Science.gov

Sample records for nanostructured aluminosilicate nsas

  1. Nanostructure of gel-derived aluminosilicate materials.

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Katalin; Hüsing, Nicola; Goerigk, Günter; Peterlik, Herwig

    2008-02-01

    In the present work, aluminosilicate aerogels prepared under various conditions were compared with respect to their nanostructures and porosity. The purpose of this investigation was to find a suitable way to predict the final product structure and to tailor a required texture. Several Al and Si precursors (Al nitrate, Al isopropoxide, Al acetate, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), and sodium silicate) were used in our examinations; the solvent content (water and alcohols), surfactants, as well as the catalysts were varied. In addition, the aerogels were subjected to various heat treatments. Hybrid aerogels were synthesized by the addition of different polymers (poly(acrylic acid), polyvinyl acetate, and polydimethylsiloxane). Aluminosilicate and hybrid aerogel structures were investigated by 27Al MAS NMR, SAXS, SEM, and porosity measurements. Loose fractal structures with a good porosity and high Al incorporation can be achieved from TEOS and Al nitrate or isopropoxide via a sol-gel preparation route. The use of Al acetate led to compact aerogel structures independently of the Si precursor, the pH, and the catalyst.

  2. Sorption of cesium ions by nanostructured calcium aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, P. S.; Shabalin, I. A.; Yarusova, S. B.; Suponina, A. P.; Zhevtun, I. G.

    2016-10-01

    Data on the sorption properties of synthetic calcium aluminosilicates (CASes) with Al: Si ratios of 2: 2, 2: 6, and 2: 10, fabricated within the multicomponent system CaCl2-AlCl3-KOM-SiO2-H2O, are presented. Isotherms of the sorption of Cs+ ions from aqueous solutions with Cs+ concentrations of 0.2 to 6.0 mmol L-1 are analyzed. The CAS maximum sorption capacity and the Langmuir constants are determined. Kinetic data are obtained, and the energy of cation-exchange activation upon the sorption of Cs+ ions is determined. The effect of a salt background (1% KCl + 6% NaCl) has on the values of distribution coefficient ( K d) and the degree of Cs+ ion removal is established.

  3. Maximizing the catalytic function of hydrogen spillover in platinum-encapsulated aluminosilicates with controlled nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Im, Juhwan; Shin, Hyeyoung; Jang, Haeyoun; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2014-02-25

    Hydrogen spillover has been studied for several decades, but its nature, catalytic functions and even its existence remain topics of vigorous debate. This is a consequence of the lack of model catalysts that can provide direct evidences of the existence of hydrogen spillover and simplify the catalytic interpretation. Here we use platinum encapsulated in a dense aluminosilicate matrix with controlled diffusional properties and surface hydroxyl concentrations to elucidate the catalytic functions of hydrogen spillover. The catalytic investigation and theoretical modelling show that surface hydroxyls, presumably Brønsted acids, are crucial for utilizing the catalytic functions of hydrogen spillover on the aluminosilicate surface. The catalysts with optimized nanostructure show remarkable activities in hydro-/dehydrogenation, but virtually no activity for hydrogenolysis. This distinct chemoselectivity may be beneficial in industrially important hydroconversions such as propane dehydrogenation to propylene because the undesired hydrogenolysis pathway producing light hydrocarbons of low value (methane and ethane) is greatly suppressed.

  4. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 531 - Instructions for the Filing of NSAs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Instructions for the Filing of NSAs A Appendix A to Part... NVOCC SERVICE ARRANGEMENTS Pt. 531, App. A Appendix A to Part 531—Instructions for the Filing of NSAs NSAs shall be filed in accordance with the instructions found on the Commission's home page,...

  5. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 531 - Instructions for the Filing of NSAs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Instructions for the Filing of NSAs A Appendix A to Part... NVOCC SERVICE ARRANGEMENTS Pt. 531, App. A Appendix A to Part 531—Instructions for the Filing of NSAs NSAs shall be filed in accordance with the instructions found on the Commission's home page,...

  6. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 531 - Instructions for the Filing of NSAs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Instructions for the Filing of NSAs A Appendix A to Part... NVOCC SERVICE ARRANGEMENTS Pt. 531, App. A Appendix A to Part 531—Instructions for the Filing of NSAs....fmc.gov. A. Registration, Log-on I.D. and Password To register for filing, an NVOCC or...

  7. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 531 - Instructions for the Filing of NSAs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Instructions for the Filing of NSAs A Appendix A to Part... NVOCC SERVICE ARRANGEMENTS Pt. 531, App. A Appendix A to Part 531—Instructions for the Filing of NSAs....fmc.gov. A. Registration, Log-on I.D. and Password To register for filing, an NVOCC or...

  8. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 531 - Instructions for the Filing of NSAs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....fmc.gov. A. Registration, Log-on I.D. and Password To register for filing, an NVOCC or authorized... required for each individual that will file NSAs. BTA will direct OIT to provide approved filers with a log... submitting an amended registration form requesting the assignment of a new log-on I.D. and password....

  9. Microprobes aluminosilicate ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Methods have been developed to make mixed alumina-silicate and aluminosilicate particulate microporous ceramic membranes. One method involves the making of separate alumina and silica sols which are then mixed. Another method involves the creation of a combined sol with aluminosilicate particles. The resulting combined alumina and silica membranes have high surface area, a very small pore size, and a very good temperature stability.

  10. Functionalized Amorphous Aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesgar, Milad

    Alkali treated aluminosilicate (geopolymer) was functionalized by surfactant to increase the hydrophobicity for making Pickering emulsion for the first part of this work. In the first part of this study, alkali treated metakaolin was functionalized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide ((C16H33)N(CH 3)3Br, CTAB). The electrostatic interaction between this quaternary ammonium and the surface of the aluminosilicate which has negative charge has taken place. The particles then were used to prepare Pickering emulsion. The resulting stable dispersions, obtained very fast at very simple conditions with low ratio of aluminosilicate to liquid phase. In the second part, the interaction between geopolymer and glycerol was studied to see the covalent grafting of the geopolymer for making geopolymer composite. The composite material would be the basis material to be used as support catalyst, thin coating reagent and flame retardant material and so on, Variety of techniques, Thermogravimetric (TGA), Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), FTIR, Solid state NMR, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), BET surface area, Elemental analysis (CHN), TEM, SEM and Optical microscopy were used to characterize the functionalized geopolymer.

  11. Results of Aluminosilicate Inhibitor Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2001-06-27

    The aluminosilicate scale in the 2H Evaporator has precluded operation since late 1999. The chemistry of scale formation is known but the mechanism(s) for deposition are not well understood. Tests have been conducted to determine if chemical agents could prevent aluminosilicate formation under conditions similar to Tank 43H. Additionally, particle growth inhibition is also tested.

  12. Solubilizing functionalized molecular aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Rascón-Cruz, Fernando; Huerta-Lavorie, Raúl; Jancik, Vojtech; Toscano, Rubén Alfredo; Cea-Olivares, Raymundo

    2009-02-21

    Molecular aluminosilicate Al(SH)(micro-O)Si(OH)(O(t)Bu)(2) ( = [HC{C(Me)N(Ar)}(2)](-), Ar = 2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3)) has been prepared from Al(SH)(2) and ((t)BuO)(2)Si(OH)(2) in high yield. When reacted with one equiv. of water, the unique aluminosilicate containing two terminal hydroxy groups Al(OH.THF)(mu-O)Si(OH)(O(t)Bu)(2) can be isolated. However, when is reacted with the bulkier silanol ((t)BuO)(3)SiOH, no reaction is observed. The desired Al(SH)(micro-O)Si(O(t)Bu)(3) can be prepared in a two-step synthesis between AlH(2) and ((t)BuO)(3)SiOH giving first Al(H)(micro-O)Si(O(t)Bu)(3), which reacts further with elemental sulfur to give as the only product. Direct hydrolysis of was conducted to obtain Al(OH)(micro-O)Si(O(t)Bu)(3), however, such hydrolysis always resulted in a complete decomposition of the starting material. Therefore we used boric acid, which condenses in non-polar solvents and slowly evolve water, to hydrolyze to under mild conditions. Compounds , and have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  13. Results of Aluminosilicate Formation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2001-09-11

    The purpose of this work was to examine several experimental parameters of the formation of aluminosilicates under several tank chemistries, examine the conversion of crystalline phases, and determine inherent solubilities of certain crystal phases.

  14. 21 CFR 182.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 182.2727 Section 182.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  15. 21 CFR 582.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 582.2727 Section 582.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  16. 21 CFR 182.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 182.2727 Section 182.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  17. 21 CFR 582.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 582.2727 Section 582.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  18. 21 CFR 582.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 582.2727 Section 582.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  19. 21 CFR 182.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 182.2727 Section 182.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  20. 21 CFR 182.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 182.2727 Section 182.2727...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2727 Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized...

  1. 21 CFR 182.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium aluminosilicate. 182.2727 Section 182.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  2. 21 CFR 582.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 582.2727 Section 582.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  3. 21 CFR 582.2727 - Sodium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium aluminosilicate. 582.2727 Section 582.2727 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminosilicate (sodium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance....

  4. 40 CFR 721.633 - Aluminosilicates, phospho-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aluminosilicates, phospho-. 721.633... Substances § 721.633 Aluminosilicates, phospho-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as Aluminosilicates, phospho- (PMN P-98-1275; CAS...

  5. 40 CFR 721.633 - Aluminosilicates, phospho-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aluminosilicates, phospho-. 721.633... Substances § 721.633 Aluminosilicates, phospho-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as Aluminosilicates, phospho- (PMN P-98-1275; CAS...

  6. 40 CFR 721.633 - Aluminosilicates, phospho-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aluminosilicates, phospho-. 721.633... Substances § 721.633 Aluminosilicates, phospho-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as Aluminosilicates, phospho- (PMN P-98-1275; CAS...

  7. 40 CFR 721.633 - Aluminosilicates, phospho-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aluminosilicates, phospho-. 721.633... Substances § 721.633 Aluminosilicates, phospho-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as Aluminosilicates, phospho- (PMN P-98-1275; CAS...

  8. 40 CFR 721.633 - Aluminosilicates, phospho-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aluminosilicates, phospho-. 721.633... Substances § 721.633 Aluminosilicates, phospho-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as Aluminosilicates, phospho- (PMN P-98-1275; CAS...

  9. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. PMID:17205741

  10. Water behaviour in nanoporous aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel

    2010-07-21

    This paper briefly reviews results of molecular dynamics simulation studies of water confined in nanoporous aluminosilicates. The behaviour of confined molecules is shown to be influenced by the nature of the host structure, and the size and the topology of the voids. For some of the systems discussed the ambiguity in results of different modelling studies call for the use of extended potential and structural models. Thus, the use of polarizable force fields was shown to be necessary to take into account the variation of the molecular dipole of confined molecules in different environments. PMID:21399287

  11. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations.

  12. Water behaviour in nanoporous aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel

    2010-07-21

    This paper briefly reviews results of molecular dynamics simulation studies of water confined in nanoporous aluminosilicates. The behaviour of confined molecules is shown to be influenced by the nature of the host structure, and the size and the topology of the voids. For some of the systems discussed the ambiguity in results of different modelling studies call for the use of extended potential and structural models. Thus, the use of polarizable force fields was shown to be necessary to take into account the variation of the molecular dipole of confined molecules in different environments.

  13. Ultrastable Mesoporous Aluminosilicates by Grafting Routes.

    PubMed

    Mokaya

    1999-10-01

    A combination of postsynthesis grafting and hydrothermal treatment offers an excellent route for the synthesis of ultrastable mesoporous aluminosilicates with enhanced acidity and catalytic activity. The stability observed (>150 h in boiling water; 4 h at 1000 degrees C) is, for mesoporous silicates, remarkable. Unusually the hydrothermal treatment is beneficial with respect to the use of the stable aluminosilicates as solid acid catalysts.

  14. Aluminosilicate Precipitation Impact on Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    WILMARTH, WILLIAM

    2006-03-10

    Experiments have been conducted to examine the fate of uranium during the formation of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) when wastes containing high aluminate concentrations are mixed with wastes of high silicate concentration. Testing was conducted at varying degrees of uranium saturation. Testing examined typical tank conditions, e.g., stagnant, slightly elevated temperature (50 C). The results showed that under sub-saturated conditions uranium is not removed from solution to any large extent in both simulant testing and actual tank waste testing. This aspect was not thoroughly understood prior to this work and was necessary to avoid criticality issues when actual tank wastes were aggregated. There are data supporting a small removal due to sorption of uranium on sites in the NAS. Above the solubility limit the data are clear that a reduction in uranium concentration occurs concomitant with the formation of aluminosilicate. This uranium precipitation is fairly rapid and ceases when uranium reaches its solubility limit. At the solubility limit, it appears that uranium is not affected, but further testing might be warranted.

  15. Beneficiation of aluminosilicate and magnesia secondary refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovskii, N.I.; Klyachin, V.V.; Rogozina, V.G.; Bortnikova, N.V.

    1987-09-01

    This article provides a comprehensive description of the recycling, magnetic separation, and utilization of waste refractories comprised of aluminosilicate and magnesia refractories along with data on the properties pertinent to the efficiency of the recycling process.

  16. Shape selectivity extending to ordered supermicroporous aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen Hua; Liang, Xiao Min; Zhang, Haidong; Wang, Yi Meng; He, Ming Yuan

    2015-01-28

    In the synthesis of polyoxymethylene dimethyl ethers (PODEn) catalyzed by ordered supermicroporous aluminosilicates, shape selectivity was observed and the high selectivity for target products (PODE3-8) was attributed to the particular pore diameter.

  17. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  18. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    DOE PAGES

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as amore » function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.« less

  19. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  20. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  1. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium...

  2. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  5. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  6. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  7. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  9. Evaluation of Uranium Coprecipitation with Sodium Aluminosilicate Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, Lawrence N.; Williams, Adrienne L.

    2004-02-15

    Batch laboratory experiments performed to evaluate uranium incorporation into aluminosilicate structures during synthesis are described. This research was conducted in response to plant problems related to the accumulation of uranium with aluminosilicates in low-level radioactive waste evaporators. Conditions that favor precipitation of aluminosilicates also foster uranium solid precipitation, so it is difficult to attribute problems with uranium accumulation to, for example, only the formation of the aluminosilicates. Infrared spectra show that sodium uranates, uranium silicates, and other uranium solids are formed during the synthesis of sodium aluminosilicates structures in the presence of uranium. Both amorphous and sodalite aluminosilicate phases, unlike the zeolite A phase, show appreciable affinity for uranium incorporation during their formation in the presence of uranium.

  10. Uranium and Aluminosilicate Surface Precipitation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2002-11-27

    The 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site has been used to treat an aluminum-rich waste stream from canyon operations and a silicon-rich waste stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The formation of aluminosilicate scale in the evaporator has caused significant operational problems. Because uranium has been found to accumulate in the aluminosilicate solids, the scale deposition has introduced criticality concerns as well. The objective of the tests described in this report is to determine possible causes of the uranium incorporation in the evaporator scale materials. The scope of this task is to perform laboratory experiments with simulant solutions to determine if (1) uranium can be deposited on the surfaces of various sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) forms and (2) aluminosilicates can form on the surfaces of uranium-containing solids. Batch experiments with simulant solutions of three types were conducted: (1) contact of uranium solutions/sols with NAS coatings on stainless steel surfaces, (2) contact of uranium solutions with NAS particles, and (3) contact of precipitated uranium-containing particles with solutions containing aluminum and silicon. The results show that uranium can be incorporated in NAS solids through encapsulation in bulk agglomerated NAS particles of different phases (amorphous, zeolite A, sodalite, and cancrinite) as well as through heterogeneous deposition on the surfaces of NAS coatings (amorphous and cancrinite) grown on stainless steel. The results also indicate that NAS particles can grow on the surfaces of precipitated uranium solids. Particularly notable for evaporator operations is the finding that uranium solids can form on existing NAS scale, including cancrinite solids. If NAS scale is present, and uranium is in sufficient concentration in solution to precipitate, a portion of the uranium can be expected to become associated with the scale. The data obtained to date on uranium-NAS affinity are qualitative. A necessary

  11. Evaluation of Uranium Co-precipitations with Sodium Aluminosilicate Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    2003-06-24

    This paper describes batch laboratory experiments performed to evaluate uranium incorporation into aluminosilicate structures during synthesis. This research was conducted in response to plant problems related to the accumulation of uranium with aluminosilicates in low-level radioactive waste evaporators. We have found that conditions which favor precipitation of aluminosilicates also foster uranium solid precipitation, so it is difficult to attribute problems with uranium accumulation to say just the formation of the aluminosilicates. Infrared spectra shows that sodium uranates, uranium silicates and other uranium solids are formed during the synthesis of sodium aluminosilicates structures in the presence of uranium. Both amorphous and sodalite aluminosilcate phases, unlike zeolite A phase, show appreciable affinity for uranium incorporation during their formation in the presence of uranium.

  12. Lithium alumino-silicate ion source development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Prabir Kumar; Seidl, Peter A.; Kwan, Joe W.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.; Mazaheri, Kavous

    2009-11-01

    We report experimental progress on Li+ source development in preparation for warm dense matter heating experiments. To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, we are pursuing the use of a low (E < 5 MeV) kinetic energy singly ionized lithium beam and a thin target. Two kinds of lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate ion sources, β-spodumene and β-eucryptite, each of area 0.31 cm2, have been fabricated for ion emission measurements. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1200 to 1300 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Tight process controls were necessary in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the porous tungsten substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. Current density limit of the two kinds have been measured, and ion species identification of possible contaminants has been verified with a Wien (E x B) filter.

  13. Metallic nanoparticles and their medicinal potential. Part II: aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, quantum dots and cochleates.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Leena; Scarabelli, Tiziano

    2013-09-01

    Metallic miniaturization techniques have taken metals to nanoscale size where they can display fascinating properties and their potential applications in medicine. In recent years, metal nanoparticles such as aluminium, silicon, iron, cadmium, selenium, indium and calcium, which find their presence in aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, quantum dots (Q-dots) and cochleates, have caught attention of medical industries. The increasing impact of metallic nanoparticles in life sciences has significantly advanced the production techniques for these nanoparticles. In this Review, the various methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles are outlined, followed by their physicochemical properties, some recent applications in wound healing, diagnostic imaging, biosensing, assay labeling, antimicrobial activity, cancer therapy and drug delivery are listed, and finally their toxicological impacts are revised. The first half of this article describes the medicinal uses of two noble nanoparticles - gold and silver. This Review provides further information on the ability of aluminum, silicon, iron, selenium, indium, calcium and zinc to be used as nanoparticles in biomedical sciences. Aluminosilicates find their utility in wound healing and antibacterial growth. Iron-oxide nanoparticles enhance the properties of MRI contrast agents and are also used as biomagnets. Cadmium, selenium, tellurium and indium form the core nanostructures of tiny Q-dots used in cellular assay labeling, high-resolution cell imaging and biosensing. Cochleates have the bivalent nano ions calcium, magnesium or zinc imbedded in their structures and are considered to be highly effective agents for drug and gene delivery. The aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, Q-dots and cochleates are discussed in the light of their properties, synthesis and utility.

  14. Photoelastic response of alkaline earth aluminosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Saxton, Scott A; Ellison, Adam J; Mauro, John C

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the structural origins of the photoelastic response in oxide glasses is important for discovering new families of zero-stress optic glasses and for developing a predictive physical model. In this Letter, we have investigated the composition dependence of the stress optic coefficient C of 32 sodium aluminosilicate glasses with different types of alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO). We find that most of the composition dependence of the stress optic response can be captured by a linear regression model and that the individual contributions from the alkaline earths to C depend on the alkaline earth-oxygen bond metallicity. High bond metallicity is required to allow bonds to be distorted along both the bonding direction and perpendicular to it. These findings are valuable for understanding the photoelastic response of oxide glasses.

  15. Characterization of Uranium Solids Precipitated with Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    DUFF, MC

    2004-04-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms store and process high-level liquid radioactive wastes from the Canyons and recycle water from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The waste is concentrated using evaporators to minimize the volume of space required for HLW storage. Recently, the 2H Evaporator was shutdown due to the crystallization of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) solids (such as cancrinite and sodalite) that contained close to 10 weight percent of elementally-enriched uranium (U). Prior to extensive cleaning,the evaporator deposits resided on the evaporator walls and other exposed internal surfaces within the evaporator pot. Our goal is to support the basis for the continued safe operation of SRS evaporators and to gain more information that could be used to help mitigate U accumulation during evaporator operation.

  16. Composites of Polyindole nanowires within Silicate and Aluminosilicate hosts with distinct conductive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez, J. M.; Gómez Costa, M. B.; Anunziata, O. A.

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured silicate SBA-15 and aluminosilicate AlSBA-15 were synthesized in order to prepare polyindole composites. The Silica mesoporous materials were prepared by sol- gel method and alumination using post-synthesis technique and analysed by different methods (XRD, BET, TEM, and FTIR). Polyindole/host composites were prepared by in situ oxidative polymerization of pre-adsorbed indole, employing Cl3Fe as oxidant. TG, FTIR, BET, XRD, SEM and TEM were used to characterize the resulting composites. These studies show that the porous structures of the materials are preserved after polymerization, and polyindole is found within the porous channels. The composites have an electrical conductivity range between values higher than those of the pure chemically synthesized polyindole, close to those of the pure electrochemically synthesized polymer and lower than those of the pure chemically synthesized polymer, in the order of 10-8 S/cm.

  17. Evaluation of the Incorporation of Uranium into Sodium Aluminosilicate Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    2003-03-26

    This report describes batch laboratory experiments performed to determine the relative amounts of uranium incorporated in aluminosilicate structures during synthesis. The findings summarized here are based on laboratory experiments, which involved the synthesis of sodium aluminosilicates (NAS) structures, amorphous, zeolites A and sodalite phases in the presence of depleted uranium and the analytical search for incorporated uranium in NAS internal structures after synthesis. These studies will support the basis for continued operation of evaporators at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  18. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  19. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-04-29

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  20. Characterization of Uranium Solids Precipitated with Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    DUFF, MC

    2004-01-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms store and process high-level liquid radioactive wastes from the Canyons and recycle water from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The waste is concentrated using evaporators to minimize the volume of space required for HLW storage. Recently, the 2H Evaporator was shutdown due to the crystallization of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) solids (such as cancrinite and sodalite) that contained close to 10 weight percent of elementally-enriched uranium (U). Prior to extensive cleaning,the evaporator deposits resided on the evaporator walls and other exposed internal surfaces within the evaporator pot. Our goal is to support the basis for the continued safe operation of SRS evaporators and to gain more information that could be used to help mitigate U accumulation during evaporator operation. To learn more about the interaction between U(VI) and NAS in HLW salt solutions, we performed several fundamental studies to examine the mechanisms of U accumulation with NAS in highly caustic solutions. This larger group of studies focused on the following processes: co-precipitation/structural incorporation, sorption, and precipitation (with or without NAS), which will be reviewed in this presentation. We will present and discuss local atomic structural characterization data about U that has been co-precipitated with NAS solids (such as amorphous zeolite precursor material and sodalite) using X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopic techniques.

  1. Uranium Sorption on Sodium Aluminosilicates and Gibbsite

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.C.

    2003-02-11

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms store and process high-level liquid radioactive wastes from the Canyons and recycle water from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The waste is concentrated using evaporators to minimize the volume of space required for HLW storage. After evaporation, the waste concentrate is transferred to one or more receipt storage tanks. Recently, the 2H Evaporator was shutdown due to the crystallization of sodium aluminosilicates (NAS) solids that contained elementally enriched uranium (U) precipitates. The scale deposits resided on the evaporator walls and other exposed internal surfaces within the evaporator pot. Little is known about U interactions with NAS in HLW solutions. Hence, this research was conducted to improve our basic understanding of one possible mechanism for U accumulation in the evaporators and in other SRS process areas. These studies will help support the basis for the continued safe operation of SRS evaporators and provide information on other issues associated with U behavior in the tank farms. For example, the knowledge of such fundamental information could help mitigate U accumulation during evaporator operation and optimize saltcake dissolution.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of aluminosilicate formation in tank waste simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.; Wang, L.; Bunker, B.C.; Windisch, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    Aluminosilicates are one of the major class of species controlling the volume of radioactive high-level waste that will be produced from future remediation at Hanford site. Here the authors present studies of the phases and structures of aluminosilicates as a function of sludge composition using X-ray powder diffraction, solid state {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the content of NaNO{sub 3} in solution has significant effects on the nature of the insoluble aluminosilicate phases produced. It was found that regardless of the initial Si:Al ratio, nitrate cancrinite was the main phase formed in the solution with pH of 13.5 and 5 M NaNO{sub 3}. However, at lower NaNO{sub 3} concentration with initial Si:Al ratios of 1.1, 2.2, and 11.0 in the solutions, a range of aluminosilicate zeolites was produced with Si:Al ratios of 1.1, 1.3, and 1.5, respectively. Lowering the solution pH appears to promote the formation of amorphous aluminosilicates. The results presented here are important for the prediction of the solubility and dissolution rate of Al in tank wastes.

  3. Mesostructured silica and aluminosilicate carriers for oxytetracycline delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Berger, D; Nastase, S; Mitran, R A; Petrescu, M; Vasile, E; Matei, C; Negreanu-Pirjol, T

    2016-08-30

    Oxytetracycline delivery systems containing various MCM-type silica and aluminosilicate with different antibiotic content were developed in order to establish the influence of the support structural and textural properties and aluminum content on the drug release profile. The antibiotic molecules were loaded into the support mesochannels by incipient wetness impregnation method using a drug concentrated aqueous solution. The carriers and drug-loaded materials were investigated by small- and wide-angle XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, TEM and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. Faster release kinetics of oxytetracycline from uncalcined silica and aluminosilicate supports was observed, whereas higher drug content led to lower delivery rate. The presence of aluminum into the silica network also slowed down the release rate. The antimicrobial assays performed on Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates showed that the oxytetracycline-loaded materials containing MCM-41-type mesoporous silica or aluminosilicate carriers inhibited the bacterial development. PMID:26861688

  4. Mesostructured silica and aluminosilicate carriers for oxytetracycline delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Berger, D; Nastase, S; Mitran, R A; Petrescu, M; Vasile, E; Matei, C; Negreanu-Pirjol, T

    2016-08-30

    Oxytetracycline delivery systems containing various MCM-type silica and aluminosilicate with different antibiotic content were developed in order to establish the influence of the support structural and textural properties and aluminum content on the drug release profile. The antibiotic molecules were loaded into the support mesochannels by incipient wetness impregnation method using a drug concentrated aqueous solution. The carriers and drug-loaded materials were investigated by small- and wide-angle XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, TEM and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. Faster release kinetics of oxytetracycline from uncalcined silica and aluminosilicate supports was observed, whereas higher drug content led to lower delivery rate. The presence of aluminum into the silica network also slowed down the release rate. The antimicrobial assays performed on Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates showed that the oxytetracycline-loaded materials containing MCM-41-type mesoporous silica or aluminosilicate carriers inhibited the bacterial development.

  5. Nanoscale encapsulation: the structure of cations in hydrophobic microporous aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Yuchs, S.E.; Giaquinta, D.; Soderholm, L.; Song, Kang

    1996-10-01

    Hydrophobic microporous aluminosilicates, created by organic surface modification of inherently hydrophilic materials such as zeolites and clays, are currently being investigated as storage media for hazardous cations. Use of organic monolayers to modify the surface of an aluminosilicate after introducing an ion into the zeolite/clay reduces the interaction of water with the material. Resulting systems are about 20 times more resistant to leaching of stored ion. XAS spectra from the encapsulated ion demonstrate that byproducts from the organic modifier can complex with the stored cation. This complexation can result in a decreased affinity of the cation for the aluminosilicate matrix. Changing the organic modifier eliminates this problem. XAS spectra also indicate that the reactivity and speciation of the encapsulated ion may change upon application of the hydrophobic layer.

  6. Phase evolution of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O gels in synthetic aluminosilicate binders.

    PubMed

    Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Gehman, John D; van Deventer, Jannie S J; Provis, John L

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates the production of stoichiometrically controlled alkali-aluminosilicate gels ('geopolymers') via alkali-activation of high-purity synthetic amorphous aluminosilicate powders. This method provides for the first time a process by which the chemistry of aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials may be accurately simulated by pure synthetic systems, allowing elucidation of physicochemical phenomena controlling alkali-aluminosilicate gel formation which has until now been impeded by the inability to isolate and control key variables. Phase evolution and nanostructural development of these materials are examined using advanced characterisation techniques, including solid state MAS NMR spectroscopy probing (29)Si, (27)Al and (23)Na nuclei. Gel stoichiometry and the reaction kinetics which control phase evolution are shown to be strongly dependent on the chemical composition of the reaction mix, while the main reaction product is a Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O type gel comprised of aluminium and silicon tetrahedra linked via oxygen bridges, with sodium taking on a charge balancing function. The alkali-aluminosilicate gels produced in this study constitute a chemically simplified model system which provides a novel research tool for the study of phase evolution and microstructural development in these systems. Novel insight of physicochemical phenomena governing geopolymer gel formation suggests that intricate control over time-dependent geopolymer physical properties can be attained through a careful precursor mix design. Chemical composition of the main N-A-S-H type gel reaction product as well as the reaction kinetics governing its formation are closely related to the Si/Al ratio of the precursor, with increased Al content leading to an increased rate of reaction and a decreased Si/Al ratio in the N-A-S-H type gel. This has significant implications for geopolymer mix design for industrial applications. PMID:26911317

  7. Phase evolution of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O gels in synthetic aluminosilicate binders.

    PubMed

    Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Gehman, John D; van Deventer, Jannie S J; Provis, John L

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates the production of stoichiometrically controlled alkali-aluminosilicate gels ('geopolymers') via alkali-activation of high-purity synthetic amorphous aluminosilicate powders. This method provides for the first time a process by which the chemistry of aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials may be accurately simulated by pure synthetic systems, allowing elucidation of physicochemical phenomena controlling alkali-aluminosilicate gel formation which has until now been impeded by the inability to isolate and control key variables. Phase evolution and nanostructural development of these materials are examined using advanced characterisation techniques, including solid state MAS NMR spectroscopy probing (29)Si, (27)Al and (23)Na nuclei. Gel stoichiometry and the reaction kinetics which control phase evolution are shown to be strongly dependent on the chemical composition of the reaction mix, while the main reaction product is a Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O type gel comprised of aluminium and silicon tetrahedra linked via oxygen bridges, with sodium taking on a charge balancing function. The alkali-aluminosilicate gels produced in this study constitute a chemically simplified model system which provides a novel research tool for the study of phase evolution and microstructural development in these systems. Novel insight of physicochemical phenomena governing geopolymer gel formation suggests that intricate control over time-dependent geopolymer physical properties can be attained through a careful precursor mix design. Chemical composition of the main N-A-S-H type gel reaction product as well as the reaction kinetics governing its formation are closely related to the Si/Al ratio of the precursor, with increased Al content leading to an increased rate of reaction and a decreased Si/Al ratio in the N-A-S-H type gel. This has significant implications for geopolymer mix design for industrial applications.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of aluminosilicate catalyst impregnated by nickel oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulida, Iffana Dani; Sriatun, Taslimah

    2015-09-01

    Aluminosilicate as a catalyst has been synthesized by pore-engineering using CetylTrimethylAmmonium-Bromide (CTAB) as templating agent. It can produce bigger aluminosilicate pore therefore it will be more suitable for bulky molecule. The aims of this research are to synthesize aluminosilicate supported by Nickel, using CTAB surfactant as templating agent for larger pore radius than natural zeolite and characterize the synthesis product, consist of total acid sites and surface area characteristic. This research has been done with following steps. First, making sodium silicate and sodium aluminate. Second, aluminosilicate was synthesized by direct methods, calcined at 550, 650 and 750°C variation temperature, characterized product by X-RD and FTIR spectrometer. Third, NiCl2 was impregnated to the aluminosilicate that has the best cristallinity and main TO4 functional groups product (550 sample). Variation of NiCl2:aluminosilicate (w/w) ratio were 25%:75%, 50%:50% and 75%:25%. Last but not least characterization of catalytic properties was performed. It comprised total acidity test (gravimetric method) and Surface Area Analyzer. The result shows that the product synthesized by direct method at 550oC calcination temperature has the best cristallinity and main functional groups of TO4. The highest total acid sites was 31.6 mmole/g (Imp-A sample). Surface Area Analyzer shows that Imp-B sample has the best pore distribution and highest total pore volume and specific surface area with value 32.424 cc/g and 46.8287 m2/g respectively. We can draw the conclusion that the most potential catalyst is Imp-A sample compared to Imp-B and Imp-C because it has the highest total acid sites. However the most effective catalyst used for product selectivity was Imp-B sample among all samples.

  9. Aluminosilicate and aluminosilicate based polymer composites: Present status, applications and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A. C.; Martins, P.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.

    2014-08-01

    Aluminosilicates have traditionally been important materials for applications related to adsorbents, water softeners, catalysis and mechanical and thermal reinforcement due to their high surface area, excellent thermal/hydrothermal stability, high shape-selectivity and superior ion-exchange ability. Recently, their use as polymer fillers has allowed to increasingly extending their application range to innovative areas such as medical and biological fields as well as in sensors, filtration membranes, energy storage and novel catalysis routes. Further, the large versatility and tailoring possibilities of both filler and matrix indicates this area as one of the enabling key technologies of the near future. This work summarizes the main developments up to date in this increasingly interesting field, focuses on the main applications already developed as well as on the key challenges for the near future.

  10. Recycling of aluminosilicate waste: Impact onto geopolymer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaidi, N.; Gharzouni, A.; Vidal, L.; Gouny, F.; Joussein, E.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    Geopolymers are innovative ecomaterials resulting from the activation of an aluminosilicate source by an alkaline solution. Their properties depend on the used raw materials. This paper focuses on the possibility to obtain geopolymer materials with aluminosilicate laboratory waste. The effect of these additions on the geopolymer properties was studied by FTIR spectroscopy and mechanical test. It was evidenced a slowdown of the polycondensation reaction as well as the compressive strength due to the addition of laboratory waste which decreases the Si/K ratio of mixture.

  11. Modelling studies of water in crystalline nanoporous aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Bougeard, Daniel; Smirnov, Konstantin S

    2007-01-14

    The paper presents a review of molecular modelling studies of hydrated nanoporous aluminosilicates (zeolites and clays) performed during the last decade. A special emphasis is set on the calculation of the dynamical quantities and collective properties of the confined water. Some new results concerning the behaviour of water molecules in the siliceous silicalite and zeolite beta structures are presented.

  12. 27Al-->1H cross-polarization in aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejski, W; Corma, A

    1994-06-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cross-polarization (CP) from 27Al to 1H was set on kaolinite, verified by a variable-contact time experiment and applied to ultrastable zeolite Y. The technique is useful for the selective NMR observation of AlOH sites in aluminosilicates, especially those from extraframework species in zeolites.

  13. Enhancement of ion mobility in aluminosilicate-polyphosphazene nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.C.; Bissessur, R.; Shriver, D.F.

    1997-09-01

    Nanocomposites of poly(bis-(2(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)phosphazene) (MEEP) or cryptand[2.2.2] with the aluminosilicate Na-montmorillonite (NaMont) were studied to develop new solid electrolytes with high conductivity and a unity cation transport number. An aluminosilicate was chosen because the low basicity of the Si-O-Al framework should minimize ion pairing. To further reduce ion pairing, solvating molecules or polymers such as cryptand[2.2.2] or MEEP were introduced into the aluminosilicate. When compared to pristine Na-montmorillonite, impedance spectroscopy indicates an increase in conductivity of up to 100 for MEEP{center_dot}NaMont intercalates, and of 50 for cryptand[2.2.2]{center_dot}NaMont intercalates. The MEEP{center_dot}NaMont intercalate exhibits high ionic conductivity anisotropy with respect to the montmorillonite layers ({sigma}{sub para.}/{sigma}{sub perp.} = 100), which is consistent with increased tortuosity of the cation diffusion path perpendicular to the structure layers. The temperature dependence of the conductivity suggests that cation transport is coupled to segmental motion of the intercalated polymer, as observed previously for simple polymer-salt complexes. Nanocomposites of solvating polymers or molecules with aluminosilicates provide a promising new direction in solid-state electrolytes.

  14. Transformation of Aluminosilicate Wet Gel to Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkó, Katalin; Pöppl, László

    2002-04-01

    Optically clear, homogeneous, monolithic aluminosilicate gels were prepared directly from solutions of inorganic aluminum salt, tetraethoxysilane, and alcohol. The dried aluminosilicate gels show new special properties, e.g. piezoelectricity and variable porosity (1-2000 m 2/g) due to the fractal-like gel structure. Ceramic products, which keep the chemical bonds and structure of the gels, were produced by heat treatment at 300-350°C. The processes that occurred during heat treatment were investigated by thermal analysis and mass spectrometry. The temperature limits of the gel state were determined by differential scanning calorimetry and small angle X-ray scattering. The collapse of the gel structure began around 350°C; however, the amorphous character remained until the temperature (ca. 970°C) of the phase transmission.

  15. Aluminosilicates and senile plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Candy, J M; Oakley, A E; Klinowski, J; Carpenter, T A; Perry, R H; Atack, J R; Perry, E K; Blessed, G; Fairbairn, A; Edwardson, J A

    1986-02-15

    Aluminium and silicon were found to be colocalised in the central region of senile plaque cores in studies with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The distribution of these elements was similar in cores isolated from the cerebral cortex of patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type and in cores studied in situ from tissue sections from the cerebral cortex of presenile and senile patients with Alzheimer's disease, and elderly, mentally normal patients. High-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques showed aluminium and silicon to be present as aluminosilicates. The presence of aluminosilicates at the centre of senile plaque cores contrasts with the distribution of other inorganic constituents and suggests that they may be involved in the initiation or early stages of senile plaque formation.

  16. Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with improved stability from protozeolitic nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Junlin; Kong, Dejin; Yang, Weimin; Xie, Zaiku; Wu, Dong; Sun, Yuhan

    2007-02-01

    Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with improved hydrothermal stability have been prepared through S +X -I + route via self-assembly of protozeolitic nanoclusters with cetyltrimethylammonium bromides (CTAB) template micelles in HNO 3 solution. SEM observation confirmed that high-yield aluminosilicate ropes could be produced under proper HNO 3 concentration. NO 3- ions had strong binding strength to the CTA + ions and tended to form more elongated surfactant micelles, thus fibrous products were fabricated under the direction of these long rod micelles in shearing flow. At the same time, the NO 3- ions combining with CTA + ions generated more active (CTA +NO 3-) assembly, which effectively catalysed the polymerization of protozeolitic nanoclusters with large volume into highly ordered mesostructures. Compared with normal MCM-41 silica synthesized through S +X -I + route in acidic media, the hydrothermal stability was improved considerably. These protozeolitic nanoclusters survived strongly acidic media and entered into mesostructured framework, which contributed to the improvement of hydrothermal stability.

  17. Hard x-ray nanotomography of amorphous aluminosilicate cements.

    SciTech Connect

    Provis, J. L.; Rose, V.; Winarski, R. P.; van Deventer, J. S. J.

    2011-08-01

    Nanotomographic reconstruction of a sample of low-CO{sub 2} 'geopolymer' cement provides the first three-dimensional view of the pore structure of the aluminosilicate geopolymer gel, as well as evidence for direct binding of geopolymer gel onto unreacted fly ash precursor particles. This is central to understanding and optimizing the durability of concretes made using this new class of binder, and demonstrates the value of nanotomography in providing a three-dimensional view of nanoporous inorganic materials.

  18. Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with improved stability from protozeolitic nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Junlin; Kong Dejin; Yang Weimin; Xie Zaiku; Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan

    2007-02-15

    Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with improved hydrothermal stability have been prepared through S{sup +}X{sup -}I{sup +} route via self-assembly of protozeolitic nanoclusters with cetyltrimethylammonium bromides (CTAB) template micelles in HNO{sub 3} solution. SEM observation confirmed that high-yield aluminosilicate ropes could be produced under proper HNO{sub 3} concentration. NO{sub 3} {sup -} ions had strong binding strength to the CTA{sup +} ions and tended to form more elongated surfactant micelles, thus fibrous products were fabricated under the direction of these long rod micelles in shearing flow. At the same time, the NO{sub 3} {sup -} ions combining with CTA{sup +} ions generated more active (CTA{sup +}NO{sub 3} {sup -}) assembly, which effectively catalysed the polymerization of protozeolitic nanoclusters with large volume into highly ordered mesostructures. Compared with normal MCM-41 silica synthesized through S{sup +}X{sup -}I{sup +} route in acidic media, the hydrothermal stability was improved considerably. These protozeolitic nanoclusters survived strongly acidic media and entered into mesostructured framework, which contributed to the improvement of hydrothermal stability. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with enhanced hydrothermal stability were fabricated from protozeolitic nanoclusters through S{sup +}X{sup -}I{sup +} route in HNO{sub 3} solution under the direction of CTAB templates.

  19. Development of Li+ alumino-silicate ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Lidia, S.; Anders, A.; Kwan, J.

    2009-04-21

    To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, one strategy is to deposit most of the ion energy at the peak of energy loss (dE/dx) with a low (E< 5 MeV) kinetic energy beam and a thin target[1]. Lower mass ions have a peak dE/dx at a lower kinetic energy. To this end, a small lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate source has been fabricated, and its emission limit has been measured. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1000-1150 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Alumino-silicates sources of K+ and Cs+ have been used extensively in beam experiments, but there are additional challenges for the preparation of high-quality Li+ sources: There are tighter tolerances in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. We report on recent measurements ofhigh ( up to 35 mA/cm2) current density from a Li+ source. Ion species identification of possible contaminants is being verified with a Wien (E x B) filter, and via time-of-flight.

  20. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  1. Relationship between texture and acidic properties of aluminosilicates and the conditions of their preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Grzechowiak, E.R.; Masalska, A.

    1986-04-01

    A study has been made of the method of pH adjustment in the precipitation of hydrogel in relation to its influence on the texture and acidic properties of alumino-silicates. It has been established that large-pore aluminosilicates can be obtained from neutral solutions. X-ray diffraction analysis of aluminosilicates has shown that the method of pH adjustment also affects their phase composition.

  2. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  3. Characterisation of frequency doubling in Eu(2+) doped aluminosilicate fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, T. J.; Lawandy, N. M.; Killian, A.; Rienhart, L.; Morse, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a series of experiments on efficient second-harmonic generation in a fiber with a Eu(2+)-doped aluminosilicate core are reported. The fiber was prepared by the seeding method with CW mode-locked radiation at 1.06 micron and produced ultrastable peak conversion efficiencies of 0.001 during mode-locked readout. Experiments were performed to determine the IR preparation intensity dependence, the stability of the output, and the type of erasure mechanisms which occur. The results are compared with those of germanosilicate fibers and some similarities and differences are discussed.

  4. Relation of the acidity of amorphous aluminosilicates with their activity and selectivity in isomerization of xylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Zadymov, V.V.; Lupina, M.I.; Kaliko, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Conversion of m-xylene on amorphous aluminosilicates is determined by overall surface acidity. The formation of acid centres with pK a greater than or equal toapprox. =-10 as a result of heat-steam treatment of aluminosilicates and a reduction in the number of strong centres increases selectivity in isomerization of m-xylene.

  5. Alumino-silicate ion sources for accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, A.I.

    1985-04-01

    As part of the program of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, ion sources have been developed using thermionic emitters of singly charged alkali metal ions. These emitters are flat surfaces of alumino-silicate, loaded with the appropriate ion. They have become convenient and reliable sources producing pulsed beams of very low emittance. Thermionic emission of ions from alumino-silicates has been known for a very long time. Here the author focuses on the practical application as accelerator ion sources. The author discusses the fabrication and heating of large area emitters, uniformity of emission and the maximum ion current density which can be extracted under space charge limited conditions, with zero electric field on the emitter surface. Results are presented for Na, K and Cs ions showing maximum space charge limited current densities of 25, 40 and 120 mAcm/sup -2/ respectively. In the case of cesium the author has produced a 5 mA beam at a kinetic energy of 200 keV with normalized emittance 1.2 x 10/sup -7/ ..pi.. m rad.

  6. Effective Sequestration of Clostridium difficile Protein Toxins by Calcium Aluminosilicate.

    PubMed

    Sturino, Joseph M; Pokusaeva, Karina; Carpenter, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent responsible for C. difficile infection. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB) are nearly indispensable virulence factors for Clostridium difficile pathogenesis. Given the toxin-centric mechanism by which C. difficile pathogenesis occurs, the selective sequestration with neutralization of TcdA and TcdB by nonantibiotic agents represents a novel mode of action to prevent or treat C. difficile-associated disease. In this preclinical study, we used quantitative enzyme immunoassays to determine the extent by which a novel drug, calcium aluminosilicate uniform particle size nonswelling M-1 (CAS UPSN M-1), is capable of sequestering TcdA and TcdB in vitro. The following major findings were derived from the present study. First, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 efficiently sequestered both TcdA and TcdB to undetectable levels. Second, we show that CAS UPSN M-1's affinity for TcdA is greater than its affinity for TcdB. Last, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 exhibited limited binding affinity for nontarget proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that ingestion of calcium aluminosilicate might protect gastrointestinal tissues from antibiotic- or chemotherapy-induced C. difficile infection by neutralizing the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of luminal TcdA and TcdB.

  7. Analysis of aluminosilicate particles in biological matrices using histochemistry and X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Powell, J J

    2002-06-01

    Aluminosilicates are a group of ubiquitous environmental particles that, in some cases, have been implicated in human disease. Characterisation of aluminosilicates in tissue samples requires, first, their in situ identification and, secondly, analysis of their aluminium and silicon content or, at least, aluminium:silicon ratio. Here, histochemical staining, microscopy and X-ray microanalysis were investigated as potential methods for the detection of aluminosilicates in biological samples. In contrast to aluminium phosphate or hydroxide, aluminosilicates were refractory to histochemical staining for aluminium. However, using electron microscopy, back scattered electrons allowed identification of aluminosilicates in tissue-like (gelatine) sections. X-ray microanalysis, using conventional peak:background ratios, did not provide a sufficiently accurate assessment of the aluminium content of various standard aluminosilicates to allow their identification. However, the similar spectral energies of aluminium and silicon allowed spectral peak heights to be directly compared and, using simple standards, aluminium:silicon ratios were found for a range of reference particles. Application of this technique should allow the localisation and identification of aluminosilicates in biological samples.

  8. SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE FOULING AND CLEANING OF DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION COALESCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-10-28

    During initial non-radioactive operations at the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the pressure drop across the decontaminated salt solution coalescer reached {approx}10 psi while processing {approx}1250 gallons of salt solution, indicating possible fouling or plugging of the coalescer. An analysis of the feed solution and the 'plugged coalescer' concluded that the plugging was due to sodium aluminosilicate solids. MCU personnel requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate the formation of the sodium aluminosilicate solids (NAS) and the impact of the solids on the decontaminated salt solution coalescer. Researchers performed developmental testing of the cleaning protocols with a bench-scale coalescer container 1-inch long segments of a new coalescer element fouled using simulant solution. In addition, the authors obtained a 'plugged' Decontaminated Salt Solution coalescer from non-radioactive testing in the MCU and cleaned it according to the proposed cleaning procedure. Conclusions from this testing include the following: (1) Testing with the bench-scale coalescer showed an increase in pressure drop from solid particles, but the increase was not as large as observed at MCU. (2) Cleaning the bench-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (11 g of bayerite if all aluminum is present in that form or 23 g of sodium aluminosilicate if all silicon is present in that form). (3) Based on analysis of the cleaning solutions from bench-scale test, the 'dirt capacity' of a 40 inch coalescer for the NAS solids tested is calculated as 450-950 grams. (4) Cleaning the full-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (60 g of aluminum and 5 g of silicon). (5) Piping holdup in the full-scale coalescer system caused the pH to differ from the target value. Comparable hold-up in the facility could lead to less effective

  9. Dynamic Reduction of FeO-Bearing, Anhydrous Aluminosilicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everman, R. L.; Cooper, R. F.

    2004-12-01

    We have studied the reduction dynamics of FeO-bearing aluminosilicate melts at oxygen activities sufficiently low to form metallic iron. The experiments involved reacting droplets, suspended from refractory metal wires, with a high-temperature ( ˜1400oC), controlled-oxygen-activity environment maintained by a dynamic CO:CO2 buffer. In the case of an FeO-doped magnesium aluminosilicate ("Fe-MAS") melt ( ˜5 mol% FeO) exposed to an oxygen activity of 2x10-13 ("QIF-2"; CO:CO2=240:1), the reduction dynamic is rate-limited by chemical diffusion of Mg2+: oxygen chemically ablates from the free surface and the network-modifying cations diffuse inward, charge-compensated by a counterflux of electron holes (the "semiconductor condition" holds for diffusion dynamics in this melt [e.g., Cook and Cooper, 2000]); nm-scale crystals of pure α -Fe nucleate at an internal front. Diffusion of an oxygen species is not involved. In the case of FeO-doped calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (Fe-CMAS) melt ( ˜8 mol% FeO) exposed to an oxygen activity of 2x10-15 (QIF-4; CO:CO2=1750:1), the dynamic changes: molten Fe-C-Si alloy droplets form near the surface, and bubbles are seen to form internally, truncating at an internal front. Further, the reaction occurs more slowly than that seen for the similarly polymerized Fe-MAS melt. The results suggests that molecular CO diffuses inward, consuming electron holes so as to form carbonate ion species in the melt [cf. Brooker et al., 2001]. Quenching produces a driving potential to reverse the internal reduction reaction, so creating the bubbles. Consumption of the electron holes by reaction with the carbon species dramatically reduces the reduction-to-metal kinetics. Brooker RA, Kohn SC, Holloway JR, McMillan PF (2001) Chem Geol 174:241-254; Cook GB, Cooper RF (2000) Am Mineral 85:397-406

  10. Strength Improvement of Glass Substrates by Using Surface Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amarendra; Kashyap, Kunal; Hou, Max T.; Yeh, J. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Defects and heterogeneities degrade the strength of glass with different surface and subsurface properties. This study uses surface nanostructures to improve the bending strength of glass and investigates the effect of defects on three glass types. Borosilicate and aluminosilicate glasses with a higher defect density than fused silica exhibited 118 and 48 % improvement, respectively, in bending strength after surface nanostructure fabrication. Fused silica, exhibited limited strength improvement. Therefore, a 4-μm-deep square notch was fabricated to study the effect of a dominant defect in low defect density glass. The reduced bending strength of fused silica caused by artificial defect increased 65 % in the presence of 2-μm-deep nanostructures, and the fused silica regained its original strength when the nanostructures were 4 μm deep. In fragmentation tests, the fused silica specimen broke into two major portions because of the creation of artificial defects. The number of fragments increased when nanostructures were fabricated on the fused silica surface. Bending strength improvement and fragmentation test confirm the usability of this method for glasses with low defect densities when a dominant defect is present on the surface. Our findings indicate that nanostructure-based strengthening is suitable for all types of glasses irrespective of defect density, and the observed Weibull modulus enhancement confirms the reliability of this method.

  11. XPS study of distribution of elements between surface and volume in aluminosilicate catalysts and adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Chukin, G.D.; Grishin, S.A.; Kulikov, A.S.; Nefedov, B.K.; Surin, S.A.

    1986-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used in an investigation of the distribution of aluminum and sodium on the surface and in the volume of amorphous aluminosilicates. It has been shown that in the Na form of the aluminosilicates, the sodium and aluminum ions are localized preferentially on the surface. When the Na/sup +/ ions are replaced by protons, there is a change in the electronic state of the near-surface atoms in the aluminosilicates. Information on acidic centers that has been obtained by IR spectroscopy is consistent with the XPS data.

  12. Crystallization Kinetics of Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of a calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass with composition relevant for aerospace applications, like air-breathing engines, were evaluated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) in powder and bulk forms. Activation energy and frequency factor values for crystallization of the glass were evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the onset of crystallization and the phases that developed after heat treating bulk glass at temperatures ranging from 690 to 960 deg for various times. Samples annealed at temperatures below 900 deg remained amorphous, while specimens heat treated at and above 900 deg exhibited crystallinity originating at the surface. The crystalline phases were identified as wollastonite (CaSiO3) and aluminum diopside (Ca(Mg,Al) (Si,Al)2O6). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were employed to examine the microstructure and chemical compositions of crystalline phases formed after heat treatment.

  13. The aluminosilicate fraction of North Pacific manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Piper, D.Z.; Leong, K.

    1981-01-01

    Nine nodules collected from throughout the deep North Pacific were analyzed for their mineralogy and major-element composition before and after leaching with Chester-Hughes solution. Data indicate that the mineral phillipsite accounts for the major part (> 75%) of the aluminosilicate fraction of all nodules. It is suggested that formation of phillipsite takes place on growing nodule surfaces coupled with the oxidation of absorbed manganous ion. All the nodules could be described as ternary mixtures of amorphous iron fraction (Fe-Ti-P), manganese oxide fraction (Mn-Mg Cu-Ni), and phillipsite fraction (Al-Si-K-Na), these fractions accounting for 96% of the variability of the chemical composition. ?? 1981.

  14. Adsorption of β-galactosidase on silica and aluminosilicate adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Dobryakova, I. V.; Pilipenko, O. S.

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that adsorption of β-galactosidase of Aspergillus oryzae fungi on mesoporous and biporous silica and aluminosilicate adsorbents and the rate of the process grow along with the diameter of the pores of the adsorbent. It is found that the shape of the adsorption isotherms changes as well, depending on the texture of the adsorbent: the Michaelis constant rises from 0.3 mM for the enzyme in solution to 0.4-0.5 mM for the enzyme on a surface in the hydrolysis of o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside. It is concluded that β-galactosidase displays its maximum activity on the surface of biporous adsorbents.

  15. Amphiphilic properties of poly(oxyalkylene)amine-intercalated smectite aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Chen, Yu-Min

    2004-05-11

    Layered aluminosilicates, including synthetic fluorine mica and natural montmorillonite (MMT), were intercalated with poly(oxypropylene)-polyamine quaternary salts with a 230-5000 molecular weight range. The X-ray basal spacing of these silicates had been expanded from 13.5 to 83.7 A for the synthetic mica and to 92.0 A for MMT. The relative silicate dimensions (300-1000 nm for synthetic mica and 80-100 nm for MMT) were ascertained by direct TEM observations in the case of the co-intercalated synthetic mica and MMT mixtures with Mw = 2000 quaternary ammonium salts. The tailored organic incorporation of synthetic mica and MMT clays could alter these hydrophilic clays, making them amphiphilic, and enable the lowering of toluene/water interfacial tension to 2.0 mN/m at the critical concentration of 0.1 wt %.

  16. Selective laser densification of lithium aluminosilicate glass ceramic tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocca, Andrea; Colombo, Paolo; Günster, Jens; Mühler, Thomas; Heinrich, Jürgen G.

    2013-01-01

    Tapes, cast by blade deposition of a lithium aluminosilicate glass slurry, were sintered using a YAG-fiber laser, with the aim of finding suitable parameters for an additive manufacturing process based on layer-wise slurry deposition and selective laser densification. The influence of the laser parameters (output power and scan velocity) on the sintering was evaluated, by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction, on the basis of the quality of the processed layer. Well densified samples could be obtained only in a small window of values for the output power and the scan velocity. The measurement of the width of a set of single scanned lines allowed also to estimate the minimum resolution of the system along the layer plane.

  17. Anastrozole versus tamoxifen as adjuvant therapy for Japanese postmenopausal patients with hormone-responsive breast cancer: efficacy results of long-term follow-up data from the N-SAS BC 03 trial.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Tomohiko; Yokota, Isao; Hozumi, Yasuo; Aogi, Kenjiro; Iwata, Hiroji; Tamura, Motoshi; Fukuuchi, Atsushi; Makino, Haruhiko; Kim, Ryungsa; Andoh, Masashi; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Ohno, Shinji; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Toru; Takatsuka, Yuichi; Mukai, Hirofumi

    2014-11-01

    Aromatase inhibitors are superior to tamoxifen as adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal patients with hormone-responsive breast cancer. We report the follow-up efficacy results from the N-SAS BC 03 trial (UMIN CTRID: C000000056) where anastrozole was compared with tamoxifen as adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal Japanese patients with hormone-responsive early breast cancer. The full analysis set contained 696 patients (anastrozole arm, n = 345; tamoxifen arm, n = 351). The log-rank test was used to compare the two groups in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse-free survival (RFS); Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated. The treatment effects were estimated by Cox's proportional hazards model. To examine time-varying effect of hazard ratios, we estimated time-varying hazard ratios at time t [HR(t)] using data from time t up to 12 months. After a median follow-up of 98.5 months, hazard ratios (95% CIs) were 0.90 (0.65-1.24; log-rank p = 0.526) for DFS and 0.83 (0.56-1.23; log-rank p = 0.344) for RFS. Hazard ratios (95% CIs) for DFS and RFS up to 36 months were 0.69 (0.40-1.17) and 0.54 (0.27-1.06) and those after 36 months were 1.06 (0.70-1.59) and 1.05 (0.64-1.73), respectively. Time-varying hazard ratios for both DFS and RFS showed that hazard ratios were initially in favor of anastrozole and approached 1.0 at around 36 months. Superior efficacy of anastrozole to tamoxifen suggested by the initial analysis was not confirmed in the present analysis after a long-term follow-up period. Advantage of anastrozole was the greatest immediately after switching from tamoxifen and then decreased thereafter.

  18. Health-related quality of life, psychological distress, and adverse events in postmenopausal women with breast cancer who receive tamoxifen, exemestane, or anastrozole as adjuvant endocrine therapy: National Surgical Adjuvant Study of Breast Cancer 04 (N-SAS BC 04).

    PubMed

    Takei, Hiroyuki; Ohsumi, Shozo; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Takehara, Megumi; Suemasu, Kimito; Ohashi, Yasuo; Hozumi, Yasuo

    2012-05-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL), symptoms of depression, and adverse events (AEs) were compared between Japanese postmenopausal patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer (BC) who received adjuvant tamoxifen, exemestane, or anastrozole in an open-labeled, randomized, multicenter trial designated as the National Surgical Adjuvant Study of Breast Cancer (N-SAS BC) 04 substudy of the Tamoxifen Exemestane Adjuvant Multinational (TEAM) trial. During the first year of treatment, HRQOL and symptoms of depression were analyzed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) and its Endocrine Symptom Subscale (ES), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), respectively. In addition, predefined AEs were analyzed. A total of 166 eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive adjuvant tamoxifen, exemestane, or anastrozole. FACT-B scores increased after treatment began and remained significantly higher in the tamoxifen group than in the exemestane group or anastrozole group during the first year (P = 0.045). FACT-B scores were similar in the exemestane group and anastrozole group. ES scores and CES-D scores were similar in all treatment groups. Arthralgia and fatigue were less frequent, but vaginal discharge was more frequent in the tamoxifen group than in the exemestane group or anastrozole group. HRQOL was better in Japanese postmenopausal women treated with tamoxifen than those treated with exemestane or anastrozole. HRQOL and AEs were similar with exemestane and anastrozole. Given the results of the TEAM trial, upfront use of tamoxifen followed by an aromatase inhibitor (AI) may be an important option for adjuvant endocrine therapy in Japanese postmenopausal women.

  19. Use of natural and synthetic aluminosilicates in decontamination of feed contaminated by fungi and micotoxins.

    PubMed

    Kołacz, R; Dobrzański, Z; Kulok, M

    2004-01-01

    The contamination of feed with micotoxin has been a serious problem in animal nutrition. Many existing methods of decontamination are not satisfying due to the toxicological safety and health quality of the fodder materials. It stimulates the scientists to search for the new methods. The use of sorbents in the form of natural and synthetic aluminosilicates is a promising direction. The efficacy of aluminosilicates towards aflatoxins has been proved. However, their influence on other micotoxins is not that obvious. According to the last investigations, the use of aluminosilicates in nutrition does not cause any side effects and widespread pathological effects are observed only when dosage is incorrect. Regarding the analyses that were published, it can be supposed that the addition of several different aluminosilicates is a sufficient protection against mycotoxicoses.

  20. Effects of Anions on Local Structure of Al and Si in Aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki; Yokoyama

    1999-06-15

    Three kinds of amorphous aluminosilicates were synthesized by coprecipitation of silicic acid with aluminum hydroxide in the presence of different inorganic ions: sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Although the bulk composition of the aluminosilicates obtained was not affected by anion species, their DTA spectra were significantly different, suggesting that their structures also differ. The local structure of Al and Si in the aluminosilicates was studied in detail by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR. From the 27Al MAS NMR spectra and comparison between 29Si HD- and CP-MAS NMR spectra, it was concluded that the aluminosilicate obtained in the presence of sulfate ions has only a montmorillonite-like structure, whereas in the cases of chloride and nitrate, the solids are composed of three phases: aluminum hydroxide, silica, and the montmorillonite-like aluminosilicate. The difference in the local structure of Al and Si in the aluminosilicates was explained by the difference in interaction between the anions and aluminum ions. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Effects of anions on local structure of Al and Si in aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Akane; Yokoyama, Takushi

    1999-06-15

    Three kinds of amorphous aluminosilicates were synthesized by coprecipitation of silicic acid with aluminum hydroxide in the presence of different inorganic ions: sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Although the bulk composition of the aluminosilicates obtained was not affected by anion species, their DTA spectra were significantly different, suggesting that their structures also differ. The local structure of Al and Si in the aluminosilicates was studied in detail by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR. From the {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra and comparison between {sup 29}Si HD- and CP-MAS NMR spectra, it was concluded that the aluminosilicate obtained in the presence of sulfate ions has only a montmorillonite-like structure, whereas in the cases of chloride and nitrate, the solids are composed of three phases: aluminum hydroxide, silica, and the montmorillonite-like aluminosilicate. The difference in the local structure of Al and Si in the aluminosilicates was explained by the difference in interaction between the anions and aluminum ions.

  2. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    SciTech Connect

    White, Claire E.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  3. The metapelitic garnet biotite muscovite aluminosilicate quartz (GBMAQ) geobarometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun-Ming; Zhao, Guochun C.

    2007-09-01

    In this contribution we have empirically calibrated the garnet-biotite-muscovite-aluminosilicate-quartz (GBMAQ) barometer using low- to medium-high-pressure, mid-grade metapelites. Application of the barometer suggests that the GBMAQ and GASP barometers show quite similar pressure estimates. Furthermore, metapelites within thermal contact aureole or very limited geographic area show no meaningful pressure diversity determined by the GBMAQ and GASP barometers which is the geological reality. The random error of the GBMAQ barometer is expected to be around ± 0.8 kbar, and this barometer shows no systematic bias with respect to either pressure, or temperature, or Al VI in muscovite, or Fe in biotite, or Fe in garnet. The GBMAQ barometer is thermodynamically consistent with the garnet-biotite geothermometer because they share the same activity models of both garnet and biotite. This barometer is especially useful for assemblages with Ca-poor garnet or Ca-poor plagioclase or plagioclase-absent metapelites. Application of this barometer beyond the calibration ranges, i.e., P- T range and chemical ranges of the minerals, is not encouraged.

  4. Mixed alkaline earth effect in the compressibility of aluminosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Rzoska, Sylwester J; Bockowski, Michal; Mauro, John C

    2014-02-01

    The mixed modifier effect (MME) in oxide glasses manifests itself as a non-additive variation in certain properties when one modifier oxide species is substituted by another one at constant total modifier content. However, the structural and topological origins of the MME are still under debate. This study provides new insights into the MME by investigating the effect of isostatic compression on density and hardness of mixed MgO/CaO sodium aluminosilicate glasses. This is done using a specially designed setup allowing isostatic compression of bulk glass samples up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature. A mixed alkaline earth effect is found in the compressibility and relative change of hardness, viz., a local maximum of density as a function of Mg/Ca ratio appears following compression, whereas a local minimum of hardness in the uncompressed glasses nearly disappears after compression. Moreover, the densification of these glasses is found to occur at temperatures much below the glass transition temperature, indicating that a non-viscous mechanism is at play. This is further supported by the fact that density relaxes in a stretched exponential manner upon subsequent annealing at ambient pressure with an exponent of ∼0.62. This is close to the Phillips value of 3/5 for relaxation in three dimensions when both short- and long-range interactions are activated.

  5. Electro-optical parameters of bond polarizability model for aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel; Tandon, Poonam

    2006-04-01

    Electro-optical parameters (EOPs) of bond polarizability model (BPM) for aluminosilicate structures were derived from quantum-chemical DFT calculations of molecular models. The tensor of molecular polarizability and the derivatives of the tensor with respect to the bond length are well reproduced with the BPM, and the EOPs obtained are in a fair agreement with available experimental data. The parameters derived were found to be transferable to larger molecules. This finding suggests that the procedure used can be applied to systems with partially ionic chemical bonds. The transferability of the parameters to periodic systems was tested in molecular dynamics simulation of the polarized Raman spectra of alpha-quartz. It appeared that the molecular Si-O bond EOPs failed to reproduce the intensity of peaks in the spectra. This limitation is due to large values of the longitudinal components of the bond polarizability and its derivative found in the molecular calculations as compared to those obtained from periodic DFT calculations of crystalline silica polymorphs by Umari et al. (Phys. Rev. B 2001, 63, 094305). It is supposed that the electric field of the solid is responsible for the difference of the parameters. Nevertheless, the EOPs obtained can be used as an initial set of parameters for calculations of polarizability related characteristics of relevant systems in the framework of BPM.

  6. SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE SOLIDS AFFINITY FOR CESIUM AND ACTINIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T; Bill Wilmarth, B; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-07-31

    Washed sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) solids at initial concentrations of 3.55 and 5.4 g/L sorb or uptake virtually no cesium over 288 hours, nor do any NAS solids generated during that time. These concentrations of solids are believed to conservatively bound current and near-term operations. Hence, the NAS solids should not have affected measurements of the cesium during the mass transfer tests and there is minimal risk of accumulating cesium during routine operations (and hence posing a gamma radiation exposure risk in maintenance). With respect to actinide uptake, it appears that NAS solids sorb minimal quantities of uranium - up to 58 mg U per kg NAS solid. The behavior with plutonium is less well understood. Additional study may be needed for radioactive operations relative to plutonium or other fissile component sorption or trapping by the solids. We recommend this testing be incorporated in the planned tests using samples from Tank 25F and Tank 49H to extend the duration to bound expected inventory time for solution.

  7. Ageing characteristics of aluminium alloy aluminosilicate discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, D.; Singh, V.

    1999-03-05

    Development of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites is aimed at providing high specific strength and stiffness needed for aerospace and some critical high temperature structural applications. Considerable efforts have been made, during the last decade, to improve the strength of age-hardening aluminium alloy matrix composites by suitable heat treatment. It has also been well established that age-hardenable aluminium alloy composites show accelerated ageing behavior because of enhanced dislocation density at the fiber/matrix interface resulting from thermal expansion mismatch between ceramic fiber and the metal matrix. The accelerated ageing of aluminium alloy composites either from dislocation density or the residual stress, as a result of thermal expansion mismatch is dependent on the size of whisker and particulate. Investigations have also been made on the effect of volume fraction of particulate on the ageing behavior of aluminium alloys. The present investigation is concerned with characterization of age-hardening behavior of an Al-Si-Cu-Mg(AA 336) alloy alumino-silicate discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites (referred to as aluminium MMCs in the present text) being developed for automotive pistons. An effort is made to study the effect of volume fraction of the reinforcement on age-hardening behavior of this composite.

  8. A new SiC-whisker-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate composite

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, L.A.; Chen, Iwei . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The glass-ceramic matrix of the well-known lithium aluminosilicate (LAS)/SiC composite is usually formulated near the spodumene composition. The authors report a new composition which is rich in alumina and lean in silica and lithia. This formulation offers a new option of converting the glass-ceramic matrix to a mullite/alumina matrix upon annealing above 1,400 C, and hence better creep resistance and other high-temperature mechanical properties. Using a transient-phase processing method that they developed previously for the superplastic forming of mullite, the authors are able to hot-press a composite containing 30 vol% SiC whiskers at [approximately]1,350 C to achieve full density. Flexural strength measurements up to 1,400 C have confirmed the improved high-temperature strength and creep resistance over conventional LAS. The fracture toughness is also higher than that of LAS. The results suggest that the new composition may be chosen as a better candidate matrix for SiC-fiber-reinforced composites.

  9. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  10. Aluminosilicate Formation in High Level Waste Evaporators: A Mechanism for Uranium Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2002-02-08

    High level waste Evaporators at the Savannah River Site (SRS) process radioactive waste to concentrate supernate and thus conserve tank space. In June of 1997, difficulty in evaporator operation was initially observed. This operational difficulty evidenced itself as a plugging of the evaporator's gravity drain line (GDL). The material blocking the GDL was determined to be a sodium aluminosilicate. Following a mechanical cleaning of the GDL, the evaporator was returned to service until October 1999. At this time massive deposits were discovered in the evaporator pot. As a result of the changes in evaporator chemistry and the resulting formation of aluminosilicate deposits in the evaporator, a comprehensive research and development program has been undertaken. This program is underway in order to assist in understanding the new evaporator chemistry and gain insight into the deposition phenomena. Key results from testing in FY01 have demonstrated that the chemistry of the evaporator feed favors aluminosilicate formation. Both the reaction kinetics and particle growth of the aluminosilicate material under SRS evaporator conditions has been demonstrated to occur within the residence times utilized in the SRS evaporator operation. Batch and continuous-flow experiments at known levels of supersaturation have shown a significant correlation between the deposition of aluminosilicates and mixing intensity in the vessel. Advances in thermodynamic modeling of the evaporator chemistry have been accomplished. The resulting thermodynamic model has been related to the operational history of the evaporator, is currently assisting in feed selection, and could potentially assist in expanding the operating envelopes technical baselines for evaporator operation.

  11. Aqueous dissolution of sodium aluminosilicate geopolymers derived from metakaolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Z.; Vance, E. R.; Perera, D. S.

    2012-05-01

    In dilute aqueous solutions, the elemental releases of Na, Al and Si from a metakaolin-based sodium aluminosilicate geopolymer were not very sensitive to pH in the range of 4-10 but increased outside this range, particularly on the acidic side. To minimise pH drifts, experiments were carried out using small amounts of graded powders in relatively large volumes of water. In deionised water, the Na dissolution rate in 7 days was dominant and increased by at least a factor of ˜4 on heating from 18 to 90 °C, with greater increases in the extractions of Al and Si. At 18 °C the elemental extractions in deionised water increased approximately linearly with time over the 1-7 days period. Further exposure led to a slower extraction into solution for Na and Si, with a decrease in extraction of Al. It was deduced that framework dissolution was important in significantly acidic or alkaline solutions, but that contributions from water transfer from pores to elemental extractions were present, even at low temperatures in neutral solutions. It was also deduced from the Na release data that the Na leaching kinetics of geopolymer in deionised water (dilute solutions) followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the pseudo-second-order rate constant evaluated. Contact with KCl, KHCO3, and pH ˜6 and 10 potassium phthalate buffer solutions gave rise to a high degree of Na+ ↔ K+ exchange and rendered the framework ions less leachable in water.

  12. Evidence for lithium-aluminosilicate supersaturation of pegmatite-forming melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneta, Victoria; Baker, Don R.; Minarik, William

    2015-07-01

    New experimental data on the solubility of lithium (Li) at spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) and petalite (LiAlSi4O10) saturation at 500 MPa and 550-750 °C reveal evidence for lithium supersaturation of pegmatite-forming melts before the formation of Li-aluminosilicates. The degree of Li enrichment in granitic melts can reach ~11,000 ppm above the saturation value before the crystallization of Li-aluminosilicate minerals at lower temperatures. Comparison of the experimental results with the spodumene-rich Moblan pegmatite (Quebec) is consistent with extreme Li enrichment of the pegmatite-forming melt prior to emplacement, which cannot be explained with equilibrium crystallization of Li-aluminosilicates from a common granitic melt. The results of this study support the model of disequilibrium fractional crystallization through liquidus undercooling as the most plausible mechanism for the generation of such Li-rich ore resources.

  13. Highly acidic mesostructured aluminosilicates assembled from surfactant-mediated zeolite hydrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Yu; Pinnavaia, Thomas J

    2006-03-16

    The surfactant-mediated hydrolysis of ZSM-5 zeolite affords five-membered ring subunits that can be readily incorporated into the framework walls of a hexagonal mesostructured aluminosilicate, denoted MSU-Z. The five-membered ring subunits, which are identifiable by infrared spectroscopy, impart unprecedented acidity to the mesostructure, as judged by cumene cracking activity at 300 degrees C. Most notably, MSU-Z aluminosilicate made through the base hydrolysis of ZSM-5 in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium ions exhibits a cumene conversion of 73%, which is 6.7-fold higher than the conversion provided by a conventional MCM-41. This approach to stabilizing zeolitic subunits through surfactant-mediated hydrolysis of zeolites appears to be general. The hydrolysis of USY zeolite under analogous hydrolytic conditions also affords zeolitic fragments that boost the acidity of the mesostructure in comparison to equivalent compositions prepared from conventional aluminosilicate precursors.

  14. Synthesis and immobilization of silver nanoparticles on aluminosilicate nanotubes and their antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek Yucelen, G.; Connell, Rachel E.; Terbush, Jessica R.; Westenberg, David J.; Dogan, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    A novel colloidal method is presented to synthesize silver nanoparticles on aluminosilicate nanotubes. The technique involves decomposition of AgNO3 solution to Ag nanoparticles in the presence of aluminosilicate nanotubes at room temperature without utilizing of reducing agents or any organic additives. Aluminosilicate nanotubes are shown to be capable of providing a unique chemical environment, not only for in situ conversion of Ag+ into Ag0, but also for stabilization and immobilization of Ag nanoparticles. The synthesis strategy described here could be implemented to obtain self-assembled nanoparticles on other single-walled metal oxide nanotubes for unique applications. Finally, we demonstrated that nanotube/nanoparticle hybrid show strong antibacterial activity toward Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli.

  15. Quantum-chemical investigation of mechanism of dehydroxylation of crystalline and amorphous aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Senchenya, I.N.; Chuvylkin, N.D.; Kazanskii, V.B.

    1986-07-01

    Within the framework of the cluster approach and the semiempirical SCF MO LCAO method in the CNDO/BW valence approximation, possible pathways have been compared for the dehydroxylation of aluminosilicate systems. It has been shown that dehydroxylation as a result of splitting of a water molecule from an acidic bridge hydroxyl group and a more basic terminal group Al-OH is the most energyfavorable. Apparently, such a dehydroxylation pathway is primarily characteristic for amorphous aluminosilicates. Typical of crystalline aluminosilicates at moderate heat-treating temperature is dehydroxylation through splitting of a water molecule from an acidic bridge hydroxyl group and a neutral Si-OH group; at higher temperatures, there is a possible pathway of dehydroxylation of highsilica zeolites as a result of condensation of two acidic surface hydroxyls.

  16. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.

    2010-10-01

    We report results on lithium alumino-silicate ion source development in preparation for warmdense-matter heating experiments on the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXII). The practical limit to the current density for a lithium alumino-silicate source is determined by the maximum operating temperature that the ion source can withstand before running into problems of heat transfer, melting of the alumino-silicate material, and emission lifetime. Using small prototype emitters, at a temperature of ~;;1275 oC, a space-charge-limited Li+ beam current density of J ~;;1 mA/cm2 was obtained. The lifetime of the ion source was ~;;50 hours while pulsing at a rate of 0.033 Hz with a pulse duration of 5-6 mu s.

  17. Aflatoxin adsorbent capacity of two Mexican aluminosilicates in experimentally contaminated chick diets.

    PubMed

    Márquez Márquez, R N; Tejada de Hernandez, I

    1995-01-01

    To study the aflatoxin-adsorbent capacity of two Mexican aluminosilicates (ALS) identified as Atapulgita (AT) and Füller earth (FE), these ALS were compared with a commercial aluminosilicate, Novasil (NV), at two concentrations (0.05 and 1.0%) added to chick diets with 55% of experimentally contaminated corn (200 micrograms/kg). Eight treatments were studied with two replicates for treatment and four chicks per cage. Results (weight gain, feed efficiency, gross and microscopic pathology) at 3 weeks showed that both Mexican ALS were as efficient as the commercial material in protecting chicks against the aflatoxin toxicity. PMID:7664939

  18. Spectroscopy and laser action of rhodamine 6G doped aluminosilicate xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    McKiernan, J.M.; Yamanaka, S.A.; Dunn, B.; Zink, J.I. )

    1990-07-26

    Rhodamine 6G (R6G) doped aluminosilicate glass synthesized by the sol-gel method exhibits laser action. Transparent 5 mm {times} 5 mm {times} 10 mm monoliths were used as cast in a simple laser cavity. This new material was pumped at rates of up to 25 Hz and was still active after as many as 40,000 pump pulses. Luminescence and free-running laser spectra are measured. The dependence of the R6G doped aluminosilicate dye laser output on the number of pump pulses and the pump pulse energy is discussed.

  19. Aflatoxin adsorbent capacity of two Mexican aluminosilicates in experimentally contaminated chick diets.

    PubMed

    Márquez Márquez, R N; Tejada de Hernandez, I

    1995-01-01

    To study the aflatoxin-adsorbent capacity of two Mexican aluminosilicates (ALS) identified as Atapulgita (AT) and Füller earth (FE), these ALS were compared with a commercial aluminosilicate, Novasil (NV), at two concentrations (0.05 and 1.0%) added to chick diets with 55% of experimentally contaminated corn (200 micrograms/kg). Eight treatments were studied with two replicates for treatment and four chicks per cage. Results (weight gain, feed efficiency, gross and microscopic pathology) at 3 weeks showed that both Mexican ALS were as efficient as the commercial material in protecting chicks against the aflatoxin toxicity.

  20. Calculation of the Aluminosilicate Half-Life Formation Time in the 2H Evaporator

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2000-09-21

    The 2H Evaporator contains large quantities of aluminosilicate solids deposited on internal fixtures. The proposed cleaning operations will dissolve the solids in nitric acid. Operations will then neutralize the waste prior to transfer to a waste tank. Combining recent calculations of heat transfer for the 2H Evaporator cleaning operations and laboratory experiments for dissolution of solid samples from the pot, the authors estimated the re-formation rate for aluminosilicates during cooling. The results indicate a half-life formation of 17 hours when evaporator solution cools from 60 degrees C and 9 hours when cooled from 90 degrees C.

  1. The Yb-doped aluminosilicate fibers photodarkening mechanism based on the charge-transfer state excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybaltovsky, A. A.; Bobkov, K. K.; Velmiskin, V. V.; Umnikov, A. A.; Shestakova, I. A.; Guryanov, A. N.; Likhachev, M. E.; Bubnov, M. M.; Dianov, E. M.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the photodarkening effect in fiber preforms with an ytterbium-doped aluminosilicate glass core. The room-temperature stable Yb2+ ions formation in the glass matrix under both UV- and NIR-pumping irradiation was revealed by the method of absorption spectra analysis and the fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Comparative studies of preforms and crystals samples luminescence spectra, obtained under UV-excitation, were performed. A general mechanism of Yb2+ ions and aluminium oxygen-hole centers (Al-OHC) formation as a result of photoinduced process of Yb3+ ions excitation to "charge-transfer state" (CTS) was found for both Yb:YAG crystal and aluminosilicate glass.

  2. Technetium (VII) Co-precipitation with Framework Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Harsh, James B.; Dickson, Johnbull Otah; Pierce, Eric M.; Bargar, John

    2015-07-13

    Technetium-99 (99Tc), a long-lived radionuclide, is one of the most widespread contaminants within the Hanford subsurface. At some depths, it is only extractable with strong acids, suggesting incorporation into a solid phase. We hypothesized that Tc may have coprecipitated with feldspathoid aluminosilicates under waste tanks that had leaked caustic solutions into the vadose zone. Our objectives were to determine if Tc could be incorporated into the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite and under what conditions coprecipitation could occur. Our hypothesis was that sodalite was more likely to incorporate and retain Tc. Our approach was to use known methods of feldspathoid formation in solutions resembling those in Hanford waste tanks contacting sediments in terms of major ion (Na, NO3, OH, Al(OH)4, and Si(OH)4 concentrations. In some cases, Al and Si were supplied from zeolite. We used perrhenate (ReO4) as a surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO4) to avoid the radioactivity. The major findings of this study were 1) ReO4 could be incorporated into either sodalite or cancrinite but the concentration in the solid was < 1% of the competing ion Cl, NO3, or NO2. 2) The small amount of ReO4 incorporated was not exchangeable with NO3 or NO2. 3) In sodalite, NO3 was highly preferred over ReO4 but significant Re-sodalite was formed when the mole fraction in solution (Re/Re+N) exceeded 0.8. 4) A nonlinear relation between the unit cell parameter and amount of Re incorporated suggested that a separate Re-sodalite phase was formed rather than a solid solution. 5) We determined that sodalite preference for sodalite in the presence of different anions increased with the ionic size of the competing anion: Cl < CO3 < NO3 < SO4 < MnO4 < WO4 and significant incorporation did not occur unless the difference in anion radii was less than 12%. 6) Re(VII) was not significantly reduced to Re(IV) under the conditions of this experiment and Re appeared to be a good surrogate for Tc under oxidizing

  3. A highly crystalline microporous hybrid organic-inorganic aluminosilicate resembling the AFI-type zeolite.

    PubMed

    Bellussi, Giuseppe; Millini, Roberto; Montanari, Erica; Carati, Angela; Rizzo, Caterina; Parker, Wallace O; Cruciani, Giuseppe; de Angelis, Alberto; Bonoldi, Lucia; Zanardi, Stefano

    2012-07-28

    ECS-14, a crystalline microporous hybrid organic-inorganic aluminosilicate, has been synthesized by using 1,4-bis-(triethoxysilyl)-benzene (BTEB) as a source of silica. Its structure contains a system of linear channels with 12-membered ring openings, running along the [001] direction, resembling the pore architecture of the AFI framework type. PMID:22717682

  4. EFFECT OF IMPURITIES ASSOCIATED WITH ALUMINOSILICATES ON ARSENIC SORPTION AND OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenite, As(III), and arsenate, As(V), are of increasing environmental concern. Risk assessment and risk management of arsenic contaminated sites requires a better understanding of arsenic-mineral interactions. Aluminosilicate minerals, such as feldspars and clays, are the mos...

  5. Direct aerosol synthesis of large-pore amorphous mesostructured aluminosilicates with superior acid-catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Pega, Stéphanie; Boissière, Cédric; Grosso, David; Azaïs, Thierry; Chaumonnot, Alexandra; Sanchez, Clément

    2009-01-01

    An old dream comes true: A direct and environmentally benign synthetic strategy was developed for the aerosol-based mass production of large-pore mesostructured aluminosilicate powders (see TEM image). Although amorphous, some powders exhibit higher activity towards m-xylene isomerization and lower coke formation than a Y-zeolite based industrial reference catalyst.

  6. Epoxide ring-opening and Meinwald rearrangement reactions of epoxides catalyzed by mesoporous aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mathew W C; Davies, A Matthew; Buckle, Richard; Mabbett, Ian; Taylor, Stuart H; Graham, Andrew E

    2009-06-21

    Mesoporous aluminosilicates efficiently catalyze the ring-opening of epoxides to produce beta-alkoxyalcohols in high yields under extremely mild reaction conditions. These materials also catalyze the corresponding Meinwald rearrangement in non-nucleophilic solvents to give aldehydes which can be trapped in situ to provide the corresponding acetals in an efficient tandem process.

  7. High-aluminum-affinity silica is a nanoparticle that seeds secondary aluminosilicate formation.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Brown, Andy; Dietzel, Martin; Powell, Jonathan J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance and abundance of aluminosilicates throughout our natural surroundings, their formation at neutral pH is, surprisingly, a matter of considerable debate. From our experiments in dilute aluminum and silica containing solutions (pH ~ 7) we previously identified a silica polymer with an extraordinarily high affinity for aluminium ions (high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer, HSP). Here, further characterization shows that HSP is a colloid of approximately 2.4 nm in diameter with a mean specific surface area of about 1,000 m(2) g(-1) and it competes effectively with transferrin for Al(III) binding. Aluminum binding to HSP strongly inhibited its decomposition whilst the reaction rate constant for the formation of the β-silicomolybdic acid complex indicated a diameter between 3.6 and 4.1 nm for these aluminum-containing nanoparticles. Similarly, high resolution microscopic analysis of the air dried aluminum-containing silica colloid solution revealed 3.9 ± 1.3 nm sized crystalline Al-rich silica nanoparticles (ASP) with an estimated Al:Si ratio of between 2 and 3 which is close to the range of secondary aluminosilicates such as imogolite. Thus the high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer is a nanoparticle that seeds early aluminosilicate formation through highly competitive binding of Al(III) ions. In niche environments, especially in vivo, this may serve as an alternative mechanism to polyhydroxy Al(III) species binding monomeric silica to form early phase, non-toxic aluminosilicates.

  8. Formic acid, ethanol in vycor glass, and water in aluminosilicate zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Loong, C.K.; Trouw, F.; Iton, L.E.

    1993-11-01

    We present results of incoherent inelastic neutron-scattering experiments on formic acid, ethanol in vycor glass, and water in aluminosilicate zeolites performed at Argonne`s spallation neutron source, IPNS. The forming and breaking of hydrogen bonds are discussed in terms of translational and rotational diffusion, and vibrational footprints of various molecular species in these systems.

  9. Corrosion behavior of sodium aluminosilicate glasses and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, James Patrick

    1999-12-01

    A comprehensive study of the effects of structure and composition on the pH-dependent corrosion behavior of sodium-aluminosilicate glasses and crystals at 25°C, was investigated by a combination of various solution and surface analysis techniques. These techniques were used to measure solution stoichiometry relative to the glass and crystal, surface composition, surface layer thickness, and structure of the surface layer. The room temperature dissolution rates of glasses and crystals with the albite composition (NaAlSi3O8) were essentially identical over the acidic-weakly basic pH region. Differences in density and tetrahedral ring structure between the glass and crystal structures, however, led to more extensive Na and Al depletion from the glass surface. Nevertheless, the outermost 17A of the glass and crystal surface were compositionally similar, suggesting that this region of the solid controls the dissolution rate. The corrosion behavior of glasses in the NBO (Na2O-xAl 2O3-(3-x)SiO2) and mineral (Na2O-Al 2O3-y SiO2) series were investigated over the pH range of 1--12. The NBO glass series tested the effects of alumina and non-bridging oxygen (NBO) concentration on corrosion behavior without any change in soda content. The mineral glass series tested the effect of Al/Si ratio on corrosion behavior in glasses with fully polymerized structures and no NBO sites. The elimination of some NBO sites by the initial addition of alumina to the glass with x = 0.0 composition caused a significant reduction in the dissolution rate. However, the dissolution rates of glasses with x > 0.2 (in the NBO series) and all glasses in the mineral series were controlled by Al-O-Si and Si-O-Si bonding. In the NBO series, NBO concentration controlled the formation and thickness of leached surface layers. In the absence of NBO sites, Al-O-Si and Si-O-Si bonding controlled the leaching behavior. Transformation of the glass surfaces during corrosion at any pH led to the formation leached

  10. Interface Induced Growth and Transformation of Polymer-Conjugated Proto-Crystalline Phases in Aluminosilicate Hybrids: A Multiple-Quantum (23)Na-(23)Na MAS NMR Correlation Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Brus, Jiri; Kobera, Libor; Urbanova, Martina; Doušová, Barbora; Lhotka, Miloslav; Koloušek, David; Kotek, Jiří; Čuba, Pavel; Czernek, Jiri; Dědeček, Jiří

    2016-03-22

    Nanostructured materials typically offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of their large interfacial area. In this contribution, we present a comprehensive structural characterization of aluminosilicate hybrids with polymer-conjugated nanosized zeolites specifically grown at the organic-inorganic interface. The inorganic amorphous Al-O-Si framework is formed by alkali-activated low-temperature transformation of metakaoline, whereas simultaneous copolymerization of organic comonomers creates a secondary epoxide network covalently bound to the aluminosilicate matrix. This secondary epoxide phase not only enhances the mechanical integrity of the resulting hybrids but also introduces additional binding sites accessible for compensating negative charge on the aluminosilicate framework. This way, the polymer network initiates growth and subsequent transformation of protocrystalline short-range ordered zeolite domains that are located at the organic-inorganic interface. By applying an experimental approach based on 2D (23)Na-(23)Na double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR spectroscopy, we discovered multiple sodium binding sites in these protocrystalline domains, in which immobilized Na(+) ions form pairs or small clusters. It is further demonstrated that these sites, the local geometry of which allows for the pairing of sodium ions, are preferentially occupied by Pb(2+) ions during the ion exchange. The proposed synthesis protocol thus allows for the preparation of a novel type of geopolymer hybrids with polymer-conjugated zeolite phases suitable for capturing and storage of metal cations. The demonstrated (23)Na-(23)Na DQ MAS NMR combined with DFT calculations represents a suitable approach for understanding the role of Na(+) ions in aluminositicate solids and related inorganic-organic hybrids, particularly their specific arrangement and clustering at interfacial areas.

  11. Sorption of cesium and strontium from mineralized aqueous solutions on natural aluminosilicates modified by ferrocyanides of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyugin, A.S.; Trofimenko, N.E.; Masherova, N.P.; Rat`ko, A.I.; Golikova, N.I.

    1994-03-10

    The sorption behavior of natural aluminosilicates (bentonite and clinoptilolite) and aluminosilicates modified by ferrocyanides of heavy metals has been studied relative to radionuclides {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in the presence of various quantities of alkali and alkaline-earth ions (e.g. surface waters). It has been shown that the distribution coefficients of the modified samples may exceed 100 for Sr{sup 2+} and 10,000 for Cs{sup +}; however, with a concentration of mineral background over 1.0 g{center_dot}liter, the competing ions strongly depress the sorption properties of the aluminosilicates.

  12. Studies of the surface charge of amorphous aluminosilicates using surface complexation models.

    PubMed

    Jara, Alejandra A; Goldberg, Sabine; Mora, M L

    2005-12-01

    Synthetic noncrystalline aluminosilicates with variable charge, similar to allophanes present naturally in volcanic soils, were studied. The surface charge behavior was determined by zero point charge (ZPC) measured by electrophoretic mobility (isoelectric points, IEP) and determined by potentiometric titration (point of zero salt effect, PZSE). The ZPC calculated by Parks model (ZPC(c)), compared with IEP values, showed that the aluminosilicate (AlSi) surface was slightly enriched by AlOH (34% Al(2)O(3) and 66% SiO(2)) compared with the bulk composition (29% Al(2)O(3) and 71% SiO(2)). For aluminosilicate coated with iron oxide (AlSiFe) the ZPC(c) (4.4) was lower than the IEP (8.46), showing that the surface composition is formed mainly from iron oxide. The PZSE values for AlSi and AlSiFe were 6.2 and 4.8, respectively. The differences between the IEP and PZSE are attributed to the formation of Si-O-Fe or Si-O-Al bonds; therefore, the reactivity of Fe and Al atoms was modified on the surface. Two mechanistic models, the constant capacitance model (CCM) and the triple layer model (TLM), using the program FITEQL 3.2 were able to describe the surface behavior of both synthetic aluminosilicates. The acidity constants determined using both models for the aluminosilicates showed differences with respect to pure oxide, mainly attributed to the presence of SiOH sites on the internal surfaces. The ionic strength showed a good relation with the parameters obtained using the CCM (pK(int)(a1), pK(int)(a2) and capacitance values) and the TLM (pK(int)(a1), pK(int)(a2), pK(int)(Cl-), pK(int)(K+), and inner capacitance) for both aluminosilicates. However, the TLM was able to describe the acidity and complexation constants better since it considered the formation of the outer sphere complex between the background electrolyte and the surface. Then, the TLM makes it possible to describe real systems.

  13. Influence of Boehmite Precursor on Aluminosilicate Aerogel Pore Structure, Phase Stability and Resistance to Densification at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Newlin, Katy N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels are of interest as constituents of thermal insulation systems for use at temperatures higher than those attainable with silica aerogels. It is anticipated that their effectiveness as thermal insulators will be influenced by their morphology, pore size distribution, physical and skeletal densities. The present study focuses on the synthesis of aluminosilicate aerogel from a variety of Boehmite (precursors as the Al source, and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source, and the influence of starting powder on pore structure and thermal stability.

  14. Twisted Graphene Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, Satrio; Virgus, Yudistira; Rossi, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in fabrication techniques have made possible the realization of graphene nanostructures with atomic precision. Some of the nanostructures realized are completely novel. We study the electronic properties of such novel graphene nanostructures when deposited on two dimensional crystals. In particular we study the case when the two dimensional crystal is graphene, or bilayer graphene. We obtain results for the nanostructure electronic spectrum and find how the spectrum is affected by the coupling between the nanostructure and the two-dimensional substrate. In particular we study how the ``twist'' angle between the graphene nanostructure and the two-dimensional crystal affects the spectrum of the nanostructure. Work supported by ONR-N00014-13-1-0321 and ACS-PRF # 53581-DNI5.

  15. Optical absorption of Co 2+ in gel-derived aluminosilicate glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiulan; Yuan, Duorong; Cheng, Xiufeng; Wang, Xinqiang

    2006-07-01

    Pure and Co 2+-doped aluminosilicate gels were prepared by the sol-gel method from two different aluminum salts, aluminum-iso-propoxide and aluminum nitrate, and heat-treated at 40-1200 °C. Visible and near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra of the heated samples were studied. When the heat-treatment temperature was 1100 °C, Co 2+-doped aluminosilicate samples, obtained by using aluminum-iso-propoxide, crystallized to Al 2O 3 nanocrystals and exhibited a broad absorption band in the range of 1200-1600 nm, which is characteristic of tetrahedral Co 2+ ions in crystals. The existence of the broad absorption band has allowed us to consider this kind of material as possible candidate for passive Q-switched materials in the NIR region. While the sample prepared from aluminum nitrate was amorphous when heated to 1200 °C.

  16. Alzheimer's disease may begin in the nose and may be caused by aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E

    1986-01-01

    Genetic factors may interact with aging changes in the nasal mucociliary apparatus to increase the probability that ubiquitously occurring aluminosilicates may enter sensory neurons of the olfactory epithelium and spread transneuronally to several olfactory-related areas of the brain, thereby initiating changes that eventually result in neuronal damage typical of Alzheimer's disease. A speculative sequence of events is suggested by which neuronally-contained aluminosilicates might cleave or otherwise alter a normal cellular protein in such a manner that aggregates would arise that could interfere with cellular function and which also could act in a pseudo-infective manner, relaxing translational and transcriptional controls in the synthesis of the native protein. Some relevant experiments and potential therapies arising from the hypothesis presented are discussed.

  17. Oxidative damage in Alzheimer's dementia, and the potential etiopathogenic role of aluminosilicates, microglia and micronutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Evans, P H; Yano, E; Klinowski, J; Peterhans, E

    1992-01-01

    While evidence implicating free radical oxidative processes in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's dementia is accumulating, the specific cellular and biochemical mechanisms involved remain to be identified. The potential pathogenic role of microglial cells in neurodegenerative processes is indicated by the finding that purified murine microglial cells exposed in vitro to various model aluminosilicate particles stimulate the generation of tissue-injurious free radical reactive oxygen metabolites. Analogous inorganic aluminosilicate deposits have been reported to occur in the core of the characteristic senile plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer disease subjects. The possible modulation of free radical oxidative activity by antioxidant micronutrients and pharmacological agents, provides a rational basis for further preventative and therapeutic clinical investigations.

  18. Surface and interface investigation of aluminosilicate biomaterial by the “in vivo” experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudadesse, H.; Derrien, A. C.; Martin, S.; Chaair, H.; Cathelineau, G.

    2008-11-01

    Porous mixtures of aluminosilicate/calcium phosphate have been studied for biomaterials applications. Aluminosilicates formed with an inorganic polymeric constitution present amorphous zeolites because of their 3D network structure and present the ability to link to bone matrix. Amorphous geopolymers of the potassium-poly(sialate)-nanopolymer type were synthesised at low temperature and studied for their use as potential biomaterials. They were mixed with 13% weight of calcium phosphate like biphasic hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. In this study, " in vivo" experiments were monitored to evaluate the biocompatibility, the surface and the interface behaviour of these composites when used as bone implants. Moreover, it has been demonstrated using histological and physicochemical studies that the developed materials exhibited a remarkable bone bonding when implanted in a rabbit's thighbone for a period of 1 month. The easy synthesis conditions (low temperature) of this composite and the fast intimate links with bone constitute an improvement of synthetic bone graft biomaterial.

  19. Amphiphilic Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Zeotype Aluminosilicate like a Nanoporous Crystallized Langmuir-Blodgett Film.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takuji; Hiyoshi, Norihito; Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Nakaoka, Takuma; Irisa, Ami; Kawano, Miki; Yamamoto, Katsutoshi

    2015-06-26

    A new organic-inorganic hybrid zeotype compound with amphiphilic one-dimensional nanopore and aluminosilicate composition was developed. The framework structure is composed of double aluminosilicate layers and 12-ring nanopores; a hydrophilic layer pillared by Q(2) silicon atom species and a lipophilic layer pillared by phenylene groups are alternately stacked, and 12-ring nanopores perpendicularly penetrate the layers. The framework topology looks similar to that of an AFI-type zeolite but possesses a quasi-multidimensional pore structure consisting of a 12-ring channel and intersecting small pores equivalent to 8-rings. The hybrid material with alternately laminated lipophilic and hydrophilic nanospaces can be assumed as a crystallized Langmuir-Blodgett film. It demonstrates microporous adsorption for both hydrophilic and lipophilic adsorptives, and its outer surface tightly adsorbs lysozyme whose molecular size is much larger than its micropore opening. Our results suggest the possibility of designing porous adsorbent with high amphipathicity.

  20. High-Aluminum-Affinity Silica Is a Nanoparticle That Seeds Secondary Aluminosilicate Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Brown, Andy; Dietzel, Martin; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance and abundance of aluminosilicates throughout our natural surroundings, their formation at neutral pH is, surprisingly, a matter of considerable debate. From our experiments in dilute aluminum and silica containing solutions (pH ~ 7) we previously identified a silica polymer with an extraordinarily high affinity for aluminium ions (high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer, HSP). Here, further characterization shows that HSP is a colloid of approximately 2.4 nm in diameter with a mean specific surface area of about 1,000 m2 g-1 and it competes effectively with transferrin for Al(III) binding. Aluminum binding to HSP strongly inhibited its decomposition whilst the reaction rate constant for the formation of the β-silicomolybdic acid complex indicated a diameter between 3.6 and 4.1 nm for these aluminum-containing nanoparticles. Similarly, high resolution microscopic analysis of the air dried aluminum-containing silica colloid solution revealed 3.9 ± 1.3 nm sized crystalline Al-rich silica nanoparticles (ASP) with an estimated Al:Si ratio of between 2 and 3 which is close to the range of secondary aluminosilicates such as imogolite. Thus the high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer is a nanoparticle that seeds early aluminosilicate formation through highly competitive binding of Al(III) ions. In niche environments, especially in vivo, this may serve as an alternative mechanism to polyhydroxy Al(III) species binding monomeric silica to form early phase, non-toxic aluminosilicates. PMID:24349573

  1. One-step synthesis of hydrothermally stable mesoporous aluminosilicates with strong acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Dongjiang; Xu Yao Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan

    2008-09-15

    Using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS) and aluminium isopropoxide (AIP) as the reactants, through a one-step nonsurfactant route based on PMHS-TEOS-AIP co-polycondensation, hydrothermally stable mesoporous aluminosilicates with different Si/Al molar ratios were successfully prepared. All samples exclusively showed narrow pore size distribution centered at 3.6 nm. To assess the hydrothermal stability, samples were subjected to 100 deg. C distilled water for 300 h. The boiled mesoporous aluminosilicates have nearly the same N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms and the same pore size distributions as those newly synthesized ones, indicating excellent hydrothermal stability. The {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectra confirmed that PMHS and TEOS have jointly condensed and CH{sub 3} groups have been introduced into the materials. The {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra indicated that Al atoms have been incorporated in the mesopore frameworks. The NH{sub 3} temperature-programmed desorption showed strong acidity. Due to the existence of large amount of CH{sub 3} groups, the mesoporous aluminosilicates obtained good hydrophobicity. Owing to the relatively large pore and the strong acidity provided by the uniform four-coordinated Al atoms, the excellent catalytic performance for 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene cracking was acquired easily. The materials may be a profitable complement for the synthesis of solid acid catalysts. - Graphical abstract: Based on the nonsurfactant method, a facile one-step synthesis route has been developed to prepare methyl-modified mesoporous aluminosilicates that possessed hydrothermal stability and strong acidity.

  2. Adsorption into mineral mesopores as a stabilization mechanism for organic matter on aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L.M. . Dept. of Oceanography)

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of mineral specific surface area and total organic carbon (TOC) indicate that many marine shelf and estuarine sediments, and aluminosilicate soils, have a TOC content equivalent to a monolayer of organic matter covering all mineral surfaces. Density separations of discrete organic particulates from mineral-associated OC are consistent with a primarily adsorbed nature foremost of TOC. Nitrogen gas adsorption data also suggest extensive organic coatings on the mineral grains. Downcore analyses indicate that sediments with TOC starting in excess of monolayer-equivalent (ME) levels decay with core depth to the ME level and then markedly slow their OC loss rate--i.e., the ME level determines the refractory background concentration of TOC. Pore size distributions of marine sediments, determined by nitrogen adsorption or mercury porosimetry, indicate that most surface area of minerals is to be found in pores of < 10 nm diameter. These observations lead to the hypothesis that organic matter is stabilized on aluminosilicate minerals by adsorption into pores too small to allow entry or functioning of the hydrolytic enzymes responsible for OC degradation. This hypothesis is consistent with, but does not require, humification reactions as necessary for OC stabilization. The ME levels of TOC found in continental platform aluminosilicates hence represent a cap on the amount of organic matter that can be protected in this manner and thus attain a residence time of > 1,000 y. Stabilization of higher levels of TOC, as in acid soils or anoxic sediments, presumably results from protection by different mechanisms.

  3. Mesoporous aluminosilicates with ordered hexagonal structure, strong acidity, and extraordinary hydrothermal stability at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Han, Y; Xiao, F S; Qiu, S; Zhu, L; Wang, R; Yu, Y; Zhang, Z; Zou, B; Wang, Y; Sun, H; Zhao, D; Wei, Y

    2001-05-30

    Highly ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates (MAS-5) with uniform pore sizes have been successfully synthesized from assembly of preformed aluminosilcate precursors with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant. The aluminosilicate precursors were obtained by heating, at 100--140 degrees C for 2--10 h, aluminasilica gels at the Al(2)O(3)/SiO(2)/TEAOH/H(2)O molar ratios of 1.0/7.0--350/10.0--33.0/500--2000. Mesoporous MAS-5 shows extraordinary stability both in boiling water (over 300 h) and in steam (800 degrees C for 2 h). Temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia shows that the acidic strength of MAS-5 is much higher than that of MCM-41 and is comparable to that of microporous Beta zeolite. In catalytic cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene and alkylation of isobutane with butene, MAS-5 exhibits greater catalytic activity and selectivity, as compared with MCM-41 and HZSM-5. The MAS-5 samples were characterized with infrared, UV--Raman, and NMR spectroscopy and numerous other techniques. The results suggest that MAS-5 consists of both mesopores and micropores and that the pore walls of MAS-5 contain primary and secondary structural building units, similar to those of microporous zeolites. Such unique structural features might be responsible for the observed strong acidity and high thermal stability of the mesoporous aluminosilicates with well-ordered hexagonal symmetry.

  4. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Zeolite Materials: Observation of Abundant Aluminosilicate Oligomers Using an Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Delmore, James Edward

    2000-12-01

    Oligomeric oxyanions were observed in the secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) of zeolite materials. The oxyanions have the general composition AlmSinO2(m+n)H(m-1)- (m + n = 2 to 8) and are termed dehydrates. For a given mass, multiple elemental compositions are possible because (Al + H) is an isovalent and isobaric substitute for Si. Using 18 keV Ga+ as a projectile, oligomer abundances are low relative to the monomers. Oligomer abundance can be increased by using the polyatomic projectile ReO4- (~5 keV). Oligomer abundance can be further increased using an ion trap (IT-) SIMS; in this instrument, long ion lifetimes (tens of ms) and relatively high He pressure result in significant collisional stabilization and increased high-mass abundance. The dehydrates rapidly react with adventitious H2O present in the IT-SIMS to form mono-, di-, and trihydrates. The rapidity of the reaction and comparison to aluminum oxyanion hydration suggest that H2O adds to the aluminosilicate oxyanions in a dissociative fashion, forming covalently bound product ions. In addition to these findings, it was noted that production of abundant oligomeric aluminosilicates could be significantly increased by substituting the countercation (NH4+) with the larger alkali ions Rb+ and Cs+. This constitutes a useful tactic for generating large aluminosilicate oligomers for surface characterization and ion-molecule reactivity studies.

  5. STUDIES OF POTENTIAL INHIBITORS OF SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE SCALES IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, B; Lawrence Oji, L; Terri Fellinger, T; David Hobbs, D; Nilesh Badheka, N

    2008-02-27

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 49 underground storage tanks used to store High Level Waste (HLW). The tank space in these tanks must be managed to support the continued operation of key facilities. The reduction of the tank volumes in these tanks are accomplished through the use of three atmospheric pressure HLW evaporators. For a decade, evaporation of highly alkaline HLW containing aluminum and silicates has produced sodium aluminosilicate scales causing both operation and criticality hazards in the 2H Evaporator System. Segregation of aluminum-rich wastes from silicate-rich wastes minimizes the amount of scale produced and reduces cleaning expenses, but does not eliminate the scaling nor increases operation flexibility in waste process. Similar issues have affected the aluminum refining industry for many decades. Over the past several years, successful commercial products have been identified to eliminate aluminosilicate fouling in the aluminum industry, but have not been utilized in a nuclear environment. Laboratory quantities of three proprietary aluminosilicate scale inhibitors have been produced and been shown to prevent formation of scales. SRNL has been actively testing these potential inhibitors to examine their radiation stability, radiolytic degradation behaviors, and downstream impacts to determine their viability within the HLW system. One of the tested polymers successfully meets the established criteria for application in the nuclear environment. This paper will describe a summary of the methodology used to prioritize laboratory testing protocols based on potential impacts/risks identified for inhibitor deployment at SRS.

  6. Hydration effects on the structural and vibrational properties of yttrium aluminosilicate glasses for in situ radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Malik, Jahangir; Tilocca, Antonio

    2013-11-21

    The performances of silicate glasses as containment matrices or vectors of radioactive ions in nuclear waste storage and in situ radiotherapy are influenced by the effect of interstitial water on the glass durability. In order to assess how hydration determines changes to atomistic structural features which control the glass degradation, we have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of a typical yttrium aluminosilicate (YAS) glass employed in radiotherapy, incorporating different water contents. The analysis of the models allows us to discuss the way in which hydroxyl groups are distributed in the glass structure and modify or disrupt the aluminosilicate glass network. Hydration affects the silicate and aluminate connectivity to a different extent, resulting in a different degree of disruption (depolymerization) of the Si and Al network. The simulations also highlight a strong tendency of all hydrated compositions to form Y(3+)- and OH(-)-rich domains, separated from the aluminosilicate matrix. The implications of these structural effects for the durability and ion release behavior of the glass are discussed, as well as the vibrational signatures of the various hydrous species identified in the models. PMID:24206236

  7. Impact Of Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Aluminosilicate, and Gibbsite/Boehmite on ARP Filter Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Burket, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. SRR requested SRNL to conduct bench-scale filter tests to evaluate whether sodium oxalate, sodium aluminosilicate, or aluminum solids (i.e., gibbsite and boehmite) could be the cause of excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter at ARP. The authors conducted the tests by preparing slurries containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 supernate, 2.5 g MST/L slurry, and varying concentrations of sodium oxalate, sodium aluminosilicate, and aluminum solids, processing the slurry through a bench-scale filter unit that contains a crossflow primary filter and a dead-end secondary filter, and measuring filter flux and transmembrane pressure as a function of time. Among the conclusions drwn from this work are the following: (1) All of the tests showed some evidence of fouling the secondary filter. This fouling could be from fine particles passing through the crossflow filter. (2) The sodium oxalate-containing feeds behaved differently from the sodium aluminosilicate- and gibbsite/boehmite-containing feeds.

  8. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  9. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  10. Development of a Composite Non-Electrostatic Surface Complexation Model Describing Plutonium Sorption to Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, B A; Kersting, A; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-10-28

    Due to their ubiquity in nature and chemical reactivity, aluminosilicate minerals play an important role in retarding actinide subsurface migration. However, very few studies have examined Pu interaction with clay minerals in sufficient detail to produce a credible mechanistic model of its behavior. In this work, Pu(IV) and Pu(V) interactions with silica, gibbsite (Aloxide), and Na-montmorillonite (smectite clay) were examined as a function of time and pH. Sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) to gibbsite and silica increased with pH (4 to 10). The Pu(V) sorption edge shifted to lower pH values over time and approached that of Pu(IV). This behavior is apparently due to surface mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV). Surface complexation constants describing Pu(IV)/Pu(V) sorption to aluminol and silanol groups were developed from the silica and gibbsite sorption experiments and applied to the montmorillonite dataset. The model provided an acceptable fit to the montmorillonite sorption data for Pu(V). In order to accurately predict Pu(IV) sorption to montmorillonite, the model required inclusion of ion exchange. The objective of this work is to measure the sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) to silica, gibbsite, and smectite (montmorillonite). Aluminosilicate minerals are ubiquitous at the Nevada National Security Site and improving our understanding of Pu sorption to aluminosilicates (smectite clays in particular) is essential to the accurate prediction of Pu transport rates. These data will improve the mechanistic approach for modeling the hydrologic source term (HST) and provide sorption Kd parameters for use in CAU models. In both alluvium and tuff, aluminosilicates have been found to play a dominant role in the radionuclide retardation because their abundance is typically more than an order of magnitude greater than other potential sorbing minerals such as iron and manganese oxides (e.g. Vaniman et al., 1996). The sorption database used in recent HST models (Carle et al., 2006

  11. Contribution of aluminas and aluminosilicates to the formation of PCDD/Fs on fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Potter, Phillip M; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M

    2016-02-01

    Chlorinated aromatics undergo surface-mediated reactions with metal oxides to form Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) which can further react to produce polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Previous work using laboratory-made fly ash surrogates composed of transition metal oxides deposited on silica powder has confirmed their ability to mimic fly ash in the production of PCDD/Fs. However, little is known about the propensity of aluminas and aluminosilicates, other components of fly ash, to form PCDD/Fs. A fly ash sample containing both alumina and mullite, an aluminosilicate, was tested for PCDD/F formation ability and compared to PCDD/F yields from the thermal degradation of 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP) precursor over γ-alumina, α-alumina, and mullite. A packed-bed flow reactor was used to investigate the thermal degradation of 2-MCP over the various catalysts at 200-600 °C. Fly ash gave similar PCDD/F yields to surrogates made with similar transition metal content. γ-alumina, which is thermodynamically unfavorable, was very catalytically active and gave low PCDD/F yields despite a high destruction of 2-MCP. Mullite and α-alumina, the thermodynamically favorable form of alumina, yielded higher concentrations of dioxins and products with a higher degree of chlorine substitution than γ-alumina. The data suggest that certain aluminas and aluminosilicates, commonly found in fly ash, are active catalytic surfaces in the formation of PCDD/Fs in the post-flame cool zones of combustion systems and should be considered as additional catalytic surfaces active in the process. PMID:26615490

  12. Efficient adsorbents of nanoporous aluminosilicate monoliths for organic dyes from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Shahat, Ahmed; Awual, Md Rabiul

    2011-07-01

    Growing public awareness on the potential risk to humans of toxic chemicals in the environment has generated demand for new and improved methods for toxicity assessment and removal, rational means for health risk estimation. With the aim of controlling nanoscale adsorbents for functionality in molecular sieving of organic pollutants, we fabricated cubic Im3m mesocages with uniform entrance and large cavity pores of aluminosilicates as highly promising candidates for the colorimetric monitoring of organic dyes in an aqueous solution. However, a feasible control over engineering of three-dimensional (3D) mesopore cage structures with uniform entrance (~5 nm) and large cavity (~10 nm) allowed the development of nanoadsorbent membranes as a powerful tool for large-quantity and high-speed (in minutes) adsorption/removal of bulk molecules such as organic dyes. Incorporation of high aluminum contents (Si/Al=1) into 3D cubic Im3m cage mesoporous silica monoliths resulted in small, easy-to-use optical adsorbent strips. In such adsorption systems, natural surfaces of active acid sites of aluminosilicate strips strongly induced both physical adsorption of chemically responsive dyes and intraparticle diffusion into cubic Im3m mesocage monoliths. Results likewise indicated that although aluminosilicate strips with low Si/Al ratios exhibit distortion in pore ordering and decrease in surface area and pore volume, enhancement of both molecular converges and intraparticle diffusion onto the network surfaces and into the pore architectures of adsorbent membranes was achieved. Moreover, 3D mesopore cage adsorbents are reversible, offering potential for multiple adsorption assays.

  13. Contribution of aluminas and aluminosilicates to the formation of PCDD/Fs on fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Potter, Phillip M; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M

    2016-02-01

    Chlorinated aromatics undergo surface-mediated reactions with metal oxides to form Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) which can further react to produce polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Previous work using laboratory-made fly ash surrogates composed of transition metal oxides deposited on silica powder has confirmed their ability to mimic fly ash in the production of PCDD/Fs. However, little is known about the propensity of aluminas and aluminosilicates, other components of fly ash, to form PCDD/Fs. A fly ash sample containing both alumina and mullite, an aluminosilicate, was tested for PCDD/F formation ability and compared to PCDD/F yields from the thermal degradation of 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP) precursor over γ-alumina, α-alumina, and mullite. A packed-bed flow reactor was used to investigate the thermal degradation of 2-MCP over the various catalysts at 200-600 °C. Fly ash gave similar PCDD/F yields to surrogates made with similar transition metal content. γ-alumina, which is thermodynamically unfavorable, was very catalytically active and gave low PCDD/F yields despite a high destruction of 2-MCP. Mullite and α-alumina, the thermodynamically favorable form of alumina, yielded higher concentrations of dioxins and products with a higher degree of chlorine substitution than γ-alumina. The data suggest that certain aluminas and aluminosilicates, commonly found in fly ash, are active catalytic surfaces in the formation of PCDD/Fs in the post-flame cool zones of combustion systems and should be considered as additional catalytic surfaces active in the process.

  14. DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W. L.; Lutz, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2011-07-21

    The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

  15. Potential Sites for Ice Nucleation on Aluminosilicate Clay Minerals and Related Materials.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2015-10-01

    Few aerosol particles in clouds nucleate the formation of ice. The surface sites available for nucleus formation, which can include surface defects and functional groups, determine in part the activity of an aerosol particle toward ice formation. Although ice nucleation on particles has been widely studied, exploration of the specific sites at which the initial germ forms has been limited, but is important for predicting the microphysical properties of clouds, which impact climate. This Perspective focuses on what is currently known about surface sites for ice nucleation on aluminosilicate clay minerals, which are commonly found in ice residuals, as well as related materials. PMID:26722881

  16. A coarse-graining approach for the proton complex in protonated aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Calero, S; Lobato, M D; García-Pérez, E; Mejías, J A; Lago, S; Vlugt, T J H; Maesen, T L M; Smit, B; Dubbeldam, D

    2006-03-30

    We have developed a computational framework for the adsorption of linear alkanes in protonated aluminosilicates. These zeolites contain trace amounts of water that form hydrated proton complexes. The presence of hydrated protons makes the simulations at the fully atomistic level difficult. Instead of constructing an elaborate and complex model, we show that an approach based on a coarse-graining of the proton-complex accurately describes the available experimental isotherms, Henry coefficients, heats of adsorption, and oxygen-proton distances. Our approach is supported by MP2 quantum mechanical simulations. The model gives remarkably good agreement with experimental data beyond the initial calibration set.

  17. Facile Fabrication of Uniform Polyaniline Nanotubes with Tubular Aluminosilicates as Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long; Liu, Peng

    2008-08-01

    The uniform polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes, with inner diameter, outer diameter, and tubular thickness of 40, 60, and 10 nm, respectively, were prepared successfully by using natural tubular aluminosilicates as templates. The halloysite nanotubes were coated with PANI via the in situ chemical oxidation polymerization. Then the templates were etched with HCl/HF solution. The PANI nanotubes were characterized using FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The conductivity of the PANI nanotubes was found to be 1.752 × 10-5 (Ω·cm)-1.

  18. Cooperative luminescence and absorption in ytterbium doped aluminosilicate glass optical fibres and preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Tom G.; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2007-05-01

    The cooperative luminescence and absorption properties of Yb 3+ doped aluminosilicate glass optical fibres and preforms are investigated in detail. In accordance with previous investigations, both the visible cooperative luminescence and the infrared luminescence decay measurements have been resolved into a single exponential decay component. We show that for a glass with similar Yb 3+ dopant concentration but more Al 3+, the glass emits less visible luminescence. Absorption loss measurements completed on fibre samples revealed a broad absorption in the 350-500 nm range, which we propose is due to a combination of Yb 2+ absorption and cooperative absorption from Yb 3+ ion pairs.

  19. Potential Sites for Ice Nucleation on Aluminosilicate Clay Minerals and Related Materials.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2015-10-01

    Few aerosol particles in clouds nucleate the formation of ice. The surface sites available for nucleus formation, which can include surface defects and functional groups, determine in part the activity of an aerosol particle toward ice formation. Although ice nucleation on particles has been widely studied, exploration of the specific sites at which the initial germ forms has been limited, but is important for predicting the microphysical properties of clouds, which impact climate. This Perspective focuses on what is currently known about surface sites for ice nucleation on aluminosilicate clay minerals, which are commonly found in ice residuals, as well as related materials.

  20. Direct observation of macrostructure formation of hierarchically structured meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with 3D interconnectivity by optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Arnaud; Rooke, Joanna Claire; Chen, Li-Hua; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-03-15

    Hierarchically structured spongy meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with high tetrahedral aluminum content were synthesized from a mixture of single molecular alkoxide precursor, (sec-BuO)2-Al-O-Si(OEt)3, already containing Si-O-Al bonds, and a silica coreactant, tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). The spontaneous byproduct templated macroporous structure formation has been directly visualized using in situ high-resolution optical microscopy (OM), allowing the crucial observation of a microbubble dispersion which is directly correlated to the macrostructure observed by electronic microscopies (SEM and TEM). This discovery leads to a comparative study with meso-macroporous pure metal oxide and to a proposal of the formation mechanism of meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with 3D interconnectivity. The aluminosilicate phase/microbubbles emulsion is produced by a phase separation process occurring between the aluminosilicate nanoparticles and the liquid hydrolysis-condensation reaction byproducts (water, methanol, ethanol, and butanol). The use of alkoxysilane improves the heterocondensation rates between the highly reactive aluminum alkoxide part of the single precursor and added silica species but, above all, leads to the spontaneous generation of an unusual meso-macroporosity in alkaline media. The particles obtained at pH = 13.0 featured regular micrometer-sized macrospheres separated by very thin mesoporous walls and connected by submicrometric openings, providing a 3D interconnectivity. The slight increase in pH value to 13.5 induced significant modifications in morphology and textural properties due to the slower gelification process of the aluminosilicate phase, resulting in the formation of an aluminosilicate material constituted of 1-2 µm large independent hollow mesoporous spheres.

  1. Development of a New Ferrous Aluminosilicate Refractory Material for Investment Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chen; Jones, Sam; Blackburn, Stuart

    2012-12-01

    Investment casting is a time-consuming, labour intensive process, which produces complex, high value-added components for a variety of specialised industries. Current environmental and economic pressures have resulted in a need for the industry to improve current casting quality, reduce manufacturing costs and explore new markets for the process. Alumino-silicate based refractories are commonly used as both filler and stucco materials for ceramic shell production. A new ceramic material, norite, is now being produced based on ferrous aluminosilicate chemistry, having many potential advantages when used for the production of shell molds for casting aluminum alloy. This paper details the results of a direct comparison made between the properties of a ceramic shell system produced with norite refractories and a typical standard refractory shell system commonly used in casting industry. A range of mechanical and physical properties of the systems was measured, and a full-scale industrial casting trial was also carried out. The unique properties of the norite shell system make it a promising alternative for casting aluminum based alloys in the investment foundry.

  2. 29Si NMR study of structural ordering in aluminosilicate geopolymer gels.

    PubMed

    Duxson, Peter; Provis, John L; Lukey, Grant C; Separovic, Frances; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2005-03-29

    A systematic series of aluminosilicate geopolymer gels was synthesized and then analyzed using 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) in combination with Gaussian peak deconvolution to characterize the short-range ordering in terms of T-O-T bonds (where T is Al or Si). The effect of nominal Na2O/(Na2O + K2O) and Si/Al ratios on short-range network ordering was quantified by deconvolution of the 29Si MAS NMR spectra into individual Gaussian peaks representing different Q4(mAl) silicon centers. The deconvolution procedure developed in this work is applicable to other aluminosilicate gel systems. The short-range ordering observed here indicates that Loewenstein's Rule of perfect aluminum avoidance may not apply strictly to geopolymeric gels, although further analyses are required to quantify the degree of aluminum avoidance. Potassium geopolymers appeared to exhibit a more random Si/Al distribution compared to that of mixed-alkali and sodium systems. This work provides a quantitative account of the silicon and aluminum ordering in geopolymers, which is essential for extending our understanding of the mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability, and fundamental structure of these systems.

  3. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Liguori, Barbara; Capasso, Ilaria; Caputo, Domenico; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a "meringue" type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (˜500 Kg/m3) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the "meringue" approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  4. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino; Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a “meringue” type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (∼500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the “meringue” approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  5. Aqueous dissolution, solubilities and thermodynamic stabilities of common aluminosilicate clay minerals: Kaolinite and smectites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Howard M.; Klnniburgh, D.G.; Helmke, P.A.; Jackson, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Determinations of the aqueous solubilities of kaolinite at pH 4, and of five smectite minerals in suspensions set between pH 5 and 8, were undertaken with mineral suspensions adjusted to approach equilibrium from over- and undersaturation. After 1,237 days, Dry Branch, Georgia kaolinite suspensions attained equilibrium solubility with respect to the kaolinite, for which Keq = (2.72 ?? 0.35) ?? 107. The experimentally determined Gibbs free energy of formation (??Gf,2980) for the kaolinite is -3,789.51 ?? 6.60 kj mol-1. Equilibrium solubilities could not be determined for the smectites because the composition of the solution phase in the smectite suspensions appeared to be controlled by the formation of gibbsite or amorphous aluminum hydroxide and not by the smectites, preventing attempts to determine valid ??Gf0 values for these complex aluminosilicate clay minerals. Reported solubility-based ??Gf0 determinations for smectites and other variable composition aluminosilicate clay minerals are shown to be invalid because of experimental deficiencies and of conceptual flaws arising from the nature of the minerals themselves. Because of the variable composition of smectites and similar minerals, it is concluded that reliable equilibrium solubilities and solubility-derived ??Gf0 values can neither be rigorously determined by conventional experimental procedures, nor applied in equilibriabased models of smectite-water interactions. ?? 1986.

  6. Effect of aluminosilicates and bentonite on aflatoxin-induced developmental toxicity in rat.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, M A; Nada, S A; Amra, H A

    1999-01-01

    Numerous studies have established that aflatoxin is a potent developmental toxin in animals. Previous research has demonstrated that a phyllosilicate clay, hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS or Novasil), tightly binds and immobilizes aflatoxins in the gastrointestinal tract of animals and markedly reduces the bioavailability and toxicity of aflatoxin. Our objective in this study was to utilize the pregnant rat as an in vivo model to compare the potential of HSCAS and bentonite to prevent the developmental toxicity of aflatoxin. Aluminosilicates (HSCAS) and bentonite were added to the diet at a level of 0.5% (w/w) and fed to the pregnant rat throughout pregnancy (i.e. days 0-20). Test animals were fed an aflatoxin-contaminated diet (2.5 mg kg(-1) diet) with or without sorbents during gestation days 6-15. Evaluations of toxicity were performed on day 20. These included maternal (mortality, body weights, feed intake and litter weights), developmental (embryonic resorptions and fetal body weights) and biochemical (ALT, AST and AP) evaluations. Sorbents alone were not toxic and aflatoxin alone resulted in significant maternal and developmental toxicity. Animals treated with phyllosilicate (plus aflatoxin) were comparable to controls following evaluations for resorptions, live fetuses and fetal body weights, as well as biochemical parameters. While bentonite plus aflatoxin resulted in significant reduction in fetal body weight, none of the fetuses from HSCAS or bentonite plus aflatoxin-treated groups had any gross, internal soft tissue or major skeletal malformations.

  7. The plumber's nightmare: a new morphology in block copolymer-ceramic nanocomposites and mesoporous aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Finnefrock, Adam C; Ulrich, Ralph; Toombes, Gilman E S; Gruner, Sol M; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2003-10-29

    A novel cubic bicontinuous morphology is found in polymer-ceramic nanocomposites and mesoporous aluminosilicates that are derived by an amphiphilic diblock copolymer, poly(isoprene-b-ethylene oxide) (PI-b-PEO), used as a structure-directing agent for an inorganic aluminosilicate. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was employed to unambiguously identify the Im(-)3m crystallographic symmetry of the materials by fitting individual Bragg peak positions in the two-dimensional X-ray images. Structure factor calculations, in conjunction with results from transmission electron microscopy, were used to narrow the range of possible structures consistent with the symmetry and showed the plumber's nightmare morphology to be consistent with the data. The samples are made by deposition onto a substrate that imposes a strain field, generating a lattice distortion. This distortion is quantitatively analyzed and shown to have resulted in shrinkage of the crystallites by approximately one-third in a direction perpendicular to the substrate, in both as-made composites and calcined ceramic materials. Finally, the observation of the bicontinuous block-copolymer-derived hybrid morphology is discussed in the context of a pseudo-ternary morphology diagram and compared to existing studies of ternary phase diagrams of amphiphiles in a mixture of two solvents. The calcined mesoporous materials have potential applications in the fields of catalysis, separation technology, and microelectronics.

  8. Ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates with low Si/Al ratio: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aifeng; Che, Hongwei; Liu, Chuanzhi; Fu, Quanrong; Jiang, Ruijiao; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Liang

    2014-06-01

    Ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates with lower Si/Al ratio below 5 have been successfully synthesized via the co-assembly of preformed aluminosilicate precursors with Gemini surfactant [C12H25N+(CH3)2(CH2)6N+(CH3)2C12H25] x 2Br(-) as the template. Powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance, thermogravimetric analysis, and temperature-programmed desorption of cyclohexylamine are employed to characterize the resulting samples. The phenol alkylation reaction is carried out to evaluate their catalytic performances. These studies indicate that the sample with a low Si/Al ratio of 3 still retains a highly ordered hexagonal mesoporous structure. And it also possesses the highest acidity of 0.96 mmol among the samples with lower Si/Al ratios below 5 due to its higher specific surface area together with more content of tetrahedrally coordinated Al in the framework. The catalytic tests confirm that the acidity of the samples plays a key role in determining their catalytic performances.

  9. Investigating the Heating of a Potassium-Doped Aluminosilicate Ion Source Using a 1 Micron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R C; Meier, W R; Kwan, J W; Abbott, R P; Latkowski, J F

    2004-12-14

    The heavy ion fusion (HIF) program is interested in developing a high brightness ion source for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. One possible approach to obtaining higher brightness may be to raise the surface temperature of the ion source just prior to extraction. The current ion source material being studied is a layer of potassium-doped aluminosilicate bonded to a tungsten substrate. It is speculated that if the surface temperature of the source is raised above 1200 C (from a steady-state temperature of 900 C) for time periods on the order of 100's of nanoseconds, current densities of greater than 100 mA/cm{sup 2} of ions may be achievable. Typical aluminosilicate sources produce ion current densities (either K+ or Na+ ions) of {approx}10 mA/cm{sup 2} (at 1100 C). A number of heating methods might be possible, including lasers, diode arrays, and flash lamps. Here we assume laser heating. In this preliminary study, we used the LLNL RadHeat code to model the time-temperature history of the surface when hit by laser pulses and illustrate how RadHeat can be used to optimize the surface temperature response. Also of interest is the temperature history of the interface temperature between the ceramic and the metal layers. This is also investigated.

  10. Water solubility in calcium aluminosilicate glasses investigated by first principles techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyer, Frederic; Geneste, Gregory; Ispas, Simona; Kob, Walter; Ganster, Patrick

    2010-12-15

    First-principles techniques have been employed to study the reactivity of water into a calcium aluminosilicate glass. In addition to the well known hydrolysis reactions Si-O-Si+H{sub 2}O{yields}Si-OH+Si-OH and Si-O-Al+H{sub 2}O{yields}Si-OH+Al-OH, a peculiar mechanism is found, leading to the formation of an AlO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O entity and the breaking of Al-O-Si bond. In the glass bulk, most of the hydrolysis reactions are endothermic. Only a few regular sites are found reactive (i.e. in association with an exothermic reaction), and in that case, the hydrolysis reaction leads to a decrease of the local disorder in the amorphous vitreous network. Afterwards, we suggest that ionic charge compensators transform into network modifiers when hydrolysis occurs, according to a global process firstly suggested by Burnham in 1975. Our theoretical computations provide a more general model of the first hydrolysis steps that could help to understand experimental data and water speciation in glasses. -- Graphical Abstract: Reactivity within glass bulk: structures obtained after hydrolyses reactions (endothermic and exothermic processes) and mechanisms involving Si-OH, Al-OH, Si-OH-Al groups within aluminosilicates glasses (through ab initio molecular dynamics): formation of the Si-OH-Al entity coupled with an H exchange-Frederic Bouyer and Gregory Geneste. Display Omitted

  11. The effects of surface modification on the speciation of metal ions intercalated into aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Giaquinta, D.M.; Yuchs, S.E.; Soderholm, L.

    1996-12-31

    Microporous aluminosilicates, including clay minerals and zeolites, are ion-exchange materials. In their most common forms, they have the ability to incorporate cationic species within their matrices. Because of this property, microporous aluminosilicates have been proposed as storage media for hazardous waste. In this paper the authors use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to examine the structure of cations held within smectite clay minerals and to determine how modification of the surface of the clay using an organic monolayer affects the coordination of the stored cation. The effects of hydrothermal and thermal processing on the coordination of the ions contained within these systems are also investigated. The presence of the monolayer changes the surface of the clay from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. It inhibits the interlayer ions from exchanging freely into environmental water and reduces the leach rate of cations out of the clay by approximately a factor of 20. Significant changes are observed when these coated samples are treated under hydrothermal and thermal conditions. Reductions of uranium (VI), in the form of uranyl, and cupric ions occur. In addition, the uranium aggregates, forming small particles that appear similar to UO{sub 2}. Comparable conglomeration occurs with lead cations and with the reduced copper species.

  12. Fate of Uranium during Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation under Waste Tank Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, B

    2005-06-22

    Experiments have been conducted to examine the fate of uranium during the formation of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) when wastes containing high aluminate concentrations are mixed with wastes of high silicate concentration. Testing was conducted at varying degrees of uranium saturation. Testing examined typical tank conditions, e.g., stagnant, slightly elevated temperature (50 C). The results showed that under sub-saturated conditions uranium is not removed from solution to any large extent in both simulant testing and actual tank waste testing. There are data supporting a small removal due to sorption of uranium on sites in the NAS. Above the solubility limit the data are clear that a reduction in uranium concentration occurs with the formation of aluminosilicate. This uranium precipitation is fairly rapid and ceases when uranium reaches its solubility limit. At the solubility limit, it appears that uranium is not affected, but further testing might be warranted. Lastly, analysis of the uranium speciation in a Tank 49H set of samples showed the uranium to be soluble. Analysis of the solution composition and subsequent use of the Hobb's uranium solubility model indicated a uranium solubility limit of 32 mg/L. The measured value of uranium in the Tank 49H matched the model prediction.

  13. Effect of water on the heat capacity of polymerized aluminosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhifd, M. Ali; Whittington, Alan; Roux, Jacques; Richet, Pascal

    2006-02-01

    The effect of water on heat capacity has been determined for four series of hydrated synthetic aluminosilicate glasses and supercooled liquids close to albite, phonolite, trachyte, and leucogranite compositions. Heat capacities were measured at atmospheric pressure by differential scanning calorimetry for water contents between 0 and 4.9 wt % from 300 K to about 100 K above the glass transition temperature ( Tg). The partial molar heat capacity of water in polymerized aluminosilicate glasses, which can be considered as independent of composition, is =-122.319+341.631×10-3T+63.4426×105/T2 (J/mol K). In liquids containing at least 1 wt % H 2O, the partial molar heat capacity of water is about 85 J/mol K. From speciation data, the effects of water as hydroxyl groups and as molecular water have tentatively been estimated, with partial molar heat capacities of 153 ± 18 and 41 ± 14 J/mol K, respectively. In all cases, water strongly increases the configurational heat capacity at Tg and exerts a marked depressing effect on Tg, in close agreement with the results of viscosity experiments on the same series of glasses. Consistent with the Adam and Gibbs theory of relaxation processes, the departure of the viscosity of hydrous melts from Arrhenian variations correlates with the magnitude of configurational heat capacities.

  14. Compressibility of magnesium silicate glasses in comparison with those of aluminosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuryaeva, R. G.

    2013-10-01

    The refractive index of the Na2MgSi6O14 glass in the pressure range up to 6.0 GPa has been measured using a polarization-interference microscope and an apparatus with diamond anvils. The changes in relative density which characterize the compressibility of the glass have been estimated in the pressure range under investigation from the measured refractive indices within the framework of the theory of photoelasticity. The results have been compared with the data previously obtained for the NaAlSi3O8 and CaAl2Si6O16 glasses. A comparison of the changes in relative density of the aluminosilicate and magnesium silicate glasses has been demonstrated that the difference in the compressibility is not so much significant as should be expected from the replacement of network-forming ions by modifiers ions. Estimated by different methods the degree of depolymerization of the Na2MgSi6O14 glass (NBO/T ≅ 0.2) is compared to those for the aluminosilicate glasses. The decrease in the compressibility in the series NaAlSi3O8, CaAl2Si6O16, Na2MgSi6O14 glasses is in agreement with an increase of the degree of depolymerization in the same series.

  15. Effect of temperature and aluminium on calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate chemistry under equilibrium conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Rupert J.; L'Hôpital, Emilie; Provis, John L.; Lothenbach, Barbara

    2015-02-15

    There exists limited information regarding the effect of temperature on the structure and solubility of calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H). Here, calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C–(A–)S–H) is synthesised at Ca/Si = 1, Al/Si ≤ 0.15 and equilibrated at 7–80 °C. These systems increase in phase-purity, long-range order, and degree of polymerisation of C–(A–)S–H chains at higher temperatures; the most highly polymerised, crystalline and cross-linked C–(A–)S–H product is formed at Al/Si = 0.1 and 80 °C. Solubility products for C–(A–)S–H were calculated via determination of the solid-phase compositions and measurements of the concentrations of dissolved species in contact with the solid products, and show that the solubilities of C–(A–)S–H change slightly, within the experimental uncertainty, as a function of Al/Si ratio and temperature between 7 °C and 80 °C. These results are important in the development of thermodynamic models for C–(A–)S–H to enable accurate thermodynamic modelling of cement-based materials.

  16. Electromagnetic and Mechanical Properties of Silica-Aluminosilicates Plasma Sprayed Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipri, F.; Bartuli, C.; Valente, T.; Casadei, F.

    2007-12-01

    The physico-chemical and thermo-mechanical properties of aluminosilicate ceramics (high-melting point, low thermal expansion coefficient, excellent thermal shock resistance, low-density and good corrosion resistance) make this class of materials a good option for high-temperature structural applications. Al2O3-SiO2 compounds show an excellent refractory behavior allowing a wide use as wear-resistant thermal barrier coatings, in metallurgical and glass plants and in high temperature heat exchangers. Moreover, the low values of thermal expansion coefficient and of complex permittivity allow to extend the use of this ceramic for microelectronic devices, radome for antennas and electromagnetic windows for microwaves and infrared. The present article presents the results of an extensive experimental activity carried out to produce thick aluminosilicate coatings by plasma-spray technique. The APS deposition parameters were optimized on the basis of a surface response approach, as specified by design of experiments (DoE) methodologies. Samples were tested for phase composition, total porosity, microstructure, microhardness, deposition efficiency, fracture toughness, and modulus of rupture. Finally, coatings were characterized for their particularly interesting electromagnetic properties: complex permittivity was measured at microwave frequency using a network analyzer with wave guide.

  17. A HIGH CURRENT DENSITY LI+ ALUMINO-SILICATE ION SOURCE FOR TARGET HEATING EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.

    2011-03-23

    The NDCX-II accelerator for target heating experiments has been designed to use a large diameter ({approx_equal} 10.9 cm) Li{sup +} doped alumino-silicate source with a pulse duration of 0.5 {micro}s, and beam current of {approx_equal} 93 mA. Characterization of a prototype lithium alumino-silicate sources is presented. Using 6.35mm diameter prototype emitters (coated on a {approx_equal} 75% porous tungsten substrate), at a temperature of {approx_equal} 1275 C, a space-charge limited Li{sup +} beam current density of {approx_equal} 1 mA/cm{sup 2} was measured. At higher extraction voltage, the source is emission limited at around {approx_equal} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, weakly dependent on the applied voltage. The lifetime of the ion source is {approx_equal} 50 hours while pulsing the extraction voltage at 2 to 3 times per minute. Measurements show that the life time of the ion source does not depend only on beam current extraction, and lithium loss may be dominated by neutral loss or by evaporation. The life time of a source is around {ge} 10 hours in a DC mode extraction, and the extracted charge is {approx_equal} 75% of the available Li in the sample. It is inferred that pulsed heating may increase the life time of a source.

  18. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    ScienceCinema

    Andy Minor

    2016-07-12

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  19. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Minor

    2008-10-16

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  20. Bioinspired chemistry: Rewiring nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulijn, Rein V.; Caponi, Pier-Francesco

    2010-07-01

    The cell's dynamic skeleton, a tightly regulated network of protein fibres, continues to provide inspiration for the design of synthetic nanostructures. Genetic engineering has now been used to encode non-biological functionality within these structures.

  1. Biaxial Q-shearing of 27Al 3QMAS NMR spectra: insight into the structural disorder of framework aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiri; Klein, Petr; Dedecek, Jiri; Urbanova, Martina

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we present the application potentiality of biaxial Q-shearing of (27)Al 3QMAS NMR spectra in the analysis of structural defects of aluminium units in aluminosilicates. This study demonstrates that the combination of various shearing transformations of the recorded (27)Al 3QMAS NMR spectra enables an understanding of the broadening processes of the correlation signals of disordered framework aluminosilicates, for which a wide distribution of (27)Al MAS NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar parameters (i.e., second-order quadrupolar splitting and quadrupole-induced chemical shifts) can be expected. By combining the suitably selected shearing transformation procedures, the mechanisms of the formation of local defects in aluminosilicate frameworks, including Al/Si substitution effects in the next-nearest neighbouring T-sites, variations in bond angles, and/or variations in the physicochemical nature of charge-balancing counter-ions, can be identified. The proposed procedure has been extensively tested on a range of model aluminosilicate materials (kyanite, γ-alumina, metakaolin, analcime, chabazite, natrolite, phillipsite, mordenite, zeolite A, and zeolite Y).

  2. Preparation and characterization of cesium-137 aluminosilicate pellets for radioactive source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.; Tompkins, J.A.; Haff, K.W.; Case, F.N.

    1981-07-01

    Twenty-seven fully loaded /sup 137/Cs aluminosilicate pellets were fabricated in a hot cell by the vacuum hot pressing of a cesium carbonate/montmorillonite clay mixture at 1500/sup 0/C and 570 psig. Four pellets were selected for characterization studies which included calorimetric measurements, metallography, scanning electron microscope and electron backscattering (SEM-BSE), electron microprobe, x-ray diffraction, and cesium ion leachability measurements. Each test pellet contained 437 to 450 curies of /sup 137/Cs as determined by calorimetric measurements. Metallographic examinations revealed a two-phase system: a primary, granular, gray matrix phase containing large and small pores and small pore agglomerations, and a secondary fused phase interspersed throughout the gray matrix. SEM-BSE analyses showed that cesium and silicon were uniformly distributed throughout both phases of the pellet. This indicated that the cesium-silicon-clay reaction went to completion. Aluminum homogeneity was unconfirmed due to the high background noise associated with the inherent radioactivity of the test specimens. X-ray diffraction analyses of both radioactive and non-radioactive aluminosilicate pellets confirmed the crystal lattice structure to be pollucite. Cesium ion quasistatic leachability measurements determined the leach rates of fully loaded /sup 137/Cs sectioned pollucite pellets to date to be 4.61 to 34.4 x 10/sup -10/ kg m/sup -2/s/sup -1/, while static leach tests performed on unsectioned fully loaded pellets showed the leach rates of the cesium ion to date to be 2.25 to 3.41 x 10/sup -12/ kg m/sup -2/s/sup -1/. The cesium ion diffusion coefficients through the pollucite pellet were calculated using Fick's first and second laws of diffusion. The diffusion coefficients calculated for three tracer level /sup 137/Cs aluminosilicate pellets were 1.29 x 10/sup -16/m/sup 2/s/sup -1/, 6.88 x 10/sup -17/m/sup 2/s/sup -1/, and 1.35 x 10/sup -17/m/sup 2/s/sup -1/, respectively.

  3. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  4. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I.; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2015-12-22

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  5. Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    Particulates, like sand and volcanic ash, threaten the development of robust environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) that protect next-generation silicon-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine engine components from harsh combustion environments during service. The siliceous particulates transform into molten glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) when ingested by an aircraft engine operating at temperatures above 1200C. In this study, a sample of desert sand was melted into CMAS glass to evaluate high-temperature interactions between the sand glass and an advanced EBC material. Desert sand glass was added to the surface of hot-pressed EBC substrates, which were then heated in air at temperatures ranging from 1200C to 1500C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate microstructure and phase compositions of specimens and the CMASEBC interface after heat treatments.

  6. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S.

    1998-09-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition.

  7. Fictive temperature-independent density and minimum indentation size effect in calcium aluminosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, T. M.; Tomozawa, M.

    2008-09-01

    Using the calcium aluminosilicate system a glass was developed that exhibits fictive temperature-independent density by creating an intermediate glass between normal and anomalous glasses. Normal glass, such as soda-lime silicate glass, exhibits decreasing density with increasing fictive temperature while anomalous glass, such as silica glass, exhibits increasing density with increasing fictive temperature. This intermediate glass composition was found to exhibit the minimum indentation size effect during indentation hardness testing. It appears that the indentation size effect is correlated with a deformation-induced fictive temperature increase, which is accompanied by a density change and hardness change in the vicinity of the indentation. It is suggested from these observations that indentation size effect originates from the energy required to create interfaces and defects such as shear bands, subsurface cracks, and point defects near the indenter-specimen boundary, which accompany the volume change.

  8. Mesoporous MCM-41 aluminosilicates as model silica-alumina catalysts: Spectroscopic characterization of the acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, F.; Chiche, B.; Fajula, F.; Viale, S.; Garrone, E.

    1996-12-31

    The synthesis procedure brings about a low threshold value for the surface concentration of Al species and renders MCM-41 a model system for the study of silica-alumina phases. On severely outgassed samples, two types of Lewis sites are present, differing in their protrusion from the surface, as well as Bronsted sites engaged in lateral H-bonding, evidenced by the interaction with NH{sub 3} and CO. The conversion of Lewis sites into Bronsted ones by water adsorption shows that the Bronsted species are Si(OH)Al, typical of zeolites, and Si-Al(OH)-Si, found in dealuminated zeolites. The flexibility of the amorphous framework accounts for the differences with zeolitic aluminosilicates.

  9. The effect of surface modification on the ion-exchange properties of layered aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Yuchs, S.E.; Wasserman, S.R.

    1996-10-01

    Layered aluminosilicates and clay type minerals have been shown to have varying degrees of ion-exchange capacity. In this paper, the ion-exchange capacities of untreated and surface modified montmorillonite clays will be discussed. The effects of extent of surface modification, type of modifier, and type of exchangeable ion will also be discussed. Physical properties, including X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, XAS and EXAFS, of the modified and native materials will be compared. These surface modification reactions have been shown to yield novel materials with very low ion leachability. Various leach test results from several encapsulated metal ion-exchanged materials will be detailed. This surface modification method may yield materials suitable for intermediate-term storage of hazardous metal ions.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of inorganic polymers from the alkali activation of an aluminosilicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, C. P.; Montaño, A. M.; González, A. K.; Ríos, C. A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the results of the synthesis and characterization of inorganic polymers (IP) from aluminosilicates: bentonite (BT) and pumice (PP). The synthesis of IP, was carried out by two methods involving alkaline activation, at room temperature and 80 ± 5 °C, using as activating agent sodium silicate both commercial and analytical (Na2SiO3). Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 3 M, 7 M and 12 M was added. A lower degree of polymerization was obtained by using analytical precursors subjected to room temperature and 80 ± 5°C. Replacement of heating by the use of the commercial activating agent with greater alkalinity allows the formation of a 3D network. The materials were structurally characterized by FTIR spectroscopy with Attenuated Reflectance (ATR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X -ray diffraction (DRX).

  11. Fictive temperature-independent density and minimum indentation size effect in calcium aluminosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T. M.; Tomozawa, M.

    2008-09-15

    Using the calcium aluminosilicate system a glass was developed that exhibits fictive temperature-independent density by creating an intermediate glass between normal and anomalous glasses. Normal glass, such as soda-lime silicate glass, exhibits decreasing density with increasing fictive temperature while anomalous glass, such as silica glass, exhibits increasing density with increasing fictive temperature. This intermediate glass composition was found to exhibit the minimum indentation size effect during indentation hardness testing. It appears that the indentation size effect is correlated with a deformation-induced fictive temperature increase, which is accompanied by a density change and hardness change in the vicinity of the indentation. It is suggested from these observations that indentation size effect originates from the energy required to create interfaces and defects such as shear bands, subsurface cracks, and point defects near the indenter-specimen boundary, which accompany the volume change.

  12. Strong UV absorption and visible luminescence in ytterbium-doped aluminosilicate glass under UV excitation.

    PubMed

    Engholm, M; Norin, L; Aberg, D

    2007-11-15

    A broad visible luminescence band and characteristic IR luminescence of Yb(3+) ions are observed under UV excitation in ytterbium-doped aluminosilicate glass. Samples made under both oxidizing and reducing conditions are analyzed. A strong charge-transfer absorption band in the UV range is observed for glass samples containing ytterbium. Additional absorption bands are observed for the sample made under reducing conditions, which are associated with f-d transitions of divalent ytterbium. The visible luminescence band is attributed to 5d-4f emission from Yb(2+) ions, and the IR luminescence is concluded to originate from a relaxed charge-transfer transition. The findings are important to explain induced optical losses (photodarkening) in high-power fiber lasers. PMID:18026305

  13. Tailoring of Boehmite-Derived Aluminosilicate Aerogel Structure and Properties: Influence of Ti Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Sheets, Erik J.; Miller, Derek R.; Newlin, Katy N.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels offer potential for extremely low thermal conductivities at temperatures greater than 900 C, beyond where silica aerogels reach their upper temperature limits. Aerogels have been synthesized at various Al:Si ratios, including mullite compositions, using Boehmite (AlOOH) as the Al source, and tetraethoxy orthosilicate as the Si precursor. The Boehmite-derived aerogels are found to form by a self-assembly process of AlOOH crystallites, with Si-O groups on the surface of an alumina skeleton. Morphology, surface area and pore size varies with the crystallite size of the starting Boehmite powder, as well as with synthesis parameters. Ternary systems, including Al-Si-Ti aerogels incorporating a soluble Ti precursor, are possible with careful control of pH. The addition of Ti influences sol viscosity, gelation time pore structure and pore size distribution, as well as phase formation on heat treatment.

  14. A facile strategy to recycle template P123 from mesoporous aluminosilicates by ultrasonic extraction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-su; Cao, Li; Su, Guang-xun; Xu, Chun-yan; Zhang, Ze-ting; Gao, Xiong-hou; Liu, Hong-hai; Liu, Hong-tao

    2014-09-01

    High synthesis cost of mesoporous aluminosilicates (MA) limits their practical application. Recycling of copolymer template employed in preparation of MA is an effective way to reduce the synthesis cost. An ultrasonic extraction strategy for recycling of organic template P123 in MAs is reported. Effects of different extraction parameters on P123 recovery are investigated and the optimum conditions are obtained. 75.0% P123 is recovered from MAs within 10 min by one-step ultrasonication. Characterizations indicated that the resulting P123-free MA (MA-U) exhibits excellent properties compared with that of calcined products. Moreover, recovered P123 can be employed to synthesize high hydrothermally stable MA. This investigation provides a facile strategy to recycle P123 from MA.

  15. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  16. Energy Analysis of Aluminosilicate Zeolites with Comprehensive Ranges of Framework Topologies, Chemical Compositions, and Aluminum Distributions.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Koki; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2016-05-18

    The contents and locations of Al in the zeolite frameworks are one of the key factors determining the physicochemical properties of zeolites. Systematic evaluation of the characteristics of zeolites with a wide variety of framework topologies, a wide range of Si/Al ratios, and various locations of Al is of great significance, but very challenging due to the limitation of the realizable ranges of Al contents in zeolites as well as the limited information on the Al locations obtained from the current analytical techniques. Here, we report the systematic analysis of the energetics of aluminosilicate zeolites with 209 existing framework topologies at different Si/Al ratios using molecular mechanics. More than 43 000 initial structures were generated to give comprehensive views of the energetics of zeolites. The results coincide well with the structural knowledge obtained experimentally. It was revealed that the relation between the relative framework energies versus the Al contents varies in accordance with the topologies, suggesting that the relative stability of zeolites depends not only on the topologies, but also on the substituting contents of Al. For particular topologies with the same Al contents, in addition, comparisons between random and specific distributions of Al showed that zeolite with Al at a particular T site is energetically more stable than those with random distributions, suggesting the inherent influences of the Al locations. The contents and locations of Al in zeolites likely have a certain preference that may reflect the range of chemical compositions, the Al distributions, and consequently the physicochemical properties of realizable aluminosilicate zeolites. PMID:27097121

  17. Structure and properties of sodium aluminosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ye; Du, Jincheng; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-07-01

    Addition of alumina to sodium silicate glasses considerably improves the mechanical properties and chemical durability and changes other properties such as ionic conductivity and melt viscosity. As a result, aluminosilicate glasses find wide industrial and technological applications including the recent Corning® Gorilla® Glass. In this paper, the structures of sodium aluminosilicate glasses with a wide range of Al/Na ratios (from 1.5 to 0.6) have been studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations in a system containing around 3000 atoms, with the aim to understand the structural role of aluminum as a function of chemical composition in these glasses. The short- and medium-range structures such as aluminum coordination, bond angle distribution around cations, Qn distribution (n bridging oxygen per network forming tetrahedron), and ring size distribution have been systematically studied. In addition, the mechanical properties including bulk, shear, and Young's moduli have been calculated and compared with experimental data. It is found that aluminum ions are mainly four-fold coordinated in peralkaline compositions (Al/Na < 1) and form an integral part of the rigid silicon-oxygen glass network. In peraluminous compositions (Al/Na > 1), small amounts of five-fold coordinated aluminum ions are present while the concentration of six-fold coordinated aluminum is negligible. Oxygen triclusters are also found to be present in peraluminous compositions, and their concentration increases with increasing Al/Na ratio. The calculated bulk, shear, and Young's moduli were found to increase with increasing Al/Na ratio, in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Prospects and challenges of iron pyroelectrolysis in magnesium aluminosilicate melts near minimum liquidus temperature.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N M; Kovalevsky, A V; Mikhalev, S M; Costa, F M; Frade, J R

    2015-04-14

    Although steel production by molten oxide electrolysis offers potential economic and environmental advantages over classic extractive metallurgy, its feasibility is far from being convincingly demonstrated, mainly due to inherent experimental difficulties exerted by harsh conditions and lack of knowledge regarding relevant mechanisms and physico-chemical processes in the melts. The present work was intended to demonstrate the concept of pyroelectrolysis at very high temperature near the minimum liquidus point of magnesium aluminosilicate, being conducted under electron-blocking conditions using yttria-stabilized zirconia cells, and to provide a new insight into electrochemistry behind this process. Significant current yields are possible for pyroelectrolysis performed in electron-blocking mode using a solid electrolyte membrane to separate the anode and the molten electrolyte. Parasitic electrochemical processes rise gradually as the concentration of iron oxide dissolved in the molten electrolytes is depleted, impairing faradaic efficiency. Reduction of silica to metallic silicon was identified as a significant contribution to those parasitic currents, among other plausible processes. Direct pyroelectrolysis without electron blocking was found much less plausible, due to major limitations on faradaic efficiency imposed by electronic leakage and insufficient ionic conductivity of the aluminosilicate melt. Ohmic losses may consume an excessive fraction of the applied voltage, thus failing to sustain the Nernst potential required for reduction to metallic iron. The results suggest the need for further optimization of the molten electrolyte composition to promote ionic conductivity and to suppress electronic transport contribution, possibly, by tuning the Al/Si ratio and altering the network-forming/modifying behaviour of the iron cations. PMID:25760633

  19. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  20. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  1. Simulation of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, A J; Grossman, J C; Puzder, A; Benedict, L X; Galli, G

    2001-07-19

    The field of research into the optical properties of silicon nanostructures has seen enormous growth over the last decade. The discovery that silicon nanoparticles exhibit visible photoluminescence (PL) has led to new insights into the mechanisms responsible for such phenomena. The importance of understanding and controlling the PL properties of any silicon based material is of paramount interest to the optoelectronics industry where silicon nanoclusters could be embedded into existing silicon based circuitry. In this talk, we present a combination of quantum Monte Carlo and density functional approaches to the calculation of the electronic, structural, and optical properties of silicon nanostructures.

  2. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  3. Plasmonics in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Zhu, Xing

    2013-07-26

    Plasmonics has developed into one of the rapidly growing research topics for nanophotonics. With advanced nanofabrication techniques, a broad variety of nanostructures can be designed and fabricated for plasmonic devices at nanoscale. Fundamental properties for both surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and localized surface plasmons (LSP) arise a new insight and understanding for the electro-optical device investigations, such as plasmonic nanofocusing, low-loss plasmon waveguide and active plasmonic detectors for energy harvesting. Here, we review some typical functional plasmonic nanostructures and nanosmart devices emerging from our individual and collaborative research works.

  4. Structural Role of Alkali Cations in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glasses as Examined Using Oxygen-17 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukenaga, Sohei; Kanehashi, Koji; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Saito, Noritaka; Nakashima, Kunihiko

    2016-08-01

    The structural roles of alkali and calcium cations are important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of aluminosilicate melts and glasses. Recently, oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (17O NMR) studies of calcium-sodium aluminosilicate glasses showed that these structural roles are not randomly given, but rather each cation has its own preferential role. However, the relationship between cation type and role preference in calcium aluminosilicate glass is not completely understood. In the present study, the structural roles of lithium, sodium, and potassium cations in selected calcium aluminosilicate glasses are investigated using 17O solid-state NMR experiments. Data from these experiments clearly show that potassium cations have a notably stronger tendency to act as charge compensators within the network structure, compared to sodium and lithium cations. The result of 17O NMR experiment also showed that sodium and lithium cations in part act as network modifier alongside with calcium cations.

  5. A Novel Conversion Process for Waste Slag: The Preparation of Aluminosilicate Glass with Evaluation of the Dielectric Properties from Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Huang, Sanxi; Liu, Hongting; Wu, Fengnian; Chang, Ziyuan; Yue, Yunlong

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, aluminosilicate glass was prepared from blast furnace slag and quartz sand. Fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry and density measurements were carried out to investigate the effects of SiO2 on the aluminosilicate glass network rigidity. The results indicate that glass structure would be enhanced if more SiO2 was introduced into the glass system. Meanwhile, both the glass transition temperature ( T g) and the glass crystallization temperature ( T c) increase slightly; the increase in density of the glass being further evidence of the enhancement in glass network rigidity. Dielectric measurements show that the dielectric constant and dielectric loss decrease with more SiO2. The properties of the prepared aluminosilicate glasses are comparable to those of E glass, indicating that blast furnace slags are suitable for producing aluminosilicate glass with low dielectric constant and dielectric loss.

  6. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  7. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information:http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/10/20/engineering-nanoparticles-for-maximum-strength/

  8. Combustion Synthesis of Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huczko, A.; Lange, H.; Chojecki, G.; Cudziłło, S.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Walton, D. R. M.; Kroto, H. W.; Presz, A.; Diduszko, R.

    2002-10-01

    Novel carbon and inorganic 1D nanostructures were prepared by combustion of metal-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) systems in a calorimetric bomb. The high carbon yield from silicon-containing PTFE starting materials is due to the production and volatility of SiF4.

  9. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  10. Charge-transfer state excitation as the main mechanism of the photodarkening process in ytterbium-doped aluminosilicate fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, K K; Rybaltovsky, A A; Vel'miskin, V V; Likhachev, M E; Bubnov, M M; Dianov, E M; Umnikov, A A; Gur'yanov, A N; Vechkanov, N N; Shestakova, I A

    2014-12-31

    We have studied photodarkening in ytterbium-doped fibre preforms with an aluminosilicate glass core. Analysis of their absorption and luminescence spectra indicates the formation of stable Yb{sup 2+} ions in the glass network under IR laser pumping at a wavelength λ = 915 nm and under UV irradiation with an excimer laser (λ = 193 nm). We have performed comparative studies of the luminescence spectra of the preforms and crystals under excitation at a wavelength of 193 nm. The mechanism behind the formation of Yb{sup 2+} ions and aluminium – oxygen hole centres (Al-OHCs), common to ytterbium-doped YAG crystals and aluminosilicate glass, has been identified: photoinduced Yb{sup 3+} charge-transfer state excitation. (optical fibres)

  11. Charge-transfer state excitation as the main mechanism of the photodarkening process in ytterbium-doped aluminosilicate fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, K. K.; Rybaltovsky, A. A.; Vel'miskin, V. V.; Likhachev, M. E.; Bubnov, M. M.; Dianov, E. M.; Umnikov, A. A.; Gur'yanov, A. N.; Vechkanov, N. N.; Shestakova, I. A.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied photodarkening in ytterbium-doped fibre preforms with an aluminosilicate glass core. Analysis of their absorption and luminescence spectra indicates the formation of stable Yb2+ ions in the glass network under IR laser pumping at a wavelength λ = 915 nm and under UV irradiation with an excimer laser (λ = 193 nm). We have performed comparative studies of the luminescence spectra of the preforms and crystals under excitation at a wavelength of 193 nm. The mechanism behind the formation of Yb2+ ions and aluminium - oxygen hole centres (Al-OHCs), common to ytterbium-doped YAG crystals and aluminosilicate glass, has been identified: photoinduced Yb3+ charge-transfer state excitation.

  12. Flux Decoupling and Chemical Diffusion in Redox Dynamics in Aluminosilicate Melts and Glasses (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. F.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of redox dynamics in silicate melts and glasses suggest that, for many compositions and for many external environments, the reaction proceeds and is rate-limited by the diffusive flux of divalent-cation network modifiers. Application of ion-backscattering spectrometry either (i) on oxidized or reduced melts (subsequently quenched before analysis) or (ii) on similarly reacted glasses, both of basalt-composition polymerization, demonstrates that the network modifiers move relative to the (first-order-rigid) aluminosilicate network. Thus, the textures associated with such reactions are often surprising, and frequently include metastable or unstable phases and/or spatial compositional differences. This response is only possible if the motion of cations can be decoupled from that of anions. In many cases, decoupling is accomplished by the presence in the melt/glass of transition-metal cations, whose heterovalency creates distortions in the electronic band structure resulting in electronic defects: electron “holes” in the valence band or electrons in the conduction band. (The prevalence of holes or electrons being a function of bulk chemistry and oxygen activity.) These electronic species make the melt/glass a “defect semiconductor.” Because (a) the critical issue in reaction dynamics is the transport coefficient (the product of species mobility and species concentration) and (b) the electronic species are many orders of magnitude more mobile than are the ions, very low concentrations of transition-metal ions are required for flux decoupling. For example, 0.04 at% Fe keeps a magnesium aluminosilicate melt/glass a defect semiconductor down to 800°C [Cook & Cooper, 2000]. Depending on composition, high-temperature melts can see ion species having a high-enough transport coefficient to allow decoupling, e.g., alkali cations in a basaltic melt [e.g., Pommier et al., 2010]. In this presentation, these ideas will be illustrated by examining redox dynamics

  13. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II)

    SciTech Connect

    LBNL; Roy, P.K.; Greenway, W.; Kwan, J.W.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2011-04-20

    To heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter with intense ion beams, low mass ions, such as lithium, have an energy loss peak (dE/dx) at a suitable kinetic energy. The Heavy Ion Fusion Sciences (HIFS) program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will carry out warm dense matter experiments using Li{sup +} ion beam with energy 1.2-4 MeV in order to achieve uniform heating up to 0.1-1 eV. The accelerator physics design of Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) has a pulse length at the ion source of about 0.5 {micro}s. Thus for producing 50 nC of beam charge, the required beam current is about 100 mA. Focusability requires a normalized (edge) emittance {approx}2 {pi}-mm-mrad. Here, lithium aluminosilicate ion sources, of {beta}-eucryptite, are being studied within the scope of NDCX-II construction. Several small (0.64 cm diameter) lithium aluminosilicate ion sources, on 70%-80% porous tungsten substrate, were operated in a pulsed mode. The distance between the source surface and the mid-plane of the extraction electrode (1 cm diameter aperture) was 1.48 cm. The source surface temperature was at 1220 C to 1300 C. A 5-6 {micro}s long beam pulsed was recorded by a Faraday cup (+300 V on the collector plate and -300 V on the suppressor ring). Figure 1 shows measured beam current density (J) vs. V{sup 3/2}. A space-charge limited beam density of {approx}1 mA/cm{sup 2} was measured at 1275 C temperature, after allowing a conditioning time of about {approx} 12 hours. Maximum emission limited beam current density of {ge} 1.8mA/cm{sup 2} was recorded at 1300 C with 10-kV extractions. Figure 2 shows the lifetime of two typical sources with space-charge limited beam current emission at a lower extraction voltage (1.75 kV) and at temperature of 1265 {+-} 7 C. These data demonstrate a constant, space-charge limited beam current for 20-50 hours. The lifetime of a source is determined by the loss of lithium from the alumino-silicate

  14. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm2 have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ~1275 °C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ≥ 1.5 mA/cm2, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, ≤0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~40 h at ~1275 °C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Finally, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  15. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2012-04-01

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm2 have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ~1275 °C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ≥ 1.5 mA/cm2, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, ≤0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~40 h at ~1275 °C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Finally, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  16. The effect of TiO2/aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives on the mechanical and thermal properties of polyacrylic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Rahimeh; Olad, Ali

    2015-12-01

    The commercial grade polyacrylic latex was modified in order to prepare a mechanical and thermal improved coating. TiO2/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposites with montmorillonite, zeolite-A and clinoptilolite aluminosilicates were prepared and used as additive in the matrix of polyacrylic latex to achieve a coating with proper mechanical and thermal properties. X-ray diffraction patterns and FESEM were used to characterize the composition, structure, and morphology of the nanocomposite additives. Polyacrylic coatings modified by TiO2/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives showed higher adhesion strength and hardness compared to unmodified commercial grade polyacrylic coatings. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed lower glass transition temperature for modified polyacrylic coatings than that of unmodified polyacrylic coatings. The tensile tests were also carried out for unmodified and modified polyacrylic coatings. According to the results, the modified polyacrylic based coating with TiO2/Ag-exchanged-clinoptilolite nanocomposite additive was the best coating considering most of useful properties.

  17. The selective adsorption of tellurium in the aluminosilicate regions of AFI- and MOR-type microporous crystals.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Takuji

    2014-10-01

    Attempts have been made to load tellurium (Te) atoms into the one-dimensional nano-channels of microporous crystals of aluminophosphate AlPO4-5 and of aluminosilicate mordenites of the Na(+) form (Na-MOR) and the H(+)-form (H-MOR) at 673 K. The density of the atoms adsorbed was in the sequence 0 ∼ AlPO4-5 ≪ H-MOR < Na-MOR. AlPO4-5 provides a shallow potential of periodical charge fluctuation for Te atoms, from the alternate ordering of Al and P atoms through O atoms. Mordenite offers a sufficiently strong potential for Te adsorption, but the magnitude varies with the type of cation. Dipoles between framework AlO2(-) anion sites and their Na(+) counter-ions in Na-MOR provide a stronger potential than the Brønsted acid points in H-MOR. The adsorption of Te atoms in the silico-aluminophosphate SAPO-5 was between that of AlPO4-5 and H-MOR, leading us to suspect that Te atoms are selectively adsorbed in the aluminosilicate regions accompanying the Brønsted acid points distributed in the major aluminophosphate network. The aluminosilicate regions in SAPO-5 are below 500 nm in size and are distributed throughout a single crystal.

  18. Chlorine, in the Presence of Iron, Does Indeed Decrease the Viscosity of Aluminosilicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The effect of volatiles on melt rheology is investigated here, as the degassing of magma before an eruption usually leads to an increase in magma viscosity; and therefore increases the probability of an explosive eruption. There is not a large amount of data on the effect of chlorine on viscosity. It would appear, however, that chlorine increases the viscosity of peralkaline sodium-aluminosilicate melts, and decreases the viscosity of peraluminous sodium-aluminosilicate melts. These different effects of chlorine on viscosity indicate that the chlorine sits in different structural sites in peraluminous and peralkaline melts. In previous studies of rheology in this laboratory, we have shown that chlorine does indeed increase the viscosity of a phonolite analog Na2O-CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 melt. In this study, we have extended our investigation of the rheology of chlorine-bearing melts to basaltic compositions. The melt composition used here is that of a basaltic glass taken from the mid-Atlantic Ridge at 3000 m depth during the Venture Cruise (Ireland) of 2011. The viscosities were determined using the micropenetration technique in the 109-1012 Pa s range at temperatures 600-800 C. It was found that the addition of 0.6 wt% Cl resulted in a 0.5 log unit decrease in viscosity. A synthetic haplo-basaltic melt with the iron replaced by Mg and the Al was also synthesized. The addition of 0.3 wt% chlorine to this melt resulted in a 0.3 log unit increase in viscosity; as observed previously for Fe-free peralkaline melts. Based on these viscosity data it would appear that the effect of chlorine on rheology is a function of the composition of the melt, and that the structural site taken by chlorine varies as a function of the presence or absence of iron. The addition of chlorine to the iron-bearing melt, increased the Fe2+/Fetot from 0.30 to 0.45. This indicates that the presence of chlorine results in an energetic preference for Fe2+ in the melt structure. Thus, it is not so much the

  19. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of the Aluminosilicate LZ-135, a Zeolite Related to ZSM-10

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, Lynne B.; Baerlocher, Christian; Wilson, Stephen T.; Broach, Robert W.

    2009-09-02

    The aluminosilicate LZ-135 was one of the first zeolites to be prepared in the presence of two or more organic structure-directing agents (in this case, Me{sub 4}N{sup +} (TMA) and Et{sub 4}N{sup +} (TEA)) and was patented 20 years ago. However, the material was polycrystalline, and at the time, its aluminosilicate framework structure could not be determined. In view of the fact that methods of structure determination from powder diffraction data have developed considerably in the meantime, a fresh analysis of the problem was undertaken. High-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction data were collected on a calcined sample of LZ-135 (as synthesized composition ca. |Na{sub 26}TMA{sub 6}|[Si{sub 76}Al{sub 32}O{sub 216}]), and the new powder charge-flipping structure-solution algorithm was applied. The framework structure (P6{sub 3}/mmc; a = 31.3830(2) {angstrom}, c = 7.6513(1) {angstrom}) was revealed immediately, and then the positions of the Na{sup +} ions and a few water molecules were located in a series of difference electron density maps. The [001] projection of the framework structure is identical to that of ZSM-10 (P6{sub 3}/mmm), but the (up-down) orientations of the (Si,Al) tetrahedra, and therefore their connectivities, are different, and this leads to a distinctly different topology with two 1-dimensional, 12-ring channel systems with effective pore widths of 7.2 and 6.5 {angstrom}. The new framework has been assigned the framework type code LTF by the International Zeolite Association. The framework structures of LZ-135 and ZSM-10 are related to one another in the same way as are those of mazzite and zeolite L. Approximately 27.5 Na{sup +} ions were located in six different sites, and all are coordinated to oxygen atoms of the framework. Twelve H{sub 2}O molecules per unit cell are associated with one of the Na{sup +} ion positions, where they serve to complete an octahedral coordination geometry around the ion, and 5.2 are located in the larger of the

  20. The aluminum ordering in aluminosilicates: a dipolar 27Al NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Gee, Becky A

    2004-01-01

    The spatial ordering of aluminum atoms in CsAl(SiO3)2 and 3Al2O3.2SiO2 was probed by 27Al dipolar solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The 27Al response to a Hahn spin-echo pulse sequence in a series of aluminum-containing model crystalline compounds demonstrates that quantitative 27Al homonuclear dipolar second moments can be obtained to within +/-20% of the theoretical values, if evaluation of the spin-echo response curve is limited to short evolution periods (2t1 < or = 0.10 ms). Additionally, selective excitation of the central transition m = 1/2 --> -1/2 is necessary in order to ensure quantitative results. Restriction of spin exchange affecting the dephasing of the magnetization may decelerate the spin-echo decay at longer evolution periods. Considering these restraints, the method was used to probe the spatial distribution of aluminum atoms among the tetrahedral sites in two aluminosilicate materials. Experimental 27Al spin-echo response data for the aluminosilicates CsAl(SiO3)2 (synthetic pollucite) and 3Al2O3.2SiO2 (mullite) are compared with theoretical data based on (I) various degrees of aluminum-oxygen-aluminum bond formation among tetrahedrally coordinated aluminum atoms (Al(T(d) )-O-Al(T(d) )) and (II) the maximum avoidance of Al(T(d) )-O-Al(T(d) ) bonding. Analysis of the second moment values and resulting echo decay responses suggests that partial suppression of spin exchange among aluminum atoms in crystallographically distinct sites may contribute to the 27Al spin echo decay in 3Al2O3.2SiO2, thus complicating quantitative analysis of the data. Silicon-29 and aluminum-27 magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of 3Al2O3.2SiO2 are consistent with those previously reported. The experimental 27Al spin-echo response behavior of CsAl(SiO3)2 differs from the theoretical response behavior based on the maximum avoidance of Al-O-Al bonding between tetrahedral aluminum sites in CsAl(SiO3)2. A single unresolved resonance is observed in both the silicon-29 and

  1. Alkali aluminosilicate melts and glasses: structuring at the middle range order of amorphous matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, C.; neuville, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviours. It is well known that several parameters impact strongly these properties, such as for instance the temperature, pressure, chemical composition and volatiles concentration, finally influencing eruptive behaviour of volcanoes. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts, like for instance the Vesuvius (Italy) or Erebus (Antartica) magmas. In an oncoming paper in Chemical Geology (Le Losq and Neuville, 2012), we have communicated results of the study of mixing Na-K in tectosilicate melts containing a high concentration of silica (≥75mol%). In the present communication, we will enlarge this first point of view to tectosilicate melts presenting a lower silica concentration. We will first present our viscosity data, and then the Adam and Gibbs theory that allows theoretically modelling Na-K mixing in aluminosilicate melts by using the so-called "mixed alkali effect". On the basis of the rheological results, the Na-K mixing cannot be explained with the ideal "mixed alkali effect", which involves random exchange of Na-K cationic pairs. To go further and as rheological properties are directly linked with structural properties, we will present our first results obtained by Raman and NMR spectroscopy. These last ones provide important structural pieces of information on the polymerization state of glasses and melts, and also on the environment of tetrahedrally coordinated cations. Rheological and structural results all highlight that Na and K are not randomly distributed in aluminosilicate glasses and melts networks. Na melts present a network with some channels and a non-random distribution of Al and Si. K networks are different. They also present a non-random distribution of Al and Si, but in two sub

  2. Manganese Nanostructures and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simov, Kirie Rangelov

    The primary goal of this study is to incorporate adatoms with large magnetic moment, such as Mn, into two technologically significant group IV semiconductor (SC) matrices, e.g. Si and Ge. For the first time in the world, we experimentally demonstrate Mn doping by embedding nanostructured thin layers, i.e. delta-doping. The growth is observed by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which combines topographic and electronic information in a single image. We investigate the initial stages of Mn monolayer growth on a Si(100)(2x1) surface reconstruction, develop methods for classification of nanostructure types for a range of surface defect concentrations (1.0 to 18.2%), and subsequently encapsulate the thin Mn layer in a SC matrix. These experiments are instrumental in generating a surface processing diagram for self-assembly of monoatomic Mn-wires. The role of surface vacancies has also been studied by kinetic Monte Carlo modeling and the experimental observations are compared with the simulation results, leading to the conclusion that Si(100)(2x1) vacancies serve as nucleation centers in the Mn-Si system. Oxide formation, which happens readily in air, is detrimental to ferromagnetism and lessens the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. Therefore, the protective SC cap, composed of either Si or Ge, serves a dual purpose: it is both the embedding matrix for the Mn nanostructured thin film and a protective agent for oxidation. STM observations of partially deposited caps ensure that the nanostructures remain intact during growth. Lastly, the relationship between magnetism and nanostructure types is established by an in-depth study using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). This sensitive method detects signals even at coverages less than one atomic layer of Mn. XMCD is capable of discerning which chemical compounds contribute to the magnetic moment of the system, and provides a ratio between the orbital and spin contributions. Depending on the amount

  3. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  4. Network cation coordination in aluminoborosilicate and Mg- aluminosilicate glasses: pressure effects in recovered structural changes and densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bista, S.; Stebbins, J. F.; Sisson, T. W.; Hankins, W. B.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we compare the aluminum and boron coordination of glass samples recovered from piston-cylinder experiments carried out at 1 to 3 GPa and near to their ambient glass transition temperature (Tg), which we have found gives a more accurate picture of high pressure structural changes than experiments involving quenching from above the liquidus, as large pressure drops can occur in the latter. Aluminoborosilicate glasses with excess modifier (Ca, La and Y- aluminoborosilicate) quenched from melts at 1-3 GPa were studied with B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to assess relative effects on two different network cations. Structural changes in the Y-aluminoborosilicate are dramatic, going from mostly AlO4 at low pressure to mostly AlO5 and AlO6 at 3 GPa. Large increases in BO4 (vs. BO3) are also seen. Mg-aluminosilicate glasses, both tectosilicate (Mg2Al4Si6O20) and with excess modifier composition (Mg3Al2Si6O18) quenched from melts at 1-3 GPa pressure were studied with Al-27 MAS NMR. In contrast to our previous study (Bista et al., Am. Min., in press) of jadeite glass, where only 0.5% of fivefold aluminum was seen in glass recovered from 3 GPa, five and six fold aluminum species increase significantly with increasing pressure in both Mg aluminosilicate glass compositions studied here. We observe that the tectosilicate Mg aluminosilicate glass has more higher coordinated aluminum than the excess modifier containing composition in the pressure range in our study. In the previous study (Bista et al., in press) of jadeite and calcium aluminosilicate (Ca3Al2Si6O18) glasses, 6-8% densification was observed in glasses recovered from 3 GPa. In this study of Mg aluminosilicate glasses, we observe 12% densification in glasses recovered from 3 GPa. Both types of observation confirm that structural and density changes with pressure are enhanced by higher field strength modifier cations, and will be especially important in Mg- and Fe-rich mantle melts.

  5. In situ structural analysis of calcium aluminosilicate glasses under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, R. F.; de Ligny, D.; Martinet, C.; Sandrini, M.; Medina, A. N.; Rohling, J. H.; Baesso, M. L.; Lima, S. M.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Guyot, Y.

    2016-08-01

    In situ micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the structural evolution of OH--free calcium aluminosilicate glasses, under high pressure and at room temperature. Evaluation was made of the role of the SiO2 concentration in percalcic join systems, for Al/(Al  +  Si) in the approximate range from 0.9 to 0.2. Under high pressure, the intensity of the main band related to the bending mode of bridging oxygen ({ν\\text{B}} [T-O-T], where T  =  Si or Al) decreased gradually, suggesting that the bonds were severely altered or even destroyed. In Si-rich glasses, compression induced a transformation of Q n species to Q n-1. In the case of Al-rich glass, the Al in the smallest Q n units evolved from tetrahedral to higher-coordinated Al ([5]Al and [6]Al). Permanent structural changes were observed in samples recovered from the highest pressure of around 15 GPa and, particularly for Si-rich samples, the recovered structure showed an increase of three-membered rings in the Si/Al tetrahedral network.

  6. In situ structural analysis of calcium aluminosilicate glasses under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, R. F.; de Ligny, D.; Martinet, C.; Sandrini, M.; Medina, A. N.; Rohling, J. H.; Baesso, M. L.; Lima, S. M.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Guyot, Y.

    2016-08-01

    In situ micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the structural evolution of OH‑-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses, under high pressure and at room temperature. Evaluation was made of the role of the SiO2 concentration in percalcic join systems, for Al/(Al  +  Si) in the approximate range from 0.9 to 0.2. Under high pressure, the intensity of the main band related to the bending mode of bridging oxygen ({ν\\text{B}} [T-O-T], where T  =  Si or Al) decreased gradually, suggesting that the bonds were severely altered or even destroyed. In Si-rich glasses, compression induced a transformation of Q n species to Q n‑1. In the case of Al-rich glass, the Al in the smallest Q n units evolved from tetrahedral to higher-coordinated Al ([5]Al and [6]Al). Permanent structural changes were observed in samples recovered from the highest pressure of around 15 GPa and, particularly for Si-rich samples, the recovered structure showed an increase of three-membered rings in the Si/Al tetrahedral network.

  7. Synthesis and Properties of a Barium Aluminosilicate Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Glass-Ceramic Sealant

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Chou, Y. S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2008-07-15

    A series of barium aluminosilicate glasses modified with CaO and B2O3, were prepared and evaluated with respect to their suitability in sealing planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). At a target operating temperature of 750ºC, the long-term CTE of one particular composition (35 mol% BaO, 15 mol% CaO, 10 mol% B2O3, 5 mol% Al2O3, bal. SiO2) was found to be particularly stable, due to devitrification to a mixture of glass and ceramic phases. This sealant composition exhibits minimal chemical interaction with the yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte, yet forms a strong bond with this material. Interactions with metal components were found to be more extensive and depended on the composition of the metal oxide scale that formed during sealing. Generally alumina-scale formers exhibited a more compact reaction zone with the glass than chromia-scale forming alloys. Mechanical measurements conducted on the bulk glass-ceramic and on seals formed using these materials indicate that the sealant is anticipated to display adequate long-term strength for most conventional stationary SOFC applications.

  8. Atomic Structure of a Cesium Aluminosilicate Geopolymer: A Pair Distribution Function Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.; Sarin, P; Provis, J; Haggerty, R; Driemeyer, P; Chupas, P; van Deventer, J; Kriven, W

    2008-01-01

    The atomic pair distribution function (PDF) method was used to study the structure of cesium aluminosilicate geopolymer. The geopolymer was prepared by reacting metakaolin with cesium silicate solution followed by curing at 50C for 24 h in a sealed container. Heating of Cs-geopolymer above 1000C resulted in formation of crystalline pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}). PDF refinement of the pollucite phase formed displayed an excellent fit over the 10-30 {angstrom} range when compared with a cubic pollucite model. A poorer fit was attained from 1-10 {angstrom} due to an additional amorphous phase present in the heated geopolymer. On the basis of PDF analysis, unheated Cs-geopolymer displayed structural ordering similar to pollucite up to a length scale of 9 {angstrom}, despite some differences. Our results suggest that hydrated Cs{sup +} ions were an integral part of the Cs-geopolymer structure and that most of the water present was not associated with Al-OH or Si-OH bonds.

  9. Structure and mechanical properties of aluminosilicate geopolymer composites with Portland cement and its constituent minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Tailby, Jonathan; MacKenzie, Kenneth J.D.

    2010-05-15

    The compressive strengths and structures of composites of aluminosilicate geopolymer with the synthetic cement minerals C{sub 3}S, beta-C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and commercial OPC were investigated. All the composites showed lower strengths than the geopolymer and OPC paste alone. X-ray diffraction, {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and SEM/EDS observations indicate that hydration of the cement minerals and OPC is hindered in the presence of geopolymer, even though sufficient water was present in the mix for hydration to occur. In the absence of SEM evidence for the formation of an impervious layer around the cement mineral grains, the poor strength development is suggested to be due to the retarded development of C-S-H because of the preferential removal from the system of available Si because geopolymer formation is more rapid than the hydration of the cement minerals. This possibility is supported by experiments in which the rate of geopolymer formation is retarded by the substitution of potassium for sodium, by the reduction of the alkali content of the geopolymer paste or by the addition of borate. In all these cases the strength of the OPC-geopolymer composite was increased, particularly by the combination of the borate additive with the potassium geopolymer, producing an OPC-geopolymer composite stronger than hydrated OPC paste alone.

  10. Mesoporous aluminosilicates assembled from dissolved LTA zeolite and triblock copolymer in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shunsuke; Okada, Hiroaki; Nakatani, Norihito; Maruo, Takanori; Nishiyama, Norikazu; Miyake, Yoshikazu

    2009-05-15

    Zeolite Na-A crystals dissolved in a HCl solution were used as a single-source of silicon and aluminum for the synthesis of mesoporous aluminosilicates via a template-assisted method with an organic base tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH). Amphiphilic triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 (EO(106)PO(70)EO(106)) was used as template. Increasing the amount of TMAOH in the synthetic solution resulted in an increase in the aluminum content of the products. On the other hand, mesostructural periodicity was deteriorated with higher content of aluminum incorporated into the mesoporous framework. The samples with low Si/Al ratios less than 5 have wormhole-like pore structure, while the samples with Si/Al ratios more than 7 possess highly ordered mesoporous structure, a body-centered Im3m symmetry, with single crystal like morphology. The samples with Si/Al ratio of 7, which prepared at TMAOH molar concentration of 25 mM in the templating solution, possess BET surface area of 470 m(2)/g, pore size of 6.4 nm, and pore volume of 0.56 cm(3)/g. Aluminum atoms have successfully been incorporated in a tetra-coordinated position and remained stable even after calcination at 600 degrees C.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-an; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-05-01

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin-Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  12. Microstructural and phase evolution in metakaolin geopolymers with different activators and added aluminosilicate fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Madhuchhanda; Dana, Kausik; Das, Sukhen

    2015-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the microstructural and phase evolution of alkali activated metakaolin products with different activators and added aluminosilicate filler phases. The added filler phases have different reactivity to the alkali activated metakaolin system. Microstructural evolution in the alkali activated products has been investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Variation in strength development in alkali activated metakaolin products was followed by compressive strength measurement test. Microstructural study shows that in case of metakaolin with NaOH activator crystalline sodalite formed in all the product samples irrespective of the added filler phases. The microstructure of these NaOH activated products investigated by FESEM showed crystalline and inhomogeneous morphology. Mixed activator containing both NaOH and sodium silicate in a fixed mass ratio formed predominantly amorphous phase. Microstructure of these samples showed more homogeneity than that of NaOH activated metakaolin products. The study further shows that addition of α-Al2O3 powder, non reactive phase to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount increased crystalline phase in the matrix. α-Al2O3 powder addition increased the compressive strength of the product samples for both the activator compositions. Added phase of colloidal silica, reactive to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount was found to increase amorphous nature of the matrix. Addition of colloidal silica influenced the compressive strength property differently with different activator compositions.

  13. Atomic mobility in calcium and sodium aluminosilicate melts at 1200 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claireaux, Corinne; Chopinet, Marie-Hélène; Burov, Ekaterina; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Roskosz, Mathieu; Toplis, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    Multicomponent chemical diffusion in liquids of the quaternary system CaO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 has been studied. Diffusion-couple experiments were performed at 1200 °C and for different durations around a central composition of 64.5 wt%SiO2, 13.3 wt%Na2O, 10.8 wt%CaO, 11.4 wt%Al2O3, leading to an overconstrained system of equations that was used to determine the diffusion matrix of the system. The dominant eigenvector of the diffusion matrix was found to correspond to the exchange between sodium and calcium, consistent with the results of the ternary soda-lime silica system. On the other hand, neither of the other two eigenvectors of the diffusion matrix of the quaternary system involve sodium. Given a factor of 50 between the dominant and second eigenvalue, diffusion couples involving the exchange of sodium oxide and a network-forming oxide result in strong uphill diffusion of calcium. The second eigenvector, corresponding to the exchange of calcium with silicon and aluminum, is close to the dominant eigenvector found in previous studies of ternary alkaline-earth aluminosilicate systems. Our results therefore suggest that simple systems may be used to understand diffusive mechanisms in more complex systems.

  14. Chemical Interactions of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Oxidation Resistant Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary ); Stevenson, Jeffry W. ); Meinhardt, Kerry D. )

    2003-04-04

    In most planar SOFC stack designs, the interconnect, which is typically made from an oxidation resistant alloy, potentially including austenitic chromia-forming, ferritic chromia-forming, and alumina-forming alloys, has to be hermitically sealed to its adjacent components, usually by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass must be chemically compatible with the alloy used for the interconnect. In this work, Nicrofer6025, AISI446 and a Fecralloy were selected as examples of austenitic chromia-forming, ferritic chromia-forming, and alumina-forming alloys, respectively. Their chemical compatibility with a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, was evaluated. It was found that the BCAS sealing glass interacted chemically with both the chromia-forming alloys and the alumina-forming alloys. The extent and nature of the interactions and their final products depended on the matrix alloy compositions, the exposure conditions and/or proximity of the glass/alloy interface to the ambient air. These interactions and their mechanisms will be discussed with the assistance of thermodynamic modeling.

  15. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Heat Resistant Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Paxton, Dean M.; Xia, Gordon; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2003-09-15

    Over the past several years, advances in the design and fabrication of planar SOFCs have led to a steady reduction in the temperatures necessary for their operation. Consequently, it appears more realistic now to use low cost heat resistant alloys for interconnect sub-components in the SOFC stack. Considering these materials requirements, heat resistant alloys, which overall demonstrate oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, could be potential candidates. Overall, the heat resistant alloys of interest may include superalloys and the stainless steels. Depending whether a chromia or alumina scale forms on the alloy surface for protection, these heat resistant alloys can be also classified into chromia or alumina formers, repetitively. To help screening alloys and understanding the interface of sealing glass, a couple of alloy compositions have been carefully chosen as a reprehensive of different groups of alloys for the study on their chemical compatibility with a barium-aluminosilicate base glass. These alloys selected are AL 29-4, Nicrofer 6025, and Fecralloy, representing chromia forming stainless steels, superalloys and alumina formers, respectively. Results of chemical and microstructural analyses on sealing glass interfaces with different alloys will be presented, and accordingly, the applicability of alloys in terms of sealing glass chemical compatibility will be discussed. Possible means of modification on alloys for an improved applicability will be elaborated as well.

  16. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Heat Resistant Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Paxton, Dean M.; Xia, Guanguang; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2003-01-02

    In most planar SOFC stacks operating at an intermediate temperature (700-800 degrees C), the interconnect is typically made from a ferritic stainless steel and has to be hermitically sealed to its adjacent components, such as the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To large extent the seal performance relies on the chemical compatibility of the sealing glass with the metallic interconnect. In this study, a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, and a ferritic stainless steel (446) were chosen as examples to investigate the chemical interactions or corrosions at the sealing glass interface with the ferritic stainless steels. Evaluation of the interfaces of coupon joints indicated that interactions between the BCAS glass-ceramic and the ferritic stainless steel depended on the exposure conditions. At the edges of joints, where oxygen or air was accessible, the interaction often led to the formation of BaCrO4, while in the interior of the joints, chromium or chromia dissolved into the glass to form a thin layer of chromium rich solid solution. It was also found that, in the interior of the joints, the interaction often resulted in the formation of pores aligning along the interface. The pore formation along the interface of sealing glass and ferritic stainless steel however could be avoided through a pre-heat treatment of the ferriitc stainless steel.

  17. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  18. Thermodynamics of aluminosilicate garnet solid solution: new experimental data, an optimized model, and thermometric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, J.; Cheng, Weiji; Tirone, Massimiliano

    1996-12-01

    We have experimentally determined the displacement of the equilibrium Grossular + 2 Kyanite + Quartz ⇆ 3 Anorthite (GASP) as a function of garnet composition in the systems Mg-Ca-Mn, Fe-Mg-Ca and Fe-Mg-Ca-Mn at 1000°C. The results were treated along with selected experimental and observational data available in the literature as well as binary parameters from other workers to obtain a set of mutually compatible binary mixing parameters of the quaternary (Fe,Mg,Ca,Mn)- aluminosilicate garnet solid solution. Attempts to determine equilibrium garnet composition in the GASP equilibrium in the Ca-Mg binary were unsuccessful due to the formation of pyroxene. Calculations of binary and ternary miscibility gaps show that the P,T,X combination required for unmixing of garnet solid solution is not realized by natural samples. The solution model was applied to account for compositional effects on Fe-Mg exchange between garnet and ortho- or clino-pyroxene. Applications of the revised thermometric formulations to selected natural assemblages yield P-T conditions which are much less sensitive to compositional effects compared to the other available formulations, and are consistent with independent constraints.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-an; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-01-01

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics. PMID:23687400

  20. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  1. Poorly Crystalline, Iron-Bearing Aluminosilicates and Their Importance on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, L. L.; Strawn, D. G.; McDaniel, P. A.; Nickerosn, R. N.; Bishop, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, Richard V.

    2011-01-01

    Martian rocks and sediments contain weathering products including evaporite salts and clay minerals that only form as a result of interaction between rocks and water [1-6]. These weathering products are key to studying the history of water on Mars because their type, abundance and location provide clues to past conditions on the surface of the planet, as well as to the possible location of present-day reservoirs of water. Weathering of terrestrial volcanic rocks similar to those on Mars produces nano-sized, variably hydrated aluminosilicate and iron oxide minerals [7-10] including allophane, imogolite, halloysite, hisingerite, and ferrihydrite. The nanoaluminosilicates can contain isomorphically substituted Fe, which affects their spectral and physical properties. Detection and quantification of such minerals in natural environments on earth is difficult due to their variable chemical composition and lack of long-range crystalline order [9, 11, 12]. Despite the difficulty in characterizing these materials, they are common on Earth, and data from orbital remote sensing and rover-based instruments suggest that they are also present on Mars [9, 10, 13-17]. Their accurate detection and quantification require a better understanding of how composition affects their spectral properties. We present here the results of XAFS spectroscopy; these results will be corroborated with planned Mossbauer and reflectance spectroscopy.

  2. Fabrication of large diameter alumino-silicate K{sup +} sources

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, D.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Wu, J.K.

    2003-02-20

    Alumino-silicate K{sup +} sources have been used in HIF experiments for many years. For example the Neutralized Transport Expt. (NTX) and the High Current Transport Expt. (HCX) are now using this type of ion source with diameters of 2.54 cm and 10 cm respectively. These sources have demonstrated ion currents of 80 mA and 700 mA, for typical HIF pulse lengths of 5-10 {micro}s. The corresponding current density is {approx} 10-15 mA/cm{sup 2}, but much higher current density has been observed using smaller size sources. Recently we have improved our fabrication techniques and, therefore, are able to reliably produce large diameter ion sources with high quality emitter surface without defects. This note provides a detailed description of the procedures employed in the fabrication process. The variables in the processing steps affecting surface quality, such as substrate porosity, powder size distribution, coating technique on large area concave surfaces, drying, and heat firing temperature have been investigated.

  3. Synthesis of hydrothermally stable, hierarchically mesoporous aluminosilicate Al-SBA-1 and their catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Wang, Jin-Gui; Xu, Jian-Xiong; Liu, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Hui-Jing; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2012-03-01

    Hydrothermally stable mesoporous aluminosilicates Al-SBA-1 with hierarchical pore structure have been successfully synthesized under alkaline condition at 120 °C by employing organic mesomorphous complexes of polyelectrolyte (poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)) and cationic surfactant (hexadecyl pyridinium chloride (CPC)) as template. The Si/Al ratio could be as high as 5 and the incorporation of Al into the silica framework did not disturb the well-ordered cubic Pm3&cmb.macr;n mesostructure. Meanwhile, the incorporation of Al could greatly increase the specific surface area and pore volume of the samples. The Al-SBA-1 materials exhibited a high hydrothermal stability and remained stable even after being treated in boiling water for 10 days. The catalytic activity of the Al-SBA-1 materials was investigated by employing the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of toluene with benzyl alcohol as a model reaction and they exhibited excellent catalytic property due to the incorporated acid sites and the hierarchically mesoporous structure.

  4. Pressure induced elastic softening in framework aluminosilicate- albite (NaAlSi3O8)

    PubMed Central

    Mookherjee, Mainak; Mainprice, David; Maheshwari, Ketan; Heinonen, Olle; Patel, Dhenu; Hariharan, Anant

    2016-01-01

    Albite (NaAlSi3O8) is an aluminosilicate mineral. Its crystal structure consists of 3-D framework of Al and Si tetrahedral units. We have used Density Functional Theory to investigate the high-pressure behavior of the crystal structure and how it affects the elasticity of albite. Our results indicate elastic softening between 6–8 GPa. This is observed in all the individual elastic stiffness components. Our analysis indicates that the softening is due to the response of the three-dimensional tetrahedral framework, in particular by the pressure dependent changes in the tetrahedral tilts. At pressure <6 GPa, the PAW-GGA can be described by a Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with  = 687.4 Å3,  = 51.7 GPa, and  = 4.7. The shear modulus and its pressure derivative are  = 33.7 GPa, and  = 2.9. At 1 bar, the azimuthal compressional and shear wave anisotropy  = 42.8%, and  = 50.1%. We also investigate the densification of albite to a mixture of jadeite and quartz. The transformation is likely to cause a discontinuity in density, compressional, and shear wave velocity across the crust and mantle. This could partially account for the Mohorovicic discontinuity in thickened continental crustal regions. PMID:27734903

  5. Aluminosilicates and biphasic HA-TCP composites: studies of properties for bony filling.

    PubMed

    Oudadesse, H; Derrien, A C; Mami, M; Martin, S; Cathelineau, G; Yahia, L

    2007-03-01

    Aluminosilicate materials synthesized at room temperature present good mechanical properties. Hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate or both offer a high biocompatibility in the biomedical field. In this work, we focused on the composites resulting from associations of these materials. The best compromise between porosity and biomechanical properties versus different parameters was determined. The in vitro behaviour of compounds in contact with the simulated body fluid (SBF) was studied and in vivo experiments in a rabbit's thighbones were carried out. The inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) method permitted us to study the eventual release of Al from composites to SBF and to evaluate the chemical stability of composites characterized by the succession of SiO(4) and AlO(4) tetrahedra. The kinetic biomineralization, the bioconsolidation and biological studies were made. The results obtained show the chemical stability of composites. In the bone-implant interface, the intimate links reveal the high quality of the biointegration and the bioconsolidation between composites and bony matrix. Histological studies confirm good bony bonding and highlight the total absence of inflammation or fibrous tissues.

  6. Monodisperse Aluminosilicate Spheres with Tunable Al/Si Ratio and Hierarchical Macro-Meso-Microporous Structure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yuan; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2015-06-24

    While tremendous success has been seen in the development of ordered mesoporous silica by soft-templated methods, synthesis of hierarchical structures with controllable multiscale pore networks has remained a challenging topic. On the other hand, introduction of heteroatoms as an effective method of chemically functionalizing silica leads to difficulties in morphological control of the product, and multistep synthesis has been necessary for functionalized silica particles with hierarchical pore structure and uniform size. The present work demonstrates that the conflict between morphological control and heteroatom incorporation can be resolved in a CTAB-stabilized toluene-water-ethanol microemulsion system. For the first time, monodisperse macro-meso-microporous aluminosilicate spheres (MASS) are synthesized in one step at room temperature. Simultaneous tuning of Al/Si ratio (0-0.35) and the hierarchical pore structure is realized by Hofmeister anion effects of the Al source itself, [Al(OH)4](-), which change the geometry of CTAB micelles and giant vesicles. The Al is incorporated purely in a tetrahedrally coordinated status, and preliminary results from catalytic experiments show improved acidity of MASS as a catalyst support.

  7. Effect of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicates on aflatoxicosis in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Kubena, L F; Harvey, R B; Phillips, T D; Clement, B A

    1993-04-01

    In three experiments, three different hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicates (HSCAS) were incorporated into chick diets (.5%) containing either 0 or 5.0 (Experiments 1 and 2) or 0 or 2.5 (Experiment 3) mg/kg aflatoxin (AF). Male broiler chicks consumed their respective diets and water ad libitum from 1 to 21 days of age. When compared with controls, body weights in chicks receiving 5.0 mg AF/kg were reduced by 214 g in Experiment 1 and 220 g in Experiment 2. The addition of .5% of the HSCAS compounds significantly diminished the growth inhibitory effects caused by AF by 39 to 68% in Experiment 1, by 46 to 88% in Experiment 2, and by 38 to 90% in Experiment 3. The increases in relative organ weights and the decreases in serum biochemical values caused by AF were significantly diminished to differing degrees by all three of the HSCAS compounds. These data demonstrate that these specific HSCAS compounds can be protective against the effects of AF in young growing broilers and further emphasizes the fact that all silicate-type sorbents are not equal in their ability to protect against aflatoxicosis. It also seems possible to specially process compounds to increase their efficacy for protection against the toxicity of AF.

  8. Aluminosilicates and the ageing brain: implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Edwardson, J A; Klinowski, J; Oakley, A E; Perry, R H; Candy, J M

    1986-01-01

    Senile plaques are a neuropathological feature of the ageing brain and consist of abnormal neuritic and glial processes surrounding an extracellular core of material with fibrillary ultrastructure. Present at low densities in the cerebral cortex of most aged individuals, they occur in large numbers in Alzheimer's disease, the major form of senile dementia. Energy-dispersive X-ray microprobe analysis of isolated cores and plaques in situ from patients with Alzheimer's disease or Down's syndrome and from normal controls has shown co-localization of high concentrations of aluminium (4-19%) and silicon (6-24%) at the centre of the core. The presence of these elements as aluminosilicates has been confirmed using solid-state 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance. These findings provide a link with the other major neuropathological feature of Alzheimer's disease, the neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons, where high intracellular levels of Al and Si have also been reported. The focal deposition of these elements may be an early and essential factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer-type changes, reflecting an increased exposure to aluminium.

  9. Effects of Thermal and Pressure Histories on the Chemical Strengthening of Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Mouritz; Thirion, Lynn; Youngman, Randall; Mauro, John; Bauchy, Mathieu; Rzoska, Sylwester; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten

    2016-03-01

    Glasses can be chemically strengthened through the ion exchange process, wherein smaller ions in the glass (e.g., Na+) are replaced by larger ions from a salt bath (e.g., K+). This develops a compressive stress (CS) on the glass surface, which, in turn, improves the damage resistance of the glass. The magnitude and depth of the generated CS depends on the thermal and pressure histories of the glass prior to ion exchange. In this study, we investigate the ion exchange-related properties (mutual diffusivity, CS, and hardness) of a sodium aluminosilicate glass, which has been densified through annealing below the initial fictive temperature of the glass or through pressure-quenching from the glass transition temperature at 1 GPa prior to ion exchange. We show that the rate of alkali interdiffusivity depends only on the density of the glass, rather than on the applied densification method. However, we also demonstrate that for a given density, the increase in CS and increase in hardness induced by ion exchange strongly depends on the densification method. Specifically, at constant density, the CS and hardness values achieved through thermal annealing are larger than those achieved through pressure-quenching. These results are discussed in relation to the structural changes in the environment of the network-modifier and the overall network densification.

  10. Aluminosilicates enhance the infectivity of cytomegalovirus in urine using centrifugation-enhanced antigen detection technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Biondo, F X; Teichberg, S; Lipson, S M

    1996-04-01

    Due to the inherent lability of CMV, necessary laboratory identification of this infectious agent is often compromised by a delay in specimen transport. Previous studies have addressed the phenomenon of infectivity enhancement/reduction in the rate of infectivity loss by the incorporation into various viral assay systems of trace concentrations of the adsorbents montmorillonite (bentonite [M]) or kaolinite (kaolin [K]). We extended these studies to the clinical setting to identify whether such aluminosilicates would effect an enhanced level of CMV infectivity. The shell vial assay-indirect immunofluorescent assay (SVA-IFA) was utilized in comparative testing throughout this study. The addition of trace concentrations of M or K to the SVA-IFA was found to enhance the infectivity of CMV in urine by 115 and 126%, respectively. The total CMV detection rate by SVA-IFA was 29% (30/105). Three of the 30 (10%) CMV positive specimens were detected only in shell vials which had been supplemented with K or M. Two specimens were isolation positive alone. The addition of K or M to shell vials immediately prior to the start of the SVA-IFA has the potential of (a), enhancing assay readability by increasing the number of fluorescent focus units per vial monolayer and (b), of detecting positive urine specimens with low viral titers which might otherwise not be identified using the conventional SVA-IFA procedure.

  11. Effect of low frequency ultrasound on the surface properties of natural aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Liudmila; Ayrault, Philippe; Fontaine, Claude; Chatel, Gregory; Jérôme, François; Belchinskaya, Larisa

    2016-07-01

    Structural and surface properties of different natural aluminosilicates (layered, chain and framework structural types) exposed of 20 kHz ultrasound irradiation (0-120 min) in aqueous and 35 wt%. aqueous H2O2 dispersions were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, thermal analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. It was confirmed that sonication caused slight changes in the structure of investigated minerals whereas their textural properties were significantly affected. The aqueous dispersions of montmorillonite (Mt), clinoptilolite (Zlt), glauconite (Glt) and palygorskite (Pal) were represented by several particles size fractions according to DLS-study. Ultrasound irradiation produced a decrease of the average particle diameter by 4-6 times in water and by 1.3-5 times in H2O2 dispersions except for Pal, which underwent strong agglomeration. A significant increase of total pore volume and pore diameter was observed for Glt sonicated in H2O2 dispersions whereas for Pal mainly micropore volume sharply increased in both aqueous and H2O2 dispersions.

  12. Microstructure-property relationships of SiC fiber-reinforced magnesium aluminosilicates. 1: Microstructural characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Knowles, K.M.

    1996-07-01

    The microstructure of two magnesium aluminosilicates unidirectionally reinforced with SiC fibers (Nicalon) has been examined. A diphasic interlayer having a higher O/Si ratio than in the fibers was found on the surface of the fibers in both composites. This interlayer could be identified as an amorphous mixture of silica and carbon in the composite hot-pressed just below the liquidus temperature of stoichiometric cordierite (composite A). In the other composite hot-pressed at 920 C and subsequently ceramed at 1,150 C (composite B), a relatively thicker diphasic interlayer was observed, consisting of turbostratic carbon together with amorphous silica. A distinct interlayer of turbostratic carbon was identified in composite A. A thin interlayer consisting mostly of matrix elements was also identified between the diphasic interlayer and the discrete carbon interlayer in this composite. Differences in the structure and morphology of interfacial regions in the two composites could clearly be attributed to differences in the hot-pressing schedules. The basal planes of turbostratic carbon were aligned parallel to the fiber-matrix interfaces in both composites.

  13. A silica optical fiber doped with yttrium aluminosilicate nanoparticles for supercontinuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tonglei; Liao, Meisong; Xue, Xiaojie; Li, Jiang; Gao, Weiqing; Li, Xia; Chen, Danping; Zheng, Shupei; Pan, Yubai; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2016-03-01

    We design and fabricate a silica optical fiber doped with yttrium aluminosilicate (YAS, Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2) nanoparticles in the core. The optical fiber is drawn directly from a silica tube with YAG (Y3Al5O12) ceramics and silica powders (the molar ratio 1:18) in the core at the temperature of ∼1950 °C. The YAS nanoparticles are formed during the optical fiber drawing process. Supercontinuum (SC) generation in the optical fiber is investigated at different pump wavelength. At the pump wavelength of ∼1750 nm which is in the deep anomalous dispersion region, SC spectrum evolution is mainly due to multiple solitons and dispersive waves (DWs), and three pairs of multiple optical solitons and DWs are observed. When the pump wavelength shifts to ∼1500 nm which is close to the zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW), flattened SC spectrum with ±7 dB uniformity is obtained at the wavelength region of ∼990-1980 nm, and only one obvious soliton and DW are observed. At the pump wavelength of ∼1100 nm, a narrow SC spectrum from ∼1020 to 1180 nm is obtained in the normal dispersion region due to self-phase modulation (SPM) effect.

  14. Preparation of bioinorganic fertilizing media by adsorption of humates on glassy aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Chassapis, Konstantinos; Roulia, Maria; Vrettou, Evangelia; Parassiris, Anastassios

    2010-11-01

    Surface-modified expanded perlite was synthesized using humic substances from the Megalopolis peaty lignite. Adsorption is efficient and increases at higher temperatures and lower pHs. The preparation can be carried out under mild conditions leading to an eco-friendly, bioinorganic material useful as soil conditioner and biofertilizer. Six adsorption models were applied; the Klotz, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherms fit more successfully to the experimental data. The obeying of the theoretical models was correlated with the heterogeneity and non-uniform distribution of the adsorption sites, host-guest attraction forces as well as the formation of self-assembled aggregates and self-organized multilayers of humic substances onto the aluminosilicate adsorbent, consistent with changes in micromorphology. Thermodynamic quantities revealing distinct physicochemical characteristics of the adsorption phenomena, i.e., enthalpy, entropy and free energy change, were calculated. Desorption experiments and cultivation of microorganisms demonstrated that perlite may act successfully as host material for microbial populations upgrading the humic-loaded perlite for soil applications.

  15. Surface of a calcium aluminosilicate glass by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganster, Patrick; Benoit, Magali; Delaye, Jean-Marc; Kob, Walter

    We present the structural properties of thin films of a calcium aluminosilicate glass generated by classical molecular dynamics (MD). The films are generated by two methods: in the first, the films are created in the liquid state and quenched to 300 K; in the second, the films are generated at room temperature. Depending on the method, film thickness and surface roughness are different but the main structural characteristics of the films are similar. The atomic concentration appears to be inhomogeneous from the center of the films to the surface and new structural entities are present at the film surfaces. The surfaces are depleted in calcium atoms and are enriched in aluminum atoms. This atomic arrangement induces a de-polymerized area under the surface. At the surface, all structural properties are modified in comparison with those of the bulk: interatomic distances, angular distributions, ring size, coordinations. In order to confirm the surface properties, we relaxed a surface using ab initio molecular dynamics. Some modifications appear but they do not significantly change the results obtained by classical MD, validating the use of interatomic potentials for the study of such films.

  16. Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Kovarik, Libor; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bowden, Mark E.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry

    2014-06-24

    Radionuclide 137Cs is one of the major fission products that dominate heat generation in spent fuels over the first 300 hundred years. A durable waste form for 137Cs that decays to 137Ba is needed to minimize its environmental impact. Aluminosilicate pollucite CsAlSi2O6 is selected as a model waste form to study the decay-induced structural effects. While Ba-containing precipitates are not present in charge-balanced Cs0.9Ba0.05AlSi2O6, they are found in Cs0.9Ba0.1AlSi2O6 and identified as monoclinic Ba2Si3O8. Pollucite is susceptible to electron irradiation induced amorphization. The threshold density of the electronic energy deposition for amorphization is determined to be ~235 keV/nm3. Pollucite can be readily amorphized under F+ ion irradiation at 673 K. A significant amount of Cs diffusion and release from the amorphized pollucite is observed during the irradiation. However, cesium is immobile in the crystalline structure under He+ ion irradiation at room temperature. The critical temperature for amorphization is not higher than 873 K under F+ ion irradiation. If kept at or above 873 K all the time, the pollucite structure is unlikely to be amorphized; Cs diffusion and release are improbable. A general discussion regarding pollucite as a potential waste form is provided in this report.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  18. Chemical and mechanical consequences of environmental barrier coating exposure to calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate.

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, B.; Ramirez-Rico, J.; Almer, J. D.; Kang, L.; Faber, K.

    2011-06-01

    The success of Si-based ceramics as high-temperature structural materials for gas turbine applications relies on the use of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) with low silica activity, such as Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} (BSAS), which protect the underlying components from oxidation and corrosion in combustion environments containing water vapor. One of the current challenges concerning EBC lifetime is the effect of sandy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass that melt during engine operation and react with the EBC, changing both its composition and stress state. In this work, we study the effect of CMAS exposure at 1300 C on the residual stress state and composition in BSAS-mullite-Si-SiC multilayers. Residual stresses were measured in BSAS multilayers exposed to CMAS for different times using high-energy X-ray diffraction. Their microstructure was studied using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Our results show that CMAS dissolves the BSAS topcoat preferentially through the grain boundaries, dislodging the grains and changing the residual stress state in the topcoat to a nonuniform and increasingly compressive stress state with increasing exposure time. The presence of CMAS accelerates the hexacelsian-to-celsian phase transformation kinetics in BSAS, which reacts with the glass by a solution-reprecipitation mechanism. Precipitates have crystallographic structures consistent with Ca-doped celsian and Ba-doped anorthite.

  19. First Principles Studies of Fe-Containing Aluminosilicate and Aluminogermanate Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ramírez, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    A theoretical study of the electronic effects of the inclusion of iron on aluminosilicates and aluminogermanates nanotubes with imogolite-like structure was carried out by unrestricted all-electron density functional theory calculations of periodic boundary models. The iron ion was incorporated to the imogolitic models by an isomorphic substitution of Al by Fe and by the adsorption of the Fe ion in the inner and outer nanotube structure in the octahedral hydrated configuration. Additionally, the effects of the Fe concentration in the interval 0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.1 were analyzed. We observe a drastic reduction of the bandgap value from 4.6 to 2.6 eV and from 4.2 to 1.0 eV for the silicon and germanium respectively. Finally, in all the models there is a shift of the Fermi energy toward the gap region as a result of the inclusion of iron electronic states in the bandgap region.

  20. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  1. Pickled luminescent silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukherroub, R.; Morin, S.; Wayner, D. D. M.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    In freshly prepared porous Si, the newly exposed silicon-nanostructure surface is protected with a monolayer of hydrogen, which is very reactive and oxidizes in air leading to a loss of luminescence intensity and a degradation of the electronic properties. We report a surface passivation approach based on organic modification that stabilizes the luminescence. This novel 'pickling' process not only augments the desired optoelectronic properties, but also is adaptable to further chemical modification for integration into chemical and biophysical sensors.

  2. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Robles, Raquel O; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Yongsheng; Lee, Jae Ah; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-05-26

    Thermophones are highly promising for applications such as high-power SONAR arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets provide the most attractive performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large-size freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets and other even more exotic materials recently investigated hampers the field. We describe alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high-energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanostructured materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. We demonstrate that the heat capacity of aerogel-like nanostructures can be extracted by a thorough analysis of the sound pressure spectra. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high-power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  3. Coherent control near metallic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, Ilya; Efimov, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    We study coherent control in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures. Unlike in the case of control in gas or liquid phase, the collective response of electrons in a metallic nanostructure can significantly enhance different frequency components of the control field. This enhancement strongly depends on the geometry of the nanostructure and can substantially modify the temporal profile of the local control field. The changes in the amplitude and phase of the control field near the nanostructure are studied using linear response theory. The inverse problem of finding the external electromagnetic field to generate the desired local control field is considered and solved.

  4. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  5. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single

  6. A New Titanium-Bearing Calcium Aluminosilicate Phase. 1; Meteoritic Occurrences and Formation in Synthetic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paque, Julie M.; Beckett, John R.; Barber, David J.; Stolper, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    A new titanium-bearing calcium aluminosilicate mineral has been identified in coarse-grained calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from carbonaceous chondrites. The formula for this phase, which we have temporarily termed "UNK," is Ca3Ti(AlTi)2(Si,Al)3O14, and it is present in at least 8 of the 20 coarse-grained CAIs from the Allende CV3 chondrite examined as part of this project. The phase occurs in Types A and B1 inclusions as small tabular crystals oriented along two mutually perpendicular planes in melilite. UNK crystallizes from melts in dynamic crystallization experiments conducted in air from four bulk compositions modeled after Types A, B1, B2 and C inclusions. Cooling rates resulting in crystallization of UNK ranged from 0.5 to 200 C/h from maximum (initial) temperatures of 1375 to 1580 C. Only below 1190 C does UNK itself begin to crystallize. To first order, the presence or absence of UNK from individual experiments can be understood in terms of the compositions of residual melts and nucleation probabilities. Compositions of synthetic and meteoritic LINK are very similar in terms of major oxides, differing only in the small amounts of trivalent Ti (7-13% of total Ti) in meteoritic samples. UNK crystallized from the Type A analog is similar texturally to that found in CAls, although glass, which is typically associated with synthetic UN& is not observed in meteoritic occurrences. A low Ti end-member of UNK ("Si-UNK") with a composition new that of Ca3Al2Si4O14 was produced in a few samples from the Type B1 analog. This phase has not been found in the meteoritic inclusions.

  7. Analysis of the biological and chemical reactivity of zeolite-based aluminosilicate fibers and particulates.

    PubMed Central

    Fach, Estelle; Waldman, W James; Williams, Marshall; Long, John; Meister, Richard K; Dutta, Prabir K

    2002-01-01

    Environmental and/or occupational exposure to minerals, metals, and fibers can cause lung diseases that may develop years after exposure to the agents. The presence of toxic fibers such as asbestos in the environment plus the continuing development of new mineral or vitreous fibers requires a better understanding of the specific physical and chemical features of fibers/particles responsible for bioactivity. Toward that goal, we have tested aluminosilicate zeolites to establish biological and chemical structure-function correlations. Zeolites have known crystal structure, are subject to experimental manipulation, and can be synthesized and controlled to produce particles of selected size and shape. Naturally occurring zeolites include forms whose biological activity is reported to range from highly pathogenic (erionite) to essentially benign (mordenite). Thus, we used naturally occurring erionite and mordenite as well as an extensively studied synthetic zeolite based on faujasite (zeolite Y). Bioactivity was evaluated using lung macrophages of rat origin (cell line NR8383). Our objective was to quantitatively determine the biological response upon interaction of the test particulates/fibers with lung macrophages and to evaluate the efficacy of surface iron on the zeolites to promote the Fenton reaction. The biological assessment included measurement of the reactive oxygen species by flow cytometry and chemiluminescence techniques upon phagocytosis of the minerals. The chemical assessment included measuring the hydroxyl radicals generated from hydrogen peroxide by iron bound to the zeolite particles and fibers (Fenton reaction). Chromatography as well as absorption spectroscopy were used to quantitate the hydroxyl radicals. We found that upon exposure to the same mass of a specific type of particulate, the oxidative burst increased with decreasing particle size, but remained relatively independent of zeolite composition. On the other hand, the Fenton reaction

  8. Effects of a hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (T-Bind) on mycotoxicosis in young broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Kubena, L F; Harvey, R B; Bailey, R H; Buckley, S A; Rottinghaus, G E

    1998-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the ability of a hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (T-Bind) sorbent to reduce the toxicity of aflatoxins (AF) or T-2 toxin in male broiler chickens from day of hatch to 21 d of age. In Experiment 1, the sorbent was added at 0.250 or 0.375% to diets containing AF at 5 or T-2 toxin at 8 mg/kg of diet. When compared with controls, AF reduced BW gain by 27% and T-2 toxin reduced BW gain by 17%. The addition of the sorbent at 0.250 or 0.375%, in the absence of added mycotoxins, did not alter the performance of the chicks. The sorbent reduced the toxic effects of 5 mg AF/kg of diet on BW gain by 43% but did not significantly diminish the toxic effects of 8 mg T-2 toxin/kg of diet. The decreased efficiency of feed utilization and the increased relative organ weights caused by AF were significantly diminished to differing degrees by the sorbent. Oral lesions caused by T-2 toxin were not affected by the sorbent. In Experiment 2, the sorbent was added at 0.80% to a diet containing 8 mg T-2 toxin/kg of diet. The sorbent did not diminish the toxic effects of T-2 toxin when added at 0.80% of the diet. These data demonstrate that this specific sorbent can provide protection against the toxicity of AF, but not T-2 toxin, in young broiler chicks.

  9. Modeling the Structure of Complex Aluminosilicate Glasses: The Effect of Zinc Addition.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Andrea; Dapiaggi, Monica; Pavese, Alessandro; Agostini, Giovanni; Bernasconi, Maurizio; Bowron, Daniel T

    2016-03-10

    An empirical potential structure refinement of neutron and X-ray diffraction data combined with extended absorption fine structure evidence has been applied to the investigation of two distinct sets of complex aluminosilicate glasses containing different quantities of zinc. Data come from (i) neutron and X-ray total scattering experiments, which have been performed at the ISIS neutron spallation source (SANDALS beamline) and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ID11 beamline), and (ii) EXAFS experiments which have been performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM23 beamline). By careful examination of the modeled ensemble of atoms, a wide range of structural information has been extracted: coordination numbers, bond distances, cluster sizes, type of oxygen sharing, and the preference of large cations to adopt a charge-compensating role. The first series of glasses, which is characterized by a fixed network modifier element content (i.e., Na), shows how the introduction of Zn at the expense of Si and Al network forming elements does not significantly alter the polymerization degree, as a result of its dominant 4-fold coordination. In the case of the second series, which is characterized by fixed network forming element content (i.e., Si and Al), it is shown how the replacement of a network modifier element (i.e., Ca) with the introduction of Zn does not change the propensity of Zn to be mainly 4-fold coordinated by promoting the network. Where appropriate the experimental results have been compared with classical theoretical approaches such as stoichiometric models based on Zachariasen's rules and computational routines. PMID:26848740

  10. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  11. Biomimetics of photonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Andrew R.; Townley, Helen E.

    2007-06-01

    Biomimetics is the extraction of good design from nature. One approach to optical biomimetics focuses on the use of conventional engineering methods to make direct analogues of the reflectors and anti-reflectors found in nature. However, recent collaborations between biologists, physicists, engineers, chemists and materials scientists have ventured beyond experiments that merely mimic what happens in nature, leading to a thriving new area of research involving biomimetics through cell culture. In this new approach, the nanoengineering efficiency of living cells is harnessed and natural organisms such as diatoms and viruses are used to make nanostructures that could have commercial applications.

  12. Nanoindentation of Carbon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Karamjit; Verma, Veena; Bhatti, H S

    2016-06-01

    In the present research paper carbon nanostructures viz. single walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nanohorns and graphene nanoplatelets have been synthesized by CVD technique, hydrothermal method, DC arc discharge method in liquid nitrogen and microwave technique respectively. After synthesis 5 mm thick pallets of given nanomaterial are prepared by making a paste in isopropyl alcohol and using polyvinylidene difluoride as a binder and then these pallets were used for nanoindentation measurements. Hardness, reduced modulus, stiffness, contact height and contact area have been measured using nanoindenter. PMID:27427726

  13. Hierarchically structured meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with high tetrahedral aluminium content in acid catalysed esterification of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Arnaud; Wang, Quan-Yi; Wei, Yingxu; Liu, Zhongmin; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-11-15

    A simple synthesis pathway has been developed for the design of hierarchically structured spongy or spherical voids assembled meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with high tetrahedral aluminium content on the basis of the aqueous polymerisation of new stabilized alkoxy-bridged single molecular precursors. The intimate mixing of an aluminosilicate ester (sec-BuO)(2)-Al-O-Si(OEt)(3) and a silica co-reactant (tetramethoxysilane, TMOS) with variable ratios and the use of alkaline solutions (pH 13.0 and 13.5) improve significantly the heterocondensation rates between the highly reactive aluminium alkoxide part of the single precursor and added silica co-reactant, leading to aluminosilicate materials with high intra-framework aluminium content and low Si/Al ratios. The spherically-shaped meso-macroporosity was spontaneously generated by the release of high amount of liquid by-products (water/alcohol molecules) produced during the rapid hydrolysis and condensation processes of this double alkoxide and the TMOS co-reactant. It has been observed that both pH value and Al-Si/TMOS molar ratio can strongly affect the macroporous structure formation. Increasing pH value, even slightly from 13 to 13.5, can significantly favour the incorporation of Al atoms in tetrahedral position of the framework. After the total ionic exchange of Na(+) compensating cations, catalytic tests of obtained materials were realised in the esterification reaction of high free fatty acid (FFA) oils, showing their higher catalytic activity compared to commercial Bentonite clay, and their potential applications as catalyst supports in acid catalysed reactions.

  14. Resonant excited state absorption and relaxation mechanisms in Tb3+-doped calcium aluminosilicate glasses: an investigation by thermal mirror spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, G S; Zanuto, V S; Astrath, F B G; Malacarne, L C; Terra, I A A; Catunda, T; Nunes, L A O; Jacinto, C; Andrade, L H C; Lima, S M; Baesso, M L; Astrath, N G C

    2013-11-15

    Resonant excited state absorption (ESA) and relaxation processes in Tb(3+)-doped aluminosilicate glasses are quantitatively evaluated. A model describing the excitation steps and upconversion emission is developed and applied to interpret the results from laser-induced surface deformation using thermal mirror spectroscopy. The fluorescence quantum efficiency of level (5)D(4) was found to be close to unity and concentration independent while, for the level (5)D(3), it decreases with Tb(3+) concentration. Emission spectroscopy measurements supported these results. ESA cross sections are found to be more than three orders of magnitude higher than the ground state absorption cross section. PMID:24322101

  15. Ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates synthesized using zeolite as precursor and the wall-thickness tuned by pH control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlei; Zhu, Guangshang; Shang, Tiecun; Cai, Xiaohui; Liu, Chengzhan; Li, Nan; Wei, Yuhong; Li, Jian; Zhang, Weiwei; Qiu, Shilun

    2005-07-01

    High aluminium content mesoporous aluminosilicates MAS-X1 and MAS-X3 have been successfully synthesized using zeolite FAU-X as precursors and triblock copolymer pluronic P123 as structure directing agent. Samples have been characterized by XRD, TEM, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, 27Al MAS NMR, and ICP element analysis techniques. The salt, NaCl, which was introduced by dissolving the zeolite FAU-X, played an important role in the synthesis of high order sample. The secondary growth of the wall was considered to occur after the pH value had been increased up to five.

  16. Magnetic Properties of Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraldo, John

    2007-10-01

    The recent development of the superlattice nanowire pattern transfer (SNAP) technique has enabled the fabrication of complex molecular-electronic circuits at unprecedented densities. In this project, we explore the possibility of extending this technique to generate comparably dense arrays of nanoscale giant magnetoresistive (GMR) and tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) devices. My primary contribution to this project has focused on using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), as well as a superconducting interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to monitor the magnetic properties of the devices as they are processed from thin 2D films into nanostructure arrays. This investigation allows us to investigate both fundamental and technological aspects of the nanopatterning process. For example, the effects of changing surface to volume ratios on the ferromagnetic exchange interaction and the role of various patterning techniques in determining surface chemistry and oxidation of the final nanostructures, respectively. Additionally I have worked on simulations of the materials using NIST's OOMF program, allowing me to compare actual results with theoretical expectations. I am also designing a magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) detector, which will allow faster approximations of magnetic behavior.

  17. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  18. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  19. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2012-11-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide.

  20. Absorption and luminescence characteristics of 5I7 <--> 5I8 transitions of the holmium ion in Ho3+-doped aluminosilicate preforms and fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabochkina, P. A.; Chabushkin, A. N.; Kosolapov, A. F.; Kurkov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    We have obtained the spectral dependences of the absorption cross sections for the Ho3+ 5I8 → 5I6 and 5I8 → 5I7 transitions in Ho3+-doped aluminosilicate fibres and the spectral dependence of the stimulated emission cross section for the Ho3+ 5I7 → 5I8 laser transition in Ho3+-doped aluminosilicate fibre preforms. The lifetime of the Ho3+ 5I7 upper laser level in the preforms has been determined.

  1. Hafnium in peralkaline and peraluminous boro-aluminosilicate glass, and glass subcomponents: a solubility study.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Linda L.; Darab, John G.; Qian, Maoxu; Zhao, Donggao; Palenik, Christopher S.; Li, Hong; Strachan, Denis M.; Li, Liyu

    2003-10-15

    A relationship between the solubility of hafnia (HfO2) and the host glass composition was explored by determining the solubility limits of HfO2 in peralkaline and peraluminous borosilicate glasses in the system SiO2-Al2O3-B2O3-Na2O, and in glasses in the system SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3 in air at 1450 C. The only Hf-bearing phase to crystallize in the peralkaline borosilicate melts is hafnia, while in the boron-free melts sodium-hafnium silicates crystallize. All peraluminous borosilicate melts crystallize hafnia, but the slightly peraluminous glasses also have sector-zoned hafnia crystals that contain Al and Si. The more peraluminous borosilicate glasses also crystallize a B-containing mullite. The general morphology of the hafnia crystals changes as peralkalinity (Na2O/(Na2O+Al2O3)) decreases, as expected in melts with increasing viscosity. In all of the glasses with Na2O > Al2O3, the solubility of hafnia is linearly and positively correlated with Na2O/(Na2O + Al2O3) or Na2O - Al2O3 (excess sodium), despite the presence of 5 to 16 mol% B2O3. The solubility of hafnia is higher in the sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses than in the sodium-aluminosilicate glasses, suggesting that the boron is enhancing the effect that excess sodium has on the incorporation of Hf into the glass structure. The results of this solubility study are compared to other studies of high-valence cation solubility in B-free silicate melts. From this, for peralkaline B-bearing glasses, it is shown that, although the solubility limits are higher, the solution behavior of hafnia is the same as in B-free silicate melts previously studied. By comparison, also, it is shown that in peraluminous melts, there must be a different solution mechanism for hafnia: different than for peralkaline sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses and different than for B-free silicate melts studied by others.

  2. In-situ growth of porous alumino-silicates and fabrication of nano-porous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodumuri, Pradeep

    2009-12-01

    Feasibility of depositing continuous films of nano-porous alumino-silicates, primarily zeolites and MCM-41, on metallic and non-metallic substrates was examined with an aim to develop membranes for separation of gaseous mixtures and also for application as hydrogen storage material. Mesoporous silica was deposited in-side the pores of these nano-porous disks with an aim to develop membranes for selective separations. Our study involves supported zeolite film growth on substrates using in-situ hydrothermal synthesis. Faujasite, Silicalite and Mesoporous silica have been grown on various metallic and non-metallic supports. Metallic substrates used for film growth included anodized titanium, sodium hydroxide treated Titanium, Anodized aluminum, and sintered copper. A non-metallic substrate used was nano-porous aluminum oxide. Zeolite film growth was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (AMRAY 1820) and High Resolution Transmission electron microscope. Silicalite was found to grow uniformly on all the substrates to form a uniform and closely packed film. Faujasite tends to grow in the form of individual particles which do not inter-grow like silicalite to form a continuous film. Mesoporous silica was found to grow uniformly on anodized aluminum compared to growth on sintered copper and anodized titanium. Mesoporous silica growth on AnodiscRTM was found to cover more than half the surface of the substrate. Commercially obtained AnodiscRTM was found to have cylindrical channels of the pore branching into each other and since we needed pore channels of uniform dimension for Mesoporous silica growth, we have fabricated nano-porous alumina with uniform pore channels. Nano-porous alumina membranes containing uniform distribution of through thickness cylindrical pore channels were fabricated using anodization of aluminum disks. Free-standing nano-porous alumina membranes were used as templates for electro-deposition in order to fabricate nickel and palladium nano

  3. Alumino-silicate speciation in aqueous fluids at deep crustal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Keppler, H.; Manning, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Alumina and silica are major oxides in most crustal rocks. While SiO2 is quite soluble in aqueous fluids at metamorphic conditions, behavior of Al2O3 in crustal metamorphic fluids has been poorly understood. It is known that alumina is dramatically less soluble in aqueous fluids and hence it is difficult to explain the common occurrence of quartz with aluminous minerals in metamorphic veins. In order to understand this complex behavior of alumina, we investigated aluminum speciation in aqueous fluids in equilibrium with corundum using in situ Raman spectroscopy in hydrothermal diamond anvil cells to 20 kbar and 1000 oC. In order to better understand the spectral features of the aqueous fluids, we used first principles simulations based on density functional theory to calculate and predict the energetics and vibrational spectra for various aluminum species that are likely to be present in aqueous solutions. The Raman spectra of pure water in equilibrium with Al2O3 are devoid of any characteristic spectral features. In contrast, aqueous fluids with KOH solution in equilibrium with Al2O3 show a sharp band at ~620 cm-1 which could be attributed to the [Al(OH)4]1- species. The band grows in intensity with temperature along an isochore. In the limited pressure, temperature and density explored in the present study, we do not find any evidence for the polymerization of the [Al(OH)4]1- species to dimers [(OH)2-Al-O2-Al(OH)2]2- or [(OH)3-Al-O-Al(OH)3]2-. This is likely due to the relatively low concentration of Al in the solutions and does not rule out significant polymerization at higher pressures and temperatures. We are also investigating the effect of SiO2 on the solubility of Al2O3 and the relative energetics of formation of pure alumina dimer [(OH)3-Al-O-Al(OH)3]2- vs. the aluminosilicate dimers, [(OH)3-Al-O-Si(OH)3]2- at deep crustal conditions. Acknowledgement- MM is supported by the US National Science Foundation grant (EAR-1250477).

  4. Strength enhancement of Nicalon-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate containing a Ta(2)O(5) second phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Guillermo R.

    The purpose of this study was to follow up the preliminary results of a previous thesis which appeared to indicate that the addition of Tasb2Osb5 to the matrix of a Nicalon fiber reinforced lithium aluminosilicate glass ceramic composite increased the mechanical properties of the resulting composites. The strength increase was attributed to the presence of a TaC platelet phase in the matrix material. The TaC was thought to be a result of the reaction between the Tasb2Osb5 additions and soluble CO from the hot press atmosphere used in the densification of the composites. These preliminary results (the strength increase and TaC formation) were a side experiment to a larger work and consequently were not rigorously investigated. The present work showed that the CO did react with Tasb2Osb5 to form TaC, but only as a surface coating. The surface coating reached a terminal thickness of 5-10 mum after 1 h at 1400sp°C. There was no evidence of soluble CO reacting to form TaC in the matrix. What was previously thought to be TaC platelets appears to be a two phase eutectic structure of beta-spodumene and Tasb2Osb5. When the Tasb2Osb5 content was increased to 15%, Tasb2Osb5 crystals were formed in addition to the eutectic structure. The formation of the eutectic structure could be suppressed in samples containing less than 3.5% Tasb2Osb5 by cooling at 10sp°C/min. Cooling rates of 1sp°C/min promoted the two phase structure. The interfacial shear strength and flexural strength did not appreciably increase with Tasb2Osb5 additions. Increasing the hot pressing time did increase the interfacial shear strength, but resulted in lower flexural strengths and less graceful failure modes. There was great variation in the flexural strength of the composites which increased with increasing Tasb2Osb5 content. With the very limited sample size of the preliminary study the large variation may have suggested a trend which did not statistically exist.

  5. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin over High-Surface-Area Mesoporous Aluminosilicates: Effect of Porosity and Acidity.

    PubMed

    Custodis, Victoria B F; Karakoulia, Stamatia A; Triantafyllidis, Kostas S; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2016-05-23

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of lignin with amorphous mesoporous aluminosilicates catalysts yields a high fraction of aromatics and a relatively low amount of char/coke. The relationship between the acidity and porosity of Al-MCM-41, Al-SBA-15, and Al-MSU-J with product selectivity during lignin CFP is determined. The acid sites (mild Brønsted and stronger Lewis) are able to catalyze pyrolysis intermediates towards fewer oxygenated phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons. A generalized correlation of the product selectivity and yield with the aluminum content and acidity of the mesoporous aluminosilicates is hard to establish. Zeolitic strong acid sites are not required to achieve high conversion and selectivity to aromatic hydrocarbon because nanosized MCM-41 produces a high liquid yield and selectivity. The two most essential parameters are diffusion, which is influenced by pore and grain size, and the active site, which may be mildly acidic, but is dominated by Lewis acid sites. Nanosized grains and mild acidity are essential ingredients for a good lignin CFP catalyst. PMID:27079742

  6. Crystalline-like molecularly ordered mesoporous aluminosilicates derived from aluminosilica-surfactant mesophases via benign template removal.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yongde; Mokaya, Robert

    2006-05-11

    We report the preparation of mesoporous aluminosilicate materials that exhibit molecular-scale ordering in their pore wall framework. The materials were derived from mesoporous aluminosilica-surfactant mesophases via benign template removal methods, which allowed the retention of molecular ordering in surfactant-free materials. The molecularly ordered aluminosilica-surfactant mesophases were obtained from hydrothermal crystallization of cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide/Al,Si/H2O systems at 135 degrees C for 12 days. Benign template removal via H2O2-mediated oxidation of the surfactant at room temperature was found to be the most effective method in generating surfactant-free materials with molecular ordering, high textural properties (depending on Al content), and high acidity. The Al in the resulting aluminosilicates was entirely incorporated in framework (tetrahedrally coordinated) sites. Template extraction in acidified ethanol also generated molecularly ordered materials but compromised the Al content and acidity. Template removal via conventional calcination generated porous materials with high textural properties but which exhibited only limited molecular ordering and had relatively low acidity and significant amounts of nonframework Al. This work demonstrates that molecular ordering in mesoporous silicate-surfactant mesophases is due to crystallographic ordering within inorganic frameworks rather than the arrangement/packing of surfactant molecules.

  7. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin over High-Surface-Area Mesoporous Aluminosilicates: Effect of Porosity and Acidity.

    PubMed

    Custodis, Victoria B F; Karakoulia, Stamatia A; Triantafyllidis, Kostas S; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2016-05-23

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of lignin with amorphous mesoporous aluminosilicates catalysts yields a high fraction of aromatics and a relatively low amount of char/coke. The relationship between the acidity and porosity of Al-MCM-41, Al-SBA-15, and Al-MSU-J with product selectivity during lignin CFP is determined. The acid sites (mild Brønsted and stronger Lewis) are able to catalyze pyrolysis intermediates towards fewer oxygenated phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons. A generalized correlation of the product selectivity and yield with the aluminum content and acidity of the mesoporous aluminosilicates is hard to establish. Zeolitic strong acid sites are not required to achieve high conversion and selectivity to aromatic hydrocarbon because nanosized MCM-41 produces a high liquid yield and selectivity. The two most essential parameters are diffusion, which is influenced by pore and grain size, and the active site, which may be mildly acidic, but is dominated by Lewis acid sites. Nanosized grains and mild acidity are essential ingredients for a good lignin CFP catalyst.

  8. Repairable, nanostructured biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Brombosz, S.; Grubjesic, S.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins facilitate many key cellular processes, including signal recognition and energy transduction. The ability to harness this evolutionarily-optimized functionality could lead to the development of protein-based systems useful for advancing alternative energy storage and conversion. The future of protein-based, however, requires the development of materials that will stabilize, order and control the activity of the proteins. Recently we have developed a synthetic approach for the preparation of a durable biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water. The matrix has proven ideal for the stable encapsulation of both water- and membrane-soluble proteins. The material is composed of an aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid and a zwitterionic co-surfactant that self-assembles into a nanostructured physical gel at room temperature as determined by X-ray scattering. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitator does not alter the self-assembled structure and UV irradiation serves to crosslink the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA forming a network within the aqueous domains as determined by FT-IR. More recently we have begun to incorporate reversible crosslinks employing Diels-Alder chemistry, allowing for the extraction and replacement of inactive proteins. The ability to replenish the materials with active, non-denatured forms of protein is an important step in advancing these materials for use in nanostructured devices This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, USDoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Nanostructured Materials for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to advance the fundamental understanding of novel photoelectronic organic device structures integrated with inorganic nanostructures, while also expanding the general field of nanomaterials for renewable energy devices and systems.

  10. Comparing the activity of aluminum in two B horizons developed from volcanic ash deposits in Japan, dominated by short-range ordered aluminosilicates and crystalline clay minerals, respectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagasaki, Yasumi; Mulder, Jan; Okazaki, Masanori

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling the activity of free aluminum (Al) in Bw1 horizons of soils developed from volcanic ash deposits in Japan were investigated by means of acid-base titrations and kinetic studies. In a Bw1 horizon, with a high content of acid-oxalate extractable Al, soil solution reached equilibrium with short-range ordered aluminosilicates in the order of days. Relatively fast kinetics of the release and precipitation of Al and Si indicate a high reactivity of short-range ordered aluminosilicates in the soil. In the Bw1 horizon of an adjacent soil, with a high content of crystalline clay minerals like halloysite and interlayered vermiculite, solution remained well undersaturated with respect to short-range ordered aluminosilicates and aluminum hydroxide. Apparent equilibrium with respect to halloysite occurred after more than 30 days. This halloysite ( logKso0=3.74±0.02 (25 °C)) has a solubility that is less than that reported in the literature ( logKso0=4.36 (25°C)). Our findings suggest that different reactive aluminosilicates may control the activity of free Al in sub-surface horizons of volcanic ash soils with different mineralogy.

  11. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  12. Enhancing stability and oxidation activity of cytochrome C by immobilization in the nanochannels of mesoporous aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Hung; Lang, Jun; Yen, Chun-Wan; Shih, Pei-Chun; Lin, Tien-Sung; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2005-06-30

    Hydrothermally stable and structrurally ordered mesoporous and microporous aluminosilicates with different pore sizes have been synthesized to immobilize cytochrome c (cyt c): MAS-9 (pore size 90 A), MCM-48-S (27 A), MCM-41-S (25 A), and Y zeolites (7.4 A). The amount of cyt c adsorption could be increased by the introduction of aluminum into the framework of pure silica materials. Among these mesoprous silicas (MPS), MAS-9 showed the highest loading capacity due to its large pore size. However, cyt c immobilized in MAS-9 could undergo facile unfolding during hydrothermal treatments. MCM-41-S and MCM-48-S have the pore sizes that match well the size of cyt c (25 x 25 x 37 A). Hence the adsorbed cyt c in these two medium pore size MPS have the highest hydrothermal stability and overall catalytic activity. On the other hand, the pore size of NaY zeolite is so small that cyt c is mostly adsorbed only on the outer surface and loses its enzymatic activity rapidly. The improved stability and high catalytic activity of cyt c immobilized in MPS are attributed to the electrostatic attraction between the pore surface and cyt c and the confinement provided by nanochannels. We further observed that cyt c immobilized in MPS exists in both high and low spin states, as inferred from the ESR and UV-vis studies. This is different from the native cyt c, which shows primarily the low spin state. The high spin state arises from the replacement of Met-80 ligands of heme Fe (III) by water or silanol group on silica surface, which could open up the heme groove for easy access of oxidants and substrates to iron center and facilitate the catalytic activity. In the catalytic study, MAS-9-cyt c showed the highest specific activity toward the oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which arises from the fast mass transfer rate of reaction substrate due to its large pore size. For pinacyanol (a hydrophilic substrate), MCM-41-S-cyt c and MCM-48-S-cyt c showed higher specific

  13. Solubility and solution mechanisms of chlorine in aluminosilicate melts at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalou, C.; Mysen, B. O.

    2012-12-01

    We address the effect of alkalies and aluminum on the solution behavior of Cl by combining solubility measurements of Cl and Raman data of Cl-bearing peralkaline aluminosilicate glasses (quenched melt). Six compositions along the join Na2Si3O7(NS3)-Na2(NaAl)3O7 and six compositions along the join K2Si3O7(KS3)-K2(KAl)3O7 were used. In order to isolate potential effects of Al/(Al+Si) from changes on melt polymerization, Al2O3 was exchanged with SiO2 in a charge-balanced form, NaAlO2 and KaAlO2 thus keeping approximately constant NBO/T (0.65 ± 0.02) for all melts (assuming Al3+ in 4-fold coordination in the melts). Starting materials were doped with 5wt% Cl in the form of PdCl2, which releases Cl2 as its gaseous phase during experiment. Samples were synthetized on piston-cylinder apparatus at 1600°C - 1.5 GPa. At the end of the experiments, Pd forms little spheres (1-2 μm) that for most part dissolves into the capsule. Chlorine oversaturation in the melts is ensured by the observation of bubbles in the quenched samples. The Cl solubility in Na-bearing systems is about twice that of the than in K-bearing system and may, therefore, be negatively correlated with ionic radius of the metal cation.. The solubility also decreases with Al/(Al+Si). In NS3 system, it decreases from 4.01 ± 0.13 wt% of Cl in Al-free systems to 1.87 ± 0.19 wt% of Cl for an Al/Al+Si ratio of 0.34. In KS3 system, this decrease is from 2.23 ± 0.08 wt% of Cl in Al-free systems to 0.62 ± 0.05 wt% of Cl for an Al/Al+Si ratio of 0.36. In Al-free systems, preliminary Raman data show the appearance of a peak around 465cm-1, that we assigned to alkali-Cl bonding. The intensity of this 465cm-1 peak increases with Al content confirming the role of Al in Cl solution mechanism.We also identify the molecular Cl peak at 1540cm-1. The peak can be detected only in Al-bearing melts. The Al substitution for Si results in increased abundance of three-dimensional cages on the melt structure into which molecular

  14. Sol-gel dip coating of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia dental ceramic by aluminosilicate nanocomposite as a novel technique to improve the bonding of veneering porcelain.

    PubMed

    Madani, Azamsadat; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Karami, Parisa; Rajabzadeh, Ghadir; Salehi, Sahar; Bagheri, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of silica and aluminosilicate nanocomposite coating of zirconia-based dental ceramic by a sol-gel dip-coating technique on the bond strength of veneering porcelain to the yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) in vitro. Thirty Y-TZP blocks (10 mm ×10 mm ×3 mm) were prepared and were assigned to four experimental groups (n=10/group): C, without any further surface treatment as the control group; S, sandblasted using 110 μm alumina powder; Si, silica sol dip coating + calcination; and Si/Al, aluminosilicate sol dip coating + calcination. After preparing Y-TZP samples, a 3 mm thick layer of the recommended porcelain was fired on the coated Y-TZP surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the coating and the nature of the bonding between the coating and zirconia. To examine the zirconia-porcelain bond strength, a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) approach was chosen. FT-IR study showed the formation of silica and aluminosilicate materials. XRD pattern showed the formation of new phases consisting of Si, Al, and Zr in coated samples. SEM showed the formation of a uniform coating on Y-TZP samples. Maximum μTBS values were obtained in aluminosilicate samples, which were significantly increased compared to control and sandblasted groups (P=0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). This study showed that aluminosilicate sol-gel dip coating can be considered as a convenient, less expensive reliable method for improving the bond strength between dental Y-TZP ceramics and veneering porcelain.

  15. Sol–gel dip coating of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia dental ceramic by aluminosilicate nanocomposite as a novel technique to improve the bonding of veneering porcelain

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Azamsadat; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Karami, Parisa; Rajabzadeh, Ghadir; Salehi, Sahar; Bagheri, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of silica and aluminosilicate nanocomposite coating of zirconia-based dental ceramic by a sol–gel dip-coating technique on the bond strength of veneering porcelain to the yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) in vitro. Thirty Y-TZP blocks (10 mm ×10 mm ×3 mm) were prepared and were assigned to four experimental groups (n=10/group): C, without any further surface treatment as the control group; S, sandblasted using 110 μm alumina powder; Si, silica sol dip coating + calcination; and Si/Al, aluminosilicate sol dip coating + calcination. After preparing Y-TZP samples, a 3 mm thick layer of the recommended porcelain was fired on the coated Y-TZP surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the coating and the nature of the bonding between the coating and zirconia. To examine the zirconia–porcelain bond strength, a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) approach was chosen. FT-IR study showed the formation of silica and aluminosilicate materials. XRD pattern showed the formation of new phases consisting of Si, Al, and Zr in coated samples. SEM showed the formation of a uniform coating on Y-TZP samples. Maximum μTBS values were obtained in aluminosilicate samples, which were significantly increased compared to control and sandblasted groups (P=0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). This study showed that aluminosilicate sol–gel dip coating can be considered as a convenient, less expensive reliable method for improving the bond strength between dental Y-TZP ceramics and veneering porcelain. PMID:27478376

  16. Sol-gel dip coating of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia dental ceramic by aluminosilicate nanocomposite as a novel technique to improve the bonding of veneering porcelain.

    PubMed

    Madani, Azamsadat; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Karami, Parisa; Rajabzadeh, Ghadir; Salehi, Sahar; Bagheri, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of silica and aluminosilicate nanocomposite coating of zirconia-based dental ceramic by a sol-gel dip-coating technique on the bond strength of veneering porcelain to the yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) in vitro. Thirty Y-TZP blocks (10 mm ×10 mm ×3 mm) were prepared and were assigned to four experimental groups (n=10/group): C, without any further surface treatment as the control group; S, sandblasted using 110 μm alumina powder; Si, silica sol dip coating + calcination; and Si/Al, aluminosilicate sol dip coating + calcination. After preparing Y-TZP samples, a 3 mm thick layer of the recommended porcelain was fired on the coated Y-TZP surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the coating and the nature of the bonding between the coating and zirconia. To examine the zirconia-porcelain bond strength, a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) approach was chosen. FT-IR study showed the formation of silica and aluminosilicate materials. XRD pattern showed the formation of new phases consisting of Si, Al, and Zr in coated samples. SEM showed the formation of a uniform coating on Y-TZP samples. Maximum μTBS values were obtained in aluminosilicate samples, which were significantly increased compared to control and sandblasted groups (P=0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). This study showed that aluminosilicate sol-gel dip coating can be considered as a convenient, less expensive reliable method for improving the bond strength between dental Y-TZP ceramics and veneering porcelain. PMID:27478376

  17. Topological crystalline insulator nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Cha, Judy J

    2014-11-01

    Topological crystalline insulators are topological insulators whose surface states are protected by the crystalline symmetry, instead of the time reversal symmetry. Similar to the first generation of three-dimensional topological insulators such as Bi₂Se₃ and Bi₂Te₃, topological crystalline insulators also possess surface states with exotic electronic properties such as spin-momentum locking and Dirac dispersion. Experimentally verified topological crystalline insulators to date are SnTe, Pb₁-xSnxSe, and Pb₁-xSnxTe. Because topological protection comes from the crystal symmetry, magnetic impurities or in-plane magnetic fields are not expected to open a gap in the surface states in topological crystalline insulators. Additionally, because they have a cubic structure instead of a layered structure, branched structures or strong coupling with other materials for large proximity effects are possible, which are difficult with layered Bi₂Se₃ and Bi₂Te₃. Thus, additional fundamental phenomena inaccessible in three-dimensional topological insulators can be pursued. In this review, topological crystalline insulator SnTe nanostructures will be discussed. For comparison, experimental results based on SnTe thin films will be covered. Surface state properties of topological crystalline insulators will be discussed briefly.

  18. Nanostructured Interfaces for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Marconnet, A. M.; Panzer, M. A.; Leblanc, S.; Dogbe, S.; Ezzahri, Y.; Shakouri, A.; Goodson, K. E.

    2010-09-01

    Temperature drops at the interfaces between thermoelectric materials and the heat source and sink reduce the overall efficiency of thermoelectric systems. Nanostructured interfaces based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) promise the combination of mechanical compliance and high thermal conductance required for thermoelectric modules, which are subjected to severe thermomechanical stresses. This work discusses the property require- ments for thermoelectric interface materials, reviews relevant data available in the literature for CNT films, and characterizes the thermal properties of vertically aligned multiwalled CNTs grown on a candidate thermoelectric material. Nanosecond thermoreflectance thermometry provides thermal property data for 1.5- μm-thick CNT films on SiGe. The thermal interface resistances between the CNT film and surrounding materials are the dominant barriers to thermal transport, ranging from 1.4 m2 K MW-1 to 4.3 m2 K MW-1. The volumetric heat capacity of the CNT film is estimated to be 87 kJ m-3 K-1, which corresponds to a volumetric fill fraction of 9%. The effect of 100 thermal cycles from 30°C to 200°C is also studied. These data provide the groundwork for future studies of thermoelectric materials in contact with CNT films serving as both a thermal and electrical interface.

  19. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, Sylvie; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  20. The nanostructure problem

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.

    2010-03-22

    Diffraction techniques are making progress in tackling the difficult problem of solving the structures of nanoparticles and nanoscale materials. The great gift of x-ray crystallography has made us almost complacent in our ability to locate the three-dimensional coordinates of atoms in a crystal with a precision of around 10{sup -4} nm. However, the powerful methods of crystallography break down for structures in which order only extends over a few nanometers. In fact, as we near the one hundred year mark since the birth of crystallography, we face a resilient frontier in condensed matter physics: our inability to routinely and robustly determine the structure of complex nanostructured and amorphous materials. Knowing the structure and arrangement of atoms in a solid is so fundamental to understanding its properties that the topic routinely occupies the early chapters of every solid-state physics textbook. Yet what has become clear with the emergence of nanotechnology is that diffraction data alone may not be enough to uniquely solve the structure of nanomaterials. As part of a growing effort to incorporate the results of other techniques to constrain x-ray refinements - a method called 'complex modeling' which is a simple but elegant approach for combining information from spectroscopy with diffraction data to solve the structure of several amorphous and nanostructured materials. Crystallography just works, so we rarely question how and why this is so, yet understanding the physics of diffraction can be very helpful as we consider the nanostructure problem. The relationship between the electron density distribution in three dimensions (i.e., the crystal structure) and an x-ray diffraction pattern is well established: the measured intensity distribution in reciprocal space is the square of the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function <{rho}(r){rho}(r+r')> of the electron density distribution {rho}(r). The fact that we get the autocorrelation function

  1. Striking role of non-bridging oxygen on glass transition temperature of calcium aluminosilicate glass-formers

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhadja, M.; Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2014-06-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structural and dynamic properties of calcium aluminosilicate, (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 1−x}(SiO{sub 2}){sub x}, glass formers along three joins, namely, R = 1, 1.57, and 3, in which the silica content x can vary from 0 to 1. For all compositions, we determined the glass-transition temperature, the abundances of the non-bridging oxygen, triclusters, and AlO{sub 5} structural units, as well as the fragility from the temperature evolution of the α-relaxation times. We clearly evidence the role played by the non-bridging oxygen linked either to Al atoms or Si atoms in the evolution of the glass-transition temperature as well as of the fragility as a function of silica content along the three joins.

  2. Structural, vibrational, and elastic properties of a calcium aluminosilicate glass from molecular dynamics simulations: The role of the potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bauchy, M.

    2014-07-14

    We study a calcium aluminosilicate glass of composition (SiO{sub 2}){sub 0.60}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.10}(CaO){sub 0.30} by means of molecular dynamics. To this end, we conduct parallel simulations, following a consistent methodology, but using three different potentials. Structural and elastic properties are analyzed and compared to available experimental data. This allows assessing the respective abilities of the potentials to produce a realistic glass. We report that, although all these potentials offer a reasonable glass structure, featuring tricluster oxygen atoms, their respective vibrational and elastic predictions differ. This allows us to draw some general conclusions about the crucial role, or otherwise, of the interaction potential in silicate systems.

  3. Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization of Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Cross-Linked Silica, Organic Polyimide, and Inorganic Aluminosilicate Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Guo, Haiquan N.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    As aerospace applications become ever more demanding, novel insulation materials with lower thermal conductivity, lighter weight and higher use temperature are required to fit the aerospace application needs. Having nanopores and high porosity, aerogels are superior thermal insulators, among other things. The use of silica aerogels in general is quite restricted due to their inherent fragility, hygroscopic nature, and poor mechanical properties, especially in extereme aerospace environments. Our research goal is to develop aerogels with better mechanical and environmental stability for a variety of aeronautic and space applications including space suit insulation for planetary surface missions, insulation for inflatable structures for habitats, inflatable aerodynamic decelerators for entry, descent and landing (EDL) operations, and cryotank insulation for advance space propulsion systems. Different type of aerogels including organic-inorganic polymer reinforced (hybrid) silica-based aerogels, polyimide aerogels and inorganic aluminosilicate aerogels have been developed and examined.

  4. A molecular dynamics study of the interaction of oleate and dodecylammonium chloride surfactants with complex aluminosilicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Rai, Beena; Sathish, P; Tanwar, Jyotsna; Pradip; Moon, K S; Fuerstenau, D W

    2011-10-15

    Surface characteristics of complex aluminosilicate minerals like spodumene [LiAl(SiO(3))(2)], jadeite [NaAl(SiO(3))(2)], feldspar [KAlSi(3)O(8)], and muscovite [K(2)Al(4)(Al(2)Si(6)O(20))(OH)(4)]) are modeled. Surface energies are computed for the cleavage planes of these minerals. Adsorption mechanisms of anionic chemisorbing type oleate and cationic physisorbing type dodecylammonium chloride molecules on two different crystal planes, that is (110) and (001), of spodumene and jadeite are studied in terms of the surface-surfactant interaction energies computed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The conclusions drawn from purely theoretical computations match remarkably well with our experimental results.

  5. X-ray and MAS NMR characterization of the thermal transformation of Li(Na)-Y zeolite to lithium aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, M.A.; Corbin, D.R.; Farlee, R.D.

    1986-12-01

    The high temperature thermal transformation of Li-exchanged Na-Y zeolite has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and /sup 29/Si MAS NMR studies. At 700/sup 0/C, the zeolite was transformed into an amorphous phase and upon further heating to 800/sup 0/C, formation of lithium aluminosilicate with high-quartz structure, in addition to an amorphous phase, was noted. When heated above 900/sup 0/C, the high-quartz structure was transformed into a ..beta..-spodumene related solid solution. X-ray and MAS NMR studies indicate the ..beta..-spodumene solid solution formed has the composition close to (Li/sub 0.23/Na/sub 0.06/)A iota /sub 0.29/Si/sub 0.71/O/sub 2/, which is in agreement with chemical analysis.

  6. Aluminosilicates with varying alumina-silica ratios: synthesis via a hybrid sol-gel route and structural characterisation.

    PubMed

    Nampi, Padmaja Parameswaran; Moothetty, Padmanabhan; Berry, Frank John; Mortimer, Michael; Warrier, Krishna Gopakumar

    2010-06-01

    Aluminosilicates with varying Al2O3:SiO2 molar ratios (3:1, 3:2, 3:3 and 3:4) have been synthesized using a hybrid sol-gel route using boehmite sol as the precursor for alumina and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as the precursor for silica. The synthesis of boehmite sol from aluminium nitrate, and its use as the alumina precursor, is cost effective compared to alkoxide precursors. Structural aspects, including bonding and coordination, are studied in detail for samples calcined in the temperature range 400-1400 °C using both NMR and FTIR spectroscopy: the results are correlated with phase formation data (spinel and high temperature phases) obtained from XRD and thermal analysis. FTIR results show a broadening of peaks at 800 °C indicating a disordered distribution of octahedral sites caused by crosslinking between AlO6 octahedral and SiO4 tetrahedral units prior to the formation of mullite. (27)Al MAS NMR spectra are consistent with a progressive decrease in the number of AlO6 polyhedra with increasing temperature corresponding to Al in these units being forced to adopt a tetrahedral coordination due to the increasing presence of similarly coordinated Si species. XRD results confirm the formation of pure mullite at 1250 °C for a 3Al2O3:2SiO2 system. At 1400 °C, phase pure mullite is observed for all compositions except 3Al2O3:SiO2 where α-Al2O3 is the major phase with traces of mullite. The synthesis of aluminosilicates through a hybrid sol-gel route and the detailed insight into structural features gained from spectroscopic and diffraction techniques contributes further to the development of these materials in applications ranging from nanocatalysts to high-temperature ceramics.

  7. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  8. Nanostructured materials in electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rahi, A; Karimian, K; Heli, H

    2016-03-15

    Basic strategies and recent developments for the enhancement of the sensory performance of nanostructures in the electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals are reviewed. A discussion of the properties of nanostructures and their application as modified electrodes for drug assays is presented. The electrocatalytic effect of nanostructured materials and their application in determining low levels of drugs in pharmaceutical forms and biofluids are discussed.

  9. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  10. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  11. PREFACE: Self-organized nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, Sylvie; Ortega, Enrique

    2006-04-01

    In order to fabricate ordered arrays of nanostructures, two different strategies might be considered. The `top-down' approach consists of pushing the limit of lithography techniques down to the nanometre scale. However, beyond 10 nm lithography techniques will inevitably face major intrinsic limitations. An alternative method for elaborating ultimate-size nanostructures is based on the reverse `bottom-up' approach, i.e. building up nanostructures (and eventually assemble them to form functional circuits) from individual atoms or molecules. Scanning probe microscopies, including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) invented in 1982, have made it possible to create (and visualize) individual structures atom by atom. However, such individual atomic manipulation is not suitable for industrial applications. Self-assembly or self-organization of nanostructures on solid surfaces is a bottom-up approach that allows one to fabricate and assemble nanostructure arrays in a one-step process. For applications, such as high density magnetic storage, self-assembly appears to be the simplest alternative to lithography for massive, parallel fabrication of nanostructure arrays with regular sizes and spacings. These are also necessary for investigating the physical properties of individual nanostructures by means of averaging techniques, i.e. all those using light or particle beams. The state-of-the-art and the current developments in the field of self-organization and physical properties of assembled nanostructures are reviewed in this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The papers have been selected from among the invited and oral presentations of the recent summer workshop held in Cargese (Corsica, France, 17-23 July 2005). All authors are world-renowned in the field. The workshop has been funded by the Marie Curie Actions: Marie Curie Conferences and Training Courses series named `NanosciencesTech' supported by the VI Framework Programme of the European Community, by

  12. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  13. Properties of Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, Inna

    2008-03-01

    Ferroelectric nanostructures (FENs) such as thin films, nanowires and nanodots are receiving a lot of attention due to their potential for technological applications and to the rich variety of underlying physics. Interestingly, properties of FENs can substantially deviate from their bulk counterpart due to their sensitivity to many factors. Examples of such factors are the electrical boundary conditions (associated with the full, partial or non-existent screening of polarization-induced surface charges) and mechanical boundary conditions (arising from the lattice mismatch between the FEN and its substrate). Here, we developed and used computational schemes to predict many properties in various FENs, as well as, to provide atomistic insight to their complex phenomena. In particular, we will show the striking following features and reveal their origins: *The interplay between electrical boundary conditions, mechanical boundary conditions and growth direction results in the appearance of novel dipole patterns and new low-symmetry phases possessing superior dielectric properties in ferroelectric dots, wires and films [1,2]. *FENs can exhibit dielectric anomalies, such as a negative dielectric susceptibility [3]. *Nanobubbles can form in ferroelectric films under an external electric field [4]. *An homogeneous electric field can be used to control the chirality of vortex structures in asymmetric ferroelectric dots, via the creation of original intermediate states [5]. [1] I. Ponomareva et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 214118 (2005). [2] I. Ponomareva and L. Bellaiche, Phys. Rev. B 74, 064102 (2006). [3] I. Ponomareva et al., to be published in Phys. Rev. Lett. (2007). [4] B.-K. Lai et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 137602 (2006). [5] S. Prosandeev et al., submitted (2007). These works have been done in collaboration with L. Bellaiche, I. Kornev, B.-K. Lai, I.I. Naumov, R. Resta and S. Prosandeev. Some computations were made possible thanks to the MRI Grants 0421099 and 0722625 from

  14. Nanostructured Substrates for Optical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Kemling, Jonathan W.; Qavi, Abraham J.; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01

    Sensors that change color have the advantages of versatility, ease of use, high sensitivity, and low cost. The recent development of optically based chemical sensing platforms has increasingly employed substrates manufactured with advanced processing or fabrication techniques to provide precise control over shape and morphology of the sensor micro- and nano-structure. New sensors have resulted with improved capabilities for a number of sensing applications, including the detection of biomolecules and environmental monitoring. This perspective focuses on recent optical sensor devices that utilize nanostructured substrates. PMID:22174955

  15. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  16. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-14-150, 151) and Tank 43H (HTF- 43-14-152, 53) Surface and Subsurface Supernatant Samples in Support of Enrichment Control, Corrosion Control and Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation Potential Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-01-14

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 38H and 43H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP), the Corrosion Control Program and Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation Potential in the Evaporator.

  17. Controlled placement and orientation of nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D; Fennimore, Adam M

    2014-04-08

    A method for controlled deposition and orientation of molecular sized nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) on substrates is disclosed. The method comprised: forming a thin layer of polymer coating on a substrate; exposing a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer to alter a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer; forming a suspension of nanostructures in a solvent, wherein the solvent suspends the nanostructures and activates the nanostructures in the solvent for deposition; and flowing a suspension of nanostructures across the layer of polymer in a flow direction; thereby: depositing a nanostructure in the suspension of nanostructures only to the selected portion of the thin layer of polymer coating on the substrate to form a deposited nanostructure oriented in the flow direction. By selectively employing portions of the method above, complex NEMS may be built of simpler NEMSs components.

  18. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  19. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    resins. The soft lithography technique was mainly used to fabricate micro and nanostructures on zein films. Zein material well-replicated small structures with the smallest size at sub micrometer scale that resulted in interesting photonic properties. The bonding method was also developed for assembling portable zein microfluidic devices with small shape distortion. Zein-zein and zein-glass microfluidic devices demonstrated sufficient strength to facilitate fluid flow in a complex microfluidic design with no leakage. Aside from the fabrication technique development, several potential applications of this environmentally friendly microfluidic device were investigated. The concentration gradient manipulation of Rhodamine B solution in zein-glass microfluidic devices was demonstrated. The diffusion of small molecules such as fluorescent dye into the wall of the zein microfluidic channels was observed. However, with this formulation, zein microfluidic devices were not suitable for cell culture applications. This pioneer study covered a wide spectrum of the implementation of the two nanotechnology approaches to advance zein biomaterial which provided proof of fundamental concepts as well as presenting some limitations. The findings in this study can lead to several innovative research opportunities of advanced zein biomaterials with broad applications. The information from the study of zein nanocomposite structure allows the packaging industry to develop the low cost biodegradable materials with physical property improvement. The information from the study of the zein microfluidic devices allows agro-industry to develop the nanotechnology-enabled microfluidic sensors fabricated entirely from biodegradable polymer for on-site disease or contaminant detection in the fields of food and agriculture.

  20. Tailoring the porous hierarchy and the tetrahedral aluminum content by using carboxylate ligands: hierarchically structured macro-mesoporous aluminosilicates from a single molecular source.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Arnaud; Su, Bao-Lian

    2010-11-16

    A novel yet facile synthesis pathway has been developed for the design of hierarchically structured macro-mesoporous aluminosilicates with high aluminum content at tetrahedral sites using a single molecular bifunctional alkoxide (sec-BuO)(2)-Al-O-Si(OEt)(3) precursor. The use of carboxylate ligands and a highly alkaline media slow down the polymerization rate of the aluminum alkoxide functionality, thus permitting the preservation of the intrinsic Al-O-Si linkage. The hierarchically structured porous aluminosilicate materials present an unprecedented low Si/Al ratio close to 1. Heat treatment applied to the synthesized material seems to favor the incorporation of aluminum into tetrahedral position (intraframework aluminum species). The macro-mesoporosity was spontaneously generated, without the use of any external templating agent, by the hydrodynamic flow of the solvents released during the rapid hydrolysis and condensation processes of this double alkoxide. This method results in materials with an open array of interconnected macrochannels. The synthesized aluminosilicate materials with tailorable macro-mesoporous hierarchy and very high Al content at tetrahedral position hold huge promise in various applications as catalysts, catalysts supports, or adsorbents.

  1. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  2. Color tunability with temperature and pump intensity in Yb3+/Tm3+ codoped aluminosilicate glass under anti-Stokes excitation.

    PubMed

    Silva, W F; Eliel, G S N; dos Santos, P V; de Araujo, M T; Vermelho, M V D; Udo, P T; Astrath, N G C; Baesso, M L; Jacinto, C

    2010-07-21

    Pump and thermally induced color tunabilities were demonstrated in Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) codoped low silica calcium aluminosilicate (LSCAS) glass under anti-Stokes excitation at 1.064 microm. The effects of pump intensity and sample's temperature on the upconversion emissions and mainly on the color tunabilities (from 800 to 480 nm) were investigated. The results revealed a 20- and a threefold reductions at 800/480 nm ratio as, respectively, the pump intensity and sample's temperature were increased from 27 to 700 kW/cm(2) and from 296 to 577 K. These behaviors with pump intensity and temperature (a strong increase of the 480 nm emission in comparison with the 800 nm one) were attributed to the several efficient processes occurring in the LSCAS system (Yb(3+)-->Tm(3+) energy-transfer processes, easy saturations of the Yb(3+) and Tm(3+) excited states, and radiative emissions). Besides these assigns, the temperature dependence is mainly assigned to the temperature-dependent effective absorption cross section of the ytterbium sensitizer through the so-called multiphonon-assisted anti-Stokes excitation process. Theoretical analyses and fits of the experimental data provided quantitative information. PMID:20649337

  3. Novel aluminosilicate hollow sphere as a catalyst support for methane decomposition to COx-free hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadallah, A. E.; Ahmed, W.; El-Din, M. R. Noor; Aboul-Enein, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Novel Ni and Co supported on aluminosilicate hollow sphere catalysts were investigated to decompose methane into CO and CO2 free hydrogen and carbon nanotube. The hollow sphere structure was prepared by reverse microemulsion method and then Ni and Co were loaded by the impregnation method. The fresh catalysts and deposited carbon were characterized by several microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The catalytic results showed that the Co based catalyst exhibited higher activity and durability at longer reaction time, due to the higher number and distribution of metal sites. The hollow sphere structure of the support could protect the metal particles against aggregation during the catalytic reactions. Accordingly, higher metal dispersion, stabilization and catalytic performance were achieved. The formation of nickel silicate is the main reason for the lower decomposition activity of Ni based catalyst at longer reaction time. TEM and Raman spectroscopic data revealed that the Co-based catalyst produced a relatively uniform diameter of MWCNTs with higher crystallinity and graphitization degree compared to the Ni-based catalyst.

  4. Electrical behavior of aluminosilicate glass-ceramic sealants and their interaction with metallic solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Kharton, Vladislav V.; Yaremchenko, Aleksey A.; Ferreira, José M. F.

    A series of alkaline-earth aluminosilicate glass-ceramics (GCs) were appraised with respect to their suitability as sealants for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The parent composition with general formula Ca 0.9MgAl 0.1La 0.1Si 1.9O 6 was modified with Cr 2O 3 and BaO. The addition of BaO led to a substantial decrease in the total electrical conductivity of the GCs, thus improving their insulating properties. BaO-containing GCs exhibited higher coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in comparison to BaO-free GCs. An extensive segregation of oxides of Ti and Mn, components of the Crofer22 APU interconnect alloy, along with negligible formation of BaCrO 4 was observed at the interface between GC/interconnects diffusion couples. Thermal shock resistance and gas-tightness of GC sealants in contact with yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte (8YSZ) was evaluated in air and water. Good matching of CTE and strong, but not reactive, adhesion to the solid electrolyte and interconnect, in conjunction with a high level of electrical resistivity, are all advantageous for potential SOFC applications.

  5. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnect in SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-08-01

    In most planar SOFC stack designs, the interconnect, which is typically made from a ferritic stainless steel, is hermitically sealed to the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize degradation of the stack performance, the sealing glass must be chemically compatible with the stainless steel interconnect. In this study, a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, and a ferritic stainless steel (446) were selected as examples to increase the understanding the chemical compatibility issues in SOFC. Evaluation of the interfaces of coupon joints indicated that interactions between the BCAS glass-ceramic and the ferritic stainless steel was dependent on the exposure conditions. At the edges of joints, where oxygen or air was accessible, the interaction often led to the formation of BaCrO4, while in the interior of the joints, chromium or chromia dissolved into the glass to form a thin layer of chromium rich solid solution. It was also found that, in the interior of the joints, the interaction often resulted in the formation of pores aligned along the interface. It appears the pore formation along the interface can be avoided through a pre-heat treatment.

  6. Relations among nonbridging oxygen, optical properties, optical basicity, and color center formation in CaO-MgO aluminosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Novatski, A.; Steimacher, A.; Medina, A. N.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Lima, S. M.; Guyot, Y.; Boulon, G.

    2008-11-01

    In this study the relations among nonbridging oxygen (NBO), optical properties, optical basicity, and color center formation in CaO-MgO aluminosilicate glasses were studied. Samples containing (in mol %) 35.9-57.5 of CaO, 16-27.7 of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 7.9-41.6 of SiO{sub 2}, and 6.5-6.9 of MgO were measured by optical absorption and excitation, luminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that when the SiO{sub 2} content was increased, the absorption edge shifted toward lower wavelengths and the bonds between O{sup 2-} ions and cations became more covalent. These observations were confirmed by Raman results that showed a decrease in the number of NBO per silicon tetrahedron as a function of SiO{sub 2} content. The results indicate that the effects of higher NBO concentration are the narrowing of the band gap energy and the delocalization of O{sup 2-} electrons, which facilitates the O{sup 2-} electrons to be trapped by anion vacancies and, consequently, forming color centers. The relationship between color center formation and SiO{sub 2} content was confirmed by optical spectroscopic measurements under UV radiation.

  7. Aluminosilicate-based adsorbent in equimolar and non-equimolar binary-component heavy metal removal systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Hadi, Pejman; Ning, Chao; Barford, John; An, Kyoung Jin; McKay, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are toxic heavy metals commonly used in various industries. The simultaneous presence of these metals in wastewater amplifies the toxicity of wastewater and the complexity of the treatment process. This study has investigated the selective behavior of an aluminosilicate-based mesoporous adsorbent. It has been demonstrated that when equimolar quantities of the metals are present in wastewater, the adsorbent uptakes the Pb²⁺ ions selectively. This has been attributed to the higher electronegativity value of Pb²⁺ compared to Cd²⁺ which can be more readily adsorbed on the adsorbent surface, displacing the Cd²⁺ ions. The selectivity can be advantageous when the objective is the separation and reuse of the metals besides wastewater treatment. In non-equimolar solutions, a complete selectivity can be observed up to a threshold Pb²⁺ molar ratio of 30%. Below this threshold value, the Cd²⁺ and Pb²⁺ ions are uptaken simultaneously due to the abundance of Cd²⁺ ions and the availability of adsorption sites at very low Pb²⁺ molar ratios. Moreover, the total adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for the multi-component system have been shown to be in the same range as the single-component system for each metal ion which can be of high value for industrial applications. PMID:26676004

  8. Environmental Weathering of Aluminosilicate Clay Minerals: Solid-State NMR Studies of Transformations Leading to Radionuclide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Crosson, Garry; Chorover, Jon; Choi, Sunkyung

    2004-03-28

    Mobilities of radionuclides (such as 137Cs and 90Sr) are governed by their interactions with natural soil particles in the saturated and unsaturated zones at Department of Energy sites. High surface area aluminosilicate clay minerals are a component of the natural soils beneath the leaking waste tanks at these sites and serve as possible radionuclide sorbents. However, due to the characteristics of the contaminant medium (high pH, high Al and high ionic strength), clay minerals are susceptible to transformations during exposure to tank waste leachates. We are currently studying the transformation of clays under specific chemical conditions that mimic the composition of known contaminant solutions. In these studies, specimen clay samples are reacted for varying time periods (up to one year) with simulated tank waste leachate solutions. Mineral dissolution and transformation are followed with solution analysis, x-ray diffraction and a number of other analytical methods. We report here results from 27Al MAS NMR at variable magnetic field strengths (up to 18.8 T), 29Si MAS NMR and 1H/29Si CPMAS NMR and evaluate these results along with those of other parallel analytic studies.

  9. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Infiltration and Cyclic Degradations of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Thermal Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Smialek, Jim; Miller, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop higher temperature capable turbine thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) resistance of the advanced coating systems needs to be evaluated and improved. This paper highlights some of NASA past high heat flux testing approaches for turbine thermal and environmental barrier coatings assessments in CMAS environments. One of our current emphases has been focused on the thermal barrier - environmental barrier coating composition and testing developments. The effort has included the CMAS infiltrations in high temperature and high heat flux turbine engine like conditions using advanced laser high heat flux rigs, and subsequently degradation studies in laser heat flux thermal gradient cyclic and isothermal furnace cyclic testing conditions. These heat flux CMAS infiltration and related coating durability testing are essential where appropriate CMAS melting, infiltration and coating-substrate temperature exposure temperature controls can be achieved, thus helping quantify the CMAS-coating interaction and degradation mechanisms. The CMAS work is also playing a critical role in advanced coating developments, by developing laboratory coating durability assessment methodologies in simulated turbine engine conditions and helping establish CMAS test standards in laboratory environments.

  10. Aluminosilicate-based adsorbent in equimolar and non-equimolar binary-component heavy metal removal systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Hadi, Pejman; Ning, Chao; Barford, John; An, Kyoung Jin; McKay, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are toxic heavy metals commonly used in various industries. The simultaneous presence of these metals in wastewater amplifies the toxicity of wastewater and the complexity of the treatment process. This study has investigated the selective behavior of an aluminosilicate-based mesoporous adsorbent. It has been demonstrated that when equimolar quantities of the metals are present in wastewater, the adsorbent uptakes the Pb²⁺ ions selectively. This has been attributed to the higher electronegativity value of Pb²⁺ compared to Cd²⁺ which can be more readily adsorbed on the adsorbent surface, displacing the Cd²⁺ ions. The selectivity can be advantageous when the objective is the separation and reuse of the metals besides wastewater treatment. In non-equimolar solutions, a complete selectivity can be observed up to a threshold Pb²⁺ molar ratio of 30%. Below this threshold value, the Cd²⁺ and Pb²⁺ ions are uptaken simultaneously due to the abundance of Cd²⁺ ions and the availability of adsorption sites at very low Pb²⁺ molar ratios. Moreover, the total adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for the multi-component system have been shown to be in the same range as the single-component system for each metal ion which can be of high value for industrial applications.

  11. RESULTS OF CAUSTIC DISSOLUTION OF ALUMINOSILICATE SCALE AND CHARACTERIZATION DATA FOR SAMPLES FROM THE EVAPORATOR POT AND GRAVITY DRAIN LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, B; Rita Sullivan, R; Chris Martino, C

    2006-08-21

    The build-up of sodium aluminosilicate scale in the 2H Evaporator system continues to cause operational difficulties. The use of a nitric acid cleaning operation proved successful in 2001. However, the operation required additional facilities to support spent cleaning solution neutralization and was quite costly. A proposed caustic cleaning flowsheet has many advantages over the acid flowsheet. Therefore, samples were retrieved from the evaporator system (gravity drain line and pot) for both chemical and radiological characterization and dissolution testing. The characterization of these scale samples showed the presence of nitrated cancrinite along with a dehydrated zeolite. Small amounts of depleted uranium were also found in these samples as expected and the amount of uranium ranged from 0.5 wt% to 2 wt%. Dissolution in sodium hydroxide solutions of various caustic concentrations showed that the scale slowly dissolves at elevated temperature (90 C). Data from similar testing indicate that the scale removed from the GDL in 2005 dissolves slower than that removed in 1997. Differences in the particle size of these samples of scale may well explain the measured dissolution rate differences.

  12. Chemical and physical transformations of aluminosilicate clay minerals due to acid treatment and consequences for heterogeneous ice nucleation.

    PubMed

    Sihvonen, Sarah K; Schill, Gregory P; Lyktey, Nicholas A; Veghte, Daniel P; Tolbert, Margaret A; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-09-25

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the largest contributors to global ice nuclei, but physical and chemical processing of dust during atmospheric transport can alter its ice nucleation activity. In particular, several recent studies have noted that sulfuric and nitric acids inhibit heterogeneous ice nucleation in the regime below liquid water saturation in aluminosilicate clay minerals. We have exposed kaolinite, KGa-1b and KGa-2, and montmorillonite, STx-1b and SWy-2, to aqueous sulfuric and nitric acid to determine the physical and chemical changes that are responsible for the observed deactivation. To characterize the changes to the samples upon acid treatment, we use X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. We find that the reaction of kaolinite and montmorillonite with aqueous sulfuric acid results in the formation of hydrated aluminum sulfate. In addition, sulfuric and nitric acids induce large structural changes in montmorillonite. We additionally report the supersaturation with respect to ice required for the onset of ice nucleation for these acid-treated species. On the basis of lattice spacing arguments, we explain how the chemical and physical changes observed upon acid treatment could lead to the observed reduction in ice nucleation activity. PMID:25211030

  13. Self-rolling of an aluminosilicate sheet into a single walled imogolite nanotube: The role of the hydroxyl arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    González, R. I.; Rogan, J.; Valdivia, J. A.; Munoz, F.; Valencia, F.; Ramírez, M.; Kiwi, M.; Ramírez, R.

    2015-12-31

    Imogolite is an inorganic nanotube, that forms naturally in weathered volcanic ashes, and it can be synthesized in nearly monodisperse diameters. However, long after its successful synthesis, the details of the way it is achieved are not fully understood. Here we elaborate on a model of its synthesis, which starts with a planar aluminosilicate sheet that is allowed to evolve freely, by means of classical molecular dynamics, until it achieves its minimum energy configuration. The minimal structures that the system thus adopts are tubular, scrolled, and more complex conformations, depending mainly on temperature as a driving force. Here we focus on the effect that the arrangement of the hydroxyl groups in the inner wall of the nanotube have on the minimal nanotubular configurations that we obtain are monodispersed in diameter, and quite similar to both from the those of weathered natural volcanic ashes, and to the ones that are synthesized in the laboratory. In this contribution we expand on the atomic mechanisms behind those behaviors.

  14. Self-rolling of an aluminosilicate sheet into a single walled imogolite nanotube: The role of the hydroxyl arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. I.; Ramírez, R.; Rogan, J.; Valdivia, J. A.; Munoz, F.; Valencia, F.; Ramírez, M.; Kiwi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Imogolite is an inorganic nanotube, that forms naturally in weathered volcanic ashes, and it can be synthesized in nearly monodisperse diameters. However, long after its successful synthesis, the details of the way it is achieved are not fully understood. Here we elaborate on a model of its synthesis, which starts with a planar aluminosilicate sheet that is allowed to evolve freely, by means of classical molecular dynamics, until it achieves its minimum energy configuration. The minimal structures that the system thus adopts are tubular, scrolled, and more complex conformations, depending mainly on temperature as a driving force. Here we focus on the effect that the arrangement of the hydroxyl groups in the inner wall of the nanotube have on the minimal nanotubular configurations that we obtain are monodispersed in diameter, and quite similar to both from the those of weathered natural volcanic ashes, and to the ones that are synthesized in the laboratory. In this contribution we expand on the atomic mechanisms behind those behaviors.

  15. Demonstrating the benefits and pitfalls of various acidity characterization techniques by a case study on bimodal aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Van Oers, Cynthia J; Góra-Marek, Kinga; Prelot, Bénédicte; Datka, Jerzy; Meynen, Vera; Cool, Pegie

    2014-02-25

    A new combination of a volumetric with a dynamic method to investigate the acidity properties of aluminosilicates is introduced. In the first step, the total acidity is determined volumetrically by the measurement of two-cycle adsorption (TCA) isotherms with ammonia as a probe, directly followed by a dynamic temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiment to define the acid strength distribution. Furthermore, the results obtained by the new direct combination of TCA and TPD are validated by comparison with an in-situ FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) study with the same probe molecule on the same materials. Both acidity characterization techniques are compared, and we comment on their complementarity, benefits, and pitfalls. The material under investigation is a new type of bimodal microporous and mesoporous material with zeolitic characteristics, synthesized by a mesotemplate-free method. The acidic nature of the novel material is compared to two reference materials: a crystalline zeolite and a mesoporous aluminum incorporated mesocellular foam (Al-MCF) with amorphous characteristics.

  16. Bona-fide method for the determination of short range order and transport properties in a ferro-aluminosilicate slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karalis, Konstantinos T.; Dellis, Dimitrios; Antipas, Georgios S. E.; Xenidis, Anthimos

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics, structural and transport properties (density, melting point, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, viscosity and electrical conductivity) of a ferro-aluminosilicate slag have been studied in the solid and liquid state (1273–2273 K) using molecular dynamics. The simulations were based on a Buckingham-type potential, which was extended here, to account for the presence of Cr and Cu. The potential was optimized by fitting pair distribution function partials to values determined by Reverse Monte Carlo modelling of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. The resulting short range order features and ring statistics were in tight agreement with experimental data and created consensus for the accurate prediction of transport properties. Accordingly, calculations yielded rational values both for the average heat capacity, equal to 1668.58 J/(kg·K), and for the viscosity, in the range of 4.09–87.64 cP. The potential was consistent in predicting accurate values for mass density (i.e. 2961.50 kg/m3 vs. an experimental value of 2940 kg/m3) and for electrical conductivity (5.3–233 S/m within a temperature range of 1273.15–2273.15 K).

  17. Effects of various types of aluminosilicates and aflatoxin B1 on aflatoxin toxicity, chick performance, and mineral status.

    PubMed

    Scheideler, S E

    1993-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro trials were conducted to test the efficacy of four aluminosilicates (AS) (Ethacal feed component, Novasil, Perlite, and Zeobrite) to sorb aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and alleviate aflatoxicosis in broiler chicks. Percentage sorption capacity of AS to radiolabeled AFB1 dissolved in methanol varied from 2 to 60%, whereas percentage sorption in intestinal contents varied from 0 to 40.0% according to type of AS tested. Intestinal contents alone sorbed 42% radiolabeled AFB1. Novasil and Zeobrite exhibited the highest rates of sorption (55 and 60%, respectively) in methanol. An in vivo study compared the four types of AS in combination with 0 or 2.5 ppm AFB1 fed to day-old chicks (two pens of six chicks per treatment) to 3 wk of age. Diet effects on body weight, liver lipid, bone ash, and serum Ca, P, Na, K, and Cl were measured. The AFB1 significantly decreased 2- and 3-wk body weight, and a significant interaction effect of AS and AFB1 on bird weight occurred at 2 and 3 wk of age. Three of the four AS tested alleviated the growth depression caused by AFB1. Liver lipids percentage was increased in the AFB1-treated chicks, but this effect was suppressed by three of the AS. Bone ash was not affected by AFB1 and was increased by Novasil and decreased by Ethacal. Ethacal, Novasil, Perlite, and Zeobrite all tended to decrease serum Cl, regardless of AFB1 treatment.

  18. Microstructure-property relationships of SiC fiber-reinforced magnesium aluminosilicates. 2: Mechanical properties and failure characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Knowles, K.M.

    1996-07-01

    Interfacial frictional shear stresses, flexural properties and failure mechanisms are reported for two magnesium aluminosilicates unidirectionally reinforced with Nicalon SiC fibers. Composites A and B were hot-pressed at 1,500 and 920 C, respectively. High values of interfacial frictional shear stresses inferred from Marshall`s analysis of the micro-indentation technique could be attributed in part to the presence of compressive radial stresses at the fiber-matrix interfaces. Although both composites failed non-catastrophically in symmetrical four point bend testing at room temperature, the failure modes were different. Extensive matrix microcracking, fiber failure and then fiber pull-put were commonly observed in composite A. Failure modes in composite B included the formation of a limited number of matrix cracks, the failure of fibers in the matrix crack front and progressive delamination. The observations demonstrate that the mechanical properties, the interfacial frictional shear stresses and the failure mechanisms of both composites are governed by their microstructural features, in particular the chemistry and structure of the matrix-fiber interfacial region.

  19. Resolving the aluminum ordering in aluminosilicates by a combined experimental/theoretical study of 27Al electric field gradients.

    PubMed

    Rocquefelte, Xavier; Clabau, Frédéric; Paris, Michael; Deniard, Philippe; Le Mercier, Thierry; Jobic, Stéphane; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2007-07-01

    The discrimination between atomic species in light-element materials is a challenging question. An archetypal example is the resolution of the Al/Si ordering in aluminosilicates. Only an average long-range order can be deduced from powder X-ray or neutron diffraction, while magic-angle-spinning NMR provides an accurate picture of the short-range order. The long- and short-range orders thus obtained usually differ, hence raising the question of whether the difference between local and extended orders is intrinsic or caused by the difficulty of obtaining an accurate picture of the long-range order from diffraction techniques. In this communication we resolve this question for the monoclinic phases of BaAl2Si2O8 and SrAl2Si2O8 on the basis of 27Al NMR measurements and ab initio simulation of electric field gradient. Although the long- and short-range orders deduced from our XRD and NMR experiments differ, they become similar when the XRD atomic positions are optimized by ab initio electronic structure calculations.

  20. Ordered three- and five-ply nanocomposites from ABC block terpolymer microphase separation with niobia and aluminosilicate sols

    PubMed Central

    Stefik, Morgan; Mahajan, Surbhi; Sai, Hiroaki; Epps, Thomas H.; Bates, Frank S.; Gruner, Sol M; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    We report the first use of a non-frustrated block terpolymer for the synthesis of highly ordered oxide nanocomposites containing multiple plies. The morphological behavior of 15 ISO-oxide nanocomposites was investigated spanning a large range of compositions along the ƒI=ƒS isopleth using aluminosilicate and niobia sols. Morphologies were determined by TEM and SAXS measurements. Four morphologies were identified, including core-shell hexagonal, core-shell double gyroid, three-domain lamellae, and core-shell inverse-hexagonal, in order of increasing O+oxide vol fraction. All of the resulting nanocomposites had three- or five-ply morphologies containing domains that were continuous in one, two, or three dimensions. The five-ply core-shell double gyroid phase was only found to be stable when the O+oxide domain was a minority. Removal of the polymer enabled simple and direct synthesis of mesoporous oxide materials while retaining the ordered network structure. We believe that advances in the synthesis of multi-ply nanocomposites will lead to advanced materials and devices containing multiple plies of functional materials. PMID:20209023

  1. Bona-fide method for the determination of short range order and transport properties in a ferro-aluminosilicate slag.

    PubMed

    Karalis, Konstantinos T; Dellis, Dimitrios; Antipas, Georgios S E; Xenidis, Anthimos

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamics, structural and transport properties (density, melting point, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, viscosity and electrical conductivity) of a ferro-aluminosilicate slag have been studied in the solid and liquid state (1273-2273 K) using molecular dynamics. The simulations were based on a Buckingham-type potential, which was extended here, to account for the presence of Cr and Cu. The potential was optimized by fitting pair distribution function partials to values determined by Reverse Monte Carlo modelling of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. The resulting short range order features and ring statistics were in tight agreement with experimental data and created consensus for the accurate prediction of transport properties. Accordingly, calculations yielded rational values both for the average heat capacity, equal to 1668.58 J/(kg·K), and for the viscosity, in the range of 4.09-87.64 cP. The potential was consistent in predicting accurate values for mass density (i.e. 2961.50 kg/m(3) vs. an experimental value of 2940 kg/m(3)) and for electrical conductivity (5.3-233 S/m within a temperature range of 1273.15-2273.15 K). PMID:27455915

  2. Color tunability with temperature and pump intensity in Yb3+/Tm3+ codoped aluminosilicate glass under anti-Stokes excitation.

    PubMed

    Silva, W F; Eliel, G S N; dos Santos, P V; de Araujo, M T; Vermelho, M V D; Udo, P T; Astrath, N G C; Baesso, M L; Jacinto, C

    2010-07-21

    Pump and thermally induced color tunabilities were demonstrated in Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) codoped low silica calcium aluminosilicate (LSCAS) glass under anti-Stokes excitation at 1.064 microm. The effects of pump intensity and sample's temperature on the upconversion emissions and mainly on the color tunabilities (from 800 to 480 nm) were investigated. The results revealed a 20- and a threefold reductions at 800/480 nm ratio as, respectively, the pump intensity and sample's temperature were increased from 27 to 700 kW/cm(2) and from 296 to 577 K. These behaviors with pump intensity and temperature (a strong increase of the 480 nm emission in comparison with the 800 nm one) were attributed to the several efficient processes occurring in the LSCAS system (Yb(3+)-->Tm(3+) energy-transfer processes, easy saturations of the Yb(3+) and Tm(3+) excited states, and radiative emissions). Besides these assigns, the temperature dependence is mainly assigned to the temperature-dependent effective absorption cross section of the ytterbium sensitizer through the so-called multiphonon-assisted anti-Stokes excitation process. Theoretical analyses and fits of the experimental data provided quantitative information.

  3. CTAB-assisted fabrication of mesoporous composite consisting of wormlike aluminosilicate shell and ordered MSU-S core

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Shangru; Zheng Junlin; Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan . E-mail: yhsun@sxicc.ac.cn; Deng Feng

    2005-01-15

    Novel mesoporous composites comprised of aluminosilicate shell with wormhole framework structure and well-ordered MSU-S core have been firstly prepared via treatment of MSU-S with NaAlO{sub 2} solution in the presence of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The obtained products were thoroughly characterized by XRD, HRTEM, N{sub 2} sorption isotherm, TG-DSC, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR, etc. Characterization results based on these techniques revealed that the introduction of CTAB during the treatment process played a crucial role in the formation of mesoporous composite, otherwise the parent ordered MSU-S would be completely destroyed. Furthermore, aluminum content in the final product determined by ICP and EDAX was significantly increased compared to the parent MSU-S, thus assuming that CTAB added in this modification process led a key role in the introduction of Al into the final solid via self-assembly with additionally added AlO{sub 2}{sup -} and partly dissolved silicate species from the parent MSU-S particles. In addition, acidity and catalytic performance of the prepared mesoporous composite were also substantially improved in comparison to the parent MSU-S sample.

  4. Bona-fide method for the determination of short range order and transport properties in a ferro-aluminosilicate slag

    PubMed Central

    Karalis, Konstantinos T.; Dellis, Dimitrios; Antipas, Georgios S. E.; Xenidis, Anthimos

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamics, structural and transport properties (density, melting point, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, viscosity and electrical conductivity) of a ferro-aluminosilicate slag have been studied in the solid and liquid state (1273–2273 K) using molecular dynamics. The simulations were based on a Buckingham-type potential, which was extended here, to account for the presence of Cr and Cu. The potential was optimized by fitting pair distribution function partials to values determined by Reverse Monte Carlo modelling of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. The resulting short range order features and ring statistics were in tight agreement with experimental data and created consensus for the accurate prediction of transport properties. Accordingly, calculations yielded rational values both for the average heat capacity, equal to 1668.58 J/(kg·K), and for the viscosity, in the range of 4.09–87.64 cP. The potential was consistent in predicting accurate values for mass density (i.e. 2961.50 kg/m3 vs. an experimental value of 2940 kg/m3) and for electrical conductivity (5.3–233 S/m within a temperature range of 1273.15–2273.15 K). PMID:27455915

  5. Chemical and physical transformations of aluminosilicate clay minerals due to acid treatment and consequences for heterogeneous ice nucleation.

    PubMed

    Sihvonen, Sarah K; Schill, Gregory P; Lyktey, Nicholas A; Veghte, Daniel P; Tolbert, Margaret A; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-09-25

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the largest contributors to global ice nuclei, but physical and chemical processing of dust during atmospheric transport can alter its ice nucleation activity. In particular, several recent studies have noted that sulfuric and nitric acids inhibit heterogeneous ice nucleation in the regime below liquid water saturation in aluminosilicate clay minerals. We have exposed kaolinite, KGa-1b and KGa-2, and montmorillonite, STx-1b and SWy-2, to aqueous sulfuric and nitric acid to determine the physical and chemical changes that are responsible for the observed deactivation. To characterize the changes to the samples upon acid treatment, we use X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. We find that the reaction of kaolinite and montmorillonite with aqueous sulfuric acid results in the formation of hydrated aluminum sulfate. In addition, sulfuric and nitric acids induce large structural changes in montmorillonite. We additionally report the supersaturation with respect to ice required for the onset of ice nucleation for these acid-treated species. On the basis of lattice spacing arguments, we explain how the chemical and physical changes observed upon acid treatment could lead to the observed reduction in ice nucleation activity.

  6. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  7. Chemical Sensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Mike J.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an overview of sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures. While nanostructures such as nanorods show significan t potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of s ignificant technical challenges remain. The major issues addressed in this work revolve around the ability to make workable sensors. This paper discusses efforts to address three technical barriers related t o the application of nanostructures into sensor systems: 1) Improving contact of the nanostructured materials with electrodes in a microse nsor structure; 2) Controling nanostructure crystallinity to allow co ntrol of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by using different nanostructured materials. It is concluded that while this work demonstrates useful tools for furt her development, these are just the beginning steps towards realizati on of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostr uctures.

  8. Nanostructured materials for water desalination.

    PubMed

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O'Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T; Karnik, R; Wang, E N

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  9. Topology optimization of piezoelectric nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanthakumar, S. S.; Lahmer, Tom; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Park, Harold S.; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-09-01

    We present an extended finite element formulation for piezoelectric nanobeams and nanoplates that is coupled with topology optimization to study the energy harvesting potential of piezoelectric nanostructures. The finite element model for the nanoplates is based on the Kirchoff plate model, with a linear through the thickness distribution of electric potential. Based on the topology optimization, the largest enhancements in energy harvesting are found for closed circuit boundary conditions, though significant gains are also found for open circuit boundary conditions. Most interestingly, our results demonstrate the competition between surface elasticity, which reduces the energy conversion efficiency, and surface piezoelectricity, which enhances the energy conversion efficiency, in governing the energy harvesting potential of piezoelectric nanostructures.

  10. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes–anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  11. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humplik, T.; Lee, J.; O'Hern, S. C.; Fellman, B. A.; Baig, M. A.; Hassan, S. F.; Atieh, M. A.; Rahman, F.; Laoui, T.; Karnik, R.; Wang, E. N.

    2011-07-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  12. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  13. Coherent acoustic phonons in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekorsy, T.; Taubert, R.; Hudert, F.; Bartels, A.; Habenicht, A.; Merkt, F.; Leiderer, P.; Köhler, K.; Schmitz, J.; Wagner, J.

    2008-02-01

    Phonons are considered as a most important origin of scattering and dissipation for electronic coherence in nanostructures. The generation of coherent acoustic phonons with femtosecond laser pulses opens the possibility to control phonon dynamics in amplitude and phase. We demonstrate a new experimental technique based on two synchronized femtosecond lasers with GHz repetition rate to study the dynamics of coherently generated acoustic phonons in semiconductor heterostructures with high sensitivity. High-speed synchronous optical sampling (ASOPS) enables to scan a time-delay of 1 ns with 100 fs time resolution with a frequency in the kHz range without a moving part in the set-up. We investigate the dynamics of coherent zone-folded acoustic phonons in semiconductor superlattices (GaAs/AlAs and GaSb/InAs) and of coherent vibration of metallic nanostructures of non-spherical shape using ASOPS.

  14. Thermoelectric effects in graphene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollfus, Philippe; Nguyen, Viet Hung; Saint-Martin, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene and graphene nanostructures have recently attracted significant attention from the physics and engineering communities. In fundamental physics, the analysis of Seebeck and Nernst effects is very useful in elucidating some details of the electronic band structure of graphene that cannot be probed by conductance measurements alone, due in particular to the ambipolar nature of this gapless material. For applications in thermoelectric energy conversion, graphene has two major disadvantages. It is gapless, which leads to a small Seebeck coefficient due to the opposite contributions of electrons and holes, and it is an excellent thermal conductor. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of a two-dimensional (2D) graphene sheet is thus very limited. However, many works have demonstrated recently that appropriate nanostructuring and bandgap engineering of graphene can concomitantly strongly reduce the lattice thermal conductance and enhance the Seebeck coefficient without dramatically degrading the electronic conductance. Hence, in various graphene nanostructures, ZT has been predicted to be high enough to make them attractive for energy conversion. In this article, we review the main results obtained experimentally and theoretically on the thermoelectric properties of graphene and its nanostructures, emphasizing the physical effects that govern these properties. Beyond pure graphene structures, we discuss also the thermoelectric properties of some hybrid graphene structures, as graphane, layered carbon allotropes such as graphynes and graphdiynes, and graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures which offer new opportunities. Finally, we briefly review the recent activities on other atomically thin 2D semiconductors with finite bandgap, i.e. dichalcogenides and phosphorene, which have attracted great attention for various kinds of applications, including thermoelectrics.

  15. Thermoelectric effects in graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Dollfus, Philippe; Hung Nguyen, Viet; Saint-Martin, Jérôme

    2015-04-10

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene and graphene nanostructures have recently attracted significant attention from the physics and engineering communities. In fundamental physics, the analysis of Seebeck and Nernst effects is very useful in elucidating some details of the electronic band structure of graphene that cannot be probed by conductance measurements alone, due in particular to the ambipolar nature of this gapless material. For applications in thermoelectric energy conversion, graphene has two major disadvantages. It is gapless, which leads to a small Seebeck coefficient due to the opposite contributions of electrons and holes, and it is an excellent thermal conductor. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of a two-dimensional (2D) graphene sheet is thus very limited. However, many works have demonstrated recently that appropriate nanostructuring and bandgap engineering of graphene can concomitantly strongly reduce the lattice thermal conductance and enhance the Seebeck coefficient without dramatically degrading the electronic conductance. Hence, in various graphene nanostructures, ZT has been predicted to be high enough to make them attractive for energy conversion. In this article, we review the main results obtained experimentally and theoretically on the thermoelectric properties of graphene and its nanostructures, emphasizing the physical effects that govern these properties. Beyond pure graphene structures, we discuss also the thermoelectric properties of some hybrid graphene structures, as graphane, layered carbon allotropes such as graphynes and graphdiynes, and graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures which offer new opportunities. Finally, we briefly review the recent activities on other atomically thin 2D semiconductors with finite bandgap, i.e. dichalcogenides and phosphorene, which have attracted great attention for various kinds of applications, including thermoelectrics.

  16. Insulating oxide surfaces and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goniakowski, Jacek; Noguera, Claudine

    2016-03-01

    This contribution describes some peculiarities of the science of oxide surfaces and nanostructures and proposes a simple conceptual scheme to understand their electronic structure, in the spirit of Jacques Friedel's work. Major results on the effects of non-stoichiometry and polarity are presented, for both semi-infinite surfaces and ultra-thin films, and promising lines of research for the near future are sketched. xml:lang="fr"

  17. Nanostructural engineering of organic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Frocle, J.

    1995-03-01

    Aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (400-1100 M{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. This paper examines the correlation between nanostructure and thermal conductivity in a series of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels prepared under different synthetic conditions.

  18. Application of smart nanostructures in medicine.

    PubMed

    He, Jingjing; Qi, Xiaoxue; Miao, Yuqing; Wu, Hai-Long; He, Nongyue; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Smart nanostructures are sensitive to various environmental or biological parameters. They offer great potential for numerous biomedical applications such as monitoring, diagnoses, repair and treatment of human biological systems. The present work introduces smart nanostructures for biomedical applications. In addition to drug delivery, which has been extensively reported and reviewed, increasing interest has been observed in using smart nanostructures to develop various novel techniques of sensing, imaging, tissue engineering, biofabrication, nanodevices and nanorobots for the improvement of healthcare.

  19. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  20. Optical properties of chiral nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, Noguez; Román-Velázquez, Carlos E.; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2004-03-01

    We present a computational model to study the optical properties chiral nanostructures[1] . In this work the nanostructures of interest are composed by N atoms, where each one is represented by a polarizable point dipole located at theposition of the atom. We assume that the dipole located is characterized by a polarizability. The nanostructure is excited by a circularly polarized incident wave, such that, each dipole is subject to a total electric field due to: (i) the incident radiation field, plus (ii) the radiation field resulting from all of the other induced dipoles. Once we solve the complex-linear equations, the dipole moment on each atom in the cluster can be determined and we can find the extinction cross section of the whole nanoparticle. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of chiral bare and thiol-passivated gold nanoclusters have been calculated within the dipole approximation. The calculated CD spectra show features that allow us to distinguish between clusters with different indexes of chirality. The main factor responsible of the differences in the CD lineshapes is the distribution of interatomic distances that characterize the chiral cluster geometry. These results provide theoretical support for the quantification of chirality and its measurement, using the CD lineshapes of chiral metal nanoclusters. [1] C. E. Roman-Velazquez, et al., J. of Phys. Chem. B (Letter) 107, 12035 (2003) This work has been partly supported by DGAPA-UNAM grants No. IN104201 and IN104402, and by CONACyT grant 36651-E.

  1. Physical electrochemistry of nanostructured devices.

    PubMed

    Bisquert, Juan

    2008-01-01

    This Perspective reviews recent developments in experimental techniques and conceptual methods applied to the electrochemical properties of metal-oxide semiconductor nanostructures and organic conductors, such as those used in dye-sensitized solar cells, high-energy batteries, sensors, and electrochromic devices. The aim is to provide a broad view of the interpretation of electrochemical and optoelectrical measurements for semiconductor nanostructures (sintered colloidal particles, nanorods, arrays of quantum dots, etc.) deposited or grown on a conducting substrate. The Fermi level displacement by potentiostatic control causes a broad change of physical properties such as the hopping conductivity, that can be investigated over a very large variation of electron density. In contrast to traditional electrochemistry, we emphasize that in nanostructured devices we must deal with systems that depart heavily from the ideal, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, due to broad distributions of states (energy disorder) and interactions of charge carriers, therefore the electrochemical analysis must be aided by thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. We discuss in detail the most characteristic densities of states, the chemical capacitance, and the transport properties, specially the chemical diffusion coefficient, mobility, and generalized Einstein relation.

  2. Chitosan in nanostructured thin films.

    PubMed

    Pavinatto, Felippe J; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2010-08-01

    This review paper brings an overview of the use of chitosans in nanostructured films produced with the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) or the electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) techniques, with emphasis on their possible applications. From a survey in the literature one may identify three main types of study with chitosan in nanostructured films. First, the interaction between chitosans and phospholipid Langmuir monolayers has been investigated for probing the mechanisms of chitosan action in their biological applications, with the monolayers serving as cell membrane models. In the second type, chitosan serves as a matrix for immobilization of biomolecules in LB as well as in LbL films, for which chitosan is suitable to help preserve the bioactivity of such biomolecules for long periods of time even in dry, solid films. An important application of these chitosan-containing films is in sensing and biosensing. The third type of study involves exploiting the mechanical and biocompatibility properties of chitosan in producing films with enhanced properties, for example, for tissue engineering. It is emphasized that chitosans have been proven excellent building blocks to produce films with controlled molecular architecture, allowing for synergy between distinct materials. We also discuss the prospects of the field, following a critical review of the latest developments in nanostructured chitosan films. PMID:20590156

  3. Synthesis of Silver Nanostructures by Multistep Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Song, Yuan-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Wu, Jing-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The shape of plasmonic nanostructures such as silver and gold is vital to their physical and chemical properties and potential applications. Recently, preparation of complex nanostructures with rich function by chemical multistep methods is the hotspot of research. In this review we introduce three typical multistep methods to prepare silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes, including the double reductant method, etching technique and construction of core-shell nanostructures. The growth mechanism of double the reductant method is that different favorable facets of silver nanocrystals are produced in different reductants, which can be used to prepare complex nanostructures such as nanoflags with ultranarrow resonant band bandwidth or some silver nanostructures which are difficult to prepare using other methods. The etching technique can selectively remove nanoparticles to achieve the aim of shape control and is widely used for the synthesis of nanoflowers and hollow nanostructures. Construction of core-shell nanostructures is another tool to control shape and size. The three methods can not only prepare various silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes, which exhibit unique optical properties, such as strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect, but also have potential application in many areas. PMID:24670722

  4. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of DNA Nanostructure Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nangreave, Jeanette

    2011-12-01

    The unique structural features of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that are of considerable biological interest also make it a valuable engineering material. Perhaps the most useful property of DNA for molecular engineering is its ability to self-assemble into predictable, double helical secondary structures. These interactions are exploited to design a variety of DNA nanostructures, which can be organized into both discrete and periodic structures. This dissertation focuses on studying the dynamic behavior of DNA nanostructure recognition processes. The thermodynamics and kinetics of nanostructure binding are evaluated, with the intention of improving our ability to understand and control their assembly. Presented here are a series of studies toward this goal. First, multi-helical DNA nanostructures were used to investigate how the valency and arrangement of the connections between DNA nanostructures affect super-structure formation. The study revealed that both the number and the relative position of connections play a significant role in the stability of the final assembly. Next, several DNA nanostructures were designed to gain insight into how small changes to the nanostructure scaffolds, intended to vary their conformational flexibility, would affect their association equilibrium. This approach yielded quantitative information about the roles of enthalpy and entropy in the affinity of polyvalent DNA nanostructure interactions, which exhibit an intriguing compensating effect. Finally, a multi-helical DNA nanostructure was used as a model 'chip' for the detection of a single stranded DNA target. The results revealed that the rate constant of hybridization is strongly dominated by a rate-limiting nucleation step.

  5. Processing Nanostructured Sensors Using Microfabrication Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Evans, Laura J.; Xu, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Standard microfabrication techniques can be implemented and scaled to help assemble nanoscale microsensors. Currently nanostructures are often deposited onto materials primarily by adding them to a solution, then applying the solution in a thin film. This results in random placement of the nanostructures with no controlled order, and no way to accurately reproduce the placement. This method changes the means by which microsensors with nanostructures are fabricated. The fundamental advantage to this approach is that it enables standard microfabrication techniques to be applied in the repeated manufacture of nanostructured sensors on a microplatform.

  6. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  7. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  8. Precise replication of antireflective nanostructures from biotemplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Guoming; Xie, Guoyong

    2007-03-01

    The authors report herein a new type of nanonipple structures on the cicada's eye and the direct structural replication of the complex micro- and nanostructures for potential functional emulation. A two-step direct molding process is developed to replicate these natural micro- and nanostructures using epoxy resin with high fidelity, which demonstrates a general way of fabricating functional nanostructures by direct replication of natural biotemplates via a suitable physicochemical process. Measurements of spectral reflectance showed that this kind of replicated nanostructure has remarkable antireflective property, suggestive of its potential applications to optical devices.

  9. Nanostructures created by interfered femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chang, Yun-Ching; Yao, Jimmy; Luo, Claire; Yin, Shizhuo; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The method by applying the interfered femtosecond laser to create nanostructured copper (Cu) surface has been studied. The nanostructure created by direct laser irradiation is also realized for comparison. Results show that more uniform and finer nanostructures with sphere shape and feature size around 100 nm can be induced by the interfered laser illumination comparing with the direct laser illumination. This offers an alternative fabrication approach that the feature size and the shape of the laser induced metallic nanostructures can be highly controlled, which can extremely improve its performance in related application such as the colorized metal, catalyst, SERS substrate, and etc.

  10. Growth and characterizations of organized nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji Hoon

    The research investigations and progresses in nanotechnology and the efforts to fabricate novel nanostructures are expected to provide new perspectives into the understanding of underlying science and the formation mechanisms of nanostructures and thus providing the potential for the next-generation device applications. The potential impact of the nano-devices to our society could be extremely enormous and thus the fabrication, engineering and designing of new configuration of nanostructures have attracted a tremendous attention from a number of research fields. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction to the growth & characterization of organized nanostructures is given. Chapter 2 discusses about the growth and fabrication effort of localized quantum structures by using Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth model on shallow patterns (35nm), namely quantum dots, quantum dot chain, quantum wires and the related research. Chapter 3 introduces the growth and characterization of novel nanostructures using Volmer-Weber (V-W) growth model. More specifically, the formation of metal droplets, the fabrication of ring-shaped nanostructures and various configurations of nanostructures using droplet epitaxy are presented. Chapter 4 explains the formation mechanisms and the optical properties of quantum dot molecules (QDMs), a hybrid nanostructure composed of a pair of a metal particle, a semiconductor quantum ring (QR), and various advanced nanostructures. Chapter 5 concludes the dissertation with some concluding remarks.

  11. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  12. A Calorimetric Study of Almandine: Are the Thermodynamic Properties of the End-Member Aluminosilicate Garnets Finally Known Quantitatively?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachs, E.; Geiger, C. A.; Benisek, A.

    2012-12-01

    The aluminosilicate garnets (E3Al2Si3O12 with E = Fe2+, Mn2+, Ca, Mg) form an important rock-forming mineral group. Much study has been directed toward determining their thermodynamic properties. The iron end-member almandine (Fe3Al2Si3O12) is a key phase in many petrologic investigations. As part of an ongoing calorimetric and thermodynamic study of the aluminosilicate garnets, the heat capacity of three synthetic well-characterized polycrystalline almandine garnets and one natural almandine-rich single crystal was measured. The various garnets were characterized by optical microscopy, electron-microprobe analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Heat capacity measurements were performed in the temperature range 3 to 300 K using relaxation calorimetry and between 282 and 764 K using DSC methods. From the former, So values between 336.7 ± 0.8 and 337.8 ± 0.8 J/molK are calculated for the different samples. The smaller value is considered the best So for end-member stoichiometric almandine, because it derives from the "best" Fe3+-free synthetic sample. The Cp behavior for almandine at T > 298 K is given by the polynomial (in J/molK): Cp = 649.06(±4) - 3837.57(±122)T-0.5 - 1.44682(±0.06)107T-2 + 1.94834(±0.09)109T-3, which is calculated using DSC data together with one published heat-content datum determined by transposed-drop calorimetry along with a new determination that gives H1181K - H302K = 415.0 ± 3.2 kJ/mole. Almandine shows a λ-type heat-capacity anomaly at low temperatures resulting from a paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic phase transition at about 9 K. The lattice heat capacity was calculated using the single-parameter phonon dispersion model of Komada and Westrum (1997), which allows the non-lattice heat capacity (Cex) behavior to be modelled. An analysis shows the presence of an electronic heat-capacity contribution (Cel - Schottky anomaly) around 17 K that is superimposed on a larger magnetic heat-capacity effect (Cmag

  13. Detecting Nanophase Weathering Products with CheMin: Reference Intensity Ratios of Allophane, Aluminosilicate Gel, and Ferrihydrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Morris, R. V.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D W.; Blake, D. F.; Anderson, R. C.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, A.; DesMarais, D. J.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Morookian, J. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Sarrazin, P.; Spanovich, N.; Stolper, E. M.; Treiman, A. H.; Vaniman, D. T.; Yen, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) data collected of the Rocknest samples by the CheMin instrument on Mars Science Laboratory suggest the presence of poorly crystalline or amorphous materials [1], such as nanophase weathering products or volcanic and impact glasses. The identification of the type(s) of X-ray amorphous material at Rocknest is important because it can elucidate past aqueous weathering processes. The presence of volcanic and impact glasses would indicate that little chemical weathering has occurred because glass is highly susceptible to aqueous alteration. The presence of nanophase weathering products, such as allophane, nanophase iron-oxides, and/or palagonite, would indicate incipient chemical weathering. Furthermore, the types of weathering products present could help constrain pH conditions and identify which primary phases altered to form the weathering products. Quantitative analysis of phases from CheMin data is achieved through Reference Intensity Ratios (RIRs) and Rietveld refinement. The RIR of a mineral (or mineraloid) that relates the scattering power of that mineral (typically the most intense diffraction line) to the scattering power of a separate mineral standard such as corundum [2]. RIRs can be calculated from XRD patterns measured in the laboratory by mixing a mineral with a standard in known abundances and comparing diffraction line intensities of the mineral to the standard. X-ray amorphous phases (e.g., nanophase weathering products) have broad scattering signatures rather than sharp diffraction lines. Thus, RIRs of X-ray amorphous materials are calculated by comparing the area under one of these broad scattering signals with the area under a diffraction line in the standard. Here, we measured XRD patterns of nanophase weathering products (allophane, aluminosilicate gel, and ferrihydrite) mixed with a mineral standard (beryl) in the CheMinIV laboratory instrument and calculated their RIRs to help constrain the abundances of these phases in

  14. Evidence of energy transfer in an aluminosilicate glass codoped with Si nanoaggregates and Er{sup 3+} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Enrichi, F.; Mattei, G.; Sada, C.; Trave, E.; Pacifici, D.; Franzo, G.; Priolo, F.; Iacona, F.; Prassas, M.; Falconieri, M.; Borsella, E.

    2004-10-01

    The enhancement of the Er{sup 3+} ions' photoluminescence (PL) emission at 1.54 {mu}m in a Si and Er coimplanted aluminosilicate glass is investigated in detail. A postimplantation thermal treatment has been performed to recover the damage induced by the implantation process and to promote Si aggregation. It will be shown that 1 h treatment in N{sub 2} atmosphere is not sufficient to induce Si precipitation for temperatures up to 500 deg. C. Nevertheless, the most intense Er{sup 3+} PL emission at 1.54 {mu}m is achieved after a thermal treatment at 400 deg. C. Such emission has been investigated by pumping in and out of resonance, showing a very efficient energy transfer process in the whole excitation wavelength range (360-515 nm). These results suggest that good energy transfer mediators could be small Si aggregates and not only crystalline clusters. For the best performing sample, the effective Er excitation cross section has been measured to be higher than 10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} at 379 and 390 nm and about 2x10{sup -16} cm{sup 2} at 476 nm, that is, several orders of magnitude higher than the Er direct absorption cross section (of the order of 10{sup -21} cm{sup 2} in this glass). Moreover the coefficient of cooperative upconversion has been evaluated to be 2.7x10{sup -18} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The structural and optical properties of this material are discussed and compared to those found for Si and Er codoped silica.

  15. Sodium sulfate corrosion of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maldia, L.C.

    1993-12-01

    Sodium sulfate hot corrosion of a SiC fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Changes in the microstructural chemical composition of the specimens were investigated. The samples provided by Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Warminster, PA were grouped as follows: (1) as-received, (2) Na2SO4 salt-coated and heat-treated in oxygen, (3) noncoated and heat-treated in oxygen, (4) Na2SO4. Salt-coated and heat-treated in argon, and (5) noncoated and heat-treated in argon. Heat treatment was performed by NAWC for 100 hours at 900 deg C. Experimental data obtained indicated that the presence of Na2SO4 in an oxidative environment resulted in rapid corrosion of the matrix and SiC fibers and in the latter rings of SiO2 replaced what had previously been SiC. There was very limited degradation of the fibers and matrix exposed at the surface in the noncoated sample heat-treated in oxygen and in the salt-coated sample heat-treated in argon. A significant reduction in the amount of mullite in the matrices of all heat-treated samples was observed. Mullite dissolved into either the glassy phase or into the Beta-spodumene matrix. Lastly, the presence of distinct magnesium silicate crystalline phases in the salt-coated and heat-treated in oxygen sample implies that the MgO at the surface reacted with the SiO2 in the matrix.

  16. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOEpatents

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  17. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lao, Jing Yu; Banerjee, Debasish

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  18. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  19. Nanostructures, systems, and methods for photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Steven Y.; Jarvi, Thomas D.

    2015-12-08

    The present invention generally relates to nanostructures and compositions comprising nanostructures, methods of making and using the nanostructures, and related systems. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises a first region and a second region, wherein a first photocatalytic reaction (e.g., an oxidation reaction) can be carried out at the first region and a second photocatalytic reaction (e.g., a reduction reaction) can be carried out at the second region. In some cases, the first photocatalytic reaction is the formation of oxygen gas from water and the second photocatalytic reaction is the formation of hydrogen gas from water. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises at least one semiconductor material, and, in some cases, at least one catalytic material and/or at least one photosensitizing agent.

  20. Microwave properties of ferromagnetic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, R; Alvarez, G; Mata-Zamora, M E

    2008-06-01

    A review of the dynamic properties of nanostructured ferromagnetic materials at microwave frequencies (1-40 GHz) is presented. Since some confusion has recently appeared between giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), a detailed analysis is made in order to establish their differences. A brief review of a novel microwave absorption mode, the low-field microwave absorption (LFA) is then presented, together with a discussion about its similarities with GMI. Recent results on high-frequency measurements on nanogranular thin films and FMR in nanowire arrays are finally addressed.

  1. Direct synthesis of Al-SBA-15 containing aluminosilicate species plugs in an acid-free medium and structural adjustment by hydrothermal post-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Na; Lin, Sen; Li, Xiangping; Guo, Peng; Li, Xuebing

    2013-07-01

    A series of Al-SBA-15 with controllable aluminosilicate plug structures inside straight mesopores has been hydrothermally synthesized in a one-step synthesis in an environmentally friendly acid-free medium, using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as a structure-directing agent, water as solvent, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and aluminum nitrate (Al(NO)3·9H2O) as silica and aluminum sources, respectively. The effects of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution and aging temperature on the structural properties of the resulting materials were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption at 77 K, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric (TG), FT-IR spectra and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses. The nature of the Al species and the acidity of the resultant samples were studied by solid state 27Al MAS NMR and pyridine adsorption measurements. The specific surface area (935-755 m2g-1), pore volume (1.03-0.56 cm3g-1) and especially the concentration and distribution of open type mesopores (0-68% to the total pores) of the synthesized Al-SBA-15 can be controlled by a simple adjustment of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution. Moreover, increasing the aging temperature higher than 363 K can remarkably decrease the formation of plug structures to obtain “open” form mesopores. The observation by TEM of alternate defined gray and white areas inside the mesopores gives the strong evidence of isolated microporous aluminosilicate plugs inside the channels. In addition, a moderate hydrothermal post-treatment can finely modify the mesostructures through the partial or complete dissolution of the aluminosilicate plugs.

  2. Direct synthesis of Al-SBA-15 containing aluminosilicate species plugs in an acid-free medium and structural adjustment by hydrothermal post-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Lei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Na; Lin, Sen; Li, Xiangping; Guo, Peng; Li, Xuebing

    2013-07-15

    A series of Al-SBA-15 with controllable aluminosilicate plug structures inside straight mesopores has been hydrothermally synthesized in a one-step synthesis in an environmentally friendly acid-free medium, using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as a structure-directing agent, water as solvent, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and aluminum nitrate (Al(NO){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O) as silica and aluminum sources, respectively. The effects of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution and aging temperature on the structural properties of the resulting materials were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption at 77 K, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric (TG), FT-IR spectra and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses. The nature of the Al species and the acidity of the resultant samples were studied by solid state {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and pyridine adsorption measurements. The specific surface area (935–755 m{sup 2}g{sup −1}), pore volume (1.03–0.56 cm{sup 3}g{sup −1}) and especially the concentration and distribution of open type mesopores (0–68% to the total pores) of the synthesized Al-SBA-15 can be controlled by a simple adjustment of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution. Moreover, increasing the aging temperature higher than 363 K can remarkably decrease the formation of plug structures to obtain “open” form mesopores. The observation by TEM of alternate defined gray and white areas inside the mesopores gives the strong evidence of isolated microporous aluminosilicate plugs inside the channels. In addition, a moderate hydrothermal post-treatment can finely modify the mesostructures through the partial or complete dissolution of the aluminosilicate plugs. - Graphical abstract: The plugs-containing structures can be interpreted as the distribution of individual isolated plugs along the mesoporous channel. - Highlights: • Al-SBA-15 with controllable

  3. Atomic Description of the Interface between Silica and Alumina in Aluminosilicates through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface-Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Valla, Maxence; Rossini, Aaron J; Caillot, Maxime; Chizallet, Céline; Raybaud, Pascal; Digne, Mathieu; Chaumonnot, Alexandra; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Copéret, Christophe

    2015-08-26

    Despite the widespread use of amorphous aluminosilicates (ASA) in various industrial catalysts, the nature of the interface between silica and alumina and the atomic structure of the catalytically active sites are still subject to debate. Here, by the use of dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy (DNP SENS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that on silica and alumina surfaces, molecular aluminum and silicon precursors are, respectively, preferentially grafted on sites that enable the formation of Al(IV) and Si(IV) interfacial sites. We also link the genesis of Brønsted acidity to the surface coverage of aluminum and silicon on silica and alumina, respectively.

  4. Effects of the degree of polymerization on the structure of sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts: An 17O NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Stebbins, Jonathan F.

    2009-02-01

    Revealing the atomic structure and disorder in oxide glasses, including sodium silicates and aluminosilicates, with varying degrees of polymerization, is a challenging problem in high-temperature geochemistry as well as glass science. Here, we report 17O MAS and 3QMAS NMR spectra for binary sodium silicate and ternary sodium aluminosilicate glasses with varying degrees of polymerization (Na 2O/SiO 2 ratio and Na 2O/Al 2O 3 ratio), revealing in detail the extent of disorder (network connectivity and topological disorder) and variations of NMR parameters with the glass composition. In binary sodium silicate glasses [Na 2O- k(SiO 2)], the fraction of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs, Na-O-Si) increases with the Na 2O/SiO 2 ratio ( k), as predicted from the composition. The 17O isotropic chemical shifts ( 17O δiso) for both bridging oxygen (BO) and NBO increase by about 10-15 ppm with the SiO 2 content (for k = 1-3). The quadrupolar coupling products of BOs and NBOs also increase with the SiO 2 content. These trends suggest that both NBOs and BOs strongly interact with Na; therefore, the Na distributions around BOs and NBOs are likely to be relatively homogenous for the glass compositions studied here, placing some qualitative limits on the extent of segregation of alkali channels from silica-enriched regions as suggested by modified random-network models. The peak width (in the isotropic dimension) and thus bond angle and length distributions of Si-O-Si and Na-O-Si increase with the SiO 2 content, indicating an increase in the topological disorder with the degree of polymerization. In the ternary aluminosilicate glasses [Na 2O] x[Al 2O 3] 1-xSiO 2, the NBO fraction decreases while the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Al fractions apparently increase with increasing Al 2O 3 content. The variation of oxygen cluster populations suggests that deviation from "Al avoidance" is more apparent near the charge-balanced join (Na/Al = 1). The Si-O-Si fraction, which is closely related to the activity

  5. Disorder and the extent of polymerization in calcium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses: O-17 NMR results and quantum chemical molecular orbital calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Stebbins, Jonathan F.

    2006-08-01

    Estimation of the framework connectivity and the atomic structure of depolymerized silicate melts and glasses (NBO/T > 0) remains a difficult question in high-temperature geochemistry relevant to magmatic processes and glass science. Here, we explore the extent of disorder and the nature of polymerization in binary Ca-silicate and ternary Ca-aluminosilicate glasses with varying NBO/T (from 0 to 2.67) using O-17 NMR at two different magnetic fields of 9.4 and 14.1 T in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. Non-random distributions among framework cations (Si and Al) are demonstrated in the variation of relative populations of oxygen sites with NBO/T. The proportion of non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Ca-O-Si) in the binary and ternary aluminosilicate glasses increases with NBO/T. While the trend is consistent with predictions from composition, the detailed fractions apparently deviate from the predicted values, suggesting further complications in the nature of polymerization. The proportion of each bridging oxygen in the glasses also varies with NBO/T. The fractions of Al-O-Si and Al-O-Al increase with increasing polymerization as CaO is replaced with Al 2O 3, while that of Si-O-Si seems to decrease, implying that activity of silica may decrease from calcium silicate to polymerized aluminosilicates (X=constant). Quantum chemical molecular orbital calculations based on density functional theory show that a silicate chain with Al-NBO (Ca-O-Al) has an energy penalty (calculated cluster energy difference) of about 108 kJ/mol compared with the cluster with Ca-O-Si, consistent with preferential depolymerization of Si-networks, reported in an earlier O-17 NMR study [Allwardt, J., Lee, S.K., Stebbins, J.F., 2003. Bonding preferences of non-bridging oxygens in calcium aluminosilicate glass: Evidence from O-17 MAS and 3QMAS NMR on calcium aluminate glass. Am. Mineral.88, 949-954]. These prominent types of non-randomness in the distributions suggest significant chemical

  6. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  7. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N.; Slepička, P.; Bačáková, L.; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2013-07-01

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell's adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  8. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Frank Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  9. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  10. EDITORIAL: Nanostructures + Light = 'New Optics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2005-02-01

    Suddenly, at the end of the last century, classical optics and classical electrodynamics became fashionable again. Fields that several generations of researchers thought were comprehensively covered by the famous Born and Wolf textbook and were essentially dead as research subjects were generating new excitement. In accordance with Richard Feynman’s famous quotation on nano-science, the optical community suddenly discovered that 'there is plenty of room at the bottom'—mixing light with small, meso- and nano-structures could generate new physics and new mind-blowing applications. This renaissance began when the concept of band structure was imported from electronics into the domain of optics and led to the development of what is now a massive research field dedicated to two- and three-dimensional photonic bandgap structures. The field was soon awash with bright new ideas and discoveries that consolidated the birth of the 'new optics'. A revision of some of the basic equations of electrodynamics led to the suspicion that we had overlooked the possibility that the triad of wave vector, electric field and magnetic field, characterizing propagating waves, do not necessarily form a right-handed set. This brought up the astonishing possibilities of sub-wavelength microscopy and telescopy where resolution is not limited by diffraction. The notion of meta-materials, i.e. artificial materials with properties not available in nature, originated in the microwave community but has been widely adopted in the domain of optical research, thanks to rapidly improving nanofabrication capabilities and the development of sub-wavelength scanning imaging techniques. Photonic meta-materials are expected to open a gateway to unprecedented electromagnetic properties and functionality unattainable from naturally occurring materials. The structural units of meta-materials can be tailored in shape and size; their composition and morphology can be artificially tuned, and inclusions can be

  11. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  12. Crystallization of LiAlSiO4 Glass in Hydrothermal Environments at Gigapascal Pressures-Dense Hydrous Aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Spektor, Kristina; Fischer, Andreas; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2016-08-15

    High-pressure hydrothermal environments can drastically reduce the kinetic constraints of phase transitions and afford high-pressure modifications of oxides at comparatively low temperatures. Under certain circumstances such environments allow access to kinetically favored phases, including hydrous ones with water incorporated as hydroxyl. We studied the crystallization of glass in the presence of a large excess of water in the pressure range of 0.25-10 GPa and at temperatures from 200 to 600 °C. The p and T quenched samples were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and IR spectroscopy. At pressures of 0.25-2 GPa metastable zeolite Li-ABW and stable α-eucryptite are obtained at low and high temperatures, respectively, with crystal structures based on tetrahedrally coordinated Al and Si atoms. At 5 GPa a new, hydrous phase of LiAlSiO4, LiAlSiO3(OH)2 = LiAlSiO4·H2O, is produced. Its crystal structure was characterized from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (space group P21/c, a = 9.547(3) Å, b = 14.461(5) Å, c = 5.062(2) Å, β = 104.36(1)°). The monoclinic structure resembles that of α-spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) and constitutes alternating layers of chains of corner-condensed SiO4 tetrahedra and chains of edge-sharing AlO6 octahedra. OH groups are part of the octahedral Al coordination and extend into channels provided within the SiO4 tetrahedron chain layers. At 10 GPa another hydrous phase of LiAlSiO4 with presently unknown structure is produced. The formation of hydrous forms of LiAlSiO4 shows the potential of hydrothermal environments at gigapascal pressures for creating truly new materials. In this particular case it indicates the possibility of generally accessing pyroxene-type aluminosilicates with crystallographic amounts of hydroxyl incorporated. This could also have implications to geosciences by representing a mechanism of water storage and transport in the depths of the Earth. PMID:27482770

  13. Spectroscopic properties of Er{sup 3+}- and Yb{sup 3+}-doped soda-lime silicate and aluminosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, M.P.; Cockroft, N.J.; Gosnell, T.R.; Bruce, A.J.

    1997-10-01

    A spectroscopic investigation of an extensive series of Er{sup 3+}-doped and Er{sup 3+},Yb{sup 3+}-codoped soda-lime-silicate (SL) and aluminosilicate (AS) glasses is presented. Compared to SL glasses, 4f transitions in AS glasses show higher oscillator strengths, larger inhomogeneous broadening, and smaller crystal-field splittings of the respective excited-state multiplets. The Er{sup 3+} excited-state relaxation dynamics is adequately described by a combination of the Judd-Ofelt model and the energy-gap law. With the exception of {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, multiphonon relaxation is dominant for all excited states, making it possible to efficiently pump the 1.55 {mu}m {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}{r_arrow}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} emission by excitation of {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} at around 980 nm. The absolute {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} luminescence quantum yield, for low 980-nm excitation density ({approximately}5W/cm{sup 2}), {eta}, is {approximately}0.9 at 0.4 mol{percent} Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and drops to about 0.65 upon increasing Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} to 1.2 mol{percent}, indicating the onset of energy-transfer processes. Samples with high OH{sup {minus}} impurity concentration suffer from significantly higher quenching of {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} luminescence at higher Er{sup 3+} concentrations. Energy migration to the minority of Er{sup 3+} ions coordinated to OH{sup {minus}}, followed by efficient multiphonon relaxation accounts for this effect. At low excitation densities, the strong near-infrared absorption of Yb{sup 3+} in combination with efficient Yb{r_arrow}Er energy transfer increases the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} population density in Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+}-codoped samples by up to 2 orders of magnitude compared to equivalent samples without Yb{sup 3+}. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. Crystallization of LiAlSiO4 Glass in Hydrothermal Environments at Gigapascal Pressures-Dense Hydrous Aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Spektor, Kristina; Fischer, Andreas; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2016-08-15

    High-pressure hydrothermal environments can drastically reduce the kinetic constraints of phase transitions and afford high-pressure modifications of oxides at comparatively low temperatures. Under certain circumstances such environments allow access to kinetically favored phases, including hydrous ones with water incorporated as hydroxyl. We studied the crystallization of glass in the presence of a large excess of water in the pressure range of 0.25-10 GPa and at temperatures from 200 to 600 °C. The p and T quenched samples were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and IR spectroscopy. At pressures of 0.25-2 GPa metastable zeolite Li-ABW and stable α-eucryptite are obtained at low and high temperatures, respectively, with crystal structures based on tetrahedrally coordinated Al and Si atoms. At 5 GPa a new, hydrous phase of LiAlSiO4, LiAlSiO3(OH)2 = LiAlSiO4·H2O, is produced. Its crystal structure was characterized from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (space group P21/c, a = 9.547(3) Å, b = 14.461(5) Å, c = 5.062(2) Å, β = 104.36(1)°). The monoclinic structure resembles that of α-spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) and constitutes alternating layers of chains of corner-condensed SiO4 tetrahedra and chains of edge-sharing AlO6 octahedra. OH groups are part of the octahedral Al coordination and extend into channels provided within the SiO4 tetrahedron chain layers. At 10 GPa another hydrous phase of LiAlSiO4 with presently unknown structure is produced. The formation of hydrous forms of LiAlSiO4 shows the potential of hydrothermal environments at gigapascal pressures for creating truly new materials. In this particular case it indicates the possibility of generally accessing pyroxene-type aluminosilicates with crystallographic amounts of hydroxyl incorporated. This could also have implications to geosciences by representing a mechanism of water storage and transport in the depths of the Earth.

  15. Elasticity of Hydrous Aluminosilicate Mineral, Topaz-OH (Al2SiO4(OH)2) at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, A.; Mookherjee, M.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2015-12-01

    We examined the equation of state and high-pressure elasticity of the hydrous aluminosilicate mineral topaz-OH (Al2SiO4(OH)2) using first principles simulation. Topaz-OH is a hydrous phase in the Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (ASH) ternary system, which is relevant for the mineral phase relations in the hydrated sedimentary layer of subducting slabs. Based on recent experiments, it is known that the protons in the topaz-OH exhibit positional disorder with half occupancy over two distinct crystallographic sites. In order to adequately depict the proton environment in the topaz-OH, we examined five crystal structure models with distinct configuration for the protons. Upon full geometry optimization, we find that there are two distinct crystal structures for the topaz-OH. The first crystal structure has an orthorhombic Pbnm space group symmetry, and the second crystal structure has a monoclinic P21/c space group symmetry. At static conditions, the monoclinic (P21/c) topaz-OH has lower energy compared to the orthorhombic (Pbnm) topaz-OH. The energy of the monoclinic (P21/c) topaz-OH remains stable at least up to 40 GPa, i.e., pressures beyond the thermodynamic stability of the topaz-OH. Based on the results from first principles simulation, the equation of state for the monoclinic topaz-OH is well represented by a third-order Birch-Murnaghan formulation, with V0 = 348.63 (±0.04) Å3, K0 = 164.7 (±0.04) GPa, and K'0 = 4.24 (±0.05). The equation of state for the orthorhombic topaz-OH is well represented by a third-order Birch-Murnaghan formulation, with V0 = 352.47 (±0.04) Å3, K0 = 166.4 (±0.06) GPa, and K'0 = 4.03 (±0.04). While the bulk modulus is very similar for both the monoclinic and orthorhombic topaz-OH, the shear elastic moduli are very sensitive to the position of the proton and the orientation of the hydroxyl (O-H) groups. In the hydrated sedimentary layer of a subducting slab, transformation of a mineral assemblage consisting of coesite (SiO2) and diaspore (AlOOH) to

  16. Energetics of hydrogen storage in organolithium nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Namilae, Sirish; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Nicholson, Don M

    2007-01-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on the second order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) were used to investigate the interaction of molecular hydrogen with alkyl lithium organometallic compounds. It is found that lithium in organolithium structures attracts two hydrogen molecules with a binding energy of about 0.14 eV. The calculations also show that organolithium compounds bind strongly with graphitic nanostructures. Therefore, these carbon based nanostructures functionalized with organolithium compounds can be effectively used for storage of molecular hydrogen. Energetics and mechanisms for achieving high weight percent hydrogen storage in organolithium based nanostructures are discussed.

  17. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  18. Optimized plasmonic nanostructures for improved sensing activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Guillot, Nicolas; Rouxel, Jérémy; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc; Toury, Timothée

    2012-09-10

    The paper outlines the optimization of plasmonic nanostructures in order to improve their sensing properties such as their sensitivity and their ease of manipulation. The key point in this study is the optimization of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties essential to the sensor characteristics, and more especially for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Two aspects were considered in order to optimize the sensing performance: apolar plasmonic nanostructures for non polarization dependent detection and improvements of SERS sensitivity by using a molecular adhesion layer between gold nanostructures and glass. Both issues could be generalized to all plasmon-resonance-based sensing applications.

  19. Nanostructured transparent conducting oxide electrochromic device

    DOEpatents

    Milliron, Delia; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-05-17

    The embodiments described herein provide an electrochromic device. In an exemplary embodiment, the electrochromic device includes (1) a substrate and (2) a film supported by the substrate, where the film includes transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes (a) an electrolyte, where the nanostructures are embedded in the electrolyte, resulting in an electrolyte, nanostructure mixture positioned above the substrate and (b) a counter electrode positioned above the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a conductive coating deposited on the substrate between the substrate and the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a second substrate positioned above the mixture.

  20. Designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2014-06-01

    Fractal structures in nature offer a unique "fractal contact mode" that guarantees the efficient working of an organism with an optimized style. Fractal nanostructured biointerfaces have shown great potential for the ultrasensitive detection of disease-relevant biomarkers from small biomolecules on the nanoscale to cancer cells on the microscale. This review will present the advantages of fractal nanostructures, the basic concept of designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces, and their biomedical applications for the ultrasensitive detection of various disease-relevant biomarkers, such microRNA, cancer antigen 125, and breast cancer cells, from unpurified cell lysates and the blood of patients.

  1. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.; Seals, Roland D.; Morrell, Jonathan S.

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  2. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-na; Watson, Devon; Thames, Kyle; Primus, Carolyn M.; Bergeron, Brian E.; Jiao, Kai; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Cutler, Christopher W.; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2015-01-01

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA) after different aging periods. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using assays that examined plasma membrane integrity, leakage of cytosolic enzyme, caspase-3 activity for early apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity and intracellular DNA content. Results of the six assays indicated that both Quick-Set2 and WMTA were initially cytotoxic to hDPSCs after setting for 24 h, with Quick-Set2 being comparatively less cytotoxic than WMTA at this stage. After two aging cycles, the cytotoxicity profiles of the two hydraulic cements were not significantly different and were much less cytotoxic than the positive control (zinc oxide–eugenol cement). Based on these results, it is envisaged that any potential beneficial effect of the discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on osteogenesis by differentiated hDPSCs is more likely to be revealed after outward diffusion and removal of its cytotoxic components. PMID:26617338

  3. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-na; Watson, Devon; Thames, Kyle; Primus, Carolyn M; Bergeron, Brian E; Jiao, Kai; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A; Cutler, Christopher W; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2015-11-30

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA) after different aging periods. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using assays that examined plasma membrane integrity, leakage of cytosolic enzyme, caspase-3 activity for early apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity and intracellular DNA content. Results of the six assays indicated that both Quick-Set2 and WMTA were initially cytotoxic to hDPSCs after setting for 24 h, with Quick-Set2 being comparatively less cytotoxic than WMTA at this stage. After two aging cycles, the cytotoxicity profiles of the two hydraulic cements were not significantly different and were much less cytotoxic than the positive control (zinc oxide-eugenol cement). Based on these results, it is envisaged that any potential beneficial effect of the discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on osteogenesis by differentiated hDPSCs is more likely to be revealed after outward diffusion and removal of its cytotoxic components.

  4. Wetting of single crystal mullite by borosilicate and yttrium-aluminosilicate glasses and wetting phenomena of steels containing aluminum and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Benjamin Todd

    This dissertation consists of two major sections. The first section concerns the wetting of single crystal mullite by borosilicate and yttrium-aluminosilicate glasses. The borosilicate glass showed poor wetting and interacted only moderately with the substrate. The yttrium-aluminosilicate glass interacted strongly with mullite and showed very good wetting. Balanced chemical equations between each glass and mullite were derived from EDS data. Wetting was found to be dependent on the crystallographic orientation of the substrate, in agreement with previous studies of the surface energy of mullite. The second section concerns the wetting phenomena of steels containing aluminum and titanium. A modified sessile drop technique was used to investigate the wetting of steels containing aluminum and/or titanium as a function of furnace atmosphere. It was found that the steel chemistry and furnace atmosphere had little effect on wetting except in the case of a particular ultra-low carbon steel containing both aluminum and titanium. This steel was found to show significantly lower contact angles than any other steel tested when it was in an atmosphere of pure hydrogen. As nitrogen was added to the atmosphere, the contact angle increased monotonically and irreversibly. The interaction between aluminum, titanium, and nitrogen is explained in terms of first-order interaction coefficients available in thermodynamic literature.

  5. Evaluation of Surface Enthalpy of Porous Aluminosilicates of the MCM-41 Type Using Immersional Calorimetry: Effect of the Pore Size and Framework Si:Al Ratio.

    PubMed

    Meziani; Zajac; Douillard; Jones; Partyka; Rozière

    2001-01-15

    Surface properties of porous aluminosilicates of the MCM-41 type have been tested by immersional calorimetry. Two series of materials, referred to as SiAlxCn, where x is the Si : Al mole ratio and n the chain length of the surfactant template, having (1) x=32 and n=8, 12, 14, 16, 18 and (2) n=14 and x=8, 32, infinity, were used. The results of thermogravimetric analysis on these samples served to evaluate the surface density of hydroxyl groups. This parameter is rather sensitive to the pore size than to the aluminium content in the solid matrix. Based on the experimentally measured enthalpies of immersion in n-heptane, water, and formamide per unit BET specific surface area, estimates could be made of the apolar, Lewis acid, and Lewis base contributions to the total surface enthalpy of MCM-41 materials. The samples studied have a predominant surface acidic character, which is markedly enhanced by incorporating aluminium into the silica matrix. Surface acidity is also modified by changes in the porous structure, although the trends are less noticeable here. Nevertheless, the total surface enthalpy of MCM-41 aluminosilicates appears to be small in comparison with typical inorganic oxides, such as silica or alumina. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF POROUS NANOSTRUCTURED METALS AND NANOSTRUCTURED MEMBRANES FOR CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Ferreira, J L; Hayes, J P

    2003-09-10

    The sputter deposition process can be used to create nanostructured materials that possess continuous open porosity. Characterization of sputter deposited metals and metal-oxide coatings are presented.

  7. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies.

  8. Ferroelectric memory based on nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the past decades, ferroelectric materials have attracted wide attention due to their applications in nonvolatile memory devices (NVMDs) rendered by the electrically switchable spontaneous polarizations. Furthermore, the combination of ferroelectric and nanomaterials opens a new route to fabricating a nanoscale memory device with ultrahigh memory integration, which greatly eases the ever increasing scaling and economic challenges encountered in the traditional semiconductor industry. In this review, we summarize the recent development of the nonvolatile ferroelectric field effect transistor (FeFET) memory devices based on nanostructures. The operating principles of FeFET are introduced first, followed by the discussion of the real FeFET memory nanodevices based on oxide nanowires, nanoparticles, semiconductor nanotetrapods, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Finally, we present the opportunities and challenges in nanomemory devices and our views on the future prospects of NVMDs. PMID:22655750

  9. Quantum rotor in nanostructured superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Hsin; Milošević, M. V.; Covaci, L.; Jankó, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its apparent simplicity, the idealized model of a particle constrained to move on a circle has intriguing dynamic properties and immediate experimental relevance. While a rotor is rather easy to set up classically, the quantum regime is harder to realize and investigate. Here we demonstrate that the quantum dynamics of quasiparticles in certain classes of nanostructured superconductors can be mapped onto a quantum rotor. Furthermore, we provide a straightforward experimental procedure to convert this nanoscale superconducting rotor into a regular or inverted quantum pendulum with tunable gravitational field, inertia, and drive. We detail how these novel states can be detected via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The proposed experiments will provide insights into quantum dynamics and quantum chaos. PMID:24686241

  10. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5–10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies. PMID:27577091

  11. Cluster assembly of hierarchical nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    In the past few years, atom clusters with diameters in the range of 2--20 nm of a variety of materials, including both metals and ceramics, have been synthesized by evaporation and condensation in high-purity gases and subsequently consolidated in situ under ultrahigh vacuum conditions to create nanophase materials. These new utlrafine-grained materials have properties that are often significantly different and considerably improved relative to those of their coarser-grained counterparts owing to both their small grain-size scale and the large percentage of their atoms in grain boundary environments. Since their properties can be engineered during the synthesis and processing steps, cluster-assembled materials appear to have significant potential for the introduction of a hierarchy of both structure and properties. Some of the recent research on nanophase materials related to properties and scale are reviewed and some of the possibilities for synthesizing hierarchical nanostructures via cluster assembly are considered.

  12. Nanostructured Materials for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Castro, Stephanie; Fahey, S.; Gennett, T.; Tin, P.

    2003-01-01

    The use of both inorganic and organic nanostructured materials in producing high efficiency photovoltaics is discussed in this paper. Recent theoretical results indicate that dramatic improvements in device efficiency may be attainable through the use of semiconductor quantum dots in an ordinary p-i-n solar cell. In addition, it has also recently been demonstrated that quantum dots can also be used to improve conversion efficiencies in polymeric thin film solar cells. A similar improvement in these types of cells has also been observed by employing single wall carbon nanotubes. This relatively new carbon allotrope may assist both in the disassociation of excitons as well as carrier transport through the composite material. This paper reviews the efforts that are currently underway to produce and characterize these nanoscale materials and to exploit their unique properties.

  13. Reconfigurable optical assembly of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Arrangements of nanostructures in well-defined patterns are the basis of photonic crystals, metamaterials and holograms. Furthermore, rewritable optical materials can be achieved by dynamically manipulating nanoassemblies. Here we demonstrate a mechanism to configure plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) in polymer media using nanosecond laser pulses. The mechanism relies on optical forces produced by the interference of laser beams, which allow NPs to migrate to lower-energy configurations. The resulting NP arrangements are stable without any external energy source, but erasable and rewritable by additional recording pulses. We demonstrate reconfigurable optical elements including multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, volumetric photonic crystals and lenses, as well as dynamic holograms of three-dimensional virtual objects. We aim to expand the applications of optical forces, which have been mostly restricted to optical tweezers. Holographic assemblies of nanoparticles will allow a new generation of programmable composites for tunable metamaterials, data storage devices, sensors and displays.

  14. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and

  15. Jumplike microdeformation of nanostructured metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschanskaya, N. N.; Smirnov, B. I.; Shpeĭzman, V. V.

    2008-05-01

    The parameters of microdeformation jumps for copper, aluminum, titanium, and Armco iron with the initial (annealed) structure and after equal-channel angular pressing are investigated in a creep mode under low compressive stresses. The strain rate is measured with a laser interferometer in 0.15-μm linear displacements. It is demonstrated that the values of the microstrain rate and the mean sizes of jumps for the annealed metals are larger than those for the metals subjected to severe deformation. It is revealed that there is a correlation between the jumps of microplastic deformation and the size of nanometal grains. The inference is made that, for nanostructured metals, as for other materials, the structural heterogeneity is one of the factors responsible for the jumplike deformation.

  16. Reconfigurable optical assembly of nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Arrangements of nanostructures in well-defined patterns are the basis of photonic crystals, metamaterials and holograms. Furthermore, rewritable optical materials can be achieved by dynamically manipulating nanoassemblies. Here we demonstrate a mechanism to configure plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) in polymer media using nanosecond laser pulses. The mechanism relies on optical forces produced by the interference of laser beams, which allow NPs to migrate to lower-energy configurations. The resulting NP arrangements are stable without any external energy source, but erasable and rewritable by additional recording pulses. We demonstrate reconfigurable optical elements including multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, volumetric photonic crystals and lenses, as well as dynamic holograms of three-dimensional virtual objects. We aim to expand the applications of optical forces, which have been mostly restricted to optical tweezers. Holographic assemblies of nanoparticles will allow a new generation of programmable composites for tunable metamaterials, data storage devices, sensors and displays.

  17. Reconfigurable optical assembly of nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Arrangements of nanostructures in well-defined patterns are the basis of photonic crystals, metamaterials and holograms. Furthermore, rewritable optical materials can be achieved by dynamically manipulating nanoassemblies. Here we demonstrate a mechanism to configure plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) in polymer media using nanosecond laser pulses. The mechanism relies on optical forces produced by the interference of laser beams, which allow NPs to migrate to lower-energy configurations. The resulting NP arrangements are stable without any external energy source, but erasable and rewritable by additional recording pulses. We demonstrate reconfigurable optical elements including multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, volumetric photonic crystals and lenses, as well as dynamic holograms of three-dimensional virtual objects. We aim to expand the applications of optical forces, which have been mostly restricted to optical tweezers. Holographic assemblies of nanoparticles will allow a new generation of programmable composites for tunable metamaterials, data storage devices, sensors and displays. PMID:27337216

  18. Nanorice Particles: Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hui (Inventor); Brandl, Daniel (Inventor); Le, Fei (Inventor); Nordlander, Peter (Inventor); Halas, Nancy J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid nanoparticle, i.e., a nanorice particle, which combines the intense local fields of nanorods with the highly tunable plasmon resonances of nanoshells, is described herein. This geometry possesses far greater structural tunability than previous nanoparticle geometries, along with much larger local field enhancements and far greater sensitivity as a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensor than presently known dielectric-conductive material nanostructures. In an embodiment, a nanoparticle comprises a prolate spheroid-shaped core having a first aspect ratio. The nanoparticle also comprises at least one conductive shell surrounding said prolate spheroid-shaped core. The nanoparticle has a surface plasmon resonance sensitivity of at least 600 nm RIU(sup.-1). Methods of making the disclosed nanorice particles are also described herein.

  19. Reconfigurable optical assembly of nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Arrangements of nanostructures in well-defined patterns are the basis of photonic crystals, metamaterials and holograms. Furthermore, rewritable optical materials can be achieved by dynamically manipulating nanoassemblies. Here we demonstrate a mechanism to configure plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) in polymer media using nanosecond laser pulses. The mechanism relies on optical forces produced by the interference of laser beams, which allow NPs to migrate to lower-energy configurations. The resulting NP arrangements are stable without any external energy source, but erasable and rewritable by additional recording pulses. We demonstrate reconfigurable optical elements including multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, volumetric photonic crystals and lenses, as well as dynamic holograms of three-dimensional virtual objects. We aim to expand the applications of optical forces, which have been mostly restricted to optical tweezers. Holographic assemblies of nanoparticles will allow a new generation of programmable composites for tunable metamaterials, data storage devices, sensors and displays. PMID:27337216

  20. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Matthew P; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies. PMID:27577091

  1. The role of Al3+ on rheology and structural changes in sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel R.; Florian, Pierre; Henderson, Grant S.; Massiot, Dominique

    2014-02-01

    Because of their importance in both the geosciences and the glass-making industry, alkali aluminosilicate melts have been the focal point of many past studies, but despite progress many problems remain unresolved, such as the complex behaviour of the thermodynamic properties of aluminium-rich alkali silicate melts. This paper presents a study of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses and melts, containing 75 mol% SiO2 and different Al/(Al + Na) ratios. Their structure has been investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, as well as, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si 1D MAS NMR spectroscopy. Results confirm the role change of Na+ cations from network modifier to charge compensator in the presence of Al3+ ions. In addition, polymerization increases with increase of the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. These structural changes explain the observed variations in the viscosity of these melts. The viscosity data in turn allow us to calculate the configurational entropy of melts at the glass transition temperature [the Sconf(Tg)]. The variations of the Sconf(Tg) are strongly nonlinear, with sharp increases and decreases depending on the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. More importantly, a strong increase of the Sconf(Tg) is observed when a few Al2O3 is added to sodium silicate melt. A strong decrease is observed after crossing the tectosilicate join, when Al/(Al + Na) > 0.5 and when Al3+ ions are present in fivefold coordination, Al[5], in the glass. Furthermore, in situ27Al NMR spectra of the peraluminous melt show a clear increase of the Al[5] concentration with increasing temperature. When considered in combination with melt fragility and heat capacity, our data demonstrate that Al[5] is clearly a transient unit at high temperature in highly polymerized tectosilicate and peraluminous melts. However, when present in glasses, Al[5] increases the stability of the aluminosilicate network, hence the Tg of glasses. This could be explained by the ability of Al[5] to carry threefold coordinated oxygen atoms in its first coordination

  2. Optical Biosensors Based on Semiconductor Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Manso, Miguel; Torres-Costa, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of semiconductor-based nanostructures with novel and unique properties has sparked widespread interest in their use in the field of biosensing. The precise control over the size, shape and composition of these nanostructures leads to the accurate control of their physico-chemical properties and overall behavior. Furthermore, modifications can be made to the nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems, leading to such interesting properties as enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility or bio-recognition. In the present work, the most significant applications of semiconductor nanostructures in the field of optical biosensing will be reviewed. In particular, the use of quantum dots as fluorescent bioprobes, which is the most widely used application, will be discussed. In addition, the use of some other nanometric structures in the field of biosensing, including porous semiconductors and photonic crystals, will be presented. PMID:22346691

  3. Nanostructured Materials: Symthesis in Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Ye, Xiangrong; Wai, Chien M.

    2009-03-24

    This chapter summarizes the recent developent of synthesis and characterization of nanostructured materials synthesized in supercritical fluids. Nanocomposite catalysts such as Pt and Pd on carbon nanotube support have been synthesized and used for fuel cell applications.

  4. Comparative Incorporation of PNA into DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ronnie O; Kong, Jing; Achim, Catalina; LaBean, Thomas H

    2015-09-23

    DNA has shown great promise as a building material for self-assembling nanoscale structures. To further develop the potential of this technology, more methods are needed for functionalizing DNA-based nanostructures to increase their chemical diversity. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) holds great promise for realizing this goal, as it conveniently allows for inclusion of both amino acids and peptides in nucleic acid-based structures. In this work, we explored incorporation of a positively charged PNA within DNA nanostructures. We investigated the efficiency of annealing a lysine-containing PNA probe with complementary, single-stranded DNA sequences within nanostructures, as well as the efficiency of duplex invasion and its dependence on salt concentration. Our results show that PNA allows for toehold-free strand displacement and that incorporation yield depends critically on binding site geometry. These results provide guidance for the design of PNA binding sites on nucleic acid nanostructures with an eye towards optimizing fabrication yield.

  5. Boundary Condition for Modeling Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Oyafuso, Fabiano; von Allmen, Paul; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    A recently proposed boundary condition for atomistic computational modeling of semiconductor nanostructures (particularly, quantum dots) is an improved alternative to two prior such boundary conditions. As explained, this boundary condition helps to reduce the amount of computation while maintaining accuracy.

  6. Hierarchically nanostructured materials for sustainable environmental applications

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions, and multiple functionalities toward water remediation, biosensing, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing, and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology. PMID:24790946

  7. Plant-derived nanostructures: types and applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plant-derived nanostructures and nanoparticles (NPs) have functional applications in numerous disciplines such as health care, food and feed, cosmetics, biomedical science, energy science, drug-gene delivery, environmental health, and so on. Consequently, it is imperative for res...

  8. Engineering metallic nanostructures for plasmonics and nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Nathan C; Nagpal, Prashant; McPeak, Kevin M; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures now play an important role in many applications. In particular, for the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics, the ability to engineer metals on nanometric scales allows the development of new devices and the study of exciting physics. This review focuses on top-down nanofabrication techniques for engineering metallic nanostructures, along with computational and experimental characterization techniques. A variety of current and emerging applications are also covered. PMID:22790420

  9. Directed spatial organization of zinc oxide nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Julia; Liu, Jun

    2009-02-17

    A method for controllably forming zinc oxide nanostructures on a surface via an organic template, which is formed using a stamp prepared from pre-defined relief structures, inking the stamp with a solution comprising self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecules, contacting the stamp to the surface, such as Ag sputtered on Si, and immersing the surface with the patterned SAM molecules with a zinc-containing solution with pH control to form zinc oxide nanostructures on the bare Ag surface.

  10. Production of fullerenic nanostructures in flames

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.; Chowdhury, K. Das

    1999-01-01

    A method for the production of fullerenic nanostructures is described in which unsaturated hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen are combusted in a burner chamber at a sub-atmospheric pressure, thereby establishing a flame. The condensibles of the flame are collected at a post-flame location. The condensibles contain fullerenic nanostructures, such as single and nested nanotubes, single and nested nanoparticles and giant fullerenes. The method of producing fullerenic soot from flames is also described.

  11. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Jin Z.; Schwartzberg, Adam; Olson, Tammy Y.

    2016-03-01

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  12. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Jin Z.; Schwartzberg, Adam; Olson, Tammy Y.

    2012-03-20

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  13. Giant optical nonlinearity of plasmonic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Melentiev, P N; Afanasev, A E; Balykin, V I

    2014-06-30

    The experimental studies of giant optical nonlinearity of single metal nanostructures are briefly reviewed. A new hybrid nanostructure – split-hole resonator (SHR) – is investigated. This structure is characterised by a record-high efficiency of third-harmonic generation and multiphoton luminescence (its nonlinearity exceeds that of a single nanohole by five orders of magnitude) and an unprecedently high sensitivity to light polarisation (extinction coefficient 4 × 10{sup 4}). (extreme light fields and their applications)

  14. Ultrafast microsphere near-field nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, K.-H.; Quentin, U.; Hornung, B.; Otto, A.; Alexeev, I.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-03-01

    Due to the steadily advancing miniaturization in all fields of technology nanostructuring becomes increasingly important. Whereas the classical lithographic nanostructuring suffers from both high costs and low flexibility, for many applications in biomedicine and technology laser based nanostructuring approaches, where near-field effects allow a sub-diffraction limited laser focusing, are on the rise. In combination with ultrashort pulsed laser sources, that allow the utilization of non-linear multi-photon absorption effects, a flexible, low-cost laser based nanostructuring with sub-wavelength resolution becomes possible. Among various near-field nanostructuring approaches the microsphere based techniques, which use small microbead particles of the size of the wavelength for a sub-diffraction limited focusing of pulsed laser radiation, are the most promising. Compared to the tip or aperture based techniques this approach is very robust and can be applied both for a large-scale production of periodic arrays of nanostructures and in combination with optical trapping also for a direct-write. Size and shape of the features produced by microsphere near-field nanostructuring strongly depend on the respective processing parameters. In this contribution a basic study of the influence of processing parameters on the microsphere near-field nanostructuring with nano-, pico- and femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. The experimental and numerical results with dielectric and metal nanoparticles on semiconductor and dielectric substrates show the influence of particle size and material, substrate material, pulse duration, laser fluence, number of contributing laser pulses and polarization on the structuring process.

  15. Laser Fabricated Nanostructures on Vanadium Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, B.; Fuele, M.; Nanai, L.; Balint, A. M.

    2011-10-03

    In this work we present our results concerning to the nanostructure generation on vanadium surfaces by ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation. The melting free formation of these structures is very important in many fields of science and industry too. We obtain that the nanostructure forming process on vanadium surface is Stransky Krastanov type. The surface covering and the nano-tower shape are depending on the ambient of the laser matter reaction.

  16. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures on iron nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshanova, A.; Partizan, G.; Mansurov, B.; Medyanova, B.; Mansurova, M.; Aliev, B.; Jiang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the results of experiments on synthesis of carbon nanostructures (CNs) by the method of thermal chemical vapor deposition using iron nanopowders obtained by the method of electrical explosion of wires as catalysts. To study the process of nucleation and growth of individual carbon nanostructures, experiments were conducted not only on nanopowders, but also on the separated clusters. To determine the optimum conditions of the carbon nanostructures synthesis and lower temperature limit, experiments were performed at different temperatures (300-700°C) and pressures (100-400 mbar). The experiments have shown that the lower temperature limit for carbon nanostructures synthesis on the iron nanopowders is 350°C and in this process the growth of carbon nanostructures is not so massive. Stable growth of carbon nanostructures for nanopowders began from 400°C during the entire range of pressures. The analysis of Raman spectroscopy showed that the most optimum conditions for obtaining nanotubes of high quality are P = 100 mbar and T = 425°C.

  17. A nanostructure thermal property measurement platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Sullivan, John Patrick; Huang, Jian Yu; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Martinez, Julio Alberto; Harris, Charles Thomas; Swartzentruber, Brian Shoemaker

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the electrical and thermal transport properties of one-dimensional nanostructures (e.g., nanotubes and nanowires) typically are obtained without detailed knowledge of the specimen's atomic-scale structure or defects. To address this deficiency we have developed a microfabricated, chip-based characterization platform that enables both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of atomic structure and defects as well as measurement of the thermal transport properties of individual nanostructures. The platform features a suspended heater line that contacts the center of a suspended nanostructure/nanowire that was placed using in-situ scanning electron microscope nanomanipulators. One key advantage of this platform is that it is possible to measure the thermal conductivity of both halves of the nanostructure (on each side of the central heater), and this feature permits identification of possible changes in thermal conductance along the wire and measurement of the thermal contact resistance. Suspension of the nanostructure across a through-hole enables TEM characterization of the atomic and defect structure (dislocations, stacking faults, etc.) of the test sample. As a model study, we report the use of this platform to measure the thermal conductivity and defect structure of GaN nanowires. The utilization of this platform for the measurements of other nanostructures will also be discussed.

  18. Nanostructured conductive polymers for advanced energy storage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ye; Peng, Lele; Ding, Yu; Zhao, Yu; Yu, Guihua

    2015-10-01

    Conductive polymers combine the attractive properties associated with conventional polymers and unique electronic properties of metals or semiconductors. Recently, nanostructured conductive polymers have aroused considerable research interest owing to their unique properties over their bulk counterparts, such as large surface areas and shortened pathways for charge/mass transport, which make them promising candidates for broad applications in energy conversion and storage, sensors, actuators, and biomedical devices. Numerous synthetic strategies have been developed to obtain various conductive polymer nanostructures, and high-performance devices based on these nanostructured conductive polymers have been realized. This Tutorial review describes the synthesis and characteristics of different conductive polymer nanostructures; presents the representative applications of nanostructured conductive polymers as active electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors and lithium-ion batteries and new perspectives of functional materials for next-generation high-energy batteries, meanwhile discusses the general design rules, advantages, and limitations of nanostructured conductive polymers in the energy storage field; and provides new insights into future directions.

  19. Characterization of Surface and Variable Depth Samples from the 3H Evaporator Feed (32H) and Drop (30H) Tanks - Re-Baseline of Silicon Concentration and Aluminosilicate Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2002-02-07

    Surface and variable depth samples from the 3H Evaporator feed tank, Tank 32H, and drop tank, Tank 30H, have been analyzed at SRTC. These analyses support continued operation of the 3H Evaporator with regards to silicon concentrations and aluminosilicate formation. Results of these analyses are included in this report.

  20. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Mao, Yuanbing

    2013-05-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterials and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  1. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus S.; Mao, Yuanbing

    2016-06-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterial's and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  2. Commercial Implementation of Model-Based Manufacturing of Nanostructured Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Terry C.

    2012-07-24

    Computational modeling is an essential tool for commercial production of nanostructured metals. Strength is limited by imperfections at the high strength levels that are achievable in nanostructured metals. Processing to achieve homogeneity at the micro- and nano-scales is critical. Manufacturing of nanostructured metals is intrinsically a multi-scale problem. Manufacturing of nanostructured metal products requires computer control, monitoring and modeling. Large scale manufacturing of bulk nanostructured metals by Severe Plastic Deformation is a multi-scale problem. Computational modeling at all scales is essential. Multiple scales of modeling must be integrated to predict and control nanostructural, microstructural, macrostructural product characteristics and production processes.

  3. Molecular beam epitaxy grown indium self-assembled plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Ricky; Gehl, Michael; Sears, Jasmine; Zandbergen, Sander; Nader, Nima; Keiffer, Patrick; Hendrickson, Joshua; Arnoult, Alexandre; Khitrova, Galina

    2015-09-01

    We describe molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth conditions for self-assembled indium nanostructures, or islands, which allow for the tuning of the density and size of the indium nanostructures. How the plasmonic resonance of indium nanostructures is affected by the island density, size, distribution in sizes, and indium purity of the nanostructures is explored. These self-assembled nanostructures provide a platform for integration of resonant and non-resonant plasmonic structures within a few nm of quantum wells (QWs) or quantum dots (QDs) in a single process. A 4× increase in peak photoluminescence intensity is demonstrated for near-surface QDs resonantly coupled to indium nanostructures.

  4. Electroactive behavior of nanostructured polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Ravi

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) offer a new class of actuator materials, which display physical response to electrical excitation. EAPs can be classified into two groups based on their response mechanism: electronic EAPs and ionic EAPs. Electronic EAPs respond due to electrostatic or Coulomb forces developed on application of an electric field, whereas ionic EAPs are driven by mobility or diffusion of ions. Electronic EAPs display better properties than ionic EAPs in terms of their high actuation strain, reliability and durability, efficiency, and response time. Dielectric electroactive polymers or D-EAPs produce large actuation strain on application of an electric field due to Maxwell stress effect. D-EAPs have superior performance than other EAPs, which is ascribed to their high actuation strain, fast response time, high energy density, and high efficiency. Acrylic elastomer is known to be superior amongst electric EAPs due to its highest areal actuation strain (˜160 %), highest elastic energy density (3.4 MJ/m3), and highest pressure (7 MPa). Generally, all the D-EAPs require very high electric field for actuation. In this work, we demonstrate that incorporation of a low-volatility, aliphatic-rich solvent (mineral oil) into a nanostructured poly [styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene] (SEBS) triblock copolymer yields physically cross-linked micellar networks, known as thermoplastic elastomer gels (TPEG). This nanostructured material exhibits excellent displacement under an external electric field, therefore refers as electroactive nanostructured polymers (ENP). Comparison of the ENPs investigated here with EAPs previously reported, confirms that the ENP217 system with 5 wt% copolymer yields the highest areal actuation amongst all D-EAPs currently known. Dielectric strength of both ENPs (ENP of 217kDa and 161kDa molecular weights) increases with increasing copolymer fraction. The ENPs introduced here exhibit coupling efficiencies that are comparable, if not

  5. Nanostructured assemblies for dental application.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Florence; Mendoza-Palomares, Carlos; Helms, Marie; Al Alam, Denise; Richert, Ludovic; Arntz, Youri; Rinckenbach, Simon; Garnier, Fabien; Haïkel, Youssef; Gangloff, Sophie C; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2010-06-22

    Millions of teeth are saved each year by root canal therapy. Although current treatment modalities offer high levels of success for many conditions, an ideal form of therapy might consist of regenerative approaches in which diseased or necrotic pulp tissues are removed and replaced with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. Melanocortin peptides (alpha-MSH) possess anti-inflammatory properties in many acute and chronic inflammatory models. Our recent studies have shown that alpha-MSH covalently coupled to poly-l-glutamic acid (PGA-alpha-MSH) retains anti-inflammatory properties on rat monocytes. This study aimed to define the effects of PGA-alpha-MSH on dental pulp fibroblasts. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated fibroblasts incubated with PGA-alpha-MSH showed an early time-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha, a late induction of IL-10, and no effect on IL-8 secretion. However, in the absence of LPS, PGA-alpha-MSH induced IL-8 secretion and proliferation of pulp fibroblasts, whereas free alpha-MSH inhibited this proliferation. Thus, PGA-alpha-MSH has potential effects in promoting human pulp fibroblast adhesion and cell proliferation. It can also reduce the inflammatory state of LPS-stimulated pulp fibroblasts observed in gram-negative bacterial infections. These effects suggest a novel use of PGA-alpha-MSH as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of endodontic lesions. To better understand these results, we have also used the multilayered polyelectrolyte films as a reservoir for PGA-alpha-MSH by using not only PLL (poly-l-lysine) but also the Dendri Graft poly-l-lysines (DGL(G4)) to be able to adsorb more PGA-alpha-MSH. Our results indicated clearly that, by using PGA-alpha-MSH, we increase not only the viability of cells but also the proliferation. We have also analyzed at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy these nanostructured architectures and shown an increase of thickness and roughness in the presence of PGA-alpha-MSH incorporated into the

  6. Electronic properties of complex nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen

    Nanostructured materials have brought an unprecedented opportunity for advancement in many fields of human endeavor and in applications. Nanostructures are a new research field which may revolutionize people's everyday life. In the Thesis, I have used theoretical methods including density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamic simulations (MD) and tight-binding methods to explore the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of various nanomaterials. In all this, I also paid attention to potential applications of these findings. First, I will briefly introduce the scientific background of this Thesis, including the motivation for the study of a boron enriched aluminum surface, novel carbon foam structures and my research interest in 2D electronics. Then I will review the computational techniques I used in the study, mostly DFT methods. In Chapter 3, I introduce an effective way to enhance surface hardness of aluminum by boron nanoparticle implantation. Using boron dimers to represent the nanoparticles, the process of boron implantation is modeled in a molecular dynamics simulation of bombarding the aluminum surface by energetic B 2 molecules. Possible metastable structures of boron-coated aluminum surface are identified. Within these structures, I find that boron atoms prefer to stay in the subsurface region of aluminum. By modeling the Rockwell indentation process, boron enriched aluminum surface is found to be harder than the pristine aluminum surface by at least 15%. In Chapter 4, I discuss novel carbon structures, including 3D carbon foam and related 2D slab structures. Carbon foam contains both sp 2 and sp3 hybridized carbon atoms. It forms a 3D honeycomb lattice with a comparable stability to fullerenes, suggesting possible existence of such carbon foam structures. Although the bulk 3D foam structure is semiconducting, an sp2 terminated carbon surface could maintain a conducting channel even when passivated by hydrogen. To promote the experimental

  7. The role of Al3+ on rheology and structural changes in sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel R.; Florian, Pierre; Henderson, Grant S.; Massiot, Dominique

    2014-02-01

    Because of their importance in both the geosciences and the glass-making industry, alkali aluminosilicate melts have been the focal point of many past studies, but despite progress many problems remain unresolved, such as the complex behaviour of the thermodynamic properties of aluminium-rich alkali silicate melts. This paper presents a study of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses and melts, containing 75 mol% SiO2 and different Al/(Al + Na) ratios. Their structure has been investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, as well as, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si 1D MAS NMR spectroscopy. Results confirm the role change of Na+ cations from network modifier to charge compensator in the presence of Al3+ ions. In addition, polymerization increases with increase of the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. These structural changes explain the observed variations in the viscosity of these melts. The viscosity data in turn allow us to calculate the configurational entropy of melts at the glass transition temperature [the Sconf(Tg)]. The variations of the Sconf(Tg) are strongly nonlinear, with sharp increases and decreases depending on the Al/(Al + Na) ratio. More importantly, a strong increase of the Sconf(Tg) is observed when a few Al2O3 is added to sodium silicate melt. A strong decrease is observed after crossing the tectosilicate join, when Al/(Al + Na) > 0.5 and when Al3+ ions are present in fivefold coordination, Al[5], in the glass. Furthermore, in situ27Al NMR spectra of the peraluminous melt show a clear increase of the Al[5] concentration with increasing temperature. When considered in combination with melt fragility and heat capacity, our data demonstrate that Al[5] is clearly a transient unit at high temperature in highly polymerized tectosilicate and peraluminous melts. However, when present in glasses, Al[5] increases the stability of the aluminosilicate network, hence the Tg of glasses. This could be explained by the ability of Al[5] to carry threefold coordinated oxygen atoms in its first coordination

  8. Thermoelectric transport phenomena in semiconducting nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, Jane

    The efficiencies of state-of-the-art thermoelectric devices made from bulk materials remain too low for widespread application. Early predictions by Hicks and Dresselhaus indicated that one potential route for improving the thermoelectric properties of materials was through nanostructuring. This predicted improvement was due to two effects: an increase in the thermoelectric power factor and a decrease in the lattice thermal conductivity. In this thesis, new models are developed for calculation of the thermoelectric transport properties of nanostructures. The results of these models are in line with what has been seen experimentally in the field of nanostructured thermoelectrics: the power factor of nanostructures falls below the bulk value for sizes accessible by current experimental techniques. While this is demonstrated first for a particular system (cylindrical InSb nanowires), this result is shown to hold true regardless of the dimensionality of the system, the material of interest or the temperature. Using the analytical forms of the transport properties of nanostructured systems, we derive universal scaling relations for the power factor which further point to the fundamental and general nature of this result. Calculations done for nanostructured systems in which the scattering time is a function of carrier energy indicate that the introduction of nanoscale grain boundaries can lead to improvements in the power factor. We present experimental methods for the fabrication and characterization of porous bismuth-antimony-telluride (Bi2-xSbxTe3 ) thin films using a templated deposition technique. Preliminary results from this experimental work indicate that the nanostructured morphology of the templates used for the deposition of porous films limits diffusion during grain growth, and thus the crystal structure of these porous films differs from that of films deposited on dense substrates. For fundamental investigation of the effects of porosity on thermoelectric

  9. Configurational forces in solid nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhigang Suo

    2006-06-12

    The DOE grant (DE-FG02-99ER45787) to Princeton University, entitled Configurational Forces in Solid Nanostructures, was intended to cover the four-year period from September 1999 to September 2003. Effective 1 July 2003, the PI will relocate from Princeton to join the Harvard faculty. Princeton University will submit the Final Financial Report, the Final Property Report, and the Final Patent Report. The expenditures to date are $261,513 with %8,487 remaining of the awarded amount of $320,000. Harvard University will submit a request for the remaining amount. This Final Technical Report covers from the period between September 1999 to June 2003. Three Ph.D. students, Wei Lu, Yanfei Gao and Wei Hong, admitted to Princeton in the fall of 1998, 1999, 2002, respectively, have been dedicated to this project. Wei Lu earned his Ph.D. in August 2001, and is now an assistant professor at The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Yanfei Gao earned his Ph.D. in February 2003, and is now a post-doc at Brown University. The amount of funding covers one student at a time. All three students received first-year fellowships from Princeton University. In the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, to fulfill a doctoral degree requirement, every student serves as a teaching assistant for three semesters, for which the student is partially paid by the University.

  10. Nanostructures from Synthetic Genetic Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Beuron, Fabienne; Peak‐Chew, Sew‐Yeu; Morris, Edward P.; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nanoscale objects of increasing complexity can be constructed from DNA or RNA. However, the scope of potential applications could be enhanced by expanding beyond the moderate chemical diversity of natural nucleic acids. Here, we explore the construction of nano‐objects made entirely from alternative building blocks: synthetic genetic polymers not found in nature, also called xeno nucleic acids (XNAs). Specifically, we describe assembly of 70 kDa tetrahedra elaborated in four different XNA chemistries (2′‐fluro‐2′‐deoxy‐ribofuranose nucleic acid (2′F‐RNA), 2′‐fluoroarabino nucleic acids (FANA), hexitol nucleic acids (HNA), and cyclohexene nucleic acids (CeNA)), as well as mixed designs, and a ∼600 kDa all‐FANA octahedron, visualised by electron microscopy. Our results extend the chemical scope for programmable nanostructure assembly, with implications for the design of nano‐objects and materials with an expanded range of structural and physicochemical properties, including enhanced biostability. PMID:26992063

  11. Computational studies of doped nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelikowsky, James R.; Alemany, M. M. G.; Chan, T.-L.; Dalpian, G. M.

    2011-04-01

    One of the most challenging issues in materials physics is to predict the properties of defects in matter. Such defects play an important role in functionalizing materials for use in electronic and optical devices. As the length scale for such devices approaches the nano-regime, the interplay of dimensionality, quantum confinement and defects can be complex. In particular, the usual rules for describing defects in bulk may be inoperative, i.e. a shallow defect level in bulk may become a deep level at the nanoscale. The development of computational methods to describe the properties of nanoscale defects is a formidable challenge. Nanoscale systems may contain numerous electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, and often possess little symmetry. In this review, we focus on new computational methods, which allow one to predict the role of quantum confinement on the electronic, magnetic and structural properties of functionalized nanostructures. We illustrate how these methods can be applied to nanoscale systems, and present calculations for the electronic, magnetic and structural properties of dopants in semiconductor nanocrystals and nanowires.

  12. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  13. Methane storage in molecular nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adisa, Olumide O.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2012-05-01

    We survey various molecular structures which have been proposed as possible nanocontainers for methane storage. These are molecular structures that have been investigated through either experiments, molecular dynamics simulations or mathematical modelling. Computational simulation and mathematical modelling play an important role in predicting and verifying experimental outcomes, but both have their limitations. Even though recent advances have greatly improved computations, due to the large number of atoms and force field calculations involved, computational simulations can still be time consuming as compared to an instantaneous mathematical modelling approach. On the other hand, underlying an ideal mathematical model, there are many assumptions and approximations, but such modelling often reveals the key physical parameters and optimal configurations. Here, we review methane adsorption for three conventional nanostructures, namely graphite, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and nanotube bundles (including interstitial and groove sites), and we survey methane adsorption in other molecular structures including metal organic frameworks. We also include an examination of minimum binding energies, equilibrium distances, gravimetric and volumetric uptakes, volume available for adsorption, as well as the effects of temperature and pressure on the adsorption of methane onto these molecular structures.

  14. Silica-Ceria Hybrid Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Baer, Donald R.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2012-04-25

    A new hybrid material system that consists of ceria attached silica nanoparticles has been developed. Because of the versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and antioxidant properties of ceria nanoparticles, this material system is ideally suited for biomedical applications. The silica particles of size ~50nm were synthesized by the Stöber synthesis method and ceria nanoparticles of size ~2-3nm was attached to the silica surface using a hetrocoagulation method. The presence of silanol groups on the surface of silica particles mediated homogenous nucleation of ceria which were attached to silica surface by Si-O-Ce bonding. The formations of silica-ceria hybrid nanostructures were characterized by X-photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The HRTEM image confirms the formation of individual crystallites of ceria nanoparticles attached to the silica surface. The XPS analysis indicates that ceria nanoparticles are chemically bonded to surface of silica and possess mixture of +3 and +4 chemical states.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  16. Radiation Nanostructuring of Magnetic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, V. A.; Kirischuk, V. I.; Koblyanskiy, Yu. V.; Melkov, G. A.; Sadovnikov, L. V.; Slavin, A. N.; Strilchuk, N. V.; Vasyuchka, V. I.; Zheltonozhsky, V. A.

    The influence of irradiations (reactor neutrons, 3 MeV protons and Ar+ ions with the energy of 125 keV) upon ferrite YIG films and devices properties has been investigated. Qualititative similarity of such influence for neutrons and protons has been established. Because of the homogeneous distribution of radiation defects in both cases, there is a simultaneous broadening of homogeneous FMR linewidth, magnetostatic oscillations and modes, and short dipole-exchange spin waves. In the case of Ar+ irradiation due to small path length, there is an inhomogeneous nanostructuring over the thickness of the film with characteristic layer size ~0.1 μm. The presence of nanolayers influences in the different way upon the properties of different film oscillations and modes. The decrease of FMR linewidth by 40% at the fluence of 3 × 1016cm-2 has been observed for the first time. At the same time, spin wave linewidth has practically not changed allowing to increase the efficiency of wave front reversal in YIG films irradiated by Ar+ ions. All discovered experimental facts are explained in the frame of multilayer model of the film consisting of alternate magnetic and nonmagnetic layers.

  17. Chemical scissors cut phosphorene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xihong; Wei, Qun

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorene, a recently fabricated two-dimensional puckered honeycomb structure of phosphorus, showed promising properties for applications in nano-electronics. In this work, we report a chemical scissors effect on phosphorene, using first-principles method. It was found that chemical species, such as H, OH, F, and Cl, can act as scissors to cut phosphorene. Phosphorus nanochains and nanoribbons can be obtained. The scissors effect results from the strong bonding between the chemical species and phosphorus atoms. Other species such as O, S and Se fail to cut phosphorene nanostructures due to their weak bonding with phosphorus. The electronic structures of the produced P-chains reveal that the hydrogenated chain is an insulator while the pristine chain is a one-dimensional Dirac material, in which the charge carriers are massless fermions travelling at an effective speed of light ˜8 × 105 m s-1. The obtained zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons show either metallic or semiconducting behaviors, depending on the treatment of the edge phosphorus atoms.

  18. Distribution of aflatoxins in tissues of growing pigs fed an aflatoxin-contaminated diet amended with a high affinity aluminosilicate sorbent.

    PubMed

    Beaver, R W; Wilson, D M; James, M A; Haydon, K D; Colvin, B M; Sangster, L T; Pikul, A H; Groopman, J D

    1990-02-01

    The effect of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) added to the diet of swine fed an aflatoxin-contaminated diet on tissue aflatoxin levels was investigated. Pigs were fed control (less than 10 ng/g B1 + B2), contaminated (500-600 ng/g B1 + B2), and contaminated +0.5% HSCAS diets. Tissues analyzed for the presence of aflatoxin B1, B2, and M1 residues included liver, muscle, kidney, and adipose. Addition of HSCAS to the contaminated diet significantly reduced the amount of M1 in liver, kidney, and muscle tissue. Aflatoxin B1 was not reduced in liver or kidney, but was decreased in muscle.

  19. Atomic Description of the Interface between Silica and Alumina in Aluminosilicates through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface-Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of amorphous aluminosilicates (ASA) in various industrial catalysts, the nature of the interface between silica and alumina and the atomic structure of the catalytically active sites are still subject to debate. Here, by the use of dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy (DNP SENS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that on silica and alumina surfaces, molecular aluminum and silicon precursors are, respectively, preferentially grafted on sites that enable the formation of Al(IV) and Si(IV) interfacial sites. We also link the genesis of Brønsted acidity to the surface coverage of aluminum and silicon on silica and alumina, respectively. PMID:26244620

  20. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3. PMID:25791958

  1. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3. PMID:25791958

  2. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-03-20

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3.

  3. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-03-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3.

  4. Atomic Description of the Interface between Silica and Alumina in Aluminosilicates through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface-Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Valla, Maxence; Rossini, Aaron J; Caillot, Maxime; Chizallet, Céline; Raybaud, Pascal; Digne, Mathieu; Chaumonnot, Alexandra; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Copéret, Christophe

    2015-08-26

    Despite the widespread use of amorphous aluminosilicates (ASA) in various industrial catalysts, the nature of the interface between silica and alumina and the atomic structure of the catalytically active sites are still subject to debate. Here, by the use of dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy (DNP SENS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that on silica and alumina surfaces, molecular aluminum and silicon precursors are, respectively, preferentially grafted on sites that enable the formation of Al(IV) and Si(IV) interfacial sites. We also link the genesis of Brønsted acidity to the surface coverage of aluminum and silicon on silica and alumina, respectively. PMID:26244620

  5. Effect of submergence-emergence sequence and organic matter or aluminosilicate amendment on metal uptake by woody wetland plant species from contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, Bart; Du Laing, Gijs; Tack, Filip M G

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific hydrological conditions affect the availability of trace metals for vegetation. In a greenhouse experiment, the effect of submersion on the metal uptake by the wetland plant species Salix cinerea and Populus nigra grown on a contaminated dredged sediment-derived soil and on an uncontaminated soil was evaluated. An upland hydrological regime for the polluted sediment caused elevated Cd concentrations in leaves and cuttings for both species. Emergence and soil oxidation after initial submersion of a polluted sediment resulted in comparable foliar Cd and Zn concentrations for S. cinerea as for the constant upland treatment. The foliar Cd and Zn concentrations were clearly higher than for submerged soils after initial upland conditions. These results point at the importance of submergence-emergence sequence for plant metal availability. The addition of foliar-based organic matter or aluminosilicates to the polluted sediment-derived soil in upland conditions did not decrease Cd and Zn uptake by S. cinerea.

  6. Scattering of Light by Colloidal Aluminosilicate Particles Produces the Unusual Sky-Blue Color of Río Celeste (Tenorio Volcano Complex, Costa Rica)

    PubMed Central

    Castellón, Erick; Martínez, María; Madrigal-Carballo, Sergio; Arias, María Laura; Vargas, William E.; Chavarría, Max

    2013-01-01

    Río Celeste (Sky-Blue River) in Tenorio National Park (Costa Rica), a river that derives from the confluence and mixing of two colorless streams—Río Buenavista (Buenavista River) and Quebrada Agria (Sour Creek)—is renowned in Costa Rica because it presents an atypical intense sky-blue color. Although various explanations have been proposed for this unusual hue of Río Celeste, no exhaustive tests have been undertaken; the reasons hence remain unclear. To understand this color phenomenon, we examined the physico-chemical properties of Río Celeste and of the two streams from which it is derived. Chemical analysis of those streams with ion-exchange chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) made us discard the hypothesis that the origin of the hue is due to colored chemical species. Our tests revealed that the origin of this coloration phenomenon is physical, due to suspended aluminosilicate particles (with diameters distributed around 566 nm according to a lognormal distribution) that produce Mie scattering. The color originates after mixing of two colorless streams because of the enlargement (by aggregation) of suspended aluminosilicate particles in the Río Buenavista stream due to a decrease of pH on mixing with the acidic Quebrada Agria. We postulate a chemical mechanism for this process, supported by experimental evidence of dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Theoretical modeling of the Mie scattering yielded a strong coincidence between the observed color and the simulated one. PMID:24058661

  7. Scattering of light by colloidal aluminosilicate particles produces the unusual sky-blue color of Río Celeste (Tenorio volcano complex, Costa Rica).

    PubMed

    Castellón, Erick; Martínez, María; Madrigal-Carballo, Sergio; Arias, María Laura; Vargas, William E; Chavarría, Max

    2013-01-01

    Río Celeste (Sky-Blue River) in Tenorio National Park (Costa Rica), a river that derives from the confluence and mixing of two colorless streams--Río Buenavista (Buenavista River) and Quebrada Agria (Sour Creek)--is renowned in Costa Rica because it presents an atypical intense sky-blue color. Although various explanations have been proposed for this unusual hue of Río Celeste, no exhaustive tests have been undertaken; the reasons hence remain unclear. To understand this color phenomenon, we examined the physico-chemical properties of Río Celeste and of the two streams from which it is derived. Chemical analysis of those streams with ion-exchange chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) made us discard the hypothesis that the origin of the hue is due to colored chemical species. Our tests revealed that the origin of this coloration phenomenon is physical, due to suspended aluminosilicate particles (with diameters distributed around 566 nm according to a lognormal distribution) that produce Mie scattering. The color originates after mixing of two colorless streams because of the enlargement (by aggregation) of suspended aluminosilicate particles in the Río Buenavista stream due to a decrease of pH on mixing with the acidic Quebrada Agria. We postulate a chemical mechanism for this process, supported by experimental evidence of dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Theoretical modeling of the Mie scattering yielded a strong coincidence between the observed color and the simulated one.

  8. Scattering of light by colloidal aluminosilicate particles produces the unusual sky-blue color of Río Celeste (Tenorio volcano complex, Costa Rica).

    PubMed

    Castellón, Erick; Martínez, María; Madrigal-Carballo, Sergio; Arias, María Laura; Vargas, William E; Chavarría, Max

    2013-01-01

    Río Celeste (Sky-Blue River) in Tenorio National Park (Costa Rica), a river that derives from the confluence and mixing of two colorless streams--Río Buenavista (Buenavista River) and Quebrada Agria (Sour Creek)--is renowned in Costa Rica because it presents an atypical intense sky-blue color. Although various explanations have been proposed for this unusual hue of Río Celeste, no exhaustive tests have been undertaken; the reasons hence remain unclear. To understand this color phenomenon, we examined the physico-chemical properties of Río Celeste and of the two streams from which it is derived. Chemical analysis of those streams with ion-exchange chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) made us discard the hypothesis that the origin of the hue is due to colored chemical species. Our tests revealed that the origin of this coloration phenomenon is physical, due to suspended aluminosilicate particles (with diameters distributed around 566 nm according to a lognormal distribution) that produce Mie scattering. The color originates after mixing of two colorless streams because of the enlargement (by aggregation) of suspended aluminosilicate particles in the Río Buenavista stream due to a decrease of pH on mixing with the acidic Quebrada Agria. We postulate a chemical mechanism for this process, supported by experimental evidence of dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Theoretical modeling of the Mie scattering yielded a strong coincidence between the observed color and the simulated one. PMID:24058661

  9. Plasmonic nanostructures for bioanalytical applications of SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Mehmet; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a potential analytical technique for the detection and identification of chemicals and biological molecules and structures in the close vicinity of metallic nanostructures. We present a novel method to fabricate tunable plasmonic nanostructures and perform a comprehensive structural and optical characterization of the structures. Spherical latex particles are uniformly deposited on glass slides and used as templates to obtain nanovoid structures on polydimethylsiloxane surfaces. The diameter and depth of the nanovoids are controlled by the size of the latex particles. The nanovoids are coated with a thin Ag layer for fabrication of uniform plasmonic nanostructures. Structural characterization of the surfaces is performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Optical properties of these plasmonic nanostructures are evaluated via UV/Vis spectroscopy, and SERS. The sample preparation step is the key point to obtain strong and reproducible SERS spectra from the biological structures. When the colloidal suspension is used as a SERS substrate for the protein detection, the electrostatic interaction of the proteins with the nanoparticles is described by the nature of their charge status, which influences the aggregation properties such as the size and shape of the aggregates, which is critical for the SERS experiment. However, when the solid SERS substrates are fabricated, SERS signal of the proteins that are background free and independent of the protein charge. Pros and cons of using plasmonic nano colloids and nanostructures as SERS substrate will be discussed for label-free detection of proteins using SERS.

  10. Shockwave Consolidation of Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick; Nemir, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology based thermoelectric materials are considered attractive for developing highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Nano-structured thermoelectric materials are predicted to offer higher ZT over bulk materials by reducing thermal conductivity and increasing electrical conductivity. Consolidation of nano-structured powders into dense materials without losing nanostructure is essential towards practical device development. Using the gas atomization process, amorphous nano-structured powders were produced. Shockwave consolidation is accomplished by surrounding the nanopowder-containing tube with explosives and then detonating. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth. We have been successful in generating consolidated nano-structured bismuth telluride alloy powders by using the shockwave technique. Using these consolidated materials, several types of thermoelectric power generating devices have been developed. Shockwave consolidation is anticipated to generate large quantities of nanostructred materials expeditiously and cost effectively. In this paper, the technique of shockwave consolidation will be presented followed by Seebeck Coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements of consolidated materials. Preliminary results indicate a substantial increase in electrical conductivity due to shockwave consolidation technique.

  11. Oriented Nanostructures for Energy Conversion and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong H.; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Donghai; DuBois, Daniel L.; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Graff, Gordon L.; Pederson, Larry R.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2008-08-28

    Recently the role of nanostructured materials in addressing the challenges in energy and natural resources has attracted wide attention. In particular, oriented nanostructures have demonstrated promising properties for energy harvesting, conversion and storage. The purpose of the paper is to review the synthesis and application of oriented nanostructures in a few key areas of energy technologies, namely photovoltaics, batteries, supercapacitors and thermoelectrics. Although the applications differ from field to field, one of the fundamental challenges is to improve the generation and transport of electrons and ions. We will first briefly review the several major approaches to attain oriented nanostructured films that are applicable for energy applications. We will then discuss how such controlled nanostructures can be used in photovoltaics, batteries, capacitors, thermoelectrics, and other unconventional ways of energy conversion. We will highlight the role of high surface area to maximize the surface activity, and the importance of optimum dimension and architecture, controlled pore channels and alignment of the nanocrystalline phase to optimize the electrons and ion transport. Finally, the paper will discuss the challenges in attaining integrated architectures to achieve the desired performance. Brief background information will be provided for the relevant technologies, but the emphasis is focused mainly on the nanoeffects of mostly inorganic based materials and devices.

  12. Polymeric photovoltaics with various metallic plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Beibei; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Kafafi, Zakya H.; Bartoli, Filbert J.

    2013-02-01

    Broadband light absorption enhancement is numerically investigated for the active light harvesting layer of an organic photovoltaic (OPV), which consists of a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Periodic plasmonic nanostructures placed above and below the active layer incorporate Ag, Al, Au, or a combination of two different metals. Three dimensional (3D) full-field electromagnetic simulations are applied to determine the effect of varying the metal employed in the plasmonic nanostructures on the absorption enhancement of the OPV. In addition, the geometric parameters (e.g., film thickness, period, and diameter) of the symmetrically distributed top and bottom metal (Ag, Al, or Au) nanostructures were varied to optimize the device structure and delineate the mechanism(s) leading to the absorption enhancement. A spectrally broadband, polarization-insensitive, and wide-angle absorption enhancement is obtained using a double plasmonic nanostructure and is attributed to the combined excitation of localized and single-interface surface plasmon polariton modes. The total photon absorption of the OPV with the optimized double plasmonic Ag nanostructures was found to be enhanced by as much as 82.8% and 80.4% under normal (0°) and 60° light incidence, respectively.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10706 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10706 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-12-576) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. Cell morphology in injectable nanostructured biosynthetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Ortal; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2014-12-01

    Even though inducing structural features on the nanometric scale has been shown to be a powerful tool in tissue engineering, almost all nanostructuring techniques available today cannot be applied to injectable hydrogel scaffolds. The current research explores such a novel technique and its effect on scaffold's properties, cell morphology, and cell-material interaction. Nanostructuring is achieved by covalently binding Pluronic(®) F127 molecules to biosynthetic hydrogels. Analysis of cell morphology revealed spindled cell morphologies at day 4 in culture. The bound Pluronic(®) F127 diminished the swelling ability and enhanced the Young modulus, thus indicating that the bound molecules crosslink the hydrogel. The relation between matrix characteristics and cell morphology was analyzed and the importance of nanostructuring was demonstrated.

  18. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Toward nanostructuring with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Juergen; Tanabe, Takasumi; Korte, Frank; Fallnich, Carsten; Ostendorf, Andreas; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2004-10-01

    Micro- and nanostructuring are very important for the fabrication of new materials and multifunctional devices. Existing photo-lithographic technologies can only be applied to a limited number of materials and used on plane surfaces. Whereas, microstructuring with femtosecond laser pulses has established itself as an excellent and universal tool for micro-processing, it is still unclear what are the limits of this technology. It is of great interest to use this technique also for nanostructuring. With tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses one can produce sub-micrometer holes and structures whose quality depends on the material. We present new results on nanostructuring of different materials with femtosecond laser pulses in an attempt to make this an universal technology, and discuss its reproducibility, and further prospects for quality control.

  20. Vibron and phonon hybridization in dielectric nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Preston, Thomas C; Signorell, Ruth

    2011-04-01

    Plasmon hybridization theory has been an invaluable tool in advancing our understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Through the prism of molecular orbital theory, it allows one to interpret complex structures as "plasmonic molecules" and easily predict and engineer their electromagnetic response. However, this formalism is limited to conducting particles. Here, we present a hybridization scheme for the external and internal vibrations of dielectric nanostructures that provides a straightforward understanding of the infrared signatures of these particles through analogy to existing hybridization models of both molecular orbitals and plasmons extending the range of applications far beyond metallic nanostructures. This method not only provides a qualitative understanding, but also allows for the quantitative prediction of vibrational spectra of complex nanoobjects from well-known spectra of their primitive building blocks. The examples of nanoshells illustrate how spectral features can be understood in terms of symmetry, number of nodal planes, and scale parameters. PMID:21422288

  1. Hybrid nanostructures for energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Mohana Reddy, Arava Leela; Gowda, Sanketh R; Shaijumon, Manikoth M; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-09-25

    Materials engineering plays a key role in the field of energy storage. In particular, engineering materials at the nanoscale offers unique properties resulting in high performance electrodes and electrolytes in various energy storage devices. Consequently, considerable efforts have been made in recent years to fulfill the future requirements of electrochemical energy storage using these advanced materials. Various multi-functional hybrid nanostructured materials are currently being studied to improve energy and power densities of next generation storage devices. This review describes some of the recent progress in the synthesis of different types of hybrid nanostructures using template assisted and non-template based methods. The potential applications and recent research efforts to utilize these hybrid nanostructures to enhance the electrochemical energy storage properties of Li-ion battery and supercapacitor are discussed. This review also briefly outlines some of the recent progress and new approaches being explored in the techniques of fabrication of 3D battery structures using hybrid nanoarchitectures.

  2. Self-Assembly of Peptides to Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Dindyal; Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; Parang, Keykavous

    2014-01-01

    The formation of well-ordered nanostructures through self-assembly of diverse organic and inorganic building blocks has drawn much attention owing to their potential applications in biology and chemistry. Among all organic building blocks, peptides are one of the most promising platforms due to their biocompatibility, chemical diversity, and resemblance with proteins. Inspired from the protein assembly in biological systems, various self-assembled peptide structures have been constructed using several amino acids and sequences. This review focuses on this emerging area, the recent advances in peptide self-assembly, and formation of different nanostructures, such as tubular, fibers, vesicles, spherical, and rod coil structures. While different peptide nanostructures are discovered, potential applications will be explored in drug delivery, tissue engineering, wound healing, and surfactants. PMID:24756480

  3. Oriented nanostructures for energy conversion and storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Donghai; Dubois, Dan; Zhou, Xiaodong; Graff, Gordon L; Pederson, Larry R; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the role of nanostructured materials in addressing the challenges in energy and natural resources has attracted wide attention. In particular, oriented nanostructures demonstrate promising properties for energy harvesting, conversion, and storage. In this Review, we highlight the synthesis and application of oriented nanostructures in a few key areas of energy technologies, namely photovoltaics, batteries, supercapacitors, and thermoelectrics. Although the applications differ from field to field, a common fundamental challenge is to improve the generation and transport of electrons and ions. We highlight the role of high surface area to maximize the surface activity and discuss the importance of optimum dimension and architecture, controlled pore channels, and alignment of the nanocrystalline phase to optimize the transport of electrons and ions. Finally, we discuss the challenges in attaining integrated architectures to achieve the desired performance. Brief background information is provided for the relevant technologies, but the emphasis is focused mainly on the nanoscale effects of mostly inorganic-based materials and devices.

  4. Nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Lu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanostructured materials, compared with conventional materials, may promote greater amounts of specific protein interactions, thereby more efficiently stimulating new bone formation. It has also been indicated that, when features or ingredients of scaffolds are nanoscaled, a variety of interactions can be stimulated at the cellular level. Some of those interactions induce favorable cellular functions while others may leads to toxicity. This review presents the mechanism of interactions between nanoscaled materials and cells and focuses on the current research status of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Firstly, the main requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds were discussed. Then, the mechanism by which nanoscaled materials promote new bone formation was explained, following which the current research status of main types of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was reviewed and discussed.

  5. Biomimetic gyroid nanostructures exceeding their natural origins.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zongsong; Turner, Mark D; Gu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using optical two-beam lithography with improved resolution and enhanced mechanical strength, we demonstrate the replication of gyroid photonic nanostructures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. These artificial structures are shown to have size, controllability, and uniformity that are superior to those of their biological counterparts. In particular, the elastic Young's modulus of fabricated nanowires is enhanced by up to 20%. As such, the circular dichroism enabled by the gyroid nanostructures can operate in the near-ultraviolet wavelength region, shorter than that supported by the natural butterfly wings of C. rubi. This fabrication technique provides a unique tool for extracting three-dimensional photonic designs from nature and will aid the investigation of biomimetic nanostructures. PMID:27386542

  6. Biomimetic gyroid nanostructures exceeding their natural origins

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Zongsong; Turner, Mark D.; Gu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Using optical two-beam lithography with improved resolution and enhanced mechanical strength, we demonstrate the replication of gyroid photonic nanostructures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. These artificial structures are shown to have size, controllability, and uniformity that are superior to those of their biological counterparts. In particular, the elastic Young’s modulus of fabricated nanowires is enhanced by up to 20%. As such, the circular dichroism enabled by the gyroid nanostructures can operate in the near-ultraviolet wavelength region, shorter than that supported by the natural butterfly wings of C. rubi. This fabrication technique provides a unique tool for extracting three-dimensional photonic designs from nature and will aid the investigation of biomimetic nanostructures. PMID:27386542

  7. Nanostructured Diclofenac Sodium Releasing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Harlin, A.; Seppälä, J.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Various techniques have been developed to produce second generation biomaterials for tissue repair. These include extrusion, molding, salt leaching, spinning etc, but success in regenerating tissues has been limited. It is important to develop porous material, yet with a fibrous structure for it to be biomimetic. To mimic biological tissues, the extra-cellular matrix usually contains fibers in nano scale. To produce nanostructures, self-assembly or electrospinning can be used. Adding a drug release function to such a material may advance applications further for use in controlled tissue repair. This turns the resulting device into a multifunctional porous, fibrous structure to support cells and drug releasing properties in order to control tissue reactions. A bioabsorbable poly(ɛ-caprolactone-co-D,L lactide) 95/5 (PCL) was made into diluted solution using a solvent, to which was added 2w-% of diclofenac sodium (DS). Nano-fibers were made by electrospinning onto substrate. Microstructure of the resulting nanomat was studied using SEM and drug release profiles with UV/VIS spectroscopy. Thickness of the electrospun nanomat was about 2 mm. SEM analysis showed that polymeric nano-fibers containing drug particles form a highly interconnected porous nano structure. Average diameter of the nano-fibers was 130 nm. There was a high burst peak in drug release, which decreased to low levels after one day. The used polymer has slow a degradation rate and though the nanomat was highly porous with a large surface area, drug release rate is slow. It is feasible to develop a nano-fibrous porous structure of bioabsorbable polymer, which is loaded with test drug. Drug release is targeted at improving the properties of biomaterial for use in controlled tissue repair and regeneration.

  8. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    SciTech Connect

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  9. Electroactive behavior of nanostructured polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Ravi

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) offer a new class of actuator materials, which display physical response to electrical excitation. EAPs can be classified into two groups based on their response mechanism: electronic EAPs and ionic EAPs. Electronic EAPs respond due to electrostatic or Coulomb forces developed on application of an electric field, whereas ionic EAPs are driven by mobility or diffusion of ions. Electronic EAPs display better properties than ionic EAPs in terms of their high actuation strain, reliability and durability, efficiency, and response time. Dielectric electroactive polymers or D-EAPs produce large actuation strain on application of an electric field due to Maxwell stress effect. D-EAPs have superior performance than other EAPs, which is ascribed to their high actuation strain, fast response time, high energy density, and high efficiency. Acrylic elastomer is known to be superior amongst electric EAPs due to its highest areal actuation strain (˜160 %), highest elastic energy density (3.4 MJ/m3), and highest pressure (7 MPa). Generally, all the D-EAPs require very high electric field for actuation. In this work, we demonstrate that incorporation of a low-volatility, aliphatic-rich solvent (mineral oil) into a nanostructured poly [styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene] (SEBS) triblock copolymer yields physically cross-linked micellar networks, known as thermoplastic elastomer gels (TPEG). This nanostructured material exhibits excellent displacement under an external electric field, therefore refers as electroactive nanostructured polymers (ENP). Comparison of the ENPs investigated here with EAPs previously reported, confirms that the ENP217 system with 5 wt% copolymer yields the highest areal actuation amongst all D-EAPs currently known. Dielectric strength of both ENPs (ENP of 217kDa and 161kDa molecular weights) increases with increasing copolymer fraction. The ENPs introduced here exhibit coupling efficiencies that are comparable, if not

  10. Low-dimensional Te-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qisheng; Safdar, Muhammad; Wang, Zhenxing; He, Jun

    2013-07-26

    Low-dimensional Te-based nanomaterials have attracted intense attention in recent years due to their novel physical properties including surface-state effects, photoelectricity, phase changes, and thermoelectricity. The recent development of synthesis methods of low-dimensional Te-based nanostructures is reviewed, such as van der Waals expitaxial growth and template-assisted solution-phase deposition. In addition, the unique properties of these materials, such as tunable surface states, high photoresponsivity, fast phase change, and high thermoelectricity figure of merit, are reviewed. The potential applications of low-dimensional Te-based nanostructures are broad but particularly promising for nanoscale electronic and photoelectronic devices. PMID:24048978

  11. Modeling light trapping in nanostructured solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Vivian E; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A

    2011-12-27

    The integration of nanophotonic and plasmonic structures with solar cells offers the ability to control and confine light in nanoscale dimensions. These nanostructures can be used to couple incident sunlight into both localized and guided modes, enhancing absorption while reducing the quantity of material. Here we use electromagnetic modeling to study the resonances in a solar cell containing both plasmonic metal back contacts and nanostructured semiconductor top contacts, identify the local and guided modes contributing to enhanced absorption, and optimize the design. We then study the role of the different interfaces and show that Al is a viable plasmonic back contact material.

  12. Nanostructured systems for enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunina, L. K.; Kuvshinov, V. A.; Kuvshinov, I. V.

    2015-10-01

    The reservoir energy or that of the injected heat carrier was used to generate in situ intelligent chemical systems—nanostructured gels, sols and oil-displacing surfactants systems, preserving for a long time in the reservoir a complex of the properties being optimal for oil displacement. The results of field tests and commercial application of physicochemical technologies using nanostructured systems for enhanced oil recovery in oilfields with difficult-to-recover reserves, including deposits of high-viscosity oils, have been presented. Field tests of new "cold" technologies on the deposit of high-viscosity oil in Usinskoye oilfield proved their high efficiency.

  13. Indistinguishable Photons from Independent Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaka, Kaoru; Pawlis, Alexander; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Lischka, Klaus; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum interference between photons generated by the radiative decay processes of excitons that are bound to isolated fluorine donor impurities in ZnSe/ZnMgSe quantum-well nanostructures. The ability to generate single photons from these devices is confirmed by autocorrelation experiments, and the indistinguishability of photons emitted from two independent nanostructures is confirmed via a Hong-Ou-Mandel dip. These results indicate that donor impurities in appropriately engineered semiconductor structures can portray atomlike homogeneity and coherence properties, potentially enabling scalable technologies for future large-scale optical quantum computers and quantum communication networks.

  14. Biocatalytic Pathway Selection in Transient Tripeptide Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Charalampos G; Sasselli, Ivan R; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-07-01

    Structural adaption in living systems is achieved by competing catalytic pathways that drive assembly and disassembly of molecular components under the influence of chemical fuels. We report on a simple mimic of such a system that displays transient, sequence-dependent formation of supramolecular nanostructures based on biocatalytic formation and hydrolysis of self-assembling tripeptides. The systems are catalyzed by α-chymotrypsin and driven by hydrolysis of dipeptide aspartyl-phenylalanine-methyl ester (the sweetener aspartame, DF-OMe). We observed switch-like pathway selection, with the kinetics and consequent lifetime of transient nanostructures controlled by the peptide sequence. In direct competition, kinetic (rather than thermodynamic) component selection is observed.

  15. Nanostructured polymeric systems as nanoreactors for nanoparticle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstein, Lyudmila M.; Sidorov, Stanislav N.; Valetsky, Petr M.

    2004-05-01

    The review concerns the syntheses of polymeric nanocomposites containing encapsulated nanoparticles formed in nanostructured polymeric systems including block copolymers, dendrimers, nanoporous polymers, polyelectrolyte gel-surfactant complexes and multilayered films. Nanostructures in amphiphilic block copolymers can form spontaneously both in the bulk (block microsegregation) and in solution (block copolymer micelle). In polymeric systems, nanostructures play the role of nanoreactors for the growing nanoparticles. The nanoparticle size, shape and size distribution are controlled by the nanostructure characteristics and synthesis conditions. The catalytic, magnetic and optical properties of these nanostructured polymeric nanocomposites are discussed.

  16. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by artificial DNA nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Y.; Seo, S.; Park, J.; Park, T.; Ahn, J. R.; Shin, J.; Dugasani, S. R.; Woo, S. H.; Park, S. H.

    2014-06-09

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance in super-periodic metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Haisheng

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated over the past decade. The periodic metal nanostructures have served as new technology platforms in fields such as biological and chemical sensing. An existing method to determine the surface plasmon resonance properties of these metal nanostructures is the measurement of the light transmission or reflection from these nanostructures. The measurement of surface plasmon resonances in either the transmission or reflection allows one to resolve the surface plasmon resonance in metal nanostructures. In this dissertation, surface plasmon resonances in a new type of metal nanostructures were investigated. The new nanostructures were created by patterning traditional periodic nanohole and nanoslit arrays into diffraction gratings. The patterned nanohole and 11anoslit arrays have two periods in the structures. The new nanostructures are called "super-periodic" nanostructures. With rigorous finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical simulations, surface plasmon resonances in super-periodic nanoslit and nanohole arrays were investigated. It was found that by creating a super-period in periodic metal nanostructures, surface plasmon radiations can be observed in the non-zero order diffractions. This discovery presents a new method of characterizing the surface plasmon resonances in metal nanostructures. Super-periodic gold nanoslit and nanohole arrays were fabricated with the electron beam lithography technique. The surface plasmon resonances were measured in the first order diffraction by using a CCD. The experimental results confirm well with the FDTD numerical simulations.

  18. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  19. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  20. The Development of Metal Oxide Chemical Sensing Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; VanderWal,R. L.; Xu, J. C.; Evans, L. J.; Berger, G. M.; Kulis, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures and microsystems technology. While nanostructures such as nanowires show significant potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of significant technical challenges remain. This paper discusses development to address each of these technical barriers: 1) Improved contact and integration of the nanostructured materials with microsystems in a sensor structure; 2) Control of nanostructure crystallinity to allow control of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by fabricating multiple nanostructured materials. A sensor structure composed of three nanostructured oxides aligned on a single microsensor has been fabricated and tested. Results of this testing are discussed and future development approaches are suggested. It is concluded that while this work lays the foundation for further development, these are the beginning steps towards realization of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostructures.