3 ± 4.5 years (median, 6 years; range, 4 months to 19 years), and males accounted for 61% (25/41) of the total. Dyspnea was the most common clinical sign, being evident in 83% (35/41) of the cats. Hind limb paresis or paralysis due to aortic thromboembolism was evident in 41% (17/41). Arrhythmias of atrial origin were common. Echocardiography commonly revealed left atrial or biatrial enlargement with severe endocardial thickening of the left ventricle. Most of the affected cats had a poor outcome; the disease duration ranged from 1 to 977 days, and the median survival period was 30 days. PMID:26822001

  11. Low cost, small form factor, and integration as the key features for the optical component industry takeoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiattone, Francesco; Bonino, Stefano; Gobbi, Luigi; Groppi, Angelamaria; Marazzi, Marco; Musio, Maurizio

    2003-04-01

    In the past the optical component market has been mainly driven by performances. Today, as the number of competitors has drastically increased, the system integrators have a wide range of possible suppliers and solutions giving them the possibility to be more focused on cost and also on footprint reduction. So, if performances are still essential, low cost and Small Form Factor issues are becoming more and more crucial in selecting components. Another evolution in the market is the current request of the optical system companies to simplify the supply chain in order to reduce the assembling and testing steps at system level. This corresponds to a growing demand in providing subassemblies, modules or hybrid integrated components: that means also Integration will be an issue in which all the optical component companies will compete to gain market shares. As we can see looking several examples offered by electronic market, to combine low cost and SFF is a very challenging task but Integration can help in achieving both features. In this work we present how these issues could be approached giving examples of some advanced solutions applied to LiNbO3 modulators. In particular we describe the progress made on automation, new materials and low cost fabrication methods for the parts. We also introduce an approach in integrating optical and electrical functionality on LiNbO3 modulators including RF driver, bias control loop, attenuator and photodiode integrated in a single device.

  12. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  13. Larval myogenesis in Echinodermata: conserved features and morphological diversity between class-specific larval forms of Echinoidae, Asteroidea, and Holothuroidea.

    PubMed

    Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Odintsova, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    The myogenesis of class-specific larval forms of three classes belonging to the phylum Echinodermata (Echinoidae, Asteroidea, and Holothuroidea) was investigated via gross-anatomy and comparative morphology of larval muscles. Using staining with phalloidin and antibodies against the muscle proteins, with subsequent CLSM and 3D imaging, we have examined myogenesis in the larvae from the gastrula stage to pre-metamorphosis larval stages. We have shown that temporal and spatial expression of muscle proteins is similar in echinoidea and asteroidea larvae but differs in holothuroidea larvae at early developmental stages. New insights regarding the protein composition of maturing muscular fibrils during development in echinoderm larvae were detected. The first differentiating muscle structures in all tested classes have been found to be circular esophageal muscles that are associated with larval feeding. During early differentiation of echinoderm larval muscle cells, we observed that the expression patterns of the muscle proteins were not uniform but with a characteristic diffuse distribution, which is typical for smooth muscle. An unusual pattern of expression of the muscle proteins was detected in larval sphincters: the thick muscle proteins were first expressed during the early developmental stages, whereas F-actin appeared at later stages. In addition, paired star-shaped muscles were revealed in the mature Echinoidae plutei, but were absent in the Asteroidea, and Holothuroidea larvae. All tested species of Echinodermata exhibited both conserved features of muscle morphology during development indicating a common life history strategy and a planktonic habitat, and also an extensive morphological diversity representing specific anatomical adaptations during development.

  14. Silica-metal core-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jankiewicz, B J; Jamiola, D; Choma, J; Jaroniec, M

    2012-01-15

    Silica-metal nanostructures consisting of silica cores and metal nanoshells attract a lot of attention because of their unique properties and potential applications ranging from catalysis and biosensing to optical devices and medicine. The important feature of these nanostructures is the possibility of controlling their properties by the variation of their geometry, shell morphology and shell material. This review is devoted to silica-noble metal core-shell nanostructures; specifically, it outlines the main methods used for the preparation and surface modification of silica particles and presents the major strategies for the formation of metal nanoshells on the modified silica particles. A special emphasis is given to the Stöber method, which is relatively simple, effective and well verified for the synthesis of large and highly uniform silica particles (with diameters from 100 nm to a few microns). Next, the surface chemistry of these particles is discussed with a special focus on the attachment of specific organic groups such as aminopropyl or mercaptopropyl groups, which interact strongly with metal species. Finally, the synthesis, characterization and application of various silica-metal core-shell nanostructures are reviewed, especially in relation to the siliceous cores with gold or silver nanoshells. Nowadays, gold is most often used metal for the formation of nanoshells due to its beneficial properties for many applications. However, other metals such as silver, platinum, palladium, nickel and copper were also used for fabrication of core-shell nanostructures. Silica-metal nanostructures can be prepared using various methods, for instance, (i) growth of metal nanoshells on the siliceous cores with deposited metal nanoparticles, (ii) reduction of metal species accompanied by precipitation of metal nanoparticles on the modified silica cores, and (iii) formation of metal nanoshells under ultrasonic conditions. A special emphasis is given to the seed

  15. Photocatalytic activity of nanostructured {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} composite powder formed via a polyelectrolyte-multilayer-assisted sol-gel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Logar, Manca; Kocjan, Andraz; Dakskobler, Ales

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEM assisted synthesis for {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} composite powder is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticulate TiO{sub 2} layer results in high specific surface area composite powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} composite powder exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity. -- Abstract: Nanostructured, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} composite powder was fabricated via an in situ, sol-gel reaction of titanium iso-propoxide in a self-assembled, polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) formed on the surface of high-specific-area, polycrystalline, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} lamellas. The infiltration of the titanium precursor into the PEM, followed by the hydrolysis and condensation reactions with the water absorbed in the PEM after annealing, resulted in the formation of a nanostructured TiO{sub 2} layer on the surface of the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} lamellas. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to evaluate the morphology, the chemical composition and the crystallinity of the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} particles of the composite powder. The as-formed, nanostructured, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} composite powder exhibited a 2.7-times-higher photo-activity in the near-UV region compared to commercially available TiO{sub 2} (Degusa P25), as monitored by the photo-decomposition of a methylene blue (MB) dye.

  16. Properties of Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, Inna

    2008-03-01

    Ferroelectric nanostructures (FENs) such as thin films, nanowires and nanodots are receiving a lot of attention due to their potential for technological applications and to the rich variety of underlying physics. Interestingly, properties of FENs can substantially deviate from their bulk counterpart due to their sensitivity to many factors. Examples of such factors are the electrical boundary conditions (associated with the full, partial or non-existent screening of polarization-induced surface charges) and mechanical boundary conditions (arising from the lattice mismatch between the FEN and its substrate). Here, we developed and used computational schemes to predict many properties in various FENs, as well as, to provide atomistic insight to their complex phenomena. In particular, we will show the striking following features and reveal their origins: *The interplay between electrical boundary conditions, mechanical boundary conditions and growth direction results in the appearance of novel dipole patterns and new low-symmetry phases possessing superior dielectric properties in ferroelectric dots, wires and films [1,2]. *FENs can exhibit dielectric anomalies, such as a negative dielectric susceptibility [3]. *Nanobubbles can form in ferroelectric films under an external electric field [4]. *An homogeneous electric field can be used to control the chirality of vortex structures in asymmetric ferroelectric dots, via the creation of original intermediate states [5]. [1] I. Ponomareva et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 214118 (2005). [2] I. Ponomareva and L. Bellaiche, Phys. Rev. B 74, 064102 (2006). [3] I. Ponomareva et al., to be published in Phys. Rev. Lett. (2007). [4] B.-K. Lai et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 137602 (2006). [5] S. Prosandeev et al., submitted (2007). These works have been done in collaboration with L. Bellaiche, I. Kornev, B.-K. Lai, I.I. Naumov, R. Resta and S. Prosandeev. Some computations were made possible thanks to the MRI Grants 0421099 and 0722625 from

  17. Organizational-Pedagogical Conditions to Form the Foreign Competence in Students with the Features of Linguistic Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panfilova, Valentina Michailovna; Panfilov, Alexey Nikolaevich; Merzon, Elena Efimovna

    2015-01-01

    The study of foreign competence at the present stage of the higher education development becomes more relevant. The article emphasizes the organizational-pedagogical conditions, providing the formation of foreign competence in students with the features of linguistic giftedness. The way to reveal the students, who have the features of linguistic…

  18. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  19. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  20. Formation of carbonic nanostructures using PECVD and glow-discharge plasma at direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, D. G.; Gavrilov, S. A.; Dubkov, S. V.

    2010-02-01

    In this research the process of formation carbonic nanostructures using low temperatures was studied. Nanostructures were formed using PECVD and glow-discharge plasma. The research was carried out at temperature range between 300°C - 700°C. The influence of Ni catalyst thickness and concentration of carbon-containing component in vapour phase on the structure of carbonic deposit was studied. Consequently we attained productive growth of both the homogeneous vertical nanotubes and graphene flakes array at low temperature (350°C). Electrophysical features of obtained structures were examined.

  1. Formation of carbonic nanostructures using PECVD and glow-discharge plasma at direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, D. G.; Gavrilov, S. A.; Dubkov, S. V.

    2009-10-01

    In this research the process of formation carbonic nanostructures using low temperatures was studied. Nanostructures were formed using PECVD and glow-discharge plasma. The research was carried out at temperature range between 300°C - 700°C. The influence of Ni catalyst thickness and concentration of carbon-containing component in vapour phase on the structure of carbonic deposit was studied. Consequently we attained productive growth of both the homogeneous vertical nanotubes and graphene flakes array at low temperature (350°C). Electrophysical features of obtained structures were examined.

  2. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of DNA Nanostructure Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nangreave, Jeanette

    2011-12-01

    The unique structural features of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that are of considerable biological interest also make it a valuable engineering material. Perhaps the most useful property of DNA for molecular engineering is its ability to self-assemble into predictable, double helical secondary structures. These interactions are exploited to design a variety of DNA nanostructures, which can be organized into both discrete and periodic structures. This dissertation focuses on studying the dynamic behavior of DNA nanostructure recognition processes. The thermodynamics and kinetics of nanostructure binding are evaluated, with the intention of improving our ability to understand and control their assembly. Presented here are a series of studies toward this goal. First, multi-helical DNA nanostructures were used to investigate how the valency and arrangement of the connections between DNA nanostructures affect super-structure formation. The study revealed that both the number and the relative position of connections play a significant role in the stability of the final assembly. Next, several DNA nanostructures were designed to gain insight into how small changes to the nanostructure scaffolds, intended to vary their conformational flexibility, would affect their association equilibrium. This approach yielded quantitative information about the roles of enthalpy and entropy in the affinity of polyvalent DNA nanostructure interactions, which exhibit an intriguing compensating effect. Finally, a multi-helical DNA nanostructure was used as a model 'chip' for the detection of a single stranded DNA target. The results revealed that the rate constant of hybridization is strongly dominated by a rate-limiting nucleation step.

  3. Directed spatial organization of zinc oxide nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Julia; Liu, Jun

    2009-02-17

    A method for controllably forming zinc oxide nanostructures on a surface via an organic template, which is formed using a stamp prepared from pre-defined relief structures, inking the stamp with a solution comprising self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecules, contacting the stamp to the surface, such as Ag sputtered on Si, and immersing the surface with the patterned SAM molecules with a zinc-containing solution with pH control to form zinc oxide nanostructures on the bare Ag surface.

  4. Nanostructured polymeric systems as nanoreactors for nanoparticle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstein, Lyudmila M.; Sidorov, Stanislav N.; Valetsky, Petr M.

    2004-05-01

    The review concerns the syntheses of polymeric nanocomposites containing encapsulated nanoparticles formed in nanostructured polymeric systems including block copolymers, dendrimers, nanoporous polymers, polyelectrolyte gel-surfactant complexes and multilayered films. Nanostructures in amphiphilic block copolymers can form spontaneously both in the bulk (block microsegregation) and in solution (block copolymer micelle). In polymeric systems, nanostructures play the role of nanoreactors for the growing nanoparticles. The nanoparticle size, shape and size distribution are controlled by the nanostructure characteristics and synthesis conditions. The catalytic, magnetic and optical properties of these nanostructured polymeric nanocomposites are discussed.

  5. Strain-based self assembly of nanostructures for non-destructive large-scale integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseeva, E. V.; Senousy, Y. M.; Harnett, C. K.

    2007-03-01

    New types of curved nanostructures, departing from the plane of the substrate yet integrated with microscale contact pads, may be formed by using a strain-based assembly method. This process relies on the strain mismatch between thin films in a bilayer (in our case, metal/insulator or two different metals). By incorporating conducting and insulating materials, this method will be able to integrate active electromechanical micro- and nanostructures into microdevices, such as steerable antenna arrays, thermal nanoactuators, strain-sensitive inductors, electromagnetically resonant metamaterials, and bistable nanomechanical switches. ``Top-down'' lithography and the highly selective XeF2 silicon dry etching process are used to obtain our released structures. The strain-based assembly technique requires no alignment step for combining nanostructures with large features, including electrical contacts and other interconnects with the outside world. We will discuss the prospects and limits for obtaining smaller thickness dimensions and lateral dimensions through electron beam lithography.

  6. Performance comparison of the Prophecy (forecasting) Algorithm in FFT form for unseen feature and time-series prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger; Handley, James

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a generalized numerical prediction and forecasting algorithm. We have previously published it for malware byte sequence feature prediction and generalized distribution modeling for disparate test article analysis. We show how non-trivial non-periodic extrapolation of a numerical sequence (forecast and backcast) from the starting data is possible. Our ancestor-progeny prediction can yield new options for evolutionary programming. Our equations enable analytical integrals and derivatives to any order. Interpolation is controllable from smooth continuous to fractal structure estimation. We show how our generalized trigonometric polynomial can be derived using a Fourier transform.

  7. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.; Seals, Roland D.; Morrell, Jonathan S.

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  8. Optimized design of a nanostructured SPCE-based multipurpose biosensing platform formed by ferrocene-tethered electrochemically-deposited cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Argoubi, Wicem; Saadaoui, Maroua

    2015-01-01

    Summary The demand for on-site nanodevices is constantly increasing. The technology development for the design of such devices is highly regarded. In this work, we report the design of a disposable platform that is structured with cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles (cfAuNPs) and we show its applications in immunosensing and enzyme-based detection. The electrochemical reduction of Au(III) allows for the electrodeposition of highly dispersed cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles on the surface of screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). The nanostructures were functionalized using ferrocenylmethyl lipoic acid ester which allowed for the tethering of the ferrocene group to gold, which serves as an electrochemical transducer/mediator. The bioconjugation of the surface with anti-human IgG antibody (α-hIgG) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme yields biosensors, which have been applied for the selective electrochemical detection of human IgG (hIgG) or H2O2 as model analytes, respectively. Parameters such as the number of sweeps, amount of charge generated from the oxidation of the electrodeposited gold, time of incubation and concentration of the ferrocene derivatives have been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Selectivity and specificity tests have been also performed in the presence of potentially interfering substances to either hIgG or H2O2. Results showed that the devised immunosensor is endowed with good selectivity and specificity in the presence of several folds of competitive analytes. The enzyme-based platform showed a good catalytic activity towards H2O2 oxidation which predestined it to potential applications pertaining to enzymatic kinetics studies. The levels of hIgG in human serum and H2O2 in honey were successfully determined and served as assessment tools of the applicability of the platforms for real samples analysis. PMID:26425435

  9. Optimized design of a nanostructured SPCE-based multipurpose biosensing platform formed by ferrocene-tethered electrochemically-deposited cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Argoubi, Wicem; Saadaoui, Maroua; Ben Aoun, Sami; Raouafi, Noureddine

    2015-01-01

    The demand for on-site nanodevices is constantly increasing. The technology development for the design of such devices is highly regarded. In this work, we report the design of a disposable platform that is structured with cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles (cfAuNPs) and we show its applications in immunosensing and enzyme-based detection. The electrochemical reduction of Au(III) allows for the electrodeposition of highly dispersed cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles on the surface of screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). The nanostructures were functionalized using ferrocenylmethyl lipoic acid ester which allowed for the tethering of the ferrocene group to gold, which serves as an electrochemical transducer/mediator. The bioconjugation of the surface with anti-human IgG antibody (α-hIgG) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme yields biosensors, which have been applied for the selective electrochemical detection of human IgG (hIgG) or H2O2 as model analytes, respectively. Parameters such as the number of sweeps, amount of charge generated from the oxidation of the electrodeposited gold, time of incubation and concentration of the ferrocene derivatives have been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Selectivity and specificity tests have been also performed in the presence of potentially interfering substances to either hIgG or H2O2. Results showed that the devised immunosensor is endowed with good selectivity and specificity in the presence of several folds of competitive analytes. The enzyme-based platform showed a good catalytic activity towards H2O2 oxidation which predestined it to potential applications pertaining to enzymatic kinetics studies. The levels of hIgG in human serum and H2O2 in honey were successfully determined and served as assessment tools of the applicability of the platforms for real samples analysis.

  10. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Mao, Yuanbing

    2013-05-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterials and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  11. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus S.; Mao, Yuanbing

    2016-06-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterial's and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  12. Key features determining the specificity of aspartic proteinase inhibition by the helix-forming IA3 polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Wyatt, David M; Phylip, Lowri H; Bur, Daniel; Harrison, Rebecca J; Berry, Colin; Kay, John

    2007-03-01

    The 68-residue IA(3) polypeptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essentially unstructured. It inhibits its target aspartic proteinase through an unprecedented mechanism whereby residues 2-32 of the polypeptide adopt an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation upon contact with the active site of the enzyme. This potent inhibitor (K(i) < 0.1 nm) appears to be specific for a single target proteinase, saccharopepsin. Mutagenesis of IA(3) from S. cerevisiae and its ortholog from Saccharomyces castellii was coupled with quantitation of the interaction for each mutant polypeptide with saccharopepsin and closely related aspartic proteinases from Pichia pastoris and Aspergillus fumigatus. This identified the charged K18/D22 residues on the otherwise hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix as key selectivity-determining residues within the inhibitor and implicated certain residues within saccharopepsin as being potentially crucial. Mutation of these amino acids established Ala-213 as the dominant specificity-governing feature in the proteinase. The side chain of Ala-213 in conjunction with valine 26 of the inhibitor marshals Tyr-189 of the enzyme precisely into a position in which its side-chain hydroxyl is interconnected via a series of water-mediated contacts to the key K18/D22 residues of the inhibitor. This extensive hydrogen bond network also connects K18/D22 directly to the catalytic Asp-32 and Tyr-75 residues of the enzyme, thus deadlocking the inhibitor in position. In most other aspartic proteinases, the amino acid at position 213 is a larger hydrophobic residue that prohibits this precise juxtaposition of residues and eliminates these enzymes as targets of IA(3). The exquisite specificity exhibited by this inhibitor in its interaction with its cognate folding partner proteinase can thus be readily explained. PMID:17145748

  13. Nanostructured magnesium has fewer detrimental effects on osteoblast function

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lucy; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Efforts have been made recently to implement nanoscale surface features on magnesium, a biodegradable metal, to increase bone formation. Compared with normal magnesium, nanostructured magnesium has unique characteristics, including increased grain boundary properties, surface to volume ratio, surface roughness, and surface energy, which may influence the initial adsorption of proteins known to promote the function of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells). Previous studies have shown that one way to increase nanosurface roughness on magnesium is to soak the metal in NaOH. However, it has not been determined if degradation of magnesium is altered by creating nanoscale features on its surface to influence osteoblast density. The aim of the present in vitro study was to determine the influence of degradation of nanostructured magnesium, created by soaking in NaOH, on osteoblast density. Our results showed a less detrimental effect of magnesium degradation on osteoblast density when magnesium was treated with NaOH to create nanoscale surface features. The detrimental degradation products of magnesium are of significant concern when considering use of magnesium as an orthopedic implant material, and this study identified a surface treatment, ie, soaking in NaOH to create nanoscale features for magnesium that can improve its use in numerous orthopedic applications. PMID:23674891

  14. Synthesis, morphology, optical and photocatalytic performance of nanostructured β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Girija, K.; Thirumalairajan, S.; Avadhani, G.S.; Mangalaraj, D.; Ponpandian, N.; Viswanathan, C.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Nanostructures of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared using facile reflux condensation process. ► The pH of the reaction mixture shows evident influence on the size and shape of the nanostructures formed. ► The nanostructures exhibited good photocatalytic activity toward Rhodamine B and was found to be superior for higher pH value. - Abstract: Fine powders of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures were prepared via low temperature reflux condensation method by varying the pH value without using any surfactant. The pH value of reaction mixture had great influence on the morphology of final products. High crystalline single phase β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures were obtained by thermal treatment at 900 °C which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The morphological analysis revealed rod like nanostructures at lower and higher pH values of 6 and 10, while spindle like structures were obtained at pH = 8. The phase purity and presence of vibrational bands were identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The optical absorbance spectrum showed intense absorption features in the UV spectral region. A broad blue emission peak centered at 441 nm due to donor–acceptor gallium–oxygen vacancy pair recombination appeared. The photocatalytic activity toward Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation was higher for nanorods at pH 10.

  15. PREFACE: Self-organized nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, Sylvie; Ortega, Enrique

    2006-04-01

    In order to fabricate ordered arrays of nanostructures, two different strategies might be considered. The `top-down' approach consists of pushing the limit of lithography techniques down to the nanometre scale. However, beyond 10 nm lithography techniques will inevitably face major intrinsic limitations. An alternative method for elaborating ultimate-size nanostructures is based on the reverse `bottom-up' approach, i.e. building up nanostructures (and eventually assemble them to form functional circuits) from individual atoms or molecules. Scanning probe microscopies, including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) invented in 1982, have made it possible to create (and visualize) individual structures atom by atom. However, such individual atomic manipulation is not suitable for industrial applications. Self-assembly or self-organization of nanostructures on solid surfaces is a bottom-up approach that allows one to fabricate and assemble nanostructure arrays in a one-step process. For applications, such as high density magnetic storage, self-assembly appears to be the simplest alternative to lithography for massive, parallel fabrication of nanostructure arrays with regular sizes and spacings. These are also necessary for investigating the physical properties of individual nanostructures by means of averaging techniques, i.e. all those using light or particle beams. The state-of-the-art and the current developments in the field of self-organization and physical properties of assembled nanostructures are reviewed in this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The papers have been selected from among the invited and oral presentations of the recent summer workshop held in Cargese (Corsica, France, 17-23 July 2005). All authors are world-renowned in the field. The workshop has been funded by the Marie Curie Actions: Marie Curie Conferences and Training Courses series named `NanosciencesTech' supported by the VI Framework Programme of the European Community, by

  16. Stacked mechanical nanogenerator comprising piezoelectric semiconducting nanostructures and Schottky conductive contacts

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L.; Xu, Sheng

    2011-08-23

    An electric power generator includes a first conductive layer, a plurality of semiconducting piezoelectric nanostructures, a second conductive layer and a plurality of conductive nanostructures. The first conductive layer has a first surface from which the semiconducting piezoelectric nanostructures extend. The second conductive layer has a second surface and is parallel to the first conductive layer so that the second surface faces the first surface of the first conductive layer. The conductive nanostructures depend downwardly therefrom. The second conductive layer is spaced apart from the first conductive layer at a distance so that when a force is applied, the semiconducting piezoelectric nanostructures engage the conductive nanostructures so that the piezoelectric nanostructures bend, thereby generating a potential difference across the at semiconducting piezoelectric nanostructures and also thereby forming a Schottky barrier between the semiconducting piezoelectric nanostructures and the conductive nanostructures.

  17. Prediction of Golgi-resident protein types using general form of Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions: Approaches with minimal redundancy maximal relevance feature selection.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ya-Sen; Du, Pu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several efforts have been made in predicting Golgi-resident proteins. However, it is still a challenging task to identify the type of a Golgi-resident protein. Precise prediction of the type of a Golgi-resident protein plays a key role in understanding its molecular functions in various biological processes. In this paper, we proposed to use a mutual information based feature selection scheme with the general form Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions to predict the Golgi-resident protein types. The positional specific physicochemical properties were applied in the Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions. We achieved 91.24% prediction accuracy in a jackknife test with 49 selected features. It has the best performance among all the present predictors. This result indicates that our computational model can be useful in identifying Golgi-resident protein types. PMID:27155042

  18. A nanostructure thermal property measurement platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Sullivan, John Patrick; Huang, Jian Yu; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Martinez, Julio Alberto; Harris, Charles Thomas; Swartzentruber, Brian Shoemaker

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the electrical and thermal transport properties of one-dimensional nanostructures (e.g., nanotubes and nanowires) typically are obtained without detailed knowledge of the specimen's atomic-scale structure or defects. To address this deficiency we have developed a microfabricated, chip-based characterization platform that enables both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of atomic structure and defects as well as measurement of the thermal transport properties of individual nanostructures. The platform features a suspended heater line that contacts the center of a suspended nanostructure/nanowire that was placed using in-situ scanning electron microscope nanomanipulators. One key advantage of this platform is that it is possible to measure the thermal conductivity of both halves of the nanostructure (on each side of the central heater), and this feature permits identification of possible changes in thermal conductance along the wire and measurement of the thermal contact resistance. Suspension of the nanostructure across a through-hole enables TEM characterization of the atomic and defect structure (dislocations, stacking faults, etc.) of the test sample. As a model study, we report the use of this platform to measure the thermal conductivity and defect structure of GaN nanowires. The utilization of this platform for the measurements of other nanostructures will also be discussed.

  19. Laser Fabricated Nanostructures on Vanadium Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, B.; Fuele, M.; Nanai, L.; Balint, A. M.

    2011-10-03

    In this work we present our results concerning to the nanostructure generation on vanadium surfaces by ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation. The melting free formation of these structures is very important in many fields of science and industry too. We obtain that the nanostructure forming process on vanadium surface is Stransky Krastanov type. The surface covering and the nano-tower shape are depending on the ambient of the laser matter reaction.

  20. Electrostatic and electrodynamic response properties of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz, Yuksel

    1999-11-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of nanostructure dielectric response to excitation by electric fields, both in the electrostatic c→infinity and the electrodynamic regimes. The nanostructures treated include planar quantum wells and quantum wires embedded in the vicinity of the bounding surface of the host semiconductor medium. Various cases are analyzed, including a single well or wire, a double well or wire, a lattice of N wells or wires and an infinite superlattice of wells or wires. The host medium is considered to have phonons and/or a bulk semiconductor plasma which interact with the plasmons of the embedded quantum wells or wires, and the host plasma is treated in both the local "cold" plasma regime and the nonlocal "hot" plasma regime. New hybridized quantum plasma collective modes emerge from these studies. The techniques employed here include the variational differential formulation of integral equations for the inverse dielectric function (in electrostatic case) and the dyadic Green's function (in the electrodynamic case) for the various systems described above. These integral equations are then solved in frequency-position representation by a variety of techniques depending on the geometrical features of the particular problem. Explicit closed form solutions for the inverse dielectric function or dyadic Green's function facilitate identification of the coupled collective modes in terms of their frequency poles, and the residues at the pole positions provide the relative amplitudes with which these normal modes respond to external excitation. Interesting features found include, for example, explicit formulas showing the transference of coupling of a two dimensional (2D) quantum well plasmon from a surface phonon to a bulk phonon as the 2D quantum well is displaced away from the bounding surface, deeper into the medium.

  1. Surface Localization of Buried III-V Semiconductor Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, P; González, L; Fuster, D; Martín-Sánchez, J; González, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study the top surface localization of InAs quantum dots once capped by a GaAs layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy. At the used growth conditions, the underneath nanostructures are revealed at the top surface as mounding features that match their density with independence of the cap layer thickness explored (from 25 to 100 nm). The correspondence between these mounds and the buried nanostructures is confirmed by posterior selective strain-driven formation of new nanostructures on top of them, when the distance between the buried and the superficial nanostructures is short enough (d = 25 nm).

  2. Twisted Graphene Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, Satrio; Virgus, Yudistira; Rossi, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in fabrication techniques have made possible the realization of graphene nanostructures with atomic precision. Some of the nanostructures realized are completely novel. We study the electronic properties of such novel graphene nanostructures when deposited on two dimensional crystals. In particular we study the case when the two dimensional crystal is graphene, or bilayer graphene. We obtain results for the nanostructure electronic spectrum and find how the spectrum is affected by the coupling between the nanostructure and the two-dimensional substrate. In particular we study how the ``twist'' angle between the graphene nanostructure and the two-dimensional crystal affects the spectrum of the nanostructure. Work supported by ONR-N00014-13-1-0321 and ACS-PRF # 53581-DNI5.

  3. Versatile pattern generation of periodic, high aspect ratio Si nanostructure arrays with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report on a method of fabricating variable patterns of periodic, high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale. The approach marries step-and-repeat nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE), enabling near perfectly ordered Si nanostructure arrays of user-defined patterns to be controllably and rapidly generated on a wafer scale. Periodic features possessing circular, hexagonal, and rectangular cross-sections with lateral dimensions down to sub-50 nm, in hexagonal or square array configurations and high array packing densities up to 5.13 × 107 structures/mm2 not achievable by conventional UV photolithography are fabricated using this top-down approach. By suitably tuning the duration of catalytic etching, variable aspect ratio Si nanostructures can be formed. As the etched Si pattern depends largely on the NIL mould which is patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), the technique can be used to form patterns not possible with self-assembly methods, nanosphere, and interference lithography for replication on a wafer scale. Good chemical resistance of the nanoimprinted mask and adhesion to the Si substrate facilitate good pattern transfer and preserve the smooth top surface morphology of the Si nanostructures as shown in TEM. This approach is suitable for generating Si nanostructures of controlled dimensions and patterns, with high aspect ratio on a wafer level suitable for semiconductor device production. PMID:24289275

  4. Versatile pattern generation of periodic, high aspect ratio Si nanostructure arrays with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Jian-Wei; Wee, Qixun; Dumond, Jarrett; Tay, Andrew; Chua, Soo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    We report on a method of fabricating variable patterns of periodic, high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale. The approach marries step-and-repeat nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE), enabling near perfectly ordered Si nanostructure arrays of user-defined patterns to be controllably and rapidly generated on a wafer scale. Periodic features possessing circular, hexagonal, and rectangular cross-sections with lateral dimensions down to sub-50 nm, in hexagonal or square array configurations and high array packing densities up to 5.13 × 107 structures/mm2 not achievable by conventional UV photolithography are fabricated using this top-down approach. By suitably tuning the duration of catalytic etching, variable aspect ratio Si nanostructures can be formed. As the etched Si pattern depends largely on the NIL mould which is patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), the technique can be used to form patterns not possible with self-assembly methods, nanosphere, and interference lithography for replication on a wafer scale. Good chemical resistance of the nanoimprinted mask and adhesion to the Si substrate facilitate good pattern transfer and preserve the smooth top surface morphology of the Si nanostructures as shown in TEM. This approach is suitable for generating Si nanostructures of controlled dimensions and patterns, with high aspect ratio on a wafer level suitable for semiconductor device production.

  5. Study of the chemical chelates and anti-microbial effect of some metal ions in nanostructural form on the efficiency of antibiotic therapy "norfloxacin drug"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Hawary, W. F.; Mohamed, Mahmoud A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper has reviewed the chemical and biological impact resulting from the interaction between norfloxacin (norH) antibiotic drug and two lanthanide (lanthanum(III) and cerium(III)) metal ions, which prepared in normal and nano-features. La(III) and Ce(III) complexes were synthesized with chemical formulas [La(nor)3]·3H2O and [Ce(nor)3]·2H2O. Lanthanum and cerium(III) ions coordinated toward norH with a hexadentate geometry. The norH acts as deprotonated bidentate ligand through the oxygen atom of carbonyl group and the oxygen atom of carboxylic group. Elemental analysis, FT-IR spectral, electrical conductivity, thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements have been used to characterize the mentioned isolated complexes. The Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger integral methods are used to estimate the kinetic parameters for the major successive steps detectable in the TG curve. The brightness side in this study is to take advantage for the preparation and characterization of single phases of La2O3 and CeO2 nanoparticles using urea as precursors via a solid-state decomposition procedure. The norH ligand in comparison with both cases (normal and nano-particles) of lanthanide complexes were screened against for antibacterial (Escherichia Coli, Staphylococcus Aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal (Aspergillus Flavus and Candida Albicans) activities. The highest antibacterial and antifungal activities data of the nano-particles complexes were observed with more potent than the free norH and normal lanthanide complexes.

  6. The influence of silver nanostructures formed in situ in silica sol-gel derived films on the rate of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Holmes-Smith, A Sheila; McDowell, Gary R; Toury, Marion; McLoskey, David; Hungerford, Graham

    2012-02-01

    The efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be enhanced in the presence of a metal. Herein, we demonstrate the increased efficiency for a novel model sensor system where FRET is shown to occur between Rhodamine 6G in the bulk sol-gel matrix and Texas Red, which is held a fixed distance away by covalent attachment onto a silane spacer. Silver colloids are formed using light to initiate the reduction of a silver salt, which can be achieved at controlled locations within the film. Both the fluorescence intensity and lifetime maps and analysis indicate that an enhanced FRET efficiency has been achieved in the presence of silver nanoparticles. An increase in efficiency of 1.2-1.5 times is demonstrated depending on the spacer used. The novelty of our approach lies in the method of silver-nanoparticle formation, which allows for the accurate positioning of the silver nanoparticles and hence selective fluorescence enhancement within a biocompatible host material. Our work gives a practical demonstration of metal-enhanced FRET and demonstrates the ability of such systems to be developed for molecular-recognition applications that could find use in lab-on-a-chip technologies.

  7. Repairable, nanostructured biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Brombosz, S.; Grubjesic, S.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins facilitate many key cellular processes, including signal recognition and energy transduction. The ability to harness this evolutionarily-optimized functionality could lead to the development of protein-based systems useful for advancing alternative energy storage and conversion. The future of protein-based, however, requires the development of materials that will stabilize, order and control the activity of the proteins. Recently we have developed a synthetic approach for the preparation of a durable biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water. The matrix has proven ideal for the stable encapsulation of both water- and membrane-soluble proteins. The material is composed of an aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid and a zwitterionic co-surfactant that self-assembles into a nanostructured physical gel at room temperature as determined by X-ray scattering. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitator does not alter the self-assembled structure and UV irradiation serves to crosslink the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA forming a network within the aqueous domains as determined by FT-IR. More recently we have begun to incorporate reversible crosslinks employing Diels-Alder chemistry, allowing for the extraction and replacement of inactive proteins. The ability to replenish the materials with active, non-denatured forms of protein is an important step in advancing these materials for use in nanostructured devices This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, USDoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Ultrafast microsphere near-field nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, K.-H.; Quentin, U.; Hornung, B.; Otto, A.; Alexeev, I.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-03-01

    Due to the steadily advancing miniaturization in all fields of technology nanostructuring becomes increasingly important. Whereas the classical lithographic nanostructuring suffers from both high costs and low flexibility, for many applications in biomedicine and technology laser based nanostructuring approaches, where near-field effects allow a sub-diffraction limited laser focusing, are on the rise. In combination with ultrashort pulsed laser sources, that allow the utilization of non-linear multi-photon absorption effects, a flexible, low-cost laser based nanostructuring with sub-wavelength resolution becomes possible. Among various near-field nanostructuring approaches the microsphere based techniques, which use small microbead particles of the size of the wavelength for a sub-diffraction limited focusing of pulsed laser radiation, are the most promising. Compared to the tip or aperture based techniques this approach is very robust and can be applied both for a large-scale production of periodic arrays of nanostructures and in combination with optical trapping also for a direct-write. Size and shape of the features produced by microsphere near-field nanostructuring strongly depend on the respective processing parameters. In this contribution a basic study of the influence of processing parameters on the microsphere near-field nanostructuring with nano-, pico- and femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. The experimental and numerical results with dielectric and metal nanoparticles on semiconductor and dielectric substrates show the influence of particle size and material, substrate material, pulse duration, laser fluence, number of contributing laser pulses and polarization on the structuring process.

  9. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  10. Optical properties of chiral nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, Noguez; Román-Velázquez, Carlos E.; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2004-03-01

    We present a computational model to study the optical properties chiral nanostructures[1] . In this work the nanostructures of interest are composed by N atoms, where each one is represented by a polarizable point dipole located at theposition of the atom. We assume that the dipole located is characterized by a polarizability. The nanostructure is excited by a circularly polarized incident wave, such that, each dipole is subject to a total electric field due to: (i) the incident radiation field, plus (ii) the radiation field resulting from all of the other induced dipoles. Once we solve the complex-linear equations, the dipole moment on each atom in the cluster can be determined and we can find the extinction cross section of the whole nanoparticle. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of chiral bare and thiol-passivated gold nanoclusters have been calculated within the dipole approximation. The calculated CD spectra show features that allow us to distinguish between clusters with different indexes of chirality. The main factor responsible of the differences in the CD lineshapes is the distribution of interatomic distances that characterize the chiral cluster geometry. These results provide theoretical support for the quantification of chirality and its measurement, using the CD lineshapes of chiral metal nanoclusters. [1] C. E. Roman-Velazquez, et al., J. of Phys. Chem. B (Letter) 107, 12035 (2003) This work has been partly supported by DGAPA-UNAM grants No. IN104201 and IN104402, and by CONACyT grant 36651-E.

  11. Main clinical features of the three mapped autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies and estimated proportion of each form in 13 Brazilian families.

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Bueno, M R; Moreira, E S; Marie, S K; Bashir, R; Vasquez, L; Love, D R; Vainzof, M; Iughetti, P; Oliveira, J R; Bakker, E; Strachan, T; Bushby, K; Zatz, M

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (AR LGMD) represent a group of muscle diseases with a wide spectrum of clinical signs, varying from very severe to mild. Four different loci that when mutated cause the AR LGMD phenotype have been mapped or cloned or both: in two of them the linked families seem to have a relatively mild phenotype (LGMD2a and LGMD2b), in the third one the reported linked families show a more severe clinical course (LGMD2c), while mutations in the fourth locus may cause severe or mild phenotypes (LGMD2d). The relative proportion of each of these genetic forms among the LGMD families and whether there are other genes that when mutated cause this phenotype is unknown. The closest available informative markers for each of the mapped AR LGMD genes have been tested in 13 Brazilian families with at least three affected patients. The findings from the present report confirm non-allelic heterogeneity for LGMD and suggest that in our population about 33% of the LGMD families are caused by mutations in the 15q gene, 33% in the 2p gene, 17% by mutations in the adhalin gene, and less than 10% may be by mutations at the 13q locus. They also suggest that there is at least one other gene responsible for this phenotype. In addition, the main clinical features of the different forms are discussed. PMID:8929943

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Nanostructured Soft Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineker, Peter; Schülz, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Nanostructures in general are playing a more and more important role in the physics and chemistry of condensed matter systems including both hard and soft materials. This Focus Issue concentrates particularly on recent developments in Nanostructured Soft Matter Systems. Many interesting questions related to both fundamental and applied research in this field have arisen. Some of them are connected to the chemical reactions that take place during the irreversible formation of soft matter systems. Others refer to the theoretical and experimental investigations of structures and topologies of `nanostructured soft matter', e.g. heterogeneous polymers and polymer networks, or soft matter at low dimensions or in constrained geometries. Additional research has also been devoted to the dynamics of other complex nanostructured systems, such as the structure formation on the basis of polymer systems and polyelectrolytes, and several kinds of phase transitions on nano- and microscales. The contributions collected here present the most up-to-date research results on all of these topics. New Journal of Physics, as an electronic journal, is perfectly suited for the presentation of the complex results that the experimental and theoretical investigations reported here yield. The articles that will follow provide a number of excellent examples of the use of animations, movies and colour features for the added benefit of the reader. Focus on Nanostructured Soft Matter Contents Phase separation kinetics in compressible polymer solutions: computer simulation of the early stages Peter Virnau, Marcus Müller, Luis González MacDowell and Kurt Binder Spectral dynamics in the B800 band of LH2 from Rhodospirillum molischianum: a single-molecule study Clemens Hofmann, Thijs J Aartsma, Hartmut Michel and Jürgen Köhler Adsorption of polyacrylic acid on self-assembled monolayers investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy Claudia Friedsam, Aránzazu Del Campo Bécares, Ulrich Jonas

  13. Structural features underlying the selective cleavage of a novel exo-type maltose-forming amylase from Pyrococcus sp. ST04.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myeong-Eun; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2014-06-01

    A novel maltose-forming α-amylase (PSMA) was recently found in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. ST04. This enzyme shows <13% amino-acid sequence identity to other known α-amylases and displays a unique enzymatic property in that it hydrolyzes both α-1,4-glucosidic and α-1,6-glucosidic linkages of substrates, recognizing only maltose units, in an exo-type manner. Here, the crystal structure of PSMA at a resolution of 1.8 Å is reported, showing a tight ring-shaped tetramer with monomers composed of two domains: an N-domain (amino acids 1-341) with a typical GH57 family (β/α)7-barrel fold and a C-domain (amino acids 342-597) composed of α-helical bundles. A small closed cavity observed in proximity to the catalytic residues Glu153 and Asp253 at the domain interface has the appropriate volume and geometry to bind a maltose unit, accounting for the selective exo-type maltose hydrolysis of the enzyme. A narrow gate at the putative subsite +1 formed by residue Phe218 and Phe452 is essential for specific cleavage of glucosidic bonds. The closed cavity at the active site is connected to a short substrate-binding channel that extends to the central hole of the tetramer, exhibiting a geometry that is significantly different from classical maltogenic amylases or β-amylases. The structural features of this novel exo-type maltose-forming α-amylase provide a molecular basis for its unique enzymatic characteristics and for its potential use in industrial applications and protein engineering.

  14. Conserved Surface Features Form the Double-stranded RNA Binding Site of Non-structural Protein 1 (NS1) from Influenza A and B Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yin,C.; Khan, J.; Swapna, G.; Ertekin, A.; Krug, R.; Tong, L.; Montelione, G.

    2007-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans and are responsible for periodic widespread epidemics with high mortality rates. The influenza A virus NS1 protein (NS1A) plays a key role in countering host antiviral defense and in virulence. The 73-residue N-terminal domain of NS1A (NS1A-(1-73)) forms a symmetric homodimer with a unique six-helical chain fold. It binds canonical A-form double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Mutational inactivation of this dsRNA binding activity of NS1A highly attenuates virus replication. Here, we have characterized the unique structural features of the dsRNA binding surface of NS1A-(1-73) using NMR methods and describe the 2.1-{angstrom} x-ray crystal structure of the corresponding dsRNA binding domain from human influenza B virus NS1B-(15-93). These results identify conserved dsRNA binding surfaces on both NS1A-(1-73) and NS1B-(15-93) that are very different from those indicated in earlier 'working models' of the complex between dsRNA and NS1A-(1-73). The combined NMR and crystallographic data reveal highly conserved surface tracks of basic and hydrophilic residues that interact with dsRNA. These tracks are structurally complementary to the polyphosphate backbone conformation of A-form dsRNA and run at an {approx}45{sup o} angle relative to the axes of helices {alpha}2/{alpha}2'. At the center of this dsRNA binding epitope, and common to NS1 proteins from influenza A and B viruses, is a deep pocket that includes both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids. This pocket provides a target on the surface of the NS1 protein that is potentially suitable for the development of antiviral drugs targeting both influenza A and B viruses.

  15. Design principles for rapid folding of knotted DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kočar, Vid; Schreck, John S; Čeru, Slavko; Gradišar, Helena; Bašić, Nino; Pisanski, Tomaž; Doye, Jonathan P K; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Knots are some of the most remarkable topological features in nature. Self-assembly of knotted polymers without breaking or forming covalent bonds is challenging, as the chain needs to be threaded through previously formed loops in an exactly defined order. Here we describe principles to guide the folding of highly knotted single-chain DNA nanostructures as demonstrated on a nano-sized square pyramid. Folding of knots is encoded by the arrangement of modules of different stability based on derived topological and kinetic rules. Among DNA designs composed of the same modules and encoding the same topology, only the one with the folding pathway designed according to the 'free-end' rule folds efficiently into the target structure. Besides high folding yield on slow annealing, this design also folds rapidly on temperature quenching and dilution from chemical denaturant. This strategy could be used to design folding of other knotted programmable polymers such as RNA or proteins.

  16. Design principles for rapid folding of knotted DNA nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Kočar, Vid; Schreck, John S.; Čeru, Slavko; Gradišar, Helena; Bašić, Nino; Pisanski, Tomaž; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Knots are some of the most remarkable topological features in nature. Self-assembly of knotted polymers without breaking or forming covalent bonds is challenging, as the chain needs to be threaded through previously formed loops in an exactly defined order. Here we describe principles to guide the folding of highly knotted single-chain DNA nanostructures as demonstrated on a nano-sized square pyramid. Folding of knots is encoded by the arrangement of modules of different stability based on derived topological and kinetic rules. Among DNA designs composed of the same modules and encoding the same topology, only the one with the folding pathway designed according to the ‘free-end' rule folds efficiently into the target structure. Besides high folding yield on slow annealing, this design also folds rapidly on temperature quenching and dilution from chemical denaturant. This strategy could be used to design folding of other knotted programmable polymers such as RNA or proteins. PMID:26887681

  17. Plasmonic properties and applications of metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Yurong

    Plasmonic properties and the related novel applications are studied on various types of metallic nano-structures in one, two, or three dimensions. For 1D nanostructure, the motion of free electrons in a metal-film with nanoscale thickness is confined in its normal dimension and free in the other two. Describing the free-electron motion at metal-dielectric surfaces, surface plasmon polariton (SPP) is an elementary excitation of such motions and is well known. When further perforated with periodic array of holes, periodicity will introduce degeneracy, incur energy-level splitting, and facilitate the coupling between free-space photon and SPP. We applied this concept to achieve a plasmonic perfect absorber. The experimentally observed reflection dip splitting is qualitatively explained by a perturbation theory based on the above concept. If confined in 2D, the nanostructures become nanowires that intrigue a broad range of research interests. We performed various studies on the resonance and propagation of metal nanowires with different materials, cross-sectional shapes and form factors, in passive or active medium, in support of corresponding experimental works. Finite- Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulations show that simulated results agrees well with experiments and makes fundamental mode analysis possible. Confined in 3D, the electron motions in a single metal nanoparticle (NP) leads to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) that enables another novel and important application: plasmon-heating. By exciting the LSPR of a gold particle embedded in liquid, the excited plasmon will decay into heat in the particle and will heat up the surrounding liquid eventually. With sufficient exciting optical intensity, the heat transfer from NP to liquid will undergo an explosive process and make a vapor envelop: nanobubble. We characterized the size, pressure and temperature of the nanobubble by a simple model relying on Mie calculations and continuous medium assumption. A

  18. INTERSTELLAR ANALOGS FROM DEFECTIVE CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES ACCOUNT FOR INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zhenquan; Abe, Hiroya; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Ohara, Satoshi; Chihara, Hiroki; Koike, Chiyoe; Kaneko, Kenji

    2010-11-15

    Because interstellar dust is closely related to the evolution of matter in the galactic environment and many other astrophysical phenomena, the laboratory synthesis of interstellar dust analogs has received significant attention over the past decade. To simulate the ultraviolet (UV) interstellar extinction feature at 217.5 nm originating from carbonaceous interstellar dust, many reports focused on the UV absorption properties of laboratory-synthesized interstellar dust analogs. However, no general relation has been established between UV interstellar extinction and artificial interstellar dust analogs. Here, we show that defective carbon nanostructures prepared by high-energy collisions exhibit a UV absorption feature at 220 nm which we suggest accounts for the UV interstellar extinction at 217.5 nm. The morphology of some carbon nanostructures is similar to that of nanocarbons discovered in the Allende meteorite. The similarity between the absorption feature of the defective carbon nanostructures and UV interstellar extinction indicates a strong correlation between the defective carbon nanostructures and interstellar dust.

  19. To the understanding of the formation of the droplet-epitaxial III-V based nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Nemcsics, Ákos

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we discuss the evolution of the self-assembling III-V based nanostructures. These nano-structures were prepared by droplet epitaxial technique. The different nanostructures such as quantum dot, quantum ring, double quantum ring, or nanohole form similarly from an initial Ga droplet but under different substrate temperature and various arsenic pressures. Started from few atomic courses, we give here a qualitative description of the key processes for all of the aforementioned nanostructures.

  20. Ionic liquid nanostructure enables alcohol self assembly.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas; Hayes, Robert; Imberti, Silvia; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2016-05-14

    Weakly structured solutions are formed from mixtures of one or more amphiphiles and a polar solvent (usually water), and often contain additional organic components. They contain solvophobic aggregates or association structures with incomplete segregation of components, which leads to a poorly defined interfacial region and significant contact between the solvent and aggregated hydrocarbon groups. The length scales, polydispersity, complexity and ill-defined structures in weakly structured solutions makes them difficult to probe experimentally, and obscures understanding of their formation and stability. In this work we probe the nanostructure of homogenous binary mixtures of the ionic liquid (IL) propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and octanol as a function of composition using neutron diffraction and atomistic empirical potential structure refinement (EPSR) fits. These experiments reveal why octanol forms weakly structured aggregates in PAN but not in water, the mechanism by which PAN stabilises the octanol assemblies, and how the aggregate morphologies evolve with octanol concentration. This new understanding provides insight into the general stabilisation mechanisms and structural features of weakly structured mixtures, and reveals new pathways for identifying molecular or ionic liquids that are likely to facilitate aggregation of non-traditional amphiphiles. PMID:27102801

  1. Cell morphology in injectable nanostructured biosynthetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Ortal; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2014-12-01

    Even though inducing structural features on the nanometric scale has been shown to be a powerful tool in tissue engineering, almost all nanostructuring techniques available today cannot be applied to injectable hydrogel scaffolds. The current research explores such a novel technique and its effect on scaffold's properties, cell morphology, and cell-material interaction. Nanostructuring is achieved by covalently binding Pluronic(®) F127 molecules to biosynthetic hydrogels. Analysis of cell morphology revealed spindled cell morphologies at day 4 in culture. The bound Pluronic(®) F127 diminished the swelling ability and enhanced the Young modulus, thus indicating that the bound molecules crosslink the hydrogel. The relation between matrix characteristics and cell morphology was analyzed and the importance of nanostructuring was demonstrated.

  2. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  3. Vibron and phonon hybridization in dielectric nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Preston, Thomas C; Signorell, Ruth

    2011-04-01

    Plasmon hybridization theory has been an invaluable tool in advancing our understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Through the prism of molecular orbital theory, it allows one to interpret complex structures as "plasmonic molecules" and easily predict and engineer their electromagnetic response. However, this formalism is limited to conducting particles. Here, we present a hybridization scheme for the external and internal vibrations of dielectric nanostructures that provides a straightforward understanding of the infrared signatures of these particles through analogy to existing hybridization models of both molecular orbitals and plasmons extending the range of applications far beyond metallic nanostructures. This method not only provides a qualitative understanding, but also allows for the quantitative prediction of vibrational spectra of complex nanoobjects from well-known spectra of their primitive building blocks. The examples of nanoshells illustrate how spectral features can be understood in terms of symmetry, number of nodal planes, and scale parameters. PMID:21422288

  4. Nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Lu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanostructured materials, compared with conventional materials, may promote greater amounts of specific protein interactions, thereby more efficiently stimulating new bone formation. It has also been indicated that, when features or ingredients of scaffolds are nanoscaled, a variety of interactions can be stimulated at the cellular level. Some of those interactions induce favorable cellular functions while others may leads to toxicity. This review presents the mechanism of interactions between nanoscaled materials and cells and focuses on the current research status of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Firstly, the main requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds were discussed. Then, the mechanism by which nanoscaled materials promote new bone formation was explained, following which the current research status of main types of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was reviewed and discussed.

  5. Computer-Aided Production of Scaffolded DNA Nanostructures from Flat Sheet Meshes.

    PubMed

    Benson, Erik; Mohammed, Abdulmelik; Bosco, Alessandro; Teixeira, Ana I; Orponen, Pekka; Högberg, Björn

    2016-07-25

    The use of DNA as a nanoscale construction material has been a rapidly developing field since the 1980s, in particular since the introduction of scaffolded DNA origami in 2006. Although software is available for DNA origami design, the user is generally limited to architectures where finding the scaffold path through the object is trivial. Herein, we demonstrate the automated conversion of arbitrary two-dimensional sheets in the form of digital meshes into scaffolded DNA nanostructures. We investigate the properties of DNA meshes based on three different internal frameworks in standard folding buffer and physiological salt buffers. We then employ the triangulated internal framework and produce four 2D structures with complex outlines and internal features. We demonstrate that this highly automated technique is capable of producing complex DNA nanostructures that fold with high yield to their programmed configurations, covering around 70 % more surface area than classic origami flat sheets.

  6. Connectivity of Somatosensory Cortical Area 1 Forms an Anatomical Substrate for the Emergence of Multifinger Receptive Fields and Complex Feature Selectivity in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus)

    PubMed Central

    Ashaber, Mária; Pálfi, Emese; Friedman, Robert M; Palmer, Cory; Jákli, Balázs; Chen, Li Min; Kántor, Orsolya; Roe, Anna W; Négyessy, Laszló

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence shows that interaction of digit-specific input, which is required to form global tactile percepts, begins as early as area 3b in the primary somatosensory cortex with the involvement of intrinsic lateral connections. How tactile processing is further elaborated in area 1, the next stage of the somatosensory cortical hierarchy, is less understood. This question was investigated by studying the tangential distribution of intrinsic and interareal connections of finger representations of area 1. Retrogradely labeled cell densities and anterogradely labeled fibers and terminal patches were plotted and quantified with respect to the hand representation by combining tract tracing with electrophysiological mapping and intrinsic signal optical imaging in somatosensory areas. Intrinsic connections of distal finger pad representations of area 1 spanned the representation of multiple digits indicating strong cross-digit connectivity. Area 1 distal finger pad regions also established high-density connections with homotopic regions of areas 3b and 2. Although similar to area 3b, connections of area 1 distributed more widely and covered a larger somatotopic representation including more proximal parts of the finger representations. The lateral connectivity pattern of area 1 is a suitable anatomical substrate of the emergence of multifinger receptive fields, complex feature selectivity, and invariant stimulus properties of the neurons. PMID:24214200

  7. Integration of nanostructured titania into microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Samah, Zuruzi

    2005-07-01

    This thesis describes research on a novel process to fabricate integrated nanostructured titanic (NST) features as functional components in microsystems devices. NST features were formed by oxidizing Ti films in aqueous hydrogen peroxide followed by thermal annealing. The oxidation kinetics and properties of NST formed were investigated. The process developed is compatible with current microelectronics manufacturing practices for Si and plastic substrates. Amorphous hydrated titanic gels form when hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2) reacts with Ti. Oxidation of a blanket (unpatterned) Ti surface with hydrogen peroxide results in a titanic layer with high crack density. In this study, NST was formed by reacting pre-patterned Ti thin films with H2O2 solution. Crack elimination was achieved when exposed Ti films were below a threshold dimension. Hydrated titanic gel crystallizes into anatase after annealing at 300°C for 8 hr. Crack elimination is thought to result from stress reduction in titanic gels due to patterning. Oxidation of Ti films occurs by nucleation and growth mechanism. During growth, oxidation of Ti films with thickness 50 nm and below proceeds at a constant rate until films are fully consumed. For Ti films with thickness 100 nm or thicker oxidation rate reduces significantly after a period of growth. This reduction is attributed to a change in mechanism controlling growth of the hydrated titania gel layer. Functionality of NST formed and compatibility of the process with current microelectronics manufacturing practices were demonstrated by exploring three applications. First, a prototype conductometric gas sensor was fabricated that used micrometer-scale NST pad arrays as sensing elements. This sensor is capable of detecting hydrogen and oxygen gas at concentration of a few parts per million (ppm). Second, micrometer scale Au-NST interpenetrating network nanocomposite contacts in micro-switches were fabricated by infiltrating NST features with Au using

  8. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    This dissertation summarizes results of an experimental exploration of heat transfer during vaporization of a water droplet deposited on a nanostructured surface at a temperature approaching and exceeding the Leidenfrost point for the surface and at lower surface temperatures 10-40 degrees C above the saturated temperature of the water droplet at approximately 101 kPa. The results of these experiments were compared to those performed on bare smooth copper and aluminum surfaces in this and other studies. The nanostructured surfaces were composed of a vast array of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals grown by hydrothermal synthesis on a smooth copper substrate having an average surface roughness of approximately 0.06 micrometer. Various nanostructured surface array geometries were produced on the copper substrate by performing the hydrothermal synthesis for 4, 10 and 24 hours. The individual nanostructures were randomly-oriented and, depending on hydrothermal synthesis time, had a mean diameter of about 500-700 nm, a mean length of 1.7-3.3 micrometers,and porosities of approximately 0.04-0.58. Surface wetting was characterized by macroscopic measurements of contact angle based on the droplet profile and calculations based on measurements of liquid film spread area. Scanning electron microscope imaging was used to document the nanoscale features of the surface before and after the experiments. The nanostructured surfaces grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 4 and 24 hours exhibited contact angles of approximately 10, whereas the surfaces grown for 10 hours were superhydrophilic, exhibiting contact angles typically less than 3 degrees. In single droplet deposition experiments at 101 kPa, a high-speed video camera was used to document the droplet-surface interaction. Distilled and degassed water droplets ranging in size from 2.5-4.0 mm were deposited onto the surface from heights ranging from approximately 0.2-8.1 cm, such that Weber numbers spanned a range of approximately 0

  9. Thermoelectric transport phenomena in semiconducting nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, Jane

    The efficiencies of state-of-the-art thermoelectric devices made from bulk materials remain too low for widespread application. Early predictions by Hicks and Dresselhaus indicated that one potential route for improving the thermoelectric properties of materials was through nanostructuring. This predicted improvement was due to two effects: an increase in the thermoelectric power factor and a decrease in the lattice thermal conductivity. In this thesis, new models are developed for calculation of the thermoelectric transport properties of nanostructures. The results of these models are in line with what has been seen experimentally in the field of nanostructured thermoelectrics: the power factor of nanostructures falls below the bulk value for sizes accessible by current experimental techniques. While this is demonstrated first for a particular system (cylindrical InSb nanowires), this result is shown to hold true regardless of the dimensionality of the system, the material of interest or the temperature. Using the analytical forms of the transport properties of nanostructured systems, we derive universal scaling relations for the power factor which further point to the fundamental and general nature of this result. Calculations done for nanostructured systems in which the scattering time is a function of carrier energy indicate that the introduction of nanoscale grain boundaries can lead to improvements in the power factor. We present experimental methods for the fabrication and characterization of porous bismuth-antimony-telluride (Bi2-xSbxTe3 ) thin films using a templated deposition technique. Preliminary results from this experimental work indicate that the nanostructured morphology of the templates used for the deposition of porous films limits diffusion during grain growth, and thus the crystal structure of these porous films differs from that of films deposited on dense substrates. For fundamental investigation of the effects of porosity on thermoelectric

  10. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    ScienceCinema

    Andy Minor

    2016-07-12

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  11. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Minor

    2008-10-16

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  12. Bioinspired chemistry: Rewiring nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulijn, Rein V.; Caponi, Pier-Francesco

    2010-07-01

    The cell's dynamic skeleton, a tightly regulated network of protein fibres, continues to provide inspiration for the design of synthetic nanostructures. Genetic engineering has now been used to encode non-biological functionality within these structures.

  13. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of novel nanostructured transparent conducting oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroabadi, Akram A.; Norwood, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been used to find the optical constants, including refractive index, extinction coefficient, thickness and volume fraction of nanostructured transparent conducting oxides including indium tin oxide (ITO) and indium zinc oxide (IZO). We observed sharp features in the ellipsometry data, with the spectral peaks and positions depending on the nanostructure dimensions and material. A superposition of Lorentzian oscillators and the effective medium approximation has been applied to determine the volume ratio of voids and nanopillars, thereby providing the effective optical constants.

  14. Interlocked DNA nanostructures controlled by a reversible logic circuit.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Lohmann, Finn; Famulok, Michael

    2014-09-17

    DNA nanostructures constitute attractive devices for logic computing and nanomechanics. An emerging interest is to integrate these two fields and devise intelligent DNA nanorobots. Here we report a reversible logic circuit built on the programmable assembly of a double-stranded (ds) DNA [3]pseudocatenane that serves as a rigid scaffold to position two separate branched-out head-motifs, a bimolecular i-motif and a G-quadruplex. The G-quadruplex only forms when preceded by the assembly of the i-motif. The formation of the latter, in turn, requires acidic pH and unhindered mobility of the head-motif containing dsDNA nanorings with respect to the central ring to which they are interlocked, triggered by release oligodeoxynucleotides. We employ these features to convert the structural changes into Boolean operations with fluorescence labelling. The nanostructure behaves as a reversible logic circuit consisting of tandem YES and AND gates. Such reversible logic circuits integrated into functional nanodevices may guide future intelligent DNA nanorobots to manipulate cascade reactions in biological systems.

  15. Interlocked DNA nanostructures controlled by a reversible logic circuit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Lohmann, Finn; Famulok, Michael

    2014-01-01

    DNA nanostructures constitute attractive devices for logic computing and nanomechanics. An emerging interest is to integrate these two fields and devise intelligent DNA nanorobots. Here we report a reversible logic circuit built on the programmable assembly of a double-stranded (ds) DNA [3]pseudocatenane that serves as a rigid scaffold to position two separate branched-out head-motifs, a bimolecular i-motif and a G-quadruplex. The G-quadruplex only forms when preceded by the assembly of the i-motif. The formation of the latter, in turn, requires acidic pH and unhindered mobility of the head-motif containing dsDNA nanorings with respect to the central ring to which they are interlocked, triggered by release oligodeoxynucleotides. We employ these features to convert the structural changes into Boolean operations with fluorescence labelling. The nanostructure behaves as a reversible logic circuit consisting of tandem YES and AND gates. Such reversible logic circuits integrated into functional nanodevices may guide future intelligent DNA nanorobots to manipulate cascade reactions in biological systems. PMID:25229207

  16. Closed form unsupervised registration of multi-temporal structure from motion-multiview stereo data using non-linearly weighted image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seers, T. D.; Hodgetts, D.

    2013-12-01

    Seers, T. D. & Hodgetts, D. School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, UK. M13 9PL. The detection of topological change at the Earth's surface is of considerable scholarly interest, allowing the quantification of the rates of geomorphic processes whilst providing lucid insights into the underlying mechanisms driving landscape evolution. In this regard, the past decade has witnessed the ever increasing proliferation of studies employing multi-temporal topographic data in within the geosciences, bolstered by continuing technical advancements in the acquisition and processing of prerequisite datasets. Provided by workers within the field of Computer Vision, multiview stereo (MVS) dense surface reconstructions, primed by structure-from-motion (SfM) based camera pose estimation represents one such development. Providing a cost effective, operationally efficient data capture medium, the modest requirement of a consumer grade camera for data collection coupled with the minimal user intervention required during post-processing makes SfM-MVS an attractive alternative to terrestrial laser scanners for collecting multi-temporal topographic datasets. However, in similitude to terrestrial scanner derived data, the co-registration of spatially coincident or partially overlapping scans produced by SfM-MVS presents a major technical challenge, particularly in the case of semi non-rigid scenes produced during topographic change detection studies. Moreover, the arbitrary scaling resulting from SfM ambiguity requires that a scale matrix must be estimated during the transformation, introducing further complexity into its formulation. Here, we present a novel, fully unsupervised algorithm which utilises non-linearly weighted image features for the solving the similarity transform (scale, translation rotation) between partially overlapping scans produced by SfM-MVS image processing. With the only initialization condition being partial intersection

  17. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  18. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I.; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2015-12-22

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  19. Nonlinear photoluminescence spectrum of single gold nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Vanessa; Fischer, Marco P; de Roo, Tjaard; Mecking, Stefan; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Brida, Daniele

    2015-01-27

    We investigate the multiphoton photoluminescence characteristics of gold nanoantennas fabricated from single crystals and polycrystalline films. By exciting these nanostructures with ultrashort pulses tunable in the near-infrared range, we observe distinct features in the broadband photoluminescence spectrum. By comparing antennas of different crystallinity and shape, we demonstrate that the nanoscopic geometry of plasmonic devices determines the shape of the emission spectra. Our findings rule out the contribution of the gold band structure in shaping the photoluminescence.

  20. The nanostructure problem

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.

    2010-03-22

    Diffraction techniques are making progress in tackling the difficult problem of solving the structures of nanoparticles and nanoscale materials. The great gift of x-ray crystallography has made us almost complacent in our ability to locate the three-dimensional coordinates of atoms in a crystal with a precision of around 10{sup -4} nm. However, the powerful methods of crystallography break down for structures in which order only extends over a few nanometers. In fact, as we near the one hundred year mark since the birth of crystallography, we face a resilient frontier in condensed matter physics: our inability to routinely and robustly determine the structure of complex nanostructured and amorphous materials. Knowing the structure and arrangement of atoms in a solid is so fundamental to understanding its properties that the topic routinely occupies the early chapters of every solid-state physics textbook. Yet what has become clear with the emergence of nanotechnology is that diffraction data alone may not be enough to uniquely solve the structure of nanomaterials. As part of a growing effort to incorporate the results of other techniques to constrain x-ray refinements - a method called 'complex modeling' which is a simple but elegant approach for combining information from spectroscopy with diffraction data to solve the structure of several amorphous and nanostructured materials. Crystallography just works, so we rarely question how and why this is so, yet understanding the physics of diffraction can be very helpful as we consider the nanostructure problem. The relationship between the electron density distribution in three dimensions (i.e., the crystal structure) and an x-ray diffraction pattern is well established: the measured intensity distribution in reciprocal space is the square of the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function <{rho}(r){rho}(r+r')> of the electron density distribution {rho}(r). The fact that we get the autocorrelation function

  1. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  2. Deposition of fibrous nanostructure by ultrafast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2010-05-01

    This research work demonstrated that laser-induced reverse transfer (LIRT) can be used for controllable site-specific deposition of fibrous nanostructure. The LIRT method makes it possible to generate and deposit the fibrous nanostructure of a wide variety of materials on a transparent acceptor in a single-step process at an ambient condition. The deposition of fibrous nanostructures was conducted using ultrafast laser ablation of silicon and aluminum targets placed behind a glass acceptor. Femtosecond laser pulses pass through the transparent acceptor and hit the bulk donor. Consequently a mass quantity of nanoparticles ablates from the donor and then aggregates and forms a porous fibrous nanostructure on the transparent acceptor. Our experiments demonstrated that the gap between the target and the glass acceptor was critical in the formation and accumulation of nanofibers and it determines the density of the formed nanostructure. The formation mechanism of the nanostructures can be explained by the well-established theory of vapor condensation within the plume induced by ultrafast laser ablation. Experimental results also show that the length of the nanostructure can be controlled by the gap between the target and glass acceptor. Lastly, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis shows the oxygen concentration in the nanofibrous structure which is associated with oxidation of ablated material at ambient atmosphere.

  3. Controllable fabrication of copper phthalocyanine nanostructure crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Xiao, Si; Huang, Wenglong; Tao, Shaohua; Zhang, Yi; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2015-06-01

    Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) nanostructure crystals, including nanoflower, nanoribbon, and nanowire, were controllably fabricated by temperature gradient physical vapor deposition (TG-PVD) through controlling the growth parameters. In a controllable growth system with carrier gas N2, nanoflower, nanoribbon, and nanowire crystals were formed in a high-temperature zone, medium-temperature zone, and low-temperature zone, respectively. They were proved to be β-phase, coexist of α-phase and β-phase, and α-phase respectively based on x-ray diffraction results. Furthermore, ultralong CuPc nanowires up to several millimeters could be fabricated by TG-PVD without carrier gas, and they were well-aligned to form large-area CuPc nanowire crystal arrays by the Langmuir-Blodgett method. The nanostructure crystals showed unusual optical absorption spectra from the ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared range, which was explained by the diffraction and scattering caused by the wavelength-sized nanostructures. These CuPc nanostructure crystals show potential applications in organic electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  4. Controllable fabrication of copper phthalocyanine nanostructure crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Xiao, Si; Huang, Wenglong; Tao, Shaohua; Zhang, Yi; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2015-06-01

    Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) nanostructure crystals, including nanoflower, nanoribbon, and nanowire, were controllably fabricated by temperature gradient physical vapor deposition (TG-PVD) through controlling the growth parameters. In a controllable growth system with carrier gas N2, nanoflower, nanoribbon, and nanowire crystals were formed in a high-temperature zone, medium-temperature zone, and low-temperature zone, respectively. They were proved to be β-phase, coexist of α-phase and β-phase, and α-phase respectively based on x-ray diffraction results. Furthermore, ultralong CuPc nanowires up to several millimeters could be fabricated by TG-PVD without carrier gas, and they were well-aligned to form large-area CuPc nanowire crystal arrays by the Langmuir-Blodgett method. The nanostructure crystals showed unusual optical absorption spectra from the ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared range, which was explained by the diffraction and scattering caused by the wavelength-sized nanostructures. These CuPc nanostructure crystals show potential applications in organic electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:25961155

  5. Controllable fabrication of copper phthalocyanine nanostructure crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Xiao, Si; Huang, Wenglong; Tao, Shaohua; Zhang, Yi; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2015-06-01

    Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) nanostructure crystals, including nanoflower, nanoribbon, and nanowire, were controllably fabricated by temperature gradient physical vapor deposition (TG-PVD) through controlling the growth parameters. In a controllable growth system with carrier gas N2, nanoflower, nanoribbon, and nanowire crystals were formed in a high-temperature zone, medium-temperature zone, and low-temperature zone, respectively. They were proved to be β-phase, coexist of α-phase and β-phase, and α-phase respectively based on x-ray diffraction results. Furthermore, ultralong CuPc nanowires up to several millimeters could be fabricated by TG-PVD without carrier gas, and they were well-aligned to form large-area CuPc nanowire crystal arrays by the Langmuir-Blodgett method. The nanostructure crystals showed unusual optical absorption spectra from the ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared range, which was explained by the diffraction and scattering caused by the wavelength-sized nanostructures. These CuPc nanostructure crystals show potential applications in organic electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  6. Zinc oxide nanostructures confined in porous silicas.

    PubMed

    Coasne, Benoit; Mezy, Aude; Pellenq, R J M; Ravot, D; Tedenac, J C

    2009-02-18

    We report on molecular simulations of zinc oxide nanostructures obtained within silica nanopores of diameter D = 1.6 nm and D = 3.2 nm. Both the effects of confinement (by varying the pore size) and degree of pore filling on the structure of the nanomaterial are addressed. Two complementary approaches are adopted: 1) the stability of the three crystalline phases of ZnO (wurtzite, rocksalt, and blende) in the silica nanopores is studied, and 2) ZnO nanostructures are obtained by slowly cooling down a homogeneous liquid phase confined in the silica pores. None of the ideal nanostructures (wurtzite, rocksalt, blende) retains the ideal structure of the initial crystal when confined within the silica pores. Only the structure starting from the ideal wurtzite nanocrystal remains significantly crystalline after relaxation, as revealed by the marked peaks in the pair correlation functions for this system. The morphology and degree of cristallinity of the structures are found to depend on the parameters involved in the synthesis (pore size, filling density). Nanograin boundaries are observed between domains of different crystal structures. Reminiscent features of the bulk behavior, such as faceting of the nanostructures, are also observed when the system size becomes large. We show that the use of nanopores as a template imposes that the confined particles exhibit neutral (basal) surfaces. These predictions provide a guide to experiments on semiconductor nanoparticles.

  7. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  8. Process for the preparation of metal-containing nanostructured films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yunfeng (Inventor); Wang, Donghai (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Metal-containing nanostructured films are prepared by electrodepositing a metal-containing composition within the pores of a mesoporous silica template to form a metal-containing silica nanocomposite. The nanocomposite is annealed to strengthen the deposited metal-containing composition. The silica is then removed from the nanocomposite, e.g., by dissolving the silica in an etching solution to provide a self-supporting metal-containing nanostructured film. The nanostructured films have a nanowire or nanomesh architecture depending on the pore structure of the mesoporous silica template used to prepare the films.

  9. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  10. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  11. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Zhigang

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  12. Simulation of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, A J; Grossman, J C; Puzder, A; Benedict, L X; Galli, G

    2001-07-19

    The field of research into the optical properties of silicon nanostructures has seen enormous growth over the last decade. The discovery that silicon nanoparticles exhibit visible photoluminescence (PL) has led to new insights into the mechanisms responsible for such phenomena. The importance of understanding and controlling the PL properties of any silicon based material is of paramount interest to the optoelectronics industry where silicon nanoclusters could be embedded into existing silicon based circuitry. In this talk, we present a combination of quantum Monte Carlo and density functional approaches to the calculation of the electronic, structural, and optical properties of silicon nanostructures.

  13. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  14. Plasmonics in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Zhu, Xing

    2013-07-26

    Plasmonics has developed into one of the rapidly growing research topics for nanophotonics. With advanced nanofabrication techniques, a broad variety of nanostructures can be designed and fabricated for plasmonic devices at nanoscale. Fundamental properties for both surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and localized surface plasmons (LSP) arise a new insight and understanding for the electro-optical device investigations, such as plasmonic nanofocusing, low-loss plasmon waveguide and active plasmonic detectors for energy harvesting. Here, we review some typical functional plasmonic nanostructures and nanosmart devices emerging from our individual and collaborative research works.

  15. The equipment for controlling the structure and functional properties of nanostructured composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. G.; Plotnikova, N. V.; Prokhorenko, E. V.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2016-04-01

    The article is devoted to the creation of an instrumental system allowing evaluating the functional properties and current-voltage characteristics of nanostructured composite films at different temperatures and other environmental parameters. The system is based on an assessment of current-voltage characteristics of a nanostructured film material. The main components of the system are a chamber and a unit for current-voltage characteristics measuring. The stage with the test material and the contact system are provided with a heating element and a cooling system thus allowing warming to 150 °C and fast cooling to negative temperatures by liquid nitrogen circulating. The chamber body leak proofness against the external environment allows forming a composition of the atmosphere at a predetermined humidity level, which is essential for the measurement of current-voltage characteristics of polymer materials. The article describes the design features of the instrumental system and results of its application used for determining the properties of polymer nanostructured composite films.

  16. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, P. Adamowski, J. Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2015-07-07

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  17. Expanding the Nanoarchitectural Diversity Through Aromatic Di- and Tri-Peptide Coassembly: Nanostructures and Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cong; Arnon, Zohar A; Qi, Ruxi; Zhang, Qingwen; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud; Wei, Guanghong

    2016-09-27

    Molecular self-assembly is pivotal for the formation of ordered nanostructures, yet the structural diversity obtained by the use of a single type of building block is limited. Multicomponent coassembly, utilized to expand the architectural space, is principally based on empirical observations rather than rational design. Here we report large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the coassembly of diphenylalanine (FF) and triphenylalanine (FFF) peptides at various mass ratios. Our simulations show that FF and FFF can co-organize into both canonical and noncanonical assemblies. Strikingly, toroid nanostructures, which were rarely observed for the extensively studied FF or FFF, are often seen in the FF-FFF coassembly simulations and later corroborated by scanning electron microscopy. Our simulations demonstrate a wide ratio-dependent variation of nanostructure morphologies including hollow and solid assemblies, much richer than those formed by each individual moiety. The hollow-solid structural transformation displays a discontinuous transition feature, and the toroids appear to be an obligatory intermediate for the structural transition. Interaction analysis reveals that the hollow-solid structural transition is mostly dominated by FF-FFF interactions, while the nanotoroid formation is determined by the competition between FF-water and FFF-water interactions. This study provides both structural and mechanistic insights into the coassembly of FF and FFF peptides, thus offering a molecular basis for the rational design of bionanomaterials utilizing peptide coassembly.

  18. Expanding the Nanoarchitectural Diversity Through Aromatic Di- and Tri-Peptide Coassembly: Nanostructures and Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cong; Arnon, Zohar A; Qi, Ruxi; Zhang, Qingwen; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud; Wei, Guanghong

    2016-09-27

    Molecular self-assembly is pivotal for the formation of ordered nanostructures, yet the structural diversity obtained by the use of a single type of building block is limited. Multicomponent coassembly, utilized to expand the architectural space, is principally based on empirical observations rather than rational design. Here we report large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the coassembly of diphenylalanine (FF) and triphenylalanine (FFF) peptides at various mass ratios. Our simulations show that FF and FFF can co-organize into both canonical and noncanonical assemblies. Strikingly, toroid nanostructures, which were rarely observed for the extensively studied FF or FFF, are often seen in the FF-FFF coassembly simulations and later corroborated by scanning electron microscopy. Our simulations demonstrate a wide ratio-dependent variation of nanostructure morphologies including hollow and solid assemblies, much richer than those formed by each individual moiety. The hollow-solid structural transformation displays a discontinuous transition feature, and the toroids appear to be an obligatory intermediate for the structural transition. Interaction analysis reveals that the hollow-solid structural transition is mostly dominated by FF-FFF interactions, while the nanotoroid formation is determined by the competition between FF-water and FFF-water interactions. This study provides both structural and mechanistic insights into the coassembly of FF and FFF peptides, thus offering a molecular basis for the rational design of bionanomaterials utilizing peptide coassembly. PMID:27548765

  19. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.; Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  20. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  1. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information:http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/10/20/engineering-nanoparticles-for-maximum-strength/

  2. Combustion Synthesis of Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huczko, A.; Lange, H.; Chojecki, G.; Cudziłło, S.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Walton, D. R. M.; Kroto, H. W.; Presz, A.; Diduszko, R.

    2002-10-01

    Novel carbon and inorganic 1D nanostructures were prepared by combustion of metal-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) systems in a calorimetric bomb. The high carbon yield from silicon-containing PTFE starting materials is due to the production and volatility of SiF4.

  3. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  4. Nanostructured inorganic/polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowrishankar, Vignesh

    The use of polymers in solar cells shows great promise for achieving high power-conversion efficiencies at low cost. Polymers have the distinct advantage of being easily solution-processable, while possibly having larger absorption coefficients than conventional inorganic semiconductors. Thus, small amounts of cheaply-processed polymer can be used to make inexpensive solar cells. However, polymers suffer from poor exciton (electron-hole pair) diffusion lengths which are significantly smaller than the typical thicknesses needed by polymers to absorb a large number of solar photons. While other solutions to this problem exist, one promising solution is the use of an ordered nanostructure comprising an inorganic-semiconductor scaffold with infiltrated polymer, which essentially facilitates strong absorption and efficient exciton harvesting concomitantly. Other advantages of such a nanostructure include improved charge extraction and greater control over charge transfer and other processes occurring at the semiconductor interface. In this thesis, I first present an analysis supporting the need for cheaper solar cells, after which I provide the reader with relevant background on nanostructured inorganic/polymer solar cells. Next, I describe the fabrication process for making suitable nanostructures in silicon and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon (a-Si:H). Nanopillared a-Si:H can be directly used as a scaffold for making polymer-based, nanostructured solar cells. The complete device physics of the a-Si:H/polymer system is then studied. It is found that energy transfer can occur from the polymers to a-Si:H. The nanostructured devices are found to exhibit improved efficiency compared to planar (bilayer) devices. However, even higher efficiencies are expected on switching the scaffold material from a-Si:H to a non-absorber such as titania. The fabrication process for creating a nanostructured scaffold in titania, using soft-lithography, is then described. Solar cells made

  5. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Mokari, Taleb

    2011-01-01

    There has been significant interest in the development of multicomponent nanocrystals formed by the assembly of two or more different materials with control over size, shape, composition, and spatial orientation. In particular, the selective growth of metals on the tips of semiconductor nanorods and wires can act to couple the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors with the unique properties of various metals. Here, we outline our progress on the solution-phase synthesis of metal-semiconductor heterojunctions formed by the growth of Au, Pt, or other binary catalytic metal systems on metal (Cd, Pb, Cu)-chalcogenide nanostructures. We show the ability to grow the metal on various shapes (spherical, rods, hexagonal prisms, and wires). Furthermore, manipulating the composition of the metal nanoparticles is also shown, where PtNi and PtCo alloys are our main focus. The magnetic and electrical properties of the developed hybrid nanostructures are shown. PMID:22110873

  6. Fabrication of the nanostructure metal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Zhiqiang; Xu, Xiaoxuan; Li, Junmei; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yufang

    2009-07-01

    With the use of nano-structure metal film and the angle incident laser which has specific wavelength and polarization, it will form surface plasma resonance, and we can see several orders of SERS phenomenon. This phenomenon can be widely used in the area of military. Such as the detection of the mine, the investigation of the concentration of toxic gas. This paper mainly describes a way of fabrication of the nano-structure metal film: at first fabricate a honeycomb structures of aluminum oxide template, the second plate the alumina template with silver, at last dissolve the alumina template with hydrochloric acid. Thus ordered silver nano arrays is formed. Experiment prove it is a very well substrate for SERS.

  7. Magneto Transport in Three Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Timir; Wang, Lei; Jaroszynski, Jan; Yin, Ming; Alameri, Dheyaa

    Electrical properties of self-assembled three dimensional nanostructures are interesting topic. Here we report temperature dependence of magneto transport in such carbon nanostructures with periodic spherical voids. Specimens with different void diameters in the temperature range from 200 mK to 20 K were studied. Above 2 K, magnetoresistance, MR = [R(B) - R(0)] / R(0), crosses over from quadratic to a linear dependence with the increase of magnetic field [Wang et al., APL 2015; DOI:10.1063/1.4926606]. We observe MR to be non-saturating even up to 18 Tesla. Furthermore, MR demonstrates universality because all experimental data can be collapsed on to a single curve, as a universal function of B/T. Below 2 K, magnetoresistance saturates with increasing field. Quantum Hall like steps are also observed in this low temperature regime. Remarkably, MR of our sample displays orientation independence, an attractive feature for technological applications.

  8. Analysis of nanopore arrangement and structural features of anodic alumina layers formed by two-step anodizing in oxalic acid using the dedicated executable software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaraska, Leszek; Stępniowski, Wojciech J.; Sulka, Grzegorz D.; Ciepiela, Eryk; Jaskuła, Marian

    2014-02-01

    Anodic porous alumina layers were fabricated by a two-step self-organized anodization in 0.3 M oxalic acid under various anodizing potentials ranging from 30 to 60 V at two different temperatures (10 and 17 ∘C). The effect of anodizing conditions on structural features and pore arrangement of AAO was investigated in detail by using the dedicated executable publication combined with ImageJ software. With increasing anodizing potential, a linear increase of the average pore diameter, interpore distance, wall thickness and barrier layer thickness, as well as a decrease of the pore density, were observed. In addition, the higher pore diameter and porosity values were obtained for samples anodized at the elevated temperature, independently of the anodizing potential. A degree of pore order was investigated on the basis of Delaunay triangulations (defect maps) and calculation of pair distribution or angle distribution functions (PDF or ADF), respectively. All methods confirmed that in order to obtain nanoporous alumina with the best, hexagonal pore arrangement, the potential of 40 V should be applied during anodization. It was confirmed that the dedicated executable publication can be used to a fast and complex analysis of nanopore arrangement and structural features of nanoporous oxide layers.

  9. Solution precursor plasma deposition of nanostructured CdS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tummala, Raghavender; Guduru, Ramesh K.; Mohanty, Pravansu S.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inexpensive process with capability to produce large scale nanostructured coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique can be employed to spray the coatings on any kind of substrates including polymers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CdS coatings developed have good electrical conductivity and optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coatings possess large amount of particulate boundaries and nanostructured grains. -- Abstract: Cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are used in solar cells, sensors and microelectronics. A variety of techniques, such as vapor based techniques, wet chemical methods and spray pyrolysis are frequently employed to develop adherent CdS films. In the present study, rapid deposition of CdS thin films via plasma spray route using a solution precursor was investigated, for the first time. Solution precursor comprising cadmium chloride, thiourea and distilled water was fed into a DC plasma jet via an axial atomizer to create ultrafine droplets for instantaneous and accelerated thermal decomposition in the plasma plume. The resulting molten/semi-molten ultrafine/nanoparticles of CdS eventually propel toward the substrate to form continuous CdS films. The chemistry of the solution precursor was found to be critical in plasma pyrolysis to control the stoichiometry and composition of the films. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed hexagonal {alpha}-CdS structure. Surface morphology and microstructures were investigated to compare with other synthesis techniques in terms of process mechanism and structural features. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed nanostructures in the atomized particulates. Optical measurements indicated a decreasing transmittance in the visible light with increasing the film thickness and band gap was calculated to be {approx}2.5 eV. The electrical resistivity of the films (0.243 {+-} 0.188 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} {Omega} cm) was comparable with the literature

  10. EDITORIAL: Nanostructures + Light = 'New Optics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2005-02-01

    Suddenly, at the end of the last century, classical optics and classical electrodynamics became fashionable again. Fields that several generations of researchers thought were comprehensively covered by the famous Born and Wolf textbook and were essentially dead as research subjects were generating new excitement. In accordance with Richard Feynman’s famous quotation on nano-science, the optical community suddenly discovered that 'there is plenty of room at the bottom'—mixing light with small, meso- and nano-structures could generate new physics and new mind-blowing applications. This renaissance began when the concept of band structure was imported from electronics into the domain of optics and led to the development of what is now a massive research field dedicated to two- and three-dimensional photonic bandgap structures. The field was soon awash with bright new ideas and discoveries that consolidated the birth of the 'new optics'. A revision of some of the basic equations of electrodynamics led to the suspicion that we had overlooked the possibility that the triad of wave vector, electric field and magnetic field, characterizing propagating waves, do not necessarily form a right-handed set. This brought up the astonishing possibilities of sub-wavelength microscopy and telescopy where resolution is not limited by diffraction. The notion of meta-materials, i.e. artificial materials with properties not available in nature, originated in the microwave community but has been widely adopted in the domain of optical research, thanks to rapidly improving nanofabrication capabilities and the development of sub-wavelength scanning imaging techniques. Photonic meta-materials are expected to open a gateway to unprecedented electromagnetic properties and functionality unattainable from naturally occurring materials. The structural units of meta-materials can be tailored in shape and size; their composition and morphology can be artificially tuned, and inclusions can be

  11. ZnS:Cr Nanostructures Building Fractals and Their Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoi, D. P.; Das, U.; Mohanta, D.; Ahmed, G. A.; Choudhury, A.

    2010-10-04

    Cr doped ZnS nanostructures have been fabricated through colloidal solution route by using Polyvinyl alcohol (-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub n} and Polyvinyl pyrrolidone k30 (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}NO){sub x} as dielectric hosts. Growth of fractal structures have been observed through Transmission Electron Microscopy. Higher magnification TEM study reveals that these fractals actually a organize structure of ZnS:Cr nanostructures. The structural study of these nanostructures in the fractals is done by X-Ray Diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, Photoluminescence spectroscopy AFM and MFM. These investigations allow us to form a comprehensive explanation of fractal as well as nanostructure growth. We have done dimensional study of these fractals and the reason behind the formation of these fractals.

  12. Manganese Nanostructures and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simov, Kirie Rangelov

    The primary goal of this study is to incorporate adatoms with large magnetic moment, such as Mn, into two technologically significant group IV semiconductor (SC) matrices, e.g. Si and Ge. For the first time in the world, we experimentally demonstrate Mn doping by embedding nanostructured thin layers, i.e. delta-doping. The growth is observed by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which combines topographic and electronic information in a single image. We investigate the initial stages of Mn monolayer growth on a Si(100)(2x1) surface reconstruction, develop methods for classification of nanostructure types for a range of surface defect concentrations (1.0 to 18.2%), and subsequently encapsulate the thin Mn layer in a SC matrix. These experiments are instrumental in generating a surface processing diagram for self-assembly of monoatomic Mn-wires. The role of surface vacancies has also been studied by kinetic Monte Carlo modeling and the experimental observations are compared with the simulation results, leading to the conclusion that Si(100)(2x1) vacancies serve as nucleation centers in the Mn-Si system. Oxide formation, which happens readily in air, is detrimental to ferromagnetism and lessens the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. Therefore, the protective SC cap, composed of either Si or Ge, serves a dual purpose: it is both the embedding matrix for the Mn nanostructured thin film and a protective agent for oxidation. STM observations of partially deposited caps ensure that the nanostructures remain intact during growth. Lastly, the relationship between magnetism and nanostructure types is established by an in-depth study using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). This sensitive method detects signals even at coverages less than one atomic layer of Mn. XMCD is capable of discerning which chemical compounds contribute to the magnetic moment of the system, and provides a ratio between the orbital and spin contributions. Depending on the amount

  13. Determination of structural and vibrational spectroscopic features of neutral and anion forms of dinicotinic acid by using NMR, infrared and Raman experimental methods combined with DFT and HF.

    PubMed

    Kose, E; Bardak, F; Atac, A; Karabacak, M; Cipiloglu, M A

    2013-10-01

    In this study; the experimental (NMR, infrared and Raman) and theoretical (HF and DFT) analysis of dinicotinic acid were presented. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution and chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The vibrational spectra of dinicotinic acid were recorded by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-10 cm(-1) and 4000-400 cm(-1), respectively. To determine the most stable neutral conformer of molecule, the selected torsion angle was changed every 10° and molecular energy profile was calculated from 0° to 360°. The geometrical parameters and energies were obtained for all conformers form from density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) and HF with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. However, the results of the most stable neutral and two anion forms (anion(-1) and anion(-2) forms) of dinicotinic acid are reported here. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational wavenumbers, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. PMID:23747433

  14. Determination of structural and vibrational spectroscopic features of neutral and anion forms of dinicotinic acid by using NMR, infrared and Raman experimental methods combined with DFT and HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, E.; Bardak, F.; Atac, A.; Karabacak, M.; Cipiloglu, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    In this study; the experimental (NMR, infrared and Raman) and theoretical (HF and DFT) analysis of dinicotinic acid were presented. 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution and chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The vibrational spectra of dinicotinic acid were recorded by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-10 cm-1 and 4000-400 cm-1, respectively. To determine the most stable neutral conformer of molecule, the selected torsion angle was changed every 10° and molecular energy profile was calculated from 0° to 360°. The geometrical parameters and energies were obtained for all conformers form from density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) and HF with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. However, the results of the most stable neutral and two anion forms (anion-1 and anion-2 forms) of dinicotinic acid are reported here. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational wavenumbers, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program.

  15. Towards nano-organic chemistry: perspectives for a bottom-up approach to the synthesis of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercuri, Francesco; Baldoni, Matteo; Sgamellotti, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Low-dimensional carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and graphenes, represent one of the most promising classes of materials, in view of their potential use in nanotechnology. However, their exploitation in applications is often hindered by difficulties in their synthesis and purification. Despite the huge efforts by the research community, the production of nanostructured carbon materials with controlled properties is still beyond reach. Nonetheless, this step is nowadays mandatory for significant progresses in the realization of advanced applications and devices based on low-dimensional carbon nanostructures. Although promising alternative routes for the fabrication of nanostructured carbon materials have recently been proposed, a comprehensive understanding of the key factors governing the bottom-up assembly of simple precursors to form complex systems with tailored properties is still at its early stages. In this paper, following a survey of recent experimental efforts in the bottom-up synthesis of carbon nanostructures, we attempt to clarify generalized criteria for the design of suitable precursors that can be used as building blocks in the production of complex systems based on sp2 carbon atoms and discuss potential synthetic strategies. In particular, the approaches presented in this feature article are based on the application of concepts borrowed from traditional organic chemistry, such as valence-bond theory and Clar sextet theory, and on their extension to the case of complex carbon nanomaterials. We also present and discuss a validation of these approaches through first-principle calculations on prototypical systems. Detailed studies on the processes involved in the bottom-up fabrication of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures are expected to pave the way for the design and optimization of precursors and efficient synthetic routes, thus allowing the development of novel materials with controlled morphology and properties that can be used in

  16. Towards nano-organic chemistry: perspectives for a bottom-up approach to the synthesis of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, Francesco; Baldoni, Matteo; Sgamellotti, Antonio

    2012-01-21

    Low-dimensional carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and graphenes, represent one of the most promising classes of materials, in view of their potential use in nanotechnology. However, their exploitation in applications is often hindered by difficulties in their synthesis and purification. Despite the huge efforts by the research community, the production of nanostructured carbon materials with controlled properties is still beyond reach. Nonetheless, this step is nowadays mandatory for significant progresses in the realization of advanced applications and devices based on low-dimensional carbon nanostructures. Although promising alternative routes for the fabrication of nanostructured carbon materials have recently been proposed, a comprehensive understanding of the key factors governing the bottom-up assembly of simple precursors to form complex systems with tailored properties is still at its early stages. In this paper, following a survey of recent experimental efforts in the bottom-up synthesis of carbon nanostructures, we attempt to clarify generalized criteria for the design of suitable precursors that can be used as building blocks in the production of complex systems based on sp(2) carbon atoms and discuss potential synthetic strategies. In particular, the approaches presented in this feature article are based on the application of concepts borrowed from traditional organic chemistry, such as valence-bond theory and Clar sextet theory, and on their extension to the case of complex carbon nanomaterials. We also present and discuss a validation of these approaches through first-principle calculations on prototypical systems. Detailed studies on the processes involved in the bottom-up fabrication of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures are expected to pave the way for the design and optimization of precursors and efficient synthetic routes, thus allowing the development of novel materials with controlled morphology and properties that can be used in

  17. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  18. Pickled luminescent silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukherroub, R.; Morin, S.; Wayner, D. D. M.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    In freshly prepared porous Si, the newly exposed silicon-nanostructure surface is protected with a monolayer of hydrogen, which is very reactive and oxidizes in air leading to a loss of luminescence intensity and a degradation of the electronic properties. We report a surface passivation approach based on organic modification that stabilizes the luminescence. This novel 'pickling' process not only augments the desired optoelectronic properties, but also is adaptable to further chemical modification for integration into chemical and biophysical sensors.

  19. The replacement histone H2A.Z in a hyperacetylated form is a feature of active genes in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Kimberley; Myers, Fiona A; Mantouvalou, Evangelia; Lefevre, Pascal; Greaves, Ian; Bonifer, Constanze; Tremethick, David J; Thorne, Alan W; Crane-Robinson, Colyn

    2005-01-01

    The replacement histone H2A.Z is variously reported as being linked to gene expression and preventing the spread of heterochromatin in yeast, or concentrated at heterochromatin in mammals. To resolve this apparent dichotomy, affinity-purified antibodies against the N-terminal region of H2A.Z, in both a triacetylated and non-acetylated state, are used in native chromatin immmuno-precipitation experiments with mononucleosomes from three chicken cell types. The hyperacetylated species concentrates at the 5' end of active genes, both tissue specific and housekeeping but is absent from inactive genes, while the unacetylated form is absent from both active and inactive genes. A concentration of H2A.Z is also found at insulators under circumstances implying a link to barrier activity but not to enhancer blocking. Although acetylated H2A.Z is widespread throughout the interphase genome, at mitosis its acetylation is erased, the unmodified form remaining. Thus, although H2A.Z may operate as an epigenetic marker for active genes, its N-terminal acetylation does not. PMID:16204459

  20. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Robles, Raquel O; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Yongsheng; Lee, Jae Ah; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-05-26

    Thermophones are highly promising for applications such as high-power SONAR arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets provide the most attractive performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large-size freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets and other even more exotic materials recently investigated hampers the field. We describe alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high-energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanostructured materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. We demonstrate that the heat capacity of aerogel-like nanostructures can be extracted by a thorough analysis of the sound pressure spectra. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high-power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  1. Isolation and measurement of the features of arrays of cell aggregates formed by dielectrophoresis using the user-specified Multi Regions Masking (MRM) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusvana, Rama; Headon, Denis; Markx, Gerard H.

    2009-08-01

    The use of dielectrophoresis for the construction of artificial skin tissue with skin cells in follicle-like 3D cell aggregates in well-defined patterns is demonstrated. To analyse the patterns produced and to study their development after their formation a Virtual Instrument (VI) system was developed using the LabVIEW IMAQ Vision Development Module. A series of programming functions (algorithms) was used to isolate the features on the image (in our case; the patterned aggregates) and separate them from all other unwanted regions on the image. The image was subsequently converted into a binary version, covering only the desired microarray regions which could then be analysed by computer for automatic object measurements. The analysis utilized the simple and easy-to-use User-Specified Multi-Regions Masking (MRM) technique, which allows one to concentrate the analysis on the desired regions specified in the mask. This simplified the algorithms for the analysis of images of cell arrays having similar geometrical properties. By having a collection of scripts containing masks of different patterns, it was possible to quickly and efficiently develop sets of custom virtual instruments for the offline or online analysis of images of cell arrays in the database.

  2. Coherent control near metallic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, Ilya; Efimov, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    We study coherent control in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures. Unlike in the case of control in gas or liquid phase, the collective response of electrons in a metallic nanostructure can significantly enhance different frequency components of the control field. This enhancement strongly depends on the geometry of the nanostructure and can substantially modify the temporal profile of the local control field. The changes in the amplitude and phase of the control field near the nanostructure are studied using linear response theory. The inverse problem of finding the external electromagnetic field to generate the desired local control field is considered and solved.

  3. Magnetic domain wall manipulation in (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures for spintronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Figielski, Tadeusz; Olender, Karolina; Wrobel, Jerzy

    2014-02-21

    Ring-shaped nanostructures have been designed and fabricated by electron-beam lithography patterning and chemical etching from thin epitaxial layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. The nanostructures, in a form of planar rings with a slit, were supplied with four electrical terminals and subjected to magneto-transport studies under planar weak magnetic field. Magnetoresistive effects caused by manipulation of magnetic domain walls and magnetization reversal in the nanostructures have been investigated and possible applications of the nanostructures as four-terminal spintronic devices are discussed.

  4. Supramolecular Differentiation for Construction of Anisotropic Fullerene Nanostructures by Time-Programmed Control of Interfacial Growth.

    PubMed

    Bairi, Partha; Minami, Kosuke; Hill, Jonathan P; Nakanishi, Waka; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Liu, Chao; Harano, Koji; Nakamura, Eiichi; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-09-27

    Supramolecular assembly can be used to construct a wide variety of ordered structures by exploiting the cumulative effects of multiple noncovalent interactions. However, the construction of anisotropic nanostructures remains subject to some limitations. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of anisotropic fullerene-based nanostructures by supramolecular differentiation, which is the programmed control of multiple assembly strategies. We have carefully combined interfacial assembly and local phase separation phenomena. Two fullerene derivatives, PhH and C12H, were together formed into self-assembled anisotropic nanostructures by using this approach. This technique is applicable for the construction of anisotropic nanostructures without requiring complex molecular design or complicated methodology. PMID:27541964

  5. Bioindication of trace metals in Brachythecium rutabulum around a copper smelter in Legnica (Southwest Poland): Use of a new form of data presentation in the form of a self-organizing feature map.

    PubMed

    Samecka-Cymerman, A; Stankiewicz, A; Kolon, K; Kempers, A J

    2009-05-01

    Concentrations of the elements Al, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn were measured in the terrestrial moss Brachythecium rutabulum and the soil on which it grew. Soil and moss plants were sampled at sites situated 1.5, 3, 6, 9 and 15 km to the north, south, east and west of the Legnica copper smelter (SW Poland). The self-organizing feature map (SOFM) or Kohonen network was used to classify the soil and moss samples according to the concentrations of the elements. The self-organizing map yielded distinct groups of B. rutabulum and soil samples, depending on the distance from and direction to the source of pollution. When the map-identified groups of sites with similar soil metal concentrations were combined with the map-identified groups of sites with similar metal concentrations in B. rutabulum, these maps were found to correspond closely. The SOFMs accurately represented the least polluted, moderately polluted and severely polluted sites, reflecting the distribution of metals that is typical of the smelter area, caused by the prevailing westerly and northerly winds. PMID:18931962

  6. Pomological features, nutritional quality, polyphenol content analysis, and antioxidant properties of domesticated and 3 wild ecotype forms of raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Gülçin, Ilhami; Topal, Fevzi; Çakmakçı, Ramazan; Bilsel, Mine; Gören, Ahmet C; Erdogan, Ummugulsum

    2011-05-01

    The raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) is an economically important berry crop that contains many phenolic compounds with potential health benefits. In this study, important pomological features, including nutrient content and antioxidant properties, of a domesticated and 3 wild (Yayla, Yavuzlar, and Yedigöl) raspberry fruits were evaluated. Also, the amount of total phenolics and flavonoids in lyophilized aqueous extracts of domesticated and wild ecotypes of raspberry fruits were calculated as gallic acid equivalents (GAEs) and quercetin equivalents (QE). The highest phenolic compounds were found in wild Yayla ecotype (26.66 ± 3.26 GAE/mg extract). Whilst, the highest flavonoids were determined in wild Yedigöl ecotype (6.09 ± 1.21 QA/mg extract). The antioxidant activity of lyophilized aqueous extracts of domesticated and wild ecotypes of raspberry fruits were investigated as trolox equivalents using different in vitro assays including DPPH(•), ABTS(•+), DMPD(•+), and O(•-)(2) radical scavenging activities, H(2)O(2) scavenging activity, ferric (Fe(3+)) and cupric ions (Cu(2+)) reducing abilities, ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activity. In addition, quantitative amounts of caffeic acid, ferulic acid, syringic acid, ellagic acid, quercetin, α-tocopherol, pyrogallol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillin, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid, and ascorbic acid in lyophilized aqueous extracts of domesticated and wild ecotypes of raspberry fruits were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The results clearly show that p-coumaric acid is the main phenolic acid responsible for the antioxidant and radical scavenging activity of lyophilized aqueous extracts of domesticated and wild ecotypes of raspberry fruits.

  7. Hollow Nanostructured Metal Silicates with Tunable Properties for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seung-Ho; Quan, Bo; Jin, Aihua; Lee, Kug-Seung; Kang, Soon Hyung; Kang, Kisuk; Piao, Yuanzhe; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-11-25

    Hollow nanostructured materials have attracted considerable interest as lithium ion battery electrodes because of their good electrochemical properties. In this study, we developed a general procedure for the synthesis of hollow nanostructured metal silicates via a hydrothermal process using silica nanoparticles as templates. The morphology and composition of hollow nanostructured metal silicates could be controlled by changing the metal precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical hollow nanostructures with diameters of ∼100-200 nm were composed of variously shaped primary particles such as hollow nanospheres, solid nanoparticles, and thin nanosheets. Furthermore, different primary nanoparticles could be combined to form hybrid hierarchical hollow nanostructures. When hollow nanostructured metal silicates were applied as anode materials for lithium ion batteries, all samples exhibited good cyclic stability during 300 cycles, as well as tunable electrochemical properties.

  8. Subwavelength resonant nanostructured films for sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Daniel L.; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-05-29

    We present a novel subwavelength nanostructure architecture that may be utilized for optical standoff sensing applications. The subwavelength structures are fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering to create metallic nanostructured films encased within a transparent media. The structures are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant LC circuits, which display a resonance frequency that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any perturbation of the nanostructured films due to chemical or environmental effects can alter the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which can shift the resonant frequency and provide an indication of the external stimulus. This shift in resonance can be interrogated remotely either actively using either laser illumination or passively using hyperspectral or multispectral sensing. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also provide polarization-sensitive interrogation. Due to the nanometer-scale of the structures, they can be tailored to be optically responsive in the visible or near infrared spectrum with a highly reflective resonant peak that is dependent solely on structural dimensions and material characteristics. We present experimental measurements of the optical response of these structures as a function of wavelength, polarization, and incident angle demonstrating the resonant effect in the near infrared region. Numerical modeling data showing the effect of different fabrication parameters such as structure parameters are also discussed.

  9. Ordered Nanostructures Made Using Chaperonin Polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan; McMillan, Robert; Paavola, Chad; Mogul, Rakesh; Kagawa, Hiromi

    2004-01-01

    A recently invented method of fabricating periodic or otherwise ordered nanostructures involves the use of chaperonin polypeptides. The method is intended to serve as a potentially superior and less expensive alternative to conventional lithographic methods for use in the patterning steps of the fabrication of diverse objects characterized by features of the order of nanometers. Typical examples of such objects include arrays of quantum dots that would serve as the functional building blocks of future advanced electronic and photonic devices. A chaperonin is a double-ring protein structure having a molecular weight of about 60 plus or minus 5 kilodaltons. In nature, chaperonins are ubiquitous, essential, subcellular structures. Each natural chaperonin molecule comprises 14, 16, or 18 protein subunits, arranged as two stacked rings approximately 16 to 18 nm tall by approximately 15 to 17 nm wide, the exact dimensions depending on the biological species in which it originates. The natural role of chaperonins is unknown, but they are believed to aid in the correct folding of other proteins, by enclosing unfolded proteins and preventing nonspecific aggregation during assembly. What makes chaperonins useful for the purpose of the present method is that under the proper conditions, chaperonin rings assemble themselves into higher-order structures. This method exploits such higher-order structures to define nanoscale devices. The higher-order structures are tailored partly by choice of chemical and physical conditions for assembly and partly by using chaperonins that have been mutated. The mutations are made by established biochemical techniques. The assembly of chaperonin polypeptides into such structures as rings, tubes, filaments, and sheets (two-dimensional crystals) can be regulated chemically. Rings, tubes, and filaments of some chaperonin polypeptides can, for example, function as nano vessels if they are able to absorb, retain, protect, and release gases or

  10. Metal plasmas for the fabrication of nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2006-09-21

    A review is provided covering metal plasma production, theenergetic condensation of metal plasmas, and the formation ofnanostructures using such plasmas. Plasma production techniques includepulsed laser ablation, filtered cathodic arcs, and various forms ofionized physical vapor deposition, namely magnetron sputtering withionization of sputtered atoms in radio frequency discharges,self-sputtering, and high power impulse magnetron sputtering. Thediscussion of energetic condensation focuses on the control of kineticenergy by biasing and also includes considerations of the potentialenergy and the processes occurring at subplantation and implantation. Inthe final section on nanostructures, two different approaches arediscussed. In the top-down approach, the primary nanostructures arelithographically produced and metal plasma is used to coat or filltrenches and vias. Additionally, multilayers with nanosize periods(nanolaminates) can be produced. In the bottom-up approach, thermodynamicforces are used to fabricate nanocomposites and nanoporous materials bydecomposition and dealloying.

  11. Nanostructured cathode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Seung-Taek; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2015-06-01

    The prospect of drastic climate change and the ceaseless fluctuation of fossil fuel prices provide motivation to reduce the use of fossil fuels and to find new energy conversion and storage systems that are able to limit carbon dioxide generation. Among known systems, lithium-ion batteries are recognized as the most appropriate energy storage system because of their high energy density and thus space saving in applications. Introduction of nanotechnology to electrode material is beneficial to improve the resulting electrode performances such as capacity, its retention, and rate capability. The nanostructure is highly available not only when used alone but also is more highlighted when harmonized in forms of core-shell structure and composites with carbon nanotubes, graphene or reduced graphene oxides. This review covers syntheses and electrochemical properties of nanoscale, nanosized, and nanostructured cathode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  12. Field Emission and Nanostructure of Carbon Films

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, V.I.; Lowndes, D.H.; Baylor, L.R.

    1999-11-29

    The results of field emission measurements of various forms of carbon films are reported. It is shown that the films nanostructure is a crucial factor determining the field emission properties. In particular, smooth, pulsed-laser deposited amorphous carbon films with both high and low sp3 contents are poor field emitters. This is similar to the results obtained for smooth nanocrystalline, sp2-bonded carbon films. In contrast, carbon films prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HE-CVD) exhibit very good field emission properties, including low emission turn-on fields, high emission site density, and excellent durability. HF-CVD carbon films were found to be predominantly sp2-bonded. However, surface morphology studies show that these films are thoroughly nanostructured, which is believed to be responsible for their promising field emission properties.

  13. Nanowires, nanostructures and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Majumdar, Arun; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Yang, Peidong; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.; Feick, Henning; Weber, Eicke R.; Kind, Hannes; Huang, Michael; Yan, Haoquan; Wu, Yiying; Fan, Rong

    2005-04-19

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  14. Self-assembled Oniontype Multiferroic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shenqiang; Briber, Robert M.; Wuttig, Manfred

    2009-03-01

    Spontaneously self-assembled oniontype multiferroic nanostructures based on block copolymers as templating materials are reported. Diblock copolymer containing two different magnetoelectric precursors separately segregated to the two microdomains have been shown to form well-ordered templated lamellar structures. Onion-type multilamellar ordered multiferroic (PZT/CoFe2O4) nanostructures have been induced by room temperature solvent annealing in a magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the plane of the film. The evolution of the onion-like microstructure has been characterized by AFM, MFM, and TEM. The structure retains lamellar periodicity observed at zero field. The onion structure is superparamagnetic above and antiferromagnetic below the blocking temperature. This templating process opens a route for nanometer-scale patterning of magnetic toroids by means of self-assembly on length scales that are difficult to obtain by standard lithography techniques.

  15. First-principles studies of boron nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kah Chun

    Boron is an 'electron deficient' element which has a rather fascinating chemical versatility. In the solid state, the elemental boron has neither a pure covalent nor a pure metallic character. As a result, its vast structural dimensionality and peculiar bonding features hold a unique place among other elements in the periodic table. In order to understand and properly describe these unusual bonding features, a detailed and systematic theoretical study is needed. In this work, I will show that some of the qualitative features of boron nanostructures, including clusters, sheets and nanotubes can easily be extracted from the results of first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Specifically, the size-dependent evolution of topological structures and bonding characteristics of boron clusters, Bn will be discussed. Based on the scenario observed in the boron clusters, the unique properties of boron sheets and boron nanotubes will be described. Moreover, the ballistic electron transport in single-walled boron nanotube relative to that of single-walled carbon nanotubes will be considered. It is expected that the theoretical results obtained in the present thesis will initiate further studies on boron nanostructures, which will be helpful in understanding, designing and realizing boron-based nanoscale devices.

  16. Tissue Engineering Special Feature: A macroporous hydrogel for the coculture of neural progenitor and endothelial cells to form functional vascular networks in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Millicent C.; Bertram, James P.; Royce Hynes, Sara; Michaud, Michael; Li, Qi; Young, Michael; Segal, Steven S.; Madri, Joseph A.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2006-02-01

    A microvascular network is critical for the survival and function of most tissues. We have investigated the potential of neural progenitor cells to augment the formation and stabilization of microvascular networks in a previously uncharacterized three-dimensional macroporous hydrogel and the ability of this engineered system to develop a functional microcirculation in vivo. The hydrogel is synthesized by cross-linking polyethylene glycol with polylysine around a salt-leached polylactic-co-glycolic acid scaffold that is degraded in a sodium hydroxide solution. An open macroporous network is formed that supports the efficient formation of tubular structures by brain endothelial cells. After subcutaneous implantation of hydrogel cocultures in mice, blood flow in new microvessels was apparent at 2 weeks with perfused networks established on the surface of implants at 6 weeks. Compared to endothelial cells cultured alone, cocultures of endothelial cells and neural progenitor cells had a significantly greater density of tubular structures positive for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 at the 6-week time point. In implant cross sections, the presence of red blood cells in vessel lumens confirmed a functional microcirculation. These findings indicate that neural progenitor cells promote the formation of endothelial cell tubes in coculture and the development of a functional microcirculation in vivo. We demonstrate a previously undescribed strategy for creating stable microvascular networks to support engineered tissues of desired parenchymal cell origin. microvasculature | neural stem cells | polymer | scaffold

  17. Transmission electron microscopy studying of structural features of NiTi B2 phase formed under pulsed electron-beam impact

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Ludmila L.; Semin, Viktor O.; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y.; Neiman, Alexey A. Lotkov, Alexander I.; Ostapenko, Marina G.; Koval, Nikolai N.; Teresov, Anton D.

    2015-10-27

    By transmission electron microscopy method the evolution of structural-phase states on a depth of close to equiatomic NiTi modified layer has been studied. Modification performed by pulse impact on its surface low-energy high-current electron beam (beam energy density 10 J/sm{sup 2}, 10 pulses, pulse duration 50mks). It is established that during the treatment in the layer thickness of 8–10 μm, the melting of primary B2 phase and contained therein as Ti2Ni phase particles occurs. The result is change in the concentration ratio of titanium and nickel in the direction of increasing titanium content, which was confirmed by X-ray analysis in the form of increased unit cell parameter B2 phase. Analysis of the electron diffraction pattern showed that the modified layer is characterized as a highly distorted structure on the basis of bcc lattice. Lattice distortions are maximal near the surface and extends to a depth of melt. In subjacent layer there is gradual decline lattice distortions is observed.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of indium arsenide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kai-An

    As MOSFET downscaling continues in the sub-0.1mum regime, quantum effects such as size quantization, phase coherence, and ballistic transport will gradually dominate the traditional MOSFET characteristics. It is important to understand these quantum effects in order to design future semiconductor devices. Among the available material systems, the InAs/AlSb quantum well system is particularly suitable for studying quantum effects. Our goal is to develop a fabrication technique for high quality InAs nanostructures and characterize them through transport measurements. Device patterns are defined by e-beam lithography and transferred into the InAs quantum well samples through either dry or wet etching. Dry etching is anisotropic and uniform, desirable for nanofabrication. However, ion bombardment induced damages create reduces the electron mobility. In contrast, shallow wet etching has good controllability and no damage to the crystal structure. Using shallow wet etching and surface Fermi level shifting, we can induce electron conducting channel in the InAs quantum well. Liquid helium temperature transport measurements show shallow-etched InAs channels can have an electron mobility of 4.3 x 105cm2/V·s and a mean free path of 7.5mum. We have successfully fabricated high quality InAs nanostructures. This dissertation is organized as the following: The theories and experimental studies of quantum effects in nanostructures, and the advantages of the InAs/AlSb system in nanofabrication are reviewed in Chapter 1. The development of our nanometer-scale electron beam lithography (EBL) is described in Chapter 2. Our achievement includes 25nm line width and +/-10nm multilevel EBL alignment accuracy. The nanofabrication using RIE mesa etching technique is addressed in Chapter 3. Using RIE for pattern transferring, we have successfully fabricated nanostructures with arbitrary geometry and the smallest feature size we have produced is 30nm. Chapter 4 is dedicated to our novel

  19. Microstructures and Nanostructures for Environmental Carbon Nanotubes and Nanoparticulate Soots

    PubMed Central

    Murr, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the microstructures and nanostructures for natural (mined) chrysotile asbestos nanotubes (Mg3 Si2O5 (OH)4) in comparison with commercial multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), utilizing scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Black carbon (BC) and a variety of specific soot particulate (aggregate) microstructures and nanostructures are also examined comparatively by SEM and TEM. A range of MWCNTs collected in the environment (both indoor and outdoor) are also examined and shown to be similar to some commercial MWCNTs but to exhibit a diversity of microstructures and nanostructures, including aggregation with other multiconcentric fullerenic nanoparticles. MWCNTs formed in the environment nucleate from special hemispherical graphene “caps” and there is evidence for preferential or energetically favorable chiralities, tube growth, and closing. The multiconcentric graphene tubes (∼5 to 50 nm diameter) differentiate themselves from multiconcentric fullerenic nanoparticles and especially turbostratic BC and carbonaceous soot nanospherules (∼8 to 80 nm diameter) because the latter are composed of curved graphene fragments intermixed or intercalated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) isomers of varying molecular weights and mass concentrations; depending upon combustion conditions and sources. The functionalizing of these nanostructures and photoxidation and related photothermal phenomena, as these may influence the cytotoxicities of these nanoparticulate aggregates, will also be discussed in the context of nanostructures and nanostructure phenomena, and implications for respiratory health. PMID:19151426

  20. N-MOSFETs Formed on Solid Phase Epitaxially Grown GeSn Film with Passivation by Oxygen Plasma Featuring High Mobility.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yung-Chin; Chen, Kuen-Yi; Hsieh, Ching-Heng; Su, Chang-Chia; Wu, Yung-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Solid phase epitaxially grown GeSn was employed as the platform to assess the eligibility of direct O2 plasma treatment on GeSn surface for passivation of GeSn N-MOSFETs. It has been confirmed that O2 plasma treatment forms a GeSnO(x) film on the surface and the GeSnO(x) topped by in situ Al2O3 constitutes the gate stack of GeSn MOS devices. The capability of the surface passivation was evidenced by the low interface trap density (D(it)) of 1.62 × 10(11) cm(-2) eV(-1), which is primarily due to the formation of Ge-O and Sn-O bonds at the surface by high density/reactivity oxygen radicals that effectively suppress dangling bonds and decrease gap states. The good D(it) not only makes tiny frequency dispersion in the characterization of GeSn MOS capacitors, but results in GeSn N-MOSFETs with outstanding peak electron mobility as high as 518 cm(2)/(V s) which outperforms other devices reported in the literature due to reduced undesirable carrier scattering. In addition, the GeSn N-MOSFETs also exhibit promising characteristics in terms of acceptable subthreshold swing of 156 mV/dec and relatively large I(ON)/I(OFF) ratio more than 4 orders. Moreover, the robust reliability in terms small V(t) variation against high field stress attests the feasibility of using the O2 plasma-treated passivation to advanced GeSn technology.

  1. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    then, using a sonication process, a uniform lipid bilayer that supports the incorporation of membrane proteins is formed. These bilayer-coated carbon nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution, and they can be used in development of various biosensors and energy producing devices. In the other hybrid nanostructure, the lipid bilayer of a liposome is covalently anchored to a biocompatible poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogel core using double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) linkers. Release studies shows that nano-size hydrogel-anchored liposomes are exceptionally stable, and they can be used as biomimetic model membranes that mimic the connectivity between the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane. After lipid bilayer removal, dsDNA linkers can provide programmable nanogels decorated with oligonucleotides with potential sites for further molecular assembly. These stable nanostructures can be useful for oligonucleotide and drug delivery applications. The developed hydrogel-anchored liposomes are exploited for encapsulation and intracellular delivery of therapeutic peptide. Peptides with anti-cancer properties are successfully encapsulated in hydrogel core of pH-sensitive liposomes during rehydration process. Liposomes release their cargo at acidic pH. Confocal microscopy confirms the intracellular delivery of liposomes through an endocytotic pathway.

  2. Shape control in wafer-based aperiodic 3D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G.; Gibbs, John G.; Reindl, Thomas; Waizmann, Ulrike; Weis, Jürgen; Fischer, Peer

    2014-06-01

    Controlled local fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures is important to explore and enhance the function of single nanodevices, but is experimentally challenging. We present a scheme based on e-beam lithography (EBL) written seeds, and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) grown structures to create nanoscale objects with defined shapes but in aperiodic arrangements. By using a continuous sacrificial corral surrounding the features of interest we grow isolated 3D nanostructures that have complex cross-sections and sidewall morphology that are surrounded by zones of clean substrate.

  3. Method for forming cooperative binary ionic solids

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Martin, Kathleen E.; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J.

    2013-03-05

    A nanostructured molecular unit and method for forming is described where a cationic porphyrin having an ethanolic substituent species and a metal in the porphyrin cavity is combined with an anionic porphyrin having a sulfonate substituent species and a metal in the porphyrin cavity to form by self-assembly a nanostructured molecular unit with a morphology comprising four dendritic elements connected at a central node.

  4. Method for forming cooperative binary ionic solids

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Martin, Kathleen E.; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J.

    2014-09-09

    A nanostructured molecular unit and method for forming is described where a cationic porphyrin having an ethanolic substituent species and a metal in the porphyrin cavity is combined with an anionic porphyrin having a sulfonate substituent species and a metal in the porphyrin cavity to form by self-assembly a nanostructured molecular unit with a morphology comprising four dendritic elements connected at a central node.

  5. Metallic nanospheres embedded in nanowires initiated on nanostructures and methods for synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem; Tringe, Joseph W.; Vanamu, Ganesh; Prinja, Rajiv

    2012-01-10

    A nanostructure includes a nanowire having metallic spheres formed therein, the spheres being characterized as having at least one of about a uniform diameter and about a uniform spacing there between. A nanostructure in another embodiment includes a substrate having an area with a nanofeature; and a nanowire extending from the nanofeature, the nanowire having metallic spheres formed therein, the spheres being characterized as having at least one of about a uniform diameter and about a uniform spacing there between. A method for forming a nanostructure is also presented. A method for reading and writing data is also presented. A method for preparing nanoparticles is also presented.

  6. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  7. Biomimetics of photonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Andrew R.; Townley, Helen E.

    2007-06-01

    Biomimetics is the extraction of good design from nature. One approach to optical biomimetics focuses on the use of conventional engineering methods to make direct analogues of the reflectors and anti-reflectors found in nature. However, recent collaborations between biologists, physicists, engineers, chemists and materials scientists have ventured beyond experiments that merely mimic what happens in nature, leading to a thriving new area of research involving biomimetics through cell culture. In this new approach, the nanoengineering efficiency of living cells is harnessed and natural organisms such as diatoms and viruses are used to make nanostructures that could have commercial applications.

  8. Nanoindentation of Carbon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Karamjit; Verma, Veena; Bhatti, H S

    2016-06-01

    In the present research paper carbon nanostructures viz. single walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nanohorns and graphene nanoplatelets have been synthesized by CVD technique, hydrothermal method, DC arc discharge method in liquid nitrogen and microwave technique respectively. After synthesis 5 mm thick pallets of given nanomaterial are prepared by making a paste in isopropyl alcohol and using polyvinylidene difluoride as a binder and then these pallets were used for nanoindentation measurements. Hardness, reduced modulus, stiffness, contact height and contact area have been measured using nanoindenter. PMID:27427726

  9. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grubbs, Robert K.; Bogart, Gregory R.; Rogers, John A.

    2011-12-20

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  10. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardan Ekiz, Melis; Cinar, Goksu; Aref Khalily, Mohammad; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2016-10-01

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies.

  11. Carbon nanotubes for stabilization of nanostructured lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Nicholas P; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Baker, Matthew J; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V

    2015-01-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development of combination therapies employing both CNTs and nanostructured lipid self-assembly together as carriers of different drugs.

  12. Magnetic Properties of Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraldo, John

    2007-10-01

    The recent development of the superlattice nanowire pattern transfer (SNAP) technique has enabled the fabrication of complex molecular-electronic circuits at unprecedented densities. In this project, we explore the possibility of extending this technique to generate comparably dense arrays of nanoscale giant magnetoresistive (GMR) and tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) devices. My primary contribution to this project has focused on using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), as well as a superconducting interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to monitor the magnetic properties of the devices as they are processed from thin 2D films into nanostructure arrays. This investigation allows us to investigate both fundamental and technological aspects of the nanopatterning process. For example, the effects of changing surface to volume ratios on the ferromagnetic exchange interaction and the role of various patterning techniques in determining surface chemistry and oxidation of the final nanostructures, respectively. Additionally I have worked on simulations of the materials using NIST's OOMF program, allowing me to compare actual results with theoretical expectations. I am also designing a magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) detector, which will allow faster approximations of magnetic behavior.

  13. Ion-beam assisted laser fabrication of sensing plasmonic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Gurbatov, Stanislav; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Milichko, Valentin; Makarov, Sergey; Kudryashov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Simple high-performance, two-stage hybrid technique was developed for fabrication of different plasmonic nanostructures, including nanorods, nanorings, as well as more complex structures on glass substrates. In this technique, a thin noble-metal film on a dielectric substrate is irradiated by a single tightly focused nanosecond laser pulse and then the modified region is slowly polished by an accelerated argon ion (Ar+) beam. As a result, each nanosecond laser pulse locally modifies the initial metal film through initiation of fast melting and subsequent hydrodynamic processes, while the following Ar+-ion polishing removes the rest of the film, revealing the hidden topography features and fabricating separate plasmonic structures on the glass substrate. We demonstrate that the shape and lateral size of the resulting functional plasmonic nanostructures depend on the laser pulse energy and metal film thickness, while subsequent Ar+-ion polishing enables to vary height of the resulting nanostructures. Plasmonic properties of the fabricated nanostructures were characterized by dark-field micro-spectroscopy, Raman and photoluminescence measurements performed on single nanofeatures, as well as by supporting numerical calculations of the related electromagnetic near-fields and Purcell factors. The developed simple two-stage technique represents a new step towards direct large-scale laser-induced fabrication of highly ordered arrays of complex plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26776569

  14. Electrochemical characterization of organosilane-functionalized nanostructured ITO surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruna, R.; Palacio, F.; López, M.; Pérez, J.; Mir, M.; Blázquez, O.; Hernández, S.; Garrido, B.

    2016-08-01

    The electroactivity of nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) has been investigated for its further use in applications such as sensing biological compounds by the analysis of redox active molecules. ITO films were fabricated by using electron beam evaporation at different substrate temperatures and subsequently annealed for promoting their crystallization. The morphology of the deposited material was monitored by scanning electron microscopy, confirming the deposition of either thin films or nanowires, depending on the substrate temperature. Electrochemical surface characterization revealed a 45 % increase in the electroactive surface area of nanostructured ITO with respect to thin films, one third lower than the geometrical surface area variation determined by atomic force microscopy. ITO surfaces were functionalized with a model organic molecule known as 6-(ferrocenyl)hexanethiol. The chemical attachment was done by means of a glycidoxy compound containing a reactive epoxy group, the so-called 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy-silane. ITO functionalization was useful for determining the benefits of nanostructuration on the surface coverage of active molecules. Compared to ITO thin films, an increase in the total peak height of 140 % was observed for as-deposited nanostructured electrodes, whereas the same measurement for annealed electrodes resulted in an increase of more than 400 %. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability of nanostructured ITO to increase the surface-to-volume ratio, conductivity and surface area functionalization, features that highly benefit the performance of biosensors.

  15. Lithographically-directed self-assembly of nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, J. Alexander; Cui, Yi; Alivisatos, Paul

    2004-09-21

    The combination of lithography and self-assembly provides apowerful means of organizing solution-synthesized nanostructures for awide variety of applications. We have developed a fluidic assembly methodthat relies on the local pinning of a moving liquid contact line bylithographically produced topographic features to concentratenanoparticles at those features. The final stages of the assembly processare controlled first by long-range immersion capillary forces and then bythe short-range electrostatic and Van der Waal's interactions. We havesuccessfully assembled nanoparticles from 50 nm to 2 nm in size usingthis technique and have also demonstrated the controlled positioning ofmore complex nanotetrapod structures. We have used this process toassemble Au nanoparticles into pre-patterned electrode structures andhave performed preliminary electrical characterization of the devices soformed. The fluidic assembly method is capable of very high yield, interms of positioning nanostructures at each lithographically-definedlocation, and of excellent specificity, with essentially no particledeposition between features.

  16. Making nanostructured pyrotechnics in a beaker

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E; Simpson, R L; Tillotson, T M; Satcher, J H; Hrubesh, L W

    2000-04-10

    Controlling composition at the nanometer scale is well known to alter material properties in sometimes highly desirable and dramatic ways. In the field of energetic materials component distributions, particle size, and morphology, effect both sensitivity and reactivity performance. To date nanostructured energetic materials are largely unknowns with the exception of nanometer-sized reactive powders now being produced at a number of laboratories. We have invented a new method of making nanostructured energetic materials, specifically explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, using sol-gel chemistry. The ease of this synthetic approach along with the inexpensive, stable, and benign nature of the metal precursors and solvents permit large-scale syntheses to be carried out. This approach can be accomplished using low cost processing methods. We will describe here, for the first time, this new synthetic route for producing metal-oxide-based pyrotechnics. The procedure employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-metal inorganic salts and environmentally friendly solvents such as water and ethanol. The synthesis is straightforward and involves the dissolution the metal salt in a solvent followed by the addition of an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Experimental evidence suggests that the epoxide acts as an irreversible proton scavenger that induces the hydrated-metal species to undergo hydrolysis and condensation to form a sol that undergoes. further condensation to form a metal-oxide nanostructured gel. Both critical point and atmospheric drying have been employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively. Using this method we have synthesized metal-oxide nanostructured materials using Fe{sup 3+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, Hf{sup 4+}, Sn{sup 4+} and Zr{sup 4+} inorganic salts. Using related methods we have made nanostructured oxides of Mo, Ti, V, Co, Ni, Cu, Y , Ta, W, Pb, B, Pr, Er, Nd and Si. These

  17. Superhydrophobic nature of nanostructures on an indigenous Australian eucalyptus plant and its potential application

    PubMed Central

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Le, Xuan Thi; Fawcett, Derek

    2011-01-01

    In this preliminary study, the morphology and nanostructured features formed by the epicuticular waxes of the mottlecah (Eucalyptus macrocarpa) leaf were investigated and quantified. The surface features formed by the waxes give the leaf remarkable wetting and self-cleaning properties that enhance the plant’s survival in an arid climate. This paper also provides experimental evidence of the self-assembly properties of the epicuticular waxes. Analysis of the water contact angle measurements gave a mean static contact angle of 162.00 ± 6.10 degrees, which clearly indicated that the mottlecah’s leaf surface was superhydrophobic. Detailed field emission scanning electron microscopy examination revealed that the surface was covered by bumps approximately 20 μm in diameter and regularly spaced at a distance of around 26 μm. The bumps are capped by nanotubules/pillars with an average diameter of 280 nm at the tips. Self-cleaning experiments indicated that the mottlecah’s leaf could be effectively cleaned by a fine spray of water droplets that rolled over the surface picking up contaminants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy investigation of extracted epicuticular waxes revealed that the waxes were capable of self-reassembly and formed features similar to those of the original leaf surface. Furthermore, also reported is a simple technique for surface treating one side of a planar surface to produce a superhydrophobic surface that can be used as a planar floatation platform for microdevices. PMID:24198490

  18. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured semiconductors for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, P. J.; Castañeda, Rocio; Ixtlilco, Luis; Mejia, Rogelio; Pantoja, J.; Olea, A.

    2008-08-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured semiconductors such as CdS, CuInSe2 (CIS) and TiO2 for photovoltaic cells and photoelectrochemical cells for hydrogen production. The CdS was prepared by chemical deposition, CuInSe2 by electrodeposition and chemical method and TiO2 by sol-gel method. All the three semiconductors were prepared in the thin film and powder form. The CdS was synthesized as wide band gap n-type material in the nanostructured form. The p-CdS was prepared also in the nanostructured form with Cu doping. P-type CuInSe2 films and powders were synthesized in the nanostructured form. TiO2 was always formed in the nanostructured and n-type form. The films and powders were characterized by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and opto-electronic methods. All the semiconductors were formed in the nanostructured form with different band gaps depending on the particle size and post-deposition treatments.

  19. The morphological and optical characteristics of femtosecond laser-induced large-area micro/nanostructures on GaAs, Si, and brass.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Ningsheng; Xu, Zhizhan

    2010-11-01

    We systematically study the morphological and optical characteristics of the large-area micro/nanostructures produced by femtosecond laser irradiation on GaAs, Si, and brass. The experimental results demonstrate that along with the increase of laser fluence, significant changes in the surface morphology can be observed, and the most prominent phenomenon is the enlarging of the feature size of formed structures. Interestingly, by the fourier analysis of the treated areas, a peculiar phenomenon can be revealed: as laser fluence increases, the spatial frequencies of the structures change following a specific law--the allowed main frequencies are discrete, and appear to be a sequence of 2f, f, f/2, f/4, and f/8 (f is the fundamental frequency corresponding to the near-subwavelength ripples). In our opinion, the new frequency components of f/2, f/4, and f/8 originate in the 2-order, 4-order, and 8-order grating coupling. The law can offer us new insights for the evolving mechanisms of a variety of laser-induced micro/nanostructures in different scales. Furthermore, the optical characteristics of the treated surface are strongly dependent on the morphological characteristics that are mainly determined by laser fluence, such as the feature size of the micro/nanostructures, the topology of the surface morphology, the surface roughness, and the irregular degree of the formed structures. In general, as laser fluence increases in a moderate range, the specular reflectance of the structured surface would be significantly reduced. However, if laser fluence is excessive, the anti-specular-reflection effect would be much weakened. In ideal laser fluence, the micro/nanostructures produced by the near-infrared laser can achieve an ultra-low specular reflectance in the visible and near-infrared spectral region, which exhibits an attracting application prospect in the field of utilizing solar energy.

  20. Silk fibroin nanostructured materials for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropoulos, Alexander N.

    Nanostructured biopolymers have proven to be promising to develop novel biomedical applications where forming structures at the nanoscale normally occurs by self-assembly. However, synthesizing these structures can also occur by inducing materials to transition into other forms by adding chemical cross-linkers, changing pH, or changing ionic composition. Understanding the generation of nanostructures in fluid environments, such as liquid organic solvents or supercritical fluids, has not been thoroughly examined, particularly those that are based on protein-based block-copolymers. Here, we examine the transformation of reconstituted silk fibroin, which has emerged as a promising biopolymer due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of functionalization, into submicron spheres and gel networks which offer applications in tissue engineering and advanced sensors. Two types of gel networks, hydrogels and aerogels, have small pores and large surface areas that are defined by their structure. We design and analyze silk nanoparticle formation using a microfluidic device while offering an application for drug delivery. Additionally, we provide a model and characterize hydrogel formation from micelles to nanoparticles, while investigating cellular response to the hydrogel in an in vitro cell culture model. Lastly, we provide a second model of nanofiber formation during near-critical and supercritical drying and characterize the silk fibroin properties at different drying pressures which, when acting as a stabilizing matrix, shows to improve the activity of entrapped enzymes dried at different pressures. This work has created new nanostructured silk fibroin forms to benefit biomedical applications that could be applied to other fibrous proteins.

  1. Lithium insertion in nanostructured TiO(2)(B) architectures.

    PubMed

    Dylla, Anthony G; Henkelman, Graeme; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-05-21

    Electric vehicles and grid storage devices have potentialto become feasible alternatives to current technology, but only if scientists can develop energy storage materials that offer high capacity and high rate capabilities. Chemists have studied anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) (bronze) in both bulk and nanostructured forms as potential Li-ion battery anodes. In most cases, the specific capacity and rate of lithiation and delithiation increases as the materials are nanostructured. Scientists have explained these enhancements in terms of higher surface areas, shorter Li(+) diffusion paths and different surface energies for nanostructured materials allowing for more facile lithiation and delithiation. Of the most studied polymorphs, nanostructured TiO2(B) has the highest capacity with promising high rate capabilities. TiO2(B) is able to accommodate 1 Li(+) per Ti, giving a capacity of 335 mAh/g for nanotubular and nanoparticulate TiO2(B). The TiO2(B) polymorph, discovered in 1980 by Marchand and co-workers, has been the focus of many recent studies regarding high power and high capacity anode materials with potential applications for electric vehicles and grid storage. This is due to the material's stability over multiple cycles, safer lithiation potential relative to graphite, reasonable capacity, high rate capability, nontoxicity, and low cost (Bruce, P. G.; Scrosati, B.; Tarascon, J.-M. Nanomaterials for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed.2008, 47, 2930-2946). One of the most interesting properties of TiO2(B) is that both bulk and nanostructured forms lithiate and delithiate through a surface redox or pseudocapacitive charging mechanism, giving rise to stable high rate charge/discharge capabilities in the case of nanostructured TiO2(B). When other polymorphs of TiO2 are nanostructured, they still mainly intercalate lithium through a bulk diffusion-controlled mechanism. TiO2(B) has a unique open crystal structure and low energy Li

  2. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  4. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Marcie

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  5. Nanostructured assemblies for dental application.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Florence; Mendoza-Palomares, Carlos; Helms, Marie; Al Alam, Denise; Richert, Ludovic; Arntz, Youri; Rinckenbach, Simon; Garnier, Fabien; Haïkel, Youssef; Gangloff, Sophie C; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2010-06-22

    Millions of teeth are saved each year by root canal therapy. Although current treatment modalities offer high levels of success for many conditions, an ideal form of therapy might consist of regenerative approaches in which diseased or necrotic pulp tissues are removed and replaced with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. Melanocortin peptides (alpha-MSH) possess anti-inflammatory properties in many acute and chronic inflammatory models. Our recent studies have shown that alpha-MSH covalently coupled to poly-l-glutamic acid (PGA-alpha-MSH) retains anti-inflammatory properties on rat monocytes. This study aimed to define the effects of PGA-alpha-MSH on dental pulp fibroblasts. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated fibroblasts incubated with PGA-alpha-MSH showed an early time-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha, a late induction of IL-10, and no effect on IL-8 secretion. However, in the absence of LPS, PGA-alpha-MSH induced IL-8 secretion and proliferation of pulp fibroblasts, whereas free alpha-MSH inhibited this proliferation. Thus, PGA-alpha-MSH has potential effects in promoting human pulp fibroblast adhesion and cell proliferation. It can also reduce the inflammatory state of LPS-stimulated pulp fibroblasts observed in gram-negative bacterial infections. These effects suggest a novel use of PGA-alpha-MSH as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of endodontic lesions. To better understand these results, we have also used the multilayered polyelectrolyte films as a reservoir for PGA-alpha-MSH by using not only PLL (poly-l-lysine) but also the Dendri Graft poly-l-lysines (DGL(G4)) to be able to adsorb more PGA-alpha-MSH. Our results indicated clearly that, by using PGA-alpha-MSH, we increase not only the viability of cells but also the proliferation. We have also analyzed at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy these nanostructured architectures and shown an increase of thickness and roughness in the presence of PGA-alpha-MSH incorporated into the

  6. Electronic properties of complex nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen

    Nanostructured materials have brought an unprecedented opportunity for advancement in many fields of human endeavor and in applications. Nanostructures are a new research field which may revolutionize people's everyday life. In the Thesis, I have used theoretical methods including density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamic simulations (MD) and tight-binding methods to explore the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of various nanomaterials. In all this, I also paid attention to potential applications of these findings. First, I will briefly introduce the scientific background of this Thesis, including the motivation for the study of a boron enriched aluminum surface, novel carbon foam structures and my research interest in 2D electronics. Then I will review the computational techniques I used in the study, mostly DFT methods. In Chapter 3, I introduce an effective way to enhance surface hardness of aluminum by boron nanoparticle implantation. Using boron dimers to represent the nanoparticles, the process of boron implantation is modeled in a molecular dynamics simulation of bombarding the aluminum surface by energetic B 2 molecules. Possible metastable structures of boron-coated aluminum surface are identified. Within these structures, I find that boron atoms prefer to stay in the subsurface region of aluminum. By modeling the Rockwell indentation process, boron enriched aluminum surface is found to be harder than the pristine aluminum surface by at least 15%. In Chapter 4, I discuss novel carbon structures, including 3D carbon foam and related 2D slab structures. Carbon foam contains both sp 2 and sp3 hybridized carbon atoms. It forms a 3D honeycomb lattice with a comparable stability to fullerenes, suggesting possible existence of such carbon foam structures. Although the bulk 3D foam structure is semiconducting, an sp2 terminated carbon surface could maintain a conducting channel even when passivated by hydrogen. To promote the experimental

  7. Rapid Solid-State Metathesis Routes to Nanostructured Silicon-Germainum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Rodriguez, Marc (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods for producing nanostructured silicon and silicon-germanium via solid state metathesis (SSM). The method of forming nanostructured silicon comprises the steps of combining a stoichiometric mixture of silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) and an alkaline earth metal silicide into a homogeneous powder, and initating the reaction between the silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) with the alkaline earth metal silicide. The method of forming nanostructured silicon-germanium comprises the steps of combining a stoichiometric mixture of silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) and a germanium based precursor into a homogeneous powder, and initiating the reaction between the silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) with the germanium based precursors.

  8. Nanostructures and pinholes on W surfaces exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Li, C.; Fu, B. Q.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructures and pinholes formed on tungsten surface exposed to high fluxes (1024 m-2 s-1) deuterium ions at 943 K and 1073 K were studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Nanostructure formation is observed at 943 K and 1073 K, and exhibits a strong dependence on the surface orientation. With increasing fluence, pinholes appear on the surface and are mainly observed on grains with surface normal near [1 1 1]. The pinholes are speculated to be caused by the rupture of bubbles formed near the surface. The formation of pinholes has no obvious relationship with the surface nanostructures.

  9. Three-dimensional nanostructuring in YIG ferrite with femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Shoji, Yuya; Hai, Pham Nam; Tanaka, Masaaki; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Takuo; Arai, Shigehisa

    2014-01-15

    With the goal of creating magneto-optical devices, we demonstrated forming nanostructures inside a substrate of cerium-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Ce:YIG) by means of direct laser writing. Laser irradiation changed both the optical and magnetic properties of Ce:YIG. The measurements showed that the refractive index was increased by 0.015 (about 0.7% change) and the magnetization property was changed from hard to soft to decrease the coercivity. This technology enables the formation of 3-dimensional optical and magnetic nanostructures in YIG and will contribute to the development of novel devices for optical communication and photonic integration. PMID:24562109

  10. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lumin; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-31

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the

  11. Nanostructured Materials for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to advance the fundamental understanding of novel photoelectronic organic device structures integrated with inorganic nanostructures, while also expanding the general field of nanomaterials for renewable energy devices and systems.

  12. Ion-implanted Si-nanostructures buried in a SiO{sub 2} substrate studied with soft-x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.; Rubensson, J.E.; Eisebitt, S.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years silicon nanostructures have gained great interest because of their optical luminescence, which immediately suggests several applications, e.g., in optoelectronic devices. Nanostructures are also investigated because of the fundamental physics involved in the underlying luminescence mechanism, especially attention has been drawn to the influence of the reduced dimensions on the electronic structure. The forming of stable and well-defined nanostructured materials is one goal of cluster physics. For silicon nanostructures this goal has so far not been reached, but various indirect methods have been established, all having the problem of producing less well defined and/or unstable nanostructures. Ion implantation and subsequent annealing is a promising new technique to overcome some of these difficulties. In this experiment the authors investigate the electronic structure of ion-implanted silicon nanoparticles buried in a stabilizing SiO{sub 2} substrate. Soft X-ray emission (SXE) spectroscopy features the appropriate information depth to investigate such buried structures. SXE spectra to a good approximation map the local partial density of occupied states (LPDOS) in broad band materials like Si. The use of monochromatized synchrotron radiation (MSR) allows for selective excitation of silicon atoms in different chemical environments. Thus, the emission from Si atom sites in the buried structure can be separated from contributions from the SiO{sub 2} substrate. In this preliminary study strong size dependent effects are found, and the electronic structure of the ion-implanted nanoparticles is shown to be qualitatively different from porous silicon. The results can be interpreted in terms of quantum confinement and chemical shifts due to neighboring oxygen atoms at the interface to SiO{sub 2}.

  13. Triphenylalanine peptides self-assemble into nanospheres and nanorods that are different from the nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cong; Luo, Yin; Zhou, Ruhong; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the nature of the self-assembly of peptide nanostructures at the molecular level is critical for rational design of functional bio-nanomaterials. Recent experimental studies have shown that triphenylalanine(FFF)-based peptides can self-assemble into solid plate-like nanostructures and nanospheres, which are different from the hollow nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine(FF)-based peptides. In spite of extensive studies, the assembly mechanism and the molecular basis for the structural differences between FFF and FF nanostructures remain poorly understood. In this work, we first investigate the assembly process and the structural features of FFF nanostructures using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and then compare them with FF nanostructures. We find that FFF peptides spontaneously assemble into solid nanometer-sized nanospheres and nanorods with substantial β-sheet contents, consistent with the structural properties of hundred-nanometer-sized FFF nano-plates characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. Distinct from the formation mechanism of water-filled FF nanovesicles and nanotubes reported in our previous study, intermediate bilayers are not observed during the self-assembly process of FFF nanospheres and nanorods. The peptides in FFF nanostructures are predominantly anti-parallel-aligned, which can form larger sizes of β-sheet-like structures than the FF counterparts. In contrast, FF peptides exhibit lipid-like assembly behavior and assemble into bilayered nanostructures. Furthermore, although the self-assembly of FF and FFF peptides is mostly driven by side chain-side chain (SC-SC) aromatic stacking interactions, the main chain-main chain (MC-MC) interactions also play an important role in the formation of fine structures of the assemblies. The delicate interplay between MC-MC and SC-SC interactions results in the different nanostructures formed by the two peptides. These findings provide new insights into the structure

  14. Magnetic nanostructures fabricated by scanning tunneling microscope-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, W.W.; Zhang, J.; Wendelken, J.F.; Warmack, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    We have successfully used scanning tunneling microscope-assisted chemical vapor deposition to fabricate magnetic nanostructures as fine as 5 nm wide and {lt}2 nm high using ferrocene [Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}] as the metal-organic source gas. The physical properties of these nanostructures were qualitatively characterized and {ital ex situ} magnetic force microscopy measurements indicate these features are strongly magnetic.

  15. Stabilizing nanostructures in metals using grain and twin boundary architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K.

    2016-05-01

    Forming alloys with impurity elements is a routine method for modifying the properties of metals. An alternative approach involves the incorporation of interfaces into the crystalline lattice to enhance the metal's properties without changing its chemical composition. The introduction of high-density interfaces in nanostructured materials results in greatly improved strength and hardness; however, interfaces at the nanoscale show low stability. In this Review, I discuss recent developments in the stabilization of nanostructured metals by modifying the architectures of their interfaces. The amount, structure and distribution of several types of interfaces, such as high- and low-angle grain boundaries and twin boundaries, are discussed. I survey several examples of materials with nanotwinned and nanolaminated structures, as well as with gradient nanostructures, describing the techniques used to produce such samples and tracing their exceptional performances back to the nanoscale architectures of their interfaces.

  16. Tunable morphologies of indium tin oxide nanostructures using nanocellulose templates

    DOE PAGES

    Aytug, Tolga; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Ozcan, Soydan; Lu, Yuan; Poole, II, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanostructures have emerged as an important family of materials for various device applications. The performance is highly dependent on the morphology of the metal oxide nanostructures. Here we report a completely green approach to prepare indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles using only water and cellulose nanofibril (CNF) in addition to the ITO precursor. Surface hydroxyl groups of the CNFs allow for efficient conjugation of ITO precursors (e.g., metal ions) in aqueous solution. The resulting CNF film allows for controllable spatial arrangement of metal oxide precursors, which results in tunable particle morphology (e.g., nanowires, nanospheres, and octahedral nanoparticles). Thesemore » ITO nanoparticles can also form conductive and transparent ITO films. This study opens a new perspective on developing metal oxide nanostructures.« less

  17. Metallic glass nanostructures of tunable shape and composition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanhui; Liu, Jingbei; Sohn, Sungwoo; Li, Yanglin; Cha, Judy J.; Schroers, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Metals of hybrid nano-/microstructures are of broad technological and fundamental interests. Manipulation of shape and composition on the nanoscale, however, is challenging, especially for multicomponent alloys such as metallic glasses. Although top–down approaches have demonstrated nanomoulding, they are limited to very few alloy systems. Here we report a facile method to synthesize metallic glass nanoarchitectures that can be applied to a broad range of glass-forming alloys. This strategy, using multitarget carousel oblique angle deposition, offers the opportunity to achieve control over size, shape and composition of complex alloys at the nanoscale. As a consequence, nanostructures of programmable three-dimensional shapes and tunable compositions are realized on wafer scale for metallic glasses including the marginal glass formers. Realizing nanostructures in a wide compositional range allows chemistry optimization for technological usage of metallic glass nanostructures, and also enables the fundamental study on size, composition and fabrication dependences of metallic glass properties. PMID:25901951

  18. Tunable morphologies of indium tin oxide nanostructures using nanocellulose templates

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, Tolga; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Ozcan, Soydan; Lu, Yuan; Poole, II, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanostructures have emerged as an important family of materials for various device applications. The performance is highly dependent on the morphology of the metal oxide nanostructures. Here we report a completely green approach to prepare indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles using only water and cellulose nanofibril (CNF) in addition to the ITO precursor. Surface hydroxyl groups of the CNFs allow for efficient conjugation of ITO precursors (e.g., metal ions) in aqueous solution. The resulting CNF film allows for controllable spatial arrangement of metal oxide precursors, which results in tunable particle morphology (e.g., nanowires, nanospheres, and octahedral nanoparticles). These ITO nanoparticles can also form conductive and transparent ITO films. This study opens a new perspective on developing metal oxide nanostructures.

  19. TXM-NEXAFS of TiO2-Based Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, P.; Bittencourt, C.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Umek, P.; Arcon, D.; Ewels, C. P.; Rehbein, S.; Heim, S.; Schneider, G.

    2011-09-01

    In this work, electronic properties of individual TiOx-pristine nanoribbons (NR) prepared by hydrothermal treatment of anatase TiO2 micro-particles were studied using the HZB transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) at the BESSY II undulator beamline U41-FSGM. NEXAFS is ideally suited to study TiO2-based materials because both the O K-edge and Ti L-edge features are very sensitive to the local bonding environment, providing diagnostic information about the crystal structures and oxidation states of various forms of titanium oxides and sub-oxides. TXM-NEXAFS combines full-field x-ray microscopy with spectroscopy, allowing the study of the electronic structure of individual nanostructures with spatial resolution better than 25 nm and a spectral resolution of up to E/ΔE = 10000. The typical image field in TXM-NEXAFS measurements is about 10 μm×10 μm, which is large compared to the individual nanoparticle. Therefore, one image stack already contains statistically significant data. In addition, the directional electric field vector (Ē) of the x-rays can be used as a "search tool" for the direction of chemical bonds of the atom selected by its absorption edge.

  20. Ultraflexible nanostructures and implications for future nanorobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Robert W.; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-05-01

    Several high aspect ratio nanostructures have been made by capillary force directed self-assembly including polymeric nanofiber air-bridges, trampoline-like membranes, microsphere-beaded nanofibers, and intermetallic nanoneedles. Arrays of polymer air-bridges form in seconds by simply hand brushing a bead of polymeric liquid over an array of micropillars. The domination of capillary force that is thinning unstable capillary bridges leads to uniform arrays of nanofiber air-bridges. Similarly, arrays of vertically oriented Ag2Ga nanoneedles have been formed by dipping silvercoated arrays of pyramidal silicon into melted gallium. Force-displacement measurements of these structures are presented. These nanostructures, especially when compressively or torsionally buckled, have extremely low stiffnesses, motion due to thermal fluctuations that is relatively easily detected, and the ability to move great distances for very small changes in applied force. Nanofibers with bead-on-a-string structure, where the beads are micron diameter and loaded with magnetic iron oxide (maghemite), are shown to be simply viewable under optical microscopes, have micronewton/ m stiffness, and have ultralow torsional stiffnesses enabling the bead to be rotated numerous revolutions without breaking. Combination of these high aspect ratio structures with stretched elastomers offer interesting possibilities for robotic actuation and locomotion. Polydimethylsiloxane loaded with nanomaterials, e.g. nanotubes, graphene or MoS2, can be efficiently heated with directed light. Heating produces considerable force through the thermoelastic effect, and this force can be used for continuous translation or to trigger reversible elastic buckling of the nanostructures. The remote stimulation of motion with light provides a possible mechanism for producing cooperative behavior between swarms of semiautonomous nanorobots.

  1. Versatile Micropatterning of Plasmonic Nanostructures by Visible Light Induced Electroless Silver Plating on Gold Nanoseeds.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Hironou, Asami; Shen, ZhengJun; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2016-09-14

    A versatile fabrication technique for plasmonic silver (Ag) nanostructures that uses visible light exposure for micropatterning and plasmon resonance tuning is presented. The surface of a glass substrate modified with gold (Au) nanoseeds by a thermal dewetting process was used as a Ag plating platform. When a solution containing silver nitrate and sodium citrate was dropped on the Au nanoseeds under visible light exposure, the plasmon-mediated reduction of Ag ions was induced on the Au nanoseeds to form Ag nanostructures. The plasmon resonance spectra of Ag nanostructures were examined by an absorption spectral measurement and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. Some examples of Ag nanostructure patterning were demonstrated by means of light exposure through a photomask, direct writing with a focused laser beam, and the interference between two laser beams. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was conducted with fabricated Ag nanostructures.

  2. Versatile Micropatterning of Plasmonic Nanostructures by Visible Light Induced Electroless Silver Plating on Gold Nanoseeds.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Hironou, Asami; Shen, ZhengJun; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2016-09-14

    A versatile fabrication technique for plasmonic silver (Ag) nanostructures that uses visible light exposure for micropatterning and plasmon resonance tuning is presented. The surface of a glass substrate modified with gold (Au) nanoseeds by a thermal dewetting process was used as a Ag plating platform. When a solution containing silver nitrate and sodium citrate was dropped on the Au nanoseeds under visible light exposure, the plasmon-mediated reduction of Ag ions was induced on the Au nanoseeds to form Ag nanostructures. The plasmon resonance spectra of Ag nanostructures were examined by an absorption spectral measurement and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. Some examples of Ag nanostructure patterning were demonstrated by means of light exposure through a photomask, direct writing with a focused laser beam, and the interference between two laser beams. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was conducted with fabricated Ag nanostructures. PMID:27564976

  3. Organic phase synthesis of noble metal-zinc chalcogenide core-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Diab, Mahmud; Flomin, Kobi; Rukenstein, Pazit; Mokari, Taleb

    2016-10-15

    Multi-component nanostructures have been attracting tremendous attention due to their ability to form novel materials with unique chemical, optical and physical properties. Development of hybrid nanostructures that are composed of metal-semiconductor components using a simple approach is of interest. Herein, we report a robust and general organic phase synthesis of metal (Au or Ag)-Zinc chalcogenide (ZnS or ZnSe) core-shell nanostructures. This synthetic protocol also enabled the growth of more compositionally complex nanostructures of Au-ZnSxSe1-x alloys and Au-ZnS-ZnSe core-shell-shell. The optical and structural properties of these hybrid nanostructures are also presented. PMID:27428852

  4. Organic phase synthesis of noble metal-zinc chalcogenide core-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Diab, Mahmud; Flomin, Kobi; Rukenstein, Pazit; Mokari, Taleb

    2016-10-15

    Multi-component nanostructures have been attracting tremendous attention due to their ability to form novel materials with unique chemical, optical and physical properties. Development of hybrid nanostructures that are composed of metal-semiconductor components using a simple approach is of interest. Herein, we report a robust and general organic phase synthesis of metal (Au or Ag)-Zinc chalcogenide (ZnS or ZnSe) core-shell nanostructures. This synthetic protocol also enabled the growth of more compositionally complex nanostructures of Au-ZnSxSe1-x alloys and Au-ZnS-ZnSe core-shell-shell. The optical and structural properties of these hybrid nanostructures are also presented.

  5. Effect of laser parameters and assist gas on spectral response of silicon fibrous nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Alubiady, M.; Tan, Bo

    2010-11-15

    This article report, for the first time, the influence of laser parameters on the spectral response of weblike silicon fibrous nanostructures. These nanostructures are formed by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz pulse frequency under atmosphere and nitrogen ambient. The observed decreasing in reflectance is correlated with the density of fibrous nanostructures and the size of the agglomerated nanoparticles. Compared to bulk silicon, Raman spectra of fibrous nanostructures shows a downward shift and asymmetric broadening at the first order phonon peak. The shift and broadening are attributed to phonon confinement of fibrous nanostructure. Polarization and nitrogen gas modify the morphology of generated nanomaterials but does not have effect on light absorptance. Pulsewidth and pulse frequency do not have significant effect on light absorptance.

  6. Effect of laser parameters and assist gas on spectral response of silicon fibrous nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo; Alubiady, M.

    2010-11-01

    This article report, for the first time, the influence of laser parameters on the spectral response of weblike silicon fibrous nanostructures. These nanostructures are formed by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz pulse frequency under atmosphere and nitrogen ambient. The observed decreasing in reflectance is correlated with the density of fibrous nanostructures and the size of the agglomerated nanoparticles. Compared to bulk silicon, Raman spectra of fibrous nanostructures shows a downward shift and asymmetric broadening at the first order phonon peak. The shift and broadening are attributed to phonon confinement of fibrous nanostructure. Polarization and nitrogen gas modify the morphology of generated nanomaterials but does not have effect on light absorptance. Pulsewidth and pulse frequency do not have significant effect on light absorptance.

  7. Electrochemical Synthesis of Nanostructured Noble Metal Films for Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Jay K.

    Nanostructures of noble metals (gold and silver) are of interest because of their important intrinsic properties. Noble metals by themselves are physically robust, chemically inert, highly conductive, and possess the capability to form strong bonds with thiols or dithiol molecules present in organic compounds, creating self-assembled monolayers with tunable functional groups at exposed interfaces. However, when the nanostructures are formed, they in addition possess high surface area and unique optical properties which can be tuned by adjusting the shape and the size of the nanostructures. All of these properties make nanostructures of noble metals suitable candidates to be used as a transducer for optical and electrochemical biosensing. Individual nanostructures might be easier to prepare but difficult to handle to use as a transducer. Therefore, we prepared and analyzed nanostructured films/coating of noble metals and used them as a transducer for optical and electrochemical biosensing. We have electrochemically prepared nanoporous gold (NPG) on gold wire varying different dependable parameters (deposition potential, time, and compositional ratio) to obtain an optimal structure in term of stability, morphology, and better surface area. NPG prepared using a deposition potential of --1.0 V for 10 min from 30:70% 50 mM potassium dicyanoaurate(I) and 50 mM potassium dicyanoargentate(I) was used as an optimal surface for protein immobilization, and to perform square wave voltammetry (SWV) based enzyme-linked lectinsorbent assays. On flat gold surfaces, adjacent protein molecules sterically block their active sites due to high-density packing, which can be minimized using NPG as a substrate. NPG can also show significant peak current in SWV experiments, a sensitive electrochemical technique that minimizes non-Faradaic current, which is difficult to obtain using a flat gold surface. These all make NPG a suitable substrate, electrode, and transducer to be used in

  8. (Plasmonic Metal Core)/(Semiconductor Shell) Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Caihong

    shape is maintained throughout the sulfidation process, with the edge length being increased gradually. TiO2 is one of the most important semiconductors that are employed in light-harvesting applications. It has been extensively studied for a variety of applications by virtue of its low toxicity, biological compatibility, chemical and thermal stability, resistance to photocorrosion, and relative abundance. However, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 is limited to the UV region because of its wide band gap, which limits its applications in light harvesting. Although (Au core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures can improve the photocatalytic activities of TiO2 in visible light, it has only been demonstrated in a few experiments and has been limited with Au nanospheres. Compared with Au nanospheres, Au nanorods offer more attractive plasmonic features, including stronger electric field enhancements and synthetically tunable longitudinal plasmon wavelengths over the visible to near-infrared region. The coating of Au nanorod therefore can largely improve light harvesting capability of TiO2. In this thesis, I developed a facile and versatile method for the preparation of (Au nanocrystal core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures by using a Ti(III) compound as the titania precursor. By employing Au nanorods with different sizes and varying the shell thickness, the plasmonic bands of the core/shell nanostructures can be tailored. TiO2 can also be grown on other monometallic and bimetallic Pd, Pt, Au nanocrystals. As a proof-of-concept application, (Au nanorod core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures were utilized in dye-sensitized solar cells to function as a scattering layer. The resultant solar cells exhibited higher power conversion efficiencies with a thinner thickness compared to the traditional TiO 2 solar cells. In addition, I also examined the property of plasmon-enhanced reactive oxygen species generation. Moreover, the TiO2 shell with a high refractive index can efficiently couple with the

  9. Application of aqueous dispersions of silver nanostructures for treatment of pyoinflammatory diseases with a chronic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutberg, Ph; Kolikov, V.; Snetov, V.; Stogov, A.; Moshkin, A.; Khalilov, M.

    2011-01-01

    Bactericidal properties of aqueous dispersions of oxide silver nanostructures (ADSN) produced by means of pulsed electric discharges (PED) in water can use in surgery for treatment of upper purulent wounds with a chronic component. The patients with such wounds are of large number and differ on etiology of diseases but their mutual feature is long treatment without marked positive changes. Thus long application of antibiotics leads to abnormality of immune processes and antibacterial resistance of microbial flora. Moreover, local antiseptics are frequently toxic and one can oppress processes of reparation in a wound. The investigation is addressed to finding out the opportunity of usage of an ADSN for treatment of purulent wounds with a chronic component and comparison of its efficiency with the sodium hypochlorite. At investigation, the ADSN formed at PED of 5 - 10 μs duration, with highest share of "small" (hydrodynamic diameter <= 100 nm) nanostructures and greatest surface electric charge we used. It was found that the usage of ADSN during the first 5 days characterized by high active reparative processes with their maximum at 3rd - 4th days and subsequent moderate further healing. At local use of ADSN, there were no cellular atypia and preternatural representations about inflammatory reactions. It is possible to assume that usage of ADSN will allow in prospect to correct the practice of out-patient therapy of chronic and slow pyoinflammatory diseases.

  10. The influence of aminophylline on the nanostructure and nanomechanics of T lymphocytes: an AFM study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xun; He, Jiexiang; Liu, Mingxian; Zhou, Changren

    2014-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in the illustration of the mechanism of aminophylline (AM) treating asthma, there is no data about its effect on the nanostructure and nanomechanics of T lymphocytes. Here, we presented atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based investigations at the nanoscale level to address the above fundamental biophysical questions. As increasing AM treatment time, T lymphocytes' volume nearly double increased and then decreased. The changes of nanostructural features of the cell membrane, i.e., mean height of particles, root-mean-square roughness (Rq), crack and fragment appearance, increased with AM treatment time. T lymphocytes were completely destroyed with 96-h treatment, and they existed in the form of small fragments. Analysis of force-distance curves showed that the adhesion force of cell surface decreased significantly with the increase of AM treatment time, while the cell stiffness increased firstly and then decreased. These changes were closely correlated to the characteristics and process of cell oncosis. In total, these quantitative and qualitative changes of T lymphocytes' structure and nanomechanical properties suggested that AM could induce T lymphocyte oncosis to exert anti-inflammatory effects for treating asthma. These findings provide new insights into the T lymphocyte oncosis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism and immune regulation actions of AM. PMID:25258618

  11. The influence of aminophylline on the nanostructure and nanomechanics of T lymphocytes: an AFM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xun; He, Jiexiang; Liu, Mingxian; Zhou, Changren

    2014-09-01

    Although much progress has been made in the illustration of the mechanism of aminophylline (AM) treating asthma, there is no data about its effect on the nanostructure and nanomechanics of T lymphocytes. Here, we presented atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based investigations at the nanoscale level to address the above fundamental biophysical questions. As increasing AM treatment time, T lymphocytes' volume nearly double increased and then decreased. The changes of nanostructural features of the cell membrane, i.e., mean height of particles, root-mean-square roughness (Rq), crack and fragment appearance, increased with AM treatment time. T lymphocytes were completely destroyed with 96-h treatment, and they existed in the form of small fragments. Analysis of force-distance curves showed that the adhesion force of cell surface decreased significantly with the increase of AM treatment time, while the cell stiffness increased firstly and then decreased. These changes were closely correlated to the characteristics and process of cell oncosis. In total, these quantitative and qualitative changes of T lymphocytes' structure and nanomechanical properties suggested that AM could induce T lymphocyte oncosis to exert anti-inflammatory effects for treating asthma. These findings provide new insights into the T lymphocyte oncosis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism and immune regulation actions of AM.

  12. Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics. Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-05-12

    The synthesis and characterization of lead telluride (PbTe) gels and aerogels with nanostructured features of potential benefit for enhanced thermoelectrics is reported. In this approach, discrete thiolate-capped PbTe nanoparticles were synthesized by a solution-based approach followed by oxidation-induced nanoparticle assembly with tetranitromethane or hydrogen peroxide to form wet gels. Drying of the wet gels by supercritical CO₂ extraction yielded aerogels, whereas xerogels were produced by ambient pressure bench top drying. The gels consist of an interconnected network of colloidal nanoparticles and pores with surface areas up to 74 m² g-1. The thermal stability of the nanostructures relative to nanoparticles was probed with the help of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The aerogels were observed to sublime at a higher temperature and over a larger range (425–500 °C) relative to the precursor nanoparticles. TGA-DSC suggests that organic capping groups can be removed in the region 250–450 °C, and melting of PbTe nanoparticles occurs near the temperature for bulk materials (ca. 920 °C). The good thermal stability combined with the presence of nanoscale interfaces suggests PbTe gels may show promise in thermoelectric devices.

  13. Measurement of thermophysical property of plasma forming tungsten nanofiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Shin; Yagi, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Tokitani, Masayuki; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2016-05-01

    Thermophysical property of a nanostructured tungsten layer formed on a tungsten film was investigated. A 1-µm-thick tungsten film deposited on a quartz glass substrate was irradiated with a high density helium plasma at the surface temperature of 1500 K. The plasma irradiation led to the formation of highly porous fiberform-nanostructured tungsten layer with a thickness of 3.5 µm. Impulse heating was applied at the interface of the film/substrate, and transient heat diffusion was observed using a pulsed light heating thermoreflectance apparatus. The thermoreflectance signals clearly differed between the nanostructure existing and mechanically removed regions; the difference can be attributed to thermal effusivity of the nanostructured tungsten layer. The estimated thermal conductivity of the nanostructured tungsten decreases to ∼2% of that of bulk when the density of the nanostructure is assumed to be ∼6% of the bulk value.

  14. Femtosecond laser induced periodic nanostructures on titanium dioxide film for improving biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinonaga, T.; Horiguchi, N.; Tsukamoto, M.; Nagai, A.; Yamashita, K.; Hanawa, T.; Matsushita, N.; Guoqiang, X.; Abe, N.

    2013-03-01

    Periodic nanostructures formation on Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film by scanning of femtosecond laser beam spot at fundamental and second harmonic wave is reported. Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used for biomaterials, because of its excellent anti-corrosion and high mechanical properties. However, Ti implant is typically artificial materials and has no biofunction. Hence, it is necessary for improving the bioactivity of Ti. Recently, coating of TiO2 film on Ti plate surface is useful methods to improve biocompatibility of Ti plate. Then, if periodic nanostructures were formed on the film surface, cell spreading might be controlled at one direction. We propose periodic nanostructures formation on TiO2 film by femtosecond laser irradiation. Cell spread could be controlled along the grooves of periodic nanostructures. In the experiments, the film was formed on Ti plate with an aerosol beam. A commercial femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser system was employed in our experiments. Periodic nanostructures, lying perpendicular to the laser electric field polarization vector, were formed on the film at fundamental and second harmonic wave. Periodic nanostructures were also produced on Ti plate with femtosecond laser. The period of periodic nanostructures on the film was much shorter than that on Ti plate. By cell test, there was a region of cell spreading along the grooves of periodic nanostructures on the film formed with femtosecond laser at fundamental wave. On bare film surface, cell spreading was observed at all direction. These results suggest that direction of cell spread could be controlled by periodic nanostructures formation on the film.

  15. LDRD final report on adaptive-responsive nanostructures for sensing applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, John Allen; van Swol, Frank B.; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J.

    2005-11-01

    Functional organic nanostructures such as well-formed tubes or fibers that can easily be fabricated into electronic and photonic devices are needed in many applications. Especially desirable from a national security standpoint are nanostructures that have enhanced sensitivity for the detection of chemicals and biological (CB) agents and other environmental stimuli. We recently discovered the first class of highly responsive and adaptive porphyrin-based nanostructures that may satisfy these requirements. These novel porphyrin nanostructures, which are formed by ionic self-assembly of two oppositely charged porphyrins, may function as conductors, semiconductors, or photoconductors, and they have additional properties that make them suitable for device fabrication (e.g., as ultrasensitive colorimetric CB microsensors). Preliminary studies with porphyrin nanotubes have shown that these nanostructures have novel optical and electronic properties, including strong resonant light scattering, quenched fluorescence, and electrical conductivity. In addition, they are photochemically active and capable of light-harvesting and photosynthesis; they may also have nonlinear optical properties. Remarkably, the nanotubes and potentially other porphyrin nanostructure are mechanically responsive and adaptive (e.g., the rigidity of the micrometers-long nanotubes is altered by light, ultrasound, or chemicals) and they self-heal upon removal the environmental stimulus. Given the tremendous degree of structural variation possible in the porphyrin subunits, additional types of nanostructures and greater control over their morphology can be anticipated. Molecular modification also provides a means of controlling their electronic, photonic, and other functional properties. In this work, we have greatly broadened the range of ionic porphyrin nanostructures that can be made, and determined the optical and responsivity properties of the nanotubes and other porphyrin nanostructures. We have

  16. Morphological characteristics of selenium-containing nanostructures based on rigid-chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, D. A.; Valueva, S. V.; Novoselov, N. P.

    2010-06-01

    Selenium-containing nanostructures of rigid-chain polymers with close molecular masses were studied by flow birefringence (FB) and static and dynamic light scattering at a fixed selenium to polymer mass ratio ν = 0.1 in solution. The group of polymers under study included the cationic polyelectrolyte poly-N,N,N,N-trimethylmethacryloyloxyethylammonium methyl sulfate, anionic polyelectrolyte carboxymethylcellulose, and nonionogen polymer oxyethylcellulose. High-molecular selenium-containing polymer nanostructures were found in all cases. Nanostructures with a maximum molecular mass and the largest number of constituent macromolecules were obtained using oxyethylcellulose. At ν = 0.1 the mean square radii of inertia of the nanostructures were almost independent of the nature of the polymer matrix. The thermodynamic state of the solutions of nanostructures was close to the ideal one in all cases. For the region where stable dispersions formed, the Gibbs energies of macromolecule-selenium nanoparticle interactions were calculated and shown to be almost independent of the nature of the polymer matrix at ν = 0.1. The close mean square radii of inertia R {g/*} of the nanostructures, the Gibbs energies of interaction, and the equivalence of the thermodynamic state of the solutions of nanostructures obtained for all polymer matrices at ν = 0.1 suggest that ν = 0.1 corresponds to the ultimate adsorption capacity of selenium nanoparticles; the considerable differences between the molecular masses (for close R {/g *} values), mean densities, and structural conformation parameters ρ* point to different packings of macromolecules in the nanostructures under study.

  17. Engineering DNA self-assemblies as templates for functional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA is a well-known natural molecule that carries genetic information. In recent decades, DNA has been used beyond its genetic role as a building block for the construction of engineering materials. Many strategies, such as tile assembly, scaffolded origami and DNA bricks, have been developed to design and produce 1D, 2D, and 3D architectures with sophisticated morphologies. Moreover, the spatial addressability of DNA nanostructures and sequence-dependent recognition enable functional elements to be precisely positioned and allow for the control of chemical and biochemical processes. The spatial arrangement of heterogeneous components using DNA nanostructures as the templates will aid in the fabrication of functional materials that are difficult to produce using other methods and can address scientific and technical challenges in interdisciplinary research. For example, plasmonic nanoparticles can be assembled into well-defined configurations with high resolution limit while exhibiting desirable collective behaviors, such as near-field enhancement. Conducting metallic or polymer patterns can be synthesized site-specifically on DNA nanostructures to form various controllable geometries, which could be used for electronic nanodevices. Biomolecules can be arranged into organized networks to perform programmable biological functionalities, such as distance-dependent enzyme-cascade activities. DNA nanostructures can carry multiple cytoactive molecules and cell-targeting groups simultaneously to address medical issues such as targeted therapy and combined administration. In this Account, we describe recent advances in the functionalization of DNA nanostructures in different fashions based on our research efforts in nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, and nanomedicine. We show that DNA origami nanostructures can guide the assembly of achiral, spherical, metallic nanoparticles into nature-mimicking chiral geometries through hybridization between complementary DNA

  18. DNA-nanostructure-assembly by sequential spotting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability to create nanostructures with biomolecules is one of the key elements in nanobiotechnology. One of the problems is the expensive and mostly custom made equipment which is needed for their development. We intended to reduce material costs and aimed at miniaturization of the necessary tools that are essential for nanofabrication. Thus we combined the capabilities of molecular ink lithography with DNA-self-assembling capabilities to arrange DNA in an independent array which allows addressing molecules in nanoscale dimensions. Results For the construction of DNA based nanostructures a method is presented that allows an arrangement of DNA strands in such a way that they can form a grid that only depends on the spotted pattern of the anchor molecules. An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used for molecular ink lithography to generate small spots. The sequential spotting process allows the immobilization of several different functional biomolecules with a single AFM-tip. This grid which delivers specific addresses for the prepared DNA-strand serves as a two-dimensional anchor to arrange the sequence according to the pattern. Once the DNA-nanoarray has been formed, it can be functionalized by PNA (peptide nucleic acid) to incorporate advanced structures. Conclusions The production of DNA-nanoarrays is a promising task for nanobiotechnology. The described method allows convenient and low cost preparation of nanoarrays. PNA can be used for complex functionalization purposes as well as a structural element. PMID:22099392

  19. Mycobacteria inactivation using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS)

    PubMed Central

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; McDevitt, James; Gao, Ya; Branco, Alan; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Lemos, Bernardo; Nardell, Edward; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Airborne transmitted pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) cause serious, often fatal infectious disease with enormous global health implications. Due to their unique cell wall and slow growth, mycobacteria are among the most resilient microbial forms. Herein we evaluate the ability of an emerging, chemical-free, nanotechnology-based method to inactivate M. parafortuitum (Mtb surrogate). This method is based on the transformation of atmospheric water vapor into engineered water nano-structures (EWNS) via electrospray. We demonstrate that the EWNS can interact with and inactivate airborne mycobacteria, reducing their concentration levels significantly. Additionally, EWNS can inactivate M. parafortuitum on surfaces eight times faster than the control. The mechanism of mycobacteria inactivation was also investigated in this study. It was demonstrated that the EWNS effectively deliver the reactive oxygen species, encapsulated during the electrospray process, to the bacteria oxidizing their cell membrane resulting into inactivation. Overall, this is a method with the potential to become an effective intervention technology in the battle against airborne infections. From the Clinical Editor This study demonstrates the feasibility of mycobacterium inactivation in airborne form or on contact surfaces using electrospray activated water nano-structures. Given that the method is free of toxic chemicals, this might become an important tool in the prevention of mycobacterial infections, which are notoriously hard to treat. PMID:24632246

  20. Boron Nitride Nanostructures: Fabrication, Functionalization and Applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Li, Jidong; Hang, Yang; Yu, Jin; Tai, Guoan; Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Zhuhua; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-06-01

    Boron nitride (BN) structures are featured by their excellent thermal and chemical stability and unique electronic and optical properties. However, the lack of controlled synthesis of quality samples and the electrically insulating property largely prevent realizing the full potential of BN nanostructures. A comprehensive overview of the current status of the synthesis of two-dimensional hexagonal BN sheets, three dimensional porous hexagonal BN materials and BN-involved heterostructures is provided, highlighting the advantages of different synthetic methods. In addition, structural characterization, functionalizations and prospective applications of hexagonal BN sheets are intensively discussed. One-dimensional BN nanoribbons and nanotubes are then discussed in terms of structure, fabrication and functionality. In particular, the existing routes in pursuit of tunable electronic and magnetic properties in various BN structures are surveyed, calling upon synergetic experimental and theoretical efforts to address the challenges for pioneering the applications of BN into functional devices. Finally, the progress in BN superstructures and novel B/N nanostructures is also briefly introduced. PMID:27073174

  1. Topological crystalline insulator nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Cha, Judy J

    2014-11-01

    Topological crystalline insulators are topological insulators whose surface states are protected by the crystalline symmetry, instead of the time reversal symmetry. Similar to the first generation of three-dimensional topological insulators such as Bi₂Se₃ and Bi₂Te₃, topological crystalline insulators also possess surface states with exotic electronic properties such as spin-momentum locking and Dirac dispersion. Experimentally verified topological crystalline insulators to date are SnTe, Pb₁-xSnxSe, and Pb₁-xSnxTe. Because topological protection comes from the crystal symmetry, magnetic impurities or in-plane magnetic fields are not expected to open a gap in the surface states in topological crystalline insulators. Additionally, because they have a cubic structure instead of a layered structure, branched structures or strong coupling with other materials for large proximity effects are possible, which are difficult with layered Bi₂Se₃ and Bi₂Te₃. Thus, additional fundamental phenomena inaccessible in three-dimensional topological insulators can be pursued. In this review, topological crystalline insulator SnTe nanostructures will be discussed. For comparison, experimental results based on SnTe thin films will be covered. Surface state properties of topological crystalline insulators will be discussed briefly.

  2. Nanostructured Interfaces for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Marconnet, A. M.; Panzer, M. A.; Leblanc, S.; Dogbe, S.; Ezzahri, Y.; Shakouri, A.; Goodson, K. E.

    2010-09-01

    Temperature drops at the interfaces between thermoelectric materials and the heat source and sink reduce the overall efficiency of thermoelectric systems. Nanostructured interfaces based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) promise the combination of mechanical compliance and high thermal conductance required for thermoelectric modules, which are subjected to severe thermomechanical stresses. This work discusses the property require- ments for thermoelectric interface materials, reviews relevant data available in the literature for CNT films, and characterizes the thermal properties of vertically aligned multiwalled CNTs grown on a candidate thermoelectric material. Nanosecond thermoreflectance thermometry provides thermal property data for 1.5- μm-thick CNT films on SiGe. The thermal interface resistances between the CNT film and surrounding materials are the dominant barriers to thermal transport, ranging from 1.4 m2 K MW-1 to 4.3 m2 K MW-1. The volumetric heat capacity of the CNT film is estimated to be 87 kJ m-3 K-1, which corresponds to a volumetric fill fraction of 9%. The effect of 100 thermal cycles from 30°C to 200°C is also studied. These data provide the groundwork for future studies of thermoelectric materials in contact with CNT films serving as both a thermal and electrical interface.

  3. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, Sylvie; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  4. Efficiency of vanilla, patchouli and ylang ylang essential oils stabilized by iron oxide@C14 nanostructures against bacterial adherence and biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Bilcu, Maxim; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mogoșanu, George Dan; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A; Mihailescu, Dan Florin; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14) in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h) and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  5. Efficiency of vanilla, patchouli and ylang ylang essential oils stabilized by iron oxide@C14 nanostructures against bacterial adherence and biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Bilcu, Maxim; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mogoșanu, George Dan; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A; Mihailescu, Dan Florin; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14) in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h) and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties. PMID:25375335

  6. Spatially-Interactive Biomolecular Networks Organized by Nucleic Acid Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinglin; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus Living systems have evolved a variety of nanostructures to control the molecular interactions that mediate many functions including the recognition of targets by receptors, the binding of enzymes to substrates, and the regulation of enzymatic activity. Mimicking these structures outside of the cell requires methods that offer nanoscale control over the organization of individual network components. Advances in DNA nanotechnology have enabled the design and fabrication of sophisticated one-, two- and three-dimensional (1D, 2D and 3D) nanostructures that utilize spontaneous and sequence specific DNA hybridization. Compared to other self-assembling biopolymers, DNA nanostructures offer predictable and programmable interactions, and surface features to which other nanoparticles and bio-molecules can be precisely positioned. The ability to control the spatial arrangement of the components while constructing highly-organized networks will lead to various applications of these systems. For example, DNA nanoarrays with surface displays of molecular probes can sense noncovalent hybridization interactions with DNA, RNA, and proteins and covalent chemical reactions. DNA nanostructures can also align external molecules into well-defined arrays, which may improve the resolution of many structural determination methods, such as X-ray diffraction, cryo-EM, NMR, and super-resolution fluorescence. Moreover, by constraining target entities to specific conformations, self-assembled DNA nanostructures can serve as molecular rulers to evaluate conformation-dependent activities. This Account describes the most recent advances in the DNA nanostructure directed assembly of biomolecular networks and explores the possibility of applying this technology to other fields of study. Recently, several reports have demonstrated the DNA nanostructure directed assembly of spatially-interactive biomolecular networks. For example, researchers have constructed synthetic multi-enzyme cascades

  7. Nanostructured Diclofenac Sodium Releasing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Harlin, A.; Seppälä, J.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Various techniques have been developed to produce second generation biomaterials for tissue repair. These include extrusion, molding, salt leaching, spinning etc, but success in regenerating tissues has been limited. It is important to develop porous material, yet with a fibrous structure for it to be biomimetic. To mimic biological tissues, the extra-cellular matrix usually contains fibers in nano scale. To produce nanostructures, self-assembly or electrospinning can be used. Adding a drug release function to such a material may advance applications further for use in controlled tissue repair. This turns the resulting device into a multifunctional porous, fibrous structure to support cells and drug releasing properties in order to control tissue reactions. A bioabsorbable poly(ɛ-caprolactone-co-D,L lactide) 95/5 (PCL) was made into diluted solution using a solvent, to which was added 2w-% of diclofenac sodium (DS). Nano-fibers were made by electrospinning onto substrate. Microstructure of the resulting nanomat was studied using SEM and drug release profiles with UV/VIS spectroscopy. Thickness of the electrospun nanomat was about 2 mm. SEM analysis showed that polymeric nano-fibers containing drug particles form a highly interconnected porous nano structure. Average diameter of the nano-fibers was 130 nm. There was a high burst peak in drug release, which decreased to low levels after one day. The used polymer has slow a degradation rate and though the nanomat was highly porous with a large surface area, drug release rate is slow. It is feasible to develop a nano-fibrous porous structure of bioabsorbable polymer, which is loaded with test drug. Drug release is targeted at improving the properties of biomaterial for use in controlled tissue repair and regeneration.

  8. Comparison of the structural and chemical composition of two unique micro/nanostructures produced by femtosecond laser interactions on nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R.

    2013-09-16

    The structural and chemical composition of two unique microstructures formed on nickel, with nanoscale features, produced using femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) techniques is reported in this paper. These two surface morphologies, termed mounds and nanoparticle-covered pyramids, are part of a larger class of self-organized micro/nanostructured surfaces formed using FLSP. Cross-sections of the structures produced using focused ion beam milling techniques were analyzed with a transmission electron microscope. Both morphologies have a solid core with a layer of nanoparticles on the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy by scanning transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the nanoparticles are a nickel oxide, while the core material is pure nickel.

  9. Supramolecular materials: Self-organized nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stupp, S.I.; LeBonheur, V.; Walker, K.

    1997-04-18

    Miniaturized triblock copolymers have been found to self-assemble into nanostructures that are highly regular in size and shape. Mushroom-shaped supramolecular structures of about 200 kilodaltons form by crystallization of the chemically identical blocks and self-organize into films containing 100 or more layers stacked in a polar arrangement. The polar supramolecular material exhibits spontaneous second-harmonic generation from infrared to green photons and has an adhesive tape-like character with nonadhesive-hydrophobic and hydrophilic-sticky opposite surfaces. The films also have reasonable shear strength and adhere tenaciously to glass surfaces on one side only. The regular and finite size of the supramolecular units is believed to be mediated by repulsive forces among some of the segments in the triblock molecules. A large diversity of multifunctional materials could be formed from regular supramolecular units weighing hundreds of kilodaltons. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Uniform metal nanostructures with long-range order via three-step hierarchical self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Denise J.; Schlage, Kai; Röhlsberger, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale nanopatterning is a major issue in nanoscience and nanotechnology, but conventional top-down approaches are challenging because of instrumentation and process complexity while often lacking the desired spatial resolution. We present a hierarchical bottom-up nanopatterning routine using exclusively self-assembly processes: By combining crystal surface reconstruction, microphase separation of copolymers, and selective metal diffusion, we produce monodisperse metal nanostructures in highly regular arrays covering areas of square centimeters. In situ grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering during Fe nanostructure formation evidences an outstanding structural order in the self-assembling system and hints at the possibility of sculpting nanostructures using external process parameters. Thus, we demonstrate that bottom-up nanopatterning is a competitive alternative to top-down routines, achieving comparable pattern regularity, feature size, and patterned areas with considerably reduced effort. Intriguing assets of the proposed fabrication approach include the option for in situ investigations during pattern formation, the possibility of customizing the nanostructure morphology, the capacity to pattern arbitrarily large areas with ultrahigh structure densities unachievable by top-down approaches, and the potential to address the nanostructures individually. Numerous applications of self-assembled nanostructure patterns can be envisioned, for example, in high-density magnetic data storage, in functional nanostructured materials for photonics or catalysis, or in surface plasmon resonance–based sensing. PMID:26601139

  11. Broadband antireflective silicon nanostructures produced by spin-coated Ag nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the fabrication of broadband antireflective silicon (Si) nanostructures fabricated using spin-coated silver (Ag) nanoparticles as an etch mask followed by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process. This fabrication technique is a simple, fast, cost-effective, and high-throughput method, making it highly suitable for mass production. Prior to the fabrication of Si nanostructures, theoretical investigations were carried out using a rigorous coupled-wave analysis method in order to determine the effects of variations in the geometrical features of Si nanostructures to obtain antireflection over a broad wavelength range. The Ag ink ratio and ICP etching conditions, which can affect the distribution, distance between the adjacent nanostructures, and height of the resulting Si nanostructures, were carefully adjusted to determine the optimal experimental conditions for obtaining desirable Si nanostructures for practical applications. The Si nanostructures fabricated using the optimal experimental conditions showed a very low average reflectance of 8.3%, which is much lower than that of bulk Si (36.8%), as well as a very low reflectance for a wide range of incident angles and different polarizations over a broad wavelength range of 300 to 1,100 nm. These results indicate that the fabrication technique is highly beneficial to produce antireflective structures for Si-based device applications requiring low light reflection. PMID:24484636

  12. Nanostructured core-shell electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Long-bo; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Hou; Zeng, Guang-ming

    2016-11-01

    Core-shell nanostructure represents a unique system for applications in electrochemical energy storage devices. Owing to the unique characteristics featuring high power delivery and long-term cycling stability, electrochemical capacitors (ECs) have emerged as one of the most attractive electrochemical storage systems since they can complement or even replace batteries in the energy storage field, especially when high power delivery or uptake is needed. This review aims to summarize recent progress on core-shell nanostructures for advanced supercapacitor applications in view of their hierarchical architecture which not only create the desired hierarchical porous channels, but also possess higher electrical conductivity and better structural mechanical stability. The core-shell nanostructures include carbon/carbon, carbon/metal oxide, carbon/conducting polymer, metal oxide/metal oxide, metal oxide/conducting polymer, conducting polymer/conducting polymer, and even more complex ternary core-shell nanoparticles. The preparation strategies, electrochemical performances, and structural stabilities of core-shell materials for ECs are summarized. The relationship between core-shell nanostructure and electrochemical performance is discussed in detail. In addition, the challenges and new trends in core-shell nanomaterials development have also been proposed.

  13. Uni-directional liquid spreading on asymmetric nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kuang-Han; Xiao, Rong; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2010-05-01

    Controlling surface wettability and liquid spreading on patterned surfaces is of significant interest for a broad range of applications, including DNA microarrays, digital lab-on-a-chip, anti-fogging and fog-harvesting, inkjet printing and thin-film lubrication. Advancements in surface engineering, with the fabrication of various micro/nanoscale topographic features, and selective chemical patterning on surfaces, have enhanced surface wettability and enabled control of the liquid film thickness and final wetted shape. In addition, groove geometries and patterned surface chemistries have produced anisotropic wetting, where contact-angle variations in different directions resulted in elongated droplet shapes. In all of these studies, however, the wetting behaviour preserves left-right symmetry. Here, we demonstrate that we can harness the design of asymmetric nanostructured surfaces to achieve uni-directional liquid spreading, where the liquid propagates in a single preferred direction and pins in all others. Through experiments and modelling, we determined that the spreading characteristic is dependent on the degree of nanostructure asymmetry, the height-to-spacing ratio of the nanostructures and the intrinsic contact angle. The theory, based on an energy argument, provides excellent agreement with experimental data. The insights gained from this work offer new opportunities to tailor advanced nanostructures to achieve active control of complex flow patterns and wetting on demand.

  14. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  15. Recent Advances in Nanostructured Biomimetic Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras; Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The relatively large size of the gecko and its ability to climb a multitude of structures with ease has often been cited as the inspiration upon which the field of dry adhesives is based. Since 2010, there have been many advances in the field of dry adhesives with much of the new research focusing on developing nanoscale and hierarchical features in a concentrated effort to develop synthetic gecko-like dry adhesives which are strong, durable, and self-cleaning. A brief overview of the geckos and the hairs which it uses to adhere to many different surfaces is provided before delving into the current methods and materials used to fabricate synthetic gecko hairs. A summary of the recently published literature on bio-inspired, nanostructured dry adhesives is presented with an emphasis being placed on fabrication techniques. PMID:25023409

  16. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  17. Nanostructured carbonaceous materials from molecular precursors.

    PubMed

    Hoheisel, Tobias N; Schrettl, Stephen; Szilluweit, Ruth; Frauenrath, Holger

    2010-09-01

    Nanostructured carbonaceous materials, that is, carbon materials with a feature size on the nanometer scale and, in some cases, functionalized surfaces, already play an important role in a wide range of emerging fields, such as the search for novel energy sources, efficient energy storage, sustainable chemical technology, as well as organic electronic materials. Furthermore, such materials might offer solutions to the challenges associated with the on-going depletion of nonrenewable energy resources or climate change, and they may promote further breakthroughs in the field of microelectronics. However, novel methods for their preparation will be required that afford functional carbon materials with controlled surface chemistry, mesoscopic morphology, and microstructure. A highly promising approach for the synthesis of such materials is based on the use of well-defined molecular precursors. PMID:20661971

  18. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E.; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  19. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms. PMID:26828313

  20. Tuning self-organized O/Cu(110) nanostructures by co-adsorption of sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiame, Frédéric; Poulain, Clément; Budinská, Zuzana; Maurice, Vincent; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    A method for tuning the nanostructures formed by self-organized growth of oxygen on Cu(110) surface is proposed. It is shown that the range of possible nanostructures, consisting in alternating stripes of bare and oxidized copper, can largely be extended by the co-adsorption of sulfur. The classical Marchenko-Vanderbilt model describing the nanostructuration was generalized in order to take into account the change in the surface properties induced by the presence of sulfur. This modified model enabled us to infer the expressions of the periodicity and width of the self-organized stripes as a function of the sulfur and oxygen coverages.

  1. Developing high-sensitivity ethanol liquid sensors based on ZnO/porous Si nanostructure surfaces using an electrochemical impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husairi, Mohd; Rouhi, Jalal; Alvin, Kevin; Atikah, Zainurul; Rusop, Muhammad; Abdullah, Saifollah

    2014-07-01

    ZnO nanostructures were synthesized on porous Si (PSi) substrates using the thermal catalytic-free immersion method. Crack-like ZnO nanostructures were formed on the bare, sponge-like PSi structures. An approach to fabricate chemical sensors based on the ZnO/PSi nanostructure arrays that uses an electrochemical impedance technique is reported. Sensor performance was evaluated for ethanol solutions by the morphology and defect structures of the ZnO nanostructure layer. Results indicate that the ZnO/PSi nanostructure chemical sensor exhibits rapid and high response to ethanol compared with a PSi nanostructure sensor because of its small particle size and an oxide layer acting as a capacitive layer on the PSi nanostructure surface.

  2. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  3. One-Dimensional Perovskite Manganite Oxide Nanostructures: Recent Developments in Synthesis, Characterization, Transport Properties, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Liang, Lizhi; Wu, Heng; Zhu, Xinhua

    2016-03-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures, including nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes, nanofibers, and nanobelts, have promising applications in mesoscopic physics and nanoscale devices. In contrast to other nanostructures, one-dimensional nanostructures can provide unique advantages in investigating the size and dimensionality dependence of the materials' physical properties, such as electrical, thermal, and mechanical performances, and in constructing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. Among the one-dimensional nanostructures, one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures have been received much attention due to their unusual electron transport and magnetic properties, which are indispensable for the applications in microelectronic, magnetic, and spintronic devices. In the past two decades, much effort has been made to synthesize and characterize one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures in the forms of nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanobelts. Various physical and chemical deposition techniques and growth mechanisms are explored and developed to control the morphology, identical shape, uniform size, crystalline structure, defects, and homogenous stoichiometry of the one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on the rational synthesis, structural characterization, fundamental properties, and unique applications of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures in nanotechnology. It begins with the rational synthesis of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures and then summarizes their structural characterizations. Fundamental physical properties of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures are also highlighted, and a range of unique applications in information storages, field-effect transistors, and spintronic devices are discussed. Finally, we conclude this review with some perspectives/outlook and future

  4. Development of colour-producing β-keratin nanostructures in avian feather barbs

    PubMed Central

    Prum, Richard O.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Quinn, Tim; Waters, Karla

    2009-01-01

    The non-iridescent structural colours of avian feather barbs are produced by coherent light scattering from amorphous (i.e. quasi-ordered) nanostructures of β-keratin and air in the medullary cells of feather barb rami. Known barb nanostructures belong to two distinct morphological classes. ‘Channel’ nanostructures consist of β-keratin bars and air channels of elongate, tortuous and twisting forms. ‘Spherical’ nanostructures consist of highly spherical air cavities that are surrounded by thin β-keratin bars and sometimes interconnected by tiny passages. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observe that the colour-producing channel-type nanostructures of medullary β-keratin in feathers of the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Psittacidae) develop by intracellular self-assembly; the process proceeds in the absence of any biological prepattern created by the cell membrane, endoplasmic reticulum or cellular intermediate filaments. We examine the hypothesis that the shape and size of these self-assembled, intracellular nanostructures are determined by phase separation of β-keratin protein from the cytoplasm of the cell. The shapes of a broad sample of colour-producing channel-type nanostructures from nine avian species are very similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of an unstable mixture, a process called spinodal decomposition (SD). In contrast, the shapes of a sample of spherical-type nanostructures from feather barbs of six species show a poor match to SD. However, spherical nanostructures show a strong morphological similarity to morphologies produced by phase separation of a metastable mixture, called nucleation and growth. We propose that colour-producing, intracellular, spongy medullary β-keratin nanostructures develop their characteristic sizes and shapes by phase separation during protein polymerization. We discuss the possible role of capillary flow through drying of medullary cells in the development of the hollow

  5. Hybrid Ag@TiO2 core-shell nanostructures with highly enhanced photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. H.; Fu, H. T.; Wong, K.; Jiang, X. C.; Yu, A. B.

    2013-10-01

    A new synthetic approach has been developed to prepare silver@titanium dioxide (Ag@TiO2) core-shell nanostructures with controllable size, shape, crystal phase and function at ambient conditions (e.g. in water, ≤100 ° C). This approach shows a few unique features, including short reaction time (a few minutes) for forming core-shell nanostructures, no requirement of high temperature calcinations for generating TiO2 (e.g. at ˜100 ° C in our case), tunable TiO2 shell thickness, high yield and good reproducibility. The experimental results show that the Ag@TiO2 core-shell nanostructures exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity compared to the commercial TiO2 (P25) and Ag-doped TiO2 nanocomposite in the degradation of organic dye molecules (e.g. methyl orange) with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. This could be attributed to the large surface area of TiO2 nanoparticles for maximum harvesting of UV light, mixed anatase and rutile crystalline phases in the TiO2 shell and the effective charge separation between Ag and TiO2 that can reduce the possible recombination of electron-hole (e--h+) pairs within TiO2 generated under UV radiation. To further understand the charge separation situation within Ag-TiO2 composites, theoretical simulation (e.g. density functional theory, DFT) was employed in this study. The DFT simulation results indicate that for the Ag@TiO2 core-shell nanostructures, photo-generated electrons transfer readily from the external TiO2 layer to the internal Ag layer with heavy accumulation compared to those doping Ag on TiO2 surfaces, which may reduce the recombination of e--h+ pairs and thus enhance the photocatalytic efficiency. The findings may open a new strategy to synthesize TiO2-based photocatalysts with highly enhanced efficiency for environmental remediation applications.

  6. Computationally designed peptides for self-assembly of nanostructured lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huixi Violet; Polzer, Frank; Haider, Michael J; Tian, Yu; Villegas, Jose A; Kiick, Kristi L; Pochan, Darrin J; Saven, Jeffery G

    2016-09-01

    Folded peptides present complex exterior surfaces specified by their amino acid sequences, and the control of these surfaces offers high-precision routes to self-assembling materials. The complexity of peptide structure and the subtlety of noncovalent interactions make the design of predetermined nanostructures difficult. Computational methods can facilitate this design and are used here to determine 29-residue peptides that form tetrahelical bundles that, in turn, serve as building blocks for lattice-forming materials. Four distinct assemblies were engineered. Peptide bundle exterior amino acids were designed in the context of three different interbundle lattices in addition to one design to produce bundles isolated in solution. Solution assembly produced three different types of lattice-forming materials that exhibited varying degrees of agreement with the chosen lattices used in the design of each sequence. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the nanostructure of the sheetlike nanomaterials. In contrast, the peptide sequence designed to form isolated, soluble, tetrameric bundles remained dispersed and did not form any higher-order assembled nanostructure. Small-angle neutron scattering confirmed the formation of soluble bundles with the designed size. In the lattice-forming nanostructures, the solution assembly process is robust with respect to variation of solution conditions (pH and temperature) and covalent modification of the computationally designed peptides. Solution conditions can be used to control micrometer-scale morphology of the assemblies. The findings illustrate that, with careful control of molecular structure and solution conditions, a single peptide motif can be versatile enough to yield a wide range of self-assembled lattice morphologies across many length scales (1 to 1000 nm). PMID:27626071

  7. Computationally designed peptides for self-assembly of nanostructured lattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huixi Violet; Polzer, Frank; Haider, Michael J.; Tian, Yu; Villegas, Jose A.; Kiick, Kristi L.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Saven, Jeffery G.

    2016-01-01

    Folded peptides present complex exterior surfaces specified by their amino acid sequences, and the control of these surfaces offers high-precision routes to self-assembling materials. The complexity of peptide structure and the subtlety of noncovalent interactions make the design of predetermined nanostructures difficult. Computational methods can facilitate this design and are used here to determine 29-residue peptides that form tetrahelical bundles that, in turn, serve as building blocks for lattice-forming materials. Four distinct assemblies were engineered. Peptide bundle exterior amino acids were designed in the context of three different interbundle lattices in addition to one design to produce bundles isolated in solution. Solution assembly produced three different types of lattice-forming materials that exhibited varying degrees of agreement with the chosen lattices used in the design of each sequence. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the nanostructure of the sheetlike nanomaterials. In contrast, the peptide sequence designed to form isolated, soluble, tetrameric bundles remained dispersed and did not form any higher-order assembled nanostructure. Small-angle neutron scattering confirmed the formation of soluble bundles with the designed size. In the lattice-forming nanostructures, the solution assembly process is robust with respect to variation of solution conditions (pH and temperature) and covalent modification of the computationally designed peptides. Solution conditions can be used to control micrometer-scale morphology of the assemblies. The findings illustrate that, with careful control of molecular structure and solution conditions, a single peptide motif can be versatile enough to yield a wide range of self-assembled lattice morphologies across many length scales (1 to 1000 nm). PMID:27626071

  8. Computationally designed peptides for self-assembly of nanostructured lattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huixi Violet; Polzer, Frank; Haider, Michael J.; Tian, Yu; Villegas, Jose A.; Kiick, Kristi L.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Saven, Jeffery G.

    2016-01-01

    Folded peptides present complex exterior surfaces specified by their amino acid sequences, and the control of these surfaces offers high-precision routes to self-assembling materials. The complexity of peptide structure and the subtlety of noncovalent interactions make the design of predetermined nanostructures difficult. Computational methods can facilitate this design and are used here to determine 29-residue peptides that form tetrahelical bundles that, in turn, serve as building blocks for lattice-forming materials. Four distinct assemblies were engineered. Peptide bundle exterior amino acids were designed in the context of three different interbundle lattices in addition to one design to produce bundles isolated in solution. Solution assembly produced three different types of lattice-forming materials that exhibited varying degrees of agreement with the chosen lattices used in the design of each sequence. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the nanostructure of the sheetlike nanomaterials. In contrast, the peptide sequence designed to form isolated, soluble, tetrameric bundles remained dispersed and did not form any higher-order assembled nanostructure. Small-angle neutron scattering confirmed the formation of soluble bundles with the designed size. In the lattice-forming nanostructures, the solution assembly process is robust with respect to variation of solution conditions (pH and temperature) and covalent modification of the computationally designed peptides. Solution conditions can be used to control micrometer-scale morphology of the assemblies. The findings illustrate that, with careful control of molecular structure and solution conditions, a single peptide motif can be versatile enough to yield a wide range of self-assembled lattice morphologies across many length scales (1 to 1000 nm).

  9. Nanostructured Substrates for Optical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Kemling, Jonathan W.; Qavi, Abraham J.; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01

    Sensors that change color have the advantages of versatility, ease of use, high sensitivity, and low cost. The recent development of optically based chemical sensing platforms has increasingly employed substrates manufactured with advanced processing or fabrication techniques to provide precise control over shape and morphology of the sensor micro- and nano-structure. New sensors have resulted with improved capabilities for a number of sensing applications, including the detection of biomolecules and environmental monitoring. This perspective focuses on recent optical sensor devices that utilize nanostructured substrates. PMID:22174955

  10. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  11. Concentration gradient induced morphology evolution of silica nanostructure growth on photoresist-derived carbon micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of silica nanostructure morphology induced by local Si vapor source concentration gradient has been investigated by a smart design of experiments. Silica nanostructure or their assemblies with different morphologies are obtained on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode array. At a temperature of 1,000°C, rope-, feather-, and octopus-like nanowire assemblies can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. While at 950°C, stringlike assemblies, bamboo-like nanostructures with large joints, and hollow structures with smaller sizes can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. Both vapor–liquid-solid and vapor-quasiliquid-solid growth mechanisms have been applied to explain the diverse morphologies involving branching, connecting, and batch growth behaviors. The present approach offers a potential method for precise design and controlled synthesis of nanostructures with different features. PMID:22938090

  12. Concentration gradient induced morphology evolution of silica nanostructure growth on photoresist-derived carbon micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Tielin; Xi, Shuang; Lai, Wuxing; Liu, Shiyuan; Li, Xiaoping; Tang, Zirong

    2012-09-01

    The evolution of silica nanostructure morphology induced by local Si vapor source concentration gradient has been investigated by a smart design of experiments. Silica nanostructure or their assemblies with different morphologies are obtained on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode array. At a temperature of 1,000°C, rope-, feather-, and octopus-like nanowire assemblies can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. While at 950°C, stringlike assemblies, bamboo-like nanostructures with large joints, and hollow structures with smaller sizes can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. Both vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-quasiliquid-solid growth mechanisms have been applied to explain the diverse morphologies involving branching, connecting, and batch growth behaviors. The present approach offers a potential method for precise design and controlled synthesis of nanostructures with different features.

  13. Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sholklapper, Tal Zvi

    2007-01-01

    The ability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to directly and efficiently convert the chemical energy in hydrocarbon fuels to electricity places the technology in a unique and exciting position to play a significant role in the clean energy revolution. In order to make SOFC technology cost competitive with existing technologies, the operating temperatures have been decreased to the range where costly ceramic components may be substituted with inexpensive metal components within the cell and stack design. However, a number of issues have arisen due to this decrease in temperature: decreased electrolyte ionic conductivity, cathode reaction rate limitations, and a decrease in anode contaminant tolerance. While the decrease in electrolyte ionic conductivities has been countered by decreasing the electrolyte thickness, the electrode limitations have remained a more difficult problem. Nanostructuring SOFC electrodes addresses the major electrode issues. The infiltration method used in this dissertation to produce nanostructure SOFC electrodes creates a connected network of nanoparticles; since the method allows for the incorporation of the nanoparticles after electrode backbone formation, previously incompatible advanced electrocatalysts can be infiltrated providing electronic conductivity and electrocatalysis within well-formed electrolyte backbones. Furthermore, the method is used to significantly enhance the conventional electrode design by adding secondary electrocatalysts. Performance enhancement and improved anode contamination tolerance are demonstrated in each of the electrodes. Additionally, cell processing and the infiltration method developed in conjunction with this dissertation are reviewed.

  14. Nanograss and nanostructure formation on silicon using a modified deep reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Mehran, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Sanaee, Z.; Abdi, Y.

    2010-05-17

    Silicon nanograss and nanostructures are realized using a modified deep reactive ion etching technique on both plane and vertical surfaces of a silicon substrate. The etching process is based on a sequential passivation and etching cycle, and it can be adjusted to achieve grassless high aspect ratio features as well as grass-full surfaces. The incorporation of nanostructures onto vertically placed parallel fingers of an interdigital capacitive accelerometer increases the total capacitance from 0.45 to 30 pF. Vertical structures with features below 100 nm have been realized.

  15. Chemistry and Processing of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G A; Baumann, T F; Hope-Weeks, L J; Vance, A L

    2002-01-18

    Nanostructured materials can be formed through the sol-gel polymerization of inorganic or organic monomer systems. For example, a two step polymerization of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) was developed such that silica aerogels with densities as low as 3 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx} two times the density of air) could be achieved. Organic aerogels based upon resorcinol-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde can also be prepared using the sol-gel process. Materials of this type have received significant attention at LLNL due to their ultrafine cell sizes, continuous porosity, high surface area and low mass density. For both types of aerogels, sol-gel polymerization depends upon the transformation of these monomers into nanometer-sized clusters followed by cross-linking into a 3-dimensional gel network. While sol-gel chemistry provides the opportunity to synthesize new material compositions, it suffers from the inability to separate the process of cluster formation from gelation. This limitation results in structural deficiencies in the gel that impact the physical properties of the aerogel, xerogel or nanocomposite. In order to control the properties of the resultant gel, one should be able to regulate the formation of the clusters and their subsequent cross-linking. Towards this goal, we are utilizing dendrimer chemistry to separate the cluster formation from the gelation so that new nanostructured materials can be produced. Dendrimers are three-dimensional, highly branched macromolecules that are prepared in such a way that their size, shape and surface functionality are readily controlled. The dendrimers will be used as pre-formed clusters of known size that can be cross-linked to form an ordered gel network.

  16. Method of making nanostructured glass-ceramic waste forms

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Huizhen; Wang, Yifeng; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2012-12-18

    A method of rendering hazardous materials less dangerous comprising trapping the hazardous material in nanopores of a nanoporous composite material, reacting the trapped hazardous material to render it less volatile/soluble, sealing the trapped hazardous material, and vitrifying the nanoporous material containing the less volatile/soluble hazardous material.

  17. Nanostructured photocatalytic titania coatings formed by suspension plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Bertrand, Ghislaine; Klein, Didier; Coddet, Christian; Meunier, Cathy

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes formation of titanium dioxide coatings designed for photocatalytic applications, obtained by suspension plasma spraying (SPS), an alternative of the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) technique in which the material feedstock is a suspension of the material to be sprayed. Two different TiO2 powders were dispersed in distilled water and ethanol and injected in Ar-H2 or Ar-H2-He plasma under atmospheric conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed to study the microstructure of the titania coatings. Photocatalytic efficiency of the elaborated samples was evaluated from the conversion ratio of different air pollutants: nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The morphology and crystalline structure of the deposits depended mainly on the nature of the solvent (water or alcohol) used in the preparation of the slurries. Dense coatings were obtained starting from aqueous suspensions and porous deposits were elaborated by plasma spraying of a PC105 alcoholic suspension. A significant phase transformation from anatase to rutile occurred when ethanol was used as a solvent. Different photocatalytic performances were observed as a function of the nature of the liquid material feed-stock, the spraying parameters, and the nature of the pollutant.

  18. System and method of forming nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Dial, Laura Cerully; DiDomizio, Richard; Alinger, Matthew Joseph; Huang, Shenyan

    2016-07-26

    A system for mechanical milling and a method of mechanical milling are disclosed. The system includes a container, a feedstock, and milling media. The container encloses a processing volume. The feedstock and the milling media are disposed in the processing volume of the container. The feedstock includes metal or alloy powder and a ceramic compound. The feedstock is mechanically milled in the processing volume using metallic milling media that includes a surface portion that has a carbon content less than about 0.4 weight percent.

  19. Fabrication of large arrays of plasmonic nanostructures via double casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Joanne C.; Horsley, David A.; Skinner, Jack L.

    2012-03-01

    Large arrays of periodic nanostructures are widely used for plasmonic applications, including ultrasensitive particle sensing, optical nanoantennas, and optical computing; however, current fabrication processes (e.g., e-beam lithography and nanoimprint lithography) remain time consuming and expensive. Previously, researchers have utilized double casting methods to effectively fabricate large-scale arrays of microscale features. Despite significant progress, employing such techniques at the nanoscale has remained a challenge due to cracking and incomplete transfer of the nanofeatures. To overcome these issues, here we present a double casting methodology for fabricating large-scale arrays of nanostructures. We demonstrate this technique by creating large (0.5 cm × 1 cm) arrays of 150 nm nanoholes and 150 nm nanopillars from one silicon master template with nanopillars. To preclude cracking and incomplete transfer problems, a hard-PDMS/soft-PDMS (h-PDMS/s-PDMS) composite stamp was used to replicate the features from: (i) the silicon template, and (ii) the resulting PDMS template. Our double casting technique can be employed repeatedly to create positive and negative copies of the original silicon template as desired. By drastically reducing the cost, time, and labor associated with creating separate silicon templates for large arrays of different nanostructures, this methodology will enable rapid prototyping for diverse applications in nanotechnological fields.

  20. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  1. Vertically Aligned Nanostructured Arrays of Inorganic Materials: Synthesis, Distinctive Physical Phenomena, and Device Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Jesus Manuel

    The manifestation of novel physical phenomena upon scaling materials to finite size has inspired new device concepts that take advantage of the distinctive electrical, mechanical, and optical, properties of nanostructures. The development of fabrication approaches for the preparation of their 1D nanostructured form, such as nanowires and nanotubes, has contributed greatly to advancing fundamental understanding of these systems, and has spurred the integration of these materials in novel electronics, photonic devices, power sources, and energy scavenging constructs. Significant progress has been achieved over the last decade in the preparation of ordered arrays of carbon nanotubes, II---VI and III---V semiconductors, and some binary oxides such as ZnO. In contrast, relatively less attention has been focused on layered materials with potential for electrochemical energy storage. Here, we describe the catalyzed vapor transport growth of vertical arrays of orthorhombic V2O 5 nanowires. In addition, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to precisely probe the alignment, uniformity in crystal growth direction, and electronic structure of single-crystalline V2O5 nanowire arrays prepared by a cobalt-catalyzed vapor transport process. The dipole selection rules operational for core-level electron spectroscopy enable angle-dependant NEXAFS spectroscopy to be used as a sensitive probe of the anisotropy of these systems and provides detailed insight into bond orientation and the symmetry of the frontier orbital states. The experimental spectra are matched to previous theoretical predictions and allow experimental verification of features such as the origin of the split-off conduction band responsible for the n-type conductivity of V2O5 and the strongly anisotropic nature of vanadyl-oxygen-derived (V=O) states thought to be involved in catalysis. We have also invested substantial effort in obtaining shape and size control of metal oxide

  2. Modeling the Electron Transport in Nanostructures by Using the Concept of BIons in M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Pincak, Richard

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, using the similarity between quantum tunnels in nanostructures and BIon in M-theory, we propose a new model which considers the process of formation of superconductors in nanostructures. We show that by decreasing the size of nanostructures, emitted photons by electrons connect to each other and form a wormhole-like tunnel. This tunnel is a channel for transporting electron inside the nanostructure. If different wormhole-like tunnels join to each other, one big tunnel is constructed that can be an origin for superconductivity in matter. The superconductor order parameter depends on the size of nanostructure and temperature. Increasing temperature, it is shown that the model matches with quantum theory prescriptions. Also, by applying external electromagnetism, external photons interact with exchanging photons between electrons, exchanging photons deviate from original route and the formation of wormhole-like tunnels inside a nanostructure is prevented. Finally, it is shown that the origin of electrodynamics and gravity are the same and thus, the phrase of wormhole can be applied for appeared tunnels in nanostructures.

  3. In situ fabricate Cu{sub 2}S thin film with hierarchical petal-like nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao Chen, Xinhua; Jia, Huimin; Zheng, Zhi

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}S thin films with hierarchical nanostructures have been synthesized by solvothermal method using DMSO as reactant. • The band gap is estimated to be 1.0 eV of the Cu{sub 2}S hierarchical nanostructures. • The form process of Cu{sub 2}S and the possible mechanism of hierarchical nanostructures were proposed. - Abstract: In this paper, Cu{sub 2}S thin film with hierarchical petal-like nanostructures has been successfully in situ synthesized via a solvothermal method using DMSO as reactant under appropriate reaction conditions. The crystalline phase, morphology and optical properties of the resulting products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The band gap is estimated to be about 1.0 eV by the results of UV–vis absorption spectroscopy of the Cu{sub 2}S thin film with hierarchical nanostructures that consisted of nanoslices with the thickness of 15 nm. The formation process of Cu{sub 2}S and the possible mechanism of hierarchical nanostructures were also proposed. These findings are valuable since Cu{sub 2}S thin film with hierarchical petal-like nanostructures are promising candidate as lithium ion battery and solar cell materials.

  4. Modeling the Electron Transport in Nanostructures by Using the Concept of BIons in M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Pincak, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, using the similarity between quantum tunnels in nanostructures and BIon in M-theory, we propose a new model which considers the process of formation of superconductors in nanostructures. We show that by decreasing the size of nanostructures, emitted photons by electrons connect to each other and form a wormhole-like tunnel. This tunnel is a channel for transporting electron inside the nanostructure. If different wormhole-like tunnels join to each other, one big tunnel is constructed that can be an origin for superconductivity in matter. The superconductor order parameter depends on the size of nanostructure and temperature. Increasing temperature, it is shown that the model matches with quantum theory prescriptions. Also, by applying external electromagnetism, external photons interact with exchanging photons between electrons, exchanging photons deviate from original route and the formation of wormhole-like tunnels inside a nanostructure is prevented. Finally, it is shown that the origin of electrodynamics and gravity are the same and thus, the phrase of wormhole can be applied for appeared tunnels in nanostructures.

  5. Growth, characterization and electrochemical properties of hierarchical CuO nanostructures for supercapacitor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hierarchical CuO nanostructures were grown on Cu foil. • Monoclinic phase of CuO was grown. • XPS analysis revealed the presence of Cu(2p{sub 3/2}) and Cu(2p{sub 1/2}) on the surfaces. • Specific capacitance of 94 F/g was achieved for the CuO using cyclic voltammetry. • Impedance spectra show their pseudo capacitor applications. - Abstract: In this paper, we have investigated the electrochemical properties of hierarchical CuO nanostructures for pseudo-supercapacitor device applications. Moreover, the CuO nanostructures were formed on Cu substrate by in situ crystallization process. The as-grown CuO nanostructures were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) analysis. The XRD and FT-IR analysis confirm the formation of monoclinic CuO nanostructures. FE-SEM analysis shows the formation of leave like hierarchical structures of CuO with high uniformity and controlled density. The electrochemical analysis such as cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies confirms the pseudo-capacitive behavior of the CuO nanostructures. Our experimental results suggest that CuO nanostructures will create promising applications of CuO toward pseudo-supercapacitors.

  6. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  7. Complex nanostructured materials from segmented copolymers prepared by ATRP.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, T; McCullough, R D; Matyjaszewski, K

    2003-01-01

    The development of new controlled/living radical polymerization processes, such as Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) and other techniques such as nitroxide mediated polymerization and degenerative transfer processes, including RAFT, opened the way to the use of radical polymerization for the synthesis of well-defined, complex functional nanostructures. The development of such nanostructures is primarily dependent on self-assembly of well-defined segmented copolymers. This article describes the fundamentals of ATRP, relevant to the synthesis of such systems. The self-assembly of block copolymers prepared by ATRP is illustrated by three examples. In the first, block copolymers of poly(butyl acrylate) with polyacrylonitrile phase separate, leading to spherical, cylindrical or lamellar morphologies, depending on the block copolymer composition. At a higher temperature, polyacrylonitrile block converts to nanostructured carbon clusters, whereas poly(butyl acrylate) block serves as a sacrificial block, aiding the development of designed nanostructures. In the second example, conductive nanoribbons of poly(n-hexylthiophene) surrounded by a matrix of organic polymers are formed from block copolymers prepared by ATRP. The third example describes an inorganic-organic hybrid system consisting of hard nanocolloidal silica particles (approximately 20 nm) grafted by ATRP with well-defined polystyrene-poly(benzyl acrylate) block copolymer chains (approximately 1000 chains per particle). Silica cores in this system are surrounded by a rigid polystyrene inner shell and softer polyacrylate outer shell. PMID:15011074

  8. Triphenylalanine peptides self-assemble into nanospheres and nanorods that are different from the nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cong; Luo, Yin; Zhou, Ruhong; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the nature of the self-assembly of peptide nanostructures at the molecular level is critical for rational design of functional bio-nanomaterials. Recent experimental studies have shown that triphenylalanine(FFF)-based peptides can self-assemble into solid plate-like nanostructures and nanospheres, which are different from the hollow nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine(FF)-based peptides. In spite of extensive studies, the assembly mechanism and the molecular basis for the structural differences between FFF and FF nanostructures remain poorly understood. In this work, we first investigate the assembly process and the structural features of FFF nanostructures using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and then compare them with FF nanostructures. We find that FFF peptides spontaneously assemble into solid nanometer-sized nanospheres and nanorods with substantial β-sheet contents, consistent with the structural properties of hundred-nanometer-sized FFF nano-plates characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. Distinct from the formation mechanism of water-filled FF nanovesicles and nanotubes reported in our previous study, intermediate bilayers are not observed during the self-assembly process of FFF nanospheres and nanorods. The peptides in FFF nanostructures are predominantly anti-parallel-aligned, which can form larger sizes of β-sheet-like structures than the FF counterparts. In contrast, FF peptides exhibit lipid-like assembly behavior and assemble into bilayered nanostructures. Furthermore, although the self-assembly of FF and FFF peptides is mostly driven by side chain-side chain (SC-SC) aromatic stacking interactions, the main chain-main chain (MC-MC) interactions also play an important role in the formation of fine structures of the assemblies. The delicate interplay between MC-MC and SC-SC interactions results in the different nanostructures formed by the two peptides. These findings provide new insights into the structure

  9. Green chemistry-mediated synthesis of nanostructures of afterglow phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pooja; Haranath, D.; Chander, Harish; Singh, Sukhvir

    2008-04-01

    Various nanostructures of SrAl 2O 4:Eu 2+, Dy 3+ (SAC) afterglow phosphor were prepared in a single-step reaction using a green chemistry-mediated modified combustion process. The evolution of hazardous NxOx gases during the customary combustion reaction was completely eliminated by employing an innovative complex formation route. Another fascinating feature of the process was that, a slight change in the processing conditions ensured the synthesis of either nanoparticles or nanowires. The photoluminescence spectrum of nanophosphor showed a slight blue shift in emission (˜511 nm) as compared to the bulk phosphor (˜520 nm). The afterglow (decay) profiles of SAC nanoparticles, nanowires and bulk phosphor were compared. The chemistry underlying the nanostructure synthesis and the probable afterglow mechanism were discussed.

  10. Direct printing of nanostructures by electrostatic autofocussing of ink nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Eghlidi, H.; Kress, S.; Sandoghdar, V.; Poulikakos, D.

    2012-06-01

    Nanotechnology, with its broad impact on societally relevant applications, relies heavily on the availability of accessible nanofabrication methods. Even though a host of such techniques exists, the flexible, inexpensive, on-demand and scalable fabrication of functional nanostructures remains largely elusive. Here we present a method involving nanoscale electrohydrodynamic ink-jet printing that may significantly contribute in this direction. A combination of nanoscopic placement precision, soft-landing fluid dynamics, rapid solvent vapourization, and subsequent self-assembly of the ink colloidal content leads to the formation of scaffolds with base diameters equal to that of a single ejected nanodroplet. The virtually material-independent growth of nanostructures into the third dimension is then governed by an autofocussing phenomenon caused by local electrostatic field enhancement, resulting in large aspect ratio. We demonstrate the capabilities of our electrohydrodynamic printing technique with several examples, including the fabrication of plasmonic nanoantennas with features sizes down to 50 nm.

  11. Carbon nanotubes for stabilization of nanostructured lipid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Nicholas P.; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Baker, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development of combination therapies employing both CNTs and nanostructured lipid self-assembly together as carriers of different drugs.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development

  12. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    SciTech Connect

    McWatters, Bruce Ray; Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  13. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  14. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    resins. The soft lithography technique was mainly used to fabricate micro and nanostructures on zein films. Zein material well-replicated small structures with the smallest size at sub micrometer scale that resulted in interesting photonic properties. The bonding method was also developed for assembling portable zein microfluidic devices with small shape distortion. Zein-zein and zein-glass microfluidic devices demonstrated sufficient strength to facilitate fluid flow in a complex microfluidic design with no leakage. Aside from the fabrication technique development, several potential applications of this environmentally friendly microfluidic device were investigated. The concentration gradient manipulation of Rhodamine B solution in zein-glass microfluidic devices was demonstrated. The diffusion of small molecules such as fluorescent dye into the wall of the zein microfluidic channels was observed. However, with this formulation, zein microfluidic devices were not suitable for cell culture applications. This pioneer study covered a wide spectrum of the implementation of the two nanotechnology approaches to advance zein biomaterial which provided proof of fundamental concepts as well as presenting some limitations. The findings in this study can lead to several innovative research opportunities of advanced zein biomaterials with broad applications. The information from the study of zein nanocomposite structure allows the packaging industry to develop the low cost biodegradable materials with physical property improvement. The information from the study of the zein microfluidic devices allows agro-industry to develop the nanotechnology-enabled microfluidic sensors fabricated entirely from biodegradable polymer for on-site disease or contaminant detection in the fields of food and agriculture.

  15. Coupled leaky mode theory for light absorption in 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiling; Cao, Linyou

    2012-06-18

    We present an intuitive, simple theoretical model, coupled leaky mode theory (CLMT), to analyze the light absorption of 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures. This model correlates the light absorption of nanostructures to the optical coupling between incident light and leaky modes of the nanostructure. Unlike conventional methods such as Mie theory that requests specific physical features of nanostructures to evaluate the absorption, the CLMT model provides an unprecedented capability to analyze the absorption using eigen values of the leaky modes. Because the eigenvalue shows very mild dependence on the physical features of nanostructures, we can generally apply one set of eigenvalues calculated using a real, constant refractive index to calculations for the absorption of various nanostructures with different sizes, different materials, and wavelength-dependent complex refractive index. This CLMT model is general, simple, yet reasonably accurate, and offers new intuitive physical insights that the light absorption of nanostructures is governed by the coupling efficiency between incident light and leaky modes of the structure.

  16. Nanostructured artificial nacre.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiyong; Kotov, Nicholas A; Magonov, Sergei; Ozturk, Birol

    2003-06-01

    Finding a synthetic pathway to artificial analogs of nacre and bones represents a fundamental milestone in the development of composite materials. The ordered brick-and-mortar arrangement of organic and inorganic layers is believed to be the most essential strength- and toughness-determining structural feature of nacre. It has also been found that the ionic crosslinking of tightly folded macromolecules is equally important. Here, we demonstrate that both structural features can be reproduced by sequential deposition of polyelectrolytes and clays. This simple process results in a nanoscale version of nacre with alternating organic and inorganic layers. The macromolecular folding effect reveals itself in the unique saw-tooth pattern of differential stretching curves attributed to the gradual breakage of ionic crosslinks in polyelectrolyte chains. The tensile strength of the prepared multilayers approached that of nacre, whereas their ultimate Young modulus was similar to that of lamellar bones. Structural and functional resemblance makes clay- polyelectrolyte multilayers a close replica of natural biocomposites. Their nanoscale nature enables elucidation of molecular processes occurring under stress.

  17. Nanostructure Formation by controlled dewetting on patterned substrates: A combined theoretical, modeling and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liang-Xing; Wang, Ying-Min; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Asbahi, Mohamed; Yang, Joel K W; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We perform systematic two-dimensional energetic analysis to study the stability of various nanostructures formed by dewetting solid films deposited on patterned substrates. Our analytical results show that by controlling system parameters such as the substrate surface pattern, film thickness and wetting angle, a variety of equilibrium nanostructures can be obtained. Phase diagrams are presented to show the complex relations between these system parameters and various nanostructure morphologies. We further carry out both phase field simulations and dewetting experiments to validate the analytically derived phase diagrams. Good agreements between the results from our energetic analyses and those from our phase field simulations and experiments verify our analysis. Hence, the phase diagrams presented here provide guidelines for using solid-state dewetting as a tool to achieve various nanostructures. PMID:27580943

  18. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic nanostructure creation on PET surface for controlling of cell spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Shinonaga, Togo; Kawa, Takuya

    2016-03-01

    A new method of periodic nanostructure formation on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface has been developed, employing a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 1045 nm. To generate structured films, the PET was placed in contact with a silicon (Si) wafer, followed by irradiation with the laser focused on the Si wafer, passing through the PET film. In order to evaluate the surface morphology, atomic force microscopy analysis was conducted on both treated and untreated PET surfaces. From the results, nanostructures with a period of 600 nm and height of 100 nm were formed on the PET film surface by laser treatment. A cell cultivation test was carried out on PET films with and without periodic nanostructures, showing that for nanostructured films, the cells (MG-63) were spread along the periodic grooves; in contrast, random cell spreading was observed for cultures grown on the untreated PET film.

  19. Nanostructure Formation by controlled dewetting on patterned substrates: A combined theoretical, modeling and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Liang-Xing; Wang, Ying-Min; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Asbahi, Mohamed; Yang, Joel K. W.; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We perform systematic two-dimensional energetic analysis to study the stability of various nanostructures formed by dewetting solid films deposited on patterned substrates. Our analytical results show that by controlling system parameters such as the substrate surface pattern, film thickness and wetting angle, a variety of equilibrium nanostructures can be obtained. Phase diagrams are presented to show the complex relations between these system parameters and various nanostructure morphologies. We further carry out both phase field simulations and dewetting experiments to validate the analytically derived phase diagrams. Good agreements between the results from our energetic analyses and those from our phase field simulations and experiments verify our analysis. Hence, the phase diagrams presented here provide guidelines for using solid-state dewetting as a tool to achieve various nanostructures. PMID:27580943

  20. Controlled synthesis of 2-D and 3-D dendritic platinum nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Shelnutt, John Allen; Yang, Yi; van Swol, Frank B.; Pereira, Eulalia; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Medforth, Craig John; Xu, Huifang; Song, Yujiang; Singh, Anup K.

    2004-06-01

    Seeding and autocatalytic reduction of platinum salts in aqueous surfactant solution using ascorbic acid as the reductant leads to remarkable dendritic metal nanostructures. In micellar surfactant solutions, spherical dendritic metal nanostructures are obtained, and the smallest of these nanodendrites resemble assemblies of joined nanoparticles and the nanodendrites are single crystals. With liposomes as the template, dendritic platinum sheets in the form of thin circular disks or solid foam-like nanomaterials can be made. Synthetic control over the morphology of these nanodendrites, nanosheets, and nanostructured foams is realized by using a tin-porphyrin photocatalyst to conveniently and effectively produce a large initial population of catalytic growth centers. The concentration of seed particles determines the ultimate average size and uniformity of these novel two- and three-dimensional platinum nanostructures.

  1. Nanostructure Formation by controlled dewetting on patterned substrates: A combined theoretical, modeling and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liang-Xing; Wang, Ying-Min; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Asbahi, Mohamed; Yang, Joel K. W.; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-09-01

    We perform systematic two-dimensional energetic analysis to study the stability of various nanostructures formed by dewetting solid films deposited on patterned substrates. Our analytical results show that by controlling system parameters such as the substrate surface pattern, film thickness and wetting angle, a variety of equilibrium nanostructures can be obtained. Phase diagrams are presented to show the complex relations between these system parameters and various nanostructure morphologies. We further carry out both phase field simulations and dewetting experiments to validate the analytically derived phase diagrams. Good agreements between the results from our energetic analyses and those from our phase field simulations and experiments verify our analysis. Hence, the phase diagrams presented here provide guidelines for using solid-state dewetting as a tool to achieve various nanostructures.

  2. Investigation of oxygen states and reactivities on a nanostructured cupric oxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svintsitskiy, D. A.; Stadnichenko, A. I.; Demidov, D. V.; Koscheev, S. V.; Boronin, A. I.

    2011-08-01

    Nanostructured copper (II) oxide was formed on clean copper foil at room temperature using activated oxygen produced by RF discharge. CuO particles of approximately 10-20 nm were observed on the surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). The copper states and oxygen species of the model cupric oxide were studied by means of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). These oxide particles demonstrated abnormally high reactivity with carbon monoxide (CO) at temperatures below 100 °C. The XPS data showed that the interaction of CO with the nanostructured cupric oxide resulted in reduction of the CuO particles to Cu 2O species. The reactivity of the nanostructured cupric oxide to CO was studied at 80 °C using XPS in step-by-step mode. The initial reactivity was estimated to be 5 × 10 -5 and was steadily reduced down to 5 × 10 -9 as the exposure was increased. O1s spectral analysis allowed us to propose that the high initial reactivity was caused by the presence of non-lattice oxygen states on the surface of the nanostructured CuO. We established that reoxidation of the partially reduced nanostructured cupric oxide by molecular oxygen O 2 restored the highly reactive oxygen form on the surface. These results allowed us to propose that the nanostructured cupric oxide could be used for low temperature catalytic CO oxidation. Some hypotheses concerning the nature of the non-lattice oxygen species with high reactivity are also discussed.

  3. Nanolayered Features of Collagen-like Peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluzzi, Regina; Bini, Elisabetta; Haas, Terry; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2003-01-01

    We have been investigating collagen-like model oligopeptides as molecular bases for complex ordered biomimetic materials. The collagen-like molecules incorporate aspects of native collagen sequence and secondary structure. Designed modifications to native primary and secondary structure have been incorporated to control the nanostructure and microstructure of the collagen-like materials produced. We find that the collagen-like molecules form a number of lyotropic rod liquid crystalline phases, which because of their strong temperature dependence in the liquid state can also be viewed as solvent intercalated thermotropic liquid crystals. The liquid crystalline phases formed by the molecules can be captured in the solid state by drying off solvent, resulting in solid nanopatterned (chemically and physically) thermally stable (to greater than 100 C) materials. Designed sequences which stabilize smectic phases have allowed a variety of nanoscale multilayered biopolymeric materials to be developed. Preliminary investigations suggest that chemical patterns running perpendicular to the smectic layer plane can be functionalized and used to localize a variety of organic, inorganic, and organometallic moieties in very simple multilayered nanocomposites. The phase behavior of collagen-like oligopeptide materials is described, emphasizing the correlation between mesophase, molecular orientation, and chemical patterning at the microscale and nanoscale. In many cases, the textures observed for smectic and hexatic phase collagens are remarkably similar to the complex (and not fully understood) helicoids observed in biological collagen-based tissues. Comparisons between biological morphologies and collagen model liquid crystalline (and solidified materials) textures may help us understand the molecular features which impart order and function to the extracellular matrix and to collagen-based mineralized tissues. Initial studies have utilized synthetic collagen-like peptides while

  4. Self-assembly strategies for the synthesis of functional nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, M.; Seguini, G.

    2016-06-01

    Self-assembly is the autonomous organization of components into patterns or structures without human intervention. This is the approach followed by nature to generate living cells and represents one of the practical strategies to fabricate ensembles of nanostructures. In static self-assembly the formation of ordered structures could require energy but once formed the structures are stable. The introduction of additional regular features in the environment could be used to template the self-assembly guiding the organization of the components and determining the final structure they form. In this regard self-assembly of block copolymers represents a potent platform for fundamental studies at the nanoscale and for application-driven investigation as a tool to fabricate functional nanostructured materials. Block copolymers can hierarchically assemble into chemically distinct domains with size and periodicity on the order of 10nm or below, offering a potentially inexpensive route to generate large-area nanostructured materials. The final structure characteristics of these materials are dictated by the properties of the elementary block copolymers, like chain length, volume fraction or degree of block incompatibility. Modern synthetic chemistry offers the possibility to design these macromolecules with very specific length scales and geometries, directly embodying in the block copolymers the code that drives their self- assembling process. The understanding of the kinetics and thermodynamics of the block copolymer self-assembly process in the bulk phase as well as in thin films represents a fundamental prerequisite toward the exploitation of these materials. Incorporating block copolymer into device fabrication procedures or directly into devices, as active elements, will lead to the development of a new generation of devices fabricated using the fundamental law of nature to our advantage in order to minimize cost and power consumption in the fabrication process

  5. PROPERTIES AND NANOSTRUCTURES OF NANO-MATERIALS PROCESSED BY SEVERE PLASTIC DEFORMATION (SPD).

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y. T.

    2001-01-01

    Metallic materials usually exhibit higher strength but lower ductility after being plastically deformed by conventional techniques such as rolling, drawing and extrusion. In contrast, nanostructured metals and alloys processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) have demonstrated both high strength and high ductility. This extraordinary mechanical behavior is attributed to the unique nanostructures generated by SPD processing. The combination of ultrafine grain size and high-density dislocations appears to enable deformation by new mechanisms not active in coarse-grained metals and alloys. These results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the microstructures of metals and alloys by SPD to obtain superior mechanical properties. Nanostructured metals and alloys processed by SPD techniques have unique nanostructures not observed in nanomaterials synthesized by other techniques such as the consolidation of nanopowders. The SPD-generated nanostructures have many features related to deformation, including high dislocation densities, and high- and low-angle grain boundaries in equilibrium or nonequilibrium states. Future studies are needed to investigate the deformation mechanisms that relate the unique nanostructures with the superior mechanical properties exhibited by SPD-processed metals and alloys.

  6. Electrocatalytic (Bio)Nanostructures Based on Polymer-Grafted Platinum Nanoparticles for Analytical Purpose.

    PubMed

    Gal, François; Challier, Lylian; Cousin, Fabrice; Perez, Henri; Noel, Vincent; Carrot, Geraldine

    2016-06-15

    Functionalized platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) possess electrocatalytic properties toward H2O2 oxidation, which are of great interest for the construction of electrochemical oxidoreductase-based sensors. In this context, we have shown that polymer-grafted PtNPs could efficiently be used as building bricks for electroactive structures. In the present work, we prepared different 2D-nanostructures based on these elementary bricks, followed by the subsequent grafting of enzymes. The aim was to provide well-defined architectures to establish a correlation between their electrocatalytic properties and the arrangement of building bricks. Two different nanostructures have been elaborated via the smart combination of surface initiated-atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), functionalized PtNPs (Br-PtNPs) and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The first nanostructure (A) has been elaborated from LB films of poly(methacrylic acid)-grafted PtNPs (PMAA-PtNPs). The second nanostructure (B) consisted in the elaboration of polymer brushes (PMAA brushes) from Br-PtNPs LB films. In both systems, grafting of the glucose oxidase (GOx) has been performed directly to nanostructures, via peptide bonding. Structural features of nanostructures have been carefully characterized (compression isotherms, neutron reflectivity, and profilometry) and correlated to their electrocatalytic properties toward H2O2 oxidation or glucose sensing.

  7. Hot spots in different metal nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-11-21

    Noble metal nanostructures are able to concentrate light into small volumes, which enhances greatly the local electromagnetic (EM) field near the metal nanostructures. The areas with greatly enhanced EM field become "hot spots" for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which utilizes the field enhancement properties of metal nanostructures to amplify the usually weak Raman scattering signals. The preparation of metal nanostructures with superior SERS performances is one of the main topics in the SERS field and is important for the applications of SERS in sensing and analysis. In this feature article, we review several different kinds of metal structures for SERS, including coupled metal nanostructures, nanostructure arrays, nano/micro structures with textured surfaces and graphene-mediated SERS substrates. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) using the metal tip of the scanning tunneling microscope is also discussed. Besides the intensity enhancement in SERS and TERS, some less studied aspects are highlighted; for example, the remote excitation technique, tuning the nanogap of gold nanorod dimers through strain control on an elastomeric substrate, manipulating Raman emission polarization using asymmetric nanoantennas, and investigating plasmon-enhanced chemical reactions by TERS. PMID:24113688

  8. Electrocatalytic (Bio)Nanostructures Based on Polymer-Grafted Platinum Nanoparticles for Analytical Purpose.

    PubMed

    Gal, François; Challier, Lylian; Cousin, Fabrice; Perez, Henri; Noel, Vincent; Carrot, Geraldine

    2016-06-15

    Functionalized platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) possess electrocatalytic properties toward H2O2 oxidation, which are of great interest for the construction of electrochemical oxidoreductase-based sensors. In this context, we have shown that polymer-grafted PtNPs could efficiently be used as building bricks for electroactive structures. In the present work, we prepared different 2D-nanostructures based on these elementary bricks, followed by the subsequent grafting of enzymes. The aim was to provide well-defined architectures to establish a correlation between their electrocatalytic properties and the arrangement of building bricks. Two different nanostructures have been elaborated via the smart combination of surface initiated-atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), functionalized PtNPs (Br-PtNPs) and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The first nanostructure (A) has been elaborated from LB films of poly(methacrylic acid)-grafted PtNPs (PMAA-PtNPs). The second nanostructure (B) consisted in the elaboration of polymer brushes (PMAA brushes) from Br-PtNPs LB films. In both systems, grafting of the glucose oxidase (GOx) has been performed directly to nanostructures, via peptide bonding. Structural features of nanostructures have been carefully characterized (compression isotherms, neutron reflectivity, and profilometry) and correlated to their electrocatalytic properties toward H2O2 oxidation or glucose sensing. PMID:27192083

  9. On the design and fabrication of nanostructures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei

    Nanotechnology is emerging into a new frontier in science and technology with potential impact on every aspect of human life. One of the major breakthroughs in today's nanotechnology is the discovery and preparation of new classes of nanomaterials and nanostructures. A large number of nanomaterials and nanostructures are synthesized and characterized with either new or profoundly enhanced properties or phenomena. However, there are several major challenges ahead need to be overcome before any substantial benefits can be brought to the market. One of the challenges that we need to address today is how to effectively integrate useful nanomaterials and nanostrucrures into functional devices and systems. Our mother nature gives us a classic example of how living organisms are built. Starting from a single cell, through its division and growth, it can self-assemble and become functional tissues and organs. Similar self-assemble approach has been adopted as a nano-fabrication technique to assemble nanomaterials and nanostructures into functional nanodevices. This technique has advantages of high precision and nanometer scale resolution. However, it requires a lot of effort to construct a single device and since the properties of individual nanostructures can be different, the fabricated devices may have different properties. In this dissertation, we design and fabricate nanostructures and devices using novel microfabrication techniques. In the first part of the dissertation, the design and fabrication of a variety of nanostructures, such as metal nanowires array, polymer nanowells, and nanostructured surfaces are discussed. In the second part, carbon nanotubes as a novel material has been explored as an example to demonstrate the integration of nanomaterials with novel microfabrication techniques to form a functional device. First, a resistive heating technique is developed to grow carbon nanotubes in localized regions, such as a nichrome heating coil. Then, MEMS micro

  10. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  11. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  12. Chemical Sensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Mike J.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an overview of sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures. While nanostructures such as nanorods show significan t potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of s ignificant technical challenges remain. The major issues addressed in this work revolve around the ability to make workable sensors. This paper discusses efforts to address three technical barriers related t o the application of nanostructures into sensor systems: 1) Improving contact of the nanostructured materials with electrodes in a microse nsor structure; 2) Controling nanostructure crystallinity to allow co ntrol of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by using different nanostructured materials. It is concluded that while this work demonstrates useful tools for furt her development, these are just the beginning steps towards realizati on of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostr uctures.

  13. The influence of Au film thickness and annealing conditions on the VLS-assisted growth of ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govatsi, K.; Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Dracopoulos, V.; Yannopoulos, S. N.

    2014-05-01

    High temperature evaporation methods, such as the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, have been exploited for the controlled growth of ZnO nanostructures on various substrates. While Au is the most frequently used catalyst for growing ZnO nanowires, its morphological features on the substrate, which determine the size and shape of the nanostructures grown, have not yet been methodically explored. In the current work, we investigated the details of the thermal dewetting of Au films into nanoparticles on Si substrates. Au films of various thicknesses ranging from 2 to 15 nm were annealed under slow and fast rates at various temperatures and the morphological details of the nanoparticles formed were investigated. The dependence of the mean particle size on the nominal film thickness is in fair agreement with theoretical predictions. The vapor-liquid-solid method was employed to investigate the role of the Au nanoparticles on the growth details of ZnO nanowires. The efficient and high throughput growth of ZnO nanowires, for a given growth time, is realized in cases of thin Au films, i.e. when the thickness is lower than 10 nm. Based on these experimental findings, a two-step mechanism is proposed to account for the growth of ZnO nanorods ending in ultrathin (˜30 nm), micron-long tips.

  14. Nanostructured materials for water desalination.

    PubMed

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O'Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T; Karnik, R; Wang, E N

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  15. Topology optimization of piezoelectric nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanthakumar, S. S.; Lahmer, Tom; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Park, Harold S.; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-09-01

    We present an extended finite element formulation for piezoelectric nanobeams and nanoplates that is coupled with topology optimization to study the energy harvesting potential of piezoelectric nanostructures. The finite element model for the nanoplates is based on the Kirchoff plate model, with a linear through the thickness distribution of electric potential. Based on the topology optimization, the largest enhancements in energy harvesting are found for closed circuit boundary conditions, though significant gains are also found for open circuit boundary conditions. Most interestingly, our results demonstrate the competition between surface elasticity, which reduces the energy conversion efficiency, and surface piezoelectricity, which enhances the energy conversion efficiency, in governing the energy harvesting potential of piezoelectric nanostructures.

  16. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes–anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  17. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humplik, T.; Lee, J.; O'Hern, S. C.; Fellman, B. A.; Baig, M. A.; Hassan, S. F.; Atieh, M. A.; Rahman, F.; Laoui, T.; Karnik, R.; Wang, E. N.

    2011-07-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  18. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  19. Coherent acoustic phonons in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekorsy, T.; Taubert, R.; Hudert, F.; Bartels, A.; Habenicht, A.; Merkt, F.; Leiderer, P.; Köhler, K.; Schmitz, J.; Wagner, J.

    2008-02-01

    Phonons are considered as a most important origin of scattering and dissipation for electronic coherence in nanostructures. The generation of coherent acoustic phonons with femtosecond laser pulses opens the possibility to control phonon dynamics in amplitude and phase. We demonstrate a new experimental technique based on two synchronized femtosecond lasers with GHz repetition rate to study the dynamics of coherently generated acoustic phonons in semiconductor heterostructures with high sensitivity. High-speed synchronous optical sampling (ASOPS) enables to scan a time-delay of 1 ns with 100 fs time resolution with a frequency in the kHz range without a moving part in the set-up. We investigate the dynamics of coherent zone-folded acoustic phonons in semiconductor superlattices (GaAs/AlAs and GaSb/InAs) and of coherent vibration of metallic nanostructures of non-spherical shape using ASOPS.

  20. Thermoelectric effects in graphene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollfus, Philippe; Nguyen, Viet Hung; Saint-Martin, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene and graphene nanostructures have recently attracted significant attention from the physics and engineering communities. In fundamental physics, the analysis of Seebeck and Nernst effects is very useful in elucidating some details of the electronic band structure of graphene that cannot be probed by conductance measurements alone, due in particular to the ambipolar nature of this gapless material. For applications in thermoelectric energy conversion, graphene has two major disadvantages. It is gapless, which leads to a small Seebeck coefficient due to the opposite contributions of electrons and holes, and it is an excellent thermal conductor. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of a two-dimensional (2D) graphene sheet is thus very limited. However, many works have demonstrated recently that appropriate nanostructuring and bandgap engineering of graphene can concomitantly strongly reduce the lattice thermal conductance and enhance the Seebeck coefficient without dramatically degrading the electronic conductance. Hence, in various graphene nanostructures, ZT has been predicted to be high enough to make them attractive for energy conversion. In this article, we review the main results obtained experimentally and theoretically on the thermoelectric properties of graphene and its nanostructures, emphasizing the physical effects that govern these properties. Beyond pure graphene structures, we discuss also the thermoelectric properties of some hybrid graphene structures, as graphane, layered carbon allotropes such as graphynes and graphdiynes, and graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures which offer new opportunities. Finally, we briefly review the recent activities on other atomically thin 2D semiconductors with finite bandgap, i.e. dichalcogenides and phosphorene, which have attracted great attention for various kinds of applications, including thermoelectrics.

  1. Thermoelectric effects in graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Dollfus, Philippe; Hung Nguyen, Viet; Saint-Martin, Jérôme

    2015-04-10

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene and graphene nanostructures have recently attracted significant attention from the physics and engineering communities. In fundamental physics, the analysis of Seebeck and Nernst effects is very useful in elucidating some details of the electronic band structure of graphene that cannot be probed by conductance measurements alone, due in particular to the ambipolar nature of this gapless material. For applications in thermoelectric energy conversion, graphene has two major disadvantages. It is gapless, which leads to a small Seebeck coefficient due to the opposite contributions of electrons and holes, and it is an excellent thermal conductor. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of a two-dimensional (2D) graphene sheet is thus very limited. However, many works have demonstrated recently that appropriate nanostructuring and bandgap engineering of graphene can concomitantly strongly reduce the lattice thermal conductance and enhance the Seebeck coefficient without dramatically degrading the electronic conductance. Hence, in various graphene nanostructures, ZT has been predicted to be high enough to make them attractive for energy conversion. In this article, we review the main results obtained experimentally and theoretically on the thermoelectric properties of graphene and its nanostructures, emphasizing the physical effects that govern these properties. Beyond pure graphene structures, we discuss also the thermoelectric properties of some hybrid graphene structures, as graphane, layered carbon allotropes such as graphynes and graphdiynes, and graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures which offer new opportunities. Finally, we briefly review the recent activities on other atomically thin 2D semiconductors with finite bandgap, i.e. dichalcogenides and phosphorene, which have attracted great attention for various kinds of applications, including thermoelectrics.

  2. Insulating oxide surfaces and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goniakowski, Jacek; Noguera, Claudine

    2016-03-01

    This contribution describes some peculiarities of the science of oxide surfaces and nanostructures and proposes a simple conceptual scheme to understand their electronic structure, in the spirit of Jacques Friedel's work. Major results on the effects of non-stoichiometry and polarity are presented, for both semi-infinite surfaces and ultra-thin films, and promising lines of research for the near future are sketched. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Nanostructural engineering of organic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Frocle, J.

    1995-03-01

    Aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (400-1100 M{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. This paper examines the correlation between nanostructure and thermal conductivity in a series of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels prepared under different synthetic conditions.

  4. Application of smart nanostructures in medicine.

    PubMed

    He, Jingjing; Qi, Xiaoxue; Miao, Yuqing; Wu, Hai-Long; He, Nongyue; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Smart nanostructures are sensitive to various environmental or biological parameters. They offer great potential for numerous biomedical applications such as monitoring, diagnoses, repair and treatment of human biological systems. The present work introduces smart nanostructures for biomedical applications. In addition to drug delivery, which has been extensively reported and reviewed, increasing interest has been observed in using smart nanostructures to develop various novel techniques of sensing, imaging, tissue engineering, biofabrication, nanodevices and nanorobots for the improvement of healthcare.

  5. Mechanically interlocked DNA nanostructures for functional devices.

    PubMed

    Jester, Stefan-S; Famulok, Michael

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Self-assembled functional DNA oligonucleotide based architectures represent highly promising candidates for the creation of nanoscale devices. The field of DNA nanotechnology has emerged to a high level of maturity and currently constitutes one of the most dynamic, creative, and exciting modern research areas. The transformation from structural DNA nanotechnology to functional DNA architectures is already taking place with tremendous pace. Particularly the advent of DNA origami technology has propelled DNA nanotechnology forward. DNA origami provided a versatile method for precisely aligning structural and functional DNA modules in two and three dimensions, thereby serving as a means for constructing scaffolds and chassis required for the precise orchestration of multiple functional DNA architectures. Key modules of these will contain interlocked nanomechanical components made of DNA. The mechanical interlocking allows for performing highly specific and controlled motion, by reducing the dimensionality of diffusion-controlled processes without restrictions in motional flexibility. Examples for nanoscale interlocked DNA architectures illustrate how elementary functional units of future nanomachines can be designed and realized, and show what role interlocked DNA architectures may play in this endeavor. Functional supramolecular systems, in general, and nanomachinery, in particular, self-organize into architectures that reflect different levels of complexity with respect to their function, their arrangement in the second and third dimension, their suitability for different purposes, and their functional interplay. Toward this goal, DNA nanotechnology and especially the DNA origami technology provide opportunities for nanomechanics, nanorobotics, and nanomachines. In this Account, we address approaches that apply to the construction of interlocked DNA nanostructures, drawing largely form our own contributions to interlocked architectures based on double

  6. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  7. Physical electrochemistry of nanostructured devices.

    PubMed

    Bisquert, Juan

    2008-01-01

    This Perspective reviews recent developments in experimental techniques and conceptual methods applied to the electrochemical properties of metal-oxide semiconductor nanostructures and organic conductors, such as those used in dye-sensitized solar cells, high-energy batteries, sensors, and electrochromic devices. The aim is to provide a broad view of the interpretation of electrochemical and optoelectrical measurements for semiconductor nanostructures (sintered colloidal particles, nanorods, arrays of quantum dots, etc.) deposited or grown on a conducting substrate. The Fermi level displacement by potentiostatic control causes a broad change of physical properties such as the hopping conductivity, that can be investigated over a very large variation of electron density. In contrast to traditional electrochemistry, we emphasize that in nanostructured devices we must deal with systems that depart heavily from the ideal, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, due to broad distributions of states (energy disorder) and interactions of charge carriers, therefore the electrochemical analysis must be aided by thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. We discuss in detail the most characteristic densities of states, the chemical capacitance, and the transport properties, specially the chemical diffusion coefficient, mobility, and generalized Einstein relation.

  8. Chitosan in nanostructured thin films.

    PubMed

    Pavinatto, Felippe J; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2010-08-01

    This review paper brings an overview of the use of chitosans in nanostructured films produced with the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) or the electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) techniques, with emphasis on their possible applications. From a survey in the literature one may identify three main types of study with chitosan in nanostructured films. First, the interaction between chitosans and phospholipid Langmuir monolayers has been investigated for probing the mechanisms of chitosan action in their biological applications, with the monolayers serving as cell membrane models. In the second type, chitosan serves as a matrix for immobilization of biomolecules in LB as well as in LbL films, for which chitosan is suitable to help preserve the bioactivity of such biomolecules for long periods of time even in dry, solid films. An important application of these chitosan-containing films is in sensing and biosensing. The third type of study involves exploiting the mechanical and biocompatibility properties of chitosan in producing films with enhanced properties, for example, for tissue engineering. It is emphasized that chitosans have been proven excellent building blocks to produce films with controlled molecular architecture, allowing for synergy between distinct materials. We also discuss the prospects of the field, following a critical review of the latest developments in nanostructured chitosan films. PMID:20590156

  9. Metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect nanostructure spin lattice devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    This dissertation explored and developed technologies for silicon based spin lattice devices. Spin lattices are artificial electron spin systems with a periodic structure having one to a few electrons at each site. They are expected to have various magnetic and even superconducting properties when structured at an optimal scale with a specific number i of electrons. Silicon turns out to be a very good material choice in realizing spin lattices. A metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect nanostructure (MOSFENS) device, which is closely related to a MOS transistor but with a nanostructured oxide-semiconductor interface, can define the spin lattices potential at the interface and alter the occupation i with the gate electrode potential to change the magnetic phase. The MOSFENS spin lattices engineering challenge addressed in this work has come from the practical difficulty of process integration in modifying a transistor fabrication process to accommodate the interface patterning requirements. Two distinct design choices for the fabrication sequences that create the nanostructure have been examined. Patterning the silicon surface before the MOS gate stack layers gives a "nanostructure first" process, and patterning the interface after forming the gate stack gives a "nanostructure last process." Both processes take advantage of a nano-LOCOS (nano-local oxidation of silicon) invention developed in this work. The nano-LOCOS process plays a central role in defining a clean, sharp confining potential for the spin lattice electrons. The MOSFENS process required a basic transistor fabrication process that can accommodate the nanostructures. The process developed for this purpose has a gate stack with a 15 nm polysilicon gate electrode and a 3 nm thermal gate oxide on a p-type silicon substrate. The measured threshold voltage is 0.25 V. Device processes were examined for either isolating the devices with windows in the field oxide or with mesas defined by the etched trenches

  10. Synthesis of hierarchical three-dimensional copper oxide nanostructures through a biomineralization-inspired approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Xiang; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin

    2013-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) copper oxide (CuO) nanostructures were synthesized in a regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin aqueous solution at room temperature. In the synthesis process, silk fibroin served as the template and helped to form the hierarchical CuO nanostructures by self-assembly. Cu(OH)2 nanowires were formed initially, and then they transformed into almond-like CuO nanostructures with branched edges and a compact middle. The size of the final CuO nanostructures can be tuned by varying the concentration of silk fibroin in the reaction system. A possible mechanism has been proposed based on various characterization techniques, such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The synthesized CuO nanostructured material has been evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, and the result showed that they had a good electrochemical performance. The straightforward energy-saving method developed in this research may provide a useful preparation strategy for other functional inorganic materials through an environmentally friendly process.Three-dimensional (3D) copper oxide (CuO) nanostructures were synthesized in a regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin aqueous solution at room temperature. In the synthesis process, silk fibroin served as the template and helped to form the hierarchical CuO nanostructures by self-assembly. Cu(OH)2 nanowires were formed initially, and then they transformed into almond-like CuO nanostructures with branched edges and a compact middle. The size of the final CuO nanostructures can be tuned by varying the concentration of silk fibroin in the reaction system. A possible mechanism has been proposed based on various characterization techniques, such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The synthesized CuO nanostructured material has been evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, and the result

  11. Plasmonic hierarchical nanostructures with cascaded field enhancement and their SERS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Benfeng; Zhu, Zhendong

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures with strong near field "hot spots" are highly demanded in many applications such as surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Here, we present some specially designed plasmonic hierarchical nanostructures that combine geometric features of micro- and nanoscales. Owing to the mode coupling and hybridization in these multiscale systems that can produce the cascaded field enhancement (CFE) effect, extremely strong and highly confined field hot spots can be readily generated in nanoscale volumes. Two typical hierarchical nanostructures are presented: an Mshaped grating with 30 nm narrow V-shaped grooves and a nanoparticle-in-cavity (PIC) plasmonic nanoantenna array. A cost-effective, efficient and reliable fabrication technique based on room-temperature nanoimprinting and anisotropic reactive ion etching is developed to fabricate these plasmonic hierarchical nanostructures in large area, during which the nano-features can be finely controlled and tuned. The field distributions and enhancement in the proposed structures are experimentally characterized, which agree very well with the numerical simulations. SERS experiments show the SERS enhancement factor as high as 5×108 by employing these hierarchical nanostructures as SERS substrates, which verify the strong light-matter interaction and show the great potential of these devices as low-cost and highly-active substrates for SERS applications.

  12. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser

    PubMed Central

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior. PMID:26469886

  13. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior.

  14. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-10-15

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior.

  15. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior. PMID:26469886

  16. Synthesis of Silver Nanostructures by Multistep Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Song, Yuan-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Wu, Jing-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The shape of plasmonic nanostructures such as silver and gold is vital to their physical and chemical properties and potential applications. Recently, preparation of complex nanostructures with rich function by chemical multistep methods is the hotspot of research. In this review we introduce three typical multistep methods to prepare silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes, including the double reductant method, etching technique and construction of core-shell nanostructures. The growth mechanism of double the reductant method is that different favorable facets of silver nanocrystals are produced in different reductants, which can be used to prepare complex nanostructures such as nanoflags with ultranarrow resonant band bandwidth or some silver nanostructures which are difficult to prepare using other methods. The etching technique can selectively remove nanoparticles to achieve the aim of shape control and is widely used for the synthesis of nanoflowers and hollow nanostructures. Construction of core-shell nanostructures is another tool to control shape and size. The three methods can not only prepare various silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes, which exhibit unique optical properties, such as strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect, but also have potential application in many areas. PMID:24670722

  17. Processing Nanostructured Sensors Using Microfabrication Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Evans, Laura J.; Xu, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Standard microfabrication techniques can be implemented and scaled to help assemble nanoscale microsensors. Currently nanostructures are often deposited onto materials primarily by adding them to a solution, then applying the solution in a thin film. This results in random placement of the nanostructures with no controlled order, and no way to accurately reproduce the placement. This method changes the means by which microsensors with nanostructures are fabricated. The fundamental advantage to this approach is that it enables standard microfabrication techniques to be applied in the repeated manufacture of nanostructured sensors on a microplatform.

  18. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  19. Precise replication of antireflective nanostructures from biotemplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Guoming; Xie, Guoyong

    2007-03-01

    The authors report herein a new type of nanonipple structures on the cicada's eye and the direct structural replication of the complex micro- and nanostructures for potential functional emulation. A two-step direct molding process is developed to replicate these natural micro- and nanostructures using epoxy resin with high fidelity, which demonstrates a general way of fabricating functional nanostructures by direct replication of natural biotemplates via a suitable physicochemical process. Measurements of spectral reflectance showed that this kind of replicated nanostructure has remarkable antireflective property, suggestive of its potential applications to optical devices.

  20. Growth and characterizations of organized nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji Hoon

    The research investigations and progresses in nanotechnology and the efforts to fabricate novel nanostructures are expected to provide new perspectives into the understanding of underlying science and the formation mechanisms of nanostructures and thus providing the potential for the next-generation device applications. The potential impact of the nano-devices to our society could be extremely enormous and thus the fabrication, engineering and designing of new configuration of nanostructures have attracted a tremendous attention from a number of research fields. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction to the growth & characterization of organized nanostructures is given. Chapter 2 discusses about the growth and fabrication effort of localized quantum structures by using Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth model on shallow patterns (35nm), namely quantum dots, quantum dot chain, quantum wires and the related research. Chapter 3 introduces the growth and characterization of novel nanostructures using Volmer-Weber (V-W) growth model. More specifically, the formation of metal droplets, the fabrication of ring-shaped nanostructures and various configurations of nanostructures using droplet epitaxy are presented. Chapter 4 explains the formation mechanisms and the optical properties of quantum dot molecules (QDMs), a hybrid nanostructure composed of a pair of a metal particle, a semiconductor quantum ring (QR), and various advanced nanostructures. Chapter 5 concludes the dissertation with some concluding remarks.

  1. Extensive mixing features at 27-41 Ka postcaldera trachytes at Long Valley caldera, CA: Mixing/mingling of basalt with trachyte and mobilization of young granitic material to form kspar megacrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, I. J.; Mahood, G.

    2014-12-01

    Five small lava domes erupted at the NW margin of Long Valley caldera from 41 to 27 Ka. They range from trachyte (66% SiO2) to trachyandesite (60%), with the youngest lava being the most mafic. Mixing features are pervasive, with enclaves, kspar megacrysts, crystal clots of various grain sizes, compositions, and degrees of resorption indicating multiple episodes of mafic injection, mobilization of young granitic material, and mixing/mingling of alkali basalt with trachyte to alkali rhyolite magmas similar to those at Mammoth Mountain. Enclaves range from 49 to 57% SiO2 and form a mixing line with a felsic end member at 67% SiO2. In order to quantify the distribution of enclaves and large (1-4 cm), resorbed, kspar megacrysts, outcrop-scale point counting was performed at >200 locations on the lavas. Contour maps show that kspar content is highest at the vent, but mafic-intermediate enclaves are irregularly distributed. Fe-Ti oxide temperatures for the host trachytic magmas are 915-1080°C, with the coolest temperatures at flow termini. Enclave temperatures are similar, 950-1120°C, with cooler temperatures in more felsic enclaves that are typically located near flow termini, indicating prolonged thermal and chemical interaction with the host magma. Calculated pressures are 2-4 kbar for host magmas, but some mafic crystal clots yield pressures up to 12 kbar, near the Moho at Long Valley. The kspar megacrysts match the composition of phenocrysts in late-erupted Bishop Tuff, suggesting that the megacrysts originated from solidified equivalents of magma remaining after eruption of the Bishop Tuff at 760 Ka. These data suggest a model in which alkali basalts are generated in the uppermost mantle and, through AFC, evolve into trachytes. Repeated basaltic injections keep the trachyte hot and partially melt young granites, resulting in entrainment of kspar megacrysts. The most mafic enclaves in the NW domes match the alkali basalt compositions of the most mafic enclaves in

  2. Self-assembling peptide amphiphile nanostructures for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukasene, Stephen

    The application of nanotechnology to cancer therapy shows great promise for reducing the burden of the disease. By virtue of their size, nanoscale objects preferentially accumulate in tumor tissue through an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, to fully overcome the issues that limit current cancer treatments, viable nanostructures must also impart multifunctionality and be fully compatible with their biological surrounds. The self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) materials studied extensively in the Stupp Research Group form very biocompatible high aspect ratio nanostructures that meet these criteria. This thesis investigates the development of PA nanostructures designed to treat cancer. We first look to use the PA as a drug delivery vehicle by entrapping a small hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, camptothecin, in the core of the nanostructures. Using a solvent evaporation technique to load the drug into the PA nanofibers, we are able to improve the aqueous solubility of the molecule by nearly 30-fold. TEM and AFM studies show that entrapment of drug molecules does not disrupt the self-assembled morphology of the nanofiber. In vitro and in vivo studies are also conducted to demonstrate the bioactivity of the drug after its entrapment. As a potential platform for novel therapeutics, we next develop techniques for using light irradiation to trigger self-assembly inside the confined space of liposomes. We encapsulate PA monomers that assemble under acidic conditions along with a photoacid generator inside liposomes. Upon exposure to 254 nm light, the PA monomers self assemble inside the liposome to form nanostructures, which we observe through a quick freeze/deep etch technique that allows us to look inside the liposomes by SEM and TEM. Last of all, the development and discovery of epitopes for targeting PA nanostructures to tumors are explored. Using phage display technology we generate two groups of peptide sequences, one of which can potentially

  3. A nanostructured synthetic collagen mimic for hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Jalan, Abhishek A; Hwang, Lyahn K; Wang, Benjamin K; Hartgerink, Jeffery D

    2014-04-14

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays a wide variety of important roles in blood clotting, healing, and tissue remodeling. Natural, animal derived, collagen is used in many clinical applications but concerns exist with respect to its role in inflammation, batch-to-batch variability, and possible disease transfection. Therefore, development of synthetic nanomaterials that can mimic the nanostructure and properties of natural collagen has been a heavily pursued goal in biomaterials. Previously, we reported on the design and multihierarchial self-assembly of a 36 amino acid collagen mimetic peptide (KOD) that forms nanofibrous triple helices that entangle to form a hydrogel. In this report, we utilize this nanofiber forming collagen mimetic peptide as a synthetic biomimetic matrix useful in thrombosis. We demonstrate that nanofibrous KOD synthetic collagen matrices adhere platelets, activate them (indicated by soluble P-selectin secretion), and clot plasma and blood similar to animal derived collagen and control surfaces. In addition to the thrombotic potential, THP-1 monocytes incubated with our KOD collagen mimetic showed minimal proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α or IL-1β) production. Together, the data presented demonstrates the potential of a novel synthetic collagen mimetic as a hemostat.

  4. A nanostructured synthetic collagen mimic for hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Jalan, Abhishek A; Hwang, Lyahn K; Wang, Benjamin K; Hartgerink, Jeffery D

    2014-04-14

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays a wide variety of important roles in blood clotting, healing, and tissue remodeling. Natural, animal derived, collagen is used in many clinical applications but concerns exist with respect to its role in inflammation, batch-to-batch variability, and possible disease transfection. Therefore, development of synthetic nanomaterials that can mimic the nanostructure and properties of natural collagen has been a heavily pursued goal in biomaterials. Previously, we reported on the design and multihierarchial self-assembly of a 36 amino acid collagen mimetic peptide (KOD) that forms nanofibrous triple helices that entangle to form a hydrogel. In this report, we utilize this nanofiber forming collagen mimetic peptide as a synthetic biomimetic matrix useful in thrombosis. We demonstrate that nanofibrous KOD synthetic collagen matrices adhere platelets, activate them (indicated by soluble P-selectin secretion), and clot plasma and blood similar to animal derived collagen and control surfaces. In addition to the thrombotic potential, THP-1 monocytes incubated with our KOD collagen mimetic showed minimal proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α or IL-1β) production. Together, the data presented demonstrates the potential of a novel synthetic collagen mimetic as a hemostat. PMID:24694012

  5. Nanostructured Surfaces for Drug Delivery and Anti-Fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Kimberly Renee

    Effective and cost-efficient healthcare is at the forefront of public discussion; on both personal and policy levels, technologies that improve therapeutic efficacy without the use of painful hypodermic needle injections or the use of harsh chemicals would prove beneficial to patients. Nanostructured surfaces as structure-mediated permeability enhancers introduce a potentially revolutionary approach to the field of drug delivery. Parental administration routes have been the mainstay technologies for delivering biologics because these therapeutics are too large to permeate epithelial barriers. However, there is a significant patient dislike for hypodermic needles resulting in reduced patient compliance and poor therapeutic results. We present an alternative strategy to harness the body's naturally occurring biological processes and transport mechanisms to enhance the drug transport of biologics across the epithelium. Our strategy offers a paradigm shift from traditional biochemical drug delivery vehicles by using nanotopography to loosen the epithelial barrier. Herein, we demonstrate that nanotopographical cues can be used to enable biologics > 66 kDa to be transported across epithelial monolayers by increasing paracellular transport. When placed in contact with epithelial cells, nanostructured films significantly increase the transport of albumin, IgG, and a model therapeutic, etanercept. Our work highlights the potential to use drug delivery systems which incorporate nanotopographical cues to increase the transport of biologics across epithelial tissue. Furthermore, we describe current advancements in nano- and microfabrication for applications in anti-fibrosis and wound healing. Influencing cellular responses to biomaterials is crucial in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Since cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix features that are on the nanoscale, identifying nanostructures for imparting desirable cellular function could greatly

  6. Substation fire protection features

    SciTech Connect

    Hausheer, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes Commonwealth Edison`s (ComEd) approach to substation fire protection. Substation fires can have a major operational, financial, as well as political impact on a utility. The overall Company philosophy encompasses both active and passive fire protection features to provide prompt detection, notification, and confinement of fire and its by-products. Conservatively designed smoke detection systems and floor and wall penetration seals form the backbone of this strategy. The Company has implemented a program to install these features in new and existing substations. Thus far these measures have been successful in mitigating the consequences of substation fires.

  7. Nanostructured Oxides and Sulfides for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoto, Kunihito

    2011-03-01

    Thermoelectric power generation can be applied to various heat sources, both waste heat and renewable energy, to harvest electricity. Even though each heat source is of a small scale, it would lead to a great deal of energy saving if they are combined and collected, and it would greatly contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emission. We have been engaged in developing novel thermoelectric materials to be used for energy saving and environmental protection and are currently developing nanostructured ceramics for thermoelectric conversion. We have demonstrated a quantum confinement effect giving rise to two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a 2D superlattice, STO/STO:Nb (STO: strontium titanate), which could generate giant thermopower while keeping high electrical conductivity. One unit-cell thick Nb-doped well layer was estimated to show ZT=2.4 at 300K. Then, a ``synergistic nanostructuring'' concept incorporating 2DEG grain boundaries as well as nanosizing of grains has been applied to our STO material and 3D superlattice ceramics was designed and proposed. It was verified by numerical simulation that this 3D superlattice ceramics should be capable of showing ZT=1.0 at 300K which is comparable to or even higher than that of conventional bismuth telluride-based thermoelectrics. We have recently proposed titanium disulfide-based misfit-layered compounds as novel TE materials. Insertion of misfit-layers into the van der Waals gaps in layer-structured titanium disulfide thus forming a natural superlattice gives rise to internal nanointerfaces and dramatically reduces its lattice thermal conductivity. ZT value reaches 0.37 at 673 K even without optimization of electronic properties. Our challenge to further increase ZT by controlling their electronic system and superlattice structures will be presented.

  8. Inkjet Color Printing by Interference Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Aleksandr V; Milichko, Valentin A; Vinogradov, Vladimir V; Vinogradov, Alexandr V

    2016-03-22

    Color printing technology is developing rapidly; in less than 40 years, it moved from dot matrix printers with an ink-soaked cloth ribbon to 3D printers used to make three-dimensional color objects. Nevertheless, what remained unchanged over this time is the fact that in each case, dye inks (CMYK or RGB color schemes) were exclusively used for coloring, which inevitably limits the technological possibilities and color reproduction. As a next step in printing color images and storing information, we propose the technology of producing optical nanostructures. In this paper, we report use of inkjet technology to create colored interference layers with high accuracy without the need for high-temperature fixing. This was made possible due to using titania-based colloidal ink yielding monolithic coatings with a high refractive index (2.00 ± 0.08 over the entire visible range) when naturally dried. By controlling the film thickness by using inkjet deposition, we produced images based on controlled interference and implementing color printing with one ink. The lack of dyes in the proposed method has good environmental prospects, because applied systems based on a crystalline anatase sol are nontoxic and biologically inert. The paper explains in detail the principle of producing interference images by the classical inkjet method and shows the advantages of this technique in depositing coatings with uniform thickness, which are required for large-scale interference color imaging even on unprepared polymer films. This article demonstrates the possibility of inkjet printing of nanostructures with a precision in thickness of up to 50 nm, we believe that the proposed approach will be the groundwork for developing interference color printing approach and allow to implement new methods of forming optical nano-objects by widely available techniques.

  9. Nanostructured conjugated polymers in chemical sensors: synthesis, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Correa, D S; Medeiros, E S; Oliveira, J E; Paterno, L G; Mattoso, Luiz C

    2014-09-01

    Conjugated polymers are organic materials endowed with a π-electron conjugation along the polymer backbone that present appealing electrical and optical properties for technological applications. By using conjugated polymeric materials in the nanoscale, such properties can be further enhanced. In addition, the use of nanostructured materials makes possible miniaturize devices at the micro/nano scale. The applications of conjugated nanostructured polymers include sensors, actuators, flexible displays, discrete electronic devices, and smart fabric, to name a few. In particular, the use of conjugated polymers in chemical and biological sensors is made feasible owning to their sensitivity to the physicochemical conditions of its surrounding environment, such as chemical composition, pH, dielectric constant, humidity or even temperature. Subtle changes in these conditions bring about variations on the electrical (resistivity and capacitance), optical (absorptivity, luminescence, etc.), and mechanical properties of the conjugated polymer, which can be precisely measured by different experimental methods and ultimately associated with a specific analyte and its concentration. The present review article highlights the main features of conjugated polymers that make them suitable for chemical sensors. An especial emphasis is given to nanostructured sensors systems, which present high sensitivity and selectivity, and find application in beverage and food quality control, pharmaceutical industries, medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and homeland security, and other applications as discussed throughout this review.

  10. The influence of different nanostructured scaffolds on fibroblast growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, I.-Cheng; Li, Ching-Wen; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2013-08-01

    Skin serves as a protective barrier, modulating body temperature and waste discharge. It is therefore desirable to be able to repair any damage that occurs to the skin as soon as possible. In this study, we demonstrate a relatively easy and cost-effective method for the fabrication of nanostructured scaffolds, to shorten the time taken for a wound to heal. Various scaffolds consisting of nanohemisphere arrays of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polylactide and chitosan were fabricated by casting using a nickel (Ni) replica mold. The Ni replica mold is electroformed using the highly ordered nanohemisphere array of the barrier-layer surface of an anodic aluminum oxide membrane as the template. Mouse fibroblast cells (L929s) were cultured on the nanostructured polymer scaffolds to investigate the effect of these different nanohemisphere arrays on cell proliferation. The concentration of collagen type I on each scaffold was then measured through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to find the most effective scaffold for shortening the wound-healing process. The experimental data indicate that the proliferation of L929 is superior when a nanostructured PLGA scaffold with a feature size of 118 nm is utilized.

  11. Mathematical modeling and computation of the optical response from nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuanchang

    This dissertation studies the computational modeling for nanostructures in response to external electromagnetic fields. Light-matter interactions on nanoscale are at the heart of nano-optics. To fully characterize the optical interactions with nanostructures quantum electrodynamics (QED) must be invoked, however, the required extremely intense computation and analysis prohibit QED from applications in nano-optics. To avoid the expensive computations and be able to seize the essential quantum effects a semiclassical model is developed. The wellposedness of the model partial differential equations is established. Emphasis is placed on the optical interactions with an individual nanostructure, excitons and biexcitons effects and finite-size effects are investigated. The crucial step of our model is to couple the electromagnetic fields with the motion of the excited particles to yield a new dielectric constant which contains quantum effects of interest. A novel feature of the dielectric constant is the wavevector-dependence which leads to a multi-wave propagation inside the medium. Additional boundary conditions are proposed to deal with this situation. We proceed with incorporating this dielectric constant to Maxwell's equations, and by solving a scattering problem the quantum effects can be captured in the scattered spectra.

  12. Nanostructured conjugated polymers in chemical sensors: synthesis, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Correa, D S; Medeiros, E S; Oliveira, J E; Paterno, L G; Mattoso, Luiz C

    2014-09-01

    Conjugated polymers are organic materials endowed with a π-electron conjugation along the polymer backbone that present appealing electrical and optical properties for technological applications. By using conjugated polymeric materials in the nanoscale, such properties can be further enhanced. In addition, the use of nanostructured materials makes possible miniaturize devices at the micro/nano scale. The applications of conjugated nanostructured polymers include sensors, actuators, flexible displays, discrete electronic devices, and smart fabric, to name a few. In particular, the use of conjugated polymers in chemical and biological sensors is made feasible owning to their sensitivity to the physicochemical conditions of its surrounding environment, such as chemical composition, pH, dielectric constant, humidity or even temperature. Subtle changes in these conditions bring about variations on the electrical (resistivity and capacitance), optical (absorptivity, luminescence, etc.), and mechanical properties of the conjugated polymer, which can be precisely measured by different experimental methods and ultimately associated with a specific analyte and its concentration. The present review article highlights the main features of conjugated polymers that make them suitable for chemical sensors. An especial emphasis is given to nanostructured sensors systems, which present high sensitivity and selectivity, and find application in beverage and food quality control, pharmaceutical industries, medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and homeland security, and other applications as discussed throughout this review. PMID:25924296

  13. Topographically Engineered Large Scale Nanostructures for Plasmonic Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Pradhan, Sangram K.; Santiago, Kevin C.; Rutherford, Gugu N.; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a nanostructured metal thin film can achieve enhanced transmission efficiency and sharp resonances and use a large-scale and high-throughput nanofabrication technique for the plasmonic structures. The fabrication technique combines the features of nanoimprint and soft lithography to topographically construct metal thin films with nanoscale patterns. Metal nanogratings developed using this method show significantly enhanced optical transmission (up to a one-order-of-magnitude enhancement) and sharp resonances with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~15nm in the zero-order transmission using an incoherent white light source. These nanostructures are sensitive to the surrounding environment, and the resonance can shift as the refractive index changes. We derive an analytical method using a spatial Fourier transformation to understand the enhancement phenomenon and the sensing mechanism. The use of real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions in microfluidic cells integrated with these nanostructures is demonstrated to be effective for biosensing. The perpendicular transmission configuration and large-scale structures provide a feasible platform without sophisticated optical instrumentation to realize label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing. PMID:27072067

  14. Hybrid Carbon-Based Nanostructured Platforms for the Advanced Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, I; Mai-Prochnow, A; Yick, S; Bilek, M M M; Kondyurin, A; Han, Z J; Fang, J; Cvelbar, U; Mariotti, D; Ostrikov, K

    2015-12-01

    Mankind faces several global challenges such as chronic and acute hunger, global poverty, energy deficiency and environment conservation. Common biotechnologies based on batch, fluidbed and other similar processes are now extensively used for the production of a wide range of products such as antibiotics, biofuels, cultured and fermented food products. Unfortunately, these processes suffer from low efficiency, high energy demand, low controllability and rapid biocatalyst degradation by microbiological attack, and thus still are not capable of seriously addressing the global hunger and energy deficiency challenges. Moreover, sustainable future technologies require minimizing the environmental impact of toxic by-products by implementing the "life produces organic matter, organic matter sustains life" principle. Nanostructure-based biotechnology is one of the most promising approaches that can help to solve these challenges. In this work we briefly review the unique features of the carbon-based nanostructured platforms, with some attention paid to other nanomaterials. We discuss the main building blocks and processes to design and fabricate novel platforms, with a focus on dense arrays of the vertically-aligned nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes and graphene. Advantages and disadvantages of these systems are considered. PMID:26682454

  15. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Melis Sardan; Cinar, Goksu; Khalily, Mohammad Aref; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-10-01

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies. PMID:27578525

  16. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Melis Sardan; Cinar, Goksu; Khalily, Mohammad Aref; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-10-01

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies.

  17. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents.

    PubMed

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janoš, Pavel; Skoumal, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxides have very important applications in many areas of chemistry, physics and materials science; their properties are dependent on the method of preparation, the morphology and texture. Nanostructured metal oxides can exhibit unique characteristics unlike those of the bulk form depending on their morphology, with a high density of edges, corners and defect surfaces. In recent years, methods have been developed for the preparation of metal oxide powders with tunable control of the primary particle size as well as of a secondary particle size: the size of agglomerates of crystallites. One of the many ways to take advantage of unique properties of nanostructured oxide materials is stoichiometric degradation of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) pollutants on their surfaces.

  18. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Majumdar, Arun; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Yang, Peidong; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.; Feick, Henning; Weber, Eicke R.; Kind, Hannes; Huang, Michael; Yan, Haoquan; Wu, Yiying; Fan, Rong

    2009-08-04

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  19. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Majumdar, Arun; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Yang, Peidong; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.; Feick, Henning; Weber, Eicke R.; Kind, Hannes; Huang, Michael; Yan, Haoquan; Wu, Yiying; Fan, Rong

    2010-11-16

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  20. Accelerated sintering in phase-separating nanostructured alloys

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mansoo; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Sintering of powders is a common means of producing bulk materials when melt casting is impossible or does not achieve a desired microstructure, and has long been pursued for nanocrystalline materials in particular. Acceleration of sintering is desirable to lower processing temperatures and times, and thus to limit undesirable microstructure evolution. Here we show that markedly enhanced sintering is possible in some nanocrystalline alloys. In a nanostructured W–Cr alloy, sintering sets on at a very low temperature that is commensurate with phase separation to form a Cr-rich phase with a nanoscale arrangement that supports rapid diffusional transport. The method permits bulk full density specimens with nanoscale grains, produced during a sintering cycle involving no applied stress. We further show that such accelerated sintering can be evoked by design in other nanocrystalline alloys, opening the door to a variety of nanostructured bulk materials processed in arbitrary shapes from powder inputs. PMID:25901420

  1. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  2. Synthesis of nanostructured polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surwade, Sumedh P.

    The organization of my thesis is as follows: (a) Chapter III describes the synthesis of bulk quantities of polyaniline nanofibers in one step using a simple and versatile high ionic strength aqueous system (HCl/NaCl) that permits the use of pure H2O2 as a mild oxidant without any added metal or enzyme catalyst. Polyaniline nanofibers obtained are highly conducting, sigma˜1--5 S/cm, and spectroscopically similar to conventional polyaniline synthesized using stronger oxidants. The synthesis method is further extended to the synthesis of oligoanilines of controlled molecular weight, e.g., aniline tetramer, octamer, and hexadecamer. Microns long tetramer nanofibers are synthesized using this method. (b) Chapter IV describes the mechanism of nanofiber formation in polyaniline. It is proposed that the surfaces such as the walls of the reaction vessel and/or intentionally added surfaces play a dramatic role in the evolution of nanofibrillar morphology. Nucleation sites on surfaces promote the accumulation of aniline dimer that reacts further to yield aniline tetramer, which (surprisingly) is entirely in form of nanofibers and whose morphology is transcribed to the bulk by a double heterogeneous nucleation mechanism. This unexpected phenomenon could form the basis of nanofiber formation in all classes of precipitation polymerization systems. (c) Chapter V is the mechanistic study on the formation of oligoanilines during the chemical oxidation of aniline in weakly acidic, neutral or basic media using peroxydisulfate oxidant. It is proposed that the reaction proceeds via the intermediacy of benzoquinone monoimine that is formed as a result of a Boyland-Sims rearrangement of aniline. The initial role of peroxydisulfate is to provide a pathway for the formation of benzoquinone monoimine intermediate that is followed by a conjugate Michael-type addition reaction with aniline or sulfated anilines. The products isolated in pH 2.5--10.0 buffers are intermediate species at various

  3. Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-28

      Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction This routine demonstrates extraction of the ... in a CALIPSO Lidar Level 2 Vertical Feature Mask feature classification flag value. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) ...

  4. The importance of the energetic species in pulsed laser deposition for nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Castelo, A; Afonso, C N; Pesce, E; Piscopiello, E

    2012-03-16

    This work reports on the optical and structural properties of nanostructured films formed by Ag nano-objects embedded in amorphous aluminium oxide (a-Al(2)O(3)) prepared by alternate pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The aim is to understand the importance of the energetic species involved in the PLD process for nanostructuring, i.e. for organizing nanoparticles (NPs) in layers or for self-assembling them into nanocolumns (NCls), all oriented perpendicular to the substrate. In order to change the kinetic energy of the species arriving at the substrate, we use a background gas during the deposition of the embedding a-Al(2)O(3) host. It was produced either in vacuum or in a gas pressure (helium and argon) while the metal NPs were always produced in vacuum. The formation of NPs or NCls is easily identified through the features of the surface plasmon resonances (SPR) in the extinction spectra and confirmed by electron microscopy. The results show that both the layer organization and self-assembling of the metal are prevented when the host is produced in a gas pressure. This result is discussed in terms of the deceleration of species arriving at the substrate in gas that reduces the metal sputtering by host species (by ≈58%) as well as the density of the host material (by ≥19%). These reductions promote the formation of large voids along which the metal easily diffuses, thus preventing organization and self-organisation, as well as an enhancement of the amount of metal that is deposited.

  5. Control and understanding of the formation of micro/nanostructured metal surfaces using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhlke, Craig A.

    An application of femtosecond lasers that has developed, in recent years, is the functionalization of surfaces. With femtosecond laser ablation micro and nano-scale features can be created in a single step without affecting the bulk material. In this dissertation micro/nanostructuring of metal surfaces, specifically nickel and SS316, was carried out using femtosecond laser pulses. By varying the fluence (between 0.01 and 3.18 J/cm2), and pulse count (between 1 and 20,000 pulses) incident on the metal surface, a number of surface morphologies were produced. It was demonstrated that a number of these morphologies can be separated in regions based on fluence and shot number. The effects of other parameters were studied in less detail, including: polarization, stationary versus rastering pulses, atmosphere during processing (processing in nitrogen and oxygen), and lens aberrations. Two morphologies from femtosecond laser ablation of metals are demonstrated for the first time: spike shaped microstructures that have peaks above the original surface, and pyramid shaped structures (with a much lower aspect ratio than commonly published morphologies) covered in thick layers of nanoparticles. Similarities and differences are shown between the commonly published relief structures, with a blunt, round top (mounds) and the protruding spikes. This work shows that the morphologies are formed through a balance between fluid flow, nanoparticle/material redeposition and preferential etching. It can be observed by watching the development of individual microstructures with increasing pulse count, what role each of these processes plays in their development. Mounds, spikes, and pyramids each have a different balance of these processes, leading to the uniqueness of each morphology. As an application of these processes, studies were completed to utilize the high surface areas of these micro/nanostructures to produce ultracapacitor electrodes. This proved to be challenging, due to the

  6. Nanostructures: a platform for brain repair and augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Vidu, Ruxandra; Rahman, Masoud; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Enachescu, Marius; Poteca, Teodor D.; Opris, Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale structures have been at the core of research efforts dealing with integration of nanotechnology into novel electronic devices for the last decade. Because the size of nanomaterials is of the same order of magnitude as biomolecules, these materials are valuable tools for nanoscale manipulation in a broad range of neurobiological systems. For instance, the unique electrical and optical properties of nanowires, nanotubes, and nanocables with vertical orientation, assembled in nanoscale arrays, have been used in many device applications such as sensors that hold the potential to augment brain functions. However, the challenge in creating nanowires/nanotubes or nanocables array-based sensors lies in making individual electrical connections fitting both the features of the brain and of the nanostructures. This review discusses two of the most important applications of nanostructures in neuroscience. First, the current approaches to create nanowires and nanocable structures are reviewed to critically evaluate their potential for developing unique nanostructure based sensors to improve recording and device performance to reduce noise and the detrimental effect of the interface on the tissue. Second, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological and medical applications will be considered from the brain augmentation perspective. Novel applications for diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis, meningitis, stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and autism will be considered. Because the blood brain barrier (BBB) has a defensive mechanism in preventing nanomaterials arrival to the brain, various strategies to help them to pass through the BBB will be discussed. Finally, the implementation of nanomaterials in neurobiological applications is addressed from the brain repair/augmentation perspective. These nanostructures at the interface between nanotechnology and neuroscience will play a pivotal role not only in

  7. Synthesis of branched metal nanostructures with controlled architecture and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Nancy

    On account of their small size, metal nanoparticles are proven to be outstanding catalysts for numerous chemical transformations and represent promising platforms for applications in the fields of electronics, chemical sensing, medicine, and beyond. Many properties of metal nanoparticles are size-dependent and can be further manipulated through their shape and architecture (e.g., spherical vs. branched). Achieving morphology control of nanoparticles through solution-based techniques has proven challenging due to limited knowledge of morphology development in nanosyntheses. To overcome these complications, a systematic examination of the local ligand environment of metal precursors on nanostructure formation was undertaken to evaluate its contribution to nanoparticle nucleation rate and subsequent growth processes. Specifically, this thesis will provide evidence from ex situ studies---Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis)---that support the hypothesis that strongly coordinated ligands delay burst-like nucleation to generate spherical metal nanoparticles and ligands with intermediate binding affinity regulate the gradual reduction of metal precursors to promote aggregated assembly of nanodendrites. These ex situ studies were coupled with a new in situ perspective, providing detailed understanding of metal precursor transformation, its direct relation to nanoparticle morphology development, and the ligand influence towards the formation of structurally complex metal nanostructures, using in situ synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Ultra Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS). The principles extracted from the study of monometallic nanostructure formation were also found to be generally applicable to the synthesis of bimetallic nanostructures, e.g., Pd-Pt architectures, with either core-shell or alloyed structures that were readily achieved by ligand selection. These outcomes provide a direct connection between fundamental

  8. Nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianluo; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Mei, Yueni; Huang, Yunhui

    2015-04-21

    The development of advanced energy storage devices is at the forefront of research geared towards a sustainable future. Nanostructured materials are advantageous in offering huge surface to volume ratios, favorable transport features, and attractive physicochemical properties. They have been extensively explored in various fields of energy storage and conversion. This review is focused largely on the recent progress in nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials including molybdenum oxides (MoO(x), 2 ≤ x ≤ 3), dichalconides (MoX2, X = S, Se), and oxysalts for rechargeable lithium/sodium-ion batteries, Mg batteries, and supercapacitors. Mo-based compounds including MoO2, MoO3, MoO(3-y) (0 < y < 1), MMo(x)O(y) (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Ca, Mn, Zn, Mg, or Cd; x = 1, y = 4; x = 3, y = 8), MoS2, MoSe2, (MoO2)2P2O7, LiMoO2, Li2MoO3, etc. possess multiple valence states and exhibit rich chemistry. They are very attractive candidates for efficient electrochemical energy storage systems because of their unique physicochemical properties, such as conductivity, mechanical and thermal stability, and cyclability. In this review, we aim to provide a systematic summary of the synthesis, modification, and electrochemical performance of nanostructured Mo-based compounds, as well as their energy storage applications in lithium/sodium-ion batteries, Mg batteries, and pseudocapacitors. The relationship between nanoarchitectures and electrochemical performances as well as the related charge-storage mechanism is discussed. Moreover, remarks on the challenges and perspectives of Mo-containing compounds for further development in electrochemical energy storage applications are proposed. This review sheds light on the sustainable development of advanced rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors with nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials.

  9. Growth of hybrid carbon nanostructures on iron-decorated ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbuyisa, Puleng N.; Rigoni, Federica; Sangaletti, Luigi; Ponzoni, Stefano; Pagliara, Stefania; Goldoni, Andrea; Ndwandwe, Muzi; Cepek, Cinzia

    2016-04-01

    A novel carbon-based nanostructured material, which includes carbon nanotubes (CNTs), porous carbon, nanostructured ZnO and Fe nanoparticles, has been synthetized using catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of acetylene on vertically aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs). The deposition of Fe before the CVD process induces the presence of dense CNTs in addition to the variety of nanostructures already observed on the process done on the bare NRs, which range from amorphous graphitic carbon up to nanostructured dendritic carbon films, where the NRs are partially or completely etched. The combination of scanning electron microscopy and in situ photoemission spectroscopy indicate that Fe enhances the ZnO etching, and that the CNT synthesis is favoured by the reduced Fe mobility due to the strong interaction between Fe and the NRs, and to the presence of many defects, formed during the CVD process. Our results demonstrate that the resulting new hybrid shows a higher sensitivity to ammonia gas at ambient conditions (∼60 ppb) than the carbon nanostructures obtained without the aid of Fe, the bare ZnO NRs, or other one-dimensional carbon nanostructures, making this system of potential interest for environmental ammonia monitoring. Finally, in view of the possible application in nanoscale optoelectronics, the photoexcited carrier behaviour in these hybrid systems has been characterized by time-resolved reflectivity measurements.

  10. Controlled synthesis of snowflake-like self-assemblies palladium nanostructures under microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ting; Ma, Yue; Yang, Hanmin Li, Jinlin

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated the synthesis of snowflake-like palladium nanostructures for the first time. • We discussed the influencing factors on the synthesis of snowflake-like Pd nanostructures. • The molar ratio of H{sub 2}Pd{sub 4} to PVP at 5 is the optimal selection. • The growth process was discussed. - Abstract: Self-assembly snowflake-like palladium nanostructures were synthesized under microwave irradiation using H{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} as precursor, benzyl alcohol as both solvent and reducing agent, and PVP as stabilizer. The Pd snowflake-like nanostructures were formed and then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction. The TEM images showed that the Pd nano-snowflakes were self-assemblies organized by hundreds of small spherical nanoparticles. Pd snowflake-like nanostructures with well-defined shape and uniform size can be obtained by tuning the concentration of palladium precursor, the molar ratio of H{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4}/PVP, as well as the heating time by microwave irradiation. The possible growing process of the snowflake-like Pd structures was also proposed on the basis of investigating the properties of as-synthesized Pd nanostructures under different conditions.

  11. Floating AC-DEP (dielectrophoretic) manipulations of fluorescent nanoparticle at metal nanostructure for plasmonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Shin, H. J.; Hwang, K. S.; Park, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    We propose the fluorescent nanoparticle manipulations at nano-metal structures with floating AC-DEP force for plasmonic applications. The electrode gap was optimized to induce enough DEP force around the nano-structure for manipulation of the nanoparticles. 10um wide gap of electrode was acquired to apply the floating AC-DEP force at various designed metal nano-structure such as nanowire, y-branch and vortex. The all shape of nano-metal structures are formed at the gap of microelectrode and not connected with microelectrode. The gold nano-structures in the gap of microelectrode were fabricated with e-beam lithography and lift-off process. Before the formation of metal nanostructure, micro electrodes for applying the electric field around the metal nano-structures were fabricated with photolithography and lift-off process. Cadmium selenide (CdSe/ZnS) QDs (0.8 nM, emission wavelength of 605 nm) with a 25 nm zinc sulfide capping layer and 100nm polystyrene nano bead (1 nM, emission wavelength of 610nm) were used as fluorescent nanoparticles. We applied the 8 Vpp, 3 MHz sine wave for the positive DEP force, and it resulted in 108 V/m electric field and 1011 V/m electric field gradient around gold nanowire with floating AC. The fluorescent nanoparticle's attachment at the nanowire is confirmed by the fluorescent optical analysis. The fluorescent nanoparticles are located successfully at designed metal nano-structures for plasmonic applications.

  12. Growth of hybrid carbon nanostructures on iron-decorated ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Mbuyisa, Puleng N; Rigoni, Federica; Sangaletti, Luigi; Ponzoni, Stefano; Pagliara, Stefania; Goldoni, Andrea; Ndwandwe, Muzi; Cepek, Cinzia

    2016-04-01

    A novel carbon-based nanostructured material, which includes carbon nanotubes (CNTs), porous carbon, nanostructured ZnO and Fe nanoparticles, has been synthetized using catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of acetylene on vertically aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs). The deposition of Fe before the CVD process induces the presence of dense CNTs in addition to the variety of nanostructures already observed on the process done on the bare NRs, which range from amorphous graphitic carbon up to nanostructured dendritic carbon films, where the NRs are partially or completely etched. The combination of scanning electron microscopy and in situ photoemission spectroscopy indicate that Fe enhances the ZnO etching, and that the CNT synthesis is favoured by the reduced Fe mobility due to the strong interaction between Fe and the NRs, and to the presence of many defects, formed during the CVD process. Our results demonstrate that the resulting new hybrid shows a higher sensitivity to ammonia gas at ambient conditions (∼60 ppb) than the carbon nanostructures obtained without the aid of Fe, the bare ZnO NRs, or other one-dimensional carbon nanostructures, making this system of potential interest for environmental ammonia monitoring. Finally, in view of the possible application in nanoscale optoelectronics, the photoexcited carrier behaviour in these hybrid systems has been characterized by time-resolved reflectivity measurements. PMID:26916977

  13. Cryovolcanic Features on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Kirk, R. L.; Mitchell, K. L.; LeGall, A.; Barnes, J. W.; Hayes, A.; Kargel, J.; Radebaugh, J.; Janssen, M. A.; Neish, C. D.; Wood, C.; Wall, S. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Malaska, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We present evidence to support the cryovolcanic origin of some features, which includes the deepest pit known on Titan (Sotra Patera) and some of the highest mountains (Doom and Erebor Montes). We interpret this region to be a cryovolcanic complex of multiple cones, craters, and flows. Elsewhere, a circular feature, approximately 100 km across, is morphologically similar to a laccolith, showing a cross pattern interpreted to be extensional fractures. However, we find that some other previously supposed cryovolcanic features were likely formed by other processes. We discuss implications for eruption style and composition of cryovolcanism on Titan. Our analysis shows the great value of combining data sets when interpreting Titan's geology and in particular stresses the value of topographic data.

  14. Bond topography and nanostructure of hydrogenated fullerene-like carbon films: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Kaixiong; Shi, Jing; Zhang, Junyan

    2016-09-01

    Fullerene-like nanostructural hydrogenated amorphous carbon (FL-C:H) films were prepared by dc- and pulse- plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (PECVD). Both the films exhibit relatively stresses (0.63 GPa) in spite of their FL features and nanostructural bonding configurations, especially the pentagonal carbon rings. The creation of pentagonal rings is not fully driven by thermodynamics, but is closely related to compressive stress determined by the ion bombardment at the discharged state of the pulse- and dc- discharged plasmas methods. The dc method leads to FL's basal planes which contain less cross-linkages, and causes amorphous strongly hydrogenated structures.

  15. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOEpatents

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  16. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lao, Jing Yu; Banerjee, Debasish

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  17. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  18. Ion irradiation induced element-enriched and depleted nanostructures in Zr-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H. C.; Liu, R. D.; Yan, L. E-mail: zhouxingtai@sinap.ac.cn; Zhou, X. T. E-mail: zhouxingtai@sinap.ac.cn; Cao, G. Q.; Wang, G.

    2015-07-21

    The microstructural evolution of a Zr-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glass induced by irradiation with Ar ions was investigated. Under ion irradiation, the Cu- and Ni-enriched nanostructures (diameter of 30–50 nm) consisted of crystalline and amorphous structures were formed. Further, Cu- and Ni-depleted nanostructures with diameters of 5–20 nm were also observed. The formation of these nanostructures can be ascribed to the migration of Cu and Ni atoms in the irradiated metallic glass.

  19. Optical nanostructures in 2D for wide-diameter and broadband beam collimation

    PubMed Central

    Clark, James; Anguita, José V.; Chen, Ying; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating curved refracting lensing components used in conventional projection, imaging and sensing optical assemblies, is critical to enable compactness and miniaturisation of optical devices. A suitable means is replacing refracting lenses with two-dimensional optical media in flat-slab form, to achieve an equivalent optical result. One approach, which has been the focus of intense research, uses a Veselago lens which features a negative-index metamaterial. However, practical implementations rely on resonance techniques, thus broadband operation at optical frequencies imposes significant technical challenges that have been difficult to overcome. Here, we demonstrate a highly-collimated, broadband, wide-diameter beam from a compact source in flat-slab form, based on light collimation using nanomaterials ordered in patterns and embedded into flexible polymers. These provide a highly anisotropic absorption coefficient due to patterns created by vertical carbon nanotube structures grown on glass, and the anisotropic electrical conductivity of the nanotubes. We show this nanostructure strongly absorbs unwanted off-axis light rays, whilst transmitting the desired on-axis rays, to achieve the required optical effect over broadband, from visible to short-infrared, thus circumventing some technical limitations of negative-index metamaterials. We further show a low substrate-temperature system for nanotube growth, allowing direct implementation into heat-sensitive large-area devices. PMID:26732851

  20. Optical nanostructures in 2D for wide-diameter and broadband beam collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James; Anguita, José V.; Chen, Ying; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating curved refracting lensing components used in conventional projection, imaging and sensing optical assemblies, is critical to enable compactness and miniaturisation of optical devices. A suitable means is replacing refracting lenses with two-dimensional optical media in flat-slab form, to achieve an equivalent optical result. One approach, which has been the focus of intense research, uses a Veselago lens which features a negative-index metamaterial. However, practical implementations rely on resonance techniques, thus broadband operation at optical frequencies imposes significant technical challenges that have been difficult to overcome. Here, we demonstrate a highly-collimated, broadband, wide-diameter beam from a compact source in flat-slab form, based on light collimation using nanomaterials ordered in patterns and embedded into flexible polymers. These provide a highly anisotropic absorption coefficient due to patterns created by vertical carbon nanotube structures grown on glass, and the anisotropic electrical conductivity of the nanotubes. We show this nanostructure strongly absorbs unwanted off-axis light rays, whilst transmitting the desired on-axis rays, to achieve the required optical effect over broadband, from visible to short-infrared, thus circumventing some technical limitations of negative-index metamaterials. We further show a low substrate-temperature system for nanotube growth, allowing direct implementation into heat-sensitive large-area devices.

  1. Nanostructures, systems, and methods for photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Steven Y.; Jarvi, Thomas D.

    2015-12-08

    The present invention generally relates to nanostructures and compositions comprising nanostructures, methods of making and using the nanostructures, and related systems. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises a first region and a second region, wherein a first photocatalytic reaction (e.g., an oxidation reaction) can be carried out at the first region and a second photocatalytic reaction (e.g., a reduction reaction) can be carried out at the second region. In some cases, the first photocatalytic reaction is the formation of oxygen gas from water and the second photocatalytic reaction is the formation of hydrogen gas from water. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises at least one semiconductor material, and, in some cases, at least one catalytic material and/or at least one photosensitizing agent.

  2. Microwave properties of ferromagnetic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, R; Alvarez, G; Mata-Zamora, M E

    2008-06-01

    A review of the dynamic properties of nanostructured ferromagnetic materials at microwave frequencies (1-40 GHz) is presented. Since some confusion has recently appeared between giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), a detailed analysis is made in order to establish their differences. A brief review of a novel microwave absorption mode, the low-field microwave absorption (LFA) is then presented, together with a discussion about its similarities with GMI. Recent results on high-frequency measurements on nanogranular thin films and FMR in nanowire arrays are finally addressed.

  3. Preparation and electrochemical characterization of NiO nanostructure-carbon nanowall composites grown on carbon cloth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Chang, Hsin-Yueh; Su, Wei-Jhih; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Shih, Wen-Ching

    2012-09-01

    This study provided a simple method to form NiO nanostructures onto the carbon nanowalls (CNWs) surface to enhance the performance of electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) characteristics. The CNWs were synthesized on carbon cloth by rf magnetron sputtering without any catalyst. Ni film was then deposited on the synthesized CNWs by e-beam evaporator. Subsequently, the vacuum annealing process and oxygen plasma treatment were used to form the NiO nanostructures. The crystallize structures of NiO nanostructures and CNWs were examined by Raman scattering spectroscopy. To realize the electrochemical properties of NiO/CNWs/carbon cloth composite, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests were investigated. Due to the relatively larger surface area of CNWs and the quickly reversible redox reaction and pseudo-capacitive properties of NiO nanostructures, the measured results demonstrated that the NiO/CNWs/carbon cloth is a suitable electrode material for EDLC applications.

  4. Organometallic Nanostructures of 1,4-DIBROMO-2,5-DIIODOBENZENE by Metal Ions Construction on Hopg Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Zhongping; Leng, Xinli; Lu, Yan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Different organometallic nanostructures on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been synthesized by different metal ions coordinating with 1,4-Dibromo-2,5-diiodobenzene (C6H2Br2I2). Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images directly demonstrated the transformation of the nanostructure from self-assembled nanostructures formed by C6H2Br2I2 through halogen bond into organometallic network, formed by the dehalogenated C6H2Br2I2 molecules covalent bonded with metal ions. Moreover, by varying the concentrations of C6H2Br2I2 molecules or valence states of metal ions, organometallic structures with different shapes and sizes have been fabricated, which illustrates that the concentrations and valence states of the metal ions play important roles in the organometallic nanostructures.

  5. Self-catalyzed carbon plasma-assisted growth of tin-doped indium oxide nanostructures by the sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setti, Grazielle O.; de Jesus, Dosil P.; Joanni, Ednan

    2016-10-01

    In this work a new strategy for growth of nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) by RF sputtering is presented. ITO is deposited in the presence of a carbon plasma which reacts with the free oxygen atoms during the deposition, forming species like CO x . These species are removed from the chamber by the pumping system, and one-dimensional ITO nanostructures are formed without the need for a seed layer. Different values of substrate temperature and power applied to the gun containing the carbon target were investigated, resulting in different nanostructure morphologies. The samples containing a higher density of nanowires were covered with gold and evaluated as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for detection of dye solutions. The concept might be applied to other oxides, providing a simple method for unidimensional nanostructural synthesis.

  6. Direct fabrication of complex 3D hierarchical nanostructures by reactive ion etching of hollow sphere colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kuo; Li, Jiaqi; Van Cleuvenbergen, Stijn; Clays, Koen

    2016-09-21

    Direct reactive ion etching (RIE) of hollow SiO2 sphere colloidal crystals (HSCCs) is employed as a facile, low-cost method to fabricate complex three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical nanostructures. These multilayered structures are gradually transformed into nanostructures of increasing complexity by controlling the etching time, without complicated procedures (no mask needed). The resulting 3D topologies are unique, and cannot be obtained through traditional approaches. The formation mechanism of these structures is explained in detail by geometrical modeling during the different etching stages, through shadow effects of the higher layers. SEM images confirm the modeled morphological changes. The nanostructures obtained by our approach show very fine features as small as ∼30 nm. Our approach opens new avenues to directly obtain complex 3D nanostructures from colloidal crystals and can find applications in sensing, templating, and catalysis where fine tuning the specific surface might be critical. PMID:27545098

  7. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  8. Nanostructured fuzz growth on tungsten under low-energy and high-flux He irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, Lu; Fan, Hongyu; Ni, Weiyuan; Liu, Dongping; Liu, C S; Benstetter, Günther; Wang, Younian

    2015-01-01

    We report the formation of wave-like structures and nanostructured fuzzes in the polycrystalline tungsten (W) irradiated with high-flux and low-energy helium (He) ions. From conductive atomic force microscope measurements, we have simultaneously obtained the surface topography and current emission images of the irradiated W materials. Our measurements show that He-enriched and nanostructured strips are formed in W crystal grains when they are exposed to low-energy and high-flux He ions at a temperature of 1400 K. The experimental measurements are confirmed by theoretical calculations, where He atoms in W crystal grains are found to cluster in a close-packed arrangement between {101} planes and form He-enriched strips. The formations of wave-like structures and nanostructured fuzzes on the W surface can be attributed to the surface sputtering and swelling of He-enriched strips, respectively.

  9. Template electropolymerization of polypyrrole nanostructures on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite step and pit defects

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, J.D.; Nicholson, M.A.; Myrick, M.L.; Van Patten, P.G.; Chung, C.W.

    1998-10-01

    Polypyrrole nanostructures with diameters {le}10 nm have been electropolymerized using step and pit defects on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) as templates for electropolymerization. Step defects were naturally occurring, and pits were formed via oxidation of freshly cleaved surfaces of an HOPG water by heating at {approximately}640 C. Underpotential deposition of {approximately}80 mV caused polypyrrole to form only on the step and pit edges of HOPG at and not on the basal plane. The size of these nanostructures could be controlled by limiting the pyrrole polymerization time at anodic potentials. Recent modeling results allow the morphology of the deposition to be inferred, and the authors find the electrochemical data consistent with wire-shaped growth for up to 30 s at constant potential, after which the growth changes morphology. Scanning tunneling microscopy data confirm this result. Preliminary studies show that these polypyrrole nanostructures can be removed by sonication.

  10. Nanostructured fuzz growth on tungsten under low-energy and high-flux He irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, Lu; Fan, Hongyu; Ni, Weiyuan; Liu, Dongping; Liu, C. S.; Benstetter, Günther; Wang, Younian

    2015-01-01

    We report the formation of wave-like structures and nanostructured fuzzes in the polycrystalline tungsten (W) irradiated with high-flux and low-energy helium (He) ions. From conductive atomic force microscope measurements, we have simultaneously obtained the surface topography and current emission images of the irradiated W materials. Our measurements show that He-enriched and nanostructured strips are formed in W crystal grains when they are exposed to low-energy and high-flux He ions at a temperature of 1400 K. The experimental measurements are confirmed by theoretical calculations, where He atoms in W crystal grains are found to cluster in a close-packed arrangement between {101} planes and form He-enriched strips. The formations of wave-like structures and nanostructured fuzzes on the W surface can be attributed to the surface sputtering and swelling of He-enriched strips, respectively. PMID:26077598

  11. An SCFT Study of Nanostructuring in Epoxy Thermosets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyerokun, Folusho; Fredrickson, Glenn; Leibler, Ludwik

    2007-03-01

    Increasing fracture resistance of epoxy thermosets via self assembly of block copolymers has generated significant interest in the past decade. Nanostructuring occurs because of the selectivity of the epoxy precursors to the different blocks of the block copolymer, i.e. one block is miscible (before curing), while the other block remains immiscible. The size and geometry of the nanostructures formed depends on the copolymer composition, solvent concentration and selectivity. Understanding the conditions at which nanostructuring occurs is important for rational design of high impact thermoset materials. A self-consistent field based study of blends of polystyrene-b-polybutadiene-b-polymethylmethacrylate (SBM) triblock and the reactive solvent DGEBA has been performed. At low copolymer concentration, the theory predicts micelles of PS and PB in the PMMA/DGEBA matrix. Increasing the copolymer concentration above a threshold value leads to formation of core-shell cylindrical or ``sphere-on-sphere'' morphologies, depending on the length of PB midblock. The theoretical predictions are in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  12. Plasma-etched nanostructures for optical applications (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Ulrike; Rickelt, Friedrich; Munzert, Peter; Kaiser, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    A basic requirement for many optical applications is the reduction of Fresnel-reflections. Besides of interference coatings, nanostructures with sub-wavelength size as known from the eye of the night-flying moth can provide antireflective (AR) properties. The basic principle is to mix a material with air on a sub-wavelength scale to decrease the effective refractive index. To realize AR nanostructures on polymers, the self-organized formation of stochastically arranged antireflective structures using a low-pressure plasma etching process was studied. An advanced procedure involves the use of additional deposition of a thin oxide layer prior etching. A broad range of different structure morphologies exhibiting antireflective properties can be generated on almost all types of polymeric materials. For applications on glass, organic films are used as a transfer medium. Organic layers as thin film materials were evaluated to identify compounds suitable for forming nanostructures by plasma etching. The vapor deposition and etching of organic layers on glass offers a new possibility to achieve antireflective properties in a broad spectral range and for a wide range of light incidence.

  13. Capacitive coupling in hybrid graphene/GaAs nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Simonet, Pauline Rössler, Clemens; Krähenmann, Tobias; Varlet, Anastasia; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Reichl, Christian; Wegscheider, Werner

    2015-07-13

    Coupled hybrid nanostructures are demonstrated using the combination of lithographically patterned graphene on top of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) buried in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The graphene forms Schottky barriers at the surface of the heterostructure and therefore allows tuning the electronic density of the 2DEG. Conversely, the 2DEG potential can tune the graphene Fermi energy. Graphene-defined quantum point contacts in the 2DEG show half-plateaus of quantized conductance in finite bias spectroscopy and display the 0.7 anomaly for a large range of densities in the constriction, testifying to their good electronic properties. Finally, we demonstrate that the GaAs nanostructure can detect charges in the vicinity of the heterostructure's surface. This confirms the strong coupling of the hybrid device: localized states in the graphene ribbon could, in principle, be probed by the underlying confined channel. The present hybrid graphene/GaAs nanostructures are promising for the investigation of strong interactions and coherent coupling between the two fundamentally different materials.

  14. A new nanostructured Silicon biosensor for diagnostics of bovine leucosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchenko, A. I.; Melnichenko, M. M.; Starodub, N. F.; Shmyryeva, O. M.

    2010-08-01

    In this report we propose a new instrumental method for the biochemical diagnostics of the bovine leucosis through the registration of the formation of the specific immune complex (antigen-antibody) with the help of biosensor based on the nano-structured silicon. The principle of the measurements is based on the determination of the photosensitivity of the surface. In spite of the existed traditional methods of the biochemical diagnostics of the bovine leucosis the proposed approach may provide the express control of the milk quality as direct on the farm and during the process raw materials. The proposed variant of the biosensor based on the nano-structured silicon may be applied for the determination of the concentration of different substances which may form the specific complex in the result of the bioaffine reactions. A new immune technique based on the nanostructured silicon and intended for the quantitative determination of some toxic substances is offered. The sensitivity of such biosensor allows determining T-2 mycotoxin at the concentration of 10 ng/ml during several minutes.

  15. Hyperbranched quasi-1D TiO2 nanostructure for hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ghadirzadeh, Ali; Passoni, Luca; Grancini, Giulia; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Li Bassi, Andrea; Petrozza, Annamaria; Di Fonzo, Fabio

    2015-04-15

    The performance of hybrid solar cells is strongly affected by the device morphology. In this work, we demonstrate a poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)/TiO2 hybrid solar cell where the TiO2 photoanode comprises an array of tree-like hyperbranched quasi-1D nanostructures self-assembled from the gas phase. This advanced architecture enables us to increase the power conversion efficiency to over 1%, doubling the efficiency with respect to state of the art devices employing standard mesoporous titania photoanodes. This improvement is attributed to several peculiar features of this array of nanostructures: high interfacial area; increased optical density thanks to the enhanced light scattering; and enhanced crystallization of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) inside the quasi-1D nanostructure. PMID:25822757

  16. Controlled Growth of Ordered III-Nitride Core-Shell Nanostructure Arrays for Visible Optoelectronic Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin K.; Mishkat Ul Masabih, Saadat; Fairchild, Michael N.; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Shima, Darryl M.; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R.J.; Feezell, Daniel F.

    2014-10-21

    In our paper, we demonstrate the growth of ordered arrays of nonpolar {101 ¯ 0} core–shell nanowalls and semipolar {101 ¯ 1} core–shell pyramidal nanostripes on c-plane (0001) sapphire substrates using selective-area epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure arrays are controllably patterned into LED mesa regions, demonstrating a technique to impart secondary lithography features into the arrays. Moreover, we study the dependence of the nanostructure cores on the epitaxial growth conditions and show that the geometry and morphology are strongly influenced by growth temperature, V/III ratio, and pulse interruption time. We also demonstrate the growth of InGaNmore » quantum well shells on the nanostructures and characterize the structures by using micro-photoluminescence and cross-section scanning tunneling electron microscopy.« less

  17. Controlled Growth of Ordered III-Nitride Core-Shell Nanostructure Arrays for Visible Optoelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin K.; Mishkat Ul Masabih, Saadat; Fairchild, Michael N.; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Shima, Darryl M.; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R.J.; Feezell, Daniel F.

    2014-10-21

    In our paper, we demonstrate the growth of ordered arrays of nonpolar {101 ¯ 0} core–shell nanowalls and semipolar {101 ¯ 1} core–shell pyramidal nanostripes on c-plane (0001) sapphire substrates using selective-area epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure arrays are controllably patterned into LED mesa regions, demonstrating a technique to impart secondary lithography features into the arrays. Moreover, we study the dependence of the nanostructure cores on the epitaxial growth conditions and show that the geometry and morphology are strongly influenced by growth temperature, V/III ratio, and pulse interruption time. We also demonstrate the growth of InGaN quantum well shells on the nanostructures and characterize the structures by using micro-photoluminescence and cross-section scanning tunneling electron microscopy.

  18. Picosecond Lifetimes with High Quantum Yields from Single-Photon-Emitting Colloidal Nanostructures at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Devilez, Alexis; Maillard, Vincent; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bonod, Nicolas; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-04-26

    Minimizing the luminescence lifetime while maintaining a high emission quantum yield is paramount in optimizing the excitation cross-section, radiative decay rate, and brightness of quantum solid-state light sources, particularly at room temperature, where nonradiative processes can dominate. We demonstrate here that DNA-templated 60 and 80 nm diameter gold nanoparticle dimers, featuring one fluorescent molecule, provide single-photon emission with lifetimes that can fall below 10 ps and typical quantum yields in a 45-70% range. Since these colloidal nanostructures are obtained as a purified aqueous suspension, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed on both fixed and freely diffusing nanostructures to quantitatively estimate the distributions of decay rate and fluorescence intensity enhancements. These data are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and demonstrate that millions of bright fluorescent nanostructures, with radiative lifetimes below 100 ps, can be produced in parallel. PMID:26972678

  19. Relation between 2D/3D chirality and the appearance of chiroptical effects in real nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Nichols, Shane; Maoz, Ben M; Canillas, Adolf; Bosch, Salvador; Markovich, Gil; Kahr, Bart

    2016-02-01

    The optical activity of fabricated metallic nanostructures is investigated by complete polarimetry. While lattices decorated with nanoscale gammadia etched in thin metallic films have been described as two dimensional, planar nanostructures, they are better described as quasi-planar structures with some three dimensional character. We find that the optical activity of these structures arises not only from the dissymmetric backing by a substrate but, more importantly, from the selective rounding of the nanostructure edges. A true chiroptical response in the far-field is only allowed when the gammadia contain these non-planar features. This is demonstrated by polarimetric measurements in conjunction with electrodynamical simulations based on the discrete dipole approximation that consider non-ideal gammadia. It is also shown that subtle planar dissymmetries in gammadia are sufficient to generate asymmetric transmission of circular polarized light.

  20. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  1. Microstructural characterization of Charpy-impact-tested nanostructured bainite

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.T.; Chang, H.T.; Huang, B.M.; Huang, C.Y.; Yang, J.R.

    2015-09-15

    In this work, a possible cause of the extraordinary low impact toughness of nanostructured bainite has been investigated. The microstructure of nanostructured bainite consisted chiefly of carbide-free bainitic ferrite with retained austenite films. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) measurement indicated that no retained austenite existed in the fractured surface of the Charpy-impact-tested specimens. Fractographs showed that cracks propagated mainly along bainitic ferrite platelet boundaries. The change in microstructure after impact loading was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, confirming that retained austenite was completely transformed to strain-induced martensite during the Charpy impact test. However, the zone affected by strained-induced martensite was found to be extremely shallow, only to a depth of several micrometers from the fracture surface. It is appropriately concluded that upon impact, as the crack forms and propagates, strain-induced martensitic transformation immediately occurs ahead of the advancing crack tip. The successive martensitic transformation profoundly facilitates the crack propagation, resulting in the extremely low impact toughness of nanostructured bainite. Retained austenite, in contrast to its well-known beneficial role, has a deteriorating effect on toughness during the course of Charpy impact. - Highlights: • The microstructure of nanostructured bainite consisted of nano-sized bainitic ferrite subunits with retained austenite films. • Special sample preparations for SEM, XRD and TEM were made, and the strain-affected structures have been explored. • Retained austenite films were found to transform into martensite after impact loading, as evidenced by XRD and TEM results. • The zone of strain-induced martensite was found to extend to only several micrometers from the fracture surface. • The poor Charpy impact toughness is associated with the fracture of martensite at a high strain rate during

  2. Metal oxide nanostructures and their gas sensing properties: a review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bo; Meng, Fan-Li; Liu, Jin-Yun; Jin, Zhen; Kong, Ling-Tao; Liu, Jin-Huai

    2012-01-01

    Metal oxide gas sensors are predominant solid-state gas detecting devices for domestic, commercial and industrial applications, which have many advantages such as low cost, easy production, and compact size. However, the performance of such sensors is significantly influenced by the morphology and structure of sensing materials, resulting in a great obstacle for gas sensors based on bulk materials or dense films to achieve highly-sensitive properties. Lots of metal oxide nanostructures have been developed to improve the gas sensing properties such as sensitivity, selectivity, response speed, and so on. Here, we provide a brief overview of metal oxide nanostructures and their gas sensing properties from the aspects of particle size, morphology and doping. When the particle size of metal oxide is close to or less than double thickness of the space-charge layer, the sensitivity of the sensor will increase remarkably, which would be called "small size effect", yet small size of metal oxide nanoparticles will be compactly sintered together during the film coating process which is disadvantage for gas diffusion in them. In view of those reasons, nanostructures with many kinds of shapes such as porous nanotubes, porous nanospheres and so on have been investigated, that not only possessed large surface area and relatively mass reactive sites, but also formed relatively loose film structures which is an advantage for gas diffusion. Besides, doping is also an effective method to decrease particle size and improve gas sensing properties. Therefore, the gas sensing properties of metal oxide nanostructures assembled by nanoparticles are reviewed in this article. The effect of doping is also summarized and finally the perspectives of metal oxide gas sensor are given. PMID:22736968

  3. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  4. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  5. Metal oxide nanostructures and their gas sensing properties: a review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bo; Meng, Fan-Li; Liu, Jin-Yun; Jin, Zhen; Kong, Ling-Tao; Liu, Jin-Huai

    2012-01-01

    Metal oxide gas sensors are predominant solid-state gas detecting devices for domestic, commercial and industrial applications, which have many advantages such as low cost, easy production, and compact size. However, the performance of such sensors is significantly influenced by the morphology and structure of sensing materials, resulting in a great obstacle for gas sensors based on bulk materials or dense films to achieve highly-sensitive properties. Lots of metal oxide nanostructures have been developed to improve the gas sensing properties such as sensitivity, selectivity, response speed, and so on. Here, we provide a brief overview of metal oxide nanostructures and their gas sensing properties from the aspects of particle size, morphology and doping. When the particle size of metal oxide is close to or less than double thickness of the space-charge layer, the sensitivity of the sensor will increase remarkably, which would be called "small size effect", yet small size of metal oxide nanoparticles will be compactly sintered together during the film coating process which is disadvantage for gas diffusion in them. In view of those reasons, nanostructures with many kinds of shapes such as porous nanotubes, porous nanospheres and so on have been investigated, that not only possessed large surface area and relatively mass reactive sites, but also formed relatively loose film structures which is an advantage for gas diffusion. Besides, doping is also an effective method to decrease particle size and improve gas sensing properties. Therefore, the gas sensing properties of metal oxide nanostructures assembled by nanoparticles are reviewed in this article. The effect of doping is also summarized and finally the perspectives of metal oxide gas sensor are given.

  6. Solution precursor plasma deposition of nanostructured ZnO coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tummala, Raghavender; Guduru, Ramesh K.; Mohanty, Pravansu S.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} The solution precursor route employed is an inexpensive process with capability to produce large scale coatings at fast rates on mass scale production. {yields} It is highly capable of developing tailorable nanostructures. {yields} This technique can be employed to spray the coatings on any kind of substrates including polymers. {yields} The ZnO coatings developed via solution precursor plasma spray process have good electrical conductivity and reflectivity properties in spite of possessing large amount of particulate boundaries, porosity and nanostructured grains. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconducting material that has various applications including optical, electronic, biomedical and corrosion protection. It is usually synthesized via processing routes, such as vapor deposition techniques, sol-gel, spray pyrolysis and thermal spray of pre-synthesized ZnO powders. Cheaper and faster synthesis techniques are of technological importance due to increased demand in alternative energy applications. Here, we report synthesis of nanostructured ZnO coatings directly from a solution precursor in a single step using plasma spray technique. Nanostructured ZnO coatings were deposited from the solution precursor prepared using zinc acetate and water/isopropanol. An axial liquid atomizer was employed in a DC plasma spray torch to create fine droplets of precursor for faster thermal treatment in the plasma plume to form ZnO. Microstructures of coatings revealed ultrafine particulate agglomerates. X-ray diffraction confirmed polycrystalline nature and hexagonal Wurtzite crystal structure of the coatings. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed fine grains in the range of 10-40 nm. Observed optical transmittance ({approx}65-80%) and reflectivity ({approx}65-70%) in the visible spectrum, and electrical resistivity (48.5-50.1 m{Omega} cm) of ZnO coatings are attributed to ultrafine particulate morphology of the coatings.

  7. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  8. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N.; Slepička, P.; Bačáková, L.; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2013-07-01

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell's adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  9. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Frank Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  10. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  11. Mimicking the nanofeatures of bone increases bone-forming cell adhesion and proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palin, Erica; Liu, Huinan; Webster, Thomas J.

    2005-09-01

    There is a great need to design better orthopaedic implant devices by modifying their surface properties. In this respect, one approach that has received much attention of late is the simulation of the surface roughness of bone in synthetic orthopaedic implant materials. Bone has numerous nanometre features due to the presence of nanostructured entities such as collagen and hydroxyapatite. Despite this fact, current orthopaedic implant materials are smooth at the nanoscale. Previous studies have measured increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions on biologically inspired nanophase titania compared to conventional titania formulations. In fact, in vitro calcium deposition by osteoblasts was up to three times higher on nanostructured compared to conventional titania. However, it was unclear in those studies what underlying surface properties (roughness, crystallinity, crystal phase, chemistry, etc) promoted enhanced functions of osteoblasts on nanophase titania. For that reason, the objective of the present in vitro study was to specifically determine the role nanostructured surface roughness of titania had on increasing functions of osteoblasts. To achieve this, the surface roughness of nanophase and conventional titania was transferred to a model tissue engineering polymer: poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). Results of the present study demonstrated greater osteoblast adhesion and proliferation for up to 5 days of culture on PLGA moulds of nanophase compared to conventional titania. In this manner, this study elucidated that the property of nanophase titania which increased osteoblast function was a large degree of nanometre surface features that mimicked bone. For this reason, nanophase materials deserve more attention in improving orthopaedic implant applications.

  12. Rational Design of Chiral Nanostructures from Self-Assembly of a Ferrocene-Modified Dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuefei; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Yang, Xuejiao; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-06-24

    We report a new paradigm for the rational design of chiral nanostructures that is based on the hierarchical self-assembly of a ferrocene (Fc)-modified dipeptide, ferrocene-L-Phe-L-Phe-OH (Fc-FF). Compared to other chiral self-assembling systems, Fc-FF is unique because of its smaller size, biocompatibility, multiple functions (a redox center), and environmental responsiveness. X-ray and spectroscopic analyses showed that the incorporation of counterions during the hierarchical self-assembly of Fc-FF changed the conformations of the secondary structures from flat β sheets into twisted β sheets. This approach enables chiral self-assembly and the formation of well-defined chiral nanostructures composed of helical twisted β sheets. We identified two elementary forms for the helical twist of the β sheets, which allowed us to create a rich variety of rigid chiral nanostructures over a wide range of scales. Furthermore, through subtle modulations in the counterions, temperature, and solvent, we are able to precisely control the helical pitch, diameter, and handedness of the self-assembled chiral nanostructures. This unprecedented level of control not only offers insights into how rationally designed chiral nanostructures can be formed from simple molecular building blocks but also is of significant practical value for the use in chiroptics, templates, chiral sensing, and separations.

  13. Synthesis of hierarchical three-dimensional copper oxide nanostructures through a biomineralization-inspired approach.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xiang; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin

    2013-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) copper oxide (CuO) nanostructures were synthesized in a regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin aqueous solution at room temperature. In the synthesis process, silk fibroin served as the template and helped to form the hierarchical CuO nanostructures by self-assembly. Cu(OH)2 nanowires were formed initially, and then they transformed into almond-like CuO nanostructures with branched edges and a compact middle. The size of the final CuO nanostructures can be tuned by varying the concentration of silk fibroin in the reaction system. A possible mechanism has been proposed based on various characterization techniques, such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The synthesized CuO nanostructured material has been evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, and the result showed that they had a good electrochemical performance. The straightforward energy-saving method developed in this research may provide a useful preparation strategy for other functional inorganic materials through an environmentally friendly process. PMID:23863944

  14. Molecular modeling of fibronectin adsorption on topographically nanostructured rutile (110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chuangqiang; Wu, Chunya; Chen, Mingjun; Zheng, Ting; Chen, Ni; Cummings, Peter T.

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the topographical dependency of protein adsorption, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to describe the adsorption behavior of the tenth type-III module of fibronectin (FN-III10) on nanostructured rutile (110) surfaces. The results indicated that the residence time of adsorbed FN-III10 largely relied on its binding mode (direct or indirect) with the substrate and the region for protein migration on the periphery (protrusion) or in the interior (cavity or groove) of nanostructures. In the direct binding mode, FN-III10 molecules were found to be 'trapped' at the anchoring sites of rutile surface, or even penetrate deep into the interior of nanostructures, regardless of the presented geometrical features. In the indirect binding mode, FN-III10 molecules were indirectly connected to the substrate via a hydrogen-bond network (linking FN-III10 and interfacial hydrations). The facets created by nanostructures, which exerted restraints on protein migration, were suggested to play an important role in the stability of indirect FN-III10-rutile binding. However, a doubly unfavorable situation - indirect FN-III10-rutile connections bridged by a handful of mediating waters and few constraints on movement of protein provided by nanostructures - would result in an early desorption of protein.

  15. Atomic layer deposition in nanostructured photovoltaics: tuning optical, electronic and surface properties.

    PubMed

    Palmstrom, Axel F; Santra, Pralay K; Bent, Stacey F

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured materials offer key advantages for third-generation photovoltaics, such as the ability to achieve high optical absorption together with enhanced charge carrier collection using low cost components. However, the extensive interfacial areas in nanostructured photovoltaic devices can cause high recombination rates and a high density of surface electronic states. In this feature article, we provide a brief review of some nanostructured photovoltaic technologies including dye-sensitized, quantum dot sensitized and colloidal quantum dot solar cells. We then introduce the technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a vapor phase deposition method using a sequence of self-limiting surface reaction steps to grow thin, uniform and conformal films. We discuss how ALD has established itself as a promising tool for addressing different aspects of nanostructured photovoltaics. Examples include the use of ALD to synthesize absorber materials for both quantum dot and plasmonic solar cells, to grow barrier layers for dye and quantum dot sensitized solar cells, and to infiltrate coatings into colloidal quantum dot solar cell to improve charge carrier mobilities as well as stability. We also provide an example of monolayer surface modification in which adsorbed ligand molecules on quantum dots are used to tune the band structure of colloidal quantum dot solar cells for improved charge collection. Finally, we comment on the present challenges and future outlook of the use of ALD for nanostructured photovoltaics.

  16. Three-dimensional crystalline and homogeneous metallic nanostructures using directed assembly of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cihan; Cetin, Arif E; Goutzamanidis, Georgia; Huang, Jun; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Altug, Hatice; Wei, Dongguang; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2014-05-27

    Directed assembly of nano building blocks offers a versatile route to the creation of complex nanostructures with unique properties. Bottom-up directed assembly of nanoparticles have been considered as one of the best approaches to fabricate such functional and novel nanostructures. However, there is a dearth of studies on making crystalline, solid, and homogeneous nanostructures. This requires a fundamental understanding of the forces driving the assembly of nanoparticles and precise control of these forces to enable the formation of desired nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate that colloidal nanoparticles can be assembled and simultaneously fused into 3-D solid nanostructures in a single step using externally applied electric field. By understanding the influence of various assembly parameters, we showed the fabrication of 3-D metallic materials with complex geometries such as nanopillars, nanoboxes, and nanorings with feature sizes as small as 25 nm in less than a minute. The fabricated gold nanopillars have a polycrystalline nature, have an electrical resistivity that is lower than or equivalent to electroplated gold, and support strong plasmonic resonances. We also demonstrate that the fabrication process is versatile, as fast as electroplating, and scalable to the millimeter scale. These results indicate that the presented approach will facilitate fabrication of novel 3-D nanomaterials (homogeneous or hybrid) in an aqueous solution at room temperature and pressure, while addressing many of the manufacturing challenges in semiconductor nanoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of carbon and boron carbide nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud, Sara

    Carbon is present in nature in a variety of allotropes and chemical compounds. Due to reduced dimensionality, nanostructured carbon materials, i.e. single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are characterized by unique physical and chemical properties. There is a potential for SWNTs use as biological probes and assists for tunable tissue growth in biomedical applications. However, the presumed cytotoxicity of SWNTs requires investigation of the risks of their incorporation into living systems. Boron is not found in nature in elementary form. Boron based materials are chemically complex and exist in various polymorphic forms, i.e. boron carbide (BC). Because BC is a lightweight material with exceptional mechanical and elastic properties, it is the ideal candidate for armor and ballistic applications. However, practical use of BC as armor material is limited because of its anomalous glass-like behaviour at high velocity impacts, which has been linked to stress-induced structural instability in one of BC polymorphs, B12(CCC). Theoretical calculations suggest that formation of B12(CCC) in BC could be suppressed by silicon doping. In the first part of this thesis, biocompatibility of SWNTs is investigated. It is shown that under normal cell implantation conditions, the electrical conductivity of the SWNTs decreases due to an increase in structural disorder. This research suggests that SWNTs can be functionalized by protein and biological cells reducing the risk of cytotoxicity. In the second part of this thesis, boron carbide nanostructured materials are synthesized and investigated. Radio frequency sputtering deposition technique is employed for fabrication of BC (Si free) and BC:Si thin films. Variation of plasma conditions and temperature are found to affect chemical composition, adhesion to the substrate and morphology of the films. It is shown that BC films are predominantly amorphous and a small addition of Si largely improves their mechanical properties. In addition

  18. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  19. Programmed self-assembly of complex DNA nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Cheng

    wide range of DNA nanostructures with varieties of features.

  20. Biofilm formation on nanostructured hydroxyapatite-coated titanium.

    PubMed

    Westas, Emma; Gillstedt, Martin; Lönn-Stensrud, Jessica; Bruzell, Ellen; Andersson, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Biofilm formation on medical devices is a common cause of implant failure, especially regarding implants that breach the epithelial tissue, so-called transcutaneous implants. Nanotechnology and the development of new nanomaterials have given the opportunity to design nanotextured implant surfaces. Such surfaces have been studied using various in vitro methods showing that nanosized features strongly benefit bone cell growth. However, little is known on how nanostructured features affect biofilm formation. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the shape- and chemical-dependent effect of a nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on the degree of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation. Three different types of nanosized HA particles having different shapes and calcium to phosphate ratios were compared to uncoated turned titanium using safranin stain in a biofilm assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for assessment of biofilm biomass and bacterial volume, respectively. No difference in biofilm biomass was detected for the various surfaces after 6 h incubation with S. epidermidis. Additionally, image analysis of CLSM Z-stacks confirmed the biofilm assay and showed similar results. In conclusion, the difference in nanomorphology and chemical composition of the surface coatings did not influence the adhesion and biofilm formation of S. epidermidis.

  1. Investigations on diamond nanostructuring of different morphologies by the reactive-ion etching process and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kunuku, Srinivasu; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Chang, Wen-Hao; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan

    2013-08-14

    We report the systematic studies on the fabrication of aligned, uniform, and highly dense diamond nanostructures from diamond films of various granular structures. Self-assembled Au nanodots are used as a mask in the self-biased reactive-ion etching (RIE) process, using an O2/CF4 process plasma. The morphology of diamond nanostructures is a close function of the initial phase composition of diamond. Cone-shaped and tip-shaped diamond nanostructures result for microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, whereas pillarlike and grasslike diamond nanostructures are obtained for Ar-plasma-based and N2-plasma-based ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films, respectively. While the nitrogen-incorporated UNCD (N-UNCD) nanograss shows the most-superior electron-field-emission properties, the NCD nanotips exhibit the best photoluminescence properties, viz, different applications need different morphology of diamond nanostructures to optimize the respective characteristics. The optimum diamond nanostructure can be achieved by proper choice of granular structure of the initial diamond film. The etching mechanism is explained by in situ observation of optical emission spectrum of RIE plasma. The preferential etching of sp(2)-bonded carbon contained in the diamond films is the prime factor, which forms the unique diamond nanostructures from each type of diamond films. However, the excited oxygen atoms (O*) are the main etching species of diamond film.

  2. Various Quantum- and Nano-Structures by III–V Droplet Epitaxy on GaAs Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We report on various self-assembled In(Ga)As nanostructures by droplet epitaxy on GaAs substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. Depending on the growth condition and index of surfaces, various nanostructures can be fabricated: quantum dots (QDs), ring-like and holed-triangular nanostructures. At near room temperatures, by limiting surface diffusion of adatoms, the size of In droplets suitable for quantum confinement can be fabricated and thus InAs QDs are demonstrated on GaAs (100) surface. On the other hand, at relatively higher substrate temperatures, by enhancing the surface migrations of In adatoms, super lower density of InGaAs ring-shaped nanostructures can be fabricated on GaAs (100). Under an identical growth condition, holed-triangular InGaAs nanostructures can be fabricated on GaAs type-A surfaces, while ring-shaped nanostructures are formed on GaAs (100). The formation mechanism of various nanostructures can be understood in terms of intermixing, surface diffusion, and surface reconstruction. PMID:20671787

  3. Isidis Planitia Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the most typical features of Isidis Planitia at full (1.5 meters -- 5 feet -- per pixel) resolution. The typical features are: (1) light-toned, ripple-like dunes and (2) mounds with summit pits. The dunes are formed by wind. The double-cone feature in the lower right quarter of the image is similar to many mounds and chains of mounds or cones found all across Isidis Planitia. These were seen at lower resolution in Viking orbiter images in the 1970s and were generally considered to be either small volcanoes or ice-cored mounds known as pingoes. With high resolution MOC images, it became apparent that many of these mounds may simply be the remnants of crater and pit chain floors, elevated above the surrounding plains as the layers of rock into which they formed were stripped away. Like much of Mars, there are more questions than answers. This image is located near 8.6oN, 268.2oW, and covers an area about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  4. Rapid Prototyping of Patterned Multifunctional Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    FAN,HONGYOU; LU,YUNFENG; LOPEZ,GABRIEL P.; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

    2000-07-18

    The ability to engineer ordered arrays of objects on multiple length scales has potential for applications such as microelectronics, sensors, wave guides, and photonic lattices with tunable band gaps. Since the invention of surfactant templated mesoporous sieves in 1992, great progress has been made in controlling different mesophases in the form of powders, particles, fibers, and films. To date, although there have been several reports of patterned mesostructures, materials prepared have been limited to metal oxides with no specific functionality. For many of the envisioned applications of hierarchical materials in micro-systems, sensors, waveguides, photonics, and electronics, it is necessary to define both form and function on several length scales. In addition, the patterning strategies utilized so far require hours or even days for completion. Such slow processes are inherently difficult to implement in commercial environments. The authors present a series of new methods of producing patterns within seconds. Combining sol-gel chemistry, Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly (EISA), and rapid prototyping techniques like pen lithography, ink-jet printing, and dip-coating on micro-contact printed substrates, they form hierarchically organized silica structures that exhibit order and function on multiple scales: on the molecular scale, functional organic moieties are positioned on pore surfaces, on the mesoscale, mono-sized pores are organized into 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional networks, providing size-selective accessibility from the gas or liquid phase, and on the macroscale, 2-dimensional arrays and fluidic or photonic systems may be defined. These rapid patterning techniques establish for the first time a link between computer-aided design and rapid processing of self-assembled nanostructures.

  5. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation.

  6. Nanostructured conducting polymer hydrogels for energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ye; Peng, Lele; Yu, Guihua

    2015-08-14

    Conducting polymer hydrogels are emerging as a promising class of polymeric materials for various technological applications, especially for energy storage devices due to their unique combination of advantageous features of conventional polymers and organic conductors. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional synthesis, new synthetic routes in which acid molecules are adopted as both crosslinkers and dopants have been developed for conducting polymer hydrogels with unique 3D hierarchical porous nanostructures, resulting in high electrical conductivity, large surface area, structural tunability and hierarchical porosity for rapid mass/charge transport. The newly developed conducting polymer hydrogels exhibit high performance when applied as active electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors or as functional binder materials for high-energy lithium-ion batteries. This feature article summarizes the synthesis of conducting polymer hydrogels, presents their applications in energy storage, and discusses further opportunities and challenges.

  7. Energetics of hydrogen storage in organolithium nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Namilae, Sirish; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Nicholson, Don M

    2007-01-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on the second order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) were used to investigate the interaction of molecular hydrogen with alkyl lithium organometallic compounds. It is found that lithium in organolithium structures attracts two hydrogen molecules with a binding energy of about 0.14 eV. The calculations also show that organolithium compounds bind strongly with graphitic nanostructures. Therefore, these carbon based nanostructures functionalized with organolithium compounds can be effectively used for storage of molecular hydrogen. Energetics and mechanisms for achieving high weight percent hydrogen storage in organolithium based nanostructures are discussed.

  8. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  9. Optimized plasmonic nanostructures for improved sensing activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Guillot, Nicolas; Rouxel, Jérémy; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc; Toury, Timothée

    2012-09-10

    The paper outlines the optimization of plasmonic nanostructures in order to improve their sensing properties such as their sensitivity and their ease of manipulation. The key point in this study is the optimization of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties essential to the sensor characteristics, and more especially for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Two aspects were considered in order to optimize the sensing performance: apolar plasmonic nanostructures for non polarization dependent detection and improvements of SERS sensitivity by using a molecular adhesion layer between gold nanostructures and glass. Both issues could be generalized to all plasmon-resonance-based sensing applications.

  10. Nanostructured transparent conducting oxide electrochromic device

    DOEpatents

    Milliron, Delia; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-05-17

    The embodiments described herein provide an electrochromic device. In an exemplary embodiment, the electrochromic device includes (1) a substrate and (2) a film supported by the substrate, where the film includes transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes (a) an electrolyte, where the nanostructures are embedded in the electrolyte, resulting in an electrolyte, nanostructure mixture positioned above the substrate and (b) a counter electrode positioned above the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a conductive coating deposited on the substrate between the substrate and the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a second substrate positioned above the mixture.

  11. Designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2014-06-01

    Fractal structures in nature offer a unique "fractal contact mode" that guarantees the efficient working of an organism with an optimized style. Fractal nanostructured biointerfaces have shown great potential for the ultrasensitive detection of disease-relevant biomarkers from small biomolecules on the nanoscale to cancer cells on the microscale. This review will present the advantages of fractal nanostructures, the basic concept of designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces, and their biomedical applications for the ultrasensitive detection of various disease-relevant biomarkers, such microRNA, cancer antigen 125, and breast cancer cells, from unpurified cell lysates and the blood of patients.

  12. Zinc-oxide-based nanostructured materials for heterostructure solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, A. A.; Maximov, A. I.; Moshnikov, V. A. Somov, P. A.; Terukov, E. I.

    2015-10-15

    Results obtained in the deposition of nanostructured zinc-oxide layers by hydrothermal synthesis as the basic method are presented. The possibility of controlling the structure and morphology of the layers is demonstrated. The important role of the procedure employed to form the nucleating layer is noted. The faceted hexagonal nanoprisms obtained are promising for the fabrication of solar cells based on oxide heterostructures, and aluminum-doped zinc-oxide layers with petal morphology, for the deposition of an antireflection layer. The results are compatible and promising for application in flexible electronics.

  13. Formation of nanostructures in a plasma focus discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Krauz, V. I.; Khimchenko, L. N.; Myalton, V. V.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Gureev, V. M.; Koidan, V. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Fortov, V. E.

    2013-04-15

    A new method for creating nanostructures in a plasma focus discharge is proposed. It is shown that the material of a micron-size dust target produced at the discharge axis efficiently evaporates and is then involved in the pinching process. After the pinch decays, the plasma expands with the thermal velocity and the evaporated dust material is deposited on the collectors in the form of fractal particles or nanoclusters organized into various structures. Such structures have a well-developed surface, which is important for various technological applications.

  14. Antireflective nanostructured zinc oxide arrays produced by pulsed electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Klochko, N. P. Klepikova, K. S.; Khrypunov, G. S.; Volkova, N. D.; Kopach, V. R.; Lyubov, V. M.; Kirichenko, M. V.; Kopach, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Conditions for the pulsed electrochemical deposition of nanostructured zinc oxide arrays with a certain morphology, crystal structure, and optical properties from aqueous electrolytes onto substrates of transparent electrically conducting tin dioxide and on single-crystal silicon wafers with built-in homojunctions are studied in order to develop antireflection coatings for solar cells. It is shown that it is possible to obtain single-layer planar antireflection coatings or arrays of nanorods of this material, both having the form of hexagonal prisms and exhibiting the moth-eye effect.

  15. Ferroelectric nanostructure having switchable multi-stable vortex states

    DOEpatents

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.; Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.

    2009-09-22

    A ferroelectric nanostructure formed as a low dimensional nano-scale ferroelectric material having at least one vortex ring of polarization generating an ordered toroid moment switchable between multi-stable states. A stress-free ferroelectric nanodot under open-circuit-like electrical boundary conditions maintains such a vortex structure for their local dipoles when subject to a transverse inhomogeneous static electric field controlling the direction of the macroscopic toroidal moment. Stress is also capable of controlling the vortex's chirality, because of the electromechanical coupling that exists in ferroelectric nanodots.

  16. Sol-gel coating of inorganic nanostructures with resorcinol-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhang, Qiao; Liu, Jian; Joo, Jibong; Lee, Austin; Gan, Yang; Yin, Yadong

    2013-06-01

    A general sol-gel process has been developed to form a coating of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin on inorganic nanostructures of various compositions and morphologies. The RF shell can be conveniently converted into carbon through high temperature carbonization under an inert atmosphere.

  17. DNA-Based Synthesis and Assembly of Organized Iron Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutov, Gennady B.

    Organized bio-inorganic and hybrid bio-organic-inorganic nanostructures consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles and DNA complexes have been formed using methods based on biomineralization, interfacial and bulk phase assembly, ligand exchange and substitution, Langmuir-Blodgett technique, DNA templating and scaffolding. Interfacially formed planar DNA complexes with water-insoluble amphiphilic polycation or intercalator Langmuir monolayers were prepared and deposited on solid substrates to form immobilized DNA complexes. Those complexes were then used for the synthesis of organized DNA-based iron oxide nanostructures. Planar net-like and circular nanostructures of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were obtained via interaction of cationic colloid magnetite nanoparticles with preformed immobilized DNA/amphiphilic polycation complexes of net-like and toroidal morphologies. The processes of the generation of iron oxide nanoparticles in immobilized DNA complexes via redox synthesis with various iron sources of biological (ferritin) and artificial (FeCl3) nature have been studied. Bulk-phase complexes of magnetite nanoparticles with biomolecular ligands (DNA, spermine) were formed and studied. Novel nano-scale organized bio-inorganic nanostructures - free-floating sheet-like spermine/magnetite nanoparticle complexes and DNA/spermine/magnetite nanoparticle complexes were synthesized in bulk aqueous phase and the effect of DNA molecules on the structure of complexes was discovered.

  18. SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF POROUS NANOSTRUCTURED METALS AND NANOSTRUCTURED MEMBRANES FOR CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Ferreira, J L; Hayes, J P

    2003-09-10

    The sputter deposition process can be used to create nanostructured materials that possess continuous open porosity. Characterization of sputter deposited metals and metal-oxide coatings are presented.

  19. Special Issue featuring invited articles arising from UK Semiconductors 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Edmund; Wada, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Semiconductor research has formed the basis of many technological advances over the past 50 years, and the field is still highly active, as new material systems and device concepts are developed to address new applications or operating conditions. In addition to the development of traditional semiconductor devices, the wealth of experience with these materials also allows their use as an ideal environment for testing new physics, leading to new classes of devices exploiting quantum mechanical effects that can also benefit from the advantages of existing semiconductor technology in scalability, compactness and ease of mass production. This special issue features papers arising from the UK Semiconductors 2012 Conference, held at the University of Sheffield. The annual conference covers all aspects of semiconductor research, from crystal growth, through investigations of the physics of semiconductor structures to realization of semiconductor devices and their application in emerging technologies. The 2012 conference featured over 150 presentations, including plenary sessions on interband cascade lasers for the 3-6 µm spectral band, efficient single photon sources based on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic nanowires, nitride-based quantum dot visible lasers and single photon sources, and engineering of organic light-emitting diodes. The seven papers collected here highlight current research advances, taken from across the scope of the conference. The papers feature growth of novel nitride-antimonide material systems for mid-infrared sources and detectors, use of semiconductor nanostructures for charge-based memory and visible lasers, optimization of device structures either to reduce losses in solar cells or achieve low noise amplification in transistors, design considerations for surface-emitting lasers incorporating photonic crystals and an assessment of laser power convertors for power transfer. The editors of this special issue and the conference

  20. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies.